WorldWideScience

Sample records for international nosocomial infection

  1. Obesity and nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, R; Karppelin, M; Syrjänen, J

    2013-09-01

    The prevention of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) is a major goal in modern healthcare. Intrinsic, patient-related factors may contribute to the risk of HCAIs. To review the association between obesity and the risk and outcome of HCAIs. A PubMed search of relevant studies on obesity and nosocomial infections and obesity and dosing of antimicrobials. Search terms were: 'obesity', 'infection', 'nosocomial infection', 'surgical site infection', 'critical care unit', 'bacteremia', 'urinary tract infection', 'health care associated infection'. Obesity has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of HCAIs in several studies. The association is most clear in cardiac, vascular, orthopaedic and gastrointestinal surgery. Body mass index (BMI) data are frequently recorded in patients undergoing surgical and invasive procedures. The recording of BMI data is not systematic in the literature and in many studies median BMI of the control group or reference group (normal weight) also indicates overweight or obesity. Thus, clear BMI cut-offs for increased infection risk cannot be determined. Obesity is frequently associated with underdosing of antimicrobials in both prophylaxis and treatment of HCAIs. Studies indicate that obesity affects the pharmacokinetics of antimicrobial drugs. However, there are no dosing recommendations for antimicrobial use in obesity. Obesity increases the risk of nosocomial infections and is frequently associated with underdosing of antimicrobials in both prophylaxis and treatment of HCAIs. A challenge in future hospital hygiene prevention lies in our capacity to combat obesity epidemics. © 2013 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Surgical site infection rates in six cities of India: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sanjeev; Chakravarthy, Murali; Rosenthal, Victor Daniel; Myatra, Sheila N; Dwivedy, Arpita; Bagasrawala, Iqbal; Munshi, Nita; Shah, Sweta; Panigrahi, Bishnu; Sood, Sanjeev; Kumar-Nair, Pravin; Radhakrishnan, Kavitha; Gokul, B N; Sukanya, R; Pushparaj, L; Pramesh, C S; Shrikhande, S V; Gulia, A; Puri, A; Moiyadi, A; Divatia, J V; Kelkar, Rohini; Biswas, Sanjay; Raut, Sandhya; Sampat, Sulochana; Shetty, Suvin; Binu, Sheena; Pinto, Preethi; Arora, Sohini; Kamble, Asmita; Kumari, Neelakshi; Mendonca, Angelina; Singhal, Tanu; Naik, Reshma; Kothari, Vatsal; Sharma, Bindu; Verma, Neeru; Khanna, D K; Chacko, Felcy

    2015-09-01

    Surgical site infections are a threat to patient safety. However, in India, data on their rates stratified by surgical procedure are not available. From January 2005 to December 2011, the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) conducted a cohort prospective surveillance study on surgical site infections in 10 hospitals in 6 Indian cities. CDC National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC-NHSN) methods were applied and surgical procedures were classified into 11 types, according to the ninth edition of the International Classification of Diseases. We documented 1189 surgical site infections, associated with 28 340 surgical procedures (4.2%; 95% CI: 4.0-4.4). Surgical site infections rates were compared with INICC and CDC-NHSN reports, respectively: 4.3% for coronary bypass with chest and donor incision (4.5% vs 2.9%); 8.3% for breast surgery (1.7% vs 2.3%); 6.5% for cardiac surgery (5.6% vs 1.3%); 6.0% for exploratory abdominal surgery (4.1% vs 2.0%), among others. In most types of surgical procedures, surgical site infections rates were higher than those reported by the CDC-NHSN, but similar to INICC. This study is an important advancement towards the knowledge of surgical site infections epidemiology in the participating Indian hospitals that will allow us to introduce targeted interventions. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Update on bacterial nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bereket, W; Hemalatha, K; Getenet, B; Wondwossen, T; Solomon, A; Zeynudin, A; Kannan, S

    2012-08-01

    With increasing use of antimicrobial agents and advance in lifesaving medical practices which expose the patients for invasive procedures, are associated with the ever increasing of nosocomial infections. Despite an effort in hospital infection control measures, health care associated infections are associated with significant morbidity and mortality adding additional health care expenditure which may leads to an economic crisis. The problem is further complicated with the emergence of difficult to treat multidrug resistant (MDR) microorganism in the hospital environment. Virtually every pathogen has the potential to cause infection in hospitalized patients but only limited number of both gram positive and gram negative bacteria are responsible for the majority of nosocomial infection. Among them Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococci takes the leading. Many intrinsic and extrinsic factors predispose hospitalized patients for these pathogens. Following simple hospital hygienic practices and strictly following standard medical procedures greatly reduces infection to a significant level although not all nosocomial infections are avoidable. The clinical spectrum caused by nosocomial pathogens depend on body site of infection, the involving pathogen and the patient's underlying condition. Structural and non structural virulence factors associated with the bacteria are responsible for the observed clinical manifestation. Bacteria isolation and characterization from appropriate clinical materials with antimicrobial susceptibility testing is the standard of laboratory diagnosis.

  4. International variation in disease burden of rotavirus gastroenteritis in children with community- and nosocomially acquired infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frühwirth, M; Heininger, U; Ehlken, B; Petersen, G; Laubereau, B; Moll-Schüler, I; Mutz, I; Forster, J

    2001-08-01

    The great impact of rotavirus disease on morbidity and medical health care costs in industrialized countries together with the withdrawal of the live oral rotavirus vaccine have made a reassessment of rotavirus gastroenteritis necessary. Such a reassessment should provide sufficient data for developing alternative disease prevention strategies and for allocating resources efficiently. To compare characteristics and management of community- and nosocomially acquired rotavirus disease in Austria, Germany and Switzerland. In a prospective, population-based, trinational (Austria, Germany, Switzerland), multicenter (9 cities, 10 hospitals and 30 pediatric practices) study, a total of 174 552 children months and 78 516 hospital days were evaluated. Participants were all children 4 years of age and younger, who either presented at one of the pediatric practices with community-acquired gastroenteritis, or who had acquired gastroenteritis nosocomially. From December, 1997, to May, 1998, prospective antigen testing was done by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and serotyping was done by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Disease severity was scored by the Vesikari severity scale. Rotavirus was detected in 29.5, 27 and 37.5% of children with community-acquired gastroenteritis and in 57, 69 and 49% of children with nosocomial gastroenteritis in Austria, Germany and Switzerland, respectively. Severity of community-acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis was more pronounced in Austria (median severity score, 11) than in Germany (median score, 9) or Switzerland (median score, 10). However, only 2% of Austrian and Swiss children compared with 12% of German children presented to their pediatricians more than four times. Nosocomially acquired rotavirus gastroenteritis was mildest in Austria but occurred within the shortest median duration of hospitalization (4 days vs. 5 and 7 in Germany and Switzerland, respectively). In a multivariant analysis age, family size, day care

  5. Socioeconomic impact on device-associated infections in pediatric intensive care units of 16 limited-resource countries: international Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Jarvis, William R; Jamulitrat, Silom; Silva, Cristiane Pavanello Rodrigues; Ramachandran, Bala; Dueñas, Lourdes; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Ersoz, Gulden; Novales, María Guadalupe Miranda; Khader, Ilham Abu; Ammar, Khaldi; Guzmán, Nayide Barahona; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Seliem, Zeinab Salah; Espinoza, Teodora Atencio; Meng, Cheong Yuet; Jayatilleke, Kushlani

    2012-07-01

    We report the results of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium prospective surveillance study from January 2004 to December 2009 in 33 pediatric intensive care units of 16 countries and the impact of being in a private vs. public hospital and the income country level on device-associated health care-associated infection rates. Additionally, we aim to compare these findings with the results of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network annual report to show the differences between developed and developing countries regarding device-associated health care-associated infection rates. A prospective cohort, active device-associated health care-associated infection surveillance study was conducted on 23,700 patients in International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium pediatric intensive care units. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium. Data collection was performed in the participating intensive care units. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium headquarters on proprietary software. Device-associated health care-associated infection rates were recorded by applying Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Healthcare Safety Network device-associated infection definitions, and the impact of being in a private vs. public hospital and the income country level on device-associated infection risk was evaluated. None. Central line-associated bloodstream infection rates were similar in private, public, or academic hospitals (7.3 vs. 8.4 central line-associated bloodstream infection per 1,000 catheter-days [p infection rates in lower middle-income countries were higher than low-income countries or upper middle-income countries (12.2 vs. 5.5 central line-associated bloodstream infections per 1,000 catheter-days [p infection rates were similar in academic, public and private

  6. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) report, data summary of 43 countries for 2007-2012. Device-associated module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Víctor Daniel; Maki, Dennis George; Mehta, Yatin; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Memish, Ziad Ahmed; Al-Mousa, Haifaa Hassan; Balkhy, Hanan; Hu, Bijie; Alvarez-Moreno, Carlos; Medeiros, Eduardo Alexandrino; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Raka, Lul; Cuellar, Luis E; Ahmed, Altaf; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; El-Kholy, Amani Ali; Kanj, Souha Sami; Bat-Erdene, Ider; Duszynska, Wieslawa; Van Truong, Nguyen; Pazmino, Leonardo N; See-Lum, Lucy Chai; Fernández-Hidalgo, Rosalia; Di-Silvestre, Gabriela; Zand, Farid; Hlinkova, Sona; Belskiy, Vladislav; Al-Rahma, Hussain; Luque-Torres, Marco Tulio; Bayraktar, Nesil; Mitrev, Zan; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Fisher, Dale; Abu-Khader, Ilham Bulos; Berechid, Kamal; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Arnaldo; Horhat, Florin George; Requejo-Pino, Osiel; Hadjieva, Nassya; Ben-Jaballah, Nejla; García-Mayorca, Elías; Kushner-Dávalos, Luis; Pasic, Srdjan; Pedrozo-Ortiz, Luis E; Apostolopoulou, Eleni; Mejía, Nepomuceno; Gamar-Elanbya, May Osman; Jayatilleke, Kushlani; de Lourdes-Dueñas, Miriam; Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe

    2014-09-01

    We report the results of an International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) surveillance study from January 2007-December 2012 in 503 intensive care units (ICUs) in Latin America, Asia, Africa, and Europe. During the 6-year study using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) U.S. National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) definitions for device-associated health care-associated infection (DA-HAI), we collected prospective data from 605,310 patients hospitalized in the INICC's ICUs for an aggregate of 3,338,396 days. Although device utilization in the INICC's ICUs was similar to that reported from ICUs in the U.S. in the CDC's NHSN, rates of device-associated nosocomial infection were higher in the ICUs of the INICC hospitals: the pooled rate of central line-associated bloodstream infection in the INICC's ICUs, 4.9 per 1,000 central line days, is nearly 5-fold higher than the 0.9 per 1,000 central line days reported from comparable U.S. ICUs. The overall rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia was also higher (16.8 vs 1.1 per 1,000 ventilator days) as was the rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (5.5 vs 1.3 per 1,000 catheter days). Frequencies of resistance of Pseudomonas isolates to amikacin (42.8% vs 10%) and imipenem (42.4% vs 26.1%) and Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates to ceftazidime (71.2% vs 28.8%) and imipenem (19.6% vs 12.8%) were also higher in the INICC's ICUs compared with the ICUs of the CDC's NHSN. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Device-Associated Infection Rates in 20 Cities of India, Data Summary for 2004-2013: Findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Yatin; Jaggi, Namita; Rosenthal, Victor Daniel; Kavathekar, Maithili; Sakle, Asmita; Munshi, Nita; Chakravarthy, Murali; Todi, Subhash Kumar; Saini, Narinder; Rodrigues, Camilla; Varma, Karthikeya; Dubey, Rekha; Kazi, Mohammad Mukhit; Udwadia, F E; Myatra, Sheila Nainan; Shah, Sweta; Dwivedy, Arpita; Karlekar, Anil; Singh, Sanjeev; Sen, Nagamani; Limaye-Joshi, Kashmira; Ramachandran, Bala; Sahu, Suneeta; Pandya, Nirav; Mathur, Purva; Sahu, Samir; Singh, Suman P; Bilolikar, Anil Kumar; Kumar, Siva; Mehta, Preeti; Padbidri, Vikram; Gita, N; Patnaik, Saroj K; Francis, Thara; Warrier, Anup R; Muralidharan, S; Nair, Pravin Kumar; Subhedar, Vaibhavi R; Gopinath, Ramachadran; Azim, Afzal; Sood, Sanjeev

    2016-02-01

    To report the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium surveillance data from 40 hospitals (20 cities) in India 2004-2013. Surveillance using US National Healthcare Safety Network's criteria and definitions, and International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium methodology. We collected data from 236,700 ICU patients for 970,713 bed-days Pooled device-associated healthcare-associated infection rates for adult and pediatric ICUs were 5.1 central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs)/1,000 central line-days, 9.4 cases of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAPs)/1,000 mechanical ventilator-days, and 2.1 catheter-associated urinary tract infections/1,000 urinary catheter-days In neonatal ICUs (NICUs) pooled rates were 36.2 CLABSIs/1,000 central line-days and 1.9 VAPs/1,000 mechanical ventilator-days Extra length of stay in adult and pediatric ICUs was 9.5 for CLABSI, 9.1 for VAP, and 10.0 for catheter-associated urinary tract infections. Extra length of stay in NICUs was 14.7 for CLABSI and 38.7 for VAP Crude extra mortality was 16.3% for CLABSI, 22.7% for VAP, and 6.6% for catheter-associated urinary tract infections in adult and pediatric ICUs, and 1.2% for CLABSI and 8.3% for VAP in NICUs Pooled device use ratios were 0.21 for mechanical ventilator, 0.39 for central line, and 0.53 for urinary catheter in adult and pediatric ICUs; and 0.07 for mechanical ventilator and 0.06 for central line in NICUs. Despite a lower device use ratio in our ICUs, our device-associated healthcare-associated infection rates are higher than National Healthcare Safety Network, but lower than International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Report.

  8. Impact of an International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium multidimensional approach on catheter-associated urinary tract infections in adult intensive care units in the Philippines: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Berba, Regina; Rosenthal, Victor D; Villanueva, Victoria D; Tolentino, María Corazon V; Genuino, Glenn Angelo S; Consunji, Rafael J; Mantaring, Jacinto Blas V

    2013-10-01

    To assess the impact of a multidimensional infection control approach on the reduction of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates in adult intensive care units (AICUs) in two hospitals in the Philippines that are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium. This was a before-after prospective active surveillance study to determine the rates of CAUTI in 3183 patients hospitalized in 4 ICUS over 14,426 bed-days. The study was divided into baseline and intervention periods. During baseline, surveillance was performed using the definitions of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN). During intervention, we implemented a multidimensional approach that included: (1) a bundle of infection control interventions, (2) education, (3) surveillance of CAUTI rates, (4) feedback on CAUTI rates, (5) process surveillance and (6) performance feedback. We used random effects Poisson regression to account for the clustering of CAUTI rates across time. We recorded 8720 urinary catheter (UC)-days: 819 at baseline and 7901 during intervention. The rate of CAUTI was 11.0 per 1000 UC-days at baseline and was decreased by 76% to 2.66 per 1000 UC-days during intervention [rate ratio [RR], 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.11-0.53; P-value, 0.0001]. Our multidimensional approach was associated with a significant reduction in the CAUTI rates in the ICU setting of a limited-resource country. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Relationship between climate conditions and nosocomial infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections constitute a global health problem. Objective: To explore the relationship between nosocomial infection rates (NIRs) and climatic factors including temperature and relative humidity in Guangzhou area of China. Methods: 30892 patients in our hospital in 2009 were investigated for ...

  10. Nosocomial infections and their control strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Ahmed Khan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections are also known as hospital-acquired/associated infections. National Healthcare Safety Network along with Centers for Disease Control for surveillance has classified nosocomial infection sites into 13 types with 50 infection sites, which are specific on the basis of biological and clinical criteria. The agents that are usually involved in hospital-acquired infections include Streptococcus spp., Acinetobacter spp., enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, coagulase-negative staphylococci, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus cereus, Legionella and Enterobacteriaceae family members, namely, Proteus mirablis, Klebsiella pneumonia, Escherichia coli, Serratia marcescens. Nosocomial pathogens can be transmitted through person to person, environment or contaminated water and food, infected individuals, contaminated healthcare personnel's skin or contact via shared items and surfaces. Mainly, multi-drug-resistant nosocomial organisms include methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella pneumonia, whereas Clostridium difficile shows natural resistance. Excessive and improper use of broad-spectrum antibiotics, especially in healthcare settings, is elevating nosocomial infections, which not only becomes a big health care problem but also causes great economic and production loss in the community. Nosocomial infections can be controlled by measuring and comparing the infection rates within healthcare settings and sticking to the best healthcare practices. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides the methodology for surveillance of nosocomial infections along with investigation of major outbreaks. By means of this surveillance, hospitals can devise a strategy comprising of infection control practices.

  11. Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Postoperative Nosocomial Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance Pattern of Bacteria Isolates among Patients Admitted at Felege Hiwot Referral Hospital, Bahirdar, ... Wound swab and venous blood samples were collected and processed for bacterial isolation and antimicrobial susceptibility testing following standard ...

  12. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J Indian Acad. Geriatric 2005;2:61‑4. 11. Vincent JL, Bihari DJ, Suter PM, Bruining HA, White J,. Nicolas‑Chanoin MH, et al. The prevalence of nosocomial infection in intensive care units in Europe. Results of the. European Prevalence of Infection in Intensive Care (EPIC). Study. EPIC International Advisory Committee.

  13. NOSOCOMIAL WOUND INFECTION AMONGST POST OPERATIVE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    associated with nosocomial infections also becomes a major therapeutic challenge for physicians. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify post operative bacterial infections in the patients developing surgical site infections at a tertiary University hospital in North India during July 2013 to Dec 2013. Methods: One hundred ...

  14. Nosocomial urinary tract infections: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacovelli, Valerio; Gaziev, Gabriele; Topazio, Luca; Bove, Pierluigi; Vespasiani, Giuseppe; Finazzi Agrò, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Nosocomial urinary tract infections are a common complication in healthcare systems worldwide. A review of the literature was performed in June 2014 using the Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE) database, through either PubMed or Ovid as a search engine, to identify publications regarding nosocomial urinary tract infections (NUTIs) definition, epidemiology, etiology and treatment.According to current definitions, more than 30% of nosocomial infections are urinary tract infections (UTIs). A UTI is defined 'nosocomial' (NUTI) when it is acquired in any healthcare institution or, more generally, when it is related to patient management. The origin of nosocomial bacteria is endogenous (the patient's flora) in two thirds of the cases. Patients with indwelling urinary catheters, those undergoing urological surgery and manipulations, long-stay elderly male patients and patients with debilitating diseases are at high risk of developing NUTIs. All bacterial NUTIs should be treated, whether the patient is harboring a urinary catheter or not. The length of treatment depends on the infection site. There is abundance of important guidance which should be considered to reduce the risk of NUTIs (hand disinfection with instant hand sanitizer, wearing non-sterile gloves permanently, isolation of infected or colonized catheterized patients). Patients with asymptomatic bacteriuria can generally be treated initially with catheter removal or catheter exchange, and do not necessarily need antimicrobial therapy. Symptomatic patients should receive antibiotic therapy. Resistance of urinary pathogens to common antibiotics is currently a topic of concern.

  15. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Infections in critical care unit are high, and of serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission.[1,2]. National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance system defines a nosocomial ...

  16. Relationship between climate conditions and nosocomial infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EB

    Abstract. Background: Nosocomial infections constitute a global health problem. Objective: To explore the relationship between .... Figure 1: Average monthly temperature (a), relative humidity (b) andnosocomial infection rates. (NIRs) (c) in 2009 among different ... Acinetobacter baumannii. 5. 0. 0. 4. 6. 1. 1. 5. Pseudomonas ...

  17. Original Paper Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-04-20

    Apr 20, 2011 ... Key Words: Bacterial pathogens, Endogenous indicators, NosocomiaI infection, Surgery. Received 30 October 2010/ Accepted 30 March 2011. INTRODUCTION. Micro-organisms from intrinsic and extrinsic sources have been known to cause nosocomial infections (CDC, 1991). The human body enables.

  18. Device-associated infection rates, mortality, length of stay and bacterial resistance in intensive care units in Ecuador: International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium’s findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado Yepez, Estuardo; Bovera, Maria M; Rosenthal, Victor D; González Flores, Hugo A; Pazmiño, Leonardo; Valencia, Francisco; Alquinga, Nelly; Ramirez, Vanessa; Jara, Edgar; Lascano, Miguel; Delgado, Veronica; Cevallos, Cristian; Santacruz, Gasdali; Pelaéz, Cristian; Zaruma, Celso; Barahona Pinto, Diego

    2017-01-01

    AIM To report the results of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) study conducted in Quito, Ecuador. METHODS A device-associated healthcare-acquired infection (DA-HAI) prospective surveillance study conducted from October 2013 to January 2015 in 2 adult intensive care units (ICUs) from 2 hospitals using the United States Centers for Disease Control/National Healthcare Safety Network (CDC/NHSN) definitions and INICC methods. RESULTS We followed 776 ICU patients for 4818 bed-days. The central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rate was 6.5 per 1000 central line (CL)-days, the ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rate was 44.3 per 1000 mechanical ventilator (MV)-days, and the catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rate was 5.7 per 1000 urinary catheter (UC)-days. CLABSI and CAUTI rates in our ICUs were similar to INICC rates [4.9 (CLABSI) and 5.3 (CAUTI)] and higher than NHSN rates [0.8 (CLABSI) and 1.3 (CAUTI)] - although device use ratios for CL and UC were higher than INICC and CDC/NSHN’s ratios. By contrast, despite the VAP rate was higher than INICC (16.5) and NHSN’s rates (1.1), MV DUR was lower in our ICUs. Resistance of A. baumannii to imipenem and meropenem was 75.0%, and of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin and piperacillin-tazobactam was higher than 72.7%, all them higher than CDC/NHSN rates. Excess length of stay was 7.4 d for patients with CLABSI, 4.8 for patients with VAP and 9.2 for patients CAUTI. Excess crude mortality in ICUs was 30.9% for CLABSI, 14.5% for VAP and 17.6% for CAUTI. CONCLUSION DA-HAI rates in our ICUs from Ecuador are higher than United States CDC/NSHN rates and similar to INICC international rates. PMID:28289522

  19. Antibiogram of nosocomial urinary tract infections in Felege Hiwot ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nosocomial infections increase the cost of medical care, extend hospital stay and reflect on the morbidity and mortality of the admitted patients. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in humans. Objectives: To determine the prevalence and antibiogram of nosocomial ...

