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Sample records for international nuclear energy

  1. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    Separate abstracts are included for each of the papers presented concerning current technical and economical events in the nuclear field. Twelve papers have been abstracted and input to the data base. The ''international nuclear energy guide'' gives a general directory of the name, the address and the telephone number of the companies and bodies quoted in this guide; a chronology of the main events 1982. The administrative and professional organization, the nuclear courses and research centers in France are presented, as also the organization of protection and safety, and of nuclear fuel cycle. The firms concerned by the design and the construction of NSSS and the allied nuclear firms are also presented. The last part of this guide deals with the nuclear energy in the world: descriptive list of international organizations, and, the nuclear activities throughout the world (alphabetical order by countries) [fr

  2. International nuclear energy guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1978-01-01

    The aim of this French-English bilingual Guide is to present a synthesis embracing all the aspects and all the implications of the development of nuclear energy by situating it both within the French administrative and professional framework and in the world context. Special attention has been paid to the protection of man and the environment and to safety and security problems; most of the other questions -technological, economic, industrial- which arise at all points in the nuclear cycle. Teaching and research are outlined and a special appendix is devoted to nuclear information [fr

  3. Nuclear energy and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Keiichi

    1981-01-01

    There is no need to emphasize that nuclear energy cannot be developed without international cooperation at either the industrial or the academic level. In the meanwhile, there have been some marked political, economic and social changes in recent years which are posing constraints to the international cooperation in nuclear energy. The problems and constraints impeding nuclear power programs cannot be overcome by only one nation; international cooperation with common efforts to solve the problems is essential. Nuclear energy is different from fossil energy resources in that it is highly technology-intensive while others are resource-intensive. International cooperation in technology has an entirely different importance in the field of nuclear energy. Educational institutions will play a role in a new era of the international cooperation. (Mori, K.)

  4. Nuclear energy and international organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindemann, B.

    1975-01-01

    The historical perspectives of the international organizations' role concerning the development and spreading of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, taking into account the national interests within and towards these organizations, are portrayed. The difference in political status between the so-called nuclear and non-nuclear States, lodged in Articles I and II of the Non-Proliferation Treaty is an important factor. The effects so far of these differences in status on the interest of nuclear States to participate in organizations and on factors which might possibly lead to conflict between these two groups are presented. The author skirts the cooperation between organizations (international bureaucracies, group-formation of states). (HP/LN) [de

  5. International nuclear energy law - present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, G.N.

    1988-01-01

    International nuclear energy law, as discussed in this article, is the law relating to the global, peaceful uses of nuclear science and technology. The position of nuclear law in the wide realm of law itself as well as the present status of nuclear legislation is assessed. This article also covers the development of international nuclear energy law, from the first nuclear law - the New Zealand Atomic Energy Act of 1945-, the present and the future. National and international organizations concerned with nuclear energy and their contribribution to nuclear law are reviewed

  6. International and national organizations within nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandstroem, S.

    1975-03-01

    A survey is given of the organization, objective and action of international and national organizations working with nuclear energy. Five types of organizations are treated: international governmental organizations, international non-governmental organizations, international organizations dealing with ionizing radiation, nordic organizations, and Swedish organizations. Special attention is payed to the Swedish participation in the different organizations. (K.K)

  7. International nuclear low and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouinet, Nejib

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to put points on the codification of international law of nuclear energy and its uses in military and peaceful in the first part. The second part was devoted for the imperfection of the law of international nuclear.

  8. Nuclear energy: exit or revival? International aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-11-01

    This colloquium took place less than 1 year after the decision of the US of revival of their nuclear program. Thus the international context has changed, even if nuclear contestation remains as strong as in the past. Among governments, some positions preach the banishment of nuclear energy while others consider the nuclear option as the only solution to meet the growing up energy demand and the future environmental and economical stakes. This report makes a synthesis of the different talks given by the participants during the 3 round tables of the colloquium on the future of nuclear energy: the ecological stake, the democratic stake, and the energy policy stake. Four talks of French government representatives open and conclude the debates of the different round tables. (J.S.)

  9. Nuclear energy, environmental protection and international conflicts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menke-Glueckert, P.

    1975-01-01

    Some general and some critical remarks on: nuclear energy as an image for politics; nuclear energy as a model for research planning; nuclear controversy; the principle of precaution in nuclear and radiation protection law; reactor safety on probation; advantages and economy of nuclear energy; communication difficulties; the special role of nuclear energy; the need for European site planning; supervision of fissionable materials; the world's energy household in danger; global structure politics and nuclear energy; nuclear energy with a capacity for social innovations. (HP/LN) [de

  10. Energy supply, nuclear power, and the international energy situation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierer, H. von

    1991-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident has greatly intensified the readiness for international cooperation on problems of reactor safety and for exchanges of operating experience. That accident was more than a regional event. If all psychological and political consequences are taken into account, its international significance is apparent. In principle, it demonstrated not the lack of safety of nuclear power plants generally, but rather that of the Soviet RBMK reactor line, which would not have been licensed in any Western country because of its inherent unsafety. In the long run, the worldwide acceptance of nuclear power can be regained and stabilized only by an open dialog and by international exchanges of experience. The pronounced growth of the world's population requires energy policy to think beyond national frontiers. The rising energy requirement permits of no other decision than to exploit all technically feasible and economically viable as well as ecologically tolerable sources of energy. This includes nuclear power as well as solar energy. (orig.) [de

  11. German nuclear energy development and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt-Kuster, W.J.

    1985-01-01

    The author gives a brief survey on the short, but relatively successful story of nuclear energy in the Federal Republic of Germany (FRG). Like many other countries, FRG had to go through a very difficult period of political indecision and violent opposition from antinuclear groups, supported by large parts of the media. The licensing procedures have been streamlined, nuclear power plants are being built without major interference, and the FRG is making good progress in closing the fuel cycle. This means that nuclear power will play an important role in the energy supply system, although on a lower level than originally anticipated

  12. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  13. Provisions relating to Nuclear Energy. II - International Conventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book published by the Portuguese Junta de Energia Nuclear (Nuclear Energy Commission) reproduces in Portuguese and in the original language (English or French), texts of a series of international conventions in the nuclear field and the Statutes of international nuclear organisations and undertakings. The following are among the texts included: the Statutes of the IAEA, NEA, Eurochemic; the Euratom Treaty; the Tlatelolco Treaty; the co-operation agreement between Portugal and the United States on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. (NEA) [fr

  14. The international framework for safeguarding peaceful nuclear energy programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazer, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    International law, in response to the need for safeguard assurances, has provided a framework which can be utilized by supplier and recipient states. Multilateral treaties have created the International Atomic Energy Agency which can serve a vital role in the establishment and supervision of safeguard agreements for nuclear energy programs. The Non-Proliferation Treaty has created definite obligations on nuclear-weapon and non-nuclear weapon states to alleviate some possibilities of proliferation and has rejuvenated the function of the IAEA in providing safeguards, especially to non-nuclear-weapon states which are parties to the Non-Proliferation treaty. States which are not parties to the Non-Proliferation Treaty may receive nuclear energy co-operation subject to IAEA safeguards. States like Canada, have insisted through the bilateral nuclear energy co-operation agreements that either individual or joint agreement be reached with the IAEA for the application of safeguards. Trilateral treaties among Canada, the recipient state and the IAEA have been employed and can provide the necessary assurances against the diversion of peaceful nuclear energy programs to military or non-peaceful uses. The advent of the Nuclear Suppliers Group and its guidlines has definitely advanced the cause of ensuring peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The ultimate objective should be the creation of an international structure incorporating the application of the most comprehensive safeguards which will be applied universally to all nuclear energy programs

  15. ICENES '91:Sixth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This document contains the program and abstracts of the sessions at the Sixth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems held June 16--21, 1991 at Monterey, California. These sessions included: The plenary session, fission session, fission and nonelectric session, poster session 1P; (space propulsion, space nuclear power, electrostatic confined fusion, fusion miscellaneous, inertial confinement fusion, μ-catalyzed fusion, and cold fusion); Advanced fusion session, space nuclear session, poster session 2P, (nuclear reactions/data, isotope separation, direct energy conversion and exotic concepts, fusion-fission hybrids, nuclear desalting, accelerator waste-transmutation, and fusion-based chemical recycling); energy policy session, poster session 3P (energy policy, magnetic fusion reactors, fission reactors, magnetically insulated inertial fusion, and nuclear explosives for power generation); exotic energy storage and conversion session; and exotic energy storage and conversion; review and closing session

  16. Inauguration of the international Institute of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2011-01-01

    On June 27, 2011 was inaugurated in Saclay (France) the I2EN (international Institute of the nuclear energy) and the Jannus platform. The I2EN has to particularly centralize and relay, at the international scale, the French formations offer in the field of nuclear energy. On the other hand, the Jannus platform is an example of cooperation between research organisms and universities. (O.M.)

  17. Report of the International Consultative Group on Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    The International Consultative Groups on Nuclear Energy adopted as its working premise the proposition that nuclear power will play a significant part in meeting future energy needs in an increasing number of countries. The Group's concern has been to examine the international political and economic conditions under which civil nuclear activities may be conducted safely, rationally, and in a manner generally acceptable to the world community. The views are presented in sections entitled: Energy and Nuclear Power; Establishing Nuclear Options; Nuclear Safety and the Public Interest; Nuclear Trade and Nuclear Proliferation; Conditions for the Future in which five conditions are summarized. The Group believes that if nuclear power is to be available to meet an increasing fraction of the world's future energy needs, nuclear power must, despite the difficulty of the sort-term climate, be systematically developed, without interruption or undue delay; earn and retain public acceptance; present technologies for using uranium more efficiently and be developed and tested as soon as possible, with both the coming decades and the 21st century in mind; be less feared; and convince countries depending on nuclear technology, services, or materials of continued international access to them under safeguards, on acceptable terms

  18. International responsibility of using nuclear energy for peaceful purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouenat, N.

    2008-01-01

    Although the stability of the idea of international responsibility in public international law, the international jurisprudence has not settled on a definition. The concept of international responsibility is no longer limited to the legal effects or consequences under international law to violate its provisions. The states recognized that the customary principles governing the international responsibility in public international law does not take into account the specificities of nuclear dangers, this sought to conclude a number of international conventions include a special system of nuclear liability not based on the wrongful act, but on the principle of keeping things, and it requires the existence of an international regime for nuclear liability in order to establish measures and procedures to achieve the implementation of the provisions for compensation unhindered by national legal systems. There is no doubt that the use of nuclear energy in time of peace falls within the scope of internationally prohibited acts. Atomic activities undertaken by the State within its borders for peaceful purposes are considered legitimate activities as long as they have taken necessary measures to avoid damage to neighboring countries. States has tended to conclude international agreements under which disputes that may result from the use of nuclear energy can be solved. The existing international legal framework on Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage consists of three major interrelated agreements: Paris Convention on civil liability in the field of nuclear energy, Vienna Convention on Civil Liability for civil damages and the Brussels Convention on Civil Liability in the Field of Maritime Carriage of Nuclear Materials.

  19. Environmental protection and international law: the case of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dagicour, F.

    2002-03-01

    Given the very hazardous nature of its activity, the nuclear industry has often been considered to be without a future. Concerns over climate change and increasing international energy needs have, however, shone a new light on the positive aspects of nuclear energy. As the only clean, stable and inexpensive energy source, available, nuclear energy promises a constant supply of electricity while protecting the atmosphere. This new relationship between the environment and nuclear energy calls for an analysis of the international regulation of the risks posed by nuclear energy production. Since the beginning of the nuclear age, the long term, unknown, and large geographic scope of the risks and effects of this activity have led to the adoption of a set of normative rules outside of the scope of international environmental law. The norms that now regulate this new, ultra-hazardous activity resulted in a set of rules aimed at protecting the environment in the face of high risk activities that now form the heart of international environmental law. Unwilling relinquish national sovereignty, States adopted a system of non-binding regulation to protect the environment and promote the nuclear industry. The Chernobyl accident later pointed to the weakness of this approach. Despite this weakness, the adoption of a soft law approach has led to progress in environmental protection in an area where States have been loathe to give up their sovereignty. (author)

  20. South Africa and nuclear energy - national and international legal aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrie, G.N.

    1987-01-01

    This article gives an exposition of the national and international legal aspects of what appears to be a technological triumph for South Africa. The nuclear policy, facilities, aims and capabilities of the country are described, as well as its nuclear energy program and development. When the Nuclear Energy Act 92 of 1982 was promulgated, a new internal legal dispensation commenced. The main objects of the act, powers and functions of the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Ltd and the Council for Nuclear Safety are stated. South Africa's official viewpoint and attitude regarding the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, the advantages and obstades to South Africa's signature and ratification of the Treaty are discussed

  1. Assuring nuclear energy's future through international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upson, P.

    1999-01-01

    It is invited lecture as the introduction to the sixt international meeting entitled Nuclear Energy in Central Europe. Good commercial operation, public information and education are needed to win the confidence of the public, and to attract young people to take over the industry's founding generation. Stimulating international co-operation and transfer of best practices can assure this happens across the whole of the Europian nuclear industry

  2. Nuclear power issue as seen by the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, P.

    1976-01-01

    An account is given of the work of the International Energy Agency towards reducing the dependence of member states on imported oil. Forecasts of energy consumption are discussed, and the contributions that could be made by various energy sources, and by energy conservation, are examined. It is concluded that nuclear power is essential to a reduced dependence policy. The constraints on full realization of national nuclear programmes are stated as follows: licensing delays, waste disposal, financing, uranium supply, and fuel services. Ways in which these could be overcome by national and international action are suggested. Reference is made to the work of other atomic energy agencies: IAEA and OECD Nuclear Energy Agency. (U.K.)

  3. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  4. International cooperation in peaceful use of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Filatkin, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    Main forms of international cooperation in peaceful use of nuclear energy are described. IAEA represents the organization called to establish the cooperation. For the purposes of wide nuclear power usage IAEA provides technical assistance to developing countries, conducting of meetings and conferences, accomplishes wide publishing activity and nuclear information exchange with the use of different data bases, including the INIS system, and coordinates the operating group activity through the INTOR program. Cooperation of socialist countries is accomplished in the framework of the CMEA. JINR, intimately connected with scientific organization of other countries including CERN, represents the center of nuclear investigations in socialist countries

  5. Perspectives of nuclear energy peaceful uses. International conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmud, K.; Adil, G.; Dinara, A.

    2010-11-01

    Full text : The scientists from following countries (Usa, Pakistan, Russia, Azerbaijan, Spain, Uzbekistan, Iran) took part at the International Conference devoted to Perspectives of Nuclear Energy Peaceful Uses. The activity was conducted in five sections : Section 1 was devoted to perspectives and statuses on nuclear energy; Section 2 was devoted to radiation impact on the environment : radioecology situation, radiation security, existing problems and their solutions; Section 3 was devoted to radiation materiology (radiation chemistry, radiation physics, radiation effects in solid states). Section 4 was devoted to existing problems of nuclear and radiation security in our Azerbaijan Republic. Section 5 was devoted to radioecology situation, its problems and the ways on their.

  6. Perspectives of nuclear energy peaceful uses. International conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimov, Mahmud; Garibov, Adil

    2010-11-01

    Full text: The scientists from following countries (Usa, Pakistan, Russia, Azerbaijan, Spain, Uzbekistan, Iran) took part at the International Conference devoted to Perspectives of Nuclear Energy Peaceful Uses. The activity was conducted in five sections : Section 1 was devoted to perspectives and statuses on nuclear energy; Section 2 was devoted to radiation impact on the environment : radioecology situation, radiation security, existing problems and their solutions; Section 3 was devoted to radiation materiology (radiation chemistry, radiation physics, radiation effects in solid states). Section 4 was devoted to existing problems of nuclear and radiation security in our Azerbaijan Republic. Section 5 was devoted to radioecology situation, its problems and the ways of their solutions.

  7. International institutions for nuclear energy: issues of assessment and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, W.R.

    1978-01-01

    Among the more attractive of candidate institutions and rules-of-trade for advanced fuel cycles are: extension of full-scope International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards as a condition of fuel assurances or technology transfer; international jurisdiction over spent fuel (custody or ownership); an IAEA remote near-real-time verification system for spent fuel remaining under national management; a convention on uniform nuclear fuel identification (tagging) designed to assist safeguards planners, trace diversionary pathways, assign liability, and enhance the credibility of fuel-cycle sanctions; international nuclear service centers for bulk processing operations (heavy water production, enrichment and reprocessing); and fuel-cycle specific regulations. Some risk-reduction measures, for example on internationally managed, remote shutdown and restart-delay system for bulk processing facilities, raise questions of acceptability. Despite uncertainties about international acceptability and hazards of enrichment technology transfer later in this century, it appears feasible to reduce proliferation risks associated with nuclear fuel cycles - existing ones and those under review within the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). 6 refereces

  8. Review of international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Ryo; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Sakurai, Satoshi; Tamai, Hiroshi; Yamamura, Tsukasa; Kuno, Yusuke

    2012-02-01

    International forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation was held at Gakushi-kaikan, Tokyo on February 2-3, 2011 in cooperation with The Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) and The University of Tokyo Global COE. In our International Forum, we would like to encourage active discussion of international challenges to and solutions for compatibility between peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation, and international cooperation for emerging nuclear energy states. It was successfully carried out with as many as 310 participants and a lot of discussions. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summary of panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. (author)

  9. Nuclear power. Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    This document lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, issued during the period 1990-2002. It gives a short abstract of these publications along with contents and their costs

  10. Nuclear energy and non proliferation. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, J.; Rauf, T.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the prevention of the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA verifies States compliance with their non-proliferation commitments through the application of safeguards on their civilian nuclear programmes to ensure that they are being used solely for peaceful purposes. The IAEA safeguards have evolved in the course of five decades and have become an integral part of the international non-proliferation regime and the global security system. To continue to serve the international community, they need to continue to move with the times, especially in light of the renewed interest in nuclear energy. (Author)

  11. Background and perspective on rapid progress and deepening of international development of nuclear industry-composition of international nuclear energy business 'cooperation and competition'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kano, Tokio; Kanda, Keji; Ishizuka, Nobuo

    2005-01-01

    Based on the recognition that international development of nuclear industry was important by a viewpoint of international cooperation to neighboring Asian area and also it was the trump that defeated a feeling of domestic confinement, the Japan Atomic Industrial Forum (JAIF) founded Nuclear energy international development gathering' in November 2004. On that occasion our magazine (March, 2005 issue) featured 'prospects and problem of the international development of nuclear energy use'. Slightly for half a year afterwards this nuclear energy international development has been rapidly deepened and become a close-up as a policy of an important strategy of the field of nuclear energy that the government and the private sector were united to make. Therefore the nuclear energy international development was secondly featured from multidirectional points of view such as a background of nuclear energy international development, composition of international nuclear energy business, a main strategy of three makers, approach of finance / a business firm. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Nuclear energy: exit or revival? International aspects; Energie nucleaire: sortie ou relance? Aspects internationaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-11-01

    This colloquium took place less than 1 year after the decision of the US of revival of their nuclear program. Thus the international context has changed, even if nuclear contestation remains as strong as in the past. Among governments, some positions preach the banishment of nuclear energy while others consider the nuclear option as the only solution to meet the growing up energy demand and the future environmental and economical stakes. This report makes a synthesis of the different talks given by the participants during the 3 round tables of the colloquium on the future of nuclear energy: the ecological stake, the democratic stake, and the energy policy stake. Four talks of French government representatives open and conclude the debates of the different round tables. (J.S.)

  13. International recommendations for managing environmental risk from nuclear energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    1996-01-01

    The establishment of any recommendations relating to the control of radiation exposure requires decisions on the management of the associated risk. Those decisions must reflect attitudes towards the acceptable levels of risk for both workers and the public. The environmental impact of nuclear energy principally concerns radiation doses and risks to members of the public. The author shows how the considerations of risk and acceptability are used internationally to set standards for protection. The results differ as between limiting doses for normal operations, for restricting the likelihood of accidents, intervening after an accident, or reducing doses from a chronic exposure situation. It is concluded that there is a coherent pattern in the resulting protection system

  14. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management, 1986-1999. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1999. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  15. Assuaging Nuclear Energy Risks: The Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Astasia

    2011-01-01

    The recent nuclear renaissance has motivated many countries, especially developing nations, to plan and build nuclear power reactors. However, domestic low enriched uranium demands may trigger nations to construct indigenous enrichment facilities, which could be redirected to fabricate high enriched uranium for nuclear weapons. The potential advantages of establishing multinational uranium enrichment sites are numerous including increased low enrichment uranium access with decreased nuclear proliferation risks. While multinational nuclear initiatives have been discussed, Russia is the first nation to actualize this concept with their Angarsk International Uranium Enrichment Center (IUEC). This paper provides an overview of the historical and modern context of the multinational nuclear fuel cycle as well as the evolution of Russia's IUEC, which exemplifies how international fuel cycle cooperation is an alternative to domestic facilities.

  16. International aspects of nuclear energy - guarantees for peaceful applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Longo, P.

    1980-03-01

    The author considers activities connected with treaties and international agreements in the context of safeguarding nuclear materials and technology and protection against radioactive contamination. A review is provided of the Non-Proliferation Treaty, the Convention on Physical Protection, the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and the London Dumping Convention. (NEA) [fr

  17. International nuclear energy organizations; Internationale Organisationen auf dem Gebiet der Kernenergie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-12-15

    The publication on International nuclear energy organizations describes the scope of work of the following organizations: IAEA, EURATOM, OECD-NEA, ENSREG, WANO, INSCEAR and ICRO. The issues covered by the organizations include nuclear electricity generation, radiation protection, nuclear safeguards, nuclear liability, public information, reactor safety, radioactive waste management, non-proliferation, marketing, safety technology, utility requirements, effects of nuclear radiation.

  18. Nuclear energy - the century's principles of law and good conduct in international nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coimbra, G.L.

    1992-01-01

    This paper considers the object and nature of the models of nuclear co-operation between Brazil and developed countries, with regard to the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. As an observer, the author analyses some of the juridicial and ethical aspects of the Brazilian Nuclear Programme. She examines some of the realities to be faced, and points out how important it is to anticipate and take necessary steps in order that difficulties, which are easily identifiable, may be reversed in the near future. The author also calls into question the means for reversal of the current situation, so as to satisfy the parties concerned: Brazil and her potential partners. Finally, the paper aims at complying with the conclusions reached by Working Group number 3 of the International Law Association on ''The Principles of Good Conduct in the International Nuclear Trade''. (author)

  19. Domestic and International Nuclear Energy Voluntary Consensus Standards Needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopper, Calvin Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces the reader to the domestic and international standards development organizations (SDOs) and their structures and operations. It also identifies some of the support and subject matter needs for the development of standards on the subject of nuclear energy. The support needs are described with regard to organizational structure and subject-matter-expert (SME) participation that is required for producing voluntary consensus standards. The subject matter needs are described with regard to growing technologies and objectives that approach the boundaries of existing standards; implementation of knowledge; and safety of people, facilities, and the environment. Standards are proposed, developed, and produced by SMEs with the support of industry and government organizations. The voluntary consensus standards development process is, as its name implies, a voluntary effort. The problem in today's competitive market, impacted by global economic uncertainty, is that the voluntary participation is shifting from a collaborative industry and SME effort to a nearly SME-only one. This shift places a financial and/or time burden on the SMEs to the point that they are purposely withdrawing from the standards development process, both domestically and internationally. The standards development process desperately needs participation from more and younger SMEs. The report includes several suggestions on how this can be addressed.

  20. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    are strong proponents of its use and others have said that they are only prepared to accept its application if safety controls are substantially improved. All affiliates of the ICFTU are convinced that energy policy options must be widened through increased research and development of new and renewable sources and through extensive energy conservation measures. The environmental impact of all methods of energy generation must be assessed on the basis of the public availability of all relevant information. It is in this context, that whatever their views about the desirability or otherwise of nuclear power, all ICFTU affiliates recognise the immediate need to assure the highest possible level of safety for all nuclear plants and activities everywhere - for example to deal with radioactive wastes created over the last 30 years. Even if some countries opt out of nuclear power it is likely that many others will be committed to it for many years. Given the widespread effects of a catastrophic failure anywhere in the world we must therefore all be concerned to strengthen the international safety regime. Because of their historic role in campaigning for health and safety at work, unions are well placed to exercise an independent watchdog role - making use of the knowledge and skills of their members in the nuclear industry - and are also able to speak on behalf of a large membership which is representative representative of the wide public concern about nuclear safety. Immediately following the Chernobyl disaster, the ICFTU Executive Board adopted a resolution (reproduced as Appendix 2 to this document) calling for immediate steps to tighten up nuclear safety. In the light of subsequent developments, the Confederation has now given further detailed consideration to the whole question of nuclear safety and has decided to publish this report which contains detailed proposals for tighter international control of nuclear energy via the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  1. Nuclear safety. ICFTU proposals for the international control of the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    are strong proponents of its use and others have said that they are only prepared to accept its application if safety controls are substantially improved. All affiliates of the ICFTU are convinced that energy policy options must be widened through increased research and development of new and renewable sources and through extensive energy conservation measures. The environmental impact of all methods of energy generation must be assessed on the basis of the public availability of all relevant information. It is in this context, that whatever their views about the desirability or otherwise of nuclear power, all ICFTU affiliates recognise the immediate need to assure the highest possible level of safety for all nuclear plants and activities everywhere - for example to deal with radioactive wastes created over the last 30 years. Even if some countries opt out of nuclear power it is likely that many others will be committed to it for many years. Given the widespread effects of a catastrophic failure anywhere in the world we must therefore all be concerned to strengthen the international safety regime. Because of their historic role in campaigning for health and safety at work, unions are well placed to exercise an independent watchdog role - making use of the knowledge and skills of their members in the nuclear industry - and are also able to speak on behalf of a large membership which is representative representative of the wide public concern about nuclear safety. Immediately following the Chernobyl disaster, the ICFTU Executive Board adopted a resolution (reproduced as Appendix 2 to this document) calling for immediate steps to tighten up nuclear safety. In the light of subsequent developments, the Confederation has now given further detailed consideration to the whole question of nuclear safety and has decided to publish this report which contains detailed proposals for tighter international control of nuclear energy via the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA

  2. Draft nuclear energy policy statement for DOE report to the International Energy Agency: long version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    US national energy policy recognizes that the continued development of commercial nuclear power in the United States is vital to US national security and energy stability since it is a significant domestic energy resource that is relatively free from international pressures. As of this writing (August 1989) the United States had 108 nuclear power reactors in commercial status. In January 1989 nuclear energy produced 46 billion KwH or 20% of total US electricity generated in contrast to 45 billion KwH (18.8%) produced in January 1988. The US Federal Government has been engaged in a variety of activities to ensure that nuclear energy remains a safe, economically competitive and environmentally acceptable option. Much of the federal effort in recent months has been devoted to developing initiatives designed to remove institutional and regulatory obstacles to the continued use of nuclear power as part of the US energy system. Within this context, the following paragraphs summarize the major features of the current status of the US nuclear energy program and policies

  3. The international legal regime governing the peaceful uses of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talaie, F.

    2004-01-01

    This paper studies the legal regime governing the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It addresses the issue of the prevention of the use by states of the nuclear weapons (as the most destructive weapon of mass destruction) and their elimination as the main purpose for maintaining international peace and security.Then, the paper presents examples of peaceful applications of nuclear energy. It points out that the peaceful uses of nuclear materials and technology are not hampered by obligation of States not to divert these materials into nuclear weapons. In this context, the paper analyses the provisions of the main international and regional treaties related to the nuclear energy (especially the Treaty on Non-proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and the Regional Treaty of TLATELOLCO). It also examines the international mechanism for monitoring the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and in particular studies the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the prevention of the proliferation of nuclear weapons through the application of safeguards agreements and the additional protocol to these agreements. One special part of the paper is dedicated to Iran and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. The paper concludes that the existing rules of international law do not prevent any State from using and applying nuclear energy and technology for peaceful uses. These rules only make such uses subject to a comprehensive verification mechanism through the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards agreements and the additional protocol the these agreements

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavko, B; Kljenak, I [Nuclear Society of Slovenia (Slovenia)

    2005-07-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This Cd-Rom is the collection of the 139 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: reactor physics, nuclear fusion, radiation monitoring, research and training reactors, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, thermal hydraulics, safety analyses, severe accidents, nuclear materials, probabilistic safety assessment, nuclear power plant operation and monitoring, nuclear waste, public safety and environmental issues, nuclear knowledge, education and training, nuclear energy and society, advances in nuclear technology and other topics.

  5. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.; Kljenak, I.

    2005-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This Cd-Rom is the collection of the 139 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: reactor physics, nuclear fusion, radiation monitoring, research and training reactors, fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, thermal hydraulics, safety analyses, severe accidents, nuclear materials, probabilistic safety assessment, nuclear power plant operation and monitoring, nuclear waste, public safety and environmental issues, nuclear knowledge, education and training, nuclear energy and society, advances in nuclear technology and other topics

  6. International Nuclear Information System 1983-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). INIS was established in 1969 to announced the scientific literature published worldwide on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. All books are published in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 21 x 30 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated. In addition all books in this catalogue, except for the INIS Input Training Kit, are available on microfiche. For information on the microfiche versions, contact the INIS Clearinghouse of the IAEA

  7. International Law governing the Safe and Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowitsch-Prevor, O.

    2002-01-01

    1. The International Governmental Institutions. History and mandates: IAEA, OECD/NEA, EURATOM. 2. International Treaties and Conventions: The Peaceful Uses of Nuclear Energy: Commitment and Verification (the NPT, Safeguards Agreements with the IAEA, The Additional protocol, Regional Non-proliferation Treaties); the Physical protection of Nuclear Material (Convention on the Physical Protection of Nuclear Material); Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage (Vienna Convention on the Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage, Protocol to Amend the Vienna Convention, Paris Convention on Civil Liability, Joint Protocol relating to the Application of the Vienna Convention and the Paris Convention, Convention on Supplementary compensation for Nuclear Damage); In case of Nuclear Accident: Notification and Assistance (Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, Convention on Assistance in the case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency); International Law Governing Nuclear Safety (Nuclear Safety Convention, Joint Convention on the Safety of Spent Fuel Management and on the Safety of Radioactive Waste Management). 3. Relationship between International and National Law

  8. Nuclear energy and public opinion: an analysis of international experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Jair A. Marques de; Spitalnik, Jorge

    1996-01-01

    Nuclear power occupies nowadays the third place among the different sources of energy in the world (17%), after coal (40%) and hydropower (18%). In the more developed countries of OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), nuclear power already represents the second most utilized source of energy (coal; 40%, nuclear: 24%, hydro: 17%). It has been frequently stated that inadequate public information constitutes one of the main hindrances for broad use worldwide of nuclear power. However, in those countries where nuclear power has been more successful their well informed populations are generally in favor of its utilization. In countries like France, Japan, Republic of Korea and the U.S., big users of nuclear power, public opinion has been either in favor or has evolved favorably to the nuclear option. The experience in this field varies from country to country, depending mainly on their cultural and socio-political traditions. This report summarizes the situation in various countries as background information for possible adaptation to the conditions in Brazil. (author)

  9. Proceedings of the 2000 International Conference on Nuclear Energy in Central Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mavko, B.; Cizelj, L.; Kovac, M.

    2000-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The proceedings contain 108 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics are: thermal hydraulics, severe accidents, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), nuclear waste, safety analyses, nuclear power plant operation, structural integrity and aging, nuclear energy and public, other related topics, research reactors, education and training and Monte Carlo transport calculations

  10. Proceedings of the X. international school on nuclear physics, neutron physics and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrejtscheff, W.; Elenkov, D.

    1992-01-01

    The history of the International School on Nuclear Physics, Neutron physics and nuclear Energy ('Varna School') goes back to the year 1973. Since that time it has been carried out in the fall of every other year in the Conference Center of the Bulgarian Academy of Sciences at the Black Sea coast near Varna. This volume contains the full texts of the lectures delivered by distinguished scientists from different countries on the Tenth Varna School, 1991. 14 of them are included in INIS separately

  11. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  12. International Nuclear Information System. 1988-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications and products of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 July 2002. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as E for English, F for French, G for German, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number. Some INIS Reference Series publications are available in electronic form from the INIS Clearinghouse. For more details on the INIS publications programme, please visit the INIS web site mentioned above

  13. The end of nuclear energy? International perspectives after Fukushima

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Netzer, Nina; Steinhilber, Jochen

    2011-07-01

    The nuclear disaster in Fukushima turned into a long-term crisis shaking the very foundations of economies and institutional structures. This offers an opportunity to organise energy supply in a more sustainable manner throughout the world. While a shift in thinking can be seen in some countries, others unswervingly continue along the planned path of an expansion of nuclear energy. However, given the economic and environmental misgivings as well as various security and safety risks of nuclear and fossil energy sources on the one hand as well as the benefits of green growth on the other hand, countries worldwide do not want to miss the opportunity to expand the use of renewable energy sources. Against the background of an ongoing depletion of resources and volatile oil and gas prices, any future set up of energy policies throughout the world has to balance the goals of energy security, economic viability, ecological sustainability and social compatibility. At the same time, a restructuring in the energy sector has to be formulated in a democratic manner involving the national, state, and community levels as well as civil society and industry.

  14. The end of nuclear energy? International perspectives after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Netzer, Nina; Steinhilber, Jochen [eds.

    2011-07-15

    The nuclear disaster in Fukushima turned into a long-term crisis shaking the very foundations of economies and institutional structures. This offers an opportunity to organise energy supply in a more sustainable manner throughout the world. While a shift in thinking can be seen in some countries, others unswervingly continue along the planned path of an expansion of nuclear energy. However, given the economic and environmental misgivings as well as various security and safety risks of nuclear and fossil energy sources on the one hand as well as the benefits of green growth on the other hand, countries worldwide do not want to miss the opportunity to expand the use of renewable energy sources. Against the background of an ongoing depletion of resources and volatile oil and gas prices, any future set up of energy policies throughout the world has to balance the goals of energy security, economic viability, ecological sustainability and social compatibility. At the same time, a restructuring in the energy sector has to be formulated in a democratic manner involving the national, state, and community levels as well as civil society and industry.

  15. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.; Lenosek, M.

    2007-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The conference attempts to address the prospects of nuclear energy in present and future Europe. Increasing electricity consumption, global warming, security of supply, all these issues contribute to the so-called nuclear renaissance. Nuclear renaissance was also the leading theme of this year's conference in Portoroz which was attended by 172 participants from 22 countries. Topics are: reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, probabilistic safety assessment, severe accidents, nuclear power plants operation, radiation protection, radioactive waste, fusion, nuclear materials and nuclear renaissance

  16. Energy and nuclear sciences international who's who. 4. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    For this fourth edition the directory has been reformatted to A4 size to allow for the restructuring of both the biological data and the cover. The fourth edition contains details of over 3,500 including 400 for the first time, scientists and engineers concerned with new and improved methods of generating electricity. A wide range of people used the information provided in the last edition, among them information scientists, administrators, conference organizers, market researchers, financiers seeking technical advice, embassy staff, consultants, biochemists and engineers. Biographical enquiry forms were sent to officers in scientific societies in each nation, to directors and section leaders in industrial and official institutions where significant numbers of scientists relating to power and energy research are employed to heads of relevant academic departments, and to editorial board members of relevant journals. Part one lists biographical profiles of scientists in alphabetical order of surname. The subject index by country in Part two centres around nuclear and energy sciences divided into the following areas; electrical power engineering, energy conservation, energy planning, energy storage, fuel production, fusion technology, geothermal energy, nuclear sciences, high energy physics, low energy physics, wind and/or ocean energy. This allows the reader to locate experts in each of the above topic areas in around 90 countries. (Author)

  17. Nuclear fission energy: the international scene and the outlook for Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monti, S.

    2008-01-01

    Because of concerns about the environment, energy security and energy costs, fission nuclear energy is gaining ground again around the world. In Italy, the research community can help relaunch the national nuclear programmes by providing advanced training, recruiting young engineers and researchers for RD activities, and furthering an immediate cooperation of the Italian system in the principal European and international projects on sustainable nuclear energy [it

  18. An international comparative analysis of public acceptance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younghwan; Kim, Wonjoon; Kim, Minki

    2014-01-01

    Across the globe, public acceptance of nuclear power is a crucial factor for governmental establishment of a nuclear energy program. Therefore, it is important to understand the determinants of public acceptance of nuclear power. This study examines the effects of knowledge, trust, risk, and benefit related factors on public acceptance of nuclear power across 19 countries. We consider three levels of public acceptance – strongly accept, reluctantly accept, and oppose – and classify countries into four groups according to the ratio of those three levels of public acceptance. Our results indicate that knowledge of nuclear inspection is more effective than trust in inspection authorities in creating stronger public acceptance among people in the countries with a high level of reluctant acceptance and a low level of strong acceptance, while trust in inspection authorities is more important than knowledge of nuclear inspection for the selection between opposition and reluctant acceptance in countries with a low level of reluctant acceptance and a high level of strong acceptance. Without grouping the countries, we found that trust in inspection authorities is crucial for the decision between opposition and reluctant acceptance. Additionally, the generation of electricity has the most positive effect on public acceptance of nuclear power. - Highlights: • We examine public acceptance (PA) of nuclear power across 19 countries. • Three levels of PA – strongly accept, reluctantly accept, and oppose – are considered. • Knowledge is most effective in creating stronger PA. • Trust is effective in shifting PA from opposition to reluctant acceptance. • Low risk and benefit of electricity generation enhance PA the most

  19. Topnux'96 international conference French nuclear energy society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    Here is the opening address of Mr S. Park, vice-president of the Korea Electric Power Corporation, at the opening session of the Topnux'96 conference. The main ideas of his speech are the following: 1)energy is indispensable for maintaining affluent living standards 2)it is the most important requirement for rapid economic growth 3)overall energy consumption of the world is expected to rise continuously in the next century 4)demand for electricity is greater than growth of overall energy consumption 5)burning of large amount of fossil fuels to meet the energy, including electricity, will bring about serious environmental impact such as air pollution and global warming due to emission of toxic chemical and greenhouse gases 6)nuclear power is one of the most effective and practical alternatives available now for solving this global problem 7)energy should be convenient to use, inexpensive, safe, secured and environment friendly; in this respect, electricity is the most desirable type of energy indispensable for modern civilization and nuclear power is surely one of the viable option for producing electricity. (O.M.)

  20. International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe 99, V. 1. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gortnar, O; Stritar, A [Nuclear Society of Slovenia (Slovenia)

    1999-07-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The proceedings contain 101 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics are: Reactor Physics, Research Reactors, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment, Severe Accidents, NPP Operation, Nuclear Energy and Public, Radioactive Waste, Radiological Protection and Environmental Issues, Nuclear Methods and Monte Carlo and Deterministic Transport Calculations.

  1. International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe 99, V. 1. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gortnar, O.; Stritar, A.

    1999-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The proceedings contain 101 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics are: Reactor Physics, Research Reactors, Thermal Hydraulics, Structural Analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment, Severe Accidents, NPP Operation, Nuclear Energy and Public, Radioactive Waste, Radiological Protection and Environmental Issues, Nuclear Methods and Monte Carlo and Deterministic Transport Calculations

  2. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.; Tkavc, M.

    2004-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This Cd-Rom is the collection of the 81 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, severe accidents, probabilistic safety analysis, nuclear power plant operation, nuclear materials and structural integrity, radiology and environment, education, regulatory issues and public relations, radioactive waste, nuclear methods and related topics

  3. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravnik, M; Zagar, T [Nuclear Society of Slovenia (Slovenia)

    2003-07-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This CD-ROM is the collection of the 103 articles from Slovenia, soraunding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, severe accidents, probabilistic safety analysis, nuclear power plant operation, nuclear materials and structural integrity, radiology and environment, education, regulatory issues and public relations, radioactive waste, nuclear methods and related topics.

  4. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravnik, M.; Zagar, T.

    2003-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This CD-ROM is the collection of the 103 articles from Slovenia, soraunding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, severe accidents, probabilistic safety analysis, nuclear power plant operation, nuclear materials and structural integrity, radiology and environment, education, regulatory issues and public relations, radioactive waste, nuclear methods and related topics

  5. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are issued in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  6. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hahn, Dohee; Park, Seongwon; Chang, Moonhee

    2013-08-15

    All the countries of the world are promoting the use of atomic energy to provide against high oil prices, climatic changes, and energy security initiative. A domestic and foreign environment for nuclear energy is changing rapidly and 13 leading countries including Korea are trying to develop advanced technologies on Gen IV nuclear energy system through Gen IV International Forum (GIF). To enhance the effectiveness of the future nuclear energy system development plan, a strategic approach is necessary for GIF program and the connection process with the 4th Nuclear Energy Promotion Program and Nuclear Energy R and D Medium and Long Term 5 year Plan for 2012 ∼ 2016 needs to be prepared. This study was to analyze the global nuclear trends of 2012 and the status of GIF program which is international cooperation activities. Also we examined the domestic R and D status of future nuclear energy systems for developing core technology and commercialization of Gen-IV nuclear energy system. A successful performance of this project enables the effective national cooperation with GIF and promotes the public acceptance by suggesting the technical alternatives for the nuclear safety and the spent fuel management.

  7. OECD-Nuclear Energy Agency. 25 years of international cooperation within the framework of the NEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stadie, Klaus B. [OECD, Paris (France). Safety and Regulation

    2015-11-15

    The nuclear atomic association NEA of the OECD, to which 23 western industrial countries belong to, was established 25 years ago (1959) as ''Nuclear Energy Agency'', almost simultaneously with other large international nuclear energy organisations. The NEA undertook special tasks during the international cooperation, which have shifted over time. A special feature today is the cooperation by means of international committees, which are supported by a small own staff of the organisation. The focus points lie within the area of safety and regimentation and on chosen scientific and technical studies.

  8. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Du Hwan

    1987-01-01

    This book gives descriptions of explanations of terminologies concerning to nuclear energy such as analysis of financial safety of nuclear energy, radwaste disposal, fast breeder reactor, nuclear reactor and device, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy radiation and measurement, plan for development of nuclear energy and international institution. This book includes 160 terms on nuclear energy and arranges in Korean alphabetical order.