  20. Nosocomial infections in developing countries: Cost effective control ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Data extraction: From individual studies or articles. Data synthesis: Information on nosocomial infections from developing and developed countries with some emphasis on Kenya is synchronized under the headings; introduction, historical background of nosocomial infections. Current situation of nosocomial infections and ...

  1. Major Trends in the Microbial Etiiology of Nosocomial Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.R. Schaberg; D.H. Culver; R.P. Gaynes

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTo determine trends in the microbial etiology of nosocomial infections in the 1980s, surveillance data on the microbiology of documented nosocomial infection reported to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System and from the University of Michigan Hospital were analyzed.

  2. Prevention and treatment of neonatal nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasethu, Jayashree

    2017-01-01

    Nosocomial or hospital acquired infections threaten the survival and neurodevelopmental outcomes of infants admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit, and increase cost of care. Premature infants are particularly vulnerable since they often undergo invasive procedures and are dependent on central catheters to deliver nutrition and on ventilators for respiratory support. Prevention of nosocomial infection is a critical patient safety imperative, and invariably requires a multidisciplinary approach. There are no short cuts. Hand hygiene before and after patient contact is the most important measure, and yet, compliance with this simple measure can be unsatisfactory. Alcohol based hand sanitizer is effective against many microorganisms and is efficient, compared to plain or antiseptic containing soaps. The use of maternal breast milk is another inexpensive and simple measure to reduce infection rates. Efforts to replicate the anti-infectious properties of maternal breast milk by the use of probiotics, prebiotics, and synbiotics have met with variable success, and there are ongoing trials of lactoferrin, an iron binding whey protein present in large quantities in colostrum. Attempts to boost the immunoglobulin levels of preterm infants with exogenous immunoglobulins have not been shown to reduce nosocomial infections significantly. Over the last decade, improvements in the incidence of catheter-related infections have been achieved, with meticulous attention to every detail from insertion to maintenance, with some centers reporting zero rates for such infections. Other nosocomial infections like ventilator acquired pneumonia and staphylococcus aureus infection remain problematic, and outbreaks with multidrug resistant organisms continue to have disastrous consequences. Management of infections is based on the profile of microorganisms in the neonatal unit and community and targeted therapy is required to control the disease without leading to the development of more

  3. Nosocomial infections in the rehabilitation department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santus, G; Brun, C; Viani, P; Pirali, F; Pirali, F

    2005-09-01

    The patients of a Rehabilitation Department are at high risk of nosocomial infections because they generally have a long term hospitalisation and more and more frequently immune-compromised subjects, like old patients or with chronic illness, are admitted to rehabilitation programs. However, to evaluate the real infectious risk of a Rehabilitation Unit, it is important to consider also that a high number of patients are transferred from other hospitals after a specific therapy of the acute phase of their medical or surgical pathology and so many nosocomial microrganisms previously acquired may spread to a Rehabilitation Unit. From January to December 2003 we have performed a screening of the bacteruria among the patients at admittance to the Rehabilitation Unit of S. Orsola Fatebenefratelli Hospital of Brescia (Italy). A significant bacteruria (>100000 cfu/mL) in 28.9% of 114 patients coming from home and in 41.9% of 179 patients transferred from other hospitals without antibacterial treatment has been documented. These findings confirm the presence of an high number of patients colonized or infected by nosocomial bacteria previously acquired in hospital and underline the need, in addition to specific skill, of wide infectious knowledge among the medical staff of a Rehabilitation Unit. A specific approach to the infectious problem in the Rehabilitation Department in order to reduce the risk of nosocomial infections may be suggested.

  4. Nosocomial Fungal Infections: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suleyman, Geehan; Alangaden, George J

    2016-12-01

    Invasive fungal infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients and in the immunocompromised population. This article reviews the current epidemiology of nosocomial fungal infections in adult patients, with an emphasis on invasive candidiasis and aspergillosis. Recently published recommendations and guidelines for the control and prevention of these nosocomial fungal infections are summarized in this article. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Nosocomial infections in intensive care units].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaragoza, Rafael; Ramírez, Paula; López-Pueyo, María Jesús

    2014-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) still have a high incidence in intensive care units (ICUs), and are becoming one of the most important problems in these units. It is well known that these infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in critically ill patients, and are associated with increases in the length of stay and excessive hospital costs. Based on the data from the ENVIN-UCI study, the rates and aetiology of the main nosocomial infections have been described, and include ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and both primary and catheter related bloodstream infections, as well as the incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria. A literature review on the impact of different nosocomial infections in critically ill patients is also presented. Infection control programs such as zero bacteraemia and pneumonia have been also analysed, and show a significant decrease in NI rates in ICUs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menegueti, Mayra Gonçalves; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; Bellissimo-Rodrigues, Fernando; Laus, Ana Maria

    2015-01-01

    to evaluate the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs in hospital institutions regarding structure and process indicators. this is a descriptive, exploratory and quantitative study conducted in 2013. The study population comprised 13 Nosocomial Infection Control Programs of health services in a Brazilian city of the state of São Paulo. Public domain instruments available in the Manual of Evaluation Indicators of Nosocomial Infection Control Practices were used. The indicators with the highest average compliance were "Evaluation of the Structure of the Nosocomial Infection Control Programs" (75%) and "Evaluation of the Epidemiological Surveillance System of Nosocomial Infection" (82%) and those with the lowest mean compliance scores were "Evaluation of Operational Guidelines" (58.97%) and "Evaluation of Activities of Control and Prevention of Nosocomial Infection" (60.29%). The use of indicators identified that, despite having produced knowledge about prevention and control of nosocomial infections, there is still a large gap between the practice and the recommendations.

  7. [Antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections' causal agents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Holguín, Héctor Daniel; Cisneros-Robledo, María Elena

    2016-01-01

    The antibibiotic resistance by nosocomial infections (NI) causal agents constitutes a seriously global problematic that involves the Mexican Institute of Social Security's Regional General Hospital 1 in Chihuahua, Mexico; although with special features that required to be specified and evaluated, in order to concrete an effective therapy. Observational, descriptive and prospective study; by means of active vigilance all along 2014 in order to detect the nosocomial infections, for epidemiologic study, culture and antibiogram to identify its causal agents and antibiotics resistance and sensitivity. Among 13527 hospital discharges, 1079 displayed NI (8 %), standed out: the related on vascular lines, of surgical site, pneumonia and urinal track; they added up two thirds of the total. We carried out culture and antibiogram about 300 of them (27.8 %); identifying 31 bacterian species, mainly seven of those (77.9 %): Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter cloacae; showing multiresistance to 34 tested antibiotics, except in seven with low or without resistance at all: vancomycin, teicoplanin, linezolid, quinupristin-dalfopristin, piperacilin-tazobactam, amikacin and carbapenems. When we contrasted those results with the recommendations in the clinical practice guides, it aroused several contradictions; so they must be taken with reserves and has to be tested in each hospital, by means of cultures and antibiograms in practically every case of nosocomial infection.

  8. Major Trends in the Microbial Etiiology of Nosocomial Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Schaberg, D.R.; Culver, D.H.; Gaynes, R.P.

    1991-01-01

    textabstractTo determine trends in the microbial etiology of nosocomial infections in the 1980s, surveillance data on the microbiology of documented nosocomial infection reported to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System and from the University of Michigan Hospital were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility data on selected pathogens from both sources were also reviewed. Overall, Escherichia coli decreased from 23% of infections in 1980 to 16% in 1986–1989, Klebsiella pneumon...

  9. Nosocomial infective endocarditis in Hemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, A.W.; Solangi, S.; Murtada, O.

    2002-01-01

    There is an increased risk of infective endocarditis catheterization usedfor Hemodialysis. We report a case of a young man who had endocarditissecondary to the use of a permanent jugular catheter for hemodialysis. Bloodcultures were repeatedly negative, but vegetations were seen on the tricuspidvalve on echocardiography. A high index of suspicion is recommended for thisserious complication. (author)

  10. Quality of nosocomial infection control in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danchaivijitr, Somwang; Supchutikul, Anuwat; Waitayapiches, Sribenja; Kachintorn, Kanchana

    2005-12-01

    To study the quality of nosocomial infection control with respect to structure and process. Data collection by questionnaire and interview administrators and medical personnel in 57 hospitals in Thailand in 2002. Nosocomial infection control was implemented in all 57 hospitals. In every hospital, there was an infection control committee (ICC) and at least 1 infection control nurse (ICN). The quality of ICNs regarding knowledge, skill and time available for infection control needed to be improved. Surveillance methods of NI were not appropriate in many hospitals. Doctors were not interested in NI control and supply of certain materials was not adequate. Lack of support and co-operation of doctors and nurses was found. Service of certain departments needed to be revised in over 50%. Doctors and nurses not directly involved in NI controlled were not satisfied with current practices. Quality of NI control in Thailand has yet to be improved regarding structure and process. Better cooperation between NI control team and healthcare personnel needs to be developed.

  11. Empiric Antibiotic Therapy of Nosocomial Bacterial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Broad-spectrum antibiotics are commonly used by physicians to treat various infections. The source of infection and causative organisms are not always apparent during the initial evaluation of the patient, and antibiotics are often given empirically to patients with suspected sepsis. Fear of attempting cephalosporins and carbapenems in penicillin-allergic septic patients may result in significant decrease in the spectrum of antimicrobial coverage. Empiric antibiotic therapy should sufficiently cover all the suspected pathogens, guided by the bacteriologic susceptibilities of the medical center. It is important to understand the major pharmacokinetic properties of antibacterial agents for proper use and to minimize the development of resistance. In several septic patients, negative cultures do not exclude active infection and positive cultures may not represent the actual infection. This article will review the important differences in the spectrum of commonly used antibiotics for nosocomial bacterial infections with a particular emphasis on culture-negative sepsis and colonization.

  12. Nosocomial infections and related factors in southern khorasan hospitals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bita Bijari

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Nosocomial infections are defined as infections occurring during a patient's stay at hospital (48-72h after admission.Nosocomial infections are one of the important problems of health. This study aimed was determine the prevalence of nosocomial infections, and related factors in hospitals with more than 100 beds in south Khorasan Province. Materials and Methods: In this crass-sectional study, an investigator-administered questionnaire was completed for each patient with nosocomial infections diagnosis in hospitals with more than 100 beds in South Khorasan. This questionnaire conation demographic characteristic of patients, department, duration of admission, kind of pathogen and risk factors that was designed according to standard questionnaire of Iranian Nasocomial infections surveillance system (INIS of Center for communicable Disease Control, Ministry of Health. Data were analyzed with SPSS 16 software. Results and discussion: Number of patients with nosocomial infection was 358. The incidence of nosocomial infection was 0.9%. ICU had the highest incidence rate (17.3%. The most common nosocomial infection was pneumonia (43%, and urinary tract infection (UTI (15.1%. In 33.5% culture result were negative. In other cases, culture results showed klebsiella spp. (12.8% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.8% were the most prevalent bacteria. Most factors associated with nosocomial infection in patients were urinary catheters (70.4%, suction (66.8% and tracheal tube (54.2%. 24% of patients expired. The results showed lower ratio of nosocomial infection, that the main reason is failure to detection and reporting of actual cases of nosocomial infection. Promoting detection and reporting system for Prevention and control of nosocomial infection was recommended

  13. [Prevention of nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance in nursing homes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleckwenn, Markus; Hammerschmidt, Judith; Rösing, Claudia; Klaschik, Manuela

    2017-06-14

    Nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant organisms are an increasing problem in nursing homes worldwide; therefore, new approaches for infection control need to be developed. This article gives an overview of infections in nursing homes, their medical treatment and previous measures for infection prevention. The article is based on a selective literature search including the literature database PubMed. In particular, scientific studies on the prevalence of nosocomial infections in German nursing homes, publications for medical care in long-term care facilities in Europe and international studies for infection prevention were evaluated. The basis for an effective reduction of infections is the establishment of a surveillance system. All participating medical professionals provide feedback about local infections and resistance situations and the presence of risk factors, such as urinary catheters or chronic wounds. Only then can targeted antibiotic strategies be adapted and the effectiveness of preventive measures, such as hand disinfection is continuously reviewed. So far, in particular multimodal, multidisciplinary prevention projects were successful. These included frequent staff training, reduction of urinary catheters and a rational use of antibiotics. Most prevention models have been previously tested in hospitals. A possible applicability of the results to the infection prevention in long-term care facilities has so far hardly been studied. Accordingly, further studies on infection control in nursing homes are absolutely necessary.

  14. Nosocomial and Community Acquired Infections in Korle Bu ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Nosocomial or hospital acquired infection has been recognized as a serious public health problem in the last twenty years. In most hospitals in Africa-South of the Sahara, although the types of community acquired infections are known, neither the magnitude, nor the common types of nosocomial infections ...

  15. Nosocomial infections in patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Archana; Dibu, Jamil; Achi, Eugene; Patel, Anand; Samant, Rohan; Yaghi, Shadi

    2015-05-01

    Nosocomial infections are frequent complications in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. To determine the prevalence, risk factors, and outcomes of nosocomial infections in patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. Prospectively collected data on patients with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage between January 2009 and June 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Patients who had nosocomial infection during the hospital stay were compared with patients who did not. Poor outcome was defined as death or discharge to a long-term nursing facility. At least 1 nosocomial infection developed in 26% of 202 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. The most common infections were pneumonia (18%), urinary tract infection (12%), meningitis or ventriculitis (3%), and bacteremia (1%). On univariate analysis, independent predictors of nosocomial infection were intraventricular hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, low score on the Glasgow Coma Scale at admission, hyperglycemia at admission, and treatment with mechanical ventilation. On multivariate regression analysis, the only significant predictor of nosocomial infection was intraventricular hemorrhage (odds ratio, 5.4; 95% CI, 1.2-11.4; P = .02). Patients with nosocomial infection were more likely than those without to require a percutaneous gastrostomy tube (odds ratio, 33.1, 95% CI, 23.3-604.4; P nosocomial pneumonia were also more likely to have a poor outcome (P infection among patients with intracerebral hemorrhage. ©2015 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  16. Neonatal listeriosis followed by nosocomial infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Dinic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal listeriosis is widely reported, but this is the first case reported in Serbia. A newborn developed respiratory distress syndrome 2 hours after delivery and was admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. Initial empirical therapy was inappropriate. Consequently, on the second day, the patient developed meningitis. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from the tracheal aspirate, blood, periumbilical swab, and cerebrospinal fluid. After bacteriology results, the therapy was changed to ampicillin and meropenem. On day 11 of hospitalization, the patient developed nosocomial infection due to multidrug-resistant Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Since therapeutic options were limited, the patient was treated with ciprofloxacin. After 26 days of hospitalization the patient showed complete recovery and was discharged with no apparent sequelae. This case showed the importance of bacteriological examination in cases of infections caused by uncommon organisms. Pediatricians should be aware of the neonatal infection caused by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia.

  17. Incidence, pathogens and resistance patterns of nosocomial infections at a rural hospital in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherbaum, Micha; Kösters, Katrin; Mürbeth, Raymund Egid; Ngoa, Ulysse Ateba; Kremsner, Peter Gottfried; Lell, Bertrand; Alabi, Abraham

    2014-03-04

    Nosocomial infections pose substantial risk to patients receiving care in hospitals. In Africa, this problem is aggravated by inadequate infection control due to poor hygiene, resource and structural constraints, deficient surveillance data and lack of awareness regarding nosocomial infections. We carried out this study to determine the incidence and spectrum of nosocomial infections, pathogens and antibiotic resistance patterns in a tertiary regional hospital in Lambaréné, Gabon. This prospective case study was carried out over a period of six months at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon. All patients admitted to the departments of surgery, gynecology/obstetrics and internal medicine were screened daily for signs and symptoms of hospital-acquired infections. A total of 2925 patients were screened out of which 46 nosocomial infections (1.6%) were diagnosed. These comprised 20 (44%) surgical-site infections, 12 (26%) urinary-tract infections, 9 (20%) bacteraemias and 5 (11%) other infections. High rates of nosocomial infections were found after hysterectomies (12%) and Caesarean sections (6%). Most frequent pathogens were Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Eight (40%) of 20 identified E. coli and Klebsiella spp. strains were ESBL-producing organisms. The cumulative incidence of nosocomial infections in this study was low; however, the high rates of surgical site infections and multi-resistant pathogens necessitate urgent comprehensive interventions of infection control.

  18. [Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Heladia; Martínez-Muñoz, Angeles Nahima; Peregrino-Bejarano, Leoncio

    2014-01-01

    Newborns who are admitted to neonatal intensive care units are at a high risk for the development of a nosocomial infection. The purpose of this study was to record the incidence and the type of nosocomial infections, the isolated microorganisms and the susceptibility profile of these newborns in a neonatal intensive care unit. A descriptive, prospective, longitudinal study was conducted over a 1-year period. Out of 113 newborns with nosocomial infection, demographic variables, antibiotic use prior to admission, central venous catheter use, type of nosocomial infection, isolated microorganism and susceptibility profile were recorded. One hundred and forty nine nosocomial infection episodes were recorded, with an incidence of 37.7 × 100 discharges and an incidence density rate of 25.6 × 1000 patient-days. The most common nosocomial infections were central venous catheter colonization related bacteremia (35.5 %) and sepsis (28.8 %). The most common microorganisms were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (43.4 %) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (21 %), out of which 97.3 % were extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producers. The incidence of nosocomial infection was similar to that reported in developing countries. Central venous catheter colonization-related bacteremia and gram-positive bacteria were the most common nosocomial infection and causative microorganisms, respectively.

  19. Prevention of nosocomial bloodstream infections in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractProtecting patients from harm is the overarching theme of the studies presented here. More precisely, this thesis places a focus on the prevention of nosocomial or hospitalacquired bloodstream infections in preterm infants, thus saving them from further harm. A nosocomial infection is an

  20. Nosocomial infections in pediatric patients with burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, J M; Sheridan, R L; Pasternack, M S; Tompkins, R G

    1997-06-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) are believed to occur more commonly in patients with burns than in patients undergoing surgery, but benchmark rates have not been well described, and widely accepted definitions of NI in patients with burns are not available. We present a clinically useful set of definitions for NI for the pediatric burn population and provide benchmark infection rates for NI at selected sites. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions were modified to more accurately describe nosocomial burn infection and secondary bloodstream infections (BSI) in the burn population. A surveillance system was developed and included calculation of NI rates by 1000 patient or device days, stratified into one of three risk groups (burn injury, 30% to 60% burn injury, and > 60% burn injury). All patients with acute burns admitted from January 1990 to December 1991 were included, and NI rates were calculated for burn infection, primary and secondary BSI, ventilator-related pneumonia and urinary catheter-related urinary tract infection (UTI). Overall 12.5% of patients with central venous catheters had development of primary BSI for a rate of 4.9/1000 central venous catheter-days. Incidence of secondary BSI was 5.8% of patients for a rate of 5.3/1000 patient-days. Incidence of burn infection was 10.1% of patients for a rate of 5.6/1000 patient-days. Incidence of ventilator-related pneumonia was 17.5% of patients for a rate of 11.4/1000 ventilator-days. Incidence of urinary catheter-related UTI was 17.9% of patients, for a rate of 13.2/1000 urinary catheter-days. When rates were stratified by risk groups, incidence increased with increasing burn size for secondary BSI (p number of patient-days or device-days more accurately reflected risk of infection over time. Infection remains a cause of significant morbidity and death for patients with burns. The definitions and benchmark rates reported here may be useful in evaluation of NI surveillance strategies and

  1. Nosocomial infections by respiratory syncytial virus in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maren Karina Machado Echeverría

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Acute lower respiratory infections cause high morbidity and mortality in children. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most prevalent agent. Some viruses cause serious nosocomial infections. In Uruguay, there is no knowledge about the morbidity and mortality of nosocomial infections by RSV. Objective: To determine the prevalence and characteristics of RSV nosocomial infections. Methodology: A descriptive study of acute lower respiratory infections caused by RSV in patients younger than two years, between 1/1/2005 and 31/12/2008 at the Hospital Pediátrico del Centro Hospitalario Pereira Rossell, was made. Results: Were identified 59 patients who represented an annual rate lower than 2/1000 discharges. The monthly distribution of cases was similar to the respiratory infections. No outbreaks were reported. The age of the patients had an average of 8.9 months, 39 were younger than one year, 23 had one or more risk factors for severe disease. Six patients required admission to intensive care unit, all required invasive ventilation, 3 died, none had chronic respiratory failure following the RSV nosocomial infection. Conclusions: During the study period, the RSV nosocomial infections showed a low prevalence, despite it highly contagiousness. They mainly affected young children, carriers of risk factors for severe ALRI. Their evolution was similar to that reported for RSV respiratory infections community acquired. It is important to maintain standards for the control of nosocomial infections, to prevent nosocomial transmission of RSV and prevent the onset of severe disease in hospitalized patients.