  9. International seminar on the role of nuclear energy for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Atomic Energy in collaboration with the International Atomic Energy Agency, organised a two-day International Seminar on The Role of Nuclear Energy for Sustainable Development, during September 8 and 9, 1997 at New Delhi. Dr R. Chidambaram, Chairman, Atomic Energy Commission in his Welcome Address dealt with the disparity in per capita consumption of energy between developed and developing countries in the world and also told that for India the requirement of power generation capacity for accelerated growth and industrial and infrastructural development to attain a reasonable standard of living for all its citizens would call for substantial increase in the per capita electricity consumption. He also told that nuclear energy can play a very important role in meeting the future energy requirements of India. In the seminar a scenario where nuclear power is called upon to play a major role in meeting the energy requirements of mankind and the peaceful uses of nuclear energy like the application of radiation and radioactive isotopes in agriculture, industry, health care etc. was discussed in detail. The design and construction of fast breeder reactors, the indigenous design of advanced heavy water reactors with passive safety features, uranium resources for global energy requirements, manufacturing of nuclear components, fusion energy, role of nuclear energy in some countries like Brazil, Islamic Republic of Iran, France, China, Bangladesh and India were some of the other topics covered. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  10. International ministerial conference on nuclear energy in the 21st century. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century was held in Beijing, China, from 20 to 22 April 2009, attended by ministers, high-ranking officials and experts from 61 States and 7 international organizations, with a total of 808 participants and observers. This conference was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), hosted by the Chinese Government through the China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA), and co-sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of OECD and the China Nuclear Energy Association (CNEA). Its aim was to review the status and the prospects of nuclear energy, including the evolution of technology, and offer a forum for many countries considering the potential benefits of adding nuclear power to the energy mix. A wide range of issues has been covered during the three days' conference, including energy resources and the environment, technology available now and in the future, infrastructure development, reliable fuel supply, spent fuel and waste management. The participants exchanged views on the future role of nuclear energy by presentations, discussions and consultations. There was a broad convergence of views among participants. The goal of the conference has been achieved

  11. NO global warming = YES nuclear energy. The International Nuclear Forum and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, Emma

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear industry sits along side the renewable energy sector in its role as a non carbon emitting technology. But persuading international political leaders of this fact presents a challenge. Generating electricity from nuclear fuel avoids at least 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year through its 16% share of world wide electricity generation. Nuclear energy is essential to minimising greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation highlights the main issues resulting from the climate change negotiations that are highly relevant to the industry; explains the activities of the International Nuclear Forum and our interaction with the delegates to the process; outlines future activities. The International Nuclear Forum (INF) was formed to provide a collective voice lobbying for nuclear at the climate change negotiations. It's internationally representative of the industry and comprises of: the Uranium Institute; the Nuclear Energy Institute; the Japan Atomic Industry Forum; the Canadian Nuclear Association; the European Nuclear Society, and Foratom. All are accredited non governmental observers to the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  12. The role of international atomic energy agency in maintaining nuclear safety competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.; Mazour, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides information how International Atomic Energy Agency can assist Member States in maintaining and developing nuclear safety competence. The topics covered include the development of safety standards, organisation of nuclear safety related conferences, provision of safety reviews, organisation of training courses and topical workshops and publication of training related documents. Usefulness of these activities for competence development is discussed. (author)

  13. An international education agenda in nuclear energy and radioactive waste management for the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powell, R.R.; Wohlpart, A.; James, E.

    1992-01-01

    As many countries have turned to scientific and technological advancements for human well being and national security, there has emerged a pressing need to promote scientific and technological literacy in national work forces. One benefit of this literacy is scientifically informed decision making on issues related to energy conservation in general and nuclear energy in particular. Realizing the need for increased literacy relative to nuclear energy, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) of the Department of Energy, U.S.A., the Organization of Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) and the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) sponsored an international conference on education in the field of radioactive waste management. This paper discusses recommendations made at the conference for developing education materials. Also described is a three-phase international plan for developing school curriculum materials relative to nuclear waste management

  14. International Symposium on Nuclear Energy SIEN 2007. Nuclear Power - A New Challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stiopol, Mihaela

    2007-01-01

    The Symposium organized by Romanian Nuclear Energy Association, AREN, in co-operation with Romanian Atomic Forum, ROMATOM, was primarily targeting the expert community involved in developing new nuclear power projects and implementing the National Nuclear Program. The symposium was also open as a dicussion and information forum for scientists, engineers, technicians and students interested in scietific and technologic topics of Nuclear Power such as: - Developing the new nuclear technologies; - Identifying new avenues for developing nuclear programs; - strengthening the public confidence and support in nuclear power technology as the energy resource fulfilling most safely the environment protection requirements with the lowest cost-efficient power technology and as the most secure, sustainable solution satisfying the ever raising energy demand. Thus the main objectives was to analyse the New Challenges of Nuclear Power for near future and long-term sustainable socio-economic development. The Symposium was structured in 5 sessions covering the following topics: S1. Developing the new nuclear technologies; S2. Operation, inspection and maintenance; S3. Enhancing nuclear safety features; S4. Fuel cycle and waste management; S5. Public acceptance and confidence strengthening. A poster session of 8 presentations and a workshop completed the Symposium works. Three topics were selected for the workshop as follows: QA Management within the European Integration; Young generation 'Building the Future'; Women in Nuclear and the EU Nuclear Programs Developing

  15. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.; Glumac, B.

    2001-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The proceedings contain 98 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics are: reactor physics, thermal hydraulics, probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) and severe accidents, nuclear materials, NPP and research reactor operation, environmental issues and radiation measurement, fusion, radioactive waste and regulatory issues and public relations

  16. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques, and Instrumentation, Industrial Applications, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1986-1996. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. Contents cover the three main areas of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactor and Particle Accelerator Applications, and Nuclear Data), (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, and Tracers), and (iii) Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

  17. Report of the international forum on nuclear energy, nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security. Measures to ensure nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security for the back end of nuclear fuel cycle and regional cooperation in Asia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazaki, Makiko; Yamamura, Tsukasa; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke; Mochiji, Toshiro

    2013-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) held 'International Forum on Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Non-proliferation and Nuclear Security - Measures to ensure nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security for the back end of nuclear fuel cycle and regional cooperation in Asia-' on 12 and 13 December 2012, co-hosted by the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. In the forum, keynote speakers from Japan, International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the U.S., France and Republic of Korea (ROK), respectively explained their efforts regarding peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation. In two panel discussions, entitled 'Measures to ensure nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security of nuclear fuel cycle back end' and 'Measures to ensure nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security for nuclear energy use in the Asian region and a multilateral cooperative framework', active discussions were made among panelists from Japan, IAEA, the U.S., France, ROK, Russia and Kazakhstan. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summaries of two panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. The editors take full responsibility for the wording and content of this report except presentation materials. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhn, W.

    1986-01-01

    This loose-leaf collection is made up of five didactically prepared units covering the following subjects: basic knowledge on nuclear energy, nuclear energy in relation to energy economy, site issues, environmental compatibility of nuclear energy, and nuclear energy in the focus of political and social action. To this was added a comprehensive collection of material: specific scientific background material, a multitude of tables, diagrams, charts etc. for copying, as well as 44 transparent charts, mostly in four colours. (orig./HP) [de

  19. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D.

  20. A Study on planning of promotion for international collaborative development of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hee, Chang Moon; Yang, M. S.; Ha, J. J.

    2006-06-01

    Korea has participated in the international collaboration programs for the development of future nuclear energy systems driven by the countries holding advanced nuclear technology and Korea and U. S. have cooperated in the INERI. This study is mainly at developing the plan for participation in the collaborative development of the Gen IV, searching the participation strategy for INERI and the INPRO, and the international cooperation in these programs. Contents and scope of the study for successful achievement are as follows; - Investigation and analysis of international and domestic trends related to advanced nuclear technologies - Development of the plan for collaborative development of the Gen IV and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support for the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U. S. and conducting the international cooperation - International cooperation activities for the INPRO This study can be useful for planning the research plan and setting up of the strategy of integrating the results of the international collaboration and the domestic R and D results by combining the Gen IV and the domestic R and D in the field of future nuclear technology. Furthermore, this study can contribute to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities not only with the advanced countries for acquisition of the advanced technologies but also with the developing countries for the export of the domestic nuclear energy systems

  1. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.; Chang, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Bae, Y. Y.; Kim, W. W.; Jeong, I.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, J. H.

    2008-06-01

    Generation IV International Forum(GIF), where 13 countries including Korea collaborate to develop future nuclear energy systems, put into force 'Generation IV International Forum Project Arrangement' in 2007 for the international research and development of Gen IV Systems, following the entry into force of Framework Agreement in 2005. The International Nuclear Research Initiative(I-NERI) between Korea and United States and the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems and Fuel Cycles(INPRO) of IAEA are continued in this year, produced lots of visible outcomes. These international activities have a common goal of the collaborative development of advanced nuclear system technologies but differ in the main focusing areas and aspects, so Korea needs to establish the integrated strategy based on the distinguished and complementary approach for the participation of each international programs, as examples the GIF for the advanced system technology development, INPRO for the set-up of institution and infra-structure, and I-NERI for the access of the core technologies and acquisition of the transparency of nuclear R and D

  2. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glumac, B.; Lengar, I.

    2006-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The conference is meant to address the prospects and the future of the nuclear energy in the world faced with the, now already very expressed, threat of the global warming. The conference evolved from annual conferences of Nuclear Society of Slovenia, which was first held in the alpine resort Bovec in 1992. The jubilee 15th conference was held and it was attended by 138 participants from 20 countries. Topics are: next generation reactor and fuels, reactor physics, reactor operation, nuclear materials, nuclear fusion and plasma technology, thermal hydraulics, probabilistic safety assessment, severe accidents, radiology and environment, radioactive waste and education, public relations and regulatory issues.The technical part of the program was complemented with a visit to Institute Jozef Stefan TRIGA reactor which in 2006 celebrated forty years of operation

  3. Study on the nuclear energy development policy to face the change in international nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Y. H.

    2009-10-01

    On 17 February 2009, American Recovery and Reinvestment Act(ARRA) came into effect after President Obama signed it. According to the Act, the total budget of $38.7 billion is used for energy sector, including energy efficiency and renewable energy($16.8 billion), electricity transmission and SMART grid($4.5 billion) and carbon capture storage and fossil energy($3.4 billion). On 26 June 2009, American Clean Energy and Security Act was passed in the U. S. House of Representatives by recorded vote as 219 - 212. The remarkable provisions of the Act are as follows: 1) greenhouse gas emission control using cap and trade system, 2) energy efficiency program, 3) plug-in hybrid vehicle program, 4) carbon capture and sequestration technology, 5) renewable energy portfolio standards and 6) smart grid. The important provisions relevant to nuclear industry of the ACESA are as follows: 1) deployment of Clean Energy Deployment Administration (CEDA) and assistance to clean energy project by CEDA, 2) DOE is required to submit to Congress a report on the use of thorium-fueled nuclear reactors by 1 February 2011, 3) DOE is required to establish a monetary award program for nuclear energy to encourage innovative means for recovering thermal energy as a potentially useful byproduct of electric power generation

  4. The Nuclear Energy Agency: Strengthening Nuclear Safety Technology and Regulation Through Effective International Cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nieh, H.

    2016-01-01

    The NEA provides an effective forum for international co-operation on nuclear safety and regulatory issues in its specific task groups, working parties and expert groups, as well as through joint international safety research projects. In these activities, NEA member countries work together to share and analyse data and experiences, gain consensus and develop approaches that can be applied within each country’s governmental processes. Through effective international co-operation, NEA member countries have worked together to develop actions for improving their regulatory frameworks and nuclear installation safety. As a result of these efforts, safety improvements and further harmonisation have been realized in the areas operating reactors, new reactors, human and organisational factors and nuclear safety research. At the NEA, technical and programmatic work under the Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI), joint safety research projects and the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP) have helped NEA member countries to ensure a high standard for nuclear safety and to further develop the technical knowledge base. (author)

  5. Status report of the US Department of Energy's International Nuclear Safety Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) implements the US Government's International Nuclear Safety Program to improve the level of safety at Soviet-designed nuclear power plants in Central and Eastern Europe, Russia, and Unkraine. The program is conducted consistent with guidance and policies established by the US Department of State (DOS) and the Agency for International Development and in close collaboration with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Some of the program elements were initiated in 1990 under a bilateral agreement with the former Soviet Union; however, most activities began after the Lisbon Nuclear Safety Initiative was announced by the DOS in 1992. Within DOE, the program is managed by the International Division of the Office of Nuclear Energy. The overall objective of the International Nuclear Safety Program is to make comprehensive improvements in the physical conditions of the power plants, plant operations, infrastructures, and safety cultures of countries operating Soviet-designed reactors. This status report summarizes the Internatioal Nuclear Safety Program's activities that have been completed as of September 1994 and discusses those activities currently in progress

  6. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  7. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  8. International cooperation in the peaceful use of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacke, S.; Stein, G.

    1988-01-01

    The article in hand reviews the scenario and organisation of the conference together with the results achieved (non-proliferation strategies with regard to technological cooperation in the nuclear field, feasible means of cooperation), saying that judged by the non-favourable conditions at the start, the fruitful dialogue between developing countries and highly industrialised countries that has set in at this conference will have to be filed on the credit side. Another important result is that one came to realize that the transfer of know-how must be very carefully prepared and accompanied by very close cooperation right from the start. (orig./DG) [de

  9. The peaceful use of nuclear energy and energy supply - national and international aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennigsen-Foerder, R. v.

    1989-01-01

    The paper concludes with a 3-item programme to summarize the need 1. to limit the nuclear energy policy of the next years to the objectives of 'safe operation of facilities without harassment by public debates' and of 'ongoing work on waste disposal'; 2) to use the years to come for organizing and implementing a supra-party process to find a new energy concept for the Federal Republic; 3) to pass the long-term nuclear energy in the mid 90-ies based on a broad parliamentary majority within a comprehensive supra-party energy consensus. Any realistic spectator will not deny the fact that common sense and reason are fairly absent from the discussions about energy and nuclear energy. However, common sense and reason will win the day in the long run - either through insight or, short of that, through coercion and sacrifices. (orig./HSCH) [de

  10. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation. Industrial applications. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2002. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English, though some are also available in other languages than English

  11. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  12. Nuclear and radiological safety 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear and Radiological Safety issued during the period 1980-1994. The following aspects are covered: Uranium mining and milling, Fuel fabrication and storage, Nuclear power plants, Research reactors, Radiation sources and accelerators, Transport of radioactive materials, Waste repositories, Radiation protection, Accident response, Radioactive waste management, Safety analysis, Quality management, Legal and governmental aspects

  13. The international thermonuclear experimental reactor and the future of nuclear fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan Chuanhong

    2010-01-01

    Energy shortage and environmental problems are now the two largest challenges for human beings. Magnetic confinement nuclear fusion, which has achieved great progress since the 1990's, is anticipated to be a way to realize an ideal source of energy in the future because of its abundance, environmental compatibility, and zero carbon release. Exemplified by the construction of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), the development of nuclear fusion energy is now in its engineering phase, and should be realized by the middle of this century if all objectives of the ITER project are met. (author)

  14. International cooperation and security in the field of nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khachatryan, D.A.; Avagyan, A.A.; Stepanyan, V.E.

    2010-01-01

    In the report presented/discussed are the ecological-humanitarian disasters and the related policy of the international organizations, especially IAEA, NATO and others on ensuring security of vital activity of people in the sphere of energy and particularly nuclear energy. Possessing the only nuclear power station in Trans Caucasus and the store of toxic wastes of reactive fuel the Government of Armenia and the Ministry of Emergency Situations of the Republic of Armenia always take into consideration the many-sided aspects of prevention, warning about accident in energy buildings including nuclear accidents and modern response in case of occurring the latter ensuring security for ANPP personnel and the inhabitants of the settlements of the possible contingency zone. In their daily activity the workers of the Emergency Situations of the Republic of Armenia, especially those of the Armenian Rescue Service base on the experience and logistic support of international community some aspects of which are presented below

  15. International research and development projects in nuclear energy: Experience and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1983-01-01

    From the very beginning nuclear energy appeared as a fruitful field for international co-operation and particularly for international projects and joint ventures. By pooling scientific, technical and financial resources, the participating countries sought to promote the development of technology and the transition of nuclear energy to the industrial stage. Governments and therefore intergovernmental organizations were the driving force behind the establishment of joint projects in various R and D sectors, often in association with industry and private research institutes. The situation changed considerably from the end of the 1960s onwards. Despite some remarkable technical achievements, international co-operation did not develop to the extent predicted at the outset. Industry took over in the exploitation of proven technologies, and industrial co-operation agreements have become an important feature in some key areas of nuclear energy. This trend raises questions as to the future of joint R and D projects organized through intergovernmental co-operation. Although such projects are still very useful, they tend to be concentrated in those few sectors which continue to be of direct interest to the Governments; for instance, fundamental research, radioactive waste management and nuclear safety. The position of nuclear energy has changed, and the benefits to be drawn from this form of international co-operation must be critically re-assessed accordingly. While advantage to be gained from international projects for countries which are the most advanced in the development of nuclear energy is not the same as it was at the beginning, the transfer of experience and knowledge to less advanced countries is still the main concern of projects dealing with safety and regulatory matters. The experience thus gained provides a very useful insight into the legal and institutional framework of joint projects

  16. International Nuclear Societies Council vision for the second fifty years of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hatcher, S.R.

    1994-01-01

    A vision of the future is presented in the context of ongoing social and technological development. The most compelling moral and ethical issue facing the world at the close of the 20th Century is to help the peoples of the poorer countries in their struggle for a reasonable quality of life, while at the same time they face a dramatic increase in their population. The new society will need vastly more energy than the world of today. It will need all supply options that can provide the energy in an economic environmentally sustainable manner. Nuclear energy will be a vital element in this supply pattern, provided that it continues to demonstrate the imperatives of safe operation and economic competitiveness. Other applications of nuclear energy will add their own impact to the improving quality of life. 5 refs., 1 fig

  17. International nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biad, A.; Cormis, F. de; Kerever, A.

    1998-01-01

    This third part is relative to the international nuclear trade it includes: the 1996 EURATOM/Usa Agreement on the peaceful Uses of nuclear energy: EURATOM Strengthened, a case study on IVO Power engineering Oy as a supplier to Russia, lessons learned from the Us/EURATOM Agreement for Cooperation, negotiating the parameters of nuclear regulation: lessons from South Africa, Good and new business in Brazil's nuclear energy field, cooperation between Russia and european union in the nuclear field: the legal basis, present status and future prospects, the industrial implications of the non proliferation policy. (N.C.)

  18. International School of Nuclear Law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2004-01-01

    This is a report about the fourth International School of Nuclear Law (ISNL) held in Montpellier, France, on 23 August to 3 September 2004 by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of Montpellier 1 with the support of the International Nuclear Law Association (INLA), the European Commission, and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). (orig.)

  19. Report of international symposium on the 22nd Japan annual nuclear energy meeting, PNC general meeting and business report about nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-04-15

    This conference report consists of three parts, which report the 22nd annual nuclear energy meeting in Japan, including the list of Korean delegates, program and the contents of five session, the conference report for PNC general meeting and the report on international symposium for fruition of nuclear power business. It introduces the main conception and the contents of the symposium.

  20. Proceedings of the International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jencic, I.; Tkavc, M.

    2002-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy for New Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. This CD-ROM is the collection of the 79 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region presented at the title conference. Topics are: innovative and alternative reactor concepts, thermal hydraulics and computational fluid dynamics, reactor and neutron physics, core and fuel management, severe accidents, policy issues and public information, nuclear power plant operation, probabilistic safety analysis, NPP accident analysis and support tools, accident analysis - integrated test facilities and research reactors, radioactive waste management and environmental impact

  1. Nuclear energy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The booklet provides and up-to-date overview of the use of nuclear energy in Finland as well as future plans regarding the nuclear energy sector. It is intended for people working in the nuclear or energy sector in other countries, as well as for those international audiences and decision-makers who would like to have extra information on this particular energy sector. In the booklet nuclear energy is described as part of the Finnish electricity market

  2. Nuclear technology: the role of the IAEA. Ninth international conference on emerging nuclear energy systems, Tel Aviv, 28 June 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the Ninth International Conference on Emerging Nuclear Energy Systems, in Tel Aviv, Israel, on 28 June 1998. The Director General outlines the role of the IAEA in assisting its Member States to meet the challenges facing the use of nuclear energy, based on the Agency' mandate on the following inter-related tasks: ta act as a catalyst for the scientific community and as a hub for state-of-the-art technology; to act as a centre for the transfer of nuclear technologies so as to ensure their accessibility to member State in general, and to developing countries in particular; to assist Member States to make informed and appropriate choices concerning the energy mix by producing comparative assessments of nuclear and other technologies; to strive for the highest level of safety in all areas of the use of nuclear energy; and to assure, through its verification system, the pledges to use nuclear energy exclusively for peaceful purposes are fulfilled

  3. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the field of nuclear power safety is growing. In the period since the Three Mile Island accident, a significant expansion in its nuclear safety programme has taken place. To assure an acceptable safety level world-wide, new emphasis is being placed on the major effort to establish and foster the use of a comprehensive set of internationally agreed safety standards for nuclear power plants. New initiatives are in progress to intensify international co-operative safety efforts through the exchange of information on safety-related operating occurrences, and through a more open sharing of safety research results. Emergency accident assistance lends itself to international co-operation and steps are being taken to establish an emergency assistance programme so the Agency can aid in co-ordinating a timely response to provide, at short notice, help and advice in case of a nuclear power accident. There has been some strengthening of those advisory services which involve missions of international experts primarily to countries with less developed nuclear power programmes, and in conjunction with the Technical Assistance Programme there is a co-ordinated programme for developing countries, involving safety training courses and assistance aimed at promoting an effective national regulatory programme in all countries using nuclear power. This paper discusses the major features of the IAEA activities in nuclear power plant safety. An understanding of the programme and its limitations is essential to its more effective use. Additional initiatives may still be proposed, but the possibilities for international and regional co-operation to assure an adequate level of safety world-wide already exist. (author)

  4. Regulation and control by international organizations in the context of a nuclear accident. The International Atomic Energy Agency and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reyners, P.; Lellouche, E.

    1988-01-01

    IAEA and NEA rapidly reoriented their work programmes to respond to the problems raised by the Chernobyl accident. This chapter describes both Agencies' statutory responsabilities, their work in the areas of radiation protection, nuclear safety and nuclear liability and the actions they took post-Chernobyl to increase international co-operation for prevention and management of nuclear accidents and their consequences (NEA) [fr

  5. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wethe, Per Ivar

    2009-01-01

    Today we know two forms of nuclear energy: fission and fusion. Fission is the decomposition of heavy nuclei, while fusion is the melting together of light nuclei. Both processes create a large surplus of energy. Technologically, we can currently only use fission to produce energy in today's nuclear power plants, but there is intense research worldwide in order to realize a controlled fusion process. In a practical context, today's nuclear energy is a sustained source of energy since the resource base is virtually unlimited. When fusion technology is realized, the resource supply will be a marginal problem. (AG)

  6. Proceedings of the fourth international symposium on advanced nuclear energy research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The papers presented and discussed in the 4th International Symposium on Advanced Nuclear Energy Research, of which subject was focussed on the Roles and Direction of Material Science in Nuclear Technology are contained. The sessions organized for the aural session of the symposium were (1) Processing Science for New Materials, (2) New Tools for Advanced Materials Research, (3) Challenge of Materials Database and (4) Frontier of Materials Technology in New Power Systems, from which 18 invited and 77 contributed papers were selected for the publication. The volume includes also summaries of the panel discussions titled as (1) Computer Simulation for Materials Innovation and (2) What is Expected for Materials Science in Future Nuclear Energy Developments ?, with which a complete recording of the discussions for the latter subject was attempted by the Editorial Working Group of the Program Committee. The 65 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  7. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. {Omicron} Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system {Omicron} Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress {Omicron} Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  8. A Study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of Advanced Nuclear Energy Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Moon Hee; Kim, H. R.; Kim, H. J.

    2009-08-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. · Investigation and analysis of the international and domestic trends related to future nuclear system · To maximize the national interests by the strategic participation of GIF meeting - To participate of GIF meeting and to support of relative work - To investigate the System R and D Arrangement and to inform its progress situation · To maximize the propulsion results of Korea/U.S nuclear energy joint research(I-NERI) - To support a delegation by the review of agenda in aspect of the technical/legal point - To participate of BINERIC meeting and to support of relative work · Streamline the nuclear energy R and D due to the effective connection between domestic R and D and international collaboration The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  9. A study on intensifying efficiency for international collaborative development of advanced nuclear energy technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. H.; Hahn, D. H.; Song, K. C.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, H. J.; Lim, C. Y.; Lee, D. S.; Lee, Y. J.

    2011-03-01

    The objective of the study was to participate the GIF for the efficient propulsion of future nuclear system development. For achieving the objective of this study, the followings were carried out. Ο Analyze the international/domestic trends in the future nuclear energy system Ο Analyze the domestic long-term R and D program for the future nuclear system and assist its implementation - Review the agenda of the executive committee, the technical committee, and sub-technical committee - Assist the committee meetings and workshops related to the future nuclear energy system Ο Develop the participation strategy for the collaborative development of Gen-IV technology and conducting the international cooperation activities - Support the delegation by reviewing the agenda of GIF meetings in the technical and legal perspective - Research the system R and D arrangement and report its progress - Participate in the SFR SIA PA negotiation meeting and report its progress Ο Support the activities related to I-NERI between Korea and U.S. - Support a delegation by reviewing the agenda in the technical/legal point of view - Participate in the BINERIC meetings and Support the related activities The result of this study may be used for 1) contribution to establishing the effective foundation and broadening the cooperation activities between the advanced countries and Korea and 2) contribution effective management of Gen IV international collaboration by technical/legal supporting

  10. Determining Nuclear Fingerprints: Glove Boxes, Radiation Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentetzi, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In a nuclear laboratory, a glove box is a windowed, sealed container equipped with two flexible gloves that allow the user to manipulate nuclear materials from the outside in an ostensibly safe environment. As a routine laboratory device, it invites neglect from historians and storytellers of science. Yet, since especially the Gulf War, glove boxes have put the interdependence of science, diplomacy, and politics into clear relief. Standing at the intersection of history of science and international history, technological materials and devices such as the glove box can provide penetrating insight into the role of international diplomatic organizations to the global circulation and control of scientific knowledge. The focus here is on the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Nuclear energy and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, R.N.

    1987-01-01

    A general view about the use of energy for brazilian development is presented. The international situation of the nuclear field and the pacific utilization of nuclear energy in Brazil are commented. The safety concepts used for reactor and nuclear facilities licensing, the environmental monitoring program and radiation protection program used in Brazil are described. (E.G.) [pt

  12. Prospects for nuclear energy in the 21st century and the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.; Kupitz, J.; Cleveland, J.; Lyon, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved to an industry that supplies 17% of the world's electricity. A great deal has been achieved and many lessons have been learned. The past decade, however, has seen stagnation or slow growth in nuclear power plant construction except in East Asia. The turn of the century can be a turning point for nuclear power due to increasing world energy consumption, the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improvements in operation and economics of nuclear power plants. Advanced reactor designs are being developed so that the technology will be ready for the next century. Issues that have dampened support for nuclear power are being addressed through the emerging global nuclear safety culture, attention to nuclear waste disposal and a strengthened safeguards system. The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes technical information exchange and co-operation, provides a source of balanced, objective information, and publishes reports on the current status of reactor development. The Agency will continue to play a major role as the nuclear industry faces the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century. (author)

  13. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2011 Progress Report. Enhancing Global Nuclear Energy Sustainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-05-15

    When INPRO was established in 2000, some key characteristics and main objectives for the project were determined and remain basically unchanged to this day: to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to satisfying energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner and to bring together technology holders, technology users and other stakeholders to consider jointly the national and international actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. I wish to use the occasion of this INPRO Progress Report to review some of the key highlights of the past year and share with you my views and vision of INPRO's future. The ''Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami'' and the resulting accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred on 11 March 2011. In response to this accident and at the request of its Member States, the IAEA drafted an Action Plan which defines a programme of work o strengthen the global nuclear safety framework. The activities proposed in the Action Plan are meant to be implemented in the near term, to assess the safety of operating nuclear power plants n the light of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The assessment covers both technical elements, specifically the design of nuclear power plants with regard to site specific extreme natural hazards, and institutional elements, such as the effectiveness of regulatory bodies, operating organizations and the international legal framework in regard to the implementation of IAEA Safety tandards and Conventions. The lessons learned in the medium and long terms will also be reflected n a periodic update of the design requirements for nuclear power plants, international safety tandards, regulations issued by national supervisory authorities, operational procedures, emergency planning and safety assessment methodologies. INPRO has a long term perspective and provides an assessment of the whole nuclear system. Ensuring

  14. International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). 2011 Progress Report. Enhancing Global Nuclear Energy Sustainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-05-01

    When INPRO was established in 2000, some key characteristics and main objectives for the project were determined and remain basically unchanged to this day: to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute to satisfying energy needs in the 21st century in a sustainable manner and to bring together technology holders, technology users and other stakeholders to consider jointly the national and international actions required to achieve desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. I wish to use the occasion of this INPRO Progress Report to review some of the key highlights of the past year and share with you my views and vision of INPRO's future. The ''Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami'' and the resulting accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant occurred on 11 March 2011. In response to this accident and at the request of its Member States, the IAEA drafted an Action Plan which defines a programme of work o strengthen the global nuclear safety framework. The activities proposed in the Action Plan are meant to be implemented in the near term, to assess the safety of operating nuclear power plants n the light of lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi accident. The assessment covers both technical elements, specifically the design of nuclear power plants with regard to site specific extreme natural hazards, and institutional elements, such as the effectiveness of regulatory bodies, operating organizations and the international legal framework in regard to the implementation of IAEA Safety tandards and Conventions. The lessons learned in the medium and long terms will also be reflected n a periodic update of the design requirements for nuclear power plants, international safety tandards, regulations issued by national supervisory authorities, operational procedures, emergency planning and safety assessment methodologies. INPRO has a long term perspective and provides an assessment of the whole nuclear system. Ensuring

  15. Proceedings of the International Conference on Access to Civil Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Today a growing number of states are considering to civil nuclear power to meet their energy needs, in a context of spiraling fossil fuel prices and the drive to combat climate change. France's position is that the peaceful use of nuclear power should not be confined to a handful of states that already hold the technology. At the same time, though, it is essential - both for the countries under consideration and for the international community as a whole - that any country undertaking a civil nuclear programme is not only willing but also capable of meeting essential requirements regarding safety, security, non-proliferation and protection of the environment for future generations. Similarly, the countries in question are confronted with the challenges of finding financing, obtaining access to the technology and the latest research, and training people to satisfactorily conduct their projects. This is why France has expressed its willingness to assist any country wishing to use nuclear technology for peaceful purposes which fully abide by their non proliferation obligations. The International Conference on Access to Civil Nuclear Energy, to be held in Paris on 8 and 9 March 2010, addresses this goal, namely to promote the peaceful and responsible use of nuclear power. It aims to enable debate on every aspect of developing a nuclear programme and on ways of using bilateral and multilateral cooperation to help countries wishing to embark on such a course to fulfill their international obligations. It will provide for a discussion forum for all of the stakeholders: government policy-makers, executives from the international organisations involved in drawing up and monitoring compliance with the regulatory framework, the managers of industrial companies in the sector and of financial establishments, the heads of research and training bodies, and qualified public figures involved in the debate. The conference programme includes several types of sessions: - Opening and

  16. Presence of renewable sources of energy, cogeneration, energy efficiency and distributed generation in the International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pares Ferrer, Marianela; Oviedo Rivero, Irayda; Gonzalez Garcia, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    The International Nuclear Information System (INIS) it was created in 1970 by the International Atomic Energy Agency (OIEA) with the objective of propitiating the exchange of scientific information and technique on the peaceful uses of the energy atomic. INIS processes most of scientific literature and technique in engineering matters nuclear, safeguard and non proliferation and applications in agriculture and health that it generates in the world and it contributes to create a repository of nuclear information for present and future generations. Additionally it includes economic aspects and environmental of other energy sources that facilitate comparative studies for the taking of decisions. The database INIS, is its main informative product and it counts with more than 3 million registrations. One of the services that lends the Center of Administration of the Information and Development of the Energy (CUBAENERGIA), like center INIS in Cuba, is the search of information on the peaceful use of the science and nuclear technology in the Countries Members and the registration of information on their applications in Cuba. More recently, it extends this service to the Renewable Sources application of Energy in the country; as part of the works of administration of the information that it carries out for the National Group of Renewable Energy, Cogeneration, Saving and Energy Efficiency, created in the 2007 and coordinated by the MINBAS with the participation of institutions belonging to Organisms of the Administration Central of the State. In this work the results of a preliminary study are presented on the witnesses in the INIS of the Renewable Sources of Energy, the Cogeneration, Energy Efficiency, and the Distributed Generation. As well as of the application of metric tools to the opposing registrations for the case of the Distributed generation, that which allowed to characterize their historical evolution, the participation for countries in their development and

  17. The legal regime governing the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. II. International Regulations. Pt.1. Regulations on peaceful uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-12-01

    The first volume on atomic energy law published by CNEN reproduced national laws and regulations in that field. This book constitutes part one of the second volume and deals with international nuclear conventions and cooperation as at 30 June 1978. It reproduces the instruments and conventions which set up the international nuclear agencies, recommendations in the field of radiation protection and nuclear safety, the nuclear third party liability conventions, the international instruments concerning technical and scientific cooperation and finally, the bilateral cooperation agreements between Italy and other nations and its agreements with international organizations (NEA) [fr

  18. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesketh, Ross.

    1985-01-01

    The subject is treated under the headings: nuclear energy -what is it; fusion (principles; practice); fission (principles); reactor types and systems (fast (neutron) reactors as breeders; fast reactors; thermal reactors; graphite-moderated thermal reactors; the CANDU reactor; light water reactors - the BWR and the PWR); the nuclear fuel cycle (waste storage; fuel element manufacture; enrichment processes; uranium mining); safety and risk assessment; the nuclear power industry and the economy (regulating authorities; economics; advantages and disadvantages). (U.K.)

  19. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Several issues concerning nuclear energy in France during 1996 are presented: permission of a demand for installing underground laboratories in three sites (Marcoule, Bure and Chapelle-Baton); a report assessing the capacity of Superphenix plant to operate as a research tool; the project of merging between Framatome and Gec-Alsthom companies; the revision of a general report on nuclear energy in France; the issue of military plutonium management

  20. Nuclear energy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the booklet is to provide an up-to-date overview of the use of nuclear energy in Finland as well as future plans regarding the nuclear energy sector. It is intended for people working in the nuclear energy or other energy sectors in other countries, as well as for those international audiences and decision-makers who would like to have extra information on this particular energy sector. Nuclear energy is described as part of the Finnish electricity market. (orig.)

  1. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladky, S.

    1985-01-01

    This booklet appeared in a series on technical history. It tries to communicate some of the scientific, technical and social stresses, which have been connected with the application of nuclear energy since its discovery. The individual sections are concerned with the following subjects: the search for the 'smallest particles'; the atomic nucleus; nuclear fission; the 'Manhattan Project'; the time after this - from the euphoria of the 1950's via disillusionment and change of opinion to the state of nuclear energy at the start of the 1980's. The booklet contains many details and is generously illustrated. (HSCH) [de

  2. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1984-01-01

    Do we need nuclear energy. Is it safe. What are the risks. Will it lead to proliferation. The questions are endless, the answers often confused. In the vigorous debates that surround the siting and operation of nuclear power plants, it is all too easy to lose sight of the central issues amid the mass of arguments and counter-arguments put forward. And there remains the doubt, who do we believe. This book presents the facts, simply, straightforwardly, and comprehensibly. It describes the different types of nuclear reactor, how they work, how energy is produced and transformed into usable power, how nuclear waste is handled, what safeguards are built in to prevent accident, contamination and misuse. More important, it does this in the context of the real world, examining the benefits as well as the dangers of a nuclear power programme, quantifying the risks, and providing an authoritative account of the nuclear industry worldwide. Technically complex and politically controversial, the contribution of nuclear energy to our future energy requirements is a crucial topic of our time. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, J.

    1990-01-01

    This set of questions is based on an inquiry from the years 1987 to 1989. About 250 people af all age groups - primarily, however, young people between 16 and 25 years of age - were asked to state the questions they considered particularly important on the subject of nuclear energy. The survey was carried out without handicaps according to the brain-storming principle. Although the results cannot claim to be representative, they certainly reflect the areas of interest of many citizens and also their expectations, hopes and fears in connection with nuclear energy. The greater part of the questions were aimed at three topic areas: The security of nuclear power-stations, the effects of radioactivity on people and the problem of waste disposal. The book centres around these sets of questions. The introduction gives a general survey of the significance of nuclear energy as a whole. After this follow questions to do with the function of nuclear power stations, for the problems of security and waste disposal - which are dealt with in the following chapters - are easier to explain and to understand if a few physical and technical basics are understood. In the final section of the book there are questions on the so-called rejection debate and on the possibility of replacing nuclear energy with other energy forms. (orig./HP) [de

  4. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panait, A.

    1994-01-01

    This is a general report presenting the section VII entitled Nuclear Power of the National Conference on Energy (CNE '94) held in Neptun, Romania, on 13-16 June 1994. The problems addressed were those relating to electric power produced by nuclear power plant, to heat secondary generation, to quality assurance, to safety, etc. A special attention was paid to the commissioning of the first Romanian nuclear power unit, the Cernavoda-1 reactor of CANDU type. The communications were grouped in four subsections. These were: 1. Quality assurance, nuclear safety, and environmental protection; 2. Nuclear power plant, commissioning, and operation; 3. Nuclear power plant inspection, maintenance, and repairs, heavy water technology; 4. Public opinion education. There were 22 reports, altogether

  5. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, Paul

    2012-01-01

    With simple and accessible explanations, this book presents the physical principles, the history and industrial developments of nuclear energy. More than 25 years after the Chernobyl accidents and few months only after the Fukushima one, it discusses the pros and cons of this energy source with its assets and its risks. (J.S.)

  6. Statement to International Conference on Access to Civil Nuclear Energy, 8 March 2010, Paris, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    consider to ensure that nuclear energy is developed beneficially, responsibly and sustainably. The other is called Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power. It systematically defines all the milestones that should guide a country's preparation of the infrastructure for nuclear power. These cover the appropriate legal and regulatory framework, engineering, financial and environmental concerns, safety and security, as well as the appropriate safeguards regime. These milestones are designed to help countries make progress, not to put obstacles in their way. Our second key role is as a reviewer. At the request of a Member State, we assemble teams of experts to conduct detailed reviews of, for example, the operational safety of its nuclear facilities, the effectiveness of its regulatory system or its overall progress in preparing for nuclear power. This system of peer review - which involves experts sharing information and experience with other experts - is of immense value. It helps to increase transparency, to the benefit of all. Third, the Agency provides a broad range of training to Member States. For example, we organize highly specialised technical training for nuclear engineers and scientists. In Montpelier, we help to run courses in nuclear law. This training helps countries to build up their own expertise so they can make informed decisions and are well prepared in dealing with vendors, consultants, industry associations and other governments. The IAEA plays an active role in contributing to technological development. A good example is the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Continual innovation in nuclear technology is essential. Fast reactors, for example, make it possible to extend the lifetime of uranium resources from hundreds of years to thousands of years, to lower costs and to reduce nuclear waste. Here, also, success will depend on international coordination. Let me state again that

  7. Statement to International Conference on Access to Civil Nuclear Energy, 8 March 2010, Paris, France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yukiya

    2010-01-01

    consider to ensure that nuclear energy is developed beneficially, responsibly and sustainably. The other is called Milestones in the Development of a National Infrastructure for Nuclear Power. It systematically defines all the milestones that should guide a country's preparation of the infrastructure for nuclear power. These cover the appropriate legal and regulatory framework, engineering, financial and environmental concerns, safety and security, as well as the appropriate safeguards regime. These milestones are designed to help countries make progress, not to put obstacles in their way. Our second key role is as a reviewer. At the request of a Member State, we assemble teams of experts to conduct detailed reviews of, for example, the operational safety of its nuclear facilities, the effectiveness of its regulatory system or its overall progress in preparing for nuclear power. This system of peer review - which involves experts sharing information and experience with other experts - is of immense value. It helps to increase transparency, to the benefit of all. Third, the Agency provides a broad range of training to Member States. For example, we organize highly specialised technical training for nuclear engineers and scientists. In Montpelier, we help to run courses in nuclear law. This training helps countries to build up their own expertise so they can make informed decisions and are well prepared in dealing with vendors, consultants, industry associations and other governments. The IAEA plays an active role in contributing to technological development. A good example is the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Continual innovation in nuclear technology is essential. Fast reactors, for example, make it possible to extend the lifetime of uranium resources from hundreds of years to thousands of years, to lower costs and to reduce nuclear waste. Here, also, success will depend on international coordination. Let me state again that

  8. Analysis of the efficiency of some international projects in Ukraine for future of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radovskaya, O.; Pysmennaya, U.; Zenyuk, D.

    2001-01-01

    The report presents the review of the status and perspectives for nuclear energy development in Ukraine. The role of certain projects for young experts is evaluated - among these projects the basic one is the IAEA Technical Co-operation Project UKR/4/006 S trategy for Nuclear Energy Development , as well as projects of the Ukrainian Nuclear Society and the Institute of Nuclear and Energy Law. (authors)

  9. Topical questions of nuclear energy law from an international point of view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, E.

    1984-01-01

    Apart from the national legal problems, national regulations and developments were discussed with a view to their consequences on an international scale and compared with the regulations of other countries. Subjects: International cooperation, non-proliferation policy, national licensing procedures compared, problems of nuclear power acceptance, liabilities and commercial law in the nuclear fuel cycle, legal and financial problems in nuclear waste management and decommissioning, recent problems of nuclear liability. (orig./HP) [de

  10. Technical Requirements For Reactors To Be Deployed Internationally For the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, Daniel T.

    2007-01-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) seeks to create an international regime to support large-scale growth in the worldwide use of nuclear energy. Fully meeting the GNEP vision may require the deployment of thousands of reactors in scores of countries, many of which do not use nuclear energy currently. Some of these needs will be met by large-scale Generation III and III+ reactors (>1000 MWe) and Generation IV reactors when they are available. However, because many developing countries have small and immature electricity grids, the currently available Generation III(+) reactors may be unsuitable since they are too large, too expensive, and too complex. Therefore, GNEP envisions new types of reactors that must be developed for international deployment that are 'right sized' for the developing countries and that are based on technologies, designs, and policies focused on reducing proliferation risk. The first step in developing such systems is the generation of technical requirements that will ensure that the systems meet both the GNEP policy goals and the power needs of the recipient countries. Reactor systems deployed internationally within the GNEP context must meet a number of requirements similar to the safety, reliability, economics, and proliferation goals established for the DOE Generation IV program. Because of the emphasis on deployment to nonnuclear developing countries, the requirements will be weighted differently than with Generation IV, especially regarding safety and non-proliferation goals. Also, the reactors should be sized for market conditions in developing countries where energy demand per capita, institutional maturity and industrial infrastructure vary considerably, and must utilize fuel that is compatible with the fuel recycle technologies being developed by GNEP. Arrangements are already underway to establish Working Groups jointly with Japan and Russia to develop requirements for reactor systems. Additional bilateral and multilateral

  11. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luxo, Armand.

    1977-01-01

    The reasons and conditions of utilizing nuclear power in developing countries are examined jointly with the present status and future uses already evaluated by some organizations. Some consequences are deduced in the human, financial scientific and technological fields, with provisional suggestions for preparing the nuclear industry development in these countries. As a conclusion trends are given to show how the industrialized countries having gained a long scientific and technological experience in nuclear energy can afford their assistance in this field, to developing countries [fr

  12. Energy: nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung, M.

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  13. PIME '89 (Public Information Materials Exchange): International workshop on public information problems of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    Presentations included in this proceedings are describing the following; Mass media and public information on nuclear energy and radiation: striving for two-way confidence and understanding; case studies of different countries having developed nuclear programs, problems of communication between nuclear promoters and/or operators and its adversaries; public attitude concerning nuclear power; different attitudes of men and women

  14. PIME '89 (Public Information Materials Exchange): International workshop on public information problems of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-07-01

    Presentations included in this proceedings are describing the following; Mass media and public information on nuclear energy and radiation: striving for two-way confidence and understanding; case studies of different countries having developed nuclear programs, problems of communication between nuclear promoters and/or operators and its adversaries; public attitude concerning nuclear power; different attitudes of men and women.

  15. Nuclear Energy Gradients for Internally Contracted Complete Active Space Second-Order Perturbation Theory: Multistate Extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlaisavljevich, Bess; Shiozaki, Toru

    2016-08-09

    We report the development of the theory and computer program for analytical nuclear energy gradients for (extended) multistate complete active space perturbation theory (CASPT2) with full internal contraction. The vertical shifts are also considered in this work. This is an extension of the fully internally contracted CASPT2 nuclear gradient program recently developed for a state-specific variant by us [MacLeod and Shiozaki, J. Chem. Phys. 2015, 142, 051103]; in this extension, the so-called λ equation is solved to account for the variation of the multistate CASPT2 energies with respect to the change in the amplitudes obtained in the preceding state-specific CASPT2 calculations, and the Z vector equations are modified accordingly. The program is parallelized using the MPI3 remote memory access protocol that allows us to perform efficient one-sided communication. The optimized geometries of the ground and excited states of a copper corrole and benzophenone are presented as numerical examples. The code is publicly available under the GNU General Public License.

  16. Director General's speech at Beijing International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the four years since the last Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy, both global energy demand and interest in nuclear power have continued to grow. Most of the 30 countries already using nuclear energy plan to expand their output. More than 60 countries - mostly in the developing world - have informed the IAEA that they might be interested in launching nuclear power programmes. Of these, 12 countries are actively considering nuclear power. The biggest change since the March 2005 Paris conference - one which none of us could have foreseen then - has been the global economic crisis. There is much discussion about what effect this unprecedented crisis will have on plans for nuclear energy. I have no doubt that this will play an important part in your deliberations in the next three days. It seems likely that the crisis could delay the implementation or expansion of nuclear power programmes in some countries for a limited period. But it is clear that, in the medium and long term, global demand for energy will continue to increase significantly as countries everywhere seek to improve living standards. Although nuclear power is not a panacea for all the world's energy problems, it will continue to play an important role in the global energy mix. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's high projection is for global nuclear power capacity to grow by around 66 percent by 2030. I will begin my remarks by reviewing the current state of play in the nuclear energy sector. I will update you on what the IAEA is doing to help Member States, especially so- called 'newcomers' to nuclear energy. And I will conclude with some observations about the future of the IAEA, highlighting issues which I believe governments, the nuclear industry, regulators and users of nuclear power need to consider carefully

  17. International nuclear material safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed Azmi Syed Ali

    1985-01-01

    History can be a very dull subject if it relates to events which have long since lost their relevance. The factors which led to the creation of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), however, are as important and relevant today as they were when the Agency was first created. Without understanding these factors it is impossible to realise how important the Agency is in the present world or to understand some of the controversies surrounding its future. Central to these controversies is the question of how best to promote the international transfer of nuclear technology without contributing further to the problem of proliferating nuclear explosives or explosive capabilities. One effective means is to subject nuclear materials (see accompanying article in box), which forms the basic link between the manufacture of nuclear explosives and nuclear power generation, to international safeguards. This was realized very early in the development of nuclear power and was given greater emphasis following the deployment of the first two atomic bombs towards the end of World War II. (author)

  18. Nuclear energy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourievidis, G.

    1984-01-01

    Having first outlined the main problems China must resolve in the field of energy supply, this paper presents the nuclear option trends established by the government, recalls the different stages in the nuclear Chinese development programme, achievements and projects. The organization of nuclear research and industry, as also the fuel cycle situation and uranium resources are then described. Finally, the international nuclear cooperation policy carried out by the chinese government and more particularly the agreement settled with France are presented [fr

  19. International energy outlook 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA`s projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA`s World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts` knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs.

  20. International energy outlook 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This International Energy Outlook presents historical data from 1970 to 1993 and EIA's projections of energy consumption and carbon emissions through 2015 for 6 country groups. Prospects for individual fuels are discussed. Summary tables of the IEO96 world energy consumption, oil production, and carbon emissions projections are provided in Appendix A. The reference case projections of total foreign energy consumption and of natural gas, coal, and renewable energy were prepared using EIA's World Energy Projection System (WEPS) model. Reference case projections of foreign oil production and consumption were prepared using the International Energy Module of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). Nuclear consumption projections were derived from the International Nuclear Model, PC Version (PC-INM). Alternatively, nuclear capacity projections were developed using two methods: the lower reference case projections were based on analysts' knowledge of the nuclear programs in different countries; the upper reference case was generated by the World Integrated Nuclear Evaluation System (WINES)--a demand-driven model. In addition, the NEMS Coal Export Submodule (CES) was used to derive flows in international coal trade. As noted above, foreign projections of electricity demand are now projected as part of the WEPS. 64 figs., 62 tabs

  1. International ITER fusion energy organization. Paving the way to power generation from nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preuschen-Liebenstein, R. von

    2006-01-01

    ITER (Latin: the way) is the acronym of a new international large research facility gradually taking shape after the meeting of Gorbachev and Reagan in Reykjavik in 1985. Under the auspices of the IAEA, worldwide scientific and industrial cooperation with 'home teams' of each of the ITER partners began at that time which were commissioned to accumulate the knowledge and the technology of nuclear fusion in the participating countries. At the end of the preparation and decisionmaking process, the design draft of the ITER reactor was elaborated in international cooperation as the basis of the ITER Convention. After lengthy negotiations among the international ITER partners, a European site for the ITER organization and its reactor was found at Cadarache, France. As the first ITER member, Europe now initiated worldwide cooperation in research and development, seeking to demonstrate the technical and scientific feasibility of tapping fusion power for peaceful purposes. The Council of the European Union (competitiveness), at its meeting on September 25, 2006, decided to sign the ITER Convention about the establishment of the International ITER Fusion Energy Organization ('ITER Organization') and about the mutual obligation to make the necessary contributions towards the construction of ITER. (orig.)

  2. Clean energy : nuclear energy world

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-10-15

    This book explains the nuclear engineering to kids with easy way. There are explanations of birth of nuclear energy such as discover of nuclear and application of modern technology of nuclear energy, principles and structure of nuclear power plant, fuel, nuclear waste management, use of radiation for medical treatment, food supplies, industry, utilization of neutron. It indicates the future of nuclear energy as integral nuclear energy and nuclear fusion energy.

  3. 78 FR 49726 - International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation Finance/Regulatory/Energy Planning...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-15

    ..., (2) government commitment and support, and (3) a sound business plan. This workshop will be designed... power purchase agreements, are playing today in the financing of nuclear power projects in emerging... opportunity to network, build relationships in the global civil nuclear sector and learn more about current...

  4. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    2 1/2 years ago a consultation group was formed to help the Section for Social Questions of the Council of Churches in the Netherlands, to answer questions in the area of nuclear energy. During this time the character of the questions has changed considerably. In the beginning people spoke of fear and anxiety over the plans for the application of this new technical development but later this fear and anxiety turned to protest and opposition. This brochure has been produced to enlighten people and try and answer their alarm, by exploring the many facets of the problems. Some of these problems are already being deeply discussed by the public, others play no role in the forming of public opinion. The points of view of the churches over nuclear energy are not expressed, the brochure endeavours to express that nuclear energy problems are a concern for the churches. Technical and economic information and the most important social questions are discussed. (C.F.)

  5. Overview of the international legal framework governing the safe and peaceful uses of nuclear energy - Some practical steps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rautenbach, J.; Tonhauser, W.; Wetherall, A.

    2006-01-01

    The accident on 26 April 1986 in unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant in the former Ukrainian Republic of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics, near the present borders of Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, was categorised at the time as 'the most devastating accident in the history of nuclear power'. Two decades on, the assessment of the health, environmental and socio-economic impacts of the accident still continues, with the aim of providing definitive and authoritative answers. In addition, from a legal perspective the accident underlined some significant deficiencies and gaps in the international legal and regulatory norms that had been established to govern the safe and peaceful uses of nuclear energy. At the same time, it stressed the need for a collective international focus on [nuclear] safety and, in its wake, prompted a call for the creation of an international regime for the safe development of [nuclear energy] under the auspices of the IAEA. For all its devastating consequences, the accident was in fact a wake-up call for the 'international nuclear community' and led to a new era in international nuclear cooperation, involving states which had so far been removed both geographically and technologically from nuclear power. In its aftermath, the international nuclear community, in an attempt to allay concerns of the public and political world over the use of the atom as a viable energy source, sought to rebuild confidence in the safety of nuclear energy, primarily through the IAEA, by urgently addressing those main deficiencies in the existing international legal framework that had been exemplified by the accident. As much as has already been written on the substantive provisions and negotiating history of the different international instruments that compromise this legal framework and that were developed under the auspices of the IAEA in the two decades since the Chernobyl accident, this paper only briefly describes their substance

  6. Review of the international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear security. Taking the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to the 2012 Seoul nuclear security summit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tazaki, Makiko; Suda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke; Mochiji, Toshiro

    2012-06-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) held '2011 International Forum on the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security - Taking the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit-' on 8 and 9 December, 2011. It intended to articulate effective strategies and measures for strengthening nuclear security using lessons learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident. Moreover, it was expected to explore comprehensive approaches which could contribute to enhancing both nuclear safety and security in order to support sustainable and appropriate development of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summary of panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. The editors take full responsibility for the wording and content of this report, excepts presentation materials. (author)

  7. Review of the international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear security. Taking the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident to the 2012 Seoul nuclear security summit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tazaki, Makiko; Suda, Kazunori; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke; Mochiji, Toshiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Department of Science and Technology for Nuclear Material Management, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2012-06-15

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) held '2011 International Forum on the Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Security - Taking the lessons learned from Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant Accident to the 2012 Seoul Nuclear Security Summit-' on 8 and 9 December, 2011. It intended to articulate effective strategies and measures for strengthening nuclear security using lessons learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident. Moreover, it was expected to explore comprehensive approaches which could contribute to enhancing both nuclear safety and security in order to support sustainable and appropriate development of the peaceful use of nuclear energy. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summary of panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. The editors take full responsibility for the wording and content of this report, excepts presentation materials. (author)

  8. West Europe without Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains basic conclusions of discussion if West Europe can exist without nuclear energy: 1. Presumptions for the nuclear energy removal 2. Regional and international consulting 3. Economic competition 4. Role of the nuclear energy 5. Situation in the energetic industry 6. Costs, safety and public relations 7. Energy policy

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'09)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruntorad, Jan; Lokajicek, Milos

    2010-11-01

    The 17th International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held on 21-27 March 2009 in Prague, Czech Republic. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing experience and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. Recent conferences were held in Victoria, Canada 2007, Mumbai, India in 2006, Interlaken, Switzerland in 2004, San Diego, USA in 2003, Beijing, China in 2001, Padua, Italy in 2000. The CHEP'09 conference had 600 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited oral presentations, a number of parallel sessions comprising 200 oral and 300 poster presentations, and an industrial exhibition. We thanks all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Components, Tools and Databases, Hardware and Computing Fabrics, Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies, Distributed Processing and Analysis and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to Prague and other Czech cities and castles and a banquet held at the Zofin palace in Prague. The next CHEP conference will be held in Taipei, Taiwan on 18-22 October 2010. We would like thank the Ministry of Education Youth and Sports of the Czech Republic and the EU ACEOLE project for the conference support, further to commercial sponsors, the International Advisory Committee, the Local Organizing Committee members representing the five collaborating Czech institutions Jan Gruntorad (co-chair), CESNET, z.s.p.o., Prague Andrej Kugler, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR v.v.i., Rez Rupert Leitner, Charles University in Prague, Faculty of Mathematics and

  10. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The expanded role of the IAEA in the field of nuclear power safety will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to the NUSS program (the letters being an acronym for Nuclear Safety Standards) to establish internationally accepted safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants dealing with governmental regulatory organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Other activities discussed will be advisory services, exchange of information and training, emergency accident assistance, and technical assistance. (orig./RW)

  11. Nuclear Energy General Objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world'. One way it achieves this objective is to issue publications in various series. Two of these series are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III, paragraph A.6, of the IAEA Statute, the IAEA safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property.' The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are primarily written in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own activities. The principal users are Member State regulatory bodies and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series consists of reports designed to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia and politicians, among others. The information is presented in guides, reports on the status of technology and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The series complements the IAEA's safety standards, and provides detailed guidance, experience, good practices and examples on the five areas covered in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series. The Nuclear Energy Basic Principles is the highest level publication in the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and describes the rationale and vision for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. It presents eight Basic Principles on which nuclear energy systems should be based to fulfil nuclear energy's potential to help meet growing global energy needs. The Nuclear Energy Series Objectives are the second level publications. They describe what needs to be

  12. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnesale, A.

    1980-01-01

    As nuclear power expands globally, so too expands the capability for producing nuclear weapons. The International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE) was organized in 1977 for the purpose of exploring two areas: (1) ways in which nuclear energy can be made available to help meet world energy needs, and (2) means by which the attendant risk of weapons proliferation can be held to a minimum. INFCE is designed for technical and analytical study rather than negotiation. Its organizational structure and issues under consideration are discussed. Some even broader issues that emerge from consideration of the relationships between the peaceful and military use of nuclear energy are also discussed. These are different notions of the meaning of nuclear proliferation, nuclear export policy, the need of a nuclear policy to be both a domestic as well as a foreign one, and political-military measures that can help reduce incentives of countries to acquire nuclear weapons of their own

  13. International cooperation and nuclear development. On the approval of the Argentina - Australia co-operation agreement for the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasol Varela, Claudia

    2005-01-01

    Argentina, with its National Atomic Energy Commission, has been maintaining during more than half a century an important activity for the development of nuclear energy and its peaceful applications. As a consequence of this tradition, it has strengthened its experience with the contribution to the international co-operation, as in the case of the Argentina-Australia co-operation agreement for the peaceful uses of nuclear energy, signed on August 8th, 2001 and ratified by the Argentine Law No. 26.014. Both countries are parties of several international treaties and conventions: physical protection of nuclear materials, nuclear non-proliferation, nuclear accidents, fuel and wastes management, and others. These legal instruments are complemented by agreements for the applications of safeguards with the International Atomic Energy Agency. On the basis of these regulations the parties agreed to establish co-operation conditions in accordance with the pledge of non-proliferation. Furthermore the agreement states that the Governments have the power to designate the governmental organizations or individuals, as well as the legal entities, which will carry out the co-operation. The co-operation covers basic and applied research, development, design, construction and operation of nuclear reactors and other installations of the nuclear fuel cycle, its related technology as well as nuclear medicine, radioisotopes, etc [es

  14. Development of nuclear energy and nuclear policy in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You Deliang

    1993-11-01

    Status of nuclear power development in China, nuclear policy and nuclear power programme are described. Issues regarding nuclear fuel cycle system, radioactive waste management and international cooperation in the field of peaceful use of nuclear energy are discussed

  15. Report of “the 2013 international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy, nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security. Ensuring nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security of nuclear fuel cycle options in consideration of the accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamura, Tsukasa; Suda, Kazunori; Tomikawa, Hirofumi; Suzuki, Mitsutoshi; Kuno, Yusuke; Mochiji, Toshiro

    2014-03-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) held “International Forum on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Non-proliferation and Nuclear Security – Ensuring Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Nuclear Security of Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options in consideration of the Accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station –” on 3 and 4 December 2013, with the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, as co-hosts. In the Forum, officials from Japan, the United States, France and International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) explained their efforts regarding peaceful use of nuclear energy and nuclear non-proliferation. Discussion was made in two panels, entitled “Nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security measures of nuclear fuel cycle options in consideration of the Accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station” and “Roles of safeguards and technical measures for ensuring nuclear non-proliferation for nuclear fuel cycle options”. In the first panel based on the implications of the Accident at TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on the domestic and global nuclear energy use and increased interest in the back end of nuclear fuel cycle, discussion was made on nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security challenges on both fuel cycle options from the policy and institutional viewpoints whereas in the second panel the roles of safeguards and proliferation resistant nuclear technology including plutonium burning technology in ensuring nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security in the back end of nuclear fuel cycle were discussed. Officials and experts from Japan, IAEA, the United States, France and Republic of Korea participated in the panel and made contributions to active discussion. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summaries of two panel discussions and materials of the presentations in the forum. The editors take full responsibility for the wording

  16. Nuclear energy and the nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    These notes have been prepared by the Department of Energy to provide information and to answer questions often raised about nuclear energy and the nuclear industry and in the hope that they will contribute to the public debate about the future of nuclear energy in the UK. The subject is dealt with under the headings; contribution of nuclear power, energy forecasts, nuclear fuels and reactor types, cost, thermal reactor strategy, planning margin, safety, nuclear licensing, unlike an atomic bomb, radiation, waste disposal, transport of nuclear materials, emergency arrangements at nuclear sites, siting of nuclear stations, security of nuclear installations, world nuclear programmes, international regulation and non-proliferation, IAEA safeguards arrangements in the UK, INFCE, and uranium supplies. (U.K.)

  17. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, H.G. de

    1980-01-01

    A survey is initially of the international-and national situation regarding energetic resources. The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Policy and the Brazilian Nuclear Program are dealt with, as well as the Nuclear Cooperation agreement signed with the Federal Republic of Germany. The situation of Brazil regarding Uranium and the main activities of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission are also discussed [pt

  18. International control of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koponen, Hannu

    1989-01-01

    Nuclear materials are subject to both national and international safeguards control. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) takes care of the international safeguards control. The control activities, which are discussed in this article, are carried out according to the agreements between various countries and the IAEA

  19. International cooperation for establishment and use of nuclear energy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendieck, K.

    1982-01-01

    Possibilities of nuclear technology transfer in view of the establishment of nuclear energy systems in developing countries are discussed on the basis of two examples: (I) The theoretical approach (not yet applied) to systemize the decision process and (II) the practical approach exemplified in the case of Brazil. (orig.)

  20. International Youth Nuclear Congress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fern, A.

    2017-01-01

    International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC) was Initiated by an international YG group of enthusiasts in 1997. Mission statement developed at ENC1998 in Nice, France Growth in enthusiasm and support: IAEA, Nuclear Societies, companies. IYNC run by the Young Generation with full support of experienced advisors, nuclear societies and companies. First came to African continent when IYNC 2010 was hosted by South Africa

  1. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Oh, K. B.

    2006-12-01

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics

  2. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Man Ki; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Oh, K. B

    2006-12-15

    It has been well recognized that securing economic viabilities along with technologies are very important elements in the successful implementation of nuclear R and D projects. The objective of the Project is to help nuclear energy to be utilized in an efficient way by analyzing major issues related with nuclear economics. The study covers following subjects: the role of nuclear in the future electric supply system, economic analysis of nuclear R and D project, contribution to the regional economy from nuclear power. In addition, the study introduces the international cooperation in the methodological area of efficient use of nuclear energy by surveying the international activities related with nuclear economics.

  3. Concluding statement by the President of the Conference [International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yizhong

    2009-01-01

    The conference recognized the positive momentum towards nuclear power and the decisions by many developed and developing States to pursue the use of nuclear energy. The Director General of the IAEA reported that more than 60 countries - mostly in the developing world - have informed the IAEA that they might be interested in launching nuclear power programmes. While respecting the right of each State to define its national energy policy in accordance with its international obligations, vast majority of participants affirmed that nuclear energy, as a proven, clean, safe, competitive technology, will make an increasing contribution to the sustainable development of human kind throughout the 21st century and beyond. It was widely recognized that: -Nuclear power contributes to global energy security while addressing climate change and avoiding air pollution; -Nuclear power is a base-load source of electricity that can make a major contribution to meeting energy needs in a sustainable manner in the 21st century; -Nuclear energy can make a valuable contribution to worldwide socio-economic development. Welcoming the opportunity of further development of nuclear power, participants present at this Conference expressed their views on the following aspects: -The international non-proliferation efforts should be strengthened and States must comply with their respective non-proliferation obligations, strengthen their export controls and enhance their cooperation with the IAEA to ensure the implementation of their respective IAEA safeguards obligations. International cooperation in these areas should be reinforced. -The operating nuclear power plants in the world have maintained an excellent safety record. The continuing safe operation of the current fleet of nuclear power reactors is essential for continued confidence in the use of nuclear technology. All States having or developing a nuclear power program should give high priority to ensuring safety. In addition, states should

  4. International conference on access to civil nuclear energy, March 8-9, 2010, at the OECD, Paris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The conference on the access to civil nuclear energy gathered representatives of 65 countries. The aim of the conference was to debate about the different aspects of the elaboration of a civil nuclear program, on the existing bilateral and multilateral cooperation means, and on the respect of international obligations of security and safety. This document summarizes the highlights of the opening session with the talk of the French President N. Sarkozy, and the opinions expressed during three round tables about: the financing of nuclear programs, the framework of a responsible use of nuclear energy, and the cooperation between nuclearized countries and newcomers. The conclusion of the conference was presented by the French Prime Minister F. Fillon. (J.S.)

  5. An international nuclear safety regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1995-01-01

    For all the parties involved with safe use of nuclear energy, the opening for signature of the 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' (signed by 60 countries) and the ongoing work to prepare a 'Convention on Radioactive Waste Safety' are particularly important milestones. 'Convention on Nuclear Safety' is the first legal instrument that directly addresses the safety of nuclear power plants worldwide. The two conventions are only one facet of international cooperation to enhance safety. A review of some cooperative efforts of the past decades, and some key provisions of the new safety conventions, presented in this paper, show how international cooperation is increasing nuclear safety worldwide. The safety philosophy and practices involved with legal framework for the safe use of nuclear power will foster a collective international involvement and commitment. It will be a positive step towards increasing public confidence in nuclear power

  6. Communication from the Permanent Mission of Israel to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding nuclear export controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter dated 13 July 2004 from the Permanent Mission of Israel providing information on Israel's nuclear export policies and practices. As requested by the Permanent Mission, the letter and document attached to it are reproduced herein for the information of Member States

  7. I wonder nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Cheol

    2009-04-15

    This book consists seven chapters, which are powerful nuclear energy, principle of nuclear fission, nuclear energy in our daily life, is nuclear energy safe?, what is radiation?, radiation spread in pur daily life and radiation like a spy. It adds nuclear energy story through quiz. This book with pictures is for kids to explain nuclear energy easily.

  8. World nuclear energy paths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connolly, T.J.; Hansen, U.; Jaek, W.; Beckurts, K.H.

    1979-01-01

    In examing the world nuclear energy paths, the following assumptions were adopted: the world economy will grow somewhat more slowly than in the past, leading to reductions in electricity demand growth rates; national and international political impediments to the deployment of nuclear power will gradually disappear over the next few years; further development of nuclear power will proceed steadily, without serious interruption but with realistic lead times for the introduction of advanced technologies. Given these assumptions, this paper attempts a study of possible world nuclear energy developments, disaggregated on a regional and national basis. The scenario technique was used and a few alternative fuel-cycle scenarios were developed. Each is an internally consistent model of technically and economically feasible paths to the further development of nuclear power in an aggregate of individual countries and regions of the world. The main purpose of this modeling exercise was to gain some insight into the probable international locations of reactors and other nuclear facilities, the future requirements for uranium and for fuel-cycle services, and the problems of spent-fuel storage and waste management. The study also presents an assessment of the role that nuclear power might actually play in meeting future world energy demand

  9. International law and public participation in the field of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strohl, P.

    1993-01-01

    Public participation in nuclear decision-making is a phenomenon which belongs to the state machine. It can be interesting for international regulations under three aspects: states would agree to recognize a general principle which would be common to their internal legislations, to harmonize their national measures, or because the ability to participate to decisions should be opened to any person concerned what ever her nationality can be or her home can stand

  10. Dossier nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-11-01

    The present Dutch government compiled the title document to enable the future Dutch government to declare its opinion on the nuclear energy problemacy. The most important questions which occupy the Dutch society are discussed: safe application and risks of nuclear energy, radioactive wastes and other environmental aspects, and the possible danger of misusing nuclear technology. In chapter two attention is paid to the policy, as formulated by the Dutch government, with regard to risks of nuclear power plants. Next the technical safety regulations that have to be met are dealt with. A brief overview is given of the state of the art of commercially available nuclear reactors, as well as reactors under development. The nuclear waste problem is the subject of chapter three. Attention is paid to the Dutch policy that has been formulated and is executed, the OPLA-program, in which the underground storage of radioactive wastes is studied, the research on the conversion of long-lived radioactive isotopes to short-lived radioactive isotopes, and planned research programs. In chapter four, other environmental effects of the use of nuclear power are taken into consideration, focusing on the nuclear fuel cycle. International obligations and agreements to guarantee the peaceful use of nuclear energy (non-proliferation) are mentioned and discussed in chapter four. In chapter six the necessity to carry out surveys to determine public support for the use of nuclear energy is outlined. In the appendices nuclear energy reports in the period 1986-present are listed. Also the subject of uranium supplies is discussed and a brief overview of the use of nuclear energy in several other countries is given. 2 tabs., 5 annexes, 63 refs

  11. International energy outlook, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This report presents the current Energy Information Administration (EIA) assessment of the long-term outlook for international energy markets. The historic political and economic changes occurring in Easter Europe and the former Soviet Union will, no doubt, transform regional markets and world trade. This report pays particular attention to energy markets and resources in those countries that were once a part of the Centrally Planned Economies (CPE's) and how prospective changes in these countries might influence the energy outlook for the rest of the world. Several major EIA estimates determine, in large part, the resulting energy projections presented here. These include estimates of the energy intensity of economic activity; oil and natural gas production capacities; nuclear and hydroelectric generation capacities; international coal trade; and the rate of incremental energy requirements met by alternatives to oil

  12. INPRO Assessment of the Planned Nuclear Energy System of Belarus. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was started in 2001 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by IAEA General Conference resolutions and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting the energy needs of the 21st century, and to bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required for ensuring sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfill these objectives, INPRO has developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, and an assessment method which, taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of the long term sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. The INPRO methodology is documented in IAEA-TECDOC-1575 Rev.1, comprising an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (impact of stressors and availability of resources), safety of reactors, and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This publication is the final report of an assessment of the planned nuclear energy system of Belarus using the INPRO methodology. The assessment was performed in 2009-2011 by Belarusian experts in a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and with support from the IAEA's INPRO Group

  13. INPRO Assessment of the Planned Nuclear Energy System of Belarus. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-09-15

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was started in 2001 on the basis of IAEA General Conference resolution GC(44)/RES/21. INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by IAEA General Conference resolutions and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting the energy needs of the 21st century, and to bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required for ensuring sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfill these objectives, INPRO has developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, and an assessment method which, taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of the long term sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. The INPRO methodology is documented in IAEA-TECDOC-1575 Rev.1, comprising an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (impact of stressors and availability of resources), safety of reactors, and safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. This publication is the final report of an assessment of the planned nuclear energy system of Belarus using the INPRO methodology. The assessment was performed in 2009-2011 by Belarusian experts in a strategic partnership with the Russian Federation and with support from the IAEA's INPRO Group.

  14. Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material in all peaceful nuclear activities of Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to all Nuclear Material in all Peaceful Nuclear Activities of Ukraine is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency`s Board of Governors on 12 September 1994 and signed in Vienna on 28 September 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 13 January 1995.

  15. Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material in all peaceful nuclear activities of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to all Nuclear Material in all Peaceful Nuclear Activities of Ukraine is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 12 September 1994 and signed in Vienna on 28 September 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 13 January 1995

  16. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This digest document was written by members of the union of associations of ex-members and retired people of the Areva group (UARGA). It gives a comprehensive overview of the nuclear industry world, starting from radioactivity and its applications, and going on with the fuel cycle (front-end, back-end, fuel reprocessing, transports), the nuclear reactors (PWR, BWR, Candu, HTR, generation 4 systems), the effluents from nuclear facilities, the nuclear wastes (processing, disposal), and the management and safety of nuclear activities. (J.S.)

  17. Teachers and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The aims of the seminar were: to exchange national experience in informing and assisting teachers in the nuclear field, and to determine the conditions for improving the effectiveness of these programmes; to develop an international understanding on the basic training and information requirements to assist secondary-school teachers in discussing nuclear energy in an appropriately wide and balanced context at school; to study the respective contributions of national authorities, industry and relevant institutes in this endeavour

  18. PREFACE: 21st International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, H.; Bonacorsi, D.; Ueda, I.; Lyon, A.

    2015-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) is a major series of international conferences intended to attract physicists and computing professionals to discuss on recent developments and trends in software and computing for their research communities. Experts from the high energy and nuclear physics, computer science, and information technology communities attend CHEP events. This conference series provides an international forum to exchange experiences and the needs of a wide community, and to present and discuss recent, ongoing, and future activities. At the beginning of the successful series of CHEP conferences in 1985, the latest developments in embedded systems, networking, vector and parallel processing were presented in Amsterdam. The software and computing ecosystem massively evolved since then, and along this path each CHEP event has marked a step further. A vibrant community of experts on a wide range of different high-energy and nuclear physics experiments, as well as technology explorer and industry contacts, attend and discuss the present and future challenges, and shape the future of an entire community. In such a rapidly evolving area, aiming to capture the state-of-the-art on software and computing through a collection of proceedings papers on a journal is a big challenge. Due to the large attendance, the final papers appear on the journal a few months after the conference is over. Additionally, the contributions often report about studies at very heterogeneous statuses, namely studies that are completed, or are just started, or yet to be done. It is not uncommon that by the time a specific paper appears on the journal some of the work is over a year old, or the investigation actually happened in different directions and with different methodologies than originally presented at the conference just a few months before. And by the time the proceedings appear in journal form, new ideas and explorations have

  19. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Simon C.; Shen, Stella; Neufeld, Niko; Gutsche, Oliver; Cattaneo, Marco; Fisk, Ian; Panzer-Steindel, Bernd; Di Meglio, Alberto; Lokajicek, Milos

    2011-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at Academia Sinica in Taipei from 18-22 October 2010. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the worldwide High Energy and Nuclear Physics community, Computer Science, and Information Technology. The CHEP conference provides an international forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18 month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, America and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Prauge, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, California(2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000) CHEP 2010 was organized by Academia Sinica Grid Computing Centre. There was an International Advisory Committee (IAC) setting the overall themes of the conference, a Programme Committee (PC) responsible for the content, as well as Conference Secretariat responsible for the conference infrastructure. There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 260 oral and 200 poster presentations, and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters, for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Software Engineering, Data Stores, and Databases, Distributed Processing and Analysis, Computing Fabrics and Networking Technologies, Grid and Cloud Middleware, and Collaborative Tools. The conference included excursions to various attractions in Northern Taiwan, including Sanhsia Tsu Shih Temple, Yingko, Chiufen Village, the Northeast Coast National Scenic Area, Keelung, Yehliu Geopark, and Wulai Aboriginal Village

  20. Structure of an international concern in view of the future nuclear energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somm, E.

    1990-01-01

    The ABB concern for electro-technical products, which was formed when the Swedish Asea and the Swiss BBC merged, has made the provision of energy the purpose of its business. Part of its activities is the manufacture of power plants and delivery of components for such plants. Even if ABB was not able to sell any new nuclear energy plant last year, which by the way was successful, the concern is fully counting on nuclear energy as an environment friendly and safe source of energy which will cover our electric power needs for a long time to come. The concern has three reactors ready for use. They have been tested in 27 plants in Europe and the USA. The company itself will be financing the development of the next generation of reactors, always building on experience won in the past. In the meantime, to stay at the front in the nuclear energy field, ABB is successfully active in the field of servicing, up-dating and fuel delivery for plants in operation. The ABB concern, active worldwide, is able and prepared to plan and build new nuclear plants at any time. (author)

  1. Nuclear energy in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilpi, K.; Palmen, B.

    1983-01-01

    Finland currently generates about 40% of its electricity from nuclear power. This achievement of worldwide record magnitude is based on long-lasting efforts to build and maintain the competent infrastructure and close international cooperation required by this demanding technology. This booklet published by the Finnish Atomic Energy Commission gives an overview of nuclear energy and related organizations in Finland. It describes the utility companies and nuclear power production, the manufacturing industry and its export potential, research and educational activities and the legal framework and authorities for nuclear safety and administration. International cooperation has been essential for Finland in developing its nuclear energy capacity and appreciation is espressed to many countries and international organizations which have contributed to this. At the same time Finnish organizations are willing to share the experiences and know-how they have gained in building nuclear power in a small country. This is a road which will be followed by many other countries in the decades to come. It is hoped that this booklet will also help to open new channels of cooperation in such efforts

  2. The Role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in a Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents and Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.; Baciu, F., E-mail: E.Buglova@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in a response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies has been defined and further expanded through the IAEA Statute, the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, IAEA safety standards, relevant decisions by Policy Making Organs of the IAEA, inter-agency agreements and other documents such as the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. The IAEA Secretariat fulfils its roles through the Agency's Incident and Emergency System (IES) and the Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC). The IEC is the global focal point for international preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological safety or security related incidents, emergencies, threats or events of media interest and for coordination of International assistance. During a response the IEC performs and facilitates for Member States many specific functions which include: prompt notification; official information exchange; assessment of potential consequences; prognosis of emergency progression; provision, facilitation and coordination of International assistance; provision of timely, accurate and easily understandable public information; coordination of inter-agency response at the International level. Through officially designated contact points of Member States the IEC is able to communicate at any time with national authorities to ensure the prompt and successful sharing of information and resources. The IEC routinely performs internal exercising of all aspects of the IAEA response and in cooperation with Member States, the IAEA organizes and facilitates the conduct of large scale international exercises to practice cooperation and coordination. This presentation outlines in detail the specific functions of the IAEA IEC during a response. (author)

  3. Joint Thesaurus. Part I (A-L) + Part II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-04-01

    This is the 1st revision of the INIS/ETDE Joint Thesaurus. It contains 20 953 valid descriptors and 8 600 forbidden terms. It was last updated in December 2003. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scope of both INIS (International Nuclear Information System) and ETDE (Energy Technology Data Exchange) information systems. The terminology is intended for use in subject description for input or retrieval of information in those systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The domain of knowledge covered by this Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear sources, energy efficiency and energy conservation, economics and sociology of energy production and use, energy policy, and nuclear law. The terms in the Thesaurus are listed alphabetically, and with each alphabetic entry a word block containing the terms associated with the particular entry is displayed. In the word block, terms that have a hierarchical relationship to the entry are identified by the symbols BT and NT, for Broader Term and Narrower Term. Those with an affinitive

  4. The international nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remick, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    With today's technology, isolationism is virtually impossible. The world's economies are so strongly intertwined that what affects one country will, in some way, influence another. Nuclear technology is no exception. If anything, nuclear technology is a catalyst for international cooperation. In the United States of America, nuclear technology is undergoing significant changes. Many of these changes are being greatly influenced by programs of international cooperation

  5. International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janin, D.

    2017-01-01

    International Youth Nuclear Congress (IYNC) is the global network of a new generation of nuclear professionals to: Communicate the benefits of nuclear energy; Promote the peaceful use of nuclear science and technology; Facilitate knowledge transfer between generations; Provide a platform for networking. The benefits of IYNC's biannual congress maintain IYNC. Innovation for Nuclear: To propose and reward innovative ideas focused on nuclear technologies for a sustainable development; To support young energy in thinking innovative solutions. The congress is funded from sponsorship (between 1000 and 45,000 euros) and individual participant's registration fees (400 euros including meals, technical visit and networking events). Knowledge Transfer at IYNC congress involves Speakers: top managers and nuclear experts, Publication of technical papers, Face-to-face with keynote speakers and organising Workshops

  6. Nuclear methods in environmental and energy research: proceedings of fifth international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogt, J.R.

    1984-04-01

    The conference includes papers in the areas of: (1) gamma-ray and x-ray spectroscopy and software, (2) environmental and geochemical methods and applications; (3) energy methods and applications; (4) nuclear and atomic methodology; and (5) biological and medical methods and applications. Papers have been individually abstracted for the data base

  7. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This brochure is intended as a contribution to a better and more general understanding of one of the most urgent problems of present society. Emphasis is laid on three issues that are always raised in the nuclear debate: 1) Fuel cycle, 2) environmental effects of nuclear power plants, 3) waste disposal problems. (GL) [de

  8. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Michael; Düllmann, Dirk; Rind, Ofer; Wong, Tony

    2012-12-01

    The International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP) was held at New York University on 21- 25 May 2012. CHEP is a major series of international conferences for physicists and computing professionals from the High Energy and Nuclear Physics community and related scientific and technical fields. The CHEP conference provides a forum to exchange information on computing progress and needs for the community, and to review recent, ongoing and future activities. CHEP conferences are held at roughly 18-month intervals, alternating between Europe, Asia, the Americas and other parts of the world. Recent CHEP conferences have been held in Taipei, Taiwan (2010); Prague, Czech Republic (2009); Victoria, Canada (2007); Mumbai, India (2006); Interlaken, Switzerland (2004); San Diego, United States (2003); Beijing, China (2001); Padova, Italy (2000). CHEP 2012 was organized by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and co-sponsored by New York University. The organizational structure for CHEP consists of an International Advisory Committee (IAC) which sets the overall themes of the conference, a Program Organizing Committee (POC) that oversees the program content, and a Local Organizing Committee (LOC) that is responsible for local arrangements (lodging, transportation and social events) and conference logistics (registration, program scheduling, conference site selection and conference proceedings). There were over 500 attendees with a program that included plenary sessions of invited speakers, a number of parallel sessions comprising around 125 oral and 425 poster presentations and industrial exhibitions. We thank all the presenters for the excellent scientific content of their contributions to the conference. Conference tracks covered topics on Online Computing, Event Processing, Distributed Processing and Analysis on Grids and Clouds, Computer Facilities, Production Grids and Networking, Software Engineering, Data Stores and Databases and

  9. Introduction to the use of the INPRO methodology in a nuclear energy system assessment. A report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in 2001 on the basis of an IAEA General Conference resolution in 2000 (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO activities have since that time been continuously endorsed by resolutions of the IAEA General Conference and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to: Help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to the goal of meeting energy needs in the 21st century; Bring together technology holders and users so that they can jointly consider the international and national actions required to ensure the sustainability of nuclear energy through innovations in technology and/or institutional arrangements. To fulfil these objectives, INPRO developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria, along with an assessment method, which are the basis of the INPRO methodology for evaluation of the sustainability of innovative nuclear energy systems. To provide additional guidance in using the INPRO methodology, the nine volume INPRO Manual was developed; it consists of an overview volume and eight volumes covering the areas of economics, institutional measures (infrastructure), waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment (including the impact of stressors and the availability of resources), reactor safety, and the safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. To assist Member States in applying the INPRO methodology, the nuclear energy system assessment (NESA) support package is being developed. This includes a database (containing input data for assessment), provision of training courses in the INPRO methodology and examples of comprehensive assessments. This publication provides guidance on how a variety of potential users, including nuclear technology developers, experienced users and prospective first time nuclear technology users (newcomers) can apply the INPRO methodology for

  10. International cooperation for nuclear science and energy development- A win win perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheriffah Noor Khamseah Al-Idid Syed Ahmad Idid

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: International and regional cooperation is fundamental for the safe and effective introduction and expansion of nuclear power programme (NPP). A win-win situation can be harnessed as experienced countries in NPP are able to offer a myriad of benefits to new comer countries as well as countries planning for NPP whilst new comer countries are able to offer education and training opportunities and business opportunities to advanced countries in NPP. Countries with long experience in nuclear power programme (NPP) are able to offer experience, knowledge, advisory as well as sharing of resources and facilities with new comer countries. As skilled and competent personnel in the entire nuclear value-chain are critical to support NPP, this paper will provide an overview of some of the experience and resources of advanced countries in NPP that could be shared with new comer countries, with a focus in the area of education and training, as well as in industrial development. The paper will conclude by offering some recommendations as a way forward for establishing international cooperation in Nuclear Education and Training, as well as for industrial development. (author)

  11. Nuclear energy and the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    This paper is the opening speech from a national seminar on the uses for nuclear energy in everyday life. The speaker, the public information director for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), stresses the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. He points out that used for peaceful purposes, and prudently, nuclear energy applications have, tremendous benefits to offer mankind in both the industrial world and developing nations

  12. Nuclear energy and renewable energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear energy and the renewable energies namely: solar energy, wind energy, geothermal energy and biomass are complementary. They are not polluting and they are expected to develop in the future to replace the fossil fuels

  13. ENC 94 International Nuclear Congress - Atoms for Energy. Transactions Vol.II: Poster Papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The transactions have been published in 2 volumes. Volume II contains the papers, which were orally presented in 4 sessions. In Session 1 'The need for nuclear energy in different parts of the world' was discussed in 17 contributions from the US, Korea, Turkey, Yugoslavia, Finland, the Netherlands, Poland, Russia, Croatia, Belgium and Germany. The other 3 sessions covered: Safety of operating nuclear plants (54 posters); Back-end of the fuel cycle (35 posters); Do we need new reactors to improve safety and economics ? (32 Posters)

  14. Nuclear energy and communication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    This article contains information related to the support that the Latin-American countries have counted, from the International Atomic Energy Agency, for the development and application of the nuclear energy in different fields. In the particular case of Costa Rica, it mentions some projects included in the program ARCAL. The achievements reached in the year 1998 and the goals proposed for 1999-2000. (S. Grainger) [es

  15. The IAEA international project on innovative nuclear reactors and fuel cycles (INPRO): study on opportunities and challenges of large-scale nuclear energy development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoroshev, M.; Subbotin, S.