  2. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach in five intensive care units in three cities of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, D; Hu, B; Rosenthal, V D; Li, R; Hao, C; Pan, W; Tao, L; Gao, X; Liu, K

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene (HH) Approach in three hospitals in three cities of China, and analyze predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance. A prospective before-after study from May 2009 to December 2010 in five intensive care units members of the INICC in China. The study was divided into two periods: a 3-month baseline period and a follow-up period. A Multidimensional HH Approach was implemented, which included the following elements: 1- administrative support, 2- supplies availability, 3- education and training, 4- reminders in the workplace, 5- process surveillance and 6- performance feedback. Observations were done for HH compliance in each ICU, during randomly selected 30-min periods. A total of 2079 opportunities for HH were recorded. Overall HH compliance increased from 51.5% to 80.1% (95% CI 73.2-87.8; P = 0.004). Multivariate analysis indicated that several variables were significantly associated with poor HH compliance: females vs males (64% vs 55%; 95% CI 0.81-0.94; P = 0.0005), nurses vs physicians (64% vs 57%, P = 0.004), among others. Adherence to HH was increased significantly with the INICC multidimensional approach. Specific programs directed to improve HH in variables found to be predictors of poor HH compliance should be implemented. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach, over 8 years, in 11 cities of Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Koksal, Iftihar; Akan, Özay Arıkan; Özgültekin, Asu; Kendirli, Tanil; Erben, Nurettin; Yalcin, Ata Nevzat; Ulusoy, Sercan; Sirmatel, Fatma; Ozdemir, Davut; Alp, Emine; Yıldızdaş, Dinçer; Esen, Saban; Ulger, Fatma; Dilek, Ahmet; Yilmaz, Hava; Yýlmaz, Gürdal; Kaya, Selçuk; Ulusoy, Hülya; Tulunay, Melek; Oral, Mehmet; Ünal, Necmettin; Turan, Güldem; Akgün, Nur; İnan, Asuman; Ince, Erdal; Karbuz, Adem; Çiftçi, Ergin; Taşyapar, Nevin; Güneş, Melek; Ozgunes, Ilhan; Usluer, Gaye; Turhan, Ozge; Gunay, Nurgul; Gumus, Eylul; Dursun, Oguz; Arda, Bilgin; Bacakoglu, Feza; Cengiz, Mustafa; Yilmaz, Leyla; Geyik, Mehmet Faruk; Şahin, Ahmet; Erdogan, Selvi; Kılıc, Aysegul Ulu; Horoz, Ozden Ozgur

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the effectiveness of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Hand Hygiene Approach in Turkey and analyse predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance. Design: An observational, prospective, interventional, before-and-after study was conducted from August 2003 to August 2011 in 12 intensive care units (ICU) of 12 hospitals in 11 cities. The study was divided into a baseline and a follow-up period and included random 30-minute observations for hand hygiene compliance in ICU. The hand hygiene approach included administrative support, supplies availability, education and training, reminders in the workplace, process surveillance, and performance feedback. Results: We observed 21,145 opportunities for hand hygiene. Overall hand hygiene compliance increased from 28.8% to 91% (95% CI 87.6–93.0, p 0.0001). Multivariate and univariate analyses showed that several variables were significantly associated with poor hand hygiene compliance: males vs. females (39% vs. 48%; 95% CI 0.79–0.84, p 0.0001), ancillary staff vs. physicians (35% vs. 46%, 95% CI 0.73–0.78, p 0.0001), and adult vs. pediatric ICUs (42% vs. 74%, 95% CI 0.54–0.60, p 0.0001). Conclusions: Adherence to hand hygiene was significantly increased with the INICC Hand Hygiene Approach. Specific programmes should be directed to improve hand hygiene in variables found to be predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance. PMID:28989420

  4. Modelling the contact propagation of nosocomial infection in emergency departments

    OpenAIRE

    Jaramillo, Cecilia; Taboada, Manel; Epelde, Francisco; Rexachs, Dolores; Luque Amat, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    The nosocomial infection is a special kind of infection that is caused by microorganisms acquired inside a hospital. In the daily care process of an emergency department, the interactions between patients and sanitary staff create the environment for the transmission of such microorganisms. Rates of morbility and mortality due to nosocomial infections areimportant indicators of the quality of hospital work. In this research, we use Agent Based Modeling and Simulation tech...

  5. Impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy on catheter-associated urinary tract infection rates in the adult intensive care units of 15 developing countries: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, V D; Todi, S K; Álvarez-Moreno, C; Pawar, M; Karlekar, A; Zeggwagh, A A; Mitrev, Z; Udwadia, F E; Navoa-Ng, J A; Chakravarthy, M; Salomao, R; Sahu, S; Dilek, A; Kanj, S S; Guanche-Garcell, H; Cuéllar, L E; Ersoz, G; Nevzat-Yalcin, A; Jaggi, N; Medeiros, E A; Ye, G; Akan, Ö A; Mapp, T; Castañeda-Sabogal, A; Matta-Cortés, L; Sirmatel, F; Olarte, N; Torres-Hernández, H; Barahona-Guzmán, N; Fernández-Hidalgo, R; Villamil-Gómez, W; Sztokhamer, D; Forciniti, S; Berba, R; Turgut, H; Bin, C; Yang, Y; Pérez-Serrato, I; Lastra, C E; Singh, S; Ozdemir, D; Ulusoy, S

    2012-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of a multidimensional infection control strategy for the reduction of the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) in patients hospitalized in adult intensive care units (AICUs) of hospitals which are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC), from 40 cities of 15 developing countries: Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, India, Lebanon, Macedonia, Mexico, Morocco, Panama, Peru, Philippines, and Turkey. We conducted a prospective before-after surveillance study of CAUTI rates on 56,429 patients hospitalized in 57 AICUs, during 360,667 bed-days. The study was divided into the baseline period (Phase 1) and the intervention period (Phase 2). In Phase 1, active surveillance was performed. In Phase 2, we implemented a multidimensional infection control approach that included: (1) a bundle of preventive measures, (2) education, (3) outcome surveillance, (4) process surveillance, (5) feedback of CAUTI rates, and (6) feedback of performance. The rates of CAUTI obtained in Phase 1 were compared with the rates obtained in Phase 2, after interventions were implemented. We recorded 253,122 urinary catheter (UC)-days: 30,390 in Phase 1 and 222,732 in Phase 2. In Phase 1, before the intervention, the CAUTI rate was 7.86 per 1,000 UC-days, and in Phase 2, after intervention, the rate of CAUTI decreased to 4.95 per 1,000 UC-days [relative risk (RR) 0.63 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.55-0.72)], showing a 37% rate reduction. Our study showed that the implementation of a multidimensional infection control strategy is associated with a significant reduction in the CAUTI rate in AICUs from developing countries.

  6. Nosocomial infection in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: a prospective study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Anne L; Reinholdt, Jes; Jensen, Anders Mørup

    2009-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to estimate the incidence and identify independent risk factors for nosocomial infections in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and to compare these findings with international results. METHODS: The study was performed prospectively from January 1, 2005 to December...... 31, 2005 in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen. Specific criteria for blood stream infection and respiratory tract infection adapted for neonates in our ward were worked out. RESULTS: Six hundred and eighty-three patients were included. The overall incidence of nosocomial...... and respiratory tract infection, and central venous catheter and parenteral nutrition risk factors for first time blood stream infection. CONCLUSION: This first prospective study of nosocomial infection in a Danish Neonatal Intensive Care Unit found an overall incidence of 8.8/1000 hospital days, which is low...

  7. Nosocomial Infections in Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are a significant subgroup of all hospitalized patients, accounting for about a quarter of all hospital infections. Aim: The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection and distribution of infection among patients admitted in Medical Intensive ...

  8. The Review Systematic and Meta Analysis of Prevalence and Causes of Nosocomial Infection in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pezhman Bagheri

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The variation of reported nosocomial infection is very high respectively. It seems review systematic and Meta analysis of related documents gives precise estimate of this subject for correct politisize. So tha aim of this study the review systematic and meta analysis of prevalence and causes of nosocomial infection in iran. Materials and Methods: For this study all articles published in Iranian journals and international journals, Final Report of Research Projects, related papers presented at congresses and thesis were reviewed with using standard and sensitive keywords. Then, all articles published between 1997-2010 years that had eligibility Inclusion criteria after quality control, using random model, intered to process of meta-analysis. Results: The finding show that the best estimate of total prevalence of nosocomial infection in Iran is 30.43% and the most common infections of nosocomial infection are respiratory infection 39.4%%, urinary infection 23.88%, bacteremia 21.98% and the most common factors of nosocomial infection are Pseudomonas aeroginosa 26.78%, klebsiella 31.42%, Staphylococcus 23.6% and E.coli 30.93%. The research also found a substantial heterogeneity that using meta regression method the main cause of produce of this heterogeneity, participants people, sample size, average age of the samples, time of study and gender were introduced. Conclusions: The simple review of studied documents in this survey show that prevalence rate of different nosocomial infection in Iran is high relatively. Hence make appropriate and evidence-based educational and control programs to reduce nosocomial infections prevalence rate in Iran should be considered by policy makers.

  9. [Risk factors of bacterial nosocomial infection after pediatric liver transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H; Gao, W

    2017-08-02

    Objective: To analyze the risk factors of nosocomial infection after liver transplantation in children, so as to provide scientific evidence for the prevention and control of nosocomial infection. Method: Clinical data of 223 pediatric patients undergoing liver transplantation between January 2014 and December 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Univariate and multivariate analyses were carried out to investigate the risk factors of infection after transplantation. Result: Totally 51 children were infected among the 223 patients, the infection rate was 22.86%(51/223). Among the 74 cases with infection, 38 were infected with the blood (included peripherally inserted central catheters) accounting for 51.35 %; and surgical site infection accounted for 21.62%, the respiratory tract infections accounted for 18.92% and the other infections accounted for 8.11%. Totally 74 strains of infectious pathogens were found in 51 cases of infected patients, including Gram-negative bacteria accounting for 48.65%, Gram-positive bacteria accounting for 44.59% and the fungus accounting for 6.76%. According to a variety of survey factors, univariate analysis showed factors of hospitalization time, hospitalization time before surgery, surgical duration, and reoperation had statistically significant association with nosocomial infection( P nosocomial infection after pediatric liver transplantation. Conclusion: There are a variety of risk factors for the postoperative infections after liver transplantation in children. It is necessary to take into account the surgery factor, medical staff factor and hospital management factor. Management strengthening of these factors is necessary to reduce the infection rate.

  10. [Prevalence of nosocomial infections in two hospitals in Conakry (Guinea)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keita, Alpha Kabinet; Doumbouya, Naman; Sow, Mamadou Saliou; Konaté, Bintou; Dabo, Yacouba; Panzo, Daniel Agbo; Keita, Mamady

    2016-01-01

    Nosocomial infections can be prevented by applying simple hygiene rules. However, they have not been sufficiently studied in the Republic of Guinea. For this purpose, we conducted a one-day study in the Conakry University Hospital surgery wards and intensive care units. Fourteen units (12 surgical wards and 2 intensive care units) participated in the study. A total of 310 patients were included. A nosocomial infection was observed in 62 patients, [20%, 95%CI 15.9-24.8%]. Surgical site infections were significantly more frequent with 42/62 cases [67.7%, 95%CI 55.3-78.1%, p = 0.0001] than other types of infections (urinary tract, skin and digestive) with 20/62 cases [32.3% 95%CI 21.9-44.6%]. The average hospital stay of 29.1 ± 23.4 days [95%CI, 23.2 ± 35.04] for patients with nosocomial infection was significantly different (p = 0.0001) from that observed in patients without nosocomial infection: 15.9 ± 16.3 days [95%CI, 13.8 ± 17.9]. Staphylococcus aureus was the pathogen most commonly isolated: 32/62 (51.6%; 95%CI 39.5-63.6%). Escherichia coli infection was identified in the bladder catheters of 13 patients [20.9%, 95%CI 12.7-32.6%]. Finally, five deaths were observed among the 62 patients with nosocomial infection. This study shows that nosocomial infections are common in Conakry University Hospital. Further studies must be conducted to identify the risk factors for nosocomial infections and to propose solutions.

  11. Impact of a multidimensional infection control approach on central line-associated bloodstream infections rates in adult intensive care units of 8 cities of Turkey: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABs) have long been associated with excess lengths of stay, increased hospital costs and mortality attributable to them. Different studies from developed countries have shown that practice bundles reduce the incidence of CLAB in intensive care units. However, the impact of the bundle strategy has not been systematically analyzed in the adult intensive care unit (ICU) setting in developing countries, such as Turkey. The aim of this study is to analyze the impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional infection control approach to reduce the rates of CLAB in 13 ICUs of 13 INICC member hospitals from 8 cities of Turkey. Methods We conducted active, prospective surveillance before-after study to determine CLAB rates in a cohort of 4,017 adults hospitalized in ICUs. We applied the definitions of the CDC/NHSN and INICC surveillance methods. The study was divided into baseline and intervention periods. During baseline, active outcome surveillance of CLAB rates was performed. During intervention, the INICC multidimensional approach for CLAB reduction was implemented and included the following measures: 1- bundle of infection control interventions, 2- education, 3- outcome surveillance, 4- process surveillance, 5- feedback of CLAB rates, and 6- performance feedback on infection control practices. CLAB rates obtained in baseline were compared with CLAB rates obtained during intervention. Results During baseline, 3,129 central line (CL) days were recorded, and during intervention, we recorded 23,463 CL-days. We used random effects Poisson regression to account for clustering of CLAB rates within hospital across time periods. The baseline CLAB rate was 22.7 per 1000 CL days, which was decreased during the intervention period to 12.0 CLABs per 1000 CL days (IRR 0.613; 95% CI 0.43 – 0.87; P 0.007). This amounted to a 39% reduction in the incidence rate of CLAB

  12. Nosocomial infections in very low birth weight infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Vamsi Sivarama Raju, Jayashree Purkayastha, Leslie Lewis, Ramesh Bhat Y

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We aimed to find out the incidence and risk factors of nosocomial infections in VLBW neonates and to explore the microbiologic flora, sensitivity pattern and outcome. Methods: A prospective, observational study was performed in a neonatal intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. VLBW infants excluding those diagnosed with early onset sepsis, admitted to the unit between August 2012 and March 2013 were followed up for evidence of nosocomial sepsis. Results: Of 92 VLBW infants, 23 developed nosocomial sepsis, incidence rate being 25%. Decreasing birth weight (1251-1500 g, 10.9%; 1001-1250 g, 28%; 751-1000 g, 50%; P33wks, 0%; 29-32wks, 21.3%; 26-28 wks, 66.7%; p<.001 were found to be associated with statistically significant increase in nosocomial sepsis rate. On multivariate logistic regression, only peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC line was independently associated with increased risk of nosocomial sepsis (aOR 13.33, 95% CI 3.58-49.5 in VLBW. A predominance of Gram negative over Gram positive nosocomial sepsis (75% vs. 25% with higher mortality in the Gram negative group (55% vs. 0% was observed. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the predominant microbe (33.4%. All microbes were sensitive to first line antibiotics except Elizabeth kingia meningoseptica and one episode of K. pneumoniae. Seven (30.4% VLBW neonates with nosocomial sepsis died. Conclusions: Among VLBW infants, the incidence of nosocomial sepsis was 25%. Lower birth weight, lesser gestational age and PICC line were important risk factors. Gram negative nosocomial sepsis was associated with higher mortality compared to Gram positive sepsis. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2017; 7(1: 7-12

  13. Pediatric mortality due to nosocomial infection: a critical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Marcia Maluf Lopes

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection is a frequent event with potentially lethal consequences. We reviewed the literature on the predictive factors for mortality related to nosocomial infection in pediatric medicine. Electronic searches in English, Spanish and Portuguese of the PubMed/MEDLINE, LILACS and Cochrane Collaboration Databases was performed, focusing on studies that had been published from 1996 to 2006. The key words were: nosocomial infection and mortality and pediatrics/neonate/ newborn/child/infant/adolescent. The risk factors found to be associated with mortality were: nosocomial infection itself, leukemia, lymphopenia, neutropenia, corticosteroid therapy, multiple organ failure, previous antimicrobial therapy, catheter use duration, candidemia, cancer, bacteremia, age over 60, invasive procedures, mechanical ventilation, transport out of the pediatric intensive care unit, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Burkholderia cepacia infections, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE II scores over 15. Among these factors, the only one that can be minimized is inadequate antimicrobial treatment, which has proven to be an important contributor to hospital mortality in critically-ill patients. There is room for further prognosis research on this matter to determine local differences. Such research requires appropriate epidemiological design and statistical analysis so that pediatric death due to nosocomial infection can be reduced and health care quality improved in pediatric hospitals.

  14. Nosocomial Infections in Nuclear Medicine Departments: some considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metello, L.F.; Cunha, L.; Martins, M.; Isabel, O.; Ribeiro, G.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Surveillance for Nosocomial Infection has become an integral part of hospital practice. Studies conducted more than 30 years ago by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) documented the efficacy of these surveillance activities in reducing Nosocomial Infection occurrence. It is clear that surveillance for Nosocomial Infection involves more than just documenting infection rates. However, many times the professionals involved have tended to stop at the point where rates are reported and fail to complete the task of implementing changes based on the analysis of rates or disseminating information. Moreover specific documentation regarding Nuclear Medicine Departments is not available. We therefore decided to produce this work based in the recognition of this specific need. Methods and Conclusions: Having previously defined the 'state-of-the-art' from science and technology concerning Nosocomial Infection Control and after particular study regarding technical/clinical reality of Nuclear Medicine Departments, namely introducing the radioactivity as a factor that must be taken into account with all its implications and interactions, we have obtained a group of considerations and/or recommendations to be considered in order to accomplish the maximum Quality and Efficiency regarding the Control of Nosocomial Infection in Nuclear Medicine Departments

  15. Nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    owner

    2012-08-24

    Aug 24, 2012 ... hospitalization, as well as increased cost of treatment in both developed and resource-poor countries.2 .... searchers- who conducted logistic regression analysis of identified risk factors associated with ... A historical perspective of the epidemiology of patho- gens responsible for neonatal nosocomial ...

  16. Nosocomial infections due to Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaer F

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty four isolates of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were studied in a period of 6 months. Maximum isolates were from burns cases and environmental sampling from burns ward also grew the same organism, indicating their role as nosocomial pathogen. Acinetobacter may initially be mistaken for Neisseria species. As the organisms show multidrug resistance to commonly used antibiotics their correct identification is important.

  17. Prospective multicentre study in intensive care units in five cities from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia: Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional approach on rates of central line-associated bloodstream infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Abdely, Hail M; Alshehri, Areej Dhafer; Rosenthal, Victor Daniel; Mohammed, Yassir Khidir; Banjar, Weam; Orellano, Pablo Wenceslao; Assiri, Abdullah Mufareh; Kader, Nahla Moustafa Abedel; Enizy, Hessa Abdullah Al; Mohammed, Diaa Abdullah; Al-Awadi, Duaa Khalil; Cabato, Analen Fabros; Wasbourne, Maria; Saliya, Randa; Aromin, Rosita Gasmin; Ubalde, Evangelina Balon; Diab, Hanan Hanafy; Alkamaly, Modhi Abdullah; Alanazi, Nawal Mohammed; Hassan Assiry, Ibtesam Yahia; Molano, Apsia Musa; Flores Baldonado, Celia; Al-Azhary, Mohamed; Al Atawi, Sharifa; Molano, Apsia Musa; Al Adwani, Fatima Mohammad; Casuyon Pahilanga, Arlu Marie; Nakhla, Raslan; Al Adwani, Fatma Mohammad; Nair, Deepa Sasithran; Sindayen, Grace; Malificio, Annalyn Amor; Helali, Najla Jameel; Al Dossari, Haya Barjas; Kelany, Ashraf; Algethami, Abdulmajid Ghowaizi; Yanne, Leigh; Tan, Avigail; Babu, Sheema; Abduljabbar, Shatha Mohammad; Bukhari, Syed Zahid; Basri, Roaa Hasan; Mushtaq, Jeyashri Jaji; Rushdi, Hala; Turkistani, Abdullah Abdulaziz; Gonzales Celiz, Jerlie Mae; Al Raey, Mohammed Abdullah; Al-Zaydani Asiri, Ibrahim AM; Aldarani, Saeed Ali; Laungayan Cortez, Elizabeth; Demaisip, Nadia Lynette; Aziz, Misbah Rehman; Omer Abdul Aziz, Ali; Al Manea, Batool; Samy, Eslam; Al-Dalaton, Mervat; Alaliany, Mohammed Jkedeb

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To analyse the impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) Multidimensional Approach (IMA) and INICC Surveillance Online System (ISOS) on central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates in five intensive care units (ICUs) from October 2013 to September 2015. Design: Prospective, before-after surveillance study of 3769 patients hospitalised in four adult ICUs and one paediatric ICU in five hospitals in five cities. During baseline, we performed outcome and process surveillance of CLABSI applying CDC/NHSN definitions. During intervention, we implemented IMA and ISOS, which included: (1) a bundle of infection prevention practice interventions; (2) education; (3) outcome surveillance; (4) process surveillance; (5) feedback on CLABSI rates and consequences; and (6) performance feedback of process surveillance. Bivariate and multivariate regression analyses were performed. Results: During baseline, 4468 central line (CL) days and 31 CLABSIs were recorded, accounting for 6.9 CLABSIs per 1000 CL-days. During intervention, 12,027 CL-days and 37 CLABSIs were recorded, accounting for 3.1 CLABSIs per 1000 CL-days. The CLABSI rate was reduced by 56% (incidence-density rate, 0.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.28–0.72; P = 0.001). Conclusions: Implementing IMA through ISOS was associated with a significant reduction in the CLABSI rate in the ICUs of Saudi Arabia. PMID:28989500

  18. [Qualitative fungal composition of services at risk of nosocomial infections at Aristide Le Dantec Hospital (Dakar)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diongue, K; Badiane, A S; Seck, M C; Ndiaye, M; Diallo, M A; Diallo, S; Sy, O; Ndiaye, J L; Faye, B; Ndir, O; Ndiaye, D

    2015-03-01

    In hospitals, the quality control of the air is a key element. Indeed airborne fungi constitute a real danger for patients hospitalized in wards at risk of nosocomial infections especially when they are immunocompromised. The objective was to determine the qualitative fungal flora composition of wards at risk of nosocomial infections at Le Dantec teaching hospital. Between April and May 2013, 73 samples were collected from 45 compartments within seven services at risk of nosocomial infection at Aristide Le Dantec teaching Hospital (Dakar). Samples were made once by sedimentation method and the percentage of positive cultures was 100%. The most represented species were Cladosporium spp. (91.1%), Aspergillus spp. (86.6%), Penicillium spp. 71.1% and Candida spp. (57.7%). Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus were isolated respectively at 15.5% and 11.1%. Wards have been classified according to the number of species isolated; 11 species in pediatric oncology, 10 species in pediatric surgery/neonatal and intensive care, nine species for oncology, eight species in general surgery and dermatology, and four species in internal medicine. This study shows that fungi causing nosocomial infections are present in hospital and their monitoring should be included in the program of Nosocomial Infections Prevention Committees (CLIN). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Risk factors for postoperative nosocomial infections among patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify possible risk factors for post operative nosocomial infections among operated patients at Felege Hiwot Referral ... Bacterial culture confirmation was done for all patients who developed clinical signs and symptoms of surgical site and/or bloodstream infection starting from the ...