    2006-01-01

    Existing scenarios for global energy use project that demand will at least double over the next 50 years. Electricity demand is projected to grow even faster. These scenarios suggest that the use of all available generating options, including nuclear energy, will inevitably be required to meet those demands. If nuclear energy is to play a meaningful role in the global energy supply in the foreseeable future, innovative approaches will be required to address concerns about economic competitiveness, environment, safety, waste management, potential proliferation risks and necessary infrastructure. In the event of a renaissance of nuclear energy, adequate infrastructure development will become crucial for Member States considering the future use of nuclear power. The IAEA should be ready to provide assistance in this area. A special resolution was adopted by the General Conference in September 2005 on 'Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications: Approaches to Supporting Nuclear Power Infrastructure Development'. Previously, in 2000, taking into account future energy scenarios and the needs of Member States, the IAEA General Conference had adopted a resolution initiating the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO). Based on scenarios for the next fifty years, INPRO identified requirements for different aspects of future nuclear energy systems, such as economics, environment, safety, waste management, proliferation resistance and infrastructure and developed a methodology to assess innovative nuclear systems and fuel cycles. Using this assessment tool, the need for innovations in nuclear technology can be defined, which can be achieved through research, development and demonstration (RD and D). INPRO developed these requirements during its first stage, Phase 1A, which lasted from 2001 to mid-2003. In the second stage, Phase 1B (first part), INPRO organized 14 case studies (8 by

  16. Hydrogen energy based on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-06-01

    A concept to produce hydrogen of an energy carrier using nuclear energy was proposed since 1970s, and a number of process based on thermochemical method has been investigated after petroleum shock. As this method is used high temperature based on nuclear reactors, these researches are mainly carried out as a part of application of high temperature reactors, which has been carried out at an aim of the high temperature reactor application in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. On October, 2000, the 'First International Conference for Information Exchange on Hydrogen Production based on Nuclear Energy' was held by auspice of OECD/NEA, where hydrogen energy at energy view in the 21st Century, technology on hydrogen production using nuclear energy, and so on, were published. This commentary was summarized surveys and researches on hydrogen production using nuclear energy carried out by the Nuclear Hydrogen Research Group established on January, 2001 for one year. They contains, views on energy and hydrogen/nuclear energy, hydrogen production using nuclear energy and already finished researches, methods of hydrogen production using nuclear energy and their present conditions, concepts on production plants of nuclear hydrogen, resources on nuclear hydrogen production and effect on global environment, requests from market and acceptability of society, and its future process. (G.K.)

  17. International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Naohiko; Dunaeva, Svetlana

    2010-11-01

    The activities of fourteen nuclear data centres are summarized, and their cooperation under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency is described. Each of the centres provides coverage for different geographical zones and/or specific types of nuclear data, thus together providing a complete service for users worldwide. The International Network of Nuclear Reaction Data Centres (NRDC) was established with the objective of providing nuclear physics databases that are required for nuclear technology (encompassing energy and non-energy applications) by coordinating the collection, compilation and dissemination of nuclear data on an international scale. (author)

  18. Topical problems of nuclear law viewed internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bischof, W.

    1978-01-01

    The International Nuclear Law Association, on its 3rd Congress Nuclear Inter Jura from October 2-5, 1977 in Italy, dealt with a number of topical problems of nuclear law, in particular aspects concerning agreements in connection with the construction of nuclear facilities, the influence of nuclear energy on the environment and the public acceptance, third party liability, and nuclear insurance, radiation protection law and international judicial problems. (orig.) [de

  19. Nuclear energy outlook 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    With the launch today of its first Nuclear Energy Outlook, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) makes an important contribution to ongoing discussions of nuclear energy's potential role in the energy mixes of its member countries. As world energy demand continues to grow unabated, many countries face serious concerns about the security of energy supplies, rising energy prices and climate change stemming from fossil fuel consumption. In his presentation, the NEA Director-General Luis Echavarri is emphasizing the role that nuclear power could play in delivering cost-competitive and stable supplies of energy, while also helping to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. In one Outlook scenario, existing nuclear power technologies could provide almost four times the current supply of nuclear-generated electricity by 2050. Under this scenario, 1400 reactors of the size commonly in use today would be in operation by 2050. But in order to accomplish such an expansion, securing political and societal support for the choice of nuclear energy is vital. An ongoing relationship between policy makers, the nuclear industry and society to develop knowledge building and public involvement will become increasingly important, the publication notes. Moreover, governments have a clear responsibility to maintain continued effective safety regulation, advance efforts to develop radioactive waste disposal solutions and uphold and reinforce the international non-proliferation regime. The authors find that the security of energy from nuclear power is more reliable than that for oil or gas. Additionally, uranium's high energy density means that transport is less vulnerable to disruption, and storing a large energy reserve is easier than for fossil fuels. One tonne of uranium produces the same energy as 10 000 to 16 000 tonnes of oil using current technology. Ongoing technological developments are likely to improve that performance even more. Until the middle of the century the dominant reactor

  20. Nuclear energy in Italy between utopia and reality: Perspectives for the future within the framework of the European Internal Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezzetti, L.

    1991-01-01

    The decision to do without nuclear energy has been made without there being an equivalent, realistic, and convincing alternative. The whole experience with the plebiscites of 1987 seems to be characterized by problematic elements from a political as well as a judicial point of view. With the Internal Market of 1992 coming nearer, the following becomes acute: Italian 'energy mechanisms' have to be adopted quickly to those of other member states. This means that the differences which characterize the internal situation have to be continuously decreased by coordinating the Italian energy policy along the lines of the latest targets of European energy policy. This can only be achieved if there are changes in the field of governmental intervention. (orig./HSCH) [de

  1. Proceedings of the international conference on the fiftieth anniversary of the Fermi reactor and on peaceful applications of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, Ph.

    1992-01-01

    This premiere conference is organized by the alumni of graduate engineers from the University of Liege - AILg - and held in Liege at the Palais des Congres from Wednesday 14th to Friday 16th October 1992. In conjunction with the 175th anniversary of the foundation of the University of Liege and the creation of of the Internal European Market at the end of 1992, this conference celebrates the 50th anniversary of the construction of the first nuclear reactor by Enrico Fermi in Chicago in 1942. This official European celebration is co-organized by the European Nuclear Society and the Belgian Nuclear Society. The goal of the conference is to provide a complete and objective evaluation to the widest possible audience of the state-of-the-art and the prospects of nuclear energy. Invited lectures will be presented by national, European and international experts. The Conference will appeal to experts in the nuclear industry and to a general audience interested in receiving a concise and illuminating expose on the following topics: 1) electricity generation and the environment 2) safeguards issues 3) safety issues 4) nuclear fuel cycle

  2. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lotter, A.C.

    1979-01-01

    The recent, terrifying threat of a major calamity at Pennsylvania's Three Mile Island power plant near Harrisburg reverberated across practically the whole of the civilised world. An almost incredible sequence of human and mechanical failures at this installation had stopped just short of disaster and had brought the unthinkable perilously close to happening. The accident had sprayed radioactive waste into the air and had led to the large scale evacuation of people from the endangered area, disrupted hundreds of thousands of lives and caused a crippling setback to the nuclear industry. In this article the author discusses the impact the Harrisburg incident has had on the nuclear industry

  3. International proliferation on nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, J.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: introduction; routes to proliferation (preparation of U 235 , Pu 239 , U 233 ); nuclear power fuel cycles and proliferation; the fast reactor fuel cycle; security aspects of the existing fuel cycle; the IAEA and the nuclear non-proliferation treaty. It is concluded that 'the basis for sound international control exists, and taken together with the further technical steps which will be taken to make the existing fuel cycles more robust against the diversion of materials by terrorists and the abuse of civil nuclear power programmes by governments, we have good reason to proceed now with the orderly exploitation of ...nuclear energy...'. (U.K.)

  4. Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    A brief indication is given of the United Kingdom nuclear power programme including descriptions of the fission process, the Magnox, AGR and PWR type reactors, the recycling process, waste management and decommissioning, safety precautions, the prototype fast reactor at Dounreay, and the JET fusion experiment. (U.K.)

  5. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Food And Agriculture during the period 1980-1994. The major subjects covered include: food irradiation, insect and pest control, mutation plant breeding, plant biotechnology, soil fertility and irrigation, agrochemicals animal production and health

  6. French nuclear energy policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, A.; Bertel, E.

    1980-11-01

    The French energy policy is supported by a lucid view of the situation of our country and the constraints linked to the international context. This statement implies, the definition of a French policy or energy production essentially based on national resources, uranium, and especially for long term, technical know how which allows using plutonium in breeder reactors. This policy implies an effort in R and D, and industrial development of nuclear field, both in reactor construction and at all levels of fuel cycle. This coherent scientific and financial effort has been pursued since the beginning of years 60, and has placed France among the first nuclear countries in the world. Now this effort enables the mastership of a strong nuclear industry capable to assure the energy future of the country [fr

  7. Nuclear exports and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCardle, J.J.

    1981-06-01

    Canada's nuclear export policy together with its non-proliferation and safeguards policy embrace both the country's desire to promote international cooperation in the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and its effort to minimize the risk of further proliferation of nuclear weapons. This policy reflects the belief that only if Canadian parliamentary and public opinion can be convinced that Canada's nuclear exports will not contribute to nuclear proliferation will the long-term health of the country's nuclear industry be assured. Canada requires a political commitment to non-proliferation from its nuclear partners, and looks to the IAEA to administer safeguards on nuclear material of Canadian origin to guarantee that commitment. Agreements reached with its nuclear partners are in accordance with provisions of the non-proliferation treaty and include a contingency provision for fall-back safeguards if the other state should withdraw from the NPT. Provision is made for mutual agreement on reprocessing and enrichment of nuclear material. Agreements have been reached with some twenty nuclear partners, and efforts are continuing to come to new international understanding on reprocessing, enrichment, and plutonium storage

  8. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Han Myung; Lee, M.K.; Moon, K.H.; Kim, S.S.; Lim, C.Y.; Song, K.D.; Kim, H

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of nuclear energy to the energy use in the economical way, based on the factor survey performed on the internal and external environmental changes occurred recent years. Internal and external environmental changes are being occurred recent years involving with using nuclear energy. This study summarizes the recent environmental changes in nuclear energy such as sustainable development issues, climate change talks, Doha round and newly created electricity fund. This study also carried out the case studies on nuclear energy, based on the environmental analysis performed above. The case studies cover following topics: role of nuclear power in energy/environment/economy, estimation of environmental external cost in electric generation sector, economic comparison of hydrogen production, and inter-industrial analysis of nuclear power generation.

  9. Economic analysis of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Myung; Lee, M.K.; Moon, K.H.; Kim, S.S.; Lim, C.Y.; Song, K.D.; Kim, H.

    2001-12-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the contribution of nuclear energy to the energy use in the economical way, based on the factor survey performed on the internal and external environmental changes occurred recent years. Internal and external environmental changes are being occurred recent years involving with using nuclear energy. This study summarizes the recent environmental changes in nuclear energy such as sustainable development issues, climate change talks, Doha round and newly created electricity fund. This study also carried out the case studies on nuclear energy, based on the environmental analysis performed above. The case studies cover following topics: role of nuclear power in energy/environment/economy, estimation of environmental external cost in electric generation sector, economic comparison of hydrogen production, and inter-industrial analysis of nuclear power generation

  10. Nuclear energy and energy security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamasakhlisi, J.

    2010-01-01

    Do Georgia needs nuclear energy? Nuclear energy is high technology and application of such technology needs definite level of industry, science and society development. Nuclear energy is not only source of electricity production - application of nuclear energy increases year-by-year for medical, science and industrial use. As an energy source Georgia has priority to extend hydro-power capacity by reasonable use of all available water resources. In parallel regime the application of energy efficiency and energy conservation measures should be considered but currently this is not prioritized by Government. Meanwhile this should be taken into consideration that attempts to reduce energy consumption by increasing energy efficiency would simply raise demand for energy in the economy as a whole. The Nuclear energy application needs routine calculation and investigation. For this reason Government Commission is already established. But it seems in advance that regional nuclear power plant for South-Caucasus region would be much more attractive for future

  11. Nuclear energy. Selective bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-07-01

    This bibliography gathers articles and books from the French National Library about civil nuclear energy, its related risks, and its perspectives of evolution: general overview (figures, legal framework, actors and markets, policies); what price for nuclear energy (environmental and health risks, financing, non-proliferation policy); future of nuclear energy in energy policies (nuclear energy versus other energies, nuclear phase-out); web sites selection

  12. International energy outlook 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year's report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs

  13. International energy outlook 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1998 (IEO98) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2020. Projections in IEO98 are displaced according to six basic country groupings. The industrialized region includes projections for four individual countries -- the United States, Canada, Mexico, and Japan -- along with the subgroups Western Europe and Australasia (defined as Australia, New Zealand, and the US Territories). The developing countries are represented by four separate regional subgroups: developing Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China and India are represented in developing Asia. New to this year`s report, country-level projections are provided for Brazil -- which is represented in Central and South America. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union (EE/FSU) are considered as a separate country grouping. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in five fuel chapters, with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. Summary tables of the IEO98 projections for world energy consumption, carbon emissions, oil production, and nuclear power generating capacity are provided in Appendix A. 88 figs., 77 tabs.

  14. Energy paper II: Nuclear energy revival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anonymous

    2008-01-01

    ESI Energy paper is called 'Issue Paper' awarded by think-tank Energy Security Institute. The second issue focuses on the energy security of countries from the perspective of Renaissance of construction of nuclear power plants. Topicality is documented by fluctuations in fossil fuel prices on the world commodity markets and by extortionate potential, disposed by their main producers. The Slovak Republic is actively engaged into international dialogue on the need for the development of nuclear energy.

  15. 6th International Conference on Hard and Electromagnetic Probes of High-Energy Nuclear Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    One of the premier meetings in the field of high-energy nuclear physics, the Hard Probes conference series brings together the experimental and theoretical communities interested in the hard and electromagnetic observables related to nuclear matter at extreme temperatures and densities. Prior to the conference, the University of Cape Town will host a summer school for young physicists in the field. High energy nuclear physics focuses on the science of a trillion degrees. These temperatures were last seen in nature a microsecond after the Big Bang, but mankind recreates them thousands of times a second in particle accelerators such as CERN's Large Hadron Collider and BNL's Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. At these temperatures, 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun, the strong force is dominant, and we hope to learn about the fundamental and non-trivial emergent many-body dynamics of the quarks and gluons that make up 99% of the mass of the visible universe. We anticipate the usual format for the H...

  16. Nuclear energy of hope and dream

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-02-01

    This book describes nuclear energy as hopeful and helpful energy for our life. It includes a lot of introductions of carbon energy, green energy, an atomic reactor for generation of electricity and research, a nuclear fuel cycle, radiation in life, radiation measurement, a radioisotope, the principle of utilization of radiation, utilization for clinical medicine, nuclear energy and economy, international cooperation of nuclear energy and control of nuclear energy.

  17. Nuclear energy worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fertel, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this short paper the author provides a list of tables and charts concerning the nuclear energy worldwide, the clean air benefits of nuclear energy, the nuclear competitiveness and the public opinion. He shows that the nuclear energy has a vital role to play in satisfying global energy and environmental goals. (A.L.B)

  18. Joint thesaurus Part I (A-L) + II (M-Z)[International Nuclear Information System. Energy Technology Data Exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-04-15

    This is the second revision of the ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus, including all updates up to September 2006. It contains 21 147 valid descriptors and 9 114 forbidden terms. The Joint Thesaurus contains the controlled terminology for indexing all information within the subject scopes of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and the Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE). The terminology is intended for use in subject descriptions for input or retrieval of information in these systems. The thesaurus is a terminological control device used in translating from the natural language of documents, indexers or users into a more constrained system language It is also a controlled and dynamic vocabulary of semantically and generically related terms which covers a specific domain of knowledge. The basic terminology in this thesaurus goes back to the 1969 edition of the EURATOM Thesaurus. The structure subsequently given to that terminology was the result of a systematic study performed by INIS subject specialists. Further expansion of the thesaurus terminology was done by ETDE to incorporate information on all forms of energy. The ETDE/INIS Joint Thesaurus is the result of continued editing, carried out in parallel to the processing of the INIS and ETDE databases. The domain of knowledge covered by the Joint Thesaurus includes physics (in particular, plasma physics, atomic and molecular physics, and especially nuclear and high-energy physics), chemistry, materials science, earth sciences, radiation biology, radioisotope effects and kinetics, applied life sciences, radiology and nuclear medicine, isotope and radiation source technology, radiation protection, radiation applications, engineering, instrumentation, fossil fuels, synthetic fuels, renewable energy sources, advanced energy systems, fission and fusion reactor technology, safeguards and inspection, waste management, environmental aspects of the production and consumption of energy from nuclear and non-nuclear

  19. Nuclear energy: a sensible alternative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, K.O.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents information on energy futures; energy demand, energy supplies; exclusive paths and difficult choices--hard, soft, and moderate energy paths; an energy-deficient society; energy shortages; economics of light-water reactors; fast breeder reactor economics; international cooperation in the nuclear field; nuclear recycling; alternative fuels, fuel cycles, and reactors; the nuclear weapons proliferation issue; paths to a world with more reliable nuclear safeguards; the homemade bomb issue; LWR risk assessment; accident analysis and risk assessment; the waste disposal risk; radon problems; risks in our society; health effects of low-level radiation; routine releases of radioactivity from the nuclear industry; low-level radioactivity and infant mortality; the myth of plutonium toxicity; myths about high-level radioactive waste; the aging reactor myth; the police state myth; insurance and nuclear power--the Price-Anderson Act; and solar and nuclear power as partners

  20. International energy outlook, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2035, : prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration, including outlooks : for major energy fuels and associated carbon dioxide emissions. The International Energy Outlook 2010 (...

  1. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications, including technical documents (TECDOCs), of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all sales publications in alphabetical order by subject category whereas the second part lists all TECDOCs in alphabetical order by subject category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  2. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications, including technical documents (TECDOCs), of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all sales publications in alphabetical order by subject category whereas the second part lists all TECDOCs in alphabetical order by subject category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages.

  3. Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The Administrative Court of Braunschweig judges the Ordinance on Advance Funding of Repositories (EndlagervorausleistungsVO) to be void. The Hannover Regional Court passes a basic judgment concerning the Gorleben salt mine (repository) and an action for damages. The Federal Administrative Court dismisses actions against part-permits for the Hanau fuel element fabrication plant. The Koblenz Higher Administrative Court dismisses actions against a part-permit for the Muelheim-Kaerlich reactor. 31st Amendment of the German Criminal Code passed, involving amendments in environmental criminal code, defined in the 2nd amendment to the Act on Unlowful Practices Causing Damage to the Environment (UKG); here: Amendments to the law relating to the criminal code and penal provisions governing unlawful conduct in the operation of nuclear installations. (orig.) [de

  4. International Aspects of Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lash, T.R.

    2000-01-01

    Even though not all the world's nations have developed a nuclear power industry, nuclear safety is unquestionably an international issue. Perhaps the most compelling proof is the 1986 accident at Chornobyl nuclear power plant in what is now Ukraine. The U.S. Department of Energy conducts a comprehensive, cooperative effort to reduce risks at Soviet-designed nuclear power plants. In the host countries : Armenia, Ukraine, Russia, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Lithuania, Slovakia, and Kazakhstan joint projects are correcting major safety deficiencies and establishing nuclear safety infrastructures that will be self-sustaining.The U.S. effort has six primary goals: 1. Operational Safety - Implement the basic elements of operational safety consistent with internationally accepted practices. 2. Training - Improve operator training to internationally accepted standards. 3. Safety Maintenance - Help establish technically effective maintenance programs that can ensure the reliability of safety-related equipment. 4. Safety Systems - Implement safety system improvements consistent with remaining plant lifetimes. 5. Safety Evaluations - Transfer the capability to conduct in-depth plant safety evaluations using internationally accepted methods. 6. Legal and Regulatory Capabilities - Facilitate host-country implementation of necessary laws and regulatory policies consistent with their international treaty obligations governing the safe use of nuclear power

  5. Proceedings of SES International Conference on Can Slovakia secure energy supply and sustainable development without nuclear? Go Nuke Slovakia!

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Conference proceedings included 28 papers. The Conference included the following sessions: (I): International views; (II): National views; (III): Industry views. Focused in its objective, the is aimed to send a clear, hard-hitting message to decision-makers. This is that: Slovakia cannot secure future energy supply, if it does not complete its partially built reactors and if it closes its safe and effective ones. Nuclear has to remain an indispensable part of the country's future energy mix. The event was opened with invited presentations by officials at the highest level of organisations such as the IAEA, the IEA, OECD/NEA, the NEI, the WNA and WANO, as well as the European Commission and Parliament. This line-up was followed by a host of speakers from the political and nuclear industrial arenas in Slovakia, the Czech Republic, Finland, Hungary and the Russian Federation

  6. International energy outlook 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    This report presents international energy projections through 2020, prepared by the Energy Information Administration. The outlooks for major energy fuels are discussed, along with electricity, transportation, and environmental issues. The report begins with a review of world trends in energy demand. The historical time frame begins with data from 1970 and extends to 1996, providing readers with a 26-year historical view of energy demand. The IEO99 projections covers a 24-year period. The next part of the report is organized by energy source. Regional consumption projections for oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear power, and renewable energy (hydroelectricity, geothermal, wind, solar, and other renewables) are presented in the five fuel chapters, along with a review of the current status of each fuel on a worldwide basis. The third part of the report looks at energy consumption in the end-use sectors, beginning with a chapter on energy use for electricity generation. New to this year`s outlook are chapters on energy use in the transportation sector and on environmental issues related to energy consumption. 104 figs., 87 tabs.

  7. Opening Statement - Angel Gurria [International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21. Century: Addressing Energy Needs and Environmental Challenges, Beijing (China), 20-22 April 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurria, Angel

    2009-01-01

    It is a great honour to open this International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy. It is also a privilege for the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to co-sponsor this conference. I wish to thank both our hosts, the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Government of China, represented by the Ministry of Industry and Information Technology and the China Atomic Energy Authority, for convening us today to advance on our common goal: to secure clean and peaceful nuclear power for the 21st century. The global crisis has exposed not only the paramount challenges of today?s global economy and the remarkable level of interdependence among our nations. It has also confronted us with our duty to define the kind of global economy we need for tomorrow. It is our responsibility to devise sound policies for a stronger, cleaner and fairer global economy. Clean and affordable energy, including access to safe and secure nuclear power, should be a central element of our efforts. This is essential not only for a sustainable economy, but also for the future of our planet. The crisis has prompted us to act immediately and in concert. Take the example of our hosts, the Government of China. In the face of the economic slowdown, they responded rapidly and in a comprehensive fashion. Importantly, they increased government spending, and stimulated domestic demand, and are looking into effective ways to enhance social policies. The turmoil showed that China and all of us need to be more involved in international economic cooperation. We are profoundly affected by the policies implemented by each of our countries. There is no better example than energy to illustrate our interdependence. Holding this meeting in Beijing shows the importance China places on international cooperation and recognizes the role China could play in designing clean and safe energy solutions for the future. For me, coming to Beijing is also an opportunity to stress the high significance of the OECD partnership with

  8. International Conference 'Current Problems in Nuclear Physics and Atomic Energy'. May 29 - Jun 03 2006. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyshnevskyi, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The collective processes in atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions and processes with exotic nuclei, rare nuclear processes, relativistic nuclear physics, neutron physics, physics of nuclear reactors, problems of atomic energy and reactors of the future, applied nuclear physics and technique of experiments was discussed in this conference

  9. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1983-06-01

    We all want to prevent the use of nuclear weapons. The issue before us is how best to achieve this objective; more specifically, whether the peaceful applications of nuclear energy help or hinder, and to what extent. Many of us in the nuclear industry are working on these applications from a conviction that without peaceful nuclear energy the risk of nuclear war would be appreciably greater. Others, however, hold the opposite view. In discussing the subject, a necessary step in allaying fears is understanding some facts, and indeed facing up to some unpalatable facts. When the facts are assessed, and a balance struck, the conclusion is that peaceful nuclear energy is much more part of the solution to preventing nuclear war than it is part of the problem

  10. Nuclear energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of basic statistics on electricity generation and nuclear power in OECD countries. The reader will find quick and easy reference to the present status of and projected trends in total electricity generating capacity, nuclear generating capacity, and actual electricity production as well as on supply and demand for nuclear fuel cycle services [fr

  11. Nuclear energy data 2010

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This 2010 edition of Nuclear Energy Data , the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of official statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, provides key information on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035 in OECD member countries. This comprehensive overview provides authoritative information for policy makers, experts and other interested stakeholders.

  12. Review of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Anttila, M.; Pirilae, P.; Vuori, S.

    1997-05-01

    The report is an overview on the production of the nuclear energy all over the world. The amount of production at present and in future, availability of the nuclear fuel, development of nuclear technology, environmental and safety issues, radioactive waste management and commissioning of the plants and also the competitivity of nuclear energy compared with other energy forms are considered. (91 refs.)

  13. The International Atomic Energy Agency shows keen interest. Innovative warning system for nuclear proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smet, S.; Van der Meer, K.

    2011-01-01

    In order to prevent nuclear proliferation, nuclear fuels and other strategic materials have to be responsibly managed. Non-proliferation aims to counteract the uncontrolled proliferation of nuclear materials worldwide. SCK-CEN is developing an innovative nuclear warning system based on political and economic indicators. Such a system should allow the early detection of the development of a nuclear weapons programme.

  14. International Nuclear Security

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, James E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14

    This presentation discusses: (1) Definitions of international nuclear security; (2) What degree of security do we have now; (3) Limitations of a nuclear security strategy focused on national lock-downs of fissile materials and weapons; (4) What do current trends say about the future; and (5) How can nuclear security be strengthened? Nuclear security can be strengthened by: (1) More accurate baseline inventories; (2) Better physical protection, control and accounting; (3) Effective personnel reliability programs; (4) Minimize weapons-usable materials and consolidate to fewer locations; (5) Consider local threat environment when siting facilities; (6) Implement pledges made in the NSS process; and (7) More robust interdiction, emergency response and special operations capabilities. International cooperation is desirable, but not always possible.

  15. Supervision of nuclear material in the Federal Republic of Germany by the Commission of the European Communities (Euratom) and the International Atomic Energy Organisation (IAEO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Since the fifties Euratom has controlled nuclear material in the Federal Republic of Germany. When the verification agreement came into force in the treaty on the non-proliferation of atomic weapons in February 1977, the International Atomic Energy Organisation (IAEO) has commenced the supervision of nuclear material in German nuclear energy installations. The author describes the basic principle of the supervision and the possible effects on the installations. In addition, he also deals with the discussions which have flared up about the international supervision of nuclear material, and indicates possible future developments. (orig.) [de

  16. Generation 4 International Forum. 2009 GIF R and D outlook for generation 4 nuclear energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This document presents the state, at mid 2009, of research and development of the 6 reactor types that were selected in the framework of the GIF (Generation 4 International Forum): VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor), SFR (Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor), SCWR (Super-Critical Water Reactor), GFR (Gas-cooled Fast Reactor), LFR (Lead-cooled reactor), and MSR (Molten Salt Reactor). Regarding each type of reactors, the state of advancement is reported for the reactor itself, its specific components and materials, its nuclear fuel, and its fuel cycle. The outlook of development and research work is also given for the next 5 years for the 6 types of reactors. (A.C.)

  17. Nuclear energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This new edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers additional textual and graphical information as compared with previous editions. It provides the reader with a comprehensive but easy-to-access overview on the status of and trends in the nuclear power and fuel cycle sector. This publication is an authoritative information source of interest to policy makers, experts and academics involved in the nuclear energy field. (authors)

  18. Nuclear energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This new edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers additional textual and graphical information as compared with previous editions. It provides the reader with a comprehensive but easy-to-access overview on the status of and trends in the nuclear power and fuel cycle sector. This publication is an authoritative information source of interest to policy makers, experts and academics involved in the nuclear energy field. (author)

  19. Remarks made by Vice Premier Mr. Zhang Dejiang at the opening ceremony of the International Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy in the 21st Century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Dejiang

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear science and technology is one of the greatest scientific and technological achievements of mankind in the 20th century. Nuclear science and technology is widely applied in various sectors with over 50 years of development, such as energy, industry, agriculture, health, and environment protection, and is playing an important role in prospering economy, improving people's livelihood, and promoting sustainable development. With global economic development and rising energy consumption, supply of traditional energy source is becoming more stretched and climate change is becoming an increasingly severe challenge. It is a common task of the international community to develop and utilize clean and renewable energy sources and properly address growing contradiction among economic development, energy development and environment protection. Given its advantage as clean, safe and could be applied in large scale, more and more countries are placing importance on nuclear energy. Accelerating peaceful uses of nuclear energy is the common wishes and inevitable choice of many countries. China started the development of nuclear energy in the early 1950s, and with the efforts of over half a century, China has established a relatively complete nuclear industry system. The installed capacity of nuclear power reached 9100 MWe, and nuclear power generation accounts for 2% of the national total electricity generated. Nuclear energy is playing an incremental role for China's economic development. However, nuclear energy utilization is rather insufficient in China, its development level is behind countries which are advanced in nuclear energy use such as the United States and France, the rate of nuclear power generation in the total electricity generated still falls behind the world average level. China's energy supply mix is featured by coal dominant and low proportion of clean energy. To achieve sustainable energy and socio-economic development, China has formulated the energy

  20. International ministerial conference on nuclear energy in the 21. century, Beijing, China, 20-22 April 2009. Concluding statement by the President of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The conference recognized the positive momentum towards nuclear power and the decisions by many developed and developing States to pursue the use of nuclear energy. The Director General of the IAEA reported that more than 60 countries - mostly in the developing world - have informed the IAEA that they might be interested in launching nuclear power programmes. While respecting the right of each State to define its national energy policy in accordance with its international obligations, vast majority of participants affirmed that nuclear energy, as a proven, clean, safe, competitive technology, will make an increasing contribution to the sustainable development of human kind throughout the 21st century and beyond. It was widely recognized that nuclear power contributes to global energy security while addressing climate change and avoiding air pollution. Welcoming the opportunity of further development of nuclear power, participants present at this Conference expressed their views on the following aspects: The international non-proliferation efforts should be strengthened and States must comply with their respective non-proliferation obligations; -The operating nuclear power plants in the world have maintained an excellent safety record. The continuing safe operation of the current fleet of nuclear power reactors is essential for continued confidence in the use of nuclear technology; Consideration should be given to measures that will help to ensure reliable access to nuclear fuel supply, while maintaining the normal operation of the international nuclear fuel market; The safe management of spent fuel, which for some countries includes reprocessing and recycling, as well as the disposal of radioactive waste are of great importance for the sustainable development of nuclear power. Countries developing nuclear power programmes are responsible for the development of the necessary infrastructure; International cooperation should be continually strengthened to carry

  1. International ministerial conference on nuclear energy in the 21. century, Beijing, China, 20-22 April 2009. Concluding statement by the President of the Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The conference recognized the positive momentum towards nuclear power and the decisions by many developed and developing States to pursue the use of nuclear energy. The Director General of the IAEA reported that more than 60 countries - mostly in the developing world - have informed the IAEA that they might be interested in launching nuclear power programmes. While respecting the right of each State to define its national energy policy in accordance with its international obligations, vast majority of participants affirmed that nuclear energy, as a proven, clean, safe, competitive technology, will make an increasing contribution to the sustainable development of human kind throughout the 21st century and beyond. It was widely recognized that nuclear power contributes to global energy security while addressing climate change and avoiding air pollution. Welcoming the opportunity of further development of nuclear power, participants present at this Conference expressed their views on the following aspects: The international non-proliferation efforts should be strengthened and States must comply with their respective non-proliferation obligations. -The operating nuclear power plants in the world have maintained an excellent safety record. The continuing safe operation of the current fleet of nuclear power reactors is essential for continued confidence in the use of nuclear technology. Consideration should be given to measures that will help to ensure reliable access to nuclear fuel supply, while maintaining the normal operation of the international nuclear fuel market. The safe management of spent fuel, which for some countries includes reprocessing and recycling, as well as the disposal of radioactive waste are of great importance for the sustainable development of nuclear power. Countries developing nuclear power programmes are responsible for the development of the necessary infrastructure. International cooperation should be continually strengthened to carry

  2. Nuclear energy. Risk or advantage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boettiger, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear energy is controversial. But what's all about really in the controversy? It's about more than safty or electricity prices. Nuclear energy is not only a technical or political question, but also a moral, a human. The discussion enter various rational and irrational arguments, beside straightforward arguments various misleading and mendacious exist. The present publication is comprehensively dedicated to the thema of nuclear energy - its pro and contra - and considers its risks and advantages. Thereby the sources of energy, the processes in the nuclear reactor, and the risk potentials (Harrisburg, Chernobyl, Fukushima) are illustratively and reproducibly presented. Extensively the text explains the forms of the radiation, its doses, and the tolerance of it. Also to the theme waste and final disposal an explaining chapter is dedicated and the question for the exit from nuclear energy elucidated. Finally the author appoints with the question ''How considers mankind nuclear energy world-wide'' the international comparison.

  3. Nuclear energy and the nuclear energy industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromova, E.; Vargoncik, D.; Sovadina, M.

    2013-01-01

    A popular interactive multimedia publication on nuclear energy in Slovak. 'Nuclear energy and energy' is a modern electronic publication that through engaging interpretation, combined with a number of interactive elements, explains the basic principles and facts of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. Operation of nuclear power plants, an important part of the energy resources of developed countries, is frequently discussed topic in different social groups. Especially important is truthful knowledgeability of the general public about the benefits of technical solutions, but also on the risks and safety measures throughout the nuclear industry. According to an online survey 'Nuclear energy and energy' is the most comprehensive electronic multimedia publication worldwide, dedicated to the popularization of nuclear energy. With easy to understand texts, interactive and rich collection of accessories stock it belongs to modern educational and informational titles of the present time. The basic explanatory text of the publication is accompanied by history and the present time of all Slovak nuclear installations, including stock photos. For readers are presented the various attractions legible for the interpretation, which help them in a visual way to make a more complete picture of the concerned issue. Each chapter ends with a test pad where the readers can test their knowledge. Whole explanatory text (72 multimedia pages, 81,000 words) is accompanied by a lot of stock of graphic materials. The publication also includes 336 photos in 60 thematic photo galleries, 45 stock charts and drawings, diagrams and interactive 31 videos and 3D models.

  4. Workshop Report: International Workshop to Explore Synergies between Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources as a Key Component in Developing Pathways to Decarbonization of the Energy Sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Boardman, Richard; Ruth, Mark; Lyons, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    An international workshop was organized in June 2016 to explore synergies between nuclear and renewable energy sources. Synergies crossing electricity, transportation, and industrial sectors were the focus of the workshop, recognizing that deep decarbonization will require efforts that go far beyond the electricity sector alone. This report summarizes the key points made within each presentation and highlights outcomes that were arrived at in the discussions.

  5. Workshop Report: International Workshop to Explore Synergies between Nuclear and Renewable Energy Sources as a Key Component in Developing Pathways to Decarbonization of the Energy Sector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Boardman, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ruth, Mark [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Lyons, Peter B. [Dept. of Energy (DOE), Washington DC (United States)

    2016-08-01

    An international workshop was organized in June 2016 to explore synergies between nuclear and renewable energy sources. Synergies crossing electricity, transportation, and industrial sectors were the focus of the workshop, recognizing that deep decarbonization will require efforts that go far beyond the electricity sector alone. This report summarizes the key points made within each presentation and highlights outcomes that were arrived at in the discussions.

  6. Energy the security of supply in question. Combating global warming: what role for nuclear power. Warning issued by the International Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montbrial, T. de [Areva, Paris (France); Moore, P. [Greenspirit Strategies Ltd, Vancouver (Canada); Cambell, N. [Greenpeace (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter put the question of energy supplies security. The unequal distribution of the world's energy resources raises the problem of energy independence and the security of supply. This question is particularly pertinent for Europe which, along with the Far East, possesses only a meager share of the planet's store of fossil fuels. Europe must learn how to live with its energy dependency, knowing that independence is an unrealistic objective in a world built on the interdependence of trade. The world's energy system is vulnerable to disruptions in supply and to geopolitical tensions. Given this context of instability, how can the security of supply and energy independence be increased? The challenge for western countries with few fossil fuel resources is to secure reliable supply while reducing energy dependency. One solution consists in diversifying power generation sources to lower dependency on oil and gas. The nuclear question is analyzed through the different point of views of Greenpeace and Greenspirit Strategies. Greenpeace refuses even the slightest involvement of nuclear power and considers that energy efficiency and renewable technologies are the only solution to both global warming and energy questions. On the other hand, Greenspirit Strategies sees nuclear power, combined with increased efforts to develop renewable energies, playing an essential role in the sustainable production of electricity. A last article devoted to the World Energy Outlook 2006 - the report published by the International Energy Agency - presents the hypotheses advanced by the Agency regarding future energy supply and its recommendations for counteracting a scenario for 2030 that is, to say the least, very alarming.

  7. Energy the security of supply in question. Combating global warming: what role for nuclear power. Warning issued by the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montbrial, T. de; Moore, P.; Cambell, N.

    2007-01-01

    This issue of Alternatives newsletter put the question of energy supplies security. The unequal distribution of the world's energy resources raises the problem of energy independence and the security of supply. This question is particularly pertinent for Europe which, along with the Far East, possesses only a meager share of the planet's store of fossil fuels. Europe must learn how to live with its energy dependency, knowing that independence is an unrealistic objective in a world built on the interdependence of trade. The world's energy system is vulnerable to disruptions in supply and to geopolitical tensions. Given this context of instability, how can the security of supply and energy independence be increased? The challenge for western countries with few fossil fuel resources is to secure reliable supply while reducing energy dependency. One solution consists in diversifying power generation sources to lower dependency on oil and gas. The nuclear question is analyzed through the different point of views of Greenpeace and Greenspirit Strategies. Greenpeace refuses even the slightest involvement of nuclear power and considers that energy efficiency and renewable technologies are the only solution to both global warming and energy questions. On the other hand, Greenspirit Strategies sees nuclear power, combined with increased efforts to develop renewable energies, playing an essential role in the sustainable production of electricity. A last article devoted to the World Energy Outlook 2006 - the report published by the International Energy Agency - presents the hypotheses advanced by the Agency regarding future energy supply and its recommendations for counteracting a scenario for 2030 that is, to say the least, very alarming

  8. Nuclear energy in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillemard, B.

    1978-01-01

    After having described the nuclear partners in Japan, the author analyzes the main aspects of Japan's nuclear energy: nuclear power plants construction program; developping of light water reactors; fuel cycle politics [fr

  9. Nuclear energy data 2011

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

     . Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports on nuclear energy, contains official information provided by OECD member country governments on plans for new nuclear plant construction, nuclear fuel cycle developments as well as current and projected nuclear generating capacity to 2035. For the first time, it includes data for Chile, Estonia, Israel and Slovenia, which recently became OECD members. Key elements of this edition show a 2% increase in nuclear and total electricity production and a 0.5% increase in nuclear generating ca

  10. International nuclear law

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mello, M.M. de.

    1981-01-01

    The peculiar feature of a developing nuclear law is discussed. Opinions from various writers and jurists are presented. It is concluded that it should be considered as international law, whose main sources are the various treaties, conventions and agreements. (A.L.) [pt

  11. The Japan white book about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    We find here a partial translation of the white book on nuclear energy published by Japan. In this document are the following themes: the safety of nuclear energy, research and development (JAERI), international cooperation, financing distribution, administrative chart of principal authorities and state agencies, budget for 1996 of nuclear energy and situation of the Japanese nuclear park. (N.C.)

  12. Nuclear energy data 2005

    CERN Document Server

    Publishing, OECD

    2005-01-01

    This 2005 edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers a projection horizon lengthened to 2025 for the first time.  It presents the reader with a comprehensive overview on the status and trends in nuclear electricity generation in OECD countries and in the various sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle.

  13. International effects on safety and performance improvement for increasing the share of nuclear power in supply of the world energy demand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhanifard, A.; Hosseini Toudeshki, S.

    2008-01-01

    Perhaps the biggest challenge in launching atomic energy projects will be common public perception that it is a dangerous energy source. In fact, there have only ever been two nuclear accidents - one was Chernobyl (Ukraine) and the other was Three Mile Island (US) where there was an encased explosion and no one was hurt. Undoubtedly, and for good reason, it has had a lasting negative effect on public opinion over the safety of nuclear energy. However, the technology behind nuclear energy has improved in recent years. People have to be aware that new nuclear is not old nuclear. Nuclear is a safe technology and plants are much safer now. In terms of air pollution, developing a nuclear power program can actually have a positive effect on the environment. So today, two thirds of the world's population live in an environment where nuclear power plants are an essential part of energy production and industrial infrastructure. World countries are moving steadily forward with plans for much expanded role of nuclear energy. Efficiency of nuclear generation has increased dramatically over thc last decades. Lessons learned from accidents, advances in nuclear technology and implementation of projects for design of future safer and more economical nuclear reactors, will lead to grow of installed global nuclear capacity from about 369 G We net at the beginning of 2005 to about 553 G We net by 2025. In this paper, we present the results of a study on international efforts to improve safety of nuclear power plants. We focus on the current state of technology and the technology which will be employed for future built reactors to strengthen the role of nuclear power plants for supply of electrical energy in next decades. Finally, based on our studies on past, present and future of the world nuclear technology, we mention the issues to be taken into consideration while preparing the program for development of nuclear power plants in Iran

  14. The nuclear controversy international

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doederlein, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper deals with the following questions: How quickly can the developed nations get as much energy as possible from the nuclear power plants they are building. How can we get a maximum output from a maximum number of nuclear plants to reduce the health and the environment damage that we get from fossil fired power plants. How can we reduce the strain on future generations because of the atmospheric pollution and reduce the strain on future generations because we use up all the oil and the gas that we should leave to them for worthier purposes than energy production. (orig.) [de

  15. Assessment of nuclear energy embodied in international trade following a world multi-regional input–output approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortés-Borda, D.; Guillén-Gosálbez, G.; Jiménez, L.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear power can contribute to cover the increasing demand of energy while keeping the carbon emissions within the desired limits. Many countries are reluctant to implement nuclear technologies in their territories, but might still use them through imports of products that embody nuclear energy in their life cycle. This work quantifies the difference between the production-based (territorial) and consumption-based (global) nuclear energy use in the main 40 economies of the world (85% of the world's GDP) through the application of a multi-regional environmentally extended input–output model. The mismatch between the direct (territorial) and total (global) use of nuclear energy varies from −237% to 44% in the top economies. From a consumption-based viewpoint, 10 out of the 40 countries reduced the per-capita use of nuclear energy in the period 1995–2009, and 7 when following a production-based approach. The per-capita nuclear energy use could differ in up to 26.2 GJ/inhabitant·year, depending on whether the assessment is consumption or production based. It was also found that around 3.5% of the world's nuclear energy production is trade-embodied and that this amount is growing along with the global production of nuclear energy. Our findings might help to develop more effective environmental regulations worldwide. - Highlights: • Global and territorial nuclear energy could differ up to 237% in the main economies. • Trade-embodied nuclear energy has increased from 1.4% to 2.5% in 15 years. • Nuclear energy production has rised in tandem with trade-embodied nuclear energy. • Nuclear production decrease in 7 countries does not counteract the increase in others.

  16. Nuclear energy basic knowledge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkmer, Martin

    2013-11-01

    The following topics are dealt with: Atoms, nuclear decays and radioactivity, energy, nuclear fission and the chain reaction, controlled nuclear fission, nuclear power plants, safety installations in nuclear power plants, fuel supply and disposal, radiation measurement and radiation exposition of man. (HSI)

  17. Nuclear energy - some aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bandeira, Fausto de Paula Menezes

    2005-05-01

    This work presents a brief history of research and development concerning to nuclear technology worldwide and in Brazil, also information about radiations and radioactive elements as well; the nuclear technology applications; nuclear reactor types and functioning of thermonuclear power plants; the number of existing nuclear power plants; the nuclear hazards occurred; the national fiscalization of nuclear sector; the Brazilian legislation in effect and the propositions under proceduring at House of Representatives related to the nuclear energy

  18. Nuclear energy. Economical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Legee, F.

    2010-01-01

    This document present 43 slides of a power point presentation containing detailed data on economical and cost data for nuclear energy and nuclear power plants: evolution from 1971 to 2007 of world total primary energy supply, development of nuclear energy in the world, nuclear power plants in the world in 2009, service life of nuclear power plants and its extension; nuclear energy market and perspectives at 2030, the EPR concept (generation III) and its perspectives at 2030 in the world; cost assessment (power generation cost, nuclear power generation cost, costs due to nuclear safety, comparison of investment costs for gas, coal and nuclear power generation, costs for building a nuclear reactor and general cost; cost for the entire fuel cycle, the case of the closed cycle with recycling (MOX); costs for radioactive waste storage; financial costs and other costs such as environmental impacts, strategic stocks, comparative evaluation of the competitiveness of nuclear versus coal and gas

  19. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM) Program. Part 1: the QUANUM Program and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    An effective management system that integrates quality management is essential for a modern nuclear medicine practice. The Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the mission of supporting nuclear medicine practice in low- and middle-income countries and of helping them introduce it in their health-care system, when not yet present. The experience gathered over several years has shown diversified levels of development and varying degrees of quality of practice, among others because of limited professional networking and limited or no opportunities for exchange of experiences. Those findings triggered the development of a program named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), aimed at improving the standards of NM practice in low- and middle-income countries to internationally accepted standards through the introduction of a culture of quality management and systematic auditing programs. QUANUM takes into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions to the practice. Those contributions include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection are also integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe services of superior quality to patients. The level of conformance is assessed using standards based on publications of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and guidelines from scientific societies such as Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Following QUANUM guidelines and by means of a specific assessment tool developed by the IAEA, auditors, both internal and external, will be able to evaluate the level of conformance. Nonconformances will then be prioritized and recommendations will be provided during an exit briefing. The

  20. Technology Roadmaps: Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    This nuclear energy roadmap has been prepared jointly by the IEA and the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA). Unlike most other low-carbon energy sources, nuclear energy is a mature technology that has been in use for more than 50 years. The latest designs for nuclear power plants build on this experience to offer enhanced safety and performance, and are ready for wider deployment over the next few years. Several countries are reactivating dormant nuclear programmes, while others are considering nuclear for the first time. China in particular is already embarking on a rapid nuclear expansion. In the longer term, there is great potential for new developments in nuclear energy technology to enhance nuclear's role in a sustainable energy future.

  1. Sustainable nuclear energy dilemma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afgan Naim H.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainable energy development implies the need for the emerging potential energy sources which are not producing adverse effect to the environment. In this respect nuclear energy has gained the complimentary favor to be considered as the potential energy source without degradation of the environment. The sustainability evaluation of the nuclear energy systems has required the special attention to the criteria for the assessment of nuclear energy system before we can make firm justification of the sustainability of nuclear energy systems. In order to demonstrate the sustainability assessment of nuclear energy system this exercise has been devoted to the potential options of nuclear energy development, namely: short term option, medium term option, long term option and classical thermal system option. Criteria with following indicators are introduced in this analysis: nuclear indicator, economic indicator, environment indicator, social indicator... The Sustainability Index is used as the merit for the priority assessment among options under consideration.

  2. Keynote address: International nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, R.T.

    1989-01-01

    These meetings provide an important opportunity for the nuclear community to assess the scope and direction of its wide-ranging activities. Nuclear technology has given us the tools to understand and shape our physical environment in ways which can solve ancient problems of health, food supply, energy, and many others which affect the quality of our lives. International cooperation is necessary to secure the peaceful benefits of nuclear technology. Meeting global energy needs must be high on any priority list of issues for the coming decade and the 21st century. The satisfaction of energy needs is today and will increasingly be a crucial factor in international stability. Hand in hand with the need to assure energy sufficiency is the need to assure the long-term protection of the environment. Three key elements that give a useful framework for approaching the future of nuclear cooperation are technological factors, economic issues, and political acceptability. Technological avenues to greater safety must be vigorously pursued. Economic alternatives must be identified and objectively weighed. Most important of all, the framework of public confidence must be strengthened

  3. The international dimensions of nuclear safety standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reed, J.M.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reviews the activities of the major international organisations in the field of nuclear safety standards; the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the Commission of the European Communities. Each organisation encourages the concept of international nuclear safety standards. After Chernobyl, there were calls for some form of binding international nuclear safety standards. Many Member States of IAEA accepted these Codes as a suitable basis for formulating their national safety standards, but the prevailing view was that voluntary compliance with the Codes was the preferred path. With few reactor vendors in a limited international market, the time may be approaching when an internationally licensable nuclear reactor is needed. Commonly accepted safety standards would be a prerequisite. The paper discusses the issues involved and the complexities of standards making in the international arena. (author)

  4. Electricity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krafft, P.

    1987-01-01

    Consequences of getting out from nuclear energy are discussed. It is concluded that the Chernobyl accident is no reason to withdraw confidence from Swiss nuclear power plants. There are no sufficient economizing potential and other energies at disposal to substitute nuclear energy. Switching to coal, oil and gas would increase environmental damages. Economic and social cost of getting out would be too high

  5. International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe 99, V. 2. Proceedings. Embedded Meeting Neutron Imaging Methods to Detect Defects in Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gortnar, O.; Stritar, A.

    1999-01-01

    International Conference Nuclear Energy in Central Europe is an annual meeting of the Nuclear Society of Slovenia. The second book of proceedings contain 14 articles from Slovenia, surrounding countries and countries of the Central and Eastern European Region. Topics cover Neutron Imaging Methods

  6. Nuclear energy: a vital energy choice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, Michel

    1980-01-01

    Speaking from the platform of the XIIIth annual session of the International Atomic Energy Agency, at New Delhi, AEC managing director Michel Pecqueur made a solemn appeal to the world community for the decisions which are needed on energy. The present energy crisis can lead the world to a recession and be a factor in grave troubles for peace and balance in the world. The crisis cannot be resolved without accrued recourse to the use of nuclear energy. Two essential themes were outlined: the development of nuclear energy in the world, and the increased reduction of proliferation risks. In concluding, he expressed the hop that with a greater effort in information media, the nuclear fact-of-life would be better accepted by the general public in future, for it is there that lies a brake which may hinder nuclear energy development [fr

  7. Climatic change and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schneider, M.

    2000-08-01

    The data presented in the different chapters lead to show that nuclear energy ids not a sustainable energy sources for the following reasons: investments in nuclear energy account financing that lacks to energy efficiency programmes. The nuclear programmes have negative effects such the need of great electric network, the need of highly qualified personnel, the freezing of innovation in the fields of supply and demand, development of small performing units. The countries resort to nuclear energy are among the biggest carbon dioxide emitters, because big size nuclear power plants lead to stimulate electric power consumption instead of inducing its rational use. Nuclear energy produces only electric power then a part of needs concerns heat (or cold) and when it is taken into account nuclear energy loses its advantages to the profit of cogeneration installations. Finally nuclear energy is a dangerous energy source, difficult to control as the accident occurring at Tokai MURA showed it in 1998. The problem of radioactive wastes is not still solved and the nuclear proliferation constitutes one of the most important threat at the international level. (N.C.)

  8. Nuclear reactor internals arrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frisch, E.; Andrews, H.N.

    1976-01-01

    A nuclear reactor internals arrangement is disclosed which facilitates reactor refueling. A reactor vessel and a nuclear core is utilized in conjunction with an upper core support arrangement having means for storing withdrawn control rods therein. The upper core support is mounted to the underside of the reactor vessel closure head so that upon withdrawal of the control rods into the upper core support, the closure head, the upper core support and the control rods are removed as a single unit thereby directly exposing the core for purposes of refueling

  9. International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative Development of Computational Models for Pyrochemical Electrorefiners of Nuclear Waste Transmutation Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, M.F.; Kim, K.-R.

    2010-01-01

    In support of closing the nuclear fuel cycle using non-aqueous separations technology, this project aims to develop computational models of electrorefiners based on fundamental chemical and physical processes. Spent driver fuel from Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II) is currently being electrorefined in the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). And Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is developing electrorefining technology for future application to spent fuel treatment and management in the Republic of Korea (ROK). Electrorefining is a critical component of pyroprocessing, a non-aqueous chemical process which separates spent fuel into four streams: (1) uranium metal, (2) U/TRU metal, (3) metallic high-level waste containing cladding hulls and noble metal fission products, and (4) ceramic high-level waste containing sodium and active metal fission products. Having rigorous yet flexible electrorefiner models will facilitate process optimization and assist in trouble-shooting as necessary. To attain such models, INL/UI has focused on approaches to develop a computationally-light and portable two-dimensional (2D) model, while KAERI/SNU has investigated approaches to develop a computationally intensive three-dimensional (3D) model for detailed and fine-tuned simulation.

  10. Nuclear energy: considerations about nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goes Fischer, M.D. de.

    1988-01-01

    A general view of historical aspects of nuclear energy and the arrangements to assure its use for peaceful purposes are presented. Then the internal character of nuclear energy in a juride context is demonstrated; some consideration about the international organizations and conventions and the Brazilian Legislation in the nuclear area are examined. It also deals with the political aspects of nuclear trade and the function of IAEA in this are. Furthermore the restrictions imposed by Non-Proliferation Treaty-NPT, the objectures of the Tlatelolco Treaty and ''London Club'' guidelines. Afterwards the bilateral cooperation under taken by countries and its agreements are discussed. Besides some aspects of agreements made between United States, France Germany and Brazil are discussed [pt

  11. Nuclear energy data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    This new edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers additional graphical information as compared with previous editions allowing a rapid comparison between capacity and requirements in the various phases of the nuclear fuel cycle. It provides the reader with a comprehensive but easy-to-access overview on the status of and trends in the nuclear power and fuel cycle sector. This publication is an authoritative information source of interest to policy makers, experts and academics involved in the nuclear energy field. (author)

  12. Nuclear energy promise or peril?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van der Zwaan, B.C.C.; Hill, C.R.; Ripka, G.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear energy will inevitably become an important worldwide issue in the 21. century. The authors are authorities in their own fields and their contributions have been read, discussed and criticized by a wide, international group of experts. The today status of nuclear power is exposed, the authors weigh the pros and cons of nuclear energy. In a near future nuclear energy could play a major role in preventing climate change and atmospheric pollution. The main challenges that put at risk nuclear energy are: nuclear safety, radiation protection, the management of radioactive wastes, the problem of plutonium stocks and the risk of proliferation. For each of these open questions, a specialist makes a precise survey of the situation

  13. International energy indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, E. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    Data are tabulated and graphically represented on international energy indicators. The following are presented: world crude oil production, 1974 to October 1981; OPEC crude oil productive capacity; world crude oil and refined product inventory levels, 1975 to October, 1981; oil consumption in OECD countries, 1975 to October 1981; USSR crude oil production and exports, 1975 to October, 1981; free world and US nuclear electricity generation, 1973 to December, 1981 and current capacity. Specific US data presented are: US domestic oil supply, 1977 to June, 1981; US gross imports of crude oil and products, 1973 to October, 1981; landed cost of Saudi crude current and 1974 dollars; US coal trade, 1975 to September, 1981; US natural gas trade, 1975 to October, 1981; summary of US merchandise trade, 1977 to October, 1981; and energy/GNP ratio

  14. International agreements on nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dombey, N.

    1982-01-01

    The satellite detection of a nuclear explosion in the South Atlantic and Israel's destruction of a research reactor in Iraq make it essential to strengthen existing monitoring and enforcement programs to prevent proliferation. While there was no reliable evidence that either South Africa or Iraq was violating non-proliferation agreements, worst case scenarios can demonstrate to unfriendly countries that South Africa had diverted fuel to test a nuclear weapon and that Iraq is intending to produce weapons-grade plutonium 239. The situation can be improved by formulating better terms and conditions for internationalizing access to materials. Nuclear suppliers need to agree on terms that will assure their customers that contracts for civil programs will be honored. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which includes both nuclear suppliers and customers, could achieve stronger agreements that take into account recent technological advances that will expand enrichment and reprocessing activities. 23 references, 1 figure

  15. Statement at Beijing international ministerial conference on nuclear energy in the 21. century, 20 April 2009, Beijing, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    2009-01-01

    In the four years since the last Ministerial Conference on Nuclear Energy , both global energy demand and interest in nuclear power have continued to grow. Most of the 30 countries already using nuclear energy plan to expand their output. More than 60 countries - mostly in the developing world - have informed the IAEA that they might be interested in launching nuclear power programmes. Of these, 12 countries are actively considering nuclear power. The biggest change since the March 2005 Paris conference - one which none of us could have foreseen then - has been the global economic crisis. There is much discussion about what effect this unprecedented crisis will have on plans for nuclear energy. I have no doubt that this will play an important part in your deliberations in the next three days. It seems likely that the crisis could delay the implementation or expansion of nuclear power programmes in some countries for a limited period. But it is clear that, in the medium and long term, global demand for energy will continue to increase significantly as countries everywhere seek to improve living standards. Although nuclear power is not a panacea for all the world's energy problems, it will continue to play an important role in the global energy mix. The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's high projection is for global nuclear power capacity to grow by around 66 percent by 2030

  16. International safeguards and nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moglewer, S.

    1987-01-01

    This report provides a critical review of the effectiveness of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards against potential acts of nuclear terrorism. The author argues that IAEA safeguards should be made applicable to deterring diversions of nuclear materials from civil to weapons purposes by subnational groups as well as by nations. Both technical and institutional factors are considered, and suggestions for organizational restructuring and further technical development are made. Awareness of the necessity for effective preventive measures is emphasized, and possible directions for further effort are suggested

  17. Lessons Learned from Nuclear Energy System Assessments (NESA) Using the INPRO Methodology. A Report of the International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-11-01

    The International Project on Innovative Nuclear Reactors and Fuel Cycles (INPRO) was initiated in 2001 on the basis of a resolution of the IAEA General Conference in 2000 (GC(44)/RES/21). INPRO activities have since been continuously endorsed by resolutions of IAEA General Conferences and by the General Assembly of the United Nations. The objectives of INPRO are to: Help ensure that nuclear energy is available to contribute, in a sustainable manner, to meeting the energy needs of the 21st century; Bring together technology holders and users so that they can consider jointly the international and national actions required for achieving desired innovations in nuclear reactors and fuel cycles. INPRO is proceeding in steps. In its first step, referred to as Phase 1, 2001 to 2006, INPRO developed a set of basic principles, user requirements and criteria together with an assessment method, which taken together, comprise the INPRO methodology for the evaluation of innovative nuclear energy systems. To provide additional guidance in using the INPRO methodology an INPRO Manual was developed; it is comprised of an overview volume and eight additional volumes covering the areas of economics, infrastructure, waste management, proliferation resistance, physical protection, environment, safety of reactors, and safety of the nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Based on a decision of the 9 INPRO steering committee in July 2006, INPRO has entered into Phase 2. This phase has three main directions of activity: methodology improvement, infrastructure/institutional aspects and collaborative projects. As of March 2009, INPRO had 28 members: Argentina, Armenia, Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, China, Czech Republic, France, Germany, India, Indonesia, Japan, Republic of Korea, Morocco, Netherlands, Pakistan, the Russian Federation, Slovakia, South Africa, Spain, Switzerland, Turkey, Ukraine, United States of America and the European Commission. This IAEA-TECDOC is part of

  18. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dow, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    It was the risk of contamination of ships from the Pacific atmospheric atomic bomb tests in the 1940's that seems first to have set insurers thinking that a limited amount of cover would be a practical possibility if not a commercially-attractive proposition. One Chapter of this book traces the early, hesitant steps towards the evolution of ''nuclear insurance'', as it is usually called; a term of convenience rather than exactitude because it seems to suggest an entirely new branch of insurance with a status of its own like that of Marine, Life or Motor insurance. Insurance in the field of nuclear energy is more correctly regarded as the application of the usual, well-established forms of cover to unusual kinds of industrial plant, materials and liabilities, characterised by the peculiar dangers of radioactivity which have no parallel among the common hazards of industry and commerce. It had, and still has, the feature that individual insurance underwriters are none too keen to look upon nuclear risks as a potential source of good business and profit. Only by joining together in Syndicates or Pools have the members of the national insurance markets been able to make proper provision for nuclear risks; only by close international collaboration among the national Pools have the insurers of the world been able to assemble adequate capacity - though still, even after thirty years, not sufficient to provide complete coverage for a large nuclear installation. (author)

  19. International nuclear agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miatello, A.; Severino, R.

    1988-01-01

    This multilingual glossary, in the laborious compilation of which the authors have been greatly assisted by a group of professional translators and experts, presents for the first time a substantial number of entries in four languages (English, French, German and Italian), whose terminology and phraseology, all bearing the appropriate normative reference, has been drawn from the official text of the most relevant international agreements on nuclear policy. It is complemented by a thorough critical study on the status of nonproliferation by Lawrence Scheinman and Josef Pilat. Librarians, translators and interpreters as well as scholars and researchers in international law will find this volume a reference tool of specific interest

  20. The ICRP 66 Internal Radiation Exposure Control and Dose Evaluation of The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pang, H. F.; Hwang, W. S.; Chiu, J. H.

    2004-07-01

    The Atomic Energy Council (AEC) is the regulatory body of ionization radiation protection in Taiwan. To effectively control the safety in ionization radiation, AEC brought into force the Ionization Radiation Protection Act on 1 February, 2003 with clear statements of the penalty for violating the Law. The Article 5 of the Act provides: In order to limit the radiation exposure from radiation sources or practices, the Competent Authority shall refer to the latest standards of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to lay down the Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation. Thus, AEC is going to draft new safety standards of ionization radiation protection of Taiwan according to ICRP Publication 60. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), the governmental institute working on ionization radiation research in Taiwan, took the responsibility of assisting AEC in establishing guidelines on the control of internal radiation exposure and responding to the regulations in the new standards as soon as possible. So, according to the recommendations of ICRP Publications 60, 66,67,68,69,71,78,88, and IAEA Safety Standard Series No. RS-G- 1.1 and 1.2, INER undertook researches on the internal radiation exposure control and dose evaluations for INER's radiation workers as well as dose evaluations for the general public. The research accomplishments not only can be the reference of AEC when making new standards, but also can be followed by other radiation protection businesses. (Author) 23 refs.

  1. The ICRP 66 Internal Radiation Exposure Control and Dose Evaluation of The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, H. F.; Hwang, W. S.; Chiu, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Council (AEC) is the regulatory body of ionization radiation protection in Taiwan. To effectively control the safety in ionization radiation, AEC brought into force the Ionization Radiation Protection Act on 1 February, 2003 with clear statements of the penalty for violating the Law. The Article 5 of the Act provides: In order to limit the radiation exposure from radiation sources or practices, the Competent Authority shall refer to the latest standards of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to lay down the Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation. Thus, AEC is going to draft new safety standards of ionization radiation protection of Taiwan according to ICRP Publication 60. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), the governmental institute working on ionization radiation research in Taiwan, took the responsibility of assisting AEC in establishing guidelines on the control of internal radiation exposure and responding to the regulations in the new standards as soon as possible. So, according to the recommendations of ICRP Publications 60, 66,67,68,69,71,78,88, and IAEA Safety Standard Series No. RS-G- 1.1 and 1.2, INER undertook researches on the internal radiation exposure control and dose evaluations for INER's radiation workers as well as dose evaluations for the general public. The research accomplishments not only can be the reference of AEC when making new standards, but also can be followed by other radiation protection businesses. (Author) 23 refs

  2. Nuclear energy dictionary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1978-03-15

    This book is a dictionary for nuclear energy which lists the technical terms in alphabetical order. It adds four appendixes. The first appendix is about people involved with nuclear energy. The second one is a bibliography and the third one is a checklist of German, English and Korean. The last one has an index. This book gives explanations on technical terms of nuclear energy such as nuclear reaction and atomic disintegration.

  3. Nuclear energy dictionary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    This book is a dictionary for nuclear energy which lists the technical terms in alphabetical order. It adds four appendixes. The first appendix is about people involved with nuclear energy. The second one is a bibliography and the third one is a checklist of German, English and Korean. The last one has an index. This book gives explanations on technical terms of nuclear energy such as nuclear reaction and atomic disintegration.

  4. Nuclear energy in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villota, C. de

    2007-01-01

    Carlos Villota. Director of Nuclear Energy of UNESA gave an overview of the Spanish nuclear industry, the utility companies and the relevant institutions. Companies of the nuclear industry include firms that produce heavy components or equipment (ENSA), manufacturers of nuclear fuel (ENUSA), engineering companies, the National Company for Radioactive Waste Management (ENRESA), and nuclear power plants (nine units at seven sites). Nuclear energy is a significant component of the energy mix in Spain: 11% of all energy produced in Spain is of nuclear origin, whilst the share of nuclear energy in the total electricity generation is approximately 23%. The five main players of the energy sector that provide for the vast majority of electricity production, distribution, and supply have formed the Spanish Electricity Industry Association (UNESA). The latter carries out co-ordination, representation, management and promotion tasks for its members, as well as the protection of their business and professional interests. In the nuclear field, UNESA through its Nuclear Energy Committee co-ordinates aspects related to nuclear safety and radiological protection, regulation, NPP operation and R and D. Regarding the institutional framework of the nuclear industry, ENSA, ENUSA and ENRESA are controlled by the national government through the Ministry of Economy and Finance and the Ministry of Science and Technology. All companies of the nuclear industry are licensed by the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (MITYC), while the regulatory body is the Nuclear Safety Council (CSN). It is noteworthy that CSN is independent of the government, as it reports directly to Parliament. (author)

  5. Soft energy vs nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    During the early 1960s, a plentiful, inexpensive supply of petroleum enabled Japanese industry to progress rapidly; however, almost all of this petroleum was imported. Even after the first oil crisis of 1973, the recent annual energy consumption of Japan is calculated to be about 360 million tons in terms of petroleum, and actual petroleum forms 73% of total energy. It is necessary for Japan to reduce reliance on petroleum and to diversify energy resources. The use of other fossil fuels, such as coal, LNG and LPG, and hydraulic energy, is considered as an established alternative. In this presentation, the author deals with new energy, namely soft energy and nuclear energy, and discusses their characteristics and problems. The following kinds of energy are dealt with: a) Solar energy, b) Geothermal energy, c) Ocean energy (tidal, thermal, wave), d) Wind energy, e) Biomass energy, f) Hydrogen, g) Nuclear (thermal, fast, fusion). To solve the energy problem in future, assiduous efforts should be made to develop new energy systems. Among them, the most promising alternative energy is nuclear energy, and various kinds of thermal reactor systems have been developed for practical application. As a solution to the long-term future energy problem, research on and development of fast breeder reactors and fusion reactors are going on. (author)

  6. Nuclear insurance in the future Internal Market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Stein, J.

    1991-01-01

    Summarizing, it is prognosticated that nuclear insurance practice will not drastically change on account of the Internal Market. This assumption is based on the unanimous estimation of the nuclear energy risk by the international insurance industry, as is documented by their traditional good cooperation in pools. (orig.) [de

  7. International cooperation for establishment and use of nuclear energy in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiendick, K.

    1980-01-01

    The study concept presented here is neither intended to put forward arguments for or against nuclear power, nor to promote the nuclear option, but to - provide a realistic basis for the decision (which in the end might turn out to be 'no'), - outline the preparatory measures in case of a positive decision, - assure optimum domestic industry and engineering participation. (orig./RW)

  8. Nuclear energy data 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    This new edition of Nuclear Energy Data, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of essential statistics on nuclear energy in OECD countries, offers projections lengthened to 2030 for the first time and information on the development of new centrifuge enrichment capacity in member countries. The compilation gives readers a comprehensive and easy-to-access overview of the current situation and expected trends in various sectors of the nuclear fuel cycle, providing authoritative information to policy makers, experts and academics working in the nuclear energy field

  9. Nuclear fission energy: new build, operation, fuel cycle and decommissioning in the international perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niessen, Stefan [AREVA GmbH, Erlangen (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Over 60 nuclear power reactors are in construction today and over 400 are connected to the grid. The presentation will show where. A nuclear new build project involves a team of several thousand people. Some pictures from ongoing new build projects will illustrate this. Using concrete examples from the AREVA group, the nuclear fuel cycle from uranium mines in Niger, Kazakhstan or Canada to chemical conversion, enrichment and fuel manufacturing will be explained. Also the recycling of used fuel and the fabrication of MOX fuel is addressed. The presentation closes with an overview on decommissioning and final storage projects.

  10. International nuclear panorama; Panorama nucleaire international

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This document takes stock on the nuclear power in the world. The nuclear power place in the energy policy of many countries is discussed and the development programs are presented. It seems that the USA attitude, favourable to a development of nuclear power plants, had an real impact on the other countries energy policy. (A.L.B.)

  11. Thirteen international workshop on nuclear theory. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This brochure contains the abstracts of reports delivered by 40 participants at the 13. International Workshop on Nuclear Theory organized by the Nuclear Theory Group in the Institute for Nuclear research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian academy of Sciences. The main topics treated in the lectures were nucleon correlation effects in nuclei, collective nuclear motions, Wigner quantum systems, pre-equilibrium neutron and photon emission from nuclei, particle-nuclei collision processes at high energies, few-body states, optical potential for neutron-nucleus scattering, relativistic generator coordinate calculations and variational nuclear structure calculations. All reports are included in INIS separately

  12. Book of presentations. Tokyo Tech COE-INES. Indonesia international symposium 2005. 'Prospect of nuclear energy in Indonesia'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The symposium of the title was organized by the 21st Century COE Program, Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems for Sustainable Development of the World, the Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech COE-INES), the Bandung Institute of Technology (ITB), and the National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN). The symposium included presentations of 21 from Japan 24 from Indonesia and discussions on innovative nuclear energy systems and on a number of topics related to nuclear energy, including long-term policies and regulation for its development. Students from Japan and Indonesia played an important role in the symposium, presenting excellent work and discussion on their research topics as well as participating in very fruitful panel discussions on 'Education in Nuclear Field' and 'Attractiveness of Jobs in the Nuclear Field'. (J.P.N.)

  13. Life sciences: Nuclear medicine, radiation biology, medical physics, 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-11-01

    The catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with Life Sciences issued during the period 1980-1994. The publications are grouped in the following chapters: Nuclear Medicine (including Radiopharmaceuticals), Radiation Biology and Medical Physics (including Dosimetry)

  14. Nuclear and radiological safety. 1986-1998. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with nuclear and radiological safety issued from 1986 to 1998. Publications are sorted according to the following subjects: Uranium mining and milling; Fuel fabrication and storage; Nuclear power plants; Research reactors; Radiation sources and accelerators; Transport of radioactive material; Waste repositories; Radiation protection; Accident response; Radioactive waste management; Safety analysis; Quality management; Legal and governmental aspects

  15. Nuclear and radiological safety. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with nuclear and radiological safety issued from 1990 to 2001. Publications are sorted according to the following subjects: Uranium mining and milling. Fuel fabrication and storage. Nuclear power plants. Research reactors. Radiation sources and accelerators. Transport of radioactive material. Waste repositories. Radiation protection. Accident response. Radioactive waste management. Safety analysis. Quality management. Legal and governmental aspects

  16. Nuclear and radiological safety. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA dealing with nuclear and radiological safety issued from 1990 to 2001. Publications are sorted according to the following subjects: Uranium mining and milling. Fuel fabrication and storage. Nuclear power plants. Research reactors. Radiation sources and accelerators. Transport of radioactive material. Waste repositories. Radiation protection. Accident response. Radioactive waste management. Safety analysis. Quality management. Legal and governmental aspects.

  17. How much can nuclear energy do about global warming? (To be published in 'International Journal for Global Energy Issues')

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, Andre; Blees, Tom; Breon, Francois-Marie; Prevot, Henri; Richet, Sebastien; Schneeberger, Michael; Brook, Barry W.; Hansen, Philippe; Grover, Ravi; Guet, Claude; Liu, Weiping; Livet, Frederic; Nifenecker, Herve; Petit, Michel; Pierre, Gerard; Safa, Henri; Salvatores, Massimo; Zhou, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    The reference framework MESSAGE devised by the 'International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA), Austria' is one of the two frameworks reported by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) as potentially able to limit the global surface temperature increase to 2 degrees Celsius (RCPi 2.6). To achieve this, it proposes the use of massive deployment of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), dealing with tens of billion tons of CO 2 . However, present knowledge of this process rests on a few experiments at the annual million tons level, with global storage capacity not yet established as being adequate. The use of CCS is limited to 24 billion tons/y, based on the assumption of either a large-scale development of nuclear energy between 2060 and 2100 or else a severe contraction of energy supply. It includes three potential scenarios: 'Supply' with a high energy consumption, 'Efficiency' which implies the end of nuclear energy, paid for by a decrease in energy consumption of 45% with respect to the 'Supply scenario', and the intermediary 'MIX' scenario. All three scenarios propose a high contribution of solar energy and biomass. In the 'Supply' scenario 7000 GWe nuclear power start operation between 2060 and 2100. Since technical requisites for nuclear energy exist today (which is the case neither for massive CCS nor for extensive use of intermittent renewable electricity production), here we propose, as a variant of the MESSAGE framework, to initiate a sustained deployment of nuclear production in 2020, rather than 2060, reaching a total nuclear power around 20,000 GWe by the year 2100. We study in detail how such a deployment is physically possible with the generalization of breeder reactors. It appears that such a large-scale deployment needs significant improvement in the throughput of reprocessing or a switch from a PWR dominated nuclear fleet to a fleet equilibrated between PWR

  18. Informing parliamentarians on nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This publication contains a selection of the papers presented at an international seminar on informing parliamentarians in the nuclear field. This seminar has been organized by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency to respond to important information needs. As a matter of fact, providing clear and accurate information to decision-makers is a key element that contributes to the quality of work for legislation for a safe use of nuclear energy. The sessions dealt with : meeting the information needs of parliamentarians and other elected representatives on nuclear energy questions, actors and their respective roles in the information process, means and tools for communicating information on nuclear energy, case studies in communication with elected officials. Abstracts have been prepared for all of the papers in this volume. (TEC)

  19. Whither the legal control of nuclear energy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, Peter

    1995-01-01

    International nuclear trade is governed by the regime of legal control of nuclear energy, nuclear materials, knowledge of nuclear processes and weapons. Nuclear trade is under pinned by international agreements concerning physical protection and safeguards, the control of nuclear weapons, the protection of nuclear materials from terrorist action and third part liability. The political and geographical boundary changes of the past two years have significantly altered the background against which this regime has developed. Such changes have affected nuclear trade. The paper summarised the legal control of nuclear energy between States, identifies the areas of change which may affect this regime and the consequences for international trade. Conclusions are drawn as to the development of the international legal control of nuclear energy. (author). 21 refs

  20. International Symposium on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-03-01

    Nuclear Regulatory Authority of the Slovak Republic and the Embassy of Japan in the Slovak Republic, under the auspices of the Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign and European Affairs Mr Lajcak organized International Symposium on Nuclear Safety on 14 and 15 March 2013. The symposium took place almost exactly two years after the occurrence of accidents at the Japanese nuclear power plant Fukushima Daichi. The main mission of the symposium was an attempt to contribute to the improvement of nuclear safety by sharing information and lessons presented by Japanese experts with experts from the region, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the European Commission. The aim of the symposium, unlike many other events organized in connection with the events in Fukushima Daichi NPP, was a summary of the results of stress tests and measures update adopted by the international community, especially within Europe. Panel discussion was included to the program of the symposium for this aim was, mainly focused on the current state of implementation of the National Action Plan of the Slovak Republic, the Czech Republic, Poland, Ukraine and Switzerland and the IAEA Action Plan.

  1. International nuclear technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cartwright, P.; Rocchio, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    Light water reactors (LWRs), originally developed in the United States, became the nuclear workhorses for utilities in Europe and Japan largely because the U.S. industry was willing and able to transfer its nuclear know-how abroad. In this international effort, the industry had the encouragement and support of the U.S. governement. In the case of the boiling water reactor (BWR) the program for technology transfer was developed in response to overseas customer demands for support in building local designs and manufacturing capabilities. The principal vehicles have been technology exchange agreements through which complete engineering and manufacturing information is furnished covering BWR systems and fuel. Agreements are held with companies in Germany, Japan, Italy, and Sweden. In recent years, a comprehensive program of joint technology development with overseas manufacturers has begun. The rapidly escalating cost of nuclear research and development make it desirable to minimize duplication of effort. These joint programs provide a mechanism for two or more parties jointly to plan a development program, assign work tasks among themselves, and exchange test results. Despite a slower-than-hoped-for start, nuclear power today is playing a significant role in the economic growth of some developing countries, and can continue to do so. Roughly half of the 23 free world nations that have adopted LWRs are developing countries

  2. Argentine nuclear energy standardization activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boero, Norma; Corcuera, Roberto; Palacios, Tulio A.; Hey, Alfredo M.; Berte, G.; Trama, L.

    2004-01-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) has more than 200 Technical Committees that develop technical standards. During April 2004 took place in Buenos Aires the 14th Plenary of the ISO/TC 85 Nuclear Energy Committee. During this Plenary issues as Nuclear Terminology, Radiation Protection, Nuclear Fuels, Nuclear Reactors and Irradiation Dosimetry was dealt with. 105 International delegates and 45 National delegates (belonging to CNEA, ARN, NASA, INVAP, CONUAR, IONICS and other organizations) attended the meetings. During this meeting ISO/TC 85 changed its scope; the new scope of the Committee is 'Standardization in the fields of peaceful applications of nuclear energy and of the protection of individuals against all sources of ionizing radiations'. This work summarizes the most important advances and resolutions about the development of standards taken during this meeting as well as the main conclusions. (author) [es

  3. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakacs, Istvan; Czeizel, Endre; Hajdu, Janos; Marx, Gyoergy.

    1984-01-01

    The text of a round-table discussion held on the occasion of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of neutron is given. The participants were the Chief Engineer of the Paks Nuclear Power Plant, the first nuclear power plant in Hungary started in November 1982, a geneticist treating the problems of genetic damages caused by nuclear and chemical effects, a nuclear physicist and a journalist interested in the social aspects of nuclear energy. They discussed the political, economical and social problems of nuclear energy in the context of its establishment in Hungary. (D.Gy.)

  4. A handbook of nuclear energy. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michaelis, H.

    1982-01-01

    With this new edition of his book 'Nuclear energy', first edited in 1977, which is extremely enlarged and brought up to date, the author has given an overall picture of nuclear energy in which the physical and technical basis and the industrial, economic and environmental aspects of nuclear energy are discussed in a systematic outline. In this second volume the topics of nuclear fuel cycle, safety and environment, and international policies against the proliferation of nuclear weapons are discussed. (UA) [de

  5. Speaking of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1992-01-01

    At the 1989 International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conference, the Japanese Government pledged an extra-budgetary contribution for a three-year enhanced public information programme. On this basis the programme was developed centering on a series of two-day regional media seminars. It was determined that these seminars were to be informative and educational, and provide balanced, honest background material on the subject of nuclear energy. The speakers chosen were a mix of IAEA and outside experts from around the world. About 500 participants from 20 countries took part over the initial three years of the programme. This document contains a selection of speeches and topics that, is believed, captured the essence of the information presented during the regional seminars

  6. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luescher, E.

    1982-01-01

    This book originated in the training courses for teachers of grammar- and secondary schools in Dillingen (Bavaria). The aim of these courses is to become informed about the latest state in one field of physics. The lectures are well-known experts in the respective fields. In the latest study (1980) of the National Academy of Sciences the experts came to the conclusion that without further development nuclear power plants the utilization of too much coal would become necessary and involve irreversible environmental damage (see chapter 6). There are two important obstacles impeding the further extension of nuclear energy. The first problem to be solved is the processing and storage of radioactive waste. This is a more technical task and can be treated in a satisfactory way. The second obstacle is less easy to take as the population has to be convinced that a nuclear power plant can be operated with almost unbelievable safety (see chapter 5) and be shut down safely in the case of incidents. The most promising possibility of controlled nuclear fusion as energy source is still many decades- if feasible at all- away from being performed (see chapter. 7). In the Soviet Union 25% of the electric energy production shall be proceed from nuclear power plants by the year 1990. (orig./GL) [de

  7. Statement of participants at the International Conference on Can Slovakia secure energy supply and sustainable development without nuclear?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikus, T.; Suchomel, J.

    2004-01-01

    The participants at the Conference called on decision makers both in the European Union (EU) and in Slovakia to provide fair treatment to nuclear power compared with other energy sources, especially with renewable, without prejudice to nuclear safety. This implies ensuring equality in terms of economics, tax, and accounting for externalities. The participants called on the Slovak government to initiate studies that compare the full life-cycle costs, impacts and risks, across the spectrum of energy sources and uses. They should also internalize the external costs. The participants called for a debate on the Slovak energy needs, taking into account the environmental impact of all potential sources of energy and the costs of providing electricity from those sources, and in addition a rational and objective analysis of the security of supply of those sources. It is necessary to have a range of sources for electricity generation that are cost effective and reliable, and respect the environment. The Slovak economy cannot withstand a sudden loss of its guaranteed energy supply. The participants believe that the major government role is setting overall policy for the economy, energy and the environment, with an adequate base in legislation and institutional competence. The Slovak government should have clear strategies for achieving self-sufficient energy-policy goals with reserve power and for meeting climate-change and air-quality goals. The Conference concluded that the nuclear option should remain open in Slovakia, as part of a balanced energy mix, in line with developments abroad and the EU Green Paper from 2000; the alternative is Slovak's failure to secure an affordable energy supply for its citizens. The participants supported the completion of Mochovce 3, 4, complying with enhanced safety requirements, as the most effective option. In Slovenske elektrarne, a.s. (SE) privatization, the government should insist on as large an involvement of Slovak firms in the

  8. Nuclear energy questions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work pack contains illustrated booklets entitled: 'Uranium mining'; 'Reactors and radiation'; 'Nuclear waste'; 'Work book on energy'; 'Alternatives now'; 'Future energy choices'; 'Resources handbook'; and 'Tutors' guidelines': a map entitled 'Nuclear power in Britain': and two coloured pictures entitled 'Nuclear prospects' and 'Safe energy'. A cover note states that the material has been prepared for use in schools and study groups. (U.K.)

  9. Germany bars nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaullier, V.

    1999-01-01

    Germany wants a future without nuclear energy, the different steps about the going out of nuclear programs are recalled. The real choice is either fossil energies with their unquestionable safety levels but with an increase of the greenhouse effect or nuclear energy with its safety concerns and waste management problems but without pollutant emission. The debate will have to be set in most European countries. (A.C.)