  20. 102 nosocomial infections and the challenges of control

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Oboro VO

    However, after about three decades of nosocomial infection surveillance and control world-wide, it still remains an important problem ... especially Africa, have no effective infection control programme due to lack of awareness of the problem, lack of personnel, poor water ..... Chain Reaction (PCR) are powerful tools in the.

  1. Impact of nosocomial infections surveillance on nosocomial infection rates: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ye; Gong, Zhenyu; Lu, Ye; Hu, Guoqing; Cai, Ran; Chen, Zhiping

    2017-06-01

    According to previously studies, nosocomial infections (NIs) surveillance could effectively reduce infection rates. As NIs surveillance systems have been implemented in some hospitals for several years, their impact on NIs need to be explored. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to evaluate the tendency of NI rates during the surveillance period and the impact of surveillance on NI rates. A systematic literature search of the PubMed database to identify papers that evaluated effect of surveillance on NIs, all kinds of NIs occurred during hospitalization or discharged were included. Exclude articles investigated the surveillance combined with other infection control measures. Twenty-five articles were included. NI rates had different levels of reduction during surveillance period, the reduction were not limited by state, department, surveillance system, and NI type. Continuous surveillance had a positive impact on NI, OR/RR were ranged from 0.43 to 0.95. Participation in NI surveillance is associated with reducing infection rates, though RCTs need to further prove the effective role of surveillance. Hospitals may consider to perform NIs surveillance systems according to its own conditions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Findings of Device-Associated Infections Rate in an Intensive Care Unit of a Lebanese University Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanj, SS; Kanafani, ZA; Sidani, N; Alamuddin, L; Zahreddine, N; Rosenthal, VD

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the rates of device-associated healthcare-associated infections (DA-HAI), microbiological profile, bacterial resistance, length of stay (LOS), excess mortality and hand hygiene compliance in one intensive care unit (ICU) of a hospital member of the International Infection Control Consortium (INICC) in Beirut, Lebanon. Materials and Methods: An open label, prospective cohort, active DA-HAI surveillance study was conducted on adults admitted to a tertiary-care ICU in Lebanon from November 2007 to March 2010. The protocol and methodology implemented were developed by INICC. Data collection was performed in the participating ICUs. Data uploading and analyses were conducted at INICC headquarters on proprietary software. DA-HAI rates were recorded by applying the definitions of the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) at the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). We analyzed the DA-HAI, mechanical ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLA-BSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) rates, microorganism profile, excess LOS, excess mortality, and hand hygiene compliance. Results: A total of 666 patients hospitalized for 5,506 days acquired 65 DA-HAIs, an overall rate of 9.8% [(95% confidence interval (CI) 7.6–12.3], and 11.8 (95% CI 9.1–15.0) DA-HAIs per 1000 ICU-days. The CLA-BSI rate was 5.2 (95% CI 2.8–8.7) per 1000 catheter-days; the VAP rate was 8.1 (95% CI 5.5–11.7) per 1000 ventilator-days; and the CAUTI rate was 4.1 (95% CI 2.6–6.2) per 1000 catheter-days. LOS of patients was 7.3 days for those without DA-HAI, 13.8 days for those with CLA-BSI, 18.8 days for those with VAP. Excess mortality was 40.9% [relative risk (RR) 3.14; P 0.004] for CLA-BSI. Mortality of VAP and CAUTI was not significantly different from patients without DA-HAI. Escherichia coli was the most common isolated microorganism. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 84.9% (95% CI 82

  3. [Prevention of nosocomial infections in the pediatric ward - own experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowska, Teresa; Pawlik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Patients pediatric wards are particularly at risk of nosocomial infections. Therefore, the newest principles of prevention of infections should be implemented and monitored. 1) to determine the prevalence, etiology and clinical manifestations of nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients; 2) to evaluate the effectiveness of procedures that aim at preventing hospital rotavirus infections and catheter-related bloodstream infections; 3) to analyse the incidence of flu among staff in two consecutive seasons of the epidemic influenza H1N1 (2009/2010 and 2010/2011); 4) to promote vaccinations of the medical staff. The study involved 4432 children hospitalized from October 2007 to December 2009 and 57 medical staff (doctors, nurses, orderlies). The effectiveness was assessed of prevention procedures for nosocomial infections and morbidity, and of vaccination against influenza among the sta$, as deƒned by the Act on the prevention and suppression of infection and infectious diseases human and the criteria developed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Nosocomial infections were diagnosed in 2.2% of hospitalized children, where 96% were of acute gastroenteritis; 3% were bloodstream infections associated with peripheral vascular catheter. The 1% had respiratory infections (influenza). Hospital gastrointestinal infections were caused by the rotavirus (78%), norovirus (13%) and adenovirus (0.9%). In 1.1% of cases the etiology had not been determined. As a result of implementing prophylactic activities, a statistically signifiƒcant reduction of the incidence of nosocomial infections by the rotavirus was achieved (from 7.1 to 1.5%). The occurrence catheter-related bloodstream infections was entirely eliminated. Influenza and influenza-like infections were reported in 7% of the medical staff in the season of 2009/2010 and 5% in the season of 2010/2011. 42% of the medical staff was immunized against the influenza (92% of doctors, 7% nurses, 0% orderlies). The

  4. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.C. Vos (Margreet); A. Ott (Alewijn); A. Voss (Andreas); J.A.J.W. Kluytmans (Jan); C.M.J.E. Vandenbroucke-Grauls (Christina); M.H.M. Meester (Marlene); P.H.J. van Keulen (Peter); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.F.L. Wertheim (Heiman)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical

  5. Major trends in the microbial etiology of nosocomial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaberg, D R; Culver, D H; Gaynes, R P

    1991-09-16

    To determine trends in the microbial etiology of nosocomial infections in the 1980s, surveillance data on the microbiology of documented nosocomial infection reported to the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System and from the University of Michigan Hospital were analyzed. Antimicrobial susceptibility data on selected pathogens from both sources were also reviewed. Overall, Escherichia coli decreased from 23% of infections in 1980 to 16% in 1986-1989, Klebsiella pneumoniae dropped from 7% to 5%, whereas coagulase negative staphylococci increased from 4% to 9% and Candida albicans increased from 2% to 5%. Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter species and enterococci had minor increases, but antimicrobial resistant strains for these pathogens as well as coagulase-negative staphylococci were seen more frequently. In contrast to the 1970s, major shifts in the etiology of nosocomial infection have occurred in the decade of the 1980s. Taken as a whole, the shifts are away from more easily treated pathogens toward more resistant pathogens with fewer options for therapy. These shifts underscore the continued need for prevention and control to accompany new developments in therapy.

  6. Nosocomial Urinary Infections at the Urogoly Unit of the National ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors and the microorganisms susceptibilities of nosocomial urinary infections at the urology unit of the national university hospital of Ouagadougou in Burkina Faso. Method: From February to September 2012, two bacteriological analyzes have been performed for any ...

  7. Asymptomatic carriers contribute to nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Thomas; Gradel, Kim Oren; Homann, Christian

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects of of as......BACKGROUND & AIMS: Nosocomial infection with Clostridium difficile pose a considerable problem despite numerous attempts by health care workers to reduce risk of transmission. Asymptomatic carriers of C difficile might spread their infection to other patients. We investigated the effects...... quartile to 4.2% in the highest quartile of exposed patients (P=.026). Combining the load of exposure to carriers and length of stay seemed to have an additive effect on the risk of contracting C difficile. CONCLUSIONS: In a population-based prospective cohort study in Denmark, we found that asymptomatic...

  8. [Orion (Outbreak Reports and Intervention studies of Nosocomial Infection) used for evaluating interventions and investigations of nosocomial infection outbreaks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires-Cronenberger, S; Nicolle, M-C; Voirin, N; Giard, M; Luxemburger, C; Vanhems, P

    2009-04-01

    British colleagues have developed the Outbreak Reports and Intervention studies of Nosocomial Infection (Orion) guidelines with the aim to promote transparency of publications in the field of health-care associated infections and particularly for reports of outbreak investigation or intervention studies. The aim of this study was to translate the Orion criteria and to promote their use in France. The Orion guidelines include a checklist of 22 commented items related to the title, abstract, introduction, methods, results, and discussion sections of a scientific article. Specific points for each item are developed to enhance its relevance. The use of Orion guidelines by authors and editors should be encouraged and should improve the quality of standards in research, intervention studies, and publications on nosocomial infections and health-care associated infections.

  9. Prevalence survey of nosocomial infections in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China [2012-2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei-Ping; Tian, Yong-Quan; Hai, Yun-Ting; Zheng, Zhi-Nan; Cao, Qing-Ling

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence of nosocomial infections, the distribution of nosocomial infection sites, the use of antibiotic and the situation of detected nosocomial infection pathogens in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China from 2012 to 2014, to grasp the current conditions of regional nosocomial infections in timely, for the development of infection prevention and control measures to provide a basis for effective hospital. A survey of the prevalence of nosocomial infections was conducted in target hospitals using the combination of a bedside survey and medical record review. In total, 101,907 inpatients were surveyed from 2012 to 2014. There were 1,997 cases of nosocomial infections, accounting for an average prevalence of 1.96%. The infection site was mainly the lower respiratory tract. Higher prevalence of nosocomial infections occurred in the comprehensive intensive care unit (ICU), Neurosurgery Department, and Hematology Department. The average rate of antibiotic use was 33.72%, and the average submission rate for bacterial cultures for patients who received therapeutic treatment with antibiotics was 28.26%. The most common pathogens associated with nosocomial infections were Gram-negative (G(-)) bacteria, and frequently detected bacterial pathogens included Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Staphylococcus aureus. The survey of the prevalence of nosocomial infections helped to identify problems in the control process of nosocomial infections and to develop targeted measures for the prevention and control of these infections accordingly.

  10. Detecting Nosocomial Intrinsic Infections through Relating Bacterial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sierra Leone Journal of Biomedical Research ... Surgical procedures often lead to both intrinsic and extrinsic infections. ... This study demonstrated surgical procedures as precursory to intrinsic infections and that bacterial pathogens found on wounds and endogenous indicators of surgery are links to intrinsic infection.

  11. postoperative nosocomial infections and antimicrobial resistance

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    Most post-operative wound infections are hospital acquired and vary from one hospital to the other and even within a given hospitals and they are associated with increased morbidity and mortality (7). The site of infection may be limited to the suture line or may become extensive in the operative site and the infecting.

  12. Postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Yuan, Yan; Li, Peiling; Wang, Tuanjie; Gao, Jun; Yao, Jinhua; Li, Shujun

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the pathogen distribution, antimicrobial susceptibility and risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections among children with congenital heart disease. Methods: Three hundreds children with congenital heart disease admitted to our hospital to receive surgeries from February 2010 to February 2013 were selected. Results: A total of 120 children were tested as positive by sputum culture, with the infection rate of 40.0%. The top five most common pathogenic microorganisms included Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Candida albicans. S. epidermidis, S. aureus and Enterococcus were highly resistant to penicillin, azithromycin and erythromycin, moderately susceptible to levofloxacin and cefazolin, and completely susceptible to vancomycin. Multivariate Logistic regression analysis showed that hospitalization stay length, combined use of antibiotics, systemic use of hormones, mechanical ventilation and catheter indwelling were the independent risk factors of postoperative nosocomial infections (P<0.05). Conclusion: Nosocomial infection, which was the most frequent postoperative complication of pediatric congenital heart disease, was predominantly induced by Gram-positive bacteria that were highly susceptible to cephalosporins and vancomycin. Particular attention should be paid to decrease relevant risk factors to improve the prognosis. PMID:24948978

  13. Pathogenesis of nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waar, Karola

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, we analyzed the role of the different virulence factors of E. faecalis known in literature in the pathogenesis of infections. We investigated the prevalence of virulence factors in E. faecalis isolates from different hosts as well as their role in biomaterial related infections. The

  14. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, 1999-2002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djoko Widodo

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection are one of the main problem in hospital which are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and increased economic cost. Surveillance should be attempted regularly to obtain local data of incidence of nosocomial infections, types of infection, pathogen and resistance pattern. We reported the results of nosocomial surveillance in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, Jakarta, in year 1999 to 2002. The data were obtained from surveillance, conducted by Nosocomial Infection Control Committee. Surveillance were performed to patient in risk of nosocomial infections such as underwent surgical procedure, urinary catheter, peripheral or central venous catheter, ventilator and other invasive procedure. Criteria for nosocomial infection which were used, based on technical guidelines of nosocomial infection in Dr. Cipto Mangunkusumo National General Hospital, year 1999; which referred to CDC definition of nosocomial infections. Incidence rate of nosocomial infections in year 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002 were 1.1, 0.9, 0.6 and 0.4 % respectively. Type of nosocomial infection include catheter related, surgical wound, urinary tract and respiratory tract infections, ranged between 0 to 5.6 %. Gram negative bacteria consist of Pseudomonas sp, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis were the most common nosocomial pathogen. Gram positive bacteria consist of Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus anhemolyticus. Trend of increasing incidence of Gram positive nosocomial infection also showed in our surveillance. Mostly Gram negative bacteria had been resistant to penicillin, co amoxicillin-clavulanic acid and 3rd generation cephalosporin, but still sensitive to 4th generation cephalosporin and aminoglycoside. The Gram positive bacteria were still sensitive to penicillin, co amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, 4th generation cephalosporin and aminoglycoside. (Med J Indones 2004; 13: 107

  15. Cost analysis and evaluation of nosocomial infections in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostakoğlu, Uğur; Saylan, Sedat; Karataş, Mevlüt; İskender, Serap; Aksoy, Firdevs; Yılmaz, Gürdal

    2016-11-17

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate nosocomial infections occurring in our hospital intensive care units (ICUs) and the risk factors for these, and to determine the effect of these infections on mortality and cost. This retrospective study was performed via infection control committee surveillance data, ICU records, and information processing data between 1 January and 31 December 2013 at the Kanuni Education and Research Hospital. A total of 309 nosocomial infections were observed in 205 out of 566 patients. The density of nosocomial infections was 25.4 in 1000 patient days. Hospitalization was prolonged, and APACHE II and Charlson comorbidity scores were high in patients developing nosocomial infections (P nosocomial infection, 170 died. Infections were determined as the cause of death in 62 (36.5%) of the nonsurviving patients with a nosocomial infection. Acinetobacter baumannii was identified in 46 (74.2%) of the patients that died from nosocomial infections. The mean cost in patients developing a nosocomial infection was 15,229.30 Turkish lira (TL), compared to 9648.00 TL in patients without a nosocomial infection (P = 0.002). Regular infection control education sessions need to be held and the number of nurses needs to be increased in order to be able to reduce this high mortality, morbidity, and cost.

  16. Secular Trends in Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections : Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Increase the Total Burden of Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ammerlaan, H. S. M.; Harbarth, S.; Buiting, A. G. M.; Crook, D. W.; Fitzpatrick, F.; Hanberger, H.; Herwaldt, L. A.; van Keulen, P. H. J.; Kluytmans, J. A. J. W.; Kola, A.; Kuchenbecker, R. S.; Lingaas, E.; Meessen, N.; Morris-Downes, M. M.; Pottinger, J. M.; Rohner, P.; dos Santos, R. P.; Seifert, H.; Wisplinghoff, H.; Ziesing, S.; Walker, A. S.; Bonten, M. J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background. It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. Methods. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence

  17. Nosocomial imipenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hospital stay before ICU admission, longer ICU stay, exposure to emergent surgery, the presence of central venous catheter and previous carbapenem use were significant risk factors for IRAB infection. Rationale use of carbapenems in ICUs should be considered. Keywords: Imipenem-resistant, Acinetobacter baumannii, ...

  18. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One HIV-infected child died of varicella pneumonia. Other common nosocomial infections encountered in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children respectively were upper respiratory tract infections (pharyngitis, tonsillitis or rhinitis) affecting 21 and four, otitis media in five and one, oral candidiasis in seven and zero, urinary ...

  19. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction between tuberculosis and HIV-infected infection is well known and is responsible for the increase in the incidence of tuberculosis ... This retrospective case-control study evaluated the occurrence of nosocomial infections in (HIV)-infected children and age- and time of ... complicated disease, or whose social.

  20. Retrospective analysis of nosocomial infections in an Italian tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancini, Alessio; Verdini, Daniele; La Vigna, Giorgio; Recanatini, Claudia; Lombardi, Francesca Elena; Barocci, Simone

    2016-07-01

    Nosocomial infections are one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in hospitalized patients. Studies of their prevalence in single institutions can reveal trends over time and help to identify risk factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the nosocomial infections trend and identify the prevalence of predominant bacterial microorganisms and their drug resistance patterns in an Italian tertiary care hospital. Infections were classified according to the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention definitions. A retrospective study was carried out from March 2011 to June 2014, based on the bacterial isolate reports of a hospital located in Central Italy. During the 40-month study period, a total of 1547 isolates were obtained from 1046 hospitalized patients and tested for their antibiotic sensitivity. The most common isolates belonged to the Enterobacteriaceae family (61.7%), followed by Enterococcus species (12.4%), Pseudomonas species (10.7%) and S. aureus (10.0%). The incidence density rate of nosocomial infections was 7.4 per 1000 patient days, with a significant difference among the 3 annual infection rates (Pinfection prevalence rate was found in Internal Medicine Unit (41.3%), followed by Intensive Care Units (12.4%), Surgical Units (9.0%,) and Cardiology (7.1%).

  1. Nursing Care Model Based on Knowledge Management in Preventing Nosocomial Infection After Caesarean Section in Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Nosocomial infection is one indicator of the quality of health services in the community, which also determines the image of health care institutions becauseit was a major cause of morbidityand death rate (mortality) in hospital. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identification knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post section caesarea. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: T...

  2. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings - Differences between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane

    2015-01-01

    positive for norovirus in Denmark, 2002-2010, and to study the distribution of norovirus genotypes among inpatients with nosocomial and community-acquired norovirus infections, respectively. METHODS:  Admission and stool sampling dates from 3656 NoV infected patients were used to estimate the proportion...... of nosocomial infections. The associations between nosocomial infection and patient age, gender, and norovirus genotype GII.4 were examined. RESULTS:  Of the 3656 inpatients, 63% were classified as having nosocomial infections. Among these 9 capsid and 8 polymerase norovirus genotypes were detected whereas...... among the smaller group of inpatients with community-acquired infections, 12 capsid and 9 polymerase genotypes were detected. Nosocomial norovirus infections were associated with age ≥60 years and infections with genotype GII.4. CONCLUSION:  The majority of norovirus infections in hospitalized patients...

  3. Periodontitis and nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection: preliminary findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Filho, Isaac Suzart; Santos, Carla M L; Cruz, Simone S; Passos, Johelle de S; Cerqueira, Eneida de M M; Costa, Maria da Conceição N; Santana, Teresinha C; Seymour, Gregory J; Santos, Carlos Antonio de S T; Barreto, Maurício L

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the possible association between periodontitis and nosocomial lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI). A case-control study was conducted at a General Hospital in Feira de Santana, Bahia, Brazil. The sample consisted of 103 individuals: 22 cases (presence of nosocomial LRTI) and 81 controls (absence of nosocomial LRTI). The diagnosis of periodontitis was based on probing depth, gingival recession, clinical attachment loss and bleeding on probing. The diagnosis of nosocomial LRTI was made in accordance with established medical criteria. Invasive ventilation was much more frequent in cases (95.5%) than in controls (7.4%). An orotracheal tube was used in 81.8% of cases and in 7.4% of controls; bronchoaspiration was suspected in 81.8% of cases and in 6.2% of controls. There was no statistically significant difference in any of the clinical periodontal parameters between cases and controls. The crude odds ratio (OR) value for individuals with periodontitis having LRTI was not statistically significant [OR(crude)=1.70; 95% confidence interval:(0.60-4.87)]. After including age, smoking and duration of hospitalization in the logistic regression, the adjusted OR for individuals with periodontitis having LRTI was statistically significant [OR(adjusted)=3.67 (1.01-13.53); p=0.049]. A marginal association between periodontitis and LRTI was found when smoking, age and length of hospitalization were included as covariates. Patients with LRTI had a high frequency of suspected bronchoaspiration and this could explain the possible association of periodontal disease and LRTI found in this and other studies. Additional studies are needed to further clarify the possible relationship between periodontal disease and LRTI.

  4. Evaluation of Nosocomial Infection in Patients at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children's hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassemi, A; Farhangi, H; Badiee, Z; Banihashem, A; Mosaddegh, M R

    2015-01-01

    Infections in critical care unit are high, and they are serious hospital problems. Infections acquired during the hospital stay are generally called nosocomial infections, initially known as infections arising after 48 h of hospital admission. The mostfrequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, gastroenteritis and blood stream infection) were common in patients at hospital.The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection among hospitalized children at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children's hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Data were collected from 200 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection at hematology-oncology ward of Dr. Sheikh children's hospital from March 2014 to September 2014. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Incidence of nosocomial infections inpatients athematology-oncology ward was 31% (62/200). Of which 69.35% (43/62) blood stream infection being the most frequent; followed by 30.64% (19/62) was urinary tract infection (UTI), and the most common blood culture isolate was been Staphylococcus epidermidis 18 (41.86%), andour study showed that large numbers ofnosocomial UTIs causing by Gram‑negative bacteria. This study showed blood stream infection and UTI are the common nosocomial infections among patients athematology-oncology ward. Early recognition of infections and short term use of invasive devices along with proper infection control procedures can significantly decrease the incidence of nosocomial infections in patients.

  5. Effects of blood products on nosocomial infections in liver transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkardesler, Sevda; Avkan-Oguz, Vildan; Akan, Mert; Unek, Tarkan; Ozbilgin, Mucahit; Meseri, Reci; Cimen, Meltem; Karademir, Sedat

    2013-12-01

    Infection is the most severe complication after an organ transplant. Blood cell transfusion is an independent risk factor for adverse events, including infection in the recipient. This study sought to evaluate the effect of blood product transfusions on nosocomial infections in liver transplant patients. Patients who underwent a liver transplant at our hospital between 2003 and 2010 were recruited for this study. Exclusion criteria were incomplete records, patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours during the 4 weeks before transplant, and pediatric transplants. Incidence of nosocomial infections, which were defined as infections occurring within 30 days after transplant was the primary endpoint. The incidence of nosocomial infections was 28.7%. The number of transfusions of packed red blood cells and fresh frozen plasma was significantly higher in patients with nosocomial infection compared with patients without nosocomial infection (P = .018 and P = .039). Blood products dose-dependently contributed to nosocomial infections. Transfusions of ≥ 7.5 units of red blood cells (odds ratio: 2.8) or ≥ 12.5 units of fresh frozen plasma (odds ratio: 3.27) were associated with nosocomial infections (P = .042 and P = .015). The infection-related mortality rate was 10.3%. Blood product transfusions are associated with an increased rate of nosocomial infections, which contributes to higher morbidity and mortality.

  6. Nosocomial infections in the ICU: Pens and spectacles as fomites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murad, Haris Farooq; Inam Pal, Khowaja Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Non-medical objects known as fomites may have a role in their genesis. We investigated the significance of writing pens and spectacles as fomites. The study was conducted at Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from July 2013 to September 2013. Cultures were taken from pens and/or spectacles of resident nurses, doctors and nursing assistants in intensive care unit (ICU). Organisms important in ICU nosocomial infections were targeted. Seven rounds of sampling over 3 weeks led to 55 pen and 5 spectacle samples. Growth was seen in 3(5.5%) pen samples and 1(20%) spectacle sample. Two (3.6%) pen cultures grew acinetobacter, 1)1.8%) grew candida and acinetobacter, and i spectacle culture grew vancomycin-resistant enterococcus faecium (VRE). Two out of the 4 (50%) personnel managing all ICU beds had growth. During the study, one or more ICU patients had infection with the same organisms. Pens and spectacles may be responsible for the spread of organisms like acinetobacter and VRE. Personnel managing multiple beds are more likely to carry contaminated fomites.

  7. [Study of the prevalence of nosocomial infections and associated factors in the two university hospitals of Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakupa, Danny Kasongo; Muenze, Prosper Kalenga; Byl, Baudouin; Wilmet, Michèle Dramaix

    2016-01-01

    To estimate the prevalence "on any given day" of nosocomial infections and to determine their associated factors. Then, to estimate the prevalence of microorganisms responsible for nosocomial infections in Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of Congo. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted in two hospitals in Lubumbashi in five inpatient units (Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics, Internal Medicine, Pediatrics and Recovery). The sample consisted of 171 hospitalized patients who were questioned using a standardized questionnaire. Patient's medical record allowed us to know the type of antibiotic administered to the patient 48 hours after admission. Our study was conducted in February 2010 as part of the first local prevalence survey on nosocomial infections. Our study collected data on 59 patients with nosocomial infection. The overall prevalence was 34.5% (17.0% with acquired nosocomial infection and 17.5% with imported infection). According to the World Health Organization, nosocomial infection is a hospital-acquired infection which was not present or incubating at the time of patient admission. The following risk factors have been associated with acquired nosocomial infections: duration of hospitalization (long stay hospital patients, hospital length of stay of more than seven days has a higher risk than shorter length of stay, hospital length of stay of less than or equal to seven days (prevalence ratio: RP =3.6 [IC A 95%.1.4-8.9])). Among nosocomial infections, surgical site infections were the most common (27.1%), followed by lung infections (22.0%) and urinary tract infections (17.0%). Microbiological examination highlighted five germs responsible for nosocomial infection in infected patients: Escherichia coli (11.9%), Staphylococcus aureus (6.8%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5.1%), Shigella spp (5.1%) and Salmonella typhimurium (1.7%). Microbiological examination was performed in 31.0% (n = 59). Cefotaxime, third-generation cephalosporin was the most

  8. Nosocomial infections in patients admitted in intensive care unit of a tertiary health center, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mythri, H; Kashinath, Kr

    2014-09-01

    Patients in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) are a significant subgroup of all hospitalized patients, accounting for about a quarter of all hospital infections. The aim was to study, the current status of nosocomial infection, rate of infection and distribution of infection among patients admitted in Medical Intensive Care Unit (MICU) of a District Hospital. Data were collected retrospectively from 130 patient's records presented with symptoms of nosocomial infection in MICU of a Tertiary Health Center, Tumkur from August 2012 to May 2013. Descriptive statistics using percentage was calculated. Incidence of nosocomial infections in MICU patients was 17.7% (23/130). Of which 34.8% (8/130) was urinary tract infection (UTI) being the most frequent; followed by pneumonia 21.7% (5/130), 17.4% (4/130) surgical site infection, 13.0% (3/130) gastroenteritis, 13.0% (3/130) blood stream infection and meningitis. The nosocomial infection was seen more in the 40-60 year of age. The male were more prone to nosocomial infections than the female. The most frequent nosocomial infections (urinary, respiratory, and surgical site) were common in geriatric patients in the MICU setting and are associated with the use of invasive device. Large-scale studies are needed to be carried out in Indian population to plan long-term strategies for prevention and management of nosocomial infections.

  9. Risk factors for nosocomial infections in selected neonatal intensive care units in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Mario A; Efird, Meica M; Lozano, Juan M; Bose, Carl L; Rojas, María X; Rondón, Martín A; Ruiz, Gloria; Piñeros, Juan G; Rojas, Catherine; Robayo, Guillermo; Hoyos, Angela; Gosendi, Maria H; Cruz, Hernan; O'Shea, Michael; Leon, Angela

    2005-08-01

    This study was designed to identify risk factors for nosocomial infections among infants admitted into eight neonatal intensive care units in Colombia. Knowledge of modifiable risk factors could be used to guide the design of interventions to prevent the problem. Data were collected prospectively from eight neonatal units. Nosocomial infection was defined as culture-proven infection diagnosed after 72 hours of hospitalization, resulting in treatment with antibiotics for >3 days. Associations were expressed as odds ratios. Logistic regression was used to adjust for potential confounders. From a total of 1504 eligible infants, 80 were treated for 127 episodes of nosocomial infection. Logistic regression analysis identified the combined exposure to postnatal steroids and H2-blockers, and use of oral gastric tubes for enteral nutrition as risk factors significantly associated with nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infections in Colombian neonatal intensive care units were associated with modifiable risk factors including use of postnatal steroids and H2-blockers.

  10. Predicting nosocomial lower respiratory tract infections by a risk index based system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Yong; Shan, Xue; Zhao, Jingya; Han, Xuelin; Tian, Shuguang; Chen, Fangyan; Su, Xueting; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Grundmann, Hajo; Wang, Hongyuan; Han, Li

    2017-01-01

    Although belonging to one of the most common type of nosocomial infection, there was currently no simple prediction model for lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). This study aims to develop a risk index based system for predicting nosocomial LRTIs based on data from a large point-prevalence

  11. Mortality among Patients with Nosocomial Infections in Tertiary Intensive Care Units of Sahloul Hospital, Sousse, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rejeb, Mohamed Ben; Sahli, Jihene; Chebil, Dhekra; Khefacha-Aissa, Selwa; Jaidane, Nadia; Kacem, Balsam; Hmouda, Houssem; Dhidah, Lamine; Said-Latiri, Houyem; Naija, Walid

    2016-03-01

    Nosocomial infections are public health issues that are associated with high mortality in intensive care units. This study aimed to determine nosocomial infection-associated mortality in Tunisian intensive care units and identify its risk factors. A prospective cohort study was carried out in intensive care units of a Tunisian University Hospital. The ICUs-wide active surveillance of nosocomial infections has been performed between 1 July 2010 and 30 June 2011. Data collection was based on Rea-Raisin protocol 2009 of "Institut National de Veille Sanitaire" (InVS, Saint Maurice - France). We used Kaplan Meier survival analysis and Cox Proportional Hazard regression to identify independent risk factors of nosocomial infection-associated mortality. Sixty-seven patients presented nosocomial infection in the end of the surveillance. The mean age of patients was 44.71 ± 21.2 years. Of them, 67.2% were male and 32.8% female. Nosocomial bacteremia was the most frequent infection (68.6%). Nosocomial infection-associated mortality rate was 35.8% (24/67). Bacteremia (Hazard Ratio (HR)) = 3.03, 95% Confidential Interval (95% CI): [1.23 - 7.45], P = 0.016) and trauma (HR = 3.6, 95% CI: [1.16 - 11.2], P = 0.026) were identified by Cox regression as independent risk factors for NI-associated mortality. Our rate was relatively high. We need to improve the care of trauma patients and intensify the fight against nosocomial infections especially bacteremia.

  12. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertheim, H.F.; Vos, A.M.C.; Ott, A.; Voss, A.; Kluytmans, J.A.J.W.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C.M.; Meester, M.; Keulen, P.H. van; Verbrugh, H.A.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the

  13. Mupirocin prophylaxis against nosocomial Staphylococcus aureus infections in nonsurgical patients: a randomized study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wertheim, Heiman F. L.; Vos, Margreet C.; Ott, Alewijn; Voss, Andreas; Kluytmans, Jan A. J. W.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Meester, Marlene H. M.; van Keulen, Peter H. J.; Verbrugh, Henri A.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Staphylococcus aureus nasal carriage is a major risk factor for nosocomial S. aureus infection. Studies show that intranasal mupirocin can prevent nosocomial surgical site infections. No data are available on the efficacy of mupirocin in nonsurgical patients. OBJECTIVE: To assess the

  14. Effectiveness of a multidimensional approach for the prevention of ventilator-associated pneumonia in an adult intensive care unit in Cuba: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Morales-Pérez, Clara; Rosenthal, Victor D

    2013-04-01

    This study sought to assess the effect of the multidimensional approach developed by the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) on the reduction of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) rates in patients hospitalized in an adult intensive care unit (AICU) in an INICC member hospital in Havana, Cuba. We conducted a prospective surveillance pre-post study in AICU patients. The study was divided into two periods:baseline and intervention. During the baseline period, we conducted active prospective surveillance of VAP using the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Health Safety Network (NHSN) definition and INICC methods. During the intervention period, we implemented the INICC multidimensional approach for VAP, in addition to performing active surveillance. This multidimensional approach included the following measures: a bundle of infection control interventions, education, outcome surveillance, process surveillance, feedback of VAP rates and performance feedback of infection control practices. The baseline rates of VAP were compared to the rates obtained after intervention, and we analyzed the impact of our interventions by Poisson regression. During the baseline period, we recorded 114 mechanical ventilator (MV) days, whereas we recorded 2350MV days during the intervention period. The baseline rate of VAP was 52.63 per 1000MV days and 15.32 per 1000MV days during the intervention. At the end of the study period, we achieved a 70% reduction in the rate of VAP (RR, 0.3; 95% CI, 0.12-0.7; P value, 0.003.). The implementation the INICC multidimensional approach for VAP was associated with a significant reduction in the VAP rate in the participating AICU of Cuba. Copyright © 2013 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Controlling nosocomial infection based on structure of hospital social networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Taro; Masuda, Naoki

    2008-10-07

    Nosocomial infection (i.e. infection in healthcare facilities) raises a serious public health problem, as implied by the existence of pathogens characteristic to healthcare facilities such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and hospital-mediated outbreaks of influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome. For general communities, epidemic modeling based on social networks is being recognized as a useful tool. However, disease propagation may occur in a healthcare facility in a manner different from that in a urban community setting due to different network architecture. We simulate stochastic susceptible-infected-recovered dynamics on social networks, which are based on observations in a hospital in Tokyo, to explore effective containment strategies against nosocomial infection. The observed social networks in the hospital have hierarchical and modular structure in which dense substructure such as departments, wards, and rooms, are globally but only loosely connected, and do not reveal extremely right-skewed distributions of the number of contacts per individual. We show that healthcare workers, particularly medical doctors, are main vectors (i.e. transmitters) of diseases on these networks. Intervention methods that restrict interaction between medical doctors and their visits to different wards shrink the final epidemic size more than intervention methods that directly protect patients, such as isolating patients in single rooms. By the same token, vaccinating doctors with priority rather than patients or nurses is more effective. Finally, vaccinating individuals with large betweenness centrality (frequency of mediating connection between pairs of individuals along the shortest paths) is superior to vaccinating ones with large connectedness to others or randomly chosen individuals, which was suggested by previous model studies.

  16. Norovirus Genotypes in Hospital Settings: Differences Between Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, Kristina Træholt; Nielsen, Rikke Thoft; Holzknecht, Barbara Juliane; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær; Fischer, Thea Kølsen; Böttiger, Blenda

    2015-09-15

    Norovirus (NoV) is a major cause of gastroenteritis and hospital outbreaks, leading to substantial morbidity and direct healthcare expenses as well as indirect societal costs. The aim of the study was to estimate the proportion of nosocomial NoV infections among inpatients testing positive for NoV in Denmark, 2002-2010, and to study the distribution of NoV genotypes among inpatients with nosocomial and community-acquired NoV infections, respectively. Admission and stool sampling dates from 3656 NoV-infected patients were used to estimate the proportion of nosocomial infections. The associations between nosocomial infection and patient age, sex, and NoV genotype GII.4 were examined. Of the 3656 inpatients, 63% were classified as having nosocomial infections. Among these, 9 capsid and 8 polymerase NoV genotypes were detected, whereas in the smaller group of inpatients with community-acquired infections, 12 capsid and 9 polymerase genotypes were detected. Nosocomial NoV infections were associated with age ≥60 years and infections with genotype GII.4. The majority of NoV infections in hospitalized patients were nosocomial. Nosocomial infection was mainly associated with older age but also with the specific genotype GII.4. The genotypes in community-acquired NoV infections were more heterogeneous than in nosocomial infections. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Immune risk phenotype is associated with nosocomial lung infections in elderly in-patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ledudal K

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nosocomial infections are extremely common in the elderly and may be related to ageing of the immune system. The Immune Risk Phenotype (IRP, which predicts shorter survival in elderly patients, has not been evaluated as a possible risk factor for nosocomial infection. Our aim was to assess the prevalence of nosocomial infections in elderly in-patients and to investigate potential relationships between nosocomial infections and the immunophenotype, including IRP parameters. Results We included 252 consecutive in-patients aged 70 years or over (mean age, 85 ± 6.2 years, between 2006 and 2008. Among them, 97 experienced nosocomial infections, yielding a prevalence rate of 38.5% (95% confidence interval, 32.5-44.5. The main infection sites were the respiratory tract (21% and urinary tract (17.1% When we compared immunological parameters including cell counts determined by flow cytometry in the groups with and without nosocomial infections, we found that the group with nosocomial infections had significantly lower values for the CD4/CD8 ratio and naive CD8 and CD4 T-cell counts and higher counts of memory CD8 T-cells with a significant increase in CD28-negative CD8-T cells. Neither cytomegalovirus status (positive in 193/246 patients nor presence of the IRP was associated with nosocomial infections. However, nosocomial pneumonia was significantly more common among IRP-positive patients than IRP-negative patients (17/60 versus 28/180; p = 0.036. Conclusion Immunological parameters that are easy to determine in everyday practice and known to be associated with immune system ageing and shorter survival in the elderly are also associated with an elevated risk of nosocomial pneumonia in the relatively short term.

  18. Efficacy of an infection control programme in reducing nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Senegalese neonatal unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landre-Peigne, C; Ka, A S; Peigne, V; Bougere, J; Seye, M N; Imbert, P

    2011-10-01

    Neonatal nosocomial infections are public health threats in the developing world, and successful interventions are rarely reported. A before-and-after study was conducted in the neonatal unit of the Hôpital Principal de Dakar, Senegal to assess the efficacy of a multi-faceted hospital infection control programme implemented from March to May 2005. The interventions included clustering of nursing care, a simple algorithm for empirical therapy of suspected early-onset sepsis, minimal invasive care and promotion of early discharge of neonates. Data on nosocomial bloodstream infections, mortality, bacterial resistance and antibiotic use were collected before and after implementation of the infection control programme. One hundred and twenty-five infants were admitted immediately before the programme (Period 1, January-February 2005) and 148 infants were admitted immediately after the programme (Period 2, June-July 2005). The two groups of infants were comparable in terms of reason for admission and birth weight. After implementation of the infection control programme, the overall rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections decreased from 8.8% to 2.0% (P=0.01), and the rate of nosocomial bloodstream infections/patient-day decreased from 10.9 to 2.9/1000 patient-days (P=0.03). Overall mortality rates did not differ significantly. The proportion of neonates who received antimicrobial therapy for suspected early-onset sepsis decreased significantly from 100% to 51% of at-risk infants (Punit, simple, low-cost and sustainable interventions led to the control of a high incidence of bacterial nosocomial bloodstream infections, and the efficacy of these interventions was long-lasting. Such interventions could be extended to other low-income countries. Copyright © 2011 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nursing Care Model Based on Knowledge Management in Preventing Nosocomial Infection After Caesarean Section in Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nosocomial infection is one indicator of the quality of health services in the community, which also determines the image of health care institutions becauseit was a major cause of morbidityand death rate (mortality in hospital. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identification knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post section caesarea. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasi experimental design. The population was all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation in hospitals A and B as much as 46 people. Sample was the total population. Data was collected through questionnaire, observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data was analyzed using t test B 1.274 dan p=0.028 Result: The result showed that 1 there was difference in knowledge management implementation before and after training; 2 there was difference in nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection before and after training; 3 there is significant relationship between nurse’s performance in preventing nosocomial infection and infection incidence; 4 there is no significant difference of nursing care impementation on nosocomial incidence. Discussion: In conclusion, the development of nursing care based on knowledge management as a synthesis or induction of findings directed at 1 nurses’ knowledge does not affect the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 2 knowledge management has a positive effect on the performance of the prevention of nosocomial infections; 3 implementation of infection prevention is integrated capabilities between knowledge, skills and attitudes of nurses in implementing performance in care. Keywords: model prevention, nosocomial infections, nursing care, knowledge management, sectio Caesarea

  20. Nosocomial Infections in Intensive Care Unit: Pattern of Antibiotic-resistance in Iranian Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfahani, Bahram Nasr; Basiri, Rozita; Mirhosseini, Seyed Mohammad Mahdy; Moghim, Sharareh; Dolatkhah, Shahaboddin

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial infections are responsible for great number of mortality in Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Knowledge about prevalence of bacterial infections and their antibiotic-resistance pattern would be a great step for their treatment and management. Data about nosocomial infections in ICUs of Alzahra Hospital (referral hospital in Isfahan, center of Iran) were gathered during the years 2007-2010. A questionnaire was fulfilled for any specific patient with nosocomial infection containing demographic data of patient and also characteristics of the infection. Out of all patients, 707 individuals (65.6%) were male and 370 (34.4%) were female. Our data revealed that Pseudomonas aeruginosa (13.9%), Klebsiella (11%), and Escherichia coli (6.4%) were the most prevalent bacterial infections. The most common sites of nosocomial infections in the ICU were respiratory system (399 cases, 37%), urinary system (230 cases, 21.4%), and blood (102 cases, 9.5%). The antibiotic-resistance of each bacteria in ICU ward was assessed and data were categorized in a table. There were less documentary about bacterial cultures in the year 2007 when compared with the next years. We found some differences (such as bacterial prevalence in ICU wards which caused nosocomial infections) in our local prevalence of nosocomial infections and also in their resistance pattern compared to other centers. Knowing about our data will help physicians to administer the most suitable antibiotics for treatment of nosocomial infections in our area.

  1. Antibiogram of nosocomial urinary tract infections in Felege Hiwot referral hospital, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melaku, S; Kibret, M; Abera, B; Gebre-Sellassie, S

    2012-06-01

    Nosocomial infections increase the cost of medical care, extend hospital stay and reflect on the morbidity and mortality of the admitted patients. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are one of the most common nosocomial infections in humans. To determine the prevalence and antibiogram of nosocomial UITs from a referral hospital. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 1 254 patients from April to August 2010. Antimicrobial susceptibility tests were done using disc diffusion technique as per the standard of Kirby-Bauer method. Of the 1 254 patients, 118 (9.4%) developed nosocomial UTIs. Seventy three (61.9%) and 44 (37.1%) of the bacterial isolates were gram negative and gram positive, respectively. One patient had a mixed infection. E. coli, S.aureus and K. pneumonia were the most predominant isolates. Gender, catheterization and pre-operative antimicrobial prophylaxis and underlying diseases were significantly associated with the occurrence of nosocomial UTIs (p=0.001). Most bacterial isolates showed high resistance rates (>80%) to ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, chloramphenicol and cloxacillin. Catheterization and preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis were found to be the risk factors for nosocomial infection. Effective infection prevention measures should be in place to reduce the prevalence of nosocomial UTIs.

  2. An overview of nosocomial infections, including the role of the microbiology laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Emori, T G; Gaynes, R P

    1993-01-01

    An estimated 2 million patients develop nosocomial infections in the United States annually. The increasing number of antimicrobial agent-resistant pathogens and high-risk patients in hospitals are challenges to progress in preventing and controlling these infections. While Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus remain the most common pathogens isolated overall from nosocomial infections, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), organisms previously considered contaminants in most culture...

  3. The Study of Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, A prospective study in Northwest Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Bagher Hosseini; Babak Abdinia; Mohammad Ahangarzadeh Rezaee; Shahram Abdoli oskouie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Therefore, in this study, the incidence and prevalence of nosocomial infections were determined in NICUs of the three largest neonatal centers in northwest Iran, and the causative bacteria were identified in order to provide potential solutions to control the infections in these hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-prospective study in which the cases of nosocomia...

  4. Transmission-associated nosocomial infections : Prolongation of intensive care unit stay and risk factor analysis using multistate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beyersmann, Jan; Gastmeier, Petra; Grundmann, Hajo; Baerwolff, Sina; Geffers, Christine; Behnke, Martin; Rueden, Henning; Schumacher, Martin

    Background: Almost all studies investigating prolongation of stay because of nosocomial infections (NI) took into account all cases of NI, regardless whether they were associated with transmission of nosocomial pathogens (and therefore preventable) or not. We investigated the prolongation of

  5. Sequence-based identification and characterization of nosocomial influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonges, M.; Rahamat-Langendoen, J.; Meijer, A.; Niesters, H. G.; Koopmans, M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Highly transmissible viruses such as influenza are a potential source of nosocomial infections and thereby cause increased patient morbidity and mortality. Aim: To assess whether influenza virus sequence data can be used to link nosocomial influenza transmission between individuals.