  10. International aspects of nuclear accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uematsu, K.

    1989-09-01

    The accident at Chernobyl revealed that there were shortcomings and gaps in the existing international mechanisms and brought home to governments the need for stronger measures to provide better protection against the risks of severe accidents. The main thrust of international co-operation with regard to nuclear safety issues is aimed at achieving a uniformly high level of safety in nuclear power plants through continuous exchanges of research findings and feedback from reactor operating experience. The second type of problem posed in the event of an accident resulting in radioactive contamination of several countries relates to the obligation to notify details of the circumstances and nature of the accident speedily so that the countries affected can take appropriate protective measures and, if necessary, organize mutual assistance. Giving the public accurate information is also an important aspect of managing an emergency situation arising from a severe accident. Finally, the confusion resulting from the unwarranted variety of protective measures implemented after the Chernobyl accident has highlighted the need for international harmonization of the principles and scientific criteria applicable to the protection of the public in the event of an accident and for a more consistent approach to emergency plans. The international conventions on third party liability in the nuclear energy sector (Paris/Brussels Conventions and the Vienna Convention) provide for compensation for damage caused by nuclear accidents in accordance with the rules and jurisdiction that they lay down. These provisions impose obligations on the operator responsible for an accident, and the State where the nuclear facility is located, towards the victims of damage caused in another country

  11. The International Atomic Energy Agency's Laboratories Seibersdorf and Vienna. Meeting the challenges of research and international co-operation in the application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippl, E.

    1999-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency therefore maintains a unique, multidisciplinary, analytical, research and training centre: the IAEA Laboratories, located at Seibersdorf near Vienna and at the Agency's Headquarters in the Vienna International Centre. They are organized in three branches: (i) the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory: Soil Science, Plant Breeding, Animal Production and Health, Entomology, Agrochemicals; (ii) the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory: Chemistry, Instrumentation, Dosimetry, Isotope Hydrology; (iii) the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Isotopic Analysis, Chemical Analysis, Clean Laboratory. 'The Mission of the IAEA Laboratories is to contribute to the implementation of the Agency's programmes in food and agriculture, human health, physical and chemical sciences, water resources, industry, environment, radiation protection and safeguards verification'. Together with a General Services and Safety Section, which provides logistics, information, industrial safety and maintenance services and runs a mechanical workshop, the three groups form the 'Seibersdorf Laboratories' and are part of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. The Laboratories contribute an important share to projects fostering peaceful applications of radiation and isotopes and radiation protection, and play a significant part in the nuclear verification mechanism. All activities are therefore planned and implemented in close co-operation with relevant divisions and departments of the IAEA. In specific sectors, the Laboratories also operate in conjunction with other organizations in the UN system, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and with networks of national laboratories in Member States

  12. IAEA and the international nuclear law development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jankowitsh, O.

    1996-01-01

    This paper summarizes the different objectives of the IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) as far as nuclear energy use is concerned. It presents the status of the organization, its action int the non-proliferation treaty, and its work on the safeguard regulations. These measures have been taken during the Convention on nuclear safety in 1994. This convention concerns nuclear power plants as well as storage of radioactive wastes. (TEC)

  13. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobajima, Makoto; Shimooka, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Yasumasa; Fujii, Yasuhiko; Misima, Tsuyoshi

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear energy has a strong relation to a society. However, due to accidents and scandals having occurred in recent years, people's reliability to nuclear energy has significantly swayed and is becoming existence of a worry. Analyzing such a situation and grasping the problem contained are serious problems for people engaging in nuclear field. In order that nuclear energy is properly used in society, communication with general public and in nuclear power plant site area are increasingly getting important as well as grasping the situation and surveying measures for overcoming the problems. On the basis of such an analysis, various activities for betterment of public acceptance of nuclear energy by nuclear industry workers, researchers and the government are proposed. (J.P.N.)

  14. International energy annual 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-02-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power, geothermal, solar, and wind electric power, biofuels energy for the US, and biofuels electric power for Brazil. New in the 1996 edition are estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from the consumption of petroleum and coal, and the consumption and flaring of natural gas. 72 tabs.

  15. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. S.; Lee, M. K.; Moon, K. H.; Nam, J. H.; Noh, B. C.; Kim, H. R.

    2008-12-01

    The concerns on the global warming issues in the international community are bringing about a paradigm shift in the national economy including energy technology development. In this connection, the green growth mainly utilizing green technology, which emits low carbon, is being initiated by many advanced countries including Korea. The objective of the study is to evaluate the contribution to the national economy from nuclear energy attributable to the characteristics of green technology, to which nuclear energy belongs. The study covers the role of nuclear in addressing climate change issues, the proper share of nuclear in the electricity sector, the cost analyses of decommissioning and radioactive waste management, and the analysis on the economic performance of nuclear R and D including cost benefit analysis

  16. Applications of nuclear energy in future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sitek, J.; Necas, V.

    2012-01-01

    Concepts and international frames of generation IV nuclear reactors. A review of use of nuclear energy for non electric applications especially in areas such as seawater desalination, hydrogen production, district heating and other industrial applications. (Author)

  17. The International Atomic Energy Agency's safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    2000-01-01

    A system of international safeguards has been established to provide assurance that nuclear materials in civilian use are not diverted from their peaceful purpose. The safeguards system is administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency/Department of Safeguards and devolves from treaties and other international agreements. Inspectors from the Agency verify reports from States about nuclear facilities by audits, observation, and measurements. (author)

  18. Canadian involvement in international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, Jon.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1945 Canada has been actively involved in the development of an international consensus on measures to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. In parallel with this involvement, Canada has entered into cooperation agreements with several countries under which nuclear materials, equipment and facilities have been supplied in connection with the medical, industrial, agricultural and electrical power applications of nuclear energy. This paper summarizes the actions taken by Canada to encourage the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to avoid the spread of nuclear weapons [fr

  19. Canadian involvement in international nuclear cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennekens, J.

    1981-01-01

    Since 1945 Canada has been actively involved in the development of an international consensus on measures to prevent the proliferation of nuclear weapons. In parallel with this involvement, Canada has entered into cooperative agreements with several countries under which nuclear materials, equipment and facilities have been supplied in connection with the medical, industrial, agricultural and electrical power applications of nuclear energy. This paper summarizes the actions taken by Canada to encourage the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and to avoid the spread of nuclear weapons. (author)

  20. International Nuclear Information System 25 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behrens, H.; Prinz, H.

    1996-01-01

    In May 1970, the first information was published in the International Nuclear Information System (Inis). This makes Inis the first system in the world to establish a decentralized international database. In creating Inis, the International Atomic Energy Agency wanted to promote the exchange of information about the peaceful uses of nuclear energy among its members. References to the nuclear literature were to be compiled in the most complete way possible. The number of IAEA member countries participating in Inis has increased from an original 38 to 90, that of international organizations, from 12 to 17. The database holds more than 1.8 million documentation units; stocks grow by some 75,000 units annually. The German literature about nuclear research and nuclear technology is collected, evaluated and entered into Inis by the Fachinformationszentrum Karlsruhe. (orig.) [de

  1. Introduction to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    After some descriptions about atoms, fission and fusion, explanations are given about the functioning of a nuclear power plant. The safety with the different plans of emergency and factors that lead to a better nuclear safety are exposed, then comes a part for the environmental protection; the fuel cycle is tackled. Some historical aspects of nuclear energy finish this file. (N.C.)

  2. Nuclear energy technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buden, David

    1992-01-01

    An overview of space nuclear energy technologies is presented. The development and characteristics of radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG's) and space nuclear power reactors are discussed. In addition, the policy and issues related to public safety and the use of nuclear power sources in space are addressed.

  3. International nuclear fuel cycle evaluation (INFCE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlupp, C.

    1986-07-01

    The study describes and analyzes the structures, the procedures and decision making processes of the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation (INFCE). INFCE was agreed by the Organizing Conference to be a technical and analytical study and not a negotiation. The results were to be transmitted to governments for their consideration in developing their nuclear energy policies and in international discussions concerning nuclear energy cooperation and related controls and safeguards. Thus INFCE provided a unique example for decision making by consensus in the nuclear world. It was carried through under mutual respect for each country's choices and decisions, without jeopardizing their respective fuel cycle policies or international co-operation agreements and contracts for the peaceful use of nuclear energy, provided that agreed safeguards are applied. (orig.)

  4. International energy outlook, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This report presents the current Energy Information Administration (EIA) assessment of the long-term outlook for international energy markets. This and other EIA reports are provided as a statistical service for use by managers and international energy analysts, not as a Government energy plan. Current US Government policies and foreign government policies are assumed to hold over the projection interval, which extends to the year 2010

  5. Nuclear energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skjoeldebrand, R.

    1994-01-01

    The thesis of this paper is that the world will need more energy and not less in the coming decades but that this enormous energy consumption entails dangers to the environment not only locally but regionally and internationally through the emissions from the burning of fossil fuels which now provide 85% of the world's commercial energy supply. The solution to this problem is nuclear power. It does not contribute to global warming. 12 figs

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahim Mohd Nor

    1985-01-01

    A review on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its relation with Malaysia is given. This article also discusses the background history of IAEA, its organization and functions in the field of nuclear energy

  7. Economic Analysis of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Han Myung; Lee, M. K.; Moon, K. H.; Kim, S. S.; Lim, C. Y.; Song, K. D.; Oh, K. B.

    2002-12-01

    This study deals with current energy issues, environmental aspects of energy, project feasibility evaluation, and activities of international organizations. Current energy issues including activities related with UNFCCC, sustainable development, and global concern on energy issues were surveyed with focusing on nuclear related activities. Environmental aspects of energy includes various topics such as, inter- industrial analysis of nuclear sector, the role of nuclear power in mitigating GHG emission, carbon capture and sequestration technology, hydrogen production by using nuclear energy, Life Cycle Analysis as a method of evaluating environmental impacts of a technology, and spent fuel management in the case of introducing fast reactor and/or accelerator driven system. Project feasibility evaluation includes nuclear desalination using SMART reactor, and introduction of COMFAR computer model, developed by UNIDO to carry out feasibility analysis in terms of business attitude. Activities of international organizations includes energy planning activities of IAEA and OECD/NEA, introduction of the activities of FNCA, one of the cooperation mechanism among Asian countries. In addition, MESSAGE computer model was also introduced. The model is being developed by IAEA to effectively handle liberalization of electricity market combined with environmental constraints

  8. Nuclear energy and security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blejwas, Thomas E.; Sanders, Thomas L.; Eagan, Robert J.; Baker, Arnold B.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear power is an important and, the authors believe, essential component of a secure nuclear future. Although nuclear fuel cycles create materials that have some potential for use in nuclear weapons, with appropriate fuel cycles, nuclear power could reduce rather than increase real proliferation risk worldwide. Future fuel cycles could be designed to avoid plutonium production, generate minimal amounts of plutonium in proliferation-resistant amounts or configurations, and/or transparently and efficiently consume plutonium already created. Furthermore, a strong and viable US nuclear infrastructure, of which nuclear power is a large element, is essential if the US is to maintain a leadership or even participatory role in defining the global nuclear infrastructure and controlling the proliferation of nuclear weapons. By focusing on new fuel cycles and new reactor technologies, it is possible to advantageously burn and reduce nuclear materials that could be used for nuclear weapons rather than increase and/or dispose of these materials. Thus, the authors suggest that planners for a secure nuclear future use technology to design an ideal future. In this future, nuclear power creates large amounts of virtually atmospherically clean energy while significantly lowering the threat of proliferation through the thoughtful use, physical security, and agreed-upon transparency of nuclear materials. The authors must develop options for policy makers that bring them as close as practical to this ideal. Just as Atoms for Peace became the ideal for the first nuclear century, they see a potential nuclear future that contributes significantly to power for peace and prosperity

  9. Vienna International Centre Library Film and Video Catalogue: Peaceful applications of nuclear energy 1928-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-12-31

    The catalogue lists films and videos which are available on free loan from Vienna International Centre Library for educational, non-commercial, non-profit showings involving no admission charges or appeals for funds. Much of the material listed has been donated to the IAEA by the Governments of Member States. The items are arranged in the catalogue by number. The catalogue also includes a title index and a subject index

  10. Vienna International Centre Library Film and Video Catalogue: Peaceful applications of nuclear energy 1928-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The catalogue lists films and videos which are available on free loan from Vienna International Centre Library for educational, non-commercial, non-profit showings involving no admission charges or appeals for funds. Much of the material listed has been donated to the IAEA by the Governments of Member States. The items are arranged in the catalogue by number. The catalogue also includes a title index and a subject index

  11. Radioactivity and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, J.; Kuczera, B.

    2001-05-01

    The terms radioactivity and nuclear energy, which have become words causing irritation in the political sphere, actually represent nothing but a large potential for innovative exploitation of natural resources. The contributions to this publication of the Karlsruhe Research Center examine more closely three major aspects of radioactivity and nuclear energy. The first paper highlights steps in the history of the discovery of radioactivity in the natural environment and presents the state of the art in health physics and research into the effects of exposure of the population to natural or artificial radionuclides. Following contributions focus on: Radiochemical methods applied in the medical sciences (diagnostic methods and devices, therapy). Nuclear energy and electricity generation, and the related safety policies, are an important subject. In this context, the approaches and pathways taken in the field of nuclear science and technology are reported and discussed from the angle of nuclear safety science, and current trends are shown in the elaboration of advanced safety standards relating to nuclear power plant operation and ultimate disposal of radioactive wastes. Finally, beneficial aspects of nuclear energy in the context of a sustainable energy policy are emphasized. In particular, the credentials of nuclear energy in the process of building an energy economy based on a balanced energy mix which combines economic and ecologic advantages are shown. (orig./CB) [de

  12. Nuclear energy in view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    This leaflet advertises the availability of the following from UKAEA: film and video titles (nuclear fuel cycle; energy for all; power from the atom; using radioactivity; fast reactor; energy - the nuclear option; principles of fission; radiation); slide-tape packs (16 titles); other information services. (U.K.)

  13. Nuclear energy, economy, ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffaes, C.

    1995-01-01

    As its operating role, its economic competitiveness and its technological control in the area of nuclear energy, the France has certainly to take initiatives in a nuclear renewal activity. The France is criticized in the world for its exclusive position about nuclear energy, but it is well situated to attract attention on the coal risks and particularly about its combustion for environment. (N.C.)

  14. Senate report n. 327 law project authorizing the approbation of international agreements on the civil liability in the domain of the nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this law project is to approve two protocols aiming to modify the OECD convention on the civil liability in the nuclear energy domain. After a short presentation of the international regime of civil liability in the nuclear domain with the Paris and Vienna conventions, the author analyzes the main improvements offered by the two protocols of February 2004 facing the french legislation. (A.L.B.)

  15. Nuclear energy inquiries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1993-02-01

    Our choice of energy sources has important consequences for the economy and the environment. Nuclear energy is a controversial energy source, subject to much public debate. Most individuals find it difficult to decide between conflicting claims and allegations in a variety of technical subjects. Under these circumstances, knowledge of various relevant inquiries can be helpful. This publication summarizes the composition and major findings of more than thirty nuclear energy inquiries. Most of the these are Canadian, but others are included where they have relevance. The survey shows that, contrary to some claims, virtually every aspect of nuclear energy has been subject to detailed scrutiny. The inquiries' reports include many recommendations on how nuclear energy can be exploited safely, but none rejects it as an acceptable energy source when needed. (Author) 38 refs

  16. Nuclear Energy Data 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants declined in 2012 as a result of operational issues at some facilities and suspended operation at all but two reactors in Japan. Nuclear safety was further strengthened in 2012 following safety reviews prompted by the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant accident. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix pursued initiatives to increase nuclear generating capacity. In Turkey, plans were finalised for the construction of the first four reactors for commercial electricity production. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Statlinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link [fr

  17. An easy explanation book on glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Du Hwan; Seo, Gyeong Won

    2011-03-01

    This book mentions about 260 words of nuclear energy, which include general term of nuclear energy, nuclear reactor, nuclear fuel and technique for concentration, using of nuclear energy, radiation and measurement, radwaste disposal, development plan on nuclear energy and international bodies. This book is useful for students studying nuclear energy and radiation and those who are interested in nuclear field to research in easy access.

  18. Energy - politics - history. National and international energy politics since 1945

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hohensee, J.; Salewski, M.

    1993-01-01

    All articles focus on historical aspects of the development of energy politics in the Federal Republic of Germany (energy enconomy and industry, hard coal, nuclear energy). Some articles also look at international developments (oil boycott, Saudia Arabias's oil policies, International Energy Agency). (UA) [de

  19. Is nuclear energy justifiable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roth, E.

    1988-01-01

    This is a comment on an article by Prof. Haerle a theologist, published earlier under the same heading, in which the use of nuclear energy is rejected for ethical reasons. The comment contents the claim mode by the first author that theologists, because they have general ethical competency, must needs have competency to decide on the fittest technique (of energy conversion) for satisfying, or potentially satisfying, the criteria of responsible action. Thus, an ethical comment on, for instance, nuclear energy is beyond the scope of the competency of the churches. One is only entitled as a private person to objecting to nuclear energy, not because of one's position in the church. (HSCH) [de

  20. International nuclear power status 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2002-04-01

    This report is the eighth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2001, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Nuclear terrorism; 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2000); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2001; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  1. International nuclear power status 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2003-03-01

    This report is the ninth in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2002, the report contains: 1) General trends in the development of nuclear power; 2) Decommissioning of the nuclear facilities at Risoe National Laboratory: 3) Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 2001); 4) An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2002; 5) The development in West Europe; 6) The development in East Europe; 7) The development in the rest of the world; 8) Development of reactor types; 9) The nuclear fuel cycle; 10) International nuclear organisations. (au)

  2. Nuclear energy today

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    Energy is the power of the world's economies, whose appetite for this commodity is increasing as the leading economies expand and developing economies grow. How to provide the energy demanded while protecting our environment and conserving natural resources is a vital question facing us today. Many parts of our society are debating how to power the future and whether nuclear energy should play a role. Nuclear energy is a complex technology with serious issues and a controversial past. Yet it also has the potential to provide considerable benefits. In pondering the future of this imposing technology, people want to know. - How safe is nuclear energy? - Is nuclear energy economically competitive? - What role can nuclear energy play in meeting greenhouse gas reduction targets? - What can be done with the radioactive waste it generates? - Does its use increase the risk of proliferation of nuclear weapons? - Are there sufficient and secure resources to permit its prolonged exploitation? - Can tomorrow's nuclear energy be better than today's? This publication provides authoritative and factual replies to these questions. Written primarily to inform policy makers, it will also serve interested members of the public, academics, journalists and industry leaders. (author)

  3. Nuclear energy: the opinion of future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathis, Agostino; Monti, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    The article described the international programs for development of nuclear systems of new generation for energy production with which many countries have started the development of new concepts of nuclear reactors to put in production in the next decades in order to protect the environment. At last it comes made the aspects of economy of nuclear energy [it

  4. Perspectives for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baugnet, J.-M.; Abderrahim, H.A.; Dekeyser, J.; Meskens, G.

    1998-09-01

    In Belgium, approximately 60 percent of the produced electricity is generated by nuclear power. At present, nuclear power production tends to stagnate in Europe and North America but is still growing in Asia. The document gives an overview of the present status and the future energy demand with emphasis on electric power. Different evaluation criteria including factors hindering and factors promoting the expansion of nuclear power as well as requirements of new nuclear power plants are discussed. The extension of the lifetime of existing facilities as well as fuel supply are taken into consideration. A comparative assesment of nuclear power with other energy sources is made. The report concludes with estimating the contribution and the role of nuclear power in future energy demand as well as with an overview of future reactors and research and development programmes

  5. Annual report of the international nuclear energy research initiative OSMOSE project (FY06).

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klann, R. T.; Hudelot, J. P.; Drin, N.; Zhong, Z.; Nuclear Engineering Division; Commissariat a l Energie Atomique

    2007-08-29

    The goal of the OSMOSE program is to measure the reactivity effect of minor actinides in known neutron spectra of interest to the Generation-IV reactor program and other programs and to create a database of these results for use as an international benchmark for the minor actinides. The results are then compared to calculation models to verify and validate integral absorption cross-sections for the minor actinides. The OSMOSE program includes all aspects of the experimental program--including the fabrication of fuel pellets and samples, the oscillation of the samples in the MINERVE reactor for the measurement of the reactivity effect, reactor physics modeling of the MINERVE reactor, and the data analysis and interpretation of the experimental results.

  6. International Nuclear Information System in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samsurdin Ahamad

    1984-01-01

    Practice of the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) in Malaysia is reviewed. The Nuclear Energy Unit, a participating representative of Malaysia, holds the responsibilities of disseminating information through this system. Its available services relevant to the aims of INIS are discussed

  7. Nuclear Energy Data - 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting the status of nuclear power in the OECD area. Information provided by member country governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projected generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants remained steady in 2013 despite the progressive shutdown of all reactors in Japan leading up to September and the permanent closure of six reactors in the OECD area. Governments committed to maintaining nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for increasing nuclear generating capacity, and progress was made in the development of deep geological repositories for spent nuclear fuel, with Finland expected to have the first such facility in operation in the early 2020's. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'StatLinks'. For each StatLink, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  8. Nuclear Energy Data - 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on installed generating capacity, total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, nuclear energy policies and fuel cycle developments, as well as projections of nuclear generating capacity and electricity production to 2035, where available. Total electricity generation at nuclear power plants and the share of electricity production from nuclear power plants increased slightly in 2015, by 0.2% and 0.1%, respectively. Two new units were connected to the grid in 2015, in Russia and Korea; two reactors returned to operation in Japan under the new regulatory regime; and seven reactors were officially shut down - five in Japan, one in Germany and one in the United Kingdom. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects progressing in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports. This publication contains 'Stat Links'. For each Stat Link, the reader will find a URL which leads to the corresponding spreadsheet. These links work in the same way as an Internet link. (authors)

  9. Communication dated 16 July 2008 received from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning an International Initiative on 3S-Based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 16 July 2008 from the Resident Representative of Japan attaching a document entitled 'International Initiative on 3S-based Nuclear Energy Infrastructure'. The communication, and as requested therein, its attachment, are circulated herewith for information

  10. International Nuclear Physics Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    We are pleased to announce that the 26th International Nuclear Physics Conference (INPC2016) will take place in Adelaide (Australia) from September 11-16, 2016. The 25th INPC was held in Firenze in 2013 and the 24th INPC in Vancouver, Canada, in 2010. The Conference is organized by the Centre for the Subatomic Structure of Matter at the University of Adelaide, together with the Australian National University and ANSTO. It is also sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by a number of organisations, including AUSHEP, BNL, CoEPP, GSI and JLab. INPC 2016 will be held in the heart of Adelaide at the Convention Centre on the banks of the River Torrens. It will consist of 5 days of conference presentations, with plenary sessions in the mornings, up to ten parallel sessions in the afternoons, poster sessions and a public lecture. The Conference will officially start in the evening of Sunday 11th September with Registration and a Reception and will end late on the afternoon of Fri...

  11. Nuclear Energy Literature Review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simic, Z.; Wastin, F.

    2016-01-01

    In the light of five years after a major accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant it is interesting to make nuclear energy related literature review. There is a number of accidents related reports from all major international institutions (like the IAEA and OECD NEA) and research organizations have drawn conclusions and lessons to learn from this terrible accident. These reports are the result of expert and scientific analyses carried out during these five years and they present ideal sources for both understanding what has happened and what can be learned in order to avoid and mitigate effects of such events in the future. From a wider perspective it is also interesting to analyze the impact on research and development (R and D) activities. This literature review is performed with hope to gain some useful insights from the analysis of the volume and topics in all research activities related to the Fukushima accident and nuclear energy (NE) altogether. This kind of review should at least provide an overview of trends and provide base for better planning of future activities. This paper analyzes the published NE related research of over more than 50 years with focus on three major nuclear accidents (TMI, Chernobyl and Fukushima). It has been performed using Scopus tools and database, and mainly focuses on statistics related to the subjects, countries, keywords and type of publishing. It also analyses how responsive is nuclear energy related R and D regarding the volume and subjects, and how is that research spread among most active countries. Nuclear power accidents influence increase and change of research. Both accidents, Chernobyl and Fukushima had maximum share in all nuclear power related papers at similar yearly level (9 percent in 1991 and 12 percent in 2015 respectively). TMI peaked at the 2.5 percent share in 1982. Engineering is the most frequent subjects for TMI and cumulative NE related publishing. Medicine and environmental science subjects

  12. Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Report of 'the 2014 international forum on peaceful use of nuclear energy, nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security. Future direction toward promoting non-proliferation and the ideal method of developing human resources using Centers of Excellence (COEs) following the new strategic energy plan'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, Chikanobu; Tomikawa, Hirofumi; Kobayashi, Naoki; Naoi, Yosuke; Oda, Tetsuzo; Mochiji, Toshiro

    2015-10-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) held 'International Forum on Peaceful Use of Nuclear Energy, Nuclear Non-proliferation and Nuclear Security – Future direction toward promoting non-proliferation and the ideal method of developing human resources using Centers of Excellence (COEs) following the New Strategic Energy Plan -' on 3 December 2014, with the Japan Institute of International Affairs (JIIA) and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo, and International Nuclear Research Center, Tokyo Institute of Technology as co-hosts. In the Forum, officials and experts from Japan, the United States explained their efforts regarding peaceful use of nuclear energy, nuclear non-proliferation and nuclear security. Discussion was made in two panels, entitled 'Effective and efficient measures to ensure nuclear non-proliferation based on domestic and foreign issues and the direction and role of technology development' and 'Roles of nuclear security COEs and future expectations'. In Panel Discussion 1, as the nuclear non-proliferation regime is facing various problems and challenges under current international circumstances, how to implement effective and efficient safeguards was discussed. In Panel Discussion 2, panelists discussed the following three points: 1. Current status of Nuclear Security Training and Support Centers and COEs, and Good Practice; 2. What these centers can do to enhance nuclear security (New role for COEs); 3. Regional cooperation in the Nuclear Security Training and Support Center (NSSC) and COEs in states, which the IAEA recommends establishing, and international cooperation and partnerships with international initiatives (New Role). Officials and experts from Japan, IAEA, the United States, France, Republic of Korea, and Indonesia participated in the panel and made contributions to active discussion. This report includes abstracts of keynote speeches, summaries of two panel discussions and materials of the

  14. Nuclear Energy Data - 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear Energy Data is the Nuclear Energy Agency's annual compilation of statistics and country reports documenting nuclear power status in NEA member countries and in the OECD area. Information provided by governments includes statistics on total electricity produced by all sources and by nuclear power, fuel cycle capacities and requirements, and projections to 2035, where available. Country reports summarise energy policies, updates of the status in nuclear energy programs and fuel cycle developments. In 2016, nuclear power continued to supply significant amounts of low-carbon baseload electricity, despite strong competition from low-cost fossil fuels and subsidised renewable energy sources. Three new units were connected to the grid in 2016, in Korea, Russia and the United States. In Japan, an additional three reactors returned to operation in 2016, bringing the total to five under the new regulatory regime. Three reactors were officially shut down in 2016 - one in Japan, one in Russia and one in the United States. Governments committed to having nuclear power in the energy mix advanced plans for developing or increasing nuclear generating capacity, with the preparation of new build projects making progress in Finland, Hungary, Turkey and the United Kingdom. Further details on these and other developments are provided in the publication's numerous tables, graphs and country reports

  15. The nuclear energy debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hardy, D.

    1984-01-01

    We have not been able to obtain closure in the nuclear energy debate because the public perception of nuclear energy is out of sync with reality. The industry has not been about to deal with the concerns of those opposed to nuclear energy because its reaction has been to generate and disseminate more facts rather than dealing with the serious moral and ethical questions that are being asked. Nuclear proponents and opponents appeal to different moral communities, and those outside each community cannot concede that the other might be right. The Interfaith Program for Public Awareness of Nuclear Issues (IPPANI) has been formed, sponsored by members of the Jewish, Baha'i, Roman Catholic, United, and Anglican faiths, to provide for a balanced discussion of the ethical aspects of energy. (L.L.)

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its role in world-wide security of nuclear fuels and facilities and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1976-01-01

    This article outlines the wide range of the Agency's concerns in both promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and ensuring that it is safely used with minimal risk of damage to man and his environment. This latter aspect includes measures against diversion to military purposes, theft or sabotage. There is a marked tendency to leave the promotion of nuclear energy to industry and commerce, and for many regional and national nuclear energy authorities to become increasingly absorbed in its safety and regulatory aspects--the ultimate aim being the establishment of a world nuclear law. This trend will certainly also be reflected in the Agency's program and will gain strength as time goes on. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency is sharply differentiated from national authorities in the industrial countries and from most regional nuclear energy authorities by the fact that its program must continue to reflect the needs of the developing nations which constitute a majority of its Member States. These nations--most of which are ''energy hungry''--need the Agency's help to benefit from the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology

  17. Nuclear energy and jobs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldfinger, N.

    1976-01-01

    Mr. Goldfinger, Research Director of AFL-CIO, examines the problem of energy in general, nuclear in particular, and the employment relationship. The energy shortages in the U.S. and its dependence on oil are cited. Directly connected with this serious problem relating to energy are jobs, income, and living standards. If energy is not available, industries will be unable to expand to meet the needs of the growing population; and prices of goods will rise. From an evaluation of what experts have said, Mr. Goldfinger concludes that increased coal production and better coal technology cannot meet energy demands; so the sharp increase both in volume and as a percentage of total energy needed in the future will have to come from nuclear power. Development of alternative sources is necessary, he feels, and intense research on these is needed now. The employment impact in the nuclear energy scenario is analyzed according to the trades involved. It is estimated that 1.5 million jobs in the nuclear industry would be open by the year 2000 if nuclear is to provide one-fourth of energy supplies. The employment picture, assuming abandonment of nuclear energy, is then discussed

  18. Utilisation of nuclear energy and coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-01-01

    Following the views and experiences presented at an International Energy Conference held in November 1980 in Lisbon under the title ''Energy - A challenge for undertakings'', the Energy Commission of the International Chamber of Commerce has prepared a document which details the most important conclusions and makes recommendations. The costs and advantages are evaluated of nuclear energy and of coal. (P.G.R.)

  19. A study on a strategic participation in a new International Framework for Nuclear Energy Cooperation(IFNEC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jae Soo; Lee, Kwang Seok; Lee, Han Myung; Jun, Eun Ju; Lee, Byung Wook; Lee, Dong Hoon; Oh, Keun Bae; Ko, Won ll; Lim, Chae Young

    2011-11-15

    The objective of the study is to analyze the current status and future direction of a new IFNEC, and to establish the national strategy for effective participation in IFNEC. To this end, the contents of this study are to compare former GNEP with a new IFNEC, to analyze the major contents and trend of the IFNEC, to examine the concept of Cradle to Grave (CTG) in nuclear fuel supply, and to establish the national strategy for effective participation in IFNEC including CTG. The result of this study may be used for contribution to strengthening the international nuclear cooperation and to promote the national nuclear activities.

  20. International energy annual 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-04-01

    The International Energy Annual presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 220 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy reported in the International Energy Annual includes hydroelectric power and geothermal, solar, and wind electric power. Also included are biomass electric power for Brazil and the US, and biomass, geothermal, and solar energy produced in the US and not used for electricity generation. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed of primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values (Appendices E and F) familiar to the American public. 93 tabs.

  1. International safeguards and international nuclear trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felten, P.

    1991-01-01

    A particular feature of nuclear trade is the need to ensure a good equilibrium between technology transfer and the requirements linked to non proliferation of nuclear weapons. The recent dramatic changes that occurred on the international scene have particularly underlined the difficulty to reach this equilibrium, reminding us the fragility of the existing order and the responsibility of the nuclear community in the field of non-proliferation. Consequently, there is a need for an international thorough review of the actual non proliferation tools developed until now. This review could lead to reconsider some of the dogmas upon which the present safeguard system is based

  2. Towards an International Approach to Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomihiro Taniguchi

    2006-01-01

    This document presents in a series of transparencies the different activities of the IAEA: Introduction of International Atomic Energy Agency, Changing world, Changing Technology, Changing Global Security, Developing Innovative Nuclear Energy Systems, Global Nuclear Safety Regime, IAEA Safety Standards: Hierarchy - Global Reference for Striving for Excellence, IAEA Safety Reviews and Services: Integrated Safety Approach, Global Knowledge Network - Asian Nuclear Safety Network, Safety Issues and Challenges, Synergy between Safety and Security, Recent Developments: Safety and Security of Radioactive Sources, Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material (CPPNM), Incident and Emergency Preparedness and Response, Holistic Approach for Safety and Security, Sustainable Development. (J.S.)

  3. International conference: nuclear power for the 21 st century; Conference internationale: L'energie nucleaire au 21. siecle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    It is widely recognised that global energy demand will rise substantially during this century. The increased industrialization and urbanization of developing countries will produce large increases in energy demand in regions that currently have very low per capita energy use. This increasing demand for energy will need to be met in order to improve living standards for at least half of the world population and to reduce the economic imbalances between countries and regions. At the same time the use of fossil fuel based energy is identified as a major cause of environmental damage. The release of greenhouse gases from burning of fossil fuel in power stations and for transport is seen as a contributor to global warming. It is widely recognised that continued exploitation of fossil fuels and release of carbon dioxide will need to be controlled. After a prolonged period of slow development of nuclear power, confined to some countries in the world, it is now being recognised that nuclear energy has a potentially significant role to play in meeting the energy needs of the planet without damaging the environment. Developments in technology make the economics of nuclear power more attractive, and they may become even more so as fossil fuel prices continue to rise.or a widespread use of nuclear power, however, there remain concerns on the safety, security, waste and proliferation aspects. The global application of safety standards and appropriate security measures are required to ensure acceptable levels of protection. Effective control measures are required to ensure that non-proliferation commitments are honored. Handling nuclear waste safely and securely is achievable, but continues to remain as a public concern. The broad strategic objectives of the Conference are the following: to review the role of nuclear power and to define the potential benefits (energy security, sustainability and improved environmental protection) that expanding nuclear power offers to meet the

  4. Nuclear and energies nr 57. Japan, another glance. The environmental and radiological impact. The international impact. The illusion of renewable energies in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lenail, B.

    2011-07-01

    The contributions of this publication first address the Japanese local context (organization, mentality, cultural background, thinking and action modes), and secondly the environmental and radiological impact of the Fukushima accident, notably in comparison with Chernobyl (contamination is much more localized, sometimes higher; a larger concerned population but quicker and more efficient protection measures; more severe consequences due to population displacement). The third article discusses the international impact of the accident: known or foreseen consequences on nuclear programs, discussion on safety strengthening and on governance, evolution of public opinion, possible consequences on climate negotiations. The last article proposes an overview of the current situation of Japan which must mobilize all the available energy resources to face the difficulties in electricity supply

  5. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Program. Part 2: Analysis of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Ordonez, Felix Barajas; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed a program, named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), to help its Member States to check the status of their nuclear medicine practices and their adherence to international reference standards, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine, including quality assurance/quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmacy (further subdivided into levels 1, 2, and 3, according to complexity of work), radiation safety, clinical applications, as well as managerial aspects. The QUANUM program is based on both internal and external audits and, with specifically developed Excel spreadsheets, it helps assess the level of conformance (LoC) to those previously defined quality standards. According to their level of implementation, the level of conformance to requested standards; 0 (absent) up to 4 (full conformance). Items scored 0, 1, and 2 are considered non-conformance; items scored 3 and 4 are considered conformance. To assess results of the audit missions performed worldwide over the last 8 years, a retrospective analysis has been run on reports from a total of 42 audit missions in 39 centers, three of which had been re-audited. The analysis of all audit reports has shown an overall LoC of 73.9 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), ranging between 56.6% and 87.9%. The highest LoC has been found in the area of clinical services (83.7% for imaging and 87.9% for therapy), whereas the lowest levels have been found for Radiopharmacy Level 2 (56.6%); Computer Systems and Data Handling (66.6%); and Evaluation of the Quality Management System (67.6%). Prioritization of non-conformances produced a total of 1687 recommendations in the final audit report. Depending on the impact on safety and daily clinical activities, they were further classified as critical (requiring immediate action; n = 276; 16% of the total); major (requiring action in relatively short time, typically from 3 to 6 months; n = 604

  6. Axiology of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawada, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear energy was born in World War II and it has grown within the regime of Cold War. When the Cold War came to the end around early 1990 s, we who have benefited by the development of nuclear energy must have been challenged with a new tide of civilization change. Although it has not been so much closely questioned since then, such a new movement, that was submerging, abruptly manifested on September 11, 2001. Then, many of us realized that global circumstances, especially concerned with security, must have actually changed with the reordering of the world basic structures. This paper describes on the thoughts to reveal the cause and background of the event on September 11 with the linkage to nuclear energy development, or nuclear civilization in pursuit of the future regime of nuclear in harmonization with the global society in 21st century. (author)

  7. Development of nuclear energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakeham, John [Secretary of State for Energy, London (UK)

    1991-06-01

    The Government's views on the development of nuclear energy are outlined. In this country, we continue to see some important advantages in maintaining nuclear power generation. It increases diversity, and so helps to maintain security of energy supply. It does not produce greenhouse gases or contribute to acid rain. But it is equally clear that nuclear costs must be brought under control whilst at the same time maintaining the high standards of safety and environmental protection which we have come to expect in the UK. The three main elements which the nuclear industry must address in the future are summarized. First the costs of nuclear generation must be reduced. Secondly, once the feasibility and costings of PWRs have been established consideration must be given to the choices for the future energy policy and thirdly new reactor designs should be standardized so the benefits of replication can be realised. (author).

  8. Nuclear power - international and national dimensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanev, Ya.

    1994-01-01

    A strong internationalization of nuclear problems is observed recently. International links have acted as a powerful force for improvement of safety standards and plant performance. The prospects for nuclear industry, its safety and excellent operation, its acceptance and tolerance from society in general will strongly influence the future of nuclear power generation in Bulgaria. The most important problems of Bulgarian nuclear energy are: implementation of safety upgrading program; building and operating new nuclear units; developing infrastructure which will permit safe and reliable operation of the existing units and solve the fuel cycle problems in a reliable and acceptable by the society manner. (I.P.)

  9. Standards: An international framework for nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Versteeg, J.

    2000-01-01

    The IAEA, uniquely among international organizations concerned with the use of radiation, radioactive materials and nuclear energy, has statutory functions to establish safety standards and to provide for their application in Member States. The IAEA also contributes towards another major element of the 'global safety culture', namely the establishment of legally binding international agreements on safety related issues. (author)

  10. The nuclear: a vital choice for energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, M.

    1980-01-01

    This paper read from the platform of the 13th annual session of the International Agency of Atomic Energy is a plea in favour of the development of nuclear energy. The majority of the reports of enquiry conclude by underlining the sane and efficient character of nuclear reactors. To face up to the energy crisis, France has decided to increase tenfold its production of nuclear energy between 1975 and 1985 -Future prospects [fr

  11. International nuclear trade and nonproliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potter, W.C.

    1990-01-01

    The purpose of this book, the culmination of one phase of an ongoing international research project on nuclear suppliers and nonproliferation, is to explore the international political and economic dimensions of nuclear trade, especially as they pertain to the behavior of eleven emerging nuclear-supplier states. More specifically, the book sets forth a conceptual framework for analyzing international nuclear trade; details the domestic and external factors that shape the nuclear export policies of Argentina, Brazil, India, Israel, Japan, Pakistan, the People's Republic of China, South Korea, South Africa, Spain and Taiwan; and identifies and assesses alternative strategies for containing the new proliferation risks posed by these emerging suppliers. The book also describes an innovative effort to utilize a computer-based system for tracking international nuclear trade

  12. Environmentalists for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comby, B.

    2001-01-01

    Fossil fuels such as coal oil, and gas, massively pollute the Earth atmosphere (CO, CO 2 , SOX, NOX...), provoking acid rains and changing the global climate by increasing the greenhouse effect, while nuclear energy does not participate in these pollutions and presents well-founded environmental benefits. Renewable energies (solar, wind) not being able to deliver the amount of energy required by populations in developing and developed countries, nuclear energy is in fact the only clean and safe energy available to protect the planet during the 21 century. The first half of the book, titled The Atomic Paradox, describes in layman language the risks of nuclear power, its environmental impact, quality and safety standards, waste management, why a power reactor is not a bomb, energy alternatives, nuclear weapons, and other major global and environmental problems. In each case the major conclusions are framed for greater emphasis. Although examples are taken from the French nuclear power program, the conclusions are equally valid elsewhere. The second half of the book is titled Information on Nuclear Energy and the Environment and briefly provides a historical survey, an explanation of the different types of radiation, radioactivity, dose effects of radiation, Chernobyl, medical uses of radiation, accident precautions, as well as a glossary of terms and abbreviations and a bibliography. (author)

  13. Nuclear Energy and the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria).

    "Nuclear Energy and the Environment" is a pocket folder of removable leaflets concerned with two major topics: Nuclear energy and Nuclear Techniques. Under Nuclear Energy, leaflets concerning the topics of "Radiation--A Fact of Life,""The Impact of a Fact: 1963 Test Ban Treaty,""Energy Needs and Nuclear Power,""Power Reactor Safety,""Transport,"…

  14. Journalism and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, M.P.

    1987-01-01

    The question as to why nuclear energy is a point of friction between journalists and the expert community is discussed. The areas in which the two communities fail to communicate are highlighted and the opportunities that exist for improved nuclear journalism are identified briefly. (author)

  15. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, Pertti

    1989-03-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1989. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  16. Nuclear energy and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The applications of nuclear energy on medicine, as well as the basic principles of these applications, are presented. The radiological diagnosis, the radiotherapy, the nuclear medicine, the radiological protection and the production of radioisotopes are studied. (M.A.C.) [pt

  17. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, P.; Mattila, L.

    1990-08-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1990. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Utilities and industry also contribute to some projects

  18. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattila, L.; Vanttola, T.

    1991-10-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes the publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1991. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  19. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.

    1992-05-01

    The annual Research Programme Plan describes publicly funded nuclear energy related research to be carried out mainly at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1992. The research is financed primarily by the Ministry of Trade and Industry (KTM), the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and VTT itself. Other research institutes, utilities and industry also contribute to many projects

  20. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salminen, P.