  6. Impact of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional hand hygiene approach over 13 years in 51 cities of 19 limited-resource countries from Latin America, Asia, the Middle East, and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Victor D; Pawar, Mandakini; Leblebicioglu, Hakan; Navoa-Ng, Josephine Anne; Villamil-Gómez, Wilmer; Armas-Ruiz, Alberto; Cuéllar, Luis E; Medeiros, Eduardo A; Mitrev, Zan; Gikas, Achilleas; Yang, Yun; Ahmed, Altaf; Kanj, Souha S; Dueñas, Lourdes; Gurskis, Vaidotas; Mapp, Trudell; Guanche-Garcell, Humberto; Fernández-Hidalgo, Rosalía; Kübler, Andrzej

    2013-04-01

    To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC) multidimensional hand hygiene approach in 19 limited-resource countries and to analyze predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance. An observational, prospective, cohort, interventional, before-and-after study from April 1999 through December 2011. The study was divided into 2 periods: a 3-month baseline period and a 7-year follow-up period. Ninety-nine intensive care unit (ICU) members of the INICC in Argentina, Brazil, China, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Greece, India, Lebanon, Lithuania, Macedonia, Mexico, Pakistan, Panama, Peru, Philippines, Poland, and Turkey. Healthcare workers at 99 ICU members of the INICC. A multidimensional hand hygiene approach was used, including (1) administrative support, (2) supplies availability, (3) education and training, (4) reminders in the workplace, (5) process surveillance, and (6) performance feedback. Observations were made for hand hygiene compliance in each ICU, during randomly selected 30-minute periods. A total of 149,727 opportunities for hand hygiene were observed. Overall hand hygiene compliance increased from 48.3% to 71.4% ([Formula: see text]). Univariate analysis indicated that several variables were significantly associated with poor hand hygiene compliance, including males versus females (63% vs 70%; [Formula: see text]), physicians versus nurses (62% vs 72%; [Formula: see text]), and adult versus neonatal ICUs (67% vs 81%; [Formula: see text]), among others. Adherence to hand hygiene increased by 48% with the INICC approach. Specific programs directed to improve hand hygiene for variables found to be predictors of poor hand hygiene compliance should be implemented.

  7. [Epidemiology of nosocomial bacterial infection in a neonatal intensive care unit in Morocco].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maoulainine, F-M-R; Elidrissi, N-S; Chkil, G; Abba, F; Soraa, N; Chabaa, L; Amine, M; Aboussad, A

    2014-09-01

    In neonatal intensive care units, the incidence of nosocomial infection is high. This study aimed to determine the epidemiology of a nosocomial bacterial infection in the neonatal intensive care unit of Mohamed VI university hospital. A total of 702 newborns were included in this study. Of the 702 neonates studied, 91 had developed a nosocomial infection. The incidence rate was 13% and incidence density was 21.2 per 1000 patient-days. The types of infection were: bloodstream infections (89%), pneumonia (6.6%), meningitis (3.3%), and urinary tract infections (1.1%). Nosocomial infection was particularly frequent in cases of low birth weight, prematurity, young age at admission, umbilical venous catheter, and mechanical ventilation. Multiresistant bacteria included enterobacteria producing betalactamase (76.9%), especially enterobacteria that were dominated by Klebsiella pneumoniae (39.7%). The mortality rate was 52.7% in nosocomial infections, 19 (20.87%) of whom had septic shock. The results of this study show that nosocomial infection is an intrahospital health problem that could be remedied by a prevention strategy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Clinical analysis of nosocomial infection and risk factors of extremely premature infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Na; Wang, Ying; Wang, Qi; Li, Haijing; Mai, Jingyun; Lin, Zhenlang

    2014-02-01

    To investigate the incidence of nosocomial infections of extremely premature infants and to explore the risk factors and strategies for infection control. There were 118 extremely premature infants who were confirmed to have nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care unit of the authors' hospital from January 2008 to December 2012. Their data of the infection rate, risk factors and clinical characteristics were retrospectively analyzed. During the study, nosocomial infection occurred in 78 extremely premature infants 129 times. The nosocomial infection rate was 66.10%. The rate of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) was 1.43% (35/2 452). The catheter related blood stream infection (CRBSI) rate was 0.35% (16/4 613). There were 74 (57.36%) cases of pneumonia, which was the most common nosocomial infection of extremely premature infants. There were 35 cases of VAP, which accounted for 47.30% of pneumonia. The next was sepsis, 48 cases. Seventy-four (74/90, 82.22%) strains of isolates were Gram-negative bacteria, which accounted for the highest proportion, followed by Gram-positive (12 strains), fungus (4 strains); Klebsiella pneumonia is the most common pathogens of nosocomial infection in extremely premature infants. The isolation rates of Klebsiella pneumonia with positive extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) were 90.91% (20/22) , universally resistant to cephalosporins. Single-factor analysis showed that the body weight, mechanical ventilation, umbilical vein catheterization, central venous catheter, parenteral nutrition and hospitalization time were risk factors for nosocomial infections in extremely preterm infants. Logistic regression analysis showed that length of hospitalization (OR = 1.024, P = 0.043) and central venous catheterization (OR = 6.170, P = 0.041) were independent risk factors of nosocomial infection. Extremely preterm infants were at higher risk of nosocomial infection. It is important to identify the high risk factors for nosocomial

  9. Combined dysfunctions of immune cells predict nosocomial infection in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway Morris, A; Anderson, N; Brittan, M; Wilkinson, T S; McAuley, D F; Antonelli, J; McCulloch, C; Barr, L C; Dhaliwal, K; Jones, R O; Haslett, C; Hay, A W; Swann, D G; Laurenson, I F; Davidson, D J; Rossi, A G; Walsh, T S; Simpson, A J

    2013-11-01

    Nosocomial infection occurs commonly in intensive care units (ICUs). Although critical illness is associated with immune activation, the prevalence of nosocomial infections suggests concomitant immune suppression. This study examined the temporal occurrence of immune dysfunction across three immune cell types, and their relationship with the development of nosocomial infection. A prospective observational cohort study was undertaken in a teaching hospital general ICU. Critically ill patients were recruited and underwent serial examination of immune status, namely percentage regulatory T-cells (Tregs), monocyte deactivation (by expression) and neutrophil dysfunction (by CD88 expression). The occurrence of nosocomial infection was determined using pre-defined, objective criteria. Ninety-six patients were recruited, of whom 95 had data available for analysis. Relative to healthy controls, percentage Tregs were elevated 6-10 days after admission, while monocyte HLA-DR and neutrophil CD88 showed broader depression across time points measured. Thirty-three patients (35%) developed nosocomial infection, and patients developing nosocomial infection showed significantly greater immune dysfunction by the measures used. Tregs and neutrophil dysfunction remained significantly predictive of infection in a Cox hazards model correcting for time effects and clinical confounders {hazard ratio (HR) 2.4 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-5.4] and 6.9 (95% CI 1.6-30), respectively, P=0.001}. Cumulative immune dysfunction resulted in a progressive risk of infection, rising from no cases in patients with no dysfunction to 75% of patients with dysfunction of all three cell types (P=0.0004). Dysfunctions of T-cells, monocytes, and neutrophils predict acquisition of nosocomial infection, and combine additively to stratify risk of nosocomial infection in the critically ill.

  10. [Risk factors for nosocomial infection in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Heladia; Torres-Gutiérrez, Javier; Peregrino-Bejarano, Leoncio; Cruz-Castañeda, Marco Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major and a frequent problem in neonatal intensive care units and increase morbidity, mortality, and costs. The objective of this study was to identify the risk factors associated with nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit. Nested case control study. Records from patients were registered: gestational age, sex, birth weight, central venous catheter and other devices, congenital malformations, surgeries, mechanical ventilation, steroid use, H2 blockers, length of stay in neonatal intensive care unit, type of infection, and etiological agent. We studied 188 cases with nosocomial infections and 192 controls without nosocomial infections. The most frequent infection was sepsis (34.8%) and coagulase negative Staphylococcus was the principal etiological agent (37.2%). The risk factors associated with nosocomial infection were central venous catheter (OR: 7.3; 95% CI: 2.3-22.8), duration of neonatal intensive care unit stay>14 days (OR: 3.4; 95% CI: 1.7-6.7), H2 blockers (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2-4.2), number of surgeries≥2 (OR: 3; 95% CI: 1.1-7.9) and mechanical ventilation>7 days (OR: 2.1; 95% CI: 1.1-4.2). Some risk factors associated to nosocomial infections in this study are similar to those found previously, with the exception of the number of surgeries that was not reported in previous studies.

  11. Secular trends in nosocomial bloodstream infections: antibiotic-resistant bacteria increase the total burden of infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammerlaan, H S M; Harbarth, S; Buiting, A G M; Crook, D W; Fitzpatrick, F; Hanberger, H; Herwaldt, L A; van Keulen, P H J; Kluytmans, J A J W; Kola, A; Kuchenbecker, R S; Lingaas, E; Meessen, N; Morris-Downes, M M; Pottinger, J M; Rohner, P; dos Santos, R P; Seifert, H; Wisplinghoff, H; Ziesing, S; Walker, A S; Bonten, M J M

    2013-03-01

    It is unknown whether rising incidence rates of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by antibiotic-resistant bacteria (ARB) replace antibiotic-susceptible bacteria (ASB), leaving the total BSI rate unaffected. We investigated temporal trends in annual incidence densities (events per 100 000 patient-days) of nosocomial BSIs caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), ARB other than MRSA, and ASB in 7 ARB-endemic and 7 ARB-nonendemic hospitals between 1998 and 2007. 33 130 nosocomial BSIs (14% caused by ARB) yielded 36 679 microorganisms. From 1998 to 2007, the MRSA incidence density increased from 0.2 to 0.7 (annual increase, 22%) in ARB-nonendemic hospitals, and from 3.1 to 11.7 (annual increase, 10%) in ARB-endemic hospitals (P = .2), increasing the incidence density difference between ARB-endemic and ARB-nonendemic hospitals from 2.9 to 11.0. The non-MRSA ARB incidence density increased from 2.8 to 4.1 (annual increase, 5%) in ARB-nonendemic hospitals, and from 1.5 to 17.4 (annual increase, 22%) in ARB-endemic hospitals (P nosocomial BSIs in ARB-nonendemic and ARB-endemic hospitals, respectively (P nosocomial BSI rates due to ARB occur in addition to infections caused by ASB, increasing the total burden of disease. Hospitals with high ARB infection rates in 2005 had an excess burden of BSI of 20.6 per 100 000 patient-days in a 10-year period, mainly caused by infections with ARB.

  12. Regional distribution of nosocomial infections due to ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae in Germany: data from the German National Reference Center for the Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections (KISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistner, R; Schröder, C; Geffers, C; Breier, A-C; Gastmeier, P; Behnke, M

    2015-03-01

    Surveillance systems for hospital infections are reporting increasing rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Enterobacteriaceae in Europe. We aimed to perform a national survey on this trend and on the regional distribution of nosocomial infections due to ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae in German hospitals. Data from 2007 to 2012 from two components of the German national nosocomial infection surveillance system were used for this analysis. The data derive from intensive care units and surgical departments. Independent factors determining the proportion of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae among nosocomial infections due to Enterobacteriaceae and changes in its regional distribution (broken down into German federal states) were calculated by regression analysis. From 2007 to 2012, the data showed a significantly increasing proportion of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae in surgical site infections (from 11.46 to 15.38, 134%, p 0.003), urinary tract infections (9.36 to 16.56, 177%, p infections (11.91 to 14.70, 123%, p nosocomial infections has significantly increased in Germany over the last 6 years. Hospitals in Central Germany and surgical departments in all of Germany are especially affected by this development. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The incidence of nosocomial infection in the Intensive Care Unit, Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia: ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program 1998-1999.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozaidi, S W; Sukro, J; Dan, A

    2001-06-01

    CU-acquired nosocomial infection (NI) remains one of the major causes of ICU mortality. This study presents the incidence of ICU-acquired nosocomial infection in ICU HUKM for the years 1998 and 1999, as part of the ongoing ICU-acquired nosocomial infection surveillance program. The overall incidence was 23%. The main types of NI was lower respiratory tract infection (15.3%), primary bacteraemia (8.1%), ventilator associated pneumonia (5.4%), urinary tract infection (2.0%), skin infection (1.6%) central venous catheter sepsis (1.2%) and surgical skin infection (0.8%). The overall culture positive nosocomial infection rate was only 12.1%, majority from the lungs (12.6%), blood (7.3%), skin swabs (2.0%), and urine (1.6%). The main gram-negative organism cultured was Acinetobacter sp. (19%) and Staph. aureus (8.5%) was the gram-positive organism. The overall ICU mortality rate was 27.5% of which 60.9% of patients who died were attributed directly to sepsis.

  14. Nosocomial Infections among Pediatric Patients with Neoplastic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peninnah Oberdorfer

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop nosocomial infections (NIs. NIs may prolong their hospital stay, and increase morbidity and mortality. Objectives. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1 the incidence of NIs, (2 sites of NIs, (3 causal organisms, and (4 outcomes of NIs among pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases. Methods. This study was a prospective cohort study of pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases who were admitted to the Chiang Mai University Hospital, Thailand. Results. A total of 707 pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases were admitted. Forty-six episodes of NIs in 30 patients were reported (6.5 NIs/100 admission episodes and 7 NIs/1000 days of hospitalization. Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia had the highest number of NIs (41.3%. The most common causal organisms were gram-negative bacteria (47.1%. Patients who had undergone invasive procedures were more likely to develop NIs than those who had not (P<.05. The mortality rate of patients with NIs was 19.6%. Conclusion. Pediatric patients with neoplastic diseases are more likely to develop NIs after having undergone invasive procedures. Pediatricians should be aware of this and strictly follow infection control guidelines in order to reduce morbidity and mortality rates related to NIs.

  15. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a tertiary care paediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Muhammad Haroon; Zafar, Aizza; Maqbool, Sajid

    2007-07-01

    To determine the frequency, causative organisms and susceptibility pattern of nosocomial bloodstream infections in children. Observational study. Paediatric Intensive Care Unit of the Children's Hospital, Lahore, from January to December 2004. All children admitted to the unit during the study period were daily evaluated for features suggestive of nosocomial infection. In addition to other investigations, blood cultures were done in all suspected cases for the confirmation of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). Nosocomial infection was defined according to the criteria set by Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Demographic, microbiological and other variables were carefully studied to analyze frequency, incidence rate, spectrum of isolates and susceptibility pattern. Children with and without nosocomial BSI were compared with regard to age, duration of stay in hospital, need and duration of ventilation and the outcome. Of the total 406 admissions, 134 children were suspected to have nosocomial infection on at least 214 occasions (episodes). Blood cultures yielded growth of pathological organisms in 62 of these episodes, giving the frequency of nosocomial BSI as 15.2 per 100 admissions (62/406 episodes). Children with nosocomial bloodstream infection were found to have younger mean age (2.1 vs. 4.1 years), longer average duration of stay (13.1 vs. 6.6 days), more frequent need for ventilation (64% vs. 34%) and longer duration of ventilation (9.7 vs. 4.8 days). Majority of isolates (77%) were gram-negative bacteria; Klebsiella being the most common isolate (n= 23). Aztreonam, Ceftiazidime, Ceforuxime and Ciprofloxacin showed high resistance pattern (33-50%). Isolates showed good sensitivity to Vancomycin (100%), Imipenem (80%), Meropenem (100%) and Co-amoxiclav (88%). The frequency of nosocomial BSI in the observed setting was quite high, having marked impact on the duration of stay and outcome. Emergence of resistant pathogens is alarming.

  16. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a tertiary care paediatric intensive care unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamid, M.H.; Maqbool, S.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency, causative organisms and susceptibility pattern of nosocomial bloodstream infections in children. All children admitted to the unit during the study period were daily evaluated for features suggestive of nosocomial infection. In addition to other investigations, blood cultures were done in all suspected cases for the confirmation of nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI). Nosocomial infection was defined according to the criteria set by Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. Demographic, microbiological and other variables were carefully studied to analyze frequency, incidence rate, spectrum of isolates and susceptibility pattern. Children with and without nosocomial BSI were compared with regard to age, duration of stay in hospital, need and duration of ventilation and the outcome. Of the total 406 admissions, 134 children were suspected to have nosocomial infection on at least 214 occasions (episodes). Blood cultures yielded growth of pathological organisms in 62 of these episodes, giving the frequency of nosocomial BSI as 15.2 per 100 admissions (62/406 episodes). Children with nosocomial bloodstream infection were found to have younger mean age (2.1 vs. 4.1 years), longer average duration of stay (13.1 vs. 6.6 days), more frequent need for ventilation (64% vs. 34%) and longer duration of ventilation (9.7 vs. 4.8 days). Majority of isolates (77%) were gram-negative bacteria; Klebsiella being the most common isolate (n= 23). Aztreonam, Ceftiazidime, Ceforuxime and Ciprofloxacin showed high resistance pattern (33-50%). Isolates showed good sensitivity to Vancomycin (100%), Imipenem (80%), Meropenem (100%) and Co-amoxiclav (88%). The frequency of nosocomial BSI in the observed setting was quite high, having marked impact on the duration of stay and outcome. Emergence of resistant pathogens is alarming. (author)

  17. [Role of donor human milk feeding in preventing nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Hong-Juan; Xu, Jing; Wei, Qiu-Fen

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the role of donor human milk in the prevention of nosocomial infection in very low birth weight infants. MeETHODS: A total of 105 hospitalized preterm infants with a very low birth weight were enrolled. They were classified into mother's own milk feeding group, donor human milk feeding group, and preterm formula feeding group, with 35 infants in each group. The three groups were compared in terms of incidence rates of nosocomial infection, necrotizing enterocolitis, and feeding intolerance, time to full enteral feeding, and early growth indices. Compared with the preterm formula feeding group, the donor human milk feeding group and the mother's own milk feeding group had significantly lower incidence rates of nosocomial infection and necrotizing enterocolitis and shorter time to full enteral feeding (Pgroups. Donor human milk can be used in case of a lack of mother's own milk and may help to reduce nosocomial infection.

  18. NURSING CARE KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT BASED TRAINING DECREASE NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION INCIDEN IN POST SECTIO CESAREA PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahsan Ahsan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Model of nursing care based on knowledge management can reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections through the performance of nurses in the prevention of infection. Nursing care based on knowledge management is established from identi fi cation knowledge which is required, prevention performance of nosocomial infections post caesarean section. Nosocomial infections component consists of wound culture result. Method: This study was an observational study with a quasy experimental design. The population were all of nursing staff who working in obstetrics installation and a number of patients who is treated in hospitals A and B post sectio caesarea. Sample is comparised a total population all the nursing staff who worked in obstetrics installation according to criteria of the sample, and most of patients were taken care by nursing staff post caesarean section which is taken by random sampling 15 patients. Data was collected through observation sheets and examination of the wound culture. Data analysis which is used the t test. Result: The result was showed that there was signi fi cant difference in the incidence of nosocomial infection in patients with post sesctio caesarea in hospital before and after nursing care training based on knowledge management (tvalue = 2.316 and p = 0.028 < α = 0.05 level, and the incidence of nosocomial infection was lower after training than before training. Discussion: It can be concluded that training knowledge management based on nursing care effectives to reduce Incidence of Nosocomial Infections in Patients after Sectio Caesarea.

  19. A Nanolayer Copper Coating for Prevention Nosocomial Multi-Drug Resistant Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-2-0066 TITLE: A Nanolayer Copper Coating for Prevention Nosocomial Multi- drug Resistant Infections PRINCIPAL...SUBTITLE A Nanolayer Copper Coating for Prevention Nosocomial Multi- drug Resistant Infections 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-2-0066 5c...for in vitro antimicrobial efficacy and mammalian cell cytotoxicity potential using standardized assays that are approved by the Food and Drug

  20. Are red blood cell transfusions associated with nosocomial infections in critically ill children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naveda Romero, Omar E; Naveda Meléndez, Andrea F

    2016-08-01

    Although the transfusionofblood products is common practice, its effects on the immune system have not been adequately studied. A prospective cohort study was conducted in critically ill children followed up until their death, transfer or discharge to establish an association between red blood cell transfusions (RBCTs) and nosocomial infections. A nosocomial infection was considered to be post-transfusional if it occurred within 14 days after RBCT. A total of 162 children were included in the study, 35 (21.6%) had a nosocomial infection, and 49 (30.2%) received a RBCT. Among those with a nosocomial infection, a RBCT was more common (48.5% versus 14.9%, OR: 5.4, 95% CI: 2.412.6, p 〈 0.0001) and mortality rate was higher (45.7% versus 10.2%, OR: 7.4, 95% CI: 3.1-18.2, p 〈 0.0001). The binary logistic regression showed that RBCT was independently associated with nosocomial infections (OR: 4.2, 95% CI: 2.1-20.2, p = 0.049). RBCT was associated with increased risk for nosocomial infections. Sociedad Argentina de Pediatría.

  1. The Study of Nosocomial Infections in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, A prospective study in Northwest Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Bagher Hosseini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections are an important cause of mortality in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs. Therefore, in this study, the incidence and prevalence of nosocomial infections were determined in NICUs of the three largest neonatal centers in northwest Iran, and the causative bacteria were identified in order to provide potential solutions to control the infections in these hospitals. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive-prospective study in which the cases of nosocomial infections were examined in the three largest hospitals in Tabriz in northwest Iran during 1 year (from June 2012 until May 2013 based on clinical findings, medical and nursing reports of patients, and laboratory results. Results: Of the 3129 patients hospitalized in NICUs of the three hospitals, 208 patients were diagnosed with nosocomial infections. The incidence rate of nosocomial infections was 11.34%.per 100 patient days with 52.4% bacteremia, 32.69% pneumonia, 5.77% urinary tract infections, 5.29% wound infections, and 3.85% necrotizing enterocolitis. There was a statistically significant relationship between invasive procedures (such as umbilical catheters, central venous catheters, surgery, and TPN and sepsis (P = 0.001. The relationships between urinary tract infection and urinary catheter (P = 0.000, and aggressive procedures (such as suctioning and intubation and pneumonia (P = 0.001 were also statistically significant. Conclusion: Incidence of nosocomial infections in premature and low birth weight newborns is considered as a health threat. The findings of this research reiterate the importance of giving further attention to prevention and control of nosocomial infections in the NICU.