    1988-02-01

    This annual Research Programme Plan covers the publicly funded nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) in 1988. The research will be financed by the Ministry of Trade and Industry, the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT itself

  1. Nuclear fuel cycle: international market, international constraints and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imai, R.

    1977-01-01

    Some of the constraints on the nuclear fuel cycle are ones arising from economic and financial reasons, those caused by uranium resources and their distribution, those arising from technical reasons, issues of public acceptance, and those quite independent of normal industrial considerations, but caused by elements of international politics. The nuclear fuel cycle and the international market, matters of nuclear non-proliferation, and international cooperation are discussed

  2. Nuclear energy: a reassessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClure, J.A.; Nader, R.; Udall, M.K.; Walske, C.

    1980-01-01

    This edited transcript of a televised American Enterprise Institute Public Poicy Forum explores the role of nuclear technology in energy production in the US today. A panel made up of Senator James A. McClure, Ralph Nader, Representative Morris K. Udall, and Dr. Carl Walske and moderated by John Charles Daly examines the lessons learned from the accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Plant and the public attitudes toward nuclear energy, particularly in light of this accident. The experts discuss alternative energy sources, such as coal, gas, biomass, and solar power as well as conservation and more efficient use of present facilities. The issues of nuclear waste disposal and transport and US commitments to countries not self-sufficient in their energy needs are also explored

  3. Nuclear energy in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    A country by country study of nuclear energy in the various European countries: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Czechoslovakia, Denmark, Federal German Republic, Finland, German Democratic Republic, Great Britain, Holland, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Rumania, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, USSR and Yugoslavia [fr

  4. Desalting and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burwell, Calvin C.

    1971-01-01

    Future use of nuclear energy to produce electricity and desalted water is outlined. Possible desalting processes are analyzed to show economic feasibility and the place in planning in world's economic growth. (DS)

  5. International nuclear service centers: a bibliography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petty, G.M.; Yokota, M.

    1978-03-01

    The literature relating specifically to international nuclear fuel service centers would appear to be relatively scarce, based on the results of searches of the Energy Data Base, the libraries of the University of California at Los Angeles, and The Rand Corporation, and other sources. Works specifically relating to international service centers are annotated in this bibliography. Also listed, without annotation, are studies of various kinds of multinational public enterprises. In addition, there are references to many of the studies of the one-nation nuclear energy center concept. Most of these resulted from the survey of possible sites for these centers mandated by the US Energy Reorganization Act of 1974

  6. Nuclear energy in Armenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gevorgyan, S.; Kharazyan, V.

    2000-01-01

    This summary represents an overview of the energy situation in Armenia and, in particular, the nuclear energy development during the last period of time. the energy sector of Armenia is one of the most developed economy branches of the country. The main sources of energy are oil products, natural gas, nuclear energy, hydropower, and coal. In the period of 1985-1988 the consumption of these energy resources varied between 12-13 million tons per year of oil equivalent. Imported energy sources accounted for 96% of the consumption. During the period 1993-1995 the consumption dropped to 3 million tons per year. Electricity in Armenia is produced by three thermal, one nuclear, and two major hydroelectric cascades together with a number small hydro units. The total installed capacity is 3558 MW. Nuclear energy in Armenia began its development during the late 1960's. Since the republic was not rich in natural reserves of primary energy sources and the only domestic source of energy was hydro resource, it was decided to build a nuclear power plant in Armenia. The Armenian Nuclear Power Plant (ANPP) Unit 1 was commissioned in 1996 and Unit 2 in 1980. The design of the ANPP was developed in 1968-1969 and was based on the project of Units 3 and 4 of the Novovoronezh NPP. Both units of the plant are equipped with reactors WWER-440 (V -270) type, which are also in use in some power stations in Russian Federation, Bulgaria, and Slovakia. Currently in Armenia, 36% of the total electricity production is nuclear power electricity. (authors)

  7. Nuclear energy and external constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lattes, R.; Thiriet, L.

    1983-01-01

    The structural factors of this crisis probably predominate over factors arising out the economic situation, even if explanations vary in this respect. In this article devoted to nuclear energy, a possible means of Loosering external constraints the current international economic environment is firstly outlined; the context in which the policies of industrialized countries, and therefore that of France, must be developed. An examination of the possible role of energy policies in general and nuclear policies in particular as an instrument of economic policy in providing a partial solution to this crisis, will then enable to quantitatively evaluate the effects of such policies at a national level [fr

  8. Nuclear energy and information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Baisong

    1996-01-01

    The information tells us that since the first chain reaction discovery about 50 years ago up to now, there are more than 400 commercial nuclear power plants connected to electricity supply net works. The electricity supplied by nuclear power plants has exceeded 2000 TWH, which represents almost 17% of the total electricity generated in the world and this proportion is still increasing. The accumulated operating experience of nuclear power plants reach more than 6000 reactor-year. Quite high average life time energy availability factors demonstrate the good reliability of nuclear power plants. The present status of the electricity development in the world shows that nuclear power has become an imperative and exclusively realistic alternative energy source. All of these information demonstrate that nuclear power as a safe, clean and less cost power source has already been widely accepted in the world. In Asia and Pacific region, the fast development of economy provides a vast possibility for the development of nuclear power. In China, shortage of electricity has become the 'bottle neck' which retards the economic development nowadays. China has already drawn up the plan for the development of nuclear power. The information is of great significance to promote the development of nuclear power. It could be said that without information, nuclear power could not be smoothly introduced in any country or region. (J.P.N.)

  9. That compromising nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mink, E.

    1981-01-01

    This book discusses a wide range of aspects of nuclear energy and its problems. Social and ideological as well as more technical sides of the nuclear controversy are dealt with. The author argues that just more information on the subject cannot solve the problem anyhow, as technologists naively hold. Being a christian, the author believes that the Bible can show us a way out, even as to these energy problems. (G.J.P.)

  10. Risk communication: Nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    The emphasis is put on communication processes, here in particular with regard to nuclear energy. Not so much dealt with are questions concerning political regulation, the constellation of power between those becoming active and risk perception by the population. Presented are individual arguments, political positions and decision-making processes. Dealt with in particular are safety philosophies, risk debates, and attempts to 'channel' all sides to the subject of nuclear energy. (DG) [de

  11. Deliberations about nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boskma, P.; Smit, W.A.; Vries, G.H. de; Dijk, G. van; Groenewold, H.J.; Jelsma, J.; Tans, P.P.; Doorn, W. van

    1975-01-01

    This report is a discussion of points raised in three safety studies dealing with nuclear energy. It reviews the problems that must be faced in order to form a safe and practical energy policy with regard to health and the environment (potential hazards, biological effects and radiation dose norms), the proliferation of nuclear weapons, reactor accidents (including their causes, consequences and evacuation problems that arise), the fallout and contamination problems, and security (both reactor security and national security)

  12. Trends of development for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Posner, E.

    1977-01-01

    The IAEA organized an 'International conference on nuclear power and its fuel cycle' from May 2-13, 1977 in Salzburg. It was attended by some 2000 participants from more than 60 IAEA member states as well as by delegates from numerous international organizations (EC Commission, COMECON, UNO Economy Commission for Europe, International Energy Agency, and others). The conference was to present a survey of 'Status and potential of nuclear energy with special emphasis on present and future limits and obstacles' and to demonstrate the future contribution of nuclear energy to assuring the world energy supply. (orig.) [de

  13. OCRWM International Cooperation in Nuclear Waste Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.; Levich, R.; Strahl, J.

    2002-01-01

    With the implementation of nuclear power as a major energy source, the United States is increasingly faced with the challenges of safely managing its inventory of spent nuclear materials. In 2002, with 438 nuclear power facilities generating electrical energy in 31 nations around the world, the management of radioactive material including spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste, is an international concern. Most of the world's nuclear nations maintain radioactive waste management programs and have generally accepted deep geologic repositories as the long-term solution for disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Similarly, the United States is evaluating the feasibility of deep geologic disposal at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. This project is directed by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), which has responsibility for managing the disposition of spent nuclear fuel produced by commercial nuclear power facilities along with U.S. government-owned spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. Much of the world class science conducted through the OCRWM program was enhanced through collaboration with other nations and international organizations focused on resolving issues associated with the disposition of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste

  14. 2. International conference on nuclear technologies of XXI centuries. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yakushev, A.P.

    2010-01-01

    The collection contains abstracts of the II International conference 'Nuclear technologies of the XXI century' on energy problems in the world, the prospects for nuclear power plant in Belarus, the various technological, technical and economic aspects of nuclear safety of NPP and nuclear reactions and international cooperation. The materials published in electronic form.

  15. Nuclear energy in the service of development and peace: the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency. New Delhi, 19 February 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at a meeting held at the India Habitat Centre, New Delhi, 19 February 1999. The following aspects from the Agency's activity are presented to emphasize its role in the use of nuclear energy for development and peace: nuclear power for electricity production, nuclear safety, transfer of nuclear technologies through the technical co-operation programme, safeguards and verification including the strengthened safeguards system, present verification activities and future prospects of verification, illicit trafficking of nuclear materials and other radioactive sources

  16. Nuclear technology international 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geary, Neville

    1987-01-01

    A total of 59 articles cover a wide range of subjects within the scope of nuclear power generation. The first 13 are concerned with the design and construction of nuclear reactors - PWRs, AGRs, Magnox reactors, fast reactors. The final article in this section is on reactor decommissioning. The next 33 papers all concern services to the nuclear power industry. These include the supply of uranium, uranium enrichment, fuel fabrication, reprocessing, spent fuel storage, robotics and remote handling and radioactive waste disposal. The 13 articles in the safety and public acceptability section concern fears over the Chernobyl accident, safety aspects of nuclear power including risk assessment, fire protection, quality assurance, earthquake tolerance, non-proliferation of nuclear weapons and finally, general problems of balancing advances in nuclear technology and economic desirability against a lack of public confidence in the industry. All reactor and fuel types are represented. Most of the articles concern nuclear power in Europe or North America. All are indexed separately. (UK)

  17. Nuclear Energy, Long Term Requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    2006-01-01

    There are serious warnings about depletion of oil and gas and even more serious warnings about dangers of climate change caused by emission of carbon dioxide. Should developed countries be called to replace CO2 emitting energy sources as soon as possible, and the time available may not be longer then few decades, can nuclear energy answer the call and what are the requirements? Assuming optimistic contribution of renewable energy sources, can nuclear energy expand to several times present level in order to replace large part of fossil fuels use? Paper considers intermediate and long-term requirements. Future of nuclear power depends on satisfactory answers on several questions. First group of questions are those important for near and intermediate future. They deal with economics and safety of nuclear power stations in the first place. On the same time scale a generally accepted concept for radioactive waste disposal is also required. All these issues are in the focus of present research and development. Safer and more economical reactors are targets of international efforts in Generation IV and INPRO projects, but aiming further ahead these innovative projects are also addressing issues such as waste reduction and proliferation resistance. However, even assuming successful technical development of these projects, and there is no reason to doubt it, long term and large-scale nuclear power use is thereby not yet secured. If nuclear power is to play an essential role in the long-term future energy production and in reduction of CO2 emission, than several additional questions must be replied. These questions will deal with long-term nuclear fuel sufficiency, with necessary contribution of nuclear power in sectors of transport and industrial processes and with nuclear proliferation safety. This last issue is more political then technical, thus sometimes neglected by nuclear engineers, yet it will have essential role for the long-term prospects of nuclear power. The

  18. Nuclear energy in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, J.-H.

    2000-01-01

    The total electricity generated in 1998 was 215,300 GWh with 43,261 MWe of total installed capacity of electric power, while in 1978 when the first Nuclear Power Plant began operation it was 31,510 GWh with 6,916 MWe installed capacity. The share of nuclear power generation in 1998 increased up to 41.7%. Currently, 16 units of nuclear power are operating with an additional four units under construction. Nuclear power has contributed to enhancing energy security and supplying stable energy for Korea. The government's strong commitment to the nuclear power program together with a long-term national policy resulted in favorable conditions for KEPCO to manage the program and promote increasing levels of national participation in successive nuclear power projects. The role of nuclear power as a sustainable energy resource can not be emphasized enough with respect to global environmental issues. Increasing the share of nuclear power in the total installed capacity for electricity generation will undoubtedly play a very important role. (author)

  19. Problems relating to international transport of nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timm, U.E.

    1985-01-01

    Owing to the tremendous geographic distances between uranium deposits of interest, to the various degrees of sophistication of nuclear industry in industrialized countries and to the close international cooperation in the field of nuclear energy, safe international transports, physical protection and transport handling play an important role. It is suggested to better coordinate the activities of nuclear power plant operators, the nuclear industry and specialized transport companies with respect to all national and international issues of nuclear fuel transports. (DG) [de

  20. Meeting EU's energy needs through nuclear fission: synergy of public and private research in an international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, Yves

    2010-01-01

    For Generation II reactors, R and D is mainly oriented towards solving issues arising from operating experience. For Generation IV systems, R and D is mainly dedicated to concepts, design and safety demonstrations. For Generation III, one could consider that there is no real need for R and D because it is too late with respect to design choices and too early with respect to operating experience issues. But in fact, the Generation III plants which will be built between 2020 and 2050 will represent a large part of the fleet operated worldwide during most of the 21st century so that there is room for developments and innovations in a 'more sustainable' light water reactor. EDF has defined a two-step nuclear strategy: deployment of Generation III reactors in a first phase and, if necessary, of Generation IV systems in a second phase. Such a strategy is flexible thanks to the diversification of the energy mix and to the possibility to evolve from Generation III to Generation. IV nuclear systems. This flexibility is an asset to overcome the uncertainties of the long term future, as energy and electricity are major long term issues and require huge investments. It is particularly true for nuclear energy where the lifespan of equipment is very long. Finally, to prepare a future competitive, safe and sustainable nuclear energy, to enhance its public acceptation, huge and continuous R and D efforts are needed and expertise must be renewed. No country can face these challenges alone

  1. Nuclear energy and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Hinnawi, E.E.

    1980-01-01

    Chapters are presented concerning the environmental impact of mining and milling of radioactive ores, upgrading processes, and fabrication of nuclear fuels; environmental impacts of nuclear power plants; non-radiological environmental implications of nuclear energy; radioactive releases from nuclear power plant accidents; environmental impact of reprocessing; nuclear waste disposal; fuel cycle; and the future of nuclear energy

  2. Nuclear energy terms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    This is an English-Afrikaans / Afrikaans-English dictionary compiled by the Technical Language Committee of the Atomic Energy Board in collaboration with the Vaktaalburo of the Suid-Afrikaanse Akademie vir Wetenskap en Kuns containing 8515 terms on nuclear energy.

  3. Nuclear energy terms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This is an English-Afrikaans / Afrikaans-English dictionary compiled by the Technical Language Committee of the Atomic Energy Board in collaboration with the Vaktaalburo of the Suid-Afrikaanse Akademie vir Wetenskap en Kuns containing 8515 terms on nuclear energy

  4. Nuclear energy versus coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storm van Leeuwen, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis is given of the consequences resulting from the Dutch government's decision to use both coal and uranium for electricity production. The energy yields are calculated for the total conversion processes, from the mine to the processing of waste and the demolition of the installations. The ecological aspects considered include the nature and quantity of the waste produced and its effect on the biosphere. The processing of waste is also considered here. Attention is given to the safety aspects of nuclear energy and the certainties and uncertainties attached to nuclear energy provision, including the value of risk-analyses. Employment opportunities, the economy, nuclear serfdom and other social aspects are discussed. The author concludes that both sources have grave disadvantages and that neither can become the energy carrier of the future. (C.F.)

  5. Parliament and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laermann, K.H.

    1993-01-01

    The paper provides a historical review of the behaviour of Parliament in the discussion about utilizing nuclear energy. An analysis of the positions taken and reasons advanced so far is necessary, because it is only from its results that promising strategies appropriate to bring about a consensus can be derived. There is no doubt that it is a genuine task of the democratically legitimated bodies to strive for a consensus in energy policy, in particular nuclear energy, in the interest of the whole State, with the legislative, executive and economic bodies combining their efforts. The reservedness of Parliament is regrettable. At the moment, however, there is the positive effect of the discussion being revived. It should be conducted rationally in the joint interest of reaching a political consensus and, on that basis, a broad acceptance of nuclear energy utilization. (orig./HSCH) [de

  6. Nuclear energy and society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baiquni, A.

    1982-01-01

    A great deal of energy will be needed for industrial development. The risks of energy production can be either individual or social in nature. Individual risk occurs in different places and different times to individuals in a certain period of time. Social risk occurs to several people in a time. People tend to refuse a nuclear power plant because of its social risk. This attitude is based more on feelings than reason. In fact radiation from a nuclear power plant is only 0.15% while radiation from medical instruments and from the environment is 99%. From the safety, pollution effect, price, and uses point of view, it can be concluded that nuclear energy is the most appropriate energy to face the future of the nation. (RUW)

  7. September 11 and Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    2002-01-01

    The terrible September 11 attacks have demonstrated the ability of international terrorists to carry out well-planned and complex operations that can kill thousands of citizens. The potential for biological, chemical and nuclear terrorism has increased and will remain as long as their underlying causes. Nuclear installations could be the targets, or the sources of materials usable for terrorism. Whilst thick containment buildings around nuclear reactors are unlikely to be breached, some installations, such as spent fuel pond are more vulnerable. The safety of nuclear installations must be reconsidered taking into account some new initiating events hitherto considered of very low probability. A resistance against nuclear power plant sabotage by terrorist group penetrating into reactor building, is a controversial topic. Measures against diversion of nuclear materials, which could be used in nuclear terrorism, must be reviewed. The danger of diversion from giant military stocks of highly enriched uranium and plutonium by far exceeds that from peaceful use of nuclear energy. Measures to neutralize these stocks, such as dilution of highly enriched uranium, should be speeded up and have a priority in public concern. As for the nuclear power stations, public should be informed about the recommendations of IAEA for better physical protection of nuclear materials prepared in 1999 (INFCIRC 225/Rev.4) and about Additional protocol to inadequate Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Materials from 1980, which is in a process of ratification. For acceptable nuclear future public must be aware that all required measures to eliminate unacceptable risks resulting from terrorist activity against nuclear installations will be undertaken. (author)

  8. Fourteen international workshop on nuclear theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This brochure contains the abstracts of reports delivered by 30 participants at the 14. International Workshop on Nuclear Theory organized by the Nuclear Theory Group in the Institute for Nuclear research and Nuclear Energy of the Bulgarian academy of Sciences. The main topics treated in the lectures were short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations in nuclei, relativistic scaling in nuclear matter and finite nuclei, hadron structure in chiral quark-meson theory, residual interaction strength and surface effects in the multistep reaction calculations, theoretical and experimental studies of heavy ion collisions, quantum algebraic approach to nuclear collective properties, description of low-lying states in even-even nuclei, deformed oscillator potentials, studies of solar neutrinos by I-127 detectors and gamma-ray astronomy of ultra-high energies. All reports are included in INIS separately

  9. Freedom from nuclear energy myth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Wonsik

    2001-09-01

    This book generalizes the history of nuclear energy with lots of myths. The contents of this book are a fundamental problem of nuclear power generation, the myth that nuclear energy is infinite energy, the myth that nuclear energy overcomes the crisis of oil, the myth that nuclear energy is cheap, safe and clean, the myth that nuclear fuel can be recycled, the myth that nuclear technology is superior and the future and present of nuclear energy problem related radiation waste and surplus of plutonium.

  10. Nuclear Energy in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biro, L.

    2003-01-01

    The new energy approach towards nuclear, due to the growing political support at the beginning of this century, is the result of a complexity of economical, social, political and technological factors. The history of peaceful use of nuclear energy in Romania goes back 45 years. Considering the strategic importance of the energy sector in developing the national economy on sustainable basis, the sector evolution should be outlined through prognosis and strategies on different horizons of time, so that the development perspectives and the energy supply to be correctly estimated. This necessity is emphasized in the Governmental Program of the present administration, which takes into consideration Romanian Economic Strategy on medium term and also The Government Action Plan on 2000-2004, agreed with the European Commission. In order to implement the Governmental Program, the Ministry of Industries and Resources elaborates the National Energy Strategy. The Government Action Plan draw up the conclusion that Unit 2 from Cernavoda NPP must be finalized. This solution fits the least-cost energy development planning and answers to environment requirements. Romania became a Member State of the Agency in 1957. From the mid-1960s to the mid-1970s its technical co-operation program with the Agency covered mainly research in nuclear physics and some medical and other applications of radiation and isotopes. Since 1976, when the Romanian nuclear power program was embarking to use CANDU-type reactors, the Agency has supported mainly the activities related to the Cernavoda NPP. In the framework of the Romanian accession process to the European structures, CNCAN co-operates with European Commission for transposition of the communautaire acquis in the field of nuclear activities. Romania has had laws in place governing the regulation of nuclear activities since 1974. They were remained in force throughout and subsequent to the national constitutional changes started in 1989 until 1996

  11. Nuclear energy is promising

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spitz, H.

    2000-02-01

    This document summarizes the different talks given by the participants to the winter meeting on nuclear energy which took place in Germany on January 27 and 28 2000. Representatives of the following companies and organisations attended the meeting: Deutsches Atomforum e.V., Bayernwerk AG, IG Bergau, Chemie und Energie, Siemens AG - energy production, VEBA AG and one public opinion poll institute. (J.S.)

  12. Meeting EU's energy needs through nuclear fission: Synergy of public and private research in an international context

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bamberger, Yves; Hutin, Jean-Pierre; Delbecq, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Nuclear will play an important part in the world energy mix of tomorrow. → More R and D is necessary to make nuclear facilities safer, cleaner, more reliable and cost-effective. → Part of these R and D needs should be addressed through cooperation involving public and private sector. → Public-private cooperation is relevant for R and D relating to Gen 4 reactors but also for many Gen 2 and Gen 3 issues. → R and D program should also be helpful in maintaining appropriate expertise and competencies. - Abstract: The availability of an affordable and sustainable energy supply is becoming a major and growing concern for world's future. It is very likely that there is not one single solution to the problem but that it is necessary to call upon a whole set of means such as energy efficiency improvement, deployment of renewable energies, clean coal technologies including CO 2 capture and storage, nuclear development. Indeed, it is more and more recognized that nuclear energy offers a very effective way to contribute to this worldwide challenge. It can be a safe, clean, reliable and cost-effective source of energy, the price of which remaining quite stable. Although the 'generations' of nuclear systems are at different degrees of maturity, the scientific, technological and industrial gaps are quite well identified and assessed so that it is possible to describe a detailed roadmap of their development, including R and D needs. A significant part of these R and D needs should be addressed through cooperation involving public and private sector. It is the case for programs relating to safety, radiation protection, PRA (probabilistic risk assessment) methodology, background knowledge about ageing, fuel and fuel cycle for future light water reactors (Gen 3), pre-normative research for the purpose of harmonizing safety demonstration methodologies, Gen 4 systems with an emphasis on sodium-cooled fast breeder, large R and D infrastructures like test reactors

  13. Hydrogen Production Using Nuclear Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verfondern, K. [Research Centre Juelich (Germany)

    2013-03-15

    One of the IAEA's statutory objectives is to 'seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world.' One way this objective is achieved is through the publication of a range of technical series. Two of these are the IAEA Nuclear Energy Series and the IAEA Safety Standards Series. According to Article III.A.6 of the IAEA Statute, the safety standards establish 'standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property'. The safety standards include the Safety Fundamentals, Safety Requirements and Safety Guides. These standards are written primarily in a regulatory style, and are binding on the IAEA for its own programmes. The principal users are the regulatory bodies in Member States and other national authorities. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series comprises reports designed to encourage and assist R and D on, and application of, nuclear energy for peaceful uses. This includes practical examples to be used by owners and operators of utilities in Member States, implementing organizations, academia, and government officials, among others. This information is presented in guides, reports on technology status and advances, and best practices for peaceful uses of nuclear energy based on inputs from international experts. The IAEA Nuclear Energy Series complements the IAEA Safety Standards Series. Nuclear generated hydrogen has important potential advantages over other sources that will be considered for a growing hydrogen share in a future world energy economy. Still, there are technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes that need to be addressed through a vigorous research and development effort. Safety issues as well as hydrogen storage and distribution are important areas of research to be undertaken to support a successful hydrogen economy in the future. The hydrogen economy is gaining higher visibility and stronger political support in several parts of the

  14. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek; Tawfik, Magdy S.

    2015-02-01

    The nuclear hybrid energy concept is becoming a reality for the US energy infrastructure where combinations of the various potential energy sources (nuclear, wind, solar, biomass, and so on) are integrated in a hybrid energy system. This paper focuses on challenges facing a hybrid system with a Small Modular Reactor at its core. The core of the paper will discuss efforts required to develop supervisory control center that collects data, supports decision-making, and serves as an information hub for supervisory control center. Such a center will also be a model for integrating future technologies and controls. In addition, advanced operations research, thermal cycle analysis, energy conversion analysis, control engineering, and human factors engineering will be part of the supervisory control center. Nuclear hybrid energy infrastructure would allow operators to optimize the cost of energy production by providing appropriate means of integrating different energy sources. The data needs to be stored, processed, analyzed, trended, and projected at right time to right operator to integrate different energy sources.

  15. Agreement between the Kingdom of Cambodia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons and the Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone Treaty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Agreement (and the Protocol thereto) concluded between the Kingdom of Cambodia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) and the Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone Treaty. The Agreement was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 November 1999, signed in Vienna on 17 December 1999, and entered into force on the same date

  16. Nuclear energy and insurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekener, H.

    1997-01-01

    It examines the technical, scientific and legal issues relating to the peaceful use of atomic energy in Turkey. The first fifteen chapters give a general overview of the atom and radioactivity; the chapters which follow this section are more technical and deal with the causes of nuclear accidents in reactors.A number of chapters cover legal issues, for example the conditions and procedures involved in the insurance market and the risks linked to operation of a nuclear power plant.The following subjects are examined in relation to nuclear insurance: risks during construction; fire during operation of the plants and other causes of accidents; risks due to the transport of radioactive materials and waste etc. The final chapters reproduce the principle legislative texts in force in Turkey in the field of nuclear energy, and also certain regulations which establish competent regulatory bodies

  17. International energy annual, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This report is prepared annually and presents the latest information and trends on world energy production, consumption, reserves, trade, and prices for five primary energy sources: petroleum, natural gas, coal, hydroelectricity, and nuclear electricity. It also presents information on petroleum products. Since the early 1980's the world's total output of primary energy has increased steadily. The annual average growth rate of energy production during the decade was 1.9 percent. Throughout the 1980's, petroleum was the world's most heavily used type of energy. In 1989, three countries--the United States, the USSR, and China--were the leading producers and consumers of world energy. Together, these countries consumed and produced almost 50 percent of the world's total energy. Global production and consumption of crude oil and natural gas liquids increased during the 1980's, despite a decline in total production and demand in the early part of the decade. World production of dry natural gas continued to rise steadily in the 1980's. For the last several years, China has been the leading producer of coal, followed by the United States. In 1989, hydroelectricity supply declined slightly from the upward trend of the last 10 years. Nuclear power generation rose slightly from the 1988 level, compared with the marked growth in earlier years. Prices for major crude oils all increased between 1988 and 1989, but remained well below the price levels at the beginning of the decade. 26 figs., 36 tabs

  18. Nuclear energy, needs and policies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousefpour, B.; Rahimi, A.R.

    2002-01-01

    As an oil-and gas-rich state, Iran is among the main energy exporting countries of the world. No doubt, economic development in a country causes increase in its energy demand. Having a glance at the statistics of energy consumption in Iran during the past three decades reveals that energy consumption has been quadrupled. Due to dependability of the country's energy-supply system on fossil industries and thanks to the increasing demand, social and economic development will face great problems. For this reason, the problem has prompted Iranian officials to diversify the country's energy-supply system, as it has been give top priority in the policies of the first and second plans. The discovered and undiscovered fields of applied nuclear sciences and technologies indicate the importance of transferring and developing nuclear technologies for different countries' economic systems. Like many other countries, Iran is also in dire need of transferring nuclear technology and applying the related sciences in various fields, paving the way for economic, agricultural, medical development and having a more active presence in the international markets through quality and standard products. Iran has all the time called for a Middle East region free of nuclear weapons and expressed its concern over production and development of atomic weapons by certain regional countries and called it a serious threat to its national and regional security

  19. International arrangements against nuclear terrorism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bunn, G.

    1987-01-01

    International efforts to show the spread of nuclear weapons have created an international norm of nonproliferation, backed by a variety of enforcement mechanisms. Together they are often referred to as the nonproliferation regime. This regime is reviewed, starting with the 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty. The centerpiece of the regime, the Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), signed in 1968, now has 135 parties, including most of the advanced industrial nuclear countries. Results of the 1985 NPT Review Conference are briefly discussed; the 86 NPT parties that attended reaffirmed the treaty's value, pledged continued support for the IAEA safeguards system, and called upon nonsigners to renounce nuclear weapons and accept IAEA safeguards. A section is devoted to the physical protection of nuclear materials, facilities, and weapons. Finally, recommendations are presented to improve international arrangements against nuclear terrorists

  20. Energy supply and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heitzer, H.

    1977-01-01

    The author emphasizes the necessity and importance of nuclear energy for the energy supply and stresses the point that it is extremely important to return to objective arguments instead of having emotional disputes. In this connection, it would be necessary for the ministries in question to have clear-cut political responsibility from which, under no circumstances, they may escape, and which they cannot pass on to the courts either. Within the framework of listing present problems, the author is concerned with the possibility of improved site planning, the introduction of a plan approval procedure and questions concerning immediately enforceable nuclear licences. He also deals with a proposal, repeatedly made, to improve nuclear licensing procedures on the one hand by introducing a project-free site-appointment procedure, and on the other hand by introducing a simplified licensing procedure for facilities of the same kind. Splitting the procedure into site and facility would make sense solely for the reason that in many cases the objections are, above all, directed against the site. (HP) [de

  1. International group calls for new nuclear 'bargain of confidence'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    A report published by the International Consultative Group on Nuclear Energy on 17 January 1980 concluded that the option of expanding nuclear power supply will not be available for the long term unless its development is carefully sustained during the intervening period. Quotations from the report are given on world energy supplies, establishing nuclear options, nuclear safety and the public interest, and nuclear trade and nuclear proliferation. (UK)

  2. Alternatives to nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrado, E.N.

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses several possibilities as alternatives to nuclear energy and their relevance to the Philippine case. The major present and future fuel alternatives to petroleum and nuclear energy are coal, geothermal heat, solar energy and hydrogen, the first two of which are being used. Different conversion technologies are also discussed for large scale electricity production namely solar thermal electric conversion (STC), photovoltaic electric power system (PEPS) and ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Major environmental considerations affect the choice of energy sources and technologies. We have the problem of long term accumulation of radioactive waste in the case of nuclear energy; in geothermal and fossil-fuels carbon dioxide uranium and accumulation may cause disastrous consequences. With regard to Philippine option, the greatest considerations in selecting alternative energy options would be resources availability - both energy and financial and technology status. For the country's energy plan, coal and geothermal energy are expected to play a significant role. The country's coal resources are 1.4 billion metric tons. For geothermal energy, 25 volcanic centers were identified and has a potential equivalent to 2.5 x 10 6 million barrels of oil. Solar energy if harnessed, being in the sunbelt, averaging some 2000 hours a year could be an energy source. The present dilemma of the policy maker is whether national resources are better spent on large scale urban-based energy projects or whether those should be focused on small scale, rural oriented installations which produced benefits to the more numerous and poorer members of the population. (RTD)

  3. The International Atomic Energy Agency: orientations for the 21. century. Nuclear facilities exploitation: three questions to Remy Carle. The civil nuclear and the electric power generation in Germany. Usa: the electric power marker deregulation and the perspective of the nuclear energy. The situation of nuclear energy in Japan. Finland.. debate about the 5. reactor. The electronuclear development in China. The last act of the swedish nuclear saga. The Korean nuclear programme. The civil nuclear energy in Eastern Europe... in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carle, R.; Thiebaud, Ph.; Heuraux, Ch.; Tinturier, B.; Lavergne, B. de; Lavigne, J.J.; Soyer, B.; Edin, K.A.; Chaucheprat, P.

    2000-01-01

    This issue is dedicated to nuclear programmes throughout the world. A few articles give an overview of the major trends of nuclear industry, from the standpoints of economy, industry, environment and international regulations. A few articles give an overview of the major trends of nuclear industry, from the standpoints of economy, industry, environment and international regulations. A few specific countries or groups of countries are then highlighted, together with a typical economic and political backgrounds. The countries dealt with are Germany, China, Korea, the U.S., Finland, Japan and Sweden. Some specific data are given on nuclear industry in Eastern Europe. (author)

  4. The international nuclear non-proliferation system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simpson, J.; McGrew, T.

    1985-01-01

    This volume focuses upon the issues raised at this Conference, and attempts to address the international diplomatic, political and trading, rather than technical, questions which surround nuclear non-proliferation policies. It does so by bringing together chapters contributed by participants in non-proliferation diplomacy, those with experience in shaping International Atomic Energy Agency and national policies and academic observers of non-proliferation activities and the international nuclear industry. An analysis is provided of past non-proliferation policies and activities and current issues, and an attempt is made to offer ideas for new initiatives which may sustain the non-proliferation system in the future

  5. Nuclear energy and environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-12-31

    The film stresses that a drastic reduction in carbon dioxide emissions, mainly from the burning of fossil fuels, must be achieved to limit a dangerous concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. It compares the environmental costs of different energy sources, in particular the wastes of a coal-fired versus a nuclear plant, and mentions the measures taken to reinforce protection against the risk of nuclear accidents

  6. Nuclear energy and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Today, about 80 developing countries are using nuclear techniques in various sectors of their national economies. In the sector of industry, the radiation processing using gamma rays of high energy electrons has grown. While in the sector of health care, an estimated 10000 gamma cameras-imaging instruments are used in combination with radioisotopes in medical diagnosis. In the field of agriculture there is, nearly, 1000 crop varieties derived from radiaton-induced mutations which are grown worldwide. Furthermore and concerning the energy sector there is 417 nuclear power plants operating in 26 countries, accounting for just 16% of the world's total electricity production; the nuclear energy helped in developing and supporting a variety of sciences. 2 tabs

  7. Nuclear energy and the greenhouse problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemeny, L.G.

    2001-01-01

    Last November - almost in parallel with the Hague Meeting on Climate Change - more than 1,500 of the world's top nuclear scientists and energy technologists met in Washington DC, at the Joint Conference of the American Nuclear Society, the European Nuclear Society, the Nuclear Energy Institute and the International Nuclear Energy Academy. Unlike the United Nations follow up to the Kyoto protocol, which ended in disarray, a note of high optimism and informed realism pervaded the nuclear conference which, among its multiple streams of subject material and papers by international experts, carried the two main themes of Long Term Globally Sustainable Energy Options and Nuclear Energy and the Greenhouse Problem. This paper considers the immense contribution to Greenhouse gas emission minimisation made by nuclear energy in 1999. In that year the global electricity production by the world's 435 nuclear power stations was 2,398 TWh or 16% of total electricity generation or 5% of total primary energy production. The amount of avoided carbon dioxide emission because of the use of nuclear energy in 1999 was 2.4 billion tonnes. This is 10% of total emissions. Japan's 54 nuclear power stations alone save the equivalent of Australia's total Greenhouse emissions. The secret of this success is Australia's uranium fuel

  8. Nuclear energy and civilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soentono, S.

    1996-01-01

    The role of energy is indeed very important since without it there will be no living-things in this world. A country's ability to cultivate energy determines the levels of her civilization and wealth. Sufficient energy supply is needed for economic growth, industrialization, and modernization. In a modern civilization, the prosperity and security of a country depends more on the capability of her people rather than the wealth of her natural resources. Energy supplies the wealth, prosperity and security, and sufficient reliable continuous supply of energy secures the sustainable development. The energy supply to sustain the development has to improve the quality of life covering also the quality of environment to support the ever increasing demand of human race civilization. Energy has a closer relationship with civilization in a modern society and will have to become even closer in the future more civilized and more modern society. The utilization of nuclear energy has, however, some problems and challenges, e.g. misleading information and understanding which need serious efforts for public information, public relation, and public acceptance, and possible deviation of nuclear materials for non-peaceful uses which needs serious efforts for technological and administrative barriers, precaution, prevention, safety, physical protection, safeguard, and transparency. These require cooperation among nuclear community. The cooperation should be more pronounced by heterogeneous growing Asian countries to reach harmony for mutual benefits toward better civilization. (J.P.N.)

  9. Communication on the risk of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    The contribution takes it that the assumption, acceptance problems of nuclear energy are based on information deficit, is groundless in the end. It is true that there is a big knowledge gap between the nuclear energy experts and the broad public, empirical investigations, however, point out that increased knowledge would by no means go along with increased nuclear energy acceptance in the population. Also, the interpretation pattern 'Science and technology hostility' is not good enough to explain the nuclear energy controversy, because nuclear energy opponents oppose nuclear energy in an increasingly professional manner, and as an alternative they do not propagate renunciation of technology but another kind of energy technology. The degree of intensity and the long duration of the nuclear energy controversy in the Federal Republic of Germany in international comparison is defined by 1. little willingness in the 'interest block' in state, industry and nuclear research in favour of speeding up nuclear energy expansion, to yield to the requirements of the anti-nuclear-energy movement, and 2. factual possibilities of the ecological movement, also without parliamentary majority, to hinder the nuclear energy program and, consequently, to influence political decisions. In addition, social peripheral conditions play a role. (orig./HSCH) [de

  10. Communication from the Permanent Mission of Cyprus to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding guidelines for the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a Note Verbale from the Permanent Mission of Cyprus providing information on the export policies and practices of the Government of Cyprus with respect to the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of the Note Verbale, the text of the Note Verbale is attached. The attachment to the Note Verbale was issued previously as INFCIRC/254/Rev. 4/Part 1

  11. Text of communication of 14 November 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 14 November 2000 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament, attaching a statement by the President of the Russian Federation. The text of the communication and, as requested therein, the text of the President of the Russian Federation, are attached hereto for the information of Member States

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist's Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately

  13. International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN): Promoting nuclear security education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muhamad Samudi Yasir

    2013-01-01

    Full-text: The need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underlined at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors Meetings. Successive IAEA Nuclear Security Plans, the most recent of which was agreed by the Board of Governors in September 2009, give high priority to assisting States in establishing educational programmes in nuclear security in order to ensure the sustainability of nuclear security improvements. The current Nuclear Security Plan 1 covering 2010-2013 emphasizes on the importance of considering existing capacities at international, regional and national levels while designing nuclear security academic programmes. In the course of implementing the Plan, the IAEA developed a guide entitled Educational Programme in Nuclear Security (IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12) that consists of a model of a MAster of Science (M.Sc.) and a Certificate Programme in Nuclear Security. This guide was aims at assisting universities or other educational institutes to developed academic programmes in nuclear security. Independently, some universities already offered academic programmes covering some areas of nuclear security, while other universities have asked the IAEA to support the implementation of these programmes. In order to better address current and future request for assistance in this area, the IAEA establish a collaboration network-International Nuclear Security Education Network (INSEN), among universities who are providing nuclear security education or who are interested in starting an academic programme/ course(s) in nuclear security. Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) is a first local university became a member of INSEN since the beginning of the establishment. (author)

  14. [Intermediate energy nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    This report summarizes work in experimental Intermediate Energy Nuclear Physics carried out between October 1, 1988 and October 1, 1989 at the Nuclear Physics Laboratory of the University of Colorado, Boulder, under grant DE-FG02-86ER-40269 with the United States Department of Energy. The experimental program is very broadly based, including pion-nucleon studies at TRIUMF, inelastic pion scattering and charge exchange reactions at LAMPF, and nucleon charge exchange at LAMPF/WNR. In addition, a number of other topics related to accelerator physics are described in this report

  15. Nuclear Energy: Pros and Cons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valentukevicius, V.

    1999-01-01

    Early this year the Government of the Republic of Lithuania has basically approved and submitted to the Parliament (Seimas) for their approval the new draft of the National Energy Strategy. It still envisages two scenarios for the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant. In accordance with one of them, the nuclear plant is to be shut down fairly soon. The greatest advantage of any commercial nuclear plant is that the share of fuel in the production cost is low. That is why efforts are being made to operate nuclear power plants to their full capacity all over the world. At the meantime a system of legal regulation and organisational management has been created and is functioning in Lithuania; Lithuania has joined the key international agreements that regulate the use of nuclear energy; a lot has been done to upgrade safety and reliability of the Ignalina NPP. Lithuania is going to stick to the policy of openness and co-operation with international organisations concerned, at the same time defends the interests of country's population

  16. International Energy: Subject Thesaurus. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-11-01

    The International Energy Agency: Subject Thesaurus contains the standard vocabulary of indexing terms (descriptors) developed and structured to build and maintain energy information databases. Involved in this cooperative task are (1) the technical staff of the USDOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) in cooperation with the member countries of the International Energy Agency`s Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDE) and (2) the International Atomic Energy Agency`s International Nuclear Information System (INIS) staff representing the more than 100 countries and organizations that record and index information for the international nuclear information community. ETDE member countries are also members of INIS. Nuclear information prepared for INIS by ETDE member countries is included in the ETDE Energy Database, which contains the online equivalent of the printed INIS Atomindex. Indexing terminology is therefore cooperatively standardized for use in both information systems. This structured vocabulary reflects thscope of international energy research, development, and technological programs. The terminology of this thesaurus aids in subject searching on commercial systems, such as ``Energy Science & Technology`` by DIALOG Information Services, ``Energy`` by STN International and the ``ETDE Energy Database`` by SilverPlatter. It is also the thesaurus for the Integrated Technical Information System (ITIS) online databases of the US Department of Energy.