  2. Pattern of nosocomial infection in two intensive care units of a tertiary care hospital in karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizvi, M.F.; Hassan, Y.; Abdullah, M.; Shakeel, J.; Memon, A.R.; Razvi, M.F.; Saleem, S.; Shakeel, J.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the pattern of nosocomial infections in two ICUs' of a teaching hospital in terms of frequency, common sites of infection, the pathogens involved and the antibiotic sensitivity patterns. It was conducted in two medical ICUs (Neurology and Nephrology) of a public tertiary care hospital. Data was collected prospectively on patients suspected to have developed nosocomial infection after 48 hours of admission to the ICU according to objective. There were 101 cases of suspected nosocomial infection out of a total of 254 patients. The frequency of nosocomial infection was 39.7%. UTI developed in 44.6%, while 27% had blood stream infection, and 21% had pneumonia. Each of the three major sites of infection was strongly associated with the use of invasive devices. Escherichia (E.) coli was the most common organism isolated followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Klebsiella. E. coli and Klebsiella showed a maximum sensitivity to Imipenem followed by Tazocin (pipericillin + tazobactam). Pseudomonas aeruginosa was sensitive to Amikacin and Fosfomycin. The high frequency of nosocomial infection suggests that more strict measures regarding invasive devices should be taken in future to control the infection and limit the emergence of antibiotic resistant organisms. (author)

  3. Doripenem in hospital infections: a focus on nosocomial pneumonia, complicated intra-abdominal infections, and complicated urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tze Shien Lo

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Tze Shien Lo,1 Stephanie M Borchardt,2 Justin M Welch,3 Melissa A Rohrich,3 Augusto M Alonto,4 Anne V Alonto51Infectious Diseases Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 2Research Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 3Pharmacy Service, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 4Infectious Diseases Department, MeritCare Medical Center, Fargo, North Dakota, USA; 5Department of Internal Medicine, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Fargo, North Dakota, USAAbstract: Doripenem is the latest carbapenem on the market to date. Although not an antibiotic in a new class, it offers a glimmer of hope in combating serious infections secondary to multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria when we have not seen a new class of antibacterial, particularly for Gram-negative bacteria, for more than 10 years. In vitro, doripenem exhibits a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL and Amp-C β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae and anaerobes. Doripenem also exhibits better in vitro activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa compared to other anti-pseudomonal carbapenems. It combines the desirable activities of both imipenem and meropenem. It has similar activity to imipenem against Gram-positive pathogens and has the antimicrobial spectrum of meropenem against Gram-negative organisms. Several randomized clinical trials have demonstrated that doripenem is non-inferior to meropenem, imipenem, piperacillin/tazobactam, or levofloxacin in its efficacy and safety profile in treating a wide range of serious bacterial infections including intra-abdominal infection, complicated urinary tract infection, and nosocomial pneumonia. Due to its wide spectrum of activity and good safety profile it is susceptible to misuse leading to increasing rates of resistance

  4. Prevalence of Nosocomial Infection in Different Wards of Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Falahi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background The CDC defines a nosocomial infection as a localized or systemic condition caused by an adverse reaction to the presence of an infectious agent(s or its toxin(s. It is an infection that occurs between 48 to 72 hours after admission of patients in the hospital or as soon after the hospital discharge and on the admission time, patients don't have this infection. Objectives This study aimed to characterize the prevalence of nosocomial infection in Ghaem hospital, Mashhad, Iran. Methods This retrospective study was conducted in all wards of the Ghaem hospital, Mashhad during the 1 year period (2013; the data were collected from the wards records and HIS system and analyzed by the SPSS software (version16. Results In the present study, of total 35979 hospitalized patients in different wards of the Ghaem hospital was reported 1.1% of nosocomial infection. In the meantime, overall, the most prevalent organism was Acinetobacter baumannii with a prevalence of 37.2% and the minimum was linked to the Bacillus species with a prevalence 0.3%. The highest and lowest prevalence of the nosocomial infection was in the ICU and CCU with 49.9% and 0.3%, respectively. In general, among all wards of the mentioned hospital, the most frequent nosocomial infection was pneumonia (47.4% and the lowest belonged to CSF (2.3%. Conclusions In our study, the ICU ward was accounted for the highest rate of nosocomial infection, due to the critical importance of this ward. Preventive measures and survivelance system for reduction of nosocomial infections is needed.

  5. Nosocomial Infections in Pediatric Population and Antibiotic Resistance of the Causative Organisms in North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadnia, Salar; Davoudi, Alireza; Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Ahangarkani, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of the nosocomial infections is complicated especially in children due to an increase in the antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Objectives: The aim of this study was to survey the nosocomial infections in children and determine the antibiotic susceptibility of their causative organisms in teaching hospitals in the north of Iran. Patients and Methods: The investigation was designed as a retrospective cross-sectional study. The study population consisted of patients under 12 years old, which were hospitalized in three teaching hospitals in the north of Iran and had symptoms of nosocomial infections in 2012. The required data of patients were extracted and entered in the information forms. The collected data were analyzed using SPSS (ver. 16). Descriptive statistics and Fisher’s exact tests (Monte Carlo) were used. Results: Out of the total number of 34556 hospitalized patients in three teaching hospitals, 61 (0.17%) patients were children under 12 years old age with nosocomial infection from which 50.81% were girls and 49.18% were boys. Most of these patients (55.73%) were admitted to the burn unit. The most common type of nosocomial infection (49.18%) was wound infection. Pseudomonas spp. (36.84%) and Acinetobacter spp. (28.02%) were the most common bacteria isolated from the clinical specimens. All the Acinetobacter spp. were multidrug-resistant. All the gram negative and gram positive bacterial species in our study showed high resistance to antibiotics. Conclusions: The rate of nosocomial infections was low in our study because the detection of nosocomial infection was based on the clinical grounds in most cases and laboratory reports might contain false-negative results. These results provide useful information for future large scale surveillance in the context of prevention programs. PMID:24719744

  6. The effects of red cell transfusion donor age on nosocomial infection among trauma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Tyler J; Thomas, Ryan M; Murphy, Travis W; Nguyen, Linda L; Moore, Frederick A; Brakenridge, Scott C; Efron, Philip A; Mohr, Alicia M

    2017-10-01

    We hypothesized that packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions from older donors would be associated with fewer nosocomial infections among trauma patients. We performed a four-year retrospective analysis of 264 consecutive adult trauma patients who received ≥1 PRBC transfusion during admission. The capacity of donor age to predict nosocomial infection was assessed by logistic regression. Thirty-three percent of all patients developed a nosocomial infection. Donor age was significantly higher among patients with nosocomial infection (40.3 vs. 37.6 years, p = 0.035), and the incidence of infection was directly proportional to donor age. The association between donor age and infection was strongest among recipients age ≥60 years, and was significant on multivariate regression for this cohort (OR 1.07 (95% CI 1.01-1.13), p = 0.024). Among trauma patients receiving PRBC transfusions, blood from older donors may be associated with increased risk for nosocomial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Etiology and Clinical Investigation of Nosocomial Infections at Ardabil Bou-Ali Hospital during 2010

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    Manoochehr Barak

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: Nosocomial infections occur following admission of patients in the hospitals and usually are accompanied by significant mortalities. This study was conducted to determine the frequency of nosocomial infections and the causatives in Ardabil Bu Ali hospital during 2010.   Methods: This study was a cross-sectional study which has been done on collection of information through practical examinations, laboratory tests and files of nosocomillay infected patients in Ardabil Bu Ali hospital during 2010. Data were analyzed by SPSS.   Results: From a total of 3254 patients, 42 (1.3% had got nosocomial infections. Of these infected patients 47.6% was males and 52.4% was females. Infection was more frequent in patients with ages between 1 month to1 year old (45.2%. Sepsis (33.3%, pneumonia and blood stream infections (23.8% and urinary tract infection (19% were the most frequent infections. The mean length of hospital stay was 26.86 days. Klebsiella pneumoniae was the most common pathogen reported (23.8%. Infection was more common in NICU (38.1%.   Conclusion: In this study, the frequency of nosocomial infection was lower than other studies. Distribution of infection differed with age, ward and length of stay in the hospital.

  8. Nosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage : time course and causative pathogens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laban, Kamil G.; Rinkel, Gabriel J. E.; Vergouwen, Mervyn D. I.

    BackgroundNosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are associated with prolonged length of stay and poor functional outcome. It remains unclear if infections result in prolonged length of stay or, vice versa, if prolonged length of stay results in more infections. Before

  9. The Mortality Rate of Nosocomial Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) of Taleghani Educational and Treatment Center, Tabriz, 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Parvin Abbasian; Mariye Mahmoodi Yegane; Mina karimi; Faezeh Ahmadi; khadijeh Pazani; Zohreh Tahmasbi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives : Information about nosocomial infections (NIs) is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. Neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) are at high-risk of developing nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate of nosocomial infections and the distribution of pathogens among newborns who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani educatio...

  10. [Study of the incidence and cost of nosocomial infections in general surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennigrou, S; Mokhtar, L; Ben Alaya, N; Dziri, C; Cherif, A; Najah, N; Ben Redjeb, S; Zouari, B

    2000-11-01

    Nosocomial infection incidence and its cost were study. We have identified 61 infected patients and 75 infectious episodes, is an incidence of 9.4% infected for 100 hospitalized by trimester. Operative site infections are the most frequent (60%), operative site infection (9.1%), inferior respiratory ways infections (2.2%). Incriminated germs are represented essentially by negative gram Bacillus (77.3%) with predominance of enterobacterias (59%). Invasive technique usage, surgery types and contamination classes have been identified as risk factors of nosocomial infection occurrence. The supplementary stay duration estimated by simple comparison between infected group and no-infected one is 9.3% days, responsible of an over cost of 336 TD by infected patient and 273 TD by infectious episode. The curative antibiotic costs have been estimated at 70 TD by infected patient being equivalent to two hospitalization days and to 57 TD by infectious episode.

  11. Incidence, risk factors and outcome of nosocomial pneumonia in patients with central nervous system infections

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    Gajović Olgica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Pneumonia is the most frequent nosocomial infection in intensive care units. The reported frequency varies with definition, the type of hospital or intensive care units and the population of patients. The incidence ranges from 6.8-27%. Objective. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency, risk factors and mortality of nosocomial pneumonia in intensive care patients. Methods. We analyzed retrospectively and prospectively the collected data of 180 patients with central nervous system infections who needed to stay in the intensive care unit for more than 48 hours. This study was conducted from 2003 to 2009 at the Clinical Centre of Kragujevac. Results. During the study period, 54 (30% patients developed nosocomial pneumonia. The time to develop pneumonia was 10±6 days. We found that the following risk factors for the development of nosocomial pneumonia were statistically significant: age, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS score <9, mechanical ventilation, duration of mechanical ventilation, tracheostomy, presence of nasogastric tube and enteral feeding. The most commonly isolated pathogens were Klebsiella-Enterobacter spp. (33.3%, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (24.1%, Acinetobacter spp. (16.6% and Staphylococcus aureus (25.9%. Conclusion. Nosocomial pneumonia is the major cause of morbidity and mortality of patients with central nervous system infections. Patients on mechanical ventilation are particularly at a high risk. The mortality rate of patients with nosocomial pneumonia was 54.4% and it was five times higher than in patients without pneumonia.

  12. Nosocomial outbreak of hepatitis B virus infection involving two hospitals in the Republic of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Burns, K

    2012-02-01

    The routes of nosocomial hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission have changed over the years. Initiatives to prevent transfusion-associated HBV and healthcare worker-to-patient transmission have had a positive impact on these transmission routes. Recent reports of outbreaks of nosocomial HBV have implicated breaches in standard precautions as important causes of HBV transmission. This report describes a nosocomial outbreak of HBV infection in the Republic of Ireland, which occurred between January 2005 and March 2006. The outbreak was detected following identification of a case of acute HBV infection in a patient whose only risk factor was a recent surgical procedure. The extensive multi-agency investigation that followed revealed that the patient was one of five cases of acute HBV infection and that four separate transmission events between infectious cases had occurred in two different hospitals over a 15-month period. A definitive cause for each transmission event was not identified, although lapses in adherence to standard precautions, safe injection and phlebotomy practices could not be ruled out. Two secondary cases of acute HBV infection in community contacts of two of the nosocomial cases were identified. Phylogenetic analysis proved a useful tool in confirming infection with a pre-core HBV mutant and viral transmission between the seven patients. A patient notification exercise involving 1028 potentially exposed patients found no evidence of additional cases of nosocomial HBV infection. These findings highlight the importance of consistent application of standard precautions.

  13. Device-associated infection rates and mortality in intensive care units of Peruvian hospitals: findings of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium Tasas de infección asociadas a aparatos y mortalidad en unidades de cuidados intensivos de hospitales peruanos: datos del Consorcio Internacional para el Control de las Infecciones Nosocomiales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Cuellar

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To measure device-associated infection (DAI rates, microbiological profiles, bacterial resistance, and attributable mortality in intensive care units (ICUs in hospitals in Peru that are members of the International Nosocomial Infection Control Consortium (INICC. METHODS: Prospective cohort surveillance of DAIs was conducted in ICUs in four hospitals applying the definitions for nosocomial infections of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (CDC-NNIS and National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN. RESULTS: From September 2003 to October 2007 1 920 patients hospitalized in ICUs for an aggregate of 9 997 days acquired 249 DAIs, accounting for a rate of 13.0% and 24.9 DAIs per 1 000 ICU-days. The ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP rate was 31.3 per 1 000 ventilator-days; the central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections (CVC-BSI rate was 7.7 cases per 1 000 catheter-days; and the rate for catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI was 5.1 cases per 1 000 catheter-days. Extra mortality for VAP was 24.5% (RR 2.07, P OBJETIVOS: Determinar las tasas de infecciones asociadas a aparatos (IAA, sus perfiles microbiológicos y la resistencia bacteriana, así como la mortalidad atribuible a estas infecciones en unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI de hospitales de Perú, miembros del Consorcio Internacional para el Control de las Infecciones Nosocomiales (INICC. MÉTODOS: Se hizo un seguimiento retrospectivo de cohorte de las IAA en las UCI de cuatro hospitales, según las definiciones de infección nosocomial del Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia de Infecciones Nosocomiales de los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC-NNIS y de la Red Nacional de Seguridad Sanitaria (NHSN, de los Estados Unidos de América. RESULTADOS: De septiembre de 2003 a octubre de 2007, 1 920 pacientes hospitalizados en las UCI, con un total de 9 997 días, adquirieron

  14. Nosocomial Infections Caused by Acinetobacter baumannii: Are We Losing the Battle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protic, Dragana; Pejovic, Aleksa; Andjelkovic, Dragana; Djukanovic, Nina; Savic, Dragana; Piperac, Pavle; Markovic Denic, Ljiljana; Zdravkovic, Marija; Todorovic, Zoran

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of nosocomial infections caused by multi-drug- and extended-drug resistant strains of Acinetobacter is constantly increasing all over the world, with a high mortality rate. We analyzed the in-hospital data on the sensitivity of Acinetobacter baumannii isolates and correlated them with antibiotic treatment and clinical outcomes of nosocomial infections over a 17-mo period. Retrospective analysis was performed at the Clinical Center "Bezanijska kosa," Belgrade, Serbia. Microbiologic data (number and sensitivity of A. baumannii isolates) and clinical data (medical records of 41 randomly selected patients who developed nosocomial infection caused by A. baumannii) were matched. Acinetobacter baumannii, detected in 279 isolates and obtained from 19 patients (12% of all samples), was resistant to almost all antibiotics tested, including carbapenems, with the exception of colistin and tigecycline. It was obtained most often from the respiratory tract samples. Empiric treatment of the nosocomial infections (pneumonia in 75% of cases) involved cephalosporins, metronidazole, and carbapenems (80%, 66%, and 61% of patients, respectively), whereas tigecyclin and colistin were used primarily in targeted therapy (20% and 12% of patients, respectively). The mortality rate of patients treated empirically was significantly higher (p Nosocomial A. baumannii infections represent a significant clinical problem because of their high incidence, lack of susceptibility to the most commonly used antibiotics, and the often inappropriate treatment, which favors the development of multi-drug-resistant strains.

  15. Nosocomial Infections and Outcomes after Intracerebral Hemorrhage: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Santosh B; Moradiya, Yogesh; Shah, Jharna; Merkler, Alexander E; Mangat, Halinder S; Iadacola, Costantino; Hanley, Daniel F; Kamel, Hooman; Ziai, Wendy C

    2016-10-01

    Infections after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) may be associated with worse outcomes. We aimed to evaluate the association between nosocomial infections (>48 h) and outcomes of ICH at a population level. We identified patients with ICH using ICD-9-CM codes in the 2002-2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Demographics, comorbidities, surgical procedures, and hospital characteristics were compared between patients with and without concomitant nosocomial infections. Primary outcomes were in-hospital mortality and home discharge. Secondary outcome was permanent cerebrospinal shunt placement. Logistic regression analyses were used to analyze the association between infections and outcomes. Among 509,516 ICH patients, infections occurred in 117,636 (23.1 %). Rates of infections gradually increased from 18.7 % in 2002-2003 to 24.1 % in 2010-2011. Pneumonia was the most common nosocomial infection (15.4 %) followed by urinary tract infection (UTI) (7.9 %). Patients with infections were older (p Nosocomial infection was associated with longer hospital stay (11 vs. 5 days, p infection had higher odds of mortality [odds ratio (OR) 2.11, 95 % CI 2.08-2.14] and cerebrospinal shunt placement (OR 2.19, 95 % CI 2.06-2.33) and lower odds of home discharge (OR 0.49, 95 % CI 0.47-0.51). Similar results were observed in subgroup analyses of individual infections. In a nationally representative cohort of ICH patients, nosocomial infection was associated with worse outcomes and greater resource utilization.

  16. Nosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage: time course and causative pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Kamil G; Rinkel, Gabriel J E; Vergouwen, Mervyn D I

    2015-07-01

    Nosocomial infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) are associated with prolonged length of stay and poor functional outcome. It remains unclear if infections result in prolonged length of stay or, vice versa, if prolonged length of stay results in more infections. Before strategies can be designed to reduce infections after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, more data are needed on time course and causative pathogens of infections. To investigate the time course of infection onset and bacterial microorganisms that cause nosocomial infections after aSAH. In consecutive patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage admitted to the University Medical Center Utrecht between 2009 and 2011, we analyzed the proportion of patients with infections, day of infection onset, and culture results. Of the 291 included patients, 107 (37%) patients developed 115 nosocomial infections. Fifty-six patients (19%) developed an infection within the first week. Median day of infection onset was for pneumonia (n = 49; 17%) day 4 (interquartile range 3-9), respiratory tract infection (n = 16; 6%) day 4 (interquartile range 1-7), urinary tract infection (n = 27; 9%) day 11 (interquartile range 7-14), and meningitis/ventriculitis (n = 10; 3%) day 19 (interquartile range 9-33). Cultures of infections mostly yielded Staphylococcus aureus (20%), Haemophilus influenzae (15%), and Escherichia coli (14%), Nosocomial infections after subarachnoid hemorrhage are common and mostly occur in the first week after ictus. Future studies should investigate if general hygienic measures, infection awareness, minimizing the duration of mechanical ventilation and use of catheters/drains, or prophylactic antibiotics reduce infections and improve functional outcome. © 2015 World Stroke Organization.

  17. Pattern of nosocomial infections in the special care baby unit of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2013-09-27

    Sep 27, 2013 ... health care-related. Objective: To determine the prevalence, types and risk factors for nosocomial infections in the. Special Care Baby Unit of a Nige- rian Tertiary Hospital. Method: A ... ficial skin and mucosal infections occurred to similar extents in ..... Changing trends in newborn sepsis in Sagamu, Nigeria: ...

  18. Impact of functional status on the onset of nosocomial infections in an acute care for elders unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazière, S; Couturier, P; Gavazzi, G

    2013-01-01

    To assess the role of functional status as a risk factor for nosocomial infections in the elderly. Prospective study. Acute care for elders units of university hospital of Grenoble. All patients over 75 years old consecutively hospitalized between January and April 2007. The main judgement criteria was the rate of nosocomial infection during the hospital stay, defined according to the French technical comity against nosocomial infections. Other data included functional status at baseline and admission (Katz' ADL), usual risk factors for nosocomial infections, demographic and geriatric assessment data. The study included 223 patients. The mean age was 86.7±6.5 years. A nosocomial infection was diagnosed for 17.0% of the patients. In univariate analysis, the number of medicines, pressure sore, pneumonia diagnosis, illness severity, indwelling bladder catheter, IADL at baseline, and all disability parameters (ADL at baseline, ADL at admission, recent functional decline) were significantly associated with nosocomial infection (pnosocomial infection (pnosocomial infection (OR=2.21). Our results suggest a significant impact of functional impairment on the incidence of nosocomial infections in hospitalized elderly population. Disability is a higher risk factor for nosocomial infections than the usual and well-known other parameters. Larger prospective studies are needed to examine the power of this relationship.

  19. [Pathogen distribution, risk factors, and outcomes of nosocomial infection in very premature infants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, De-Shuang; Xie, Dong-Ke; He, Na; Dong, Wen-Bin; Lei, Xiao-Ping

    2017-08-01

    To study the pathogen distribution and risk factors of nosocomial infection in very preterm infants, as well as the risk of adverse outcomes. A retrospective analysis was performed for the clinical data of 111 very preterm infants who were born between January and December, 2016 and had a gestational age of nosocomial infection after 72 hours of hospitalization, the infants were divided into infection group and non-infection group. The infection group was analyzed in terms of pathogenic bacteria which caused infection and their drug sensitivity. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to investigate the potential risk factors and risk of adverse outcomes of nosocomial infection in very preterm infants. Gram-negative bacteria were the main pathogens for nosocomial infection in very preterm infants and accounted for 54%, among which Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common one; the following pathogens were fungi (41%), among which Candida albicans was the most common one. The drug sensitivity test showed that Gram-negative bacteria were highly resistant to β-lactam and carbapenems and highly sensitive to quinolones, while fungi had low sensitivity to itraconazole and high sensitivity to 5-fluorocytosine and amphotericin B. Early-onset sepsis, duration of peripherally inserted central catheter, steroid exposure, and duration of parenteral nutrition were risk factors for nosocomial infection in very preterm infants (Pinfection group, the infection group had significantly higher risks of pulmonary complications (PNosocomial infection in very preterm infants is affected by various factors and may increase the risk of adverse outcomes. In clinical practice, reasonable preventive and treatment measures should be taken with reference to drug sensitivity, in order to improve the prognosis of very premature infants.