  17. White paper on nuclear energy, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Japan has scant energy resources, and more than 80% of its energy demand depends on other countries. The energy problem should be considered not only from the domestic viewpoint of energy supply and demand but also from the global viewpoint. Japanese nuclear power generation accounts for about 30% of its total electric power. The main strategy of Japan is to secure stable energy supply through the establishment of nuclear fuel cycle, and to efficiently use the plutonium and residual uranium recovered from spent nuclear fuel. The sodium leakage from the prototype FBR 'Monju' in December, 1995 raised the anxiety about the nuclear policy. People living in Japan should be assured the peace of mind about the development and utilization of nuclear energy. Regarding coexistence of nuclear energy and people, stronger demand of clearer reflection of public opinion to nuclear policy, holding of the round table conferences on nuclear policy, various efforts toward the coexistence of nuclear energy and people and so on are discussed. The development and utilization of nuclear energy in Japan and overseas are reported on nuclear nonproliferation, safety assurance, information disclosure, present and future of nuclear power generation, international cooperation and others. (K.I.)

  18. International cooperation in nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanisms of international co-operations, co-ordinated by International Atomic Energy Agency, are presented. These co-operations are related to international safety standards, to the safety of the four hundred existing reactors in operation, to quick help and information in case of emergency, and to the already valid international conventions. The relation between atomic energy and environmental protection is also discussed briefly. (K.A.)

  19. The nuclear energy debate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rippon, S.

    1976-01-01

    With reference to the public discussion which is taking place at the moment concerning the future of nuclear energy in the UK, the document from the Advisory Council on Research and Development for Fuel and Power and also the report of the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution are considered. Although there have been many other projections of UK and world energy requirements prepared by many different organisations, few cover such a wide range of scenarios in such detail as the ACORD report. The Royal Commission report contains many reassuring findings on the more extreme claims of the worldwide anti-nuclear movement, but one cannot read it without gaining the impression that the nuclear option is the energy source they would most like to do without. It is felt that against this background, it would seem to be time for the power industry to stop defending nuclear energy as an acceptable necessity and rather promoting it as the best energy option. (U.K.)

  20. Nuclear Inter Jura '91: nuclear law and nuclear energy for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1991 congress of the International Nuclear Law Association took as its subject Nuclear Law and Nuclear Energy for the future. As well as individual reports, there were four sessions each covering the report of one or more working groups. The first session investigated licensing and decommissioning, while the second focussed on insurance and liability. The third session was devoted to nuclear supply and commerce at an international level. Finally radiological protection and nuclear waste management was discussed in the fourth session. (UK)

  1. The geometry of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, J.A.L.

    1992-01-01

    In a personal assessment of the ethics of nuclear energy, the author challenges some of the conventional wisdom surrounding the subject, and concludes that for many applications nuclear energy is the energy source of ethical choice

  2. Nuclear re-think [The case for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the early 1970s, Patrick Moore, a co-founder of Greenpeace, believed that nuclear energy was synonymous with nuclear holocaust. Thirty years on, his views have changed because nuclear energy is the only non-greenhouse-gas-emitting power source that can effectively replace fossil fuels while satisfying the world's increasing demand for energy. Today, 441 nuclear plants operating globally avoid the release of nearly 3 billion tonnes of CO 2 emissions annually-the equivalent of the exhaust from more than 428 million cars. Concerns associated with nuclear energy are discussed including costs of nuclear energy, safety of nuclear plants, radioactive waste management, vulnerability of nuclear plants to terrorist attacks and diversion of nuclear fuel for weaponization. It is concluded that nuclear energy is the best way to produce safe, clean, reliable baseload electricity, and will play a key role in achieving global energy security. With climate change at the top of the international agenda, we must all do our part to encourage a nuclear energy renaissance

  3. Nuclear energy and nuclear technology in Switzerland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graf, P.

    1975-01-01

    The energy crisis, high fuel costs and slow progress in the development of alternative energy sources, e.g. solar energy have given further impetus to nuclear power generation. The Swiss nuclear energy programme is discussed and details are given of nuclear station in operation, under construction, in the project stage and of Swiss participation in foreign nuclear stations. Reference is made to the difficulties, delays and resulting cost increases caused by local and regional opposition to nuclear power stations. The significant contributions made by Swiss industry and Swiss consulting engineers are discussed. (P.G.R.)

  4. The internal energy market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The briefs compile the results of the studies the Commission worked out on the subject on the basis of experiences gained on its own part, on the part of the government and on the part of the market. The briefs are based on the schematic inventory annexed which for each energy sector points out the different existing or potential obstacles to a common energy market the most comprehensive and transparent way possible. Step by step part one and part two discuss the general problems connected with the integration of energy into the internal market, priorities which according to the Commission should be investigated into, and guidelines for such investigations. (orig./UA) [de

  5. International energy annual, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-08

    This document presents an overview of key international energy trends for production, consumption, imports, and exports of primary energy commodities in over 200 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are population and gross domestic product data, as well as prices for crude oil and petroleum products in selected countries. Renewable energy includes hydroelectric, geothermal, solar and wind electric power and alcohol for fuel. The data were largely derived from published sources and reports from US Embassy personnel in foreign posts. EIA also used data from reputable secondary sources, industry reports, etc.

  6. International energy annual, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    The International Energy Annual presents current data and trends for production, consumption, stocks, imports, and exports for primary energy commodities in more than 190 countries, dependencies, and areas of special sovereignty. Also included are prices on crude petroleum and petroleum products in selected countries. This report is published to keep the public and other interested parties fully informed with respect to primary energy supplies on a global basis. The data presented have been largely derived from published sources and from United States Embassy personnel in foreign posts. The data have been converted to units of measurement and thermal values familiar to the American public

  7. International symposium on uranium production and raw materials for the nuclear fuel cycle - Supply and demand, economics, the environment and energy security. Extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    The IAEA periodically organizes nical meetings and international symposia on all areas of the uranium production cycle. This publication contains 160 extended synopses related to the 2005 international symposium on 'Uranium Production and Raw Materials for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle - Supply and Demand, Economics, the Environment and Energy Security'. They cover all areas of natural uranium resources and production cycle including uranium supply and demand; uranium geology and deposit; uranium exploration; uranium mining and milling; waste management; and environment and regulation. Each synopsis was indexed individually.

  8. High energy nuclear excitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gogny, D.; Decharge, J.

    1983-09-01

    The main purpose of this talk is to see whether a simple description of the nuclear excitations permits one to characterize some of the high energy structures recently observed. The discussion is based on the linear response to different external fields calculated using the Random Phase Approximation. For those structure in heavy ion collisions at excitation energies above 50 MeV which cannot be explained with such a simple approach, we discuss a possible mechanism for this heavy ion scattering

  9. Transferring nuclear knowledge - An international partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badawy, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The fast decrease of coal, oil and natural gas as energy resources is pushing the world towards the use of nuclear energy. The expectation of growth in the nuclear field seems to be a great challenge -specially- in developing countries which are in hard need of acquiring nuclear knowledge and nuclear technology as well. In this situation, various factors would have great influence on the implementation of nuclear projects -in particular- for electricity generation. As a matter of fact, it is essential for each country to have its own strategy for national development. In practice, the implementation of such a strategy would need the collective efforts of specialized and efficient human resources for executing the tasks. This would need cooperation with, and/or technical aid of developed countries and international organizations. There are various parameters that may contribute in the national development in a country, the most important of which are the development in science and technology. Then, the industrial development becomes essential for the nuclear industry. In order to achieve this, the information acquiring and knowledge transfer are fundamental tools. The partnership between developed and developing countries would mean cooperation and aid directed to nuclear technology and knowledge transfer; and specialized technical training in the nuclear industry. Supplier countries might need to use high technology in implementing nuclear safeguards commitments, but with minimum side effects. This paper investigates some factors that may have influence on transferring peaceful uses of nuclear knowledge and/or nuclear technology; such as establishing and sustaining the national nuclear workforce, building of public understanding and public acceptance of nuclear science and technology. Also, it discusses the importance of activating and strengthening the international regime of partnership for the welfare and prosperity of human kind; with specific

  10. International nuclear power status 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lauritzen, B.; Majborn, B.; Nonboel, E.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    2001-03-01

    This report is the seventh in a series of annual reports on the international development of nuclear power with special emphasis on reactor safety. For 2000, the report contains: 1. General trends in the development of nuclear power. 2. Deposition of low-level radioactive waste. 3. Statistical information on nuclear power production (in 1999). 4. An overview of safety-relevant incidents in 2000. 5. The development in Sweden. 6. The development in Eastern Europe. 7. The development in the rest of the world. 8. Trends in the development of reactor types. 9. Trends in the development of the nuclear fuel cycle. (au)

  11. Vision of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A study about the perspectives of nuclear energy, in Japan, for the next 40 years is shown. The present tendencies are analyzed as well as the importance that the subject adquires for the economy and the industry. At the same time, the parameters of the governmental, private and foreign participation are established in the frame of the technological development. The aim fixed for the year 2030 can be divided into; 1: from 1986 to 2010-development of the technology of nuclear fuel cycle already stablished and in process of maturity. The LWR technology will reach a very advanced stage. The fast breeder reactors (FBRs) will become commercially available, and the nuclear fuel cycle will reach its maturity in Japan; 2: from 2011 to 2030-commercial use of the FBRS and further advance in the nuclear fuel cycle. (M.E.L.) [es

  12. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bararu, Corina [Nuclearelectrica, 65 Polona St., Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being a

  13. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bararu, Corina

    2008-01-01

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being a

  14. Nuclear Energy Has To Communicate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bararu, Corina [Nuclearelectrica, 65 Polona St., Bucharest (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    The silence has been kept too long. Nuclear energy has to implement some strong communication strategies in order to firstly attract the most valuable employees, and secondly to develop on the long term. The paper presents arguments and means for the nuclear energy companies to communicate on the inside and the outside of their organizations. Firstly, the internal communication of a nuclear power plant organization is as important as completing it's object of activity, it is a basic element for a strong image of the company and of the industry on the outside. If (executive) employees acknowledge the importance of the company and industry they work for, surely this message will be supported by external parties as well. Employees do not simply work in an office like theirs, but for a nuclear plant and they should become the first exponents of the industry, with respect to the theory that every employee is a marketer of their business. In order to accomplish this, a strong organization has to be built and healthy work environment has to be put into place. The most time and cost efficient methods, in order to attain high group adherence of the employees are group-ware applications, developed on an intranet platform, inside the company. Another means of motivation of the present and future employees are interactive exchange programs between companies from different countries. An issue that stands in the way of opening the way to communicate with the public is the degree of technicality implied by the energy industry, in particular the nuclear sector. Secondly, the external communication of such a company may solve - on the long term - the current personnel crisis in the Nuclear Energy sector, if targeted toward this direction. An external communication strategy would raise the level of public acceptance regarding the nuclear energy. One of the means of putting it into practice would have to be: internships for students, in order to allow young people to test being

  15. Nuclear energy related research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toerroenen, K.; Kilpi, K.

    1985-01-01

    This research programme plan for 1985 covers the nuclear energy related research planned to be carried out at the Technical Research Centre of Finland (VTT) and funded by the Ministry of Trade and Industry in Finland, the Nordic Council of Ministers and VTT

  16. World nuclear-fuel procurement: relationships between uranium and enrichment markets. Final report. International energies studies program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neff, T.L.

    1982-03-01

    This article explores the relationships between international uranium and enrichment markets under current contracting and equity arrangements and in comparison with actual feed requirements for existing and committed reactors. We begin with an overview of the world situation, examining current and prospective conditions. We then consider enrichment and uranium supply and demand situations of the three consumer nations outside the United States with the largest nuclear programs: France, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany. We conclude with an evaluation of likely directions of change in the coupled markets for uranium and enrichment services

  17. Intermediate energy nuclear fission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hylten, G.

    1982-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been investigated with the double-kinetic-energy method using silicon surface barrier detectors. Fragment energy correlation measurements have been made for U, Th and Bi with bremsstrahlung of 600 MeV maximum energy. Distributions of kinetic energy as a function of fragment mass are presented. The results are compared with earlier photofission data and in the case of bismuth, with calculations based on the liquid drop model. The binary fission process in U, Yb, Tb, Ce, La, Sb, Ag and Y induced by 600 MeV protons has been investigated yielding fission cross sections, fragment kinetic energies, angular correlations and mass distributions. Fission-spallation competition calculations are used to deduce values of macroscopic fission barrier heights and nuclear level density parameter values at deformations corresponding to the saddle point shapes. We find macroscopic fission barriers lower than those predicted by macroscopic theories. No indication is found of the Businaro Gallone limit expected to occur somewhere in the mass range A = 100 to A = 140. For Ce and La asymmetric mass distributions similar to those in the actinide region are found. A method is described for the analysis of angular correlations between complementary fission products. The description is mainly concerned with fission induced by medium-energy protons but is applicable also to other projectiles and energies. It is shown that the momentum and excitation energy distributions of cascade residuals leading to fission can be extracted. (Author)

  18. The church and nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, G.O.

    1978-03-01

    The subject is covered in sections, entitled: foreword (explaining that report is a synopsis of the Hearing on Nuclear Energy arranged by the World Council of Churches, held in Sigtune, Sweden, June 24 to 29, 1975); humanity's energy needs); alternative sources of energy (nuclear fission, nuclear fusion, non-nuclear processes; some generalisations (concerning the advantages and disadvantages of nuclear energy to various sections of the world); what risks are acceptable (radiation hazards, reactor safety, radioactive wastes, misuse of Pu, safeguarding); nuclear weapons; nuclear energy - a challenge to the Churches; social and ethical issues; certain conclusions; postscript -the American move. (U.K.)

  19. Practices on nuclear security and international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Ning

    2009-01-01

    on Integrated Management of Nuclear Materials to introduce modern technology development on nuclear safeguards, material accounting and control, and physical protection in October 2005. After the Tech Demo, a series of cooperation projects on nuclear safeguards and security were developed. To support the security of 2008 Beijing Summer Olympic Games, China Atomic Energy Authority (CAEA), worked with IAEA and the U.S. Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA), carried out trainings for the officials from public security, border control and customs, etc. for strengthening the response capabilities to the Major Public Events (MPEs) and implemented physical security upgrades and radioactive sources recovery at facilities near Olympic venues. As a partner state of the Global Initiative to Combat Nuclear Terrorism, China organized a scenario-based workshop on radioactive detection and emergency response in cooperation with U.S. in December 2007, more than 60 Participants from 20 more countries participated the workshop. To strengthen the training capability on nuclear safeguards and security, CAEA and the IAEA jointly established a 'CAEA-IAEA Joint Training Center on Nuclear Safeguards and Security' in December 2006, located at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). International Cooperation is a very important element in developing global nuclear security regime. China is willing to make continuous efforts to promoting the development of nuclear security through international cooperation. (author)

  20. International Nuclear Security Situation And China’s Approach

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chong

    2016-01-01

    Since 2010,the three Nuclear Security Summits have made a number of achievements,but the international nuclear security situation is still not relaxed.The rapid development of China’s domestic nuclear facilities and a large amount of nuclear and radioactive materials related to nuclear power,active international nuclear black market in China’s surrounding regions,rather serious domestic and international terrorist threats as well as the emerging technology development bring about new challenges to nuclear security.Facing the complicated and long-term nuclear security situation,China from the perspective of monitoring mechanism,laws and regulations system,technical capability-building and nuclear emergency preparedness,takes a series of effective measures to build the national nuclear security capacity,and strictly fulfills its international obligations,actively participates in upgrading the international nuclear non-proliferation regime and relevant international rules,and actively takes part in the Nuclear Security Summit process,strengthens bilateral cooperation on nuclear security with major countries especially the United States of America,and jointly organizes various training with International Atomic Energy Agency,which has made great contributions to upgrading the global nuclear security level.At the end of the Nuclear Security Summit process,China should continue to strengthen its domestic nuclear security capacity building,and promote the international community to treat the root causes and symptoms,adopt a comprehensive strategy,and work together,effectively prevent and dissolve the nuclear terrorist threats.

  1. ISO: international standards development for nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, K.

    1981-01-01

    The importance of internationally recognized standards for nuclear technology and safety is rapidly increasing for technical as well as economical and political reasons such as public acceptance and nuclear technology transfer to developing countries. The need for such standards is also evident because of the large number of nuclear installations sited close to international borders, and the export of nuclear installations from relatively few supplier countries to a large number of user countries. It is the purpose of this report to describe briefly the history, organizational structures and procedures, goals, accomplishments, problems, and future needs of the relevant activities of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ISO is composed of the partly governmental, partly non-governmental national standards bodies of 86 countries including China. The work of its Technical Committee (TC) 85 'Nuclear Energy' is mostly concerned with industrial applications, contractual aspects and international communication, for the benefit of both developed and developing countries. It works in close liaison with IAEA, which develops Codes and Guides addressed mainly to the regulatory aspects of nuclear power plants in developing countries. ISO/TC 85 has four sub-committees dealing with: (a) Terminology, Definitions, Units and Symbols (Secretariat USA, four working groups (WGs)); (b) Radiation Protection (Secretariat France, ten WGs); (c) Power Reactor Technology (Secretariat Sweden, nine WGs); (d) Nuclear Fuel Technology (Secretariat F.R. Germany, seven WGs). (author)

  2. 9th international conference on high-temperature reactors - coal and nuclear energy for electricity and gas generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelber, G.

    1987-01-01

    The site of the high-temperatur reactor in the Ruhr region neighbouring on a coal-fired power plant is not accidental. The potential of the high-temperature reactor as a central plant element for the supply of heat for heating purposes and process heat covers also the possibility of coal gasification and liquefaction. Therefore the high-temperature reactor is, in the long term, a ray of hope for the coal region, able to compensate for the production-related competitive disadvantages of local coal. It can contribute to guaranteeing in the long term the task of German hard coal as an essential pillar of our energy supply. The VGB as a technical association of thermal power plant operators is particularly committed to the integration of coal and nuclear energy. Within the bounds of its possibilities, it will contribute to promoting the safe and environmentally beneficial generation of electricity from the two primary energy sources. (orig./DG) [de

  3. Energy security strategy and nuclear power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toichi, Tsutomu; Shibata, Masaharu; Uchiyama, Yoji; Suzuki, Tatsujiro; Yamazaki, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    This special edition of 'Energy security strategy and nuclear power' is abstracts of the 27 th Policy Recommendations 'The Establishment of an International Energy Security System' by the Japan Forum on International Relations, Inc on May 18 th , 2006. It consists of five papers: Energy security trend in the world and Japan strategy by Tsutomu Toichi, Establishment of energy strategy supporting Japan as the focus on energy security by Masaharu Shibata, World pays attention to Japan nuclear power policy and nuclear fuel cycle by Yoji Uchiyama, Part of nuclear power in the energy security - the basic approach and future problems by Tatsujiro Suzuki, and Drawing up the energy strategy focused on the national interests - a demand for the next government by Kazuo Yamazaki. (S.Y.)

  4. Nuclear energy technology transfer: the security barriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rinne, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    The problems presented by security considerations to the transfer of nuclear energy technology are examined. In the case of fusion, the national security barrier associated with the laser and E-beam approaches is discussed; for fission, the international security requirements, due to the possibility of the theft or diversion of special nuclear materials or sabotage of nuclear facilities, are highlighted. The paper outlines the nuclear fuel cycle and terrorist threat, examples of security barriers, and the current approaches to transferring technology. (auth)

  5. International Clean Energy Coalition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erin Skootsky; Matt Gardner; Bevan Flansburgh

    2010-09-28

    In 2003, the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and National Energy Technology Laboratories (NETL) collaboratively established the International Clean Energy Coalition (ICEC). The coalition consisting of energy policy-makers, technologists, and financial institutions was designed to assist developing countries in forming and supporting local approaches to greenhouse gas mitigation within the energy sector. ICEC's work focused on capacity building and clean energy deployment in countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation. Under ICEC, the coalition formed a steering committee consisting of NARUC members and held a series of meetings to develop and manage the workplan and define successful outcomes for the projects. ICEC identified India as a target country for their work and completed a country assessment that helped ICEC build a framework for discussion with Indian energy decisionmakers including two follow-on in-country workshops. As of the conclusion of the project in 2010, ICEC had also conducted outreach activities conducted during United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) Ninth Conference of Parties (COP 9) and COP 10. The broad goal of this project was to develop a coalition of decision-makers, technologists, and financial institutions to assist developing countries in implementing affordable, effective and resource appropriate technology and policy strategies to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Project goals were met through international forums, a country assessment, and in-country workshops. This project focused on countries that rely heavily on fossil-based electric generation.

  6. Department of Nuclear Energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The activities of Department was engaged in the selected topics in nuclear fission reactor science and engineering. Present and future industry competitiveness, economic prosperity and living standards within the world are strongly dependent on maintaining the availability of energy at reasonable prices and with security of supply. Also, protection of man and the environment from the harmful effects of all uses of energy is an important element of the quality of life especially in Europe. It is unrealistic to assume that the technology for renewable (hydro, wind, solar and biomass) available within a 20-30 year perspective could provide the production capacity to replace present use of nuclear power and at the same time substantially reduce the use of fossil fuels, especially when considering that energy demand in industrialized countries can be expected to continue to increase even within a framework of overall energy conservation and continued improvement of efficiency in energy usage. In the area of nuclear fission, we continue support to maintain and develop the competence needed to ensure the safety of existing and future reactors and other nuclear installations. In addition support is given to explore the potential for improving present fission technology from a sustainable development point of view. The focus on advanced modelling of improved reactor and fuel cycle concepts, including supporting experimental research, with a view to improving the utilisation of the inherent energy content of uranium and other nuclear fuels, whilst at the same time reducing the amount of long-lived radioactive waste produced. A common scientific understanding of the frequently used concept of ''reasonable assurance of safety'' for the long-term, post-closure phase of repositories for spent fuel and high-level waste developed in order to ensure reasonably equivalent legal interpretations in environmental impact assessment and licensing procedures. Also, research is

  7. Is nuclear energy acceptable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberg, A.M.

    1977-01-01

    Nuclear hazards are assessed as being unique only in the sense of their unfamiliarity, with future development of nuclear energy dependent on overcoming public fears. Economics is clearly in favor of properly operated nuclear energy facilities for long-term power generation. Risks arise over the potential for human error to permit improper operation and for an industry shutdown because of a reactor accident. Attempts to ascertain accident probabilities have revealed that emergency core cooling systems and containment are not simply parallel, but operate in series and provide more safety than was thought. Insurance liability, resting on the small probability of very costly damage, is felt to be best placed on the utility with the government providing ultimate protection in the event of a potentially bankrupting accident. Problems of nuclear waste handling and low-level release are felt to be solvable with present technology. Proliferation is felt to be a political problem that is incidental to power plants. Public concern is blamed on possible diversion of materials for weapons, unfamiliarity with radiation, and the demand for meticulous handling of materials and operations. Burner reactors are projected to phase out and be replaced by breeder reactors that are operated in physical isolation under strict security by a professional cadre aware of its responsibility. A restructuring of the nuclear industry is called for so that the generation of power can be insulated from the distribution and marketing functions. (13 references)

  8. Prospect on nuclear energy and promotion strategy for next 50 years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chang Gun

    1996-10-01

    This book describes prospect for nuclear energy and promotion strategy for next 50 years, which has four part ; summary, prospect on nuclear energy for next 50 years with wealth, quality of the life and energy, available energy, future power and energy, nuclear power except as using energy, promotion strategy for nuclear energy for next 50 year with current situation and the rule of nuclear energy in the future, international situation and effect on environment, nuclear reactor and strategy for nuclear fuel cycle, international, institutional and social problems, using nuclear energy except power, precondition for international use of nuclear power, use of nuclear energy for extra field and conclusion.

  9. Nuclear energy and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, D.K.; Johnson, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Both the light water reactor and the Canadian heavy water reactor systems produce electricity cheaply and efficiently. They produce some fissionable byproducts, which can be recycled to extend energy sources many-fold. Besides the production of electrical power, the nuclear industry produces various radioistopes used for treatment of cancer, in diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine, in ionization smoke detectors, and as radioactive tracers with various technological applications including the study of the mechanisms of life. The increment in environmental radiation levels resulting from operation of nuclear power reactors represents a very small fraction of the radiation levels to which we are all exposed from natural sources, and of the average radiation exposures resulting from diagnostic procedures in the healing arts. The total health hazard of the complete nuclear power cycle is generally agreed to be smaller than the hazards associated with the generation of an equal amount of electricity from most other currently available sources of energy. The hazards from energy production in terms of shortened life expectancy are much smaller in all cases than the resulting increase in health and life expectancy. (auth)

  10. Non-nuclear energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, H.

    2007-01-01

    The different meanings of the word 'energy', as understood by economists, are reviewed and explained. Present rates of consumption of fossil and nuclear fuels are given as well as corresponding reserves and resources. The time left before exhaustion of these reserves is calculated for different energy consumption scenarios. On finds that coal and nuclear only allow to reach the end of this century. Without specific dispositions, the predicted massive use of coal is not compatible with any admissible value of global heating. Thus, we discuss the clean coal techniques, including carbon dioxide capture and storage. One proceeds with the discussion of availability and feasibility of renewable energies, with special attention to electricity production. One distinguishes controllable renewable energies from those which are intermittent. Among the first we find hydroelectricity, biomass, and geothermal and among the second, wind and solar. At world level, hydroelectricity will, most probably, remain the main renewable contributor to electricity production. Photovoltaic is extremely promising for providing villages remote deprived from access to a centralized network. Biomass should be an important source of bio-fuels. Geothermal energy should be an interesting source of low temperature heat. Development of wind energy will be inhibited by the lack of cheap and massive electricity storage; its contribution should not exceed 10% of electricity production. Its present development is totally dependent upon massive public support. A large part of this paper follows chapters of the monograph 'L'energie de demain: technique, environnement, economie', EDP Sciences, 2005. (author)

  11. International nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, P.H.W.

    1978-01-01

    The background to the development of internationally agreed safety principles and practices is discussed. The activities of the IAEA and the scope, structure, and organisation of its programme of Reactor Safety Codes and Guides are described. Attention is drawn to certain areas needing further considerations. (UK)

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1991-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1991. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency: Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, A.

    1992-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1992. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  14. Nuclear energy, the climate and nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, V.

    1998-01-01

    The main concern of Pugwash, with very good reason, is nuclear disarmament, but a negative attitude towards nuclear energy is not only futile, but counterproductive as it misses opportunities to appropriately influence its development. Since nuclear energy cannot be abandoned for ecological (decrease in greenhouse gases emission) and economic reasons as a long term energy source, then efforts should be devoted to make it safe from proliferation, which is possible from scientific and technological point of view

  15. Nuclear energy and nuclear weapons proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-01-01

    A summary of the report dispatched in the middle of 1978 by the Atlantic Council of United States, organized by North American citizens, is presented. The report considers the relation between the production of nucleoelectric energy and the capacity of proliferation of nuclear weapons. The factors which affect the grade of proliferation risk represented by the use of nuclear energy in the world comparing this risk with the proliferation risks independently of nuclear energy, are examined. (M.C.K.) [pt

  16. The need for safe nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawley, R.

    1995-01-01

    The Government's Nuclear Review has given the nuclear industry an opportunity to demonstrate the key role that it can play in developing the UK's energy supply. To fulfil its ultimate potential in both the UK and international markets, nuclear energy must be able to compete in an open market alongside UK fossil fuel based suppliers and with overseas power generators. There are huge potential export opportunities for the nuclear industry, but for the UK to be able to compete in these markets there must be a thriving nuclear sector at home. The Government is now in a position to determine the future development of the nuclear energy industry. A positive commitment to nuclear power will not only be good for the nuclear industry, it will be good for the nation as a whole. (Author)

  17. International energy annual 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided.

  18. International energy annual 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-12-01

    The International Energy Annual presents information and trends on world energy production and consumption for petroleum, natural gas, coal, and electricity. Production and consumption data are reported in standard units as well as British thermal units (Btu). Trade and reserves are shown for petroleum, natural gas, and coal. Data are provided on crude oil refining capacity and electricity installed capacity by type. Prices are included for selected crude oils and for refined petroleum products in selected countries. Population and Gross Domestic Product data are also provided

  19. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leigh, I.W.; Patridge, M.D.

    1991-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECN/NEA activities reports; not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  20. Proceedings of the ANS executive conference on international nuclear commerce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    These proceedings compile papers given at a conference on nuclear commerce. Topice include: global forecasting, foreign policy, nuclear weapons proliferation, trade, non-proliferation policies, non-proliferation treaties, IAEA safeguards, international cooperation, nuclear materials management and safety, the nuclear power industry and energy policy, plutonium storage, and uranium enrichment

  1. Public acceptance of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reis, J.S.B.

    1984-01-01

    Man, being unacquainted with the advantages of Nuclear Energy associates it with the manufacture of weaponry. However, the benefits of Nuclear Energy is received daily. In Brazil the public has not taken an anti-nuclear position; it is recognized that the Nuclear Plan exists exclusively for peaceful purposes and the authorities keep the community well informed. The Comision Nacional de Energia Nuclear along with the Instituto de Radioproteccion y Dosimetria, Instituto de Ingenieria Nuclear and the Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Nucleares has developed in 27 years of existence, a gradual, accute and effective long term programme for the formation of potentially receptive opinion of Nuclear Energy. (Author)

  2. Nuclear pharmacy education: international harmonization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, S.M.; Cox, P.H.

    1998-01-01

    Education of nuclear pharmacists exists in many countries around the world. The approach and level of education varies between countries depending upon the expectations of the nuclear pharmacist, the work site and the economic environment. In Australia, training is provided through distance learning. In Europe and Canada, nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists receive postgraduate education in order to engage in the small-scale preparation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals as well as research and development. In the U.S.A., nuclear pharmacy practitioners obtain basic knowledge primarily through undergraduate programs taken when pursuit the first professional degree in pharmacy. Licensed practitioners in pharmacy enter the practice of nuclear pharmacy through distance learning programs or short courses. While different approaches to education exist, there is a basic core of knowledge and a level of competence required of all nuclear pharmacists and radiochemists providing radiopharmaceutical products and services. It was with this realization that efforts were initiated to develop harmonization concepts and documents pertaining to education in nuclear pharmacy. The benefits of international harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education are numerous. Assurance of the availability of quality professionals to provide optimal products and care to the patient is a principle benefit. Spanning national barriers through the demonstration of self governance and unification in education will enhance the goal of increased freedom of employment between countries. Harmonization endeavors will improve existing education programs through sharing of innovative concepts and knowledge between educators. Documents generated will benefit new educational programs especially in developing nations. A committee on harmonization in nuclear pharmacy education was formed consisting of educators and practitioners from the international community. A working document on education was

  3. International Nuclear Model. Volume 3. Program description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andress, D.

    1985-01-01

    This is Volume 3 of three volumes of documentation of the International Nuclear Model (INM). This volume presents the Program Description of the International Nuclear Model, which was developed for the Nuclear and Alternate Fuels Division (NAFD), Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Energy Information Administration (EIA), US Department of Energy (DOE). The International Nuclear Model (INM) is a comprehensive model of the commercial nuclear power industry. It simulates economic decisions for reactor deployment and fuel management decision based on an input set of technical economic and scenario parameters. The technical parameters include reactor operating characteristics, fuel cycle timing and mass loss factors, and enrichment tails assays. Economic parameters include fuel cycle costs, financial data, and tax alternatives. INM has a broad range of scenario options covering, for example, process constraints, interregional activities, reprocessing, and fuel management selection. INM reports reactor deployment schedules, electricity generation, and fuel cycle requirements and costs. It also has specialized reports for extended burnup and permanent disposal. Companion volumes to Volume 3 are: Volume 1 - Model Overview, and Volume 2 - Data Base Relationships

  4. Abusive use of nuclear energy - A definition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ungerer, W.

    1975-01-01

    Abusive use of nuclear energy is mainly defined as its use for explosives where one has to distinguish between the use on a political and on a sub-national level. On a political level the use of nuclear materials for nuclear weapons is considered to be an abuse, whereas the use of nuclear explosives for peaceful uses, e.g. construction of channels and caverns, is only permissible when the nuclear explosions are carried out under suitable international supervision. The supervision is supposed to guarantee that the nuclear material is not used for weapons. On the sub-national level the use of nuclear energy is taken to be abusive if it serves explosive purposes or purposes other than declared as non-explosive. Those who take away nuclear materials for unknown purposes arouse suspicion that they use it for the manufacture of nuclear explosives or that they either use it or intend to use it for blackmail. (orig./LN) [de

  5. International energy indicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosoi, E., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Data are presented under the following headings: world crude oil production, OPEC crude oil productive capacity; world crude oil and refined product inventory levels; and oil consumption in the OECD countries. The USSR crude oil production and exports; free world and US nuclear electricity generation; US domestic oil supply; US gross imports of crude oil and products; landed cost of Saudi crude, current and 1974 dollars; US coal trade; US natural gas trade; summary of US merchandise trade; and energy/GNP ratio data are also included.

  6. Non-nuclear energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nifenecker, Herve

    2006-01-01

    The different meanings of the word 'energy', as understood by economists, are reviewed and explained. Present rates of consumption of fossil and nuclear fuels are given as well as corresponding reserves and resources. The time left before exhaustion of these reserves is calculated for different energy consumption scenarios. On finds that coal and nuclear only allow to reach the end of this century. Without specific dispositions, the predicted massive use of coal is not compatible with any admissible value of global heating. Thus, we discuss the clean coal techniques, including carbon dioxide capture and storage. On proceeds with the discussion of availability and feasibility of renewable energies, with special attention to electricity production. One distinguishes controllable renewable energies from those which are intermittent. Among the first we find hydroelectricity, biomass, and geothermal and among the second, wind and solar. At world level, hydroelectricity will, most probably, remain the main renewable contributor to electricity production. Photovoltaic is extremely promising for providing villages remote deprived from access to a centralized network. Biomass should be an important source of biofuels. Geothermal energy should be an interesting source of low temperature heat. Development of wind energy will be inhibited by the lack of cheap and massive electricity storage; its contribution should not exceed 10% of electricity production. Its present development is totally dependent upon massive public support. (author)

  7. International nuclear power status 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoejerup, C.F.; Majborn, B.; Oelgaard, P.L.

    1995-02-01

    This report is the first in a planned series of annual reports covering the international development in the field of nuclear power. The report deals with: statistical information on the electricity produced by nuclear power plants; major safety-related incidents in 1994; the development in Sweden, Eastern Europe, and the rest of the world; the trends of development of a number of reactor types; the trends of development in the fuel cycle. (au)

  8. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in technology transfer for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the strengthening of the Safeguards system, Santiago, 9 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA national seminar on 'Nuclear Development and its Implications for Chilean International Policy' in Santiago, Chile, on 9 December 1998. After a short presentation of Chile's participation in all aspects of the work of the Agency, the conference focuses on the Agency's role in the following areas: technology transfer with emphasis on Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme, nuclear power and sustainable energy development, including nuclear safety aspects, and the strengthened safeguards system, including future prospects of verification

  9. Future development of nuclear energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Nuclear energy development in Japan has passed about 30 years, and reaches to a step to supply about 35 % of total electric power demand. However, together with globalization of economic and technical development, its future progressing method is required for its new efforts. Among such conditions, when considering a state of future type nuclear energy application, its contribution to further environmental conservation and international cooperation is essential, and it is required for adoption to such requirement how it is made an energy source with excellent economics.The Research Committee on 'Engineering Design on Nuclear Energy Systems' established under recognition in 1998 has been carried out some discussions on present and future status of nuclear energy development. And so forth under participation of outer specialists. Here were summarized on two year's committee actions containing them and viewpoints of nuclear industries, popularization of nuclear system technology, and so forth. (G.K.)

  10. Nuclear education and international nuclear university

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, C.S.

    2000-01-01

    In this paper author deals with the concept of establishing the International Nuclear University (INU) would be one of the most viable options. The INU would provide young professionals with not only university-level education but also high-skill training in the fields of nuclear technology. The program will emphasize on global and multi- disciplinary perspectives, which should offer our young generation broader opportunities of advanced education and motivate professional staffs in the enhancement of their knowledge and skills. The 'World Council of Nuclear Education' could be formed to steer the INU for close international cooperation under the auspices of the IAEA. The INU would organize a world network of existing nuclear- related educational organizations and training centers which already exist in Member States. Existing facilities and can be utilized at maximum. Use of cyber-lecturing through Internet, cross-approval of credits among educational organizations in degree work, certification of credits by the authorized body like IAEA, human resources placement services, etc. are some of the activities that the INU could provide in addition to its professional training and higher education. (authors)

  11. A century of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hug, M.

    2009-01-01

    The author proposes a history of the French nuclear industry and nuclear energy since the Nobel prizes of 1903 and 1911. He describes and comments the context of the energy production sector before the development of the nuclear energy, the development of the institutional context, the successive and different nuclear technologies, the main characteristics of the French program at its beginning, the relationship between the nuclear energy and the public, the main accidents and lessons learned from them, the perspectives of evolution of nuclear energy

  12. Regional cooperation based on multilateral international agreements in nuclear field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcic, I.

    1996-01-01

    Multilateral international agreements have defined the framework of behavior and cooperation in various fields and aspects of peaceful use of nuclear energy. Thus, obligations have been defined in the following areas: nonproliferation of nuclear weapons, physical protection of nuclear material, liability for nuclear damage, nuclear safety, early notification about a nuclear accident and assistance in case of nuclear accident. Obligations regarding radioactive waste management should be defined soon. This paper gives a review of obligations from particular agreements with a special emphasis on those which are being realized through mutual cooperation of concerned countries and are important for safe use of nuclear energy. (author)

  13. Energy: nuclear energy; Energies: l'energie nucleaire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, M. [Societe Generale pour les Techniques Nouvelles (SGN), 78 - Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2000-11-01

    Convinced that the nuclear energy will be the cleaner, safer, more economical and more respectful of the environment energy of the future, the author preconizes to study the way it can be implemented, to continue to improve its production, to understand its virtues and to better inform the public. He develops this opinion in the presentation of the principal characteristics of the nuclear energy: technology, radioactive wastes, radiation protection, the plutonium, the nuclear accidents, the proliferation risks, the economics and nuclear energy and competitiveness, development and sustainability. (A.L.B.)

  14. INDC International Nuclear Data Committee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, A. [Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); McCutchan, E. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Dimitriou, P. [Intl Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria)

    2017-12-11

    The 22nd meeting of the International Network of Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators was convened at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, USA, from 22 to 26 May 2017 under the auspices of the IAEA Nuclear Data Section. This meeting was attended by 38 scientists from 12 Member States and the IAEA, all of whom are concerned primarily with the measurement, evaluation and dissemination of nuclear structure and decay data. A summary of the meeting, data centre reports, various proposals considered, technical discussions, actions agreed by the participants, and the resulting recommendations/conclusions are presented within this document.

  15. Glossary of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    TNC 90 focuses on nuclear energy technology. Some more basic or less central terms which were included in the previous glossary, TNC 55, have not been included in this version. About 1200 definitions in swedish included together with translations to english, german and french. The terms have been listed in alphabetical order. To make it easier to look up a certain term or terms that stand for related concepts the terms have been systematically arranged in a special index. (L.E.)

  16. Nuclear energy and German foreign policy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, K.

    1979-01-01

    The author shows that the present foreign-policy situation with regard to the nuclear-energy complex is due to political and energy-policy origins. He is further of the opinion that the expansion of nuclear energy - in spite of internal political difficulties - will continue in the long term. Hence breeders and reconditioning will become realities. For German foreign policy this means that it must also carry responsibilities on a global scale in this respect. (orig.) [de

  17. Finnish energy outlook - role of nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santaholma, J.

    2004-01-01

    New nuclear power partly covers additional electricity demand and replaces retiring power plants in coming decades after 2010. Nuclear energy secures stable, economical and predictable electricity price as well as operation environment for the electricity intensive industry for coming decades. Nuclear energy also reduces the dependence on electricity import of Finland. Nuclear energy partly enables, together with renewable, fulfilment of Finland's Kyoto commitments. Solutions for nuclear waste management are a condition sine qua non for sound nuclear programmes. Funding has been arranged. All this is carried out in Finland in a transparent way and in accordance with any democratic requirements. (author)

  18. Reconsidering relations between nuclear energy and security concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Kazutomo

    2004-01-01

    Relations between nuclear energy and security concepts can be clarified through investigation into the multivocal nature of security concepts. While military uses of nuclear energy significantly influence national security, peaceful uses of nuclear energy contribute energy security, which is an expanded concept of national security. Military and peaceful uses of nuclear energy have reciprocal actions, thus influencing national security and energy security, respectively. Nuclear security, which means security of nuclear systems themselves, recently attracts the attention of the international society. Nuclear security directly influences national security issues. On the other hand, along with nuclear safety, nuclear security becomes a prerequisite for energy security through peaceful uses of nuclear energy. In investigating into relations between nuclear energy and security concepts, the difficulty of translating the English word of 'nuclear security' into Japanese as well as other languages is found. (author)

  19. Nuclear energy in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacob, F.X.

    1996-01-01

    The Malaysian Vision 2020 envisages doubling of the its economy every ten years for the next three decades. The Second Outline Perspective plan 1991-2000 (OPP2), also known as the National Development Policy (NDP) will set the pace to enable Malaysia to become a fully developed nation by the year 2020. The Malaysian economy is targeted to grow at 7 percent per annum in the decade of OPP2. In view of the targets set under Vision 2020, it is important to ensure that energy does not become a constraint to growth, and this sector develops in a least cost basis. Energy is crucial for industrialization and no modern industrial state can function without it. The paper presents a description of the main utilities in the country. Their installed capacities, maximum demand, generation mix and customers served are discussed. The electricity demand forecast till the year 2020 is presented. The paper presents this for 4 scenarios - a low growth, business as usual scenario, a moderate growth, business as usual scenario, a moderate growth, energy efficient scenario and a targeted growth, energy efficient scenario. The energy resources in the country is described together with its energy policy. The country's four-fuel policy is elaborated with the various options discussed. The environmental and pricing policies with regards to energy is also briefly given. Finally the nuclear option is presented in this context of the country's energy policy. The country had undertaken various studies for the nuclear option. These studies are given in the paper. The purpose of these studies and what the government decided is also discussed. Finally the prospects for the nuclear option in the future for the country is discussed. It is concluded that while, for the present, the nuclear option is not considered by the government, this may not be so in the future. The various reasons for this is given and the paper concludes that it may be prudent to keep this option under constant review. (J.P.N.)

  20. Co-operation agreement. The text of the agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for accounting and control of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-06-25

    The document reproduces the text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials which entered into force on 25 May 1998