  20. Nosocomial infections in a Dutch neonatal intensive care unit: surveillance study with definitions for infection specifically adapted for neonates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zwet, W. C.; Kaiser, A. M.; van Elburg, R. M.; Berkhof, J.; Fetter, W. P. F.; Parlevliet, G. A.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M. J. E.

    2005-01-01

    The incidence of nosocomial infection in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) is high compared with other wards. However, no definitions for hospital-acquired infection are available for NICUs. The aim of this study was to measure the incidence of such infections and to identify risk factors in the

  1. Risk factors for nosocomial infection among hospitalised severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Li, Hui; Gu, Li; Liu, Meng; Xue, Chun-Xue; Cao, Bin; Wang, Chen

    2018-01-01

    Nosocomial infections following influenza are important causes of death, requiring early implementation of preventive measures, but predictors for nosocomial infection in the early stage remained undetermined. We aimed to determine risk factors that can help clinicians identify patients with high risk of nosocomial infection following influenza on admission. Using a database prospectively collected through a Chinese national network for hospitalised severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 patients, we compared the characteristics on admission between patients with and without nosocomial infection. A total of 2146 patients were enrolled in the final analysis with a median age of 36.0 years, male patients comprising 50.2% of the sample and 232 (10.8%) patients complicated with nosocomial infection. Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia and Staphylococcus aureus were the leading pathogens, and invasive fungal infection was found in 30 cases (12.9%). The in-hospital mortality was much higher in patients with nosocomial infection than those without (45.7% vs 11.8%, P  65 years (OR: 1.83; 95% CI 1.04-3.21) and anaemia (OR: 1.39; 95% CI 1.39-2.79) were independently associated with nosocomial infection. Need for mechanical ventilation, sepsis, ICU admission on first day, lymphocytopenia, older age and anaemia were independent risk factors that can help clinicians identify severe influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 patients at high risk of nosocomial infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A systematic review of nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moffa, Michelle; Guo, Wilson; Li, Trudy; Cronk, Ryan; Abebe, Lydia S; Bartram, Jamie

    2017-11-01

    Water is an important, overlooked, and controllable source of nosocomial infection. Hospitalized neonates and their mothers are particularly vulnerable to nosocomial waterborne infections. Our objectives through this systematic review were to: investigate water sources, reservoirs, and transmission routes that lead to nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and their mothers; establish patient risk factors; compile measures for controlling outbreaks and recommended strategies for prevention; and identify information gaps to improve guidelines for reporting future outbreaks. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and clinicaltrials.gov. Peer-reviewed studies reporting contaminated water as a route of transmission to neonates and/or their mothers were included. Twenty-five studies were included. The most common contaminated water sources in healthcare facilities associated with infection transmission were tap water, sinks, and faucets. Low birthweights, preterm or premature birth, and underlying disease increased neonatal risk of infection. Effective control measures commonly included replacing or cleaning faucets and increased or alternative methods for hand disinfection, and recommendations for prevention of future infections highlighted the need for additional surveillance. The implementation of control measures and recommended prevention strategies by healthcare workers and managing authorities of healthcare facilities and improved reporting of future outbreaks may contribute to a reduction in the incidence of nosocomial waterborne infections in neonates and their mothers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. ANALYSIS OF LONG-TERM DYNAMICS OF NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS INCIDENCE IN THE REPUBLIC OF NORTH OSSETIA-ALANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. R. Khabalova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Nosocomial infections occur in 5–20% of hospitalized patients. Officially, from 50 to 60 thousand cases of nosocomial infections are annually reported in the Russian Federation. The rapid development of invasive medical techniques, inappropriate use of antibiotics, instability of the sanitary-epidemiological, socio-economic, sociopolitical and socio-demographic situations could be considered as prerequisites for the increasing of many infectious diseases, including nosocomial infections. The detailed epidemiological analysis of nosocomial infections incidence at regional level provides the most complete picture of epidemiological situation and determines the tactics of surveillance and infection control. The aim of this study was to evaluate long-term dynamics of nosocomial infections incidence in the Republic of North Ossetia-Alania. The study of epidemic process manifestations was based on the retrospective analysis of incidence from 1993 to 2010.

  4. The Relationship of Nosocomial Infection Reduction to Changes in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit Rates of Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapcharoensap, Wannasiri; Kan, Peiyi; Powers, Richard J; Shaw, Gary M; Stevenson, David K; Gould, Jeffrey B; Wirtschafter, David D; Lee, Henry C

    2017-01-01

    To examine whether recent reductions in rates of nosocomial infection have contributed to changes in rates of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in a population-based cohort. This was a retrospective, population-based cohort study that used the California Perinatal Quality Care Collaborative database from 2006 to 2013. Eligible infants included those less than 30 weeks' gestational age and less than 1500 g who survived to 3 days of life. Primary variables of interest were rates of nosocomial infections and BPD. Adjusted rates of nosocomial infections and BPD from a baseline period (2006-2010) were compared with a later period (2011-2013). The correlation of changes in rates across periods for both variables was assessed by hospital of care. A total of 22 967 infants from 129 hospitals were included in the study. From the first to second time period, the incidence of nosocomial infections declined from 24.7% to 15% and BPD declined from 35% to 30%. Adjusted hospital rates of BPD and nosocomial infections were correlated positively with a calculated 8% reduction of BPD rates attributable to reductions in nosocomial infections. Successful interventions to reduce rates of nosocomial infections may have a positive impact on other comorbidities such as BPD. The prevention of nosocomial infections should be viewed as a significant component in avoiding long-term neonatal morbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Epidemiology and characteristics of nosocomial infections in critically ill patients in a tertiary care Intensive Care Unit of Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhuri, Anirban Hom; Chakravarty, Mitali; Uppal, Rajeev

    2017-01-01

    The prevalence of nosocomial infection is higher in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) than other areas of the hospital. The present observational study was undertaken to describe the epidemiology and characteristics of nosocomial infections acquired in a tertiary care ICU and the impact of the various risk factors in their causation. A retrospective study was conducted on the prospectively collected data of 153 consecutive patients admitted in a tertiary care ICU between July 2014 and December 2015. The primary objective was to assess the epidemiology of ICU-acquired bacterial infections in terms of the incidence of new infections, causative organism, and site. The secondary end point was to assess the risk factors for developing ICU-acquired infections. Out of the 153 patients enrolled in the study, 87 had an ICU-acquired nosocomial infection (58.86%). The most common organism responsible for infection was Klebsiella pneumoniae (37%), and the most common infection was pneumonia (33%). The duration of mechanical ventilation and length of ICU stay were significantly prolonged in patients developing nosocomial infections. There was no difference in mortality between the groups. The multivariate analyses identified intubation longer than 7 days, urinary catheterization >7 days, duration of mechanical ventilation more than 7 days, and ICU length of stay longer than 7 days as independent risk factors for nosocomial infections. The study demonstrated a high incidence of nosocomial infection in the ICU and identified the risk factors for acquisition of nosocomial infections in the ICU.

  6. Surveillance of some bacterial causative agents of nosocomial infections during the war and peace period

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    Šuljagić Vesna

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Surveillance based on laboratory findings of bacteria isolated from hospitalized patients is an important activity in epidemiologic surveillance of nosocomial infections. It provides the insight into the circulation and management of some causative agents of nosocomial infections in hospitals which facilitates defining of proper measures for the prevention and suppression of nosocomial infections caused by these agents. The aim of this study was to analyze and compare surveillance data collected in Military Medical Academy (MMA during June 1999 (the period of war and June 2000 (the period of peace. Isolation frequency of bacteria that were the most common agents of nosocomial: Pseudomonas aeruginosa, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, Escherichia coli, Acinetobacter spp. and Enterococcus spp., was monitored in patients from 5 various surgical wards of MMA. In the war period, the increase of number of isolates of all these bacteria was registered, but the increase of isolated Acinetobacter spp. was the most significant. The total number of isolates was greater in June 1999 in comparison to June 2000. Most isolates were recovered from wound cultures when the increased number of Enterococcus spp. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the blood was registered. In the period of peace isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa manifested reduced resistance to quinolones, imipenem and 3rd generation cephalosporins. Barrier infection control measures are necessary in preventing nosocomial transmission particularly in the wartime. Thus, preventive medicine is important for performing efficient surveillance, and suggesting the adequate measures for prevention and repression of nosocomial infections, particularly in the period of war.

  7. A NOSOCOMIAL INFECTION MANIFESTED AS ERYSIPELAS IN PEMPHIGUS FOLIACEUS PATIENT UNDER INTRAVENOUS DEXAMETHASONE TREATMENT

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    Achmad Yudha Pranata

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Puncture wound in diagnostic interventions permits the entry of bacteria into the skin or soft tissue, thus precipitating nosocomial infection, such as erysipelas. There are other risk factors of nosocomial infections including old age, immunosuppressive drugs, and underlying diseases. Pemphigus foliaceus (PF is an autoimmune disease with corticosteroid treatment as the mainstay therapy, which could cause immunosuppression and predispose patients to infection. The objective of this paper was to report erysipelas as one of the manifestations of nosocomial infection in patients under immunosuppressive therapy. Case: A case of erysipelas acquired on the 9th day of hospitalization in a PF patient underwent intravenous dexamethasone injection, with history of puncture wounds on the previous day on the site of erysipelas was reported. The clinical findings of erysipelas were well defined, painful erythema and edema that felt firm and warm on palpation, with blisters and pustules on top. Gram staining from the pustules and blisters fluid revealed Gram (+ cocci. Patient was given 2 grams intravenous ceftriaxone for 7 days and saline wet compress. Improvement on the erysipelas was seen the day after ceftriaxone injection. The patient was discharged after 12 days of hospitalization with improvement both on the PF and the erysipelas. On the next visit 7 days later, the erysipelas lesion disappeared. Conclusion: Puncture wound and immunosuppresive treatment are the factors that could cause erysipelas as a nosocomial infection, and an appropriate treatment of the infection would decrease the functional disability of the patient.

  8. Nosocomial infections in heart surgery patients: active surveillance in two Italian hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sodano, L; Agodi, A; Barchitta, M; Musumeci, F; Menichetti, A; Bellocchi, P; Cunsolo, R; Coco, G

    2004-01-01

    In Italy no nosocomial infection surveillance database has been established despite the fact that a decrease of nosocomial infection rates was one of the priorities of the Italian National Health Plan 1998--2000. Heart surgery operations are the most frequent high risk procedures in western countries. Active surveillance was performed at the heart surgery wards of two Italian hospitals (Rome and Catania, Southern Italy) in accordance with the methods described for the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance (NNIS) System of the USA. In both hospitals surgical site infections (SSIs) were the most frequently encountered type of nosocomial infections, accounting for 57.2% in Rome and 50% in Catania, and SSI rates in coronary artery bypass grafts with both chest and donor site incisions, calculated by risk index equal to 1, were above the 90th percentile for the NNIS System. The urinary catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) rate (5.8%) in Catania exceeded the 90th percentile for the NNIS System, while the device-associated UTI (1.6%), bloodstream (4.1%) and pneumonia (8.0%) rates, from the hospital in Rome, did not. All device utilization ratios were lower than the 10th percentile for the NNIS System. Our study demonstrated that the NNIS methodology is applicable to Italian hospitals, although with some limitations mainly regarding the minimal surveillance duration required for significant interhospital comparison, and highlighted the need of a national comparison of surveillance data as benchmark.

  9. Prevention of nosocomial infection in cardiac surgery by decontamination of the nasopharynx and oropharynx with chlorhexidine gluconate: a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segers, Patrique; Speekenbrink, Ron G. H.; Ubbink, Dirk T.; van Ogtrop, Marc L.; de Mol, Bas A.

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: Nosocomial infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality after cardiac surgery. Decolonization of endogenous potential pathogenic microorganisms is important in the prevention of nosocomial infections. OBJECTIVE: To determine the efficacy of perioperative decontamination of

  10. Nosocomial infection and related risk factors in a general surgery service: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Aragon, P; Lizan-Garcia, M; Cascales-Sanchez, P; Villar-Canovas, M T; Garcia-Olmo, D

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the frequency of nosocomial infection in the general surgery service of a tertiary-care hospital and to identify associated risk factors. A prospective, longitudinal, descriptive and analytical study was made from January 1995 to December 1998 of a clinical cohort of 2794 patients who underwent a surgical procedure with a post-surgery stay of more than 48 h. The criteria for infection were those defined by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of the USA. The most frequent nosocomial infection was surgical infection (SI), with a global cumulative incidence (CI) of 7.7%, ranging from 3.4% for clean surgery to 23.7% for dirty surgery. The next most frequent were urinary tract infection (UTI) and bacteremia (1.5%) and nosocomial pneumonia (NP) (0.5%). The global CI of SI decreased from 11.7% in 1995 to 4% in 1998. An ASA classification higher than 2 multiplied the risk of SI by 1.76; with respect to UTI multiplied the risk by 2.13; the risk of NP by 5.93 and multiplied the risk of B by 4.72. The most frequent nosocomial infection was surgical infection. An ASA higher than 2, the stay prior to surgery; the number of days with a urinary catheter, with a central venous catheter and with mechanical ventilation; as well as the improvement in the use of antimicrobial prophylaxis, were all factors that influenced the frequency of nosocomial infection.

  11. Value of platelet count in the early diagnosis of nosocomial invasive fungal infections in premature infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Chen; Mao, Jian

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the value of a platelet count (PLT) in the early diagnosis of nosocomial invasive fungal infections in premature infants. Based on clinical diagnosis combined with blood culture results, 72 premature infants of 5354 pediatric patients who were hospitalized in the neonatal ward of our hospital between September 2009 and February 2013 were diagnosed with nosocomial invasive fungal infections (fungal infection group). There were 58 premature infants diagnosed with bacterial infections during the same period (bacterial infection group). The control group included 74 premature infants without nosocomial infections who were hospitalized during the same period. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to analyze the sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic efficacy of the PLT and white blood cell (WBC) counts and C-reactive protein (CRP) level in the diagnosis of fungal infections in premature infants. The risk factors for invasive fungal infections included birth weight infection group decreased in the early and acute stages of infection (p infection group decreased in the early and acute stages of infection (p infection group was more significant than the bacterial infection group (p infection group in the early stage of infection (p infection groups in the acute stage of infection (p > 0.05). ROC curve analysis of the WBC and PLT counts and the CRP level in the early diagnosis of fungal infections showed that the area under the curve of the PLT count was 0.912 (95% confidence interval:0.863-0.961), thus indicating a high accuracy with a cutoff PLT count of 157.0 × 10 9 /L. The corresponding sensitivity and specificity were 77.8% and 94.6%, respectively. We conclude that the PLT count is a convenient, economical, and effective predictor of invasive fungal infections in premature infants and has potential in the early diagnosis of fungal infections.

  12. [Mortality associated with nosocomial infection, occurring in a general hospital of Sumaré-SP, Brazil].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Aline Caixeta; Donalisio, Maria Rita; Santiago, Thaiana Helena Roma; Freire, June Barreiros

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the socio-demographic profile, clinical procedures and etiology of nosocomial infection associated with deaths in the Hospital Estadual Sumaré, state of São Paulo, Brazil, from 2007 to 2008. The retrospective study of medical records (n = 133) revealed an average of 35 days of hospitalization. Most patients (97%) underwent some invasive procedure associated with nosocomial infection (p ≤ 0.05), including: 90 (67.7%) pneumonia, 62 (46.6%), urinary infections and 97 (73%) septicemia. Infection was the leading cause of death in 75 (56.4%) cases, with defined etiology in 110 (82.7%); 34 (30.9%) because of microorganisms that were multidrug-resistant. The most common was Staphylococcus aureus (25%), related to pneumonia and blood stream infection. The monitoring of hospital infection contributed to intervention at risk situation and death.

  13. Nosocomial infections: knowledge and source of information among clinical health care students in Ghana

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    Bello AI

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ajediran I Bello1, Eunice N Asiedu1, Babatunde OA Adegoke2, Jonathan NA Quartey1, Kwadwo O Appiah-Kubi1, Bertha Owusu-Ansah11Department of Physiotherapy, School of Allied Health Sciences, College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana, Accra, Ghana; 2Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan, NigeriaBackground: This study determined and compared the knowledge of nosocomial infections among clinical health care students at the College of Health Sciences, University of Ghana.Methods: Two hundred undergraduate health care students from four academic programs participated in the study. The study sample was drawn from each academic program by a simple random sampling technique using the class directory from each course. The Infection Control Standardized Questionnaire (ICSQ was used to assess the knowledge of students about three main domains, ie, hand hygiene, nosocomial infections, and standard precautions. A maximum score of 50 was obtainable, and respondents with scores ≥70% were classified as having a satisfactory knowledge. The response on each item was coded numerically to generate data for statistical analysis. Comparison of knowledge on the domains among categories of students was assessed using the Kruskal–Wallis test, while associations between courses of study and knowledge about nosocomial infections were determined using the Chi-square test. All statistical tests had a significant level of 5% (P < 0.05Results: Overall mean percentage score of the participants on ICSQ was 65.4 ± 2.58, with medical, physiotherapy, radiography, and nursing students recording mean percentage scores of 70.58 ± 0.62, 65.02 ± 2.00, 64.74 ± 1.19, and 61.31 ± 2.35, respectively. The main source of information about the prevention of nosocomial infections as cited by participants was their routine formal training in class. There was no significant association (P > 0.05 between course of study and knowledge of

  14. Effect of executive programs of infection control committees on the prevalence of nosocomial infections in Kermanshah's Hospitals (2010-2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatankhah, Sodabe; Mokarami, Hamidreza; Karchani, Mohsen; Hosseini, Zahra; Izadi, Babak; Moradi, Farideh

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of executive programs of infection control committees on the incidence of nosocomial infections in hospitals affiliated with the Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (Kermanshah, Iran) during 2010 and 2011. The numbers of patients admitted in 2010 and 2011 were 8084 and 7166, respectively, and the average prevalence of nosocomial infections in 2010 and 2011 was 0.8 and 1.9 infections per 100 patients, respectively. In 2010, the mean scores obtained by hospital for regular Infection Control Committee meetings, regular gatherings, registration of program information analysis, and regular follow-up meetings were 19, 31, 30.5, and 41.7 (out of 100), respectively. In 2011, they were 20.2, 36.4, 38.1, and 50, respectively. The results of this study indicated that executive programs of infection control committees had no effect on the incidence of nosocomial infections; therefore, the experts who assess hospitals should pay more attention to the systems that are used to conduct surveillance of nosocomial infection control programs.

  15. Nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infections in the palivizumab-prophylaxis era with implications regarding high-risk infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashkenazi-Hoffnung, Liat; Dotan, Miri; Livni, Gilat; Amir, Jacob; Bilavsky, Efraim

    2014-09-01

    Although respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection continues to be a leading cause of infant hospitalization with a high transmission rate, recent data on nosocomial RSV infection are scarce. This study investigated the clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial RSV infection in the palivizumab-prophylaxis era. The database of a tertiary pediatric medical center was searched for all hospitalized patients with RSV-positive respiratory disease in 2008-2010. Data were compared between patients with community-associated and nosocomial disease, and the qualification of the latter group for palivizumab was evaluated. Of the 873 children identified, 30 (3.4%) had a nosocomial infection. This group accounted for 0.06% of all admissions during the study period. The nosocomial infection group had higher rates of preterm birth and severe underlying disease than the community-associated RSV group and a longer mean hospital stay. The nosocomial infection group also had higher rates of intensive care unit admission and mechanical ventilation. Although 73% had underlying conditions, most (80%) did not qualify for RSV immunoprophylaxis, including 7 children (23%) with immune deficiency. Nosocomial RSV infection is a significant cause of morbidity among hospitalized infants, especially those with comorbidities and lengthy hospital stay, and is associated with a complicated clinical course. In addition to strict infection-control measures, extending palivizumab prophylaxis to additional selected high-risk populations should be considered. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. [Microorganisms responsible of nosocomial infections in the Mexican Social Security Institute].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Flores, Rafael; Rosado-Quiab, Ulises; Vargas-Valerio, Alfredo; Grajales-Muñiz, Concepción

    2016-01-01

    The prevention and control of the nosocomial infections involve the knowledge of the most frequent type of microorganism isolated. In Mexico there are not national statistics to identify the main microorganisms that cause a nosocomial infection. It was conducted an analysis of all the culture results of the nosocomial infections reported by the Sistema de Vigilancia Epidemiológica Hospitalaria (Epidemiological Surveillance System) of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social during the year 2013. The most frequent and relevant microorganisms were reported. 48 377 results from cultures of nosocomial infections were studied. Of these 13 207 (27.3 %) were from 25 high specialty medical units and 35 170 (72.6 %) from 197 second level medical units. The most frequently isolated microorganism was Escherichia coli with 8192 results (16.9 %), followed by the group of Coagulase-negative Staphylococci with 6771 cultures (14 %) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa with 5275 results (19.9 %). Slight differences between levels of care and specialized hospitals were observed. This study identifies the Escherichia coli, the group of Coagulase-negative Staphylococci and the Pseudomonas aeruginosa as the main microorganisms to prevent.

  17. Reduced Responsiveness of Blood Leukocytes to Lipopolysaccharide Does not Predict Nosocomial Infections in Critically Ill Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vught, Lonneke A.; Wiewel, Maryse A.; Hoogendijk, Arie J.; Scicluna, Brendon P.; Belkasim-Bohoudi, Hakima; Horn, Janneke; Schultz, Marcus J.; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Critically ill patients show signs of immune suppression, which is considered to increase vulnerability to nosocomial infections. Whole-blood stimulation is frequently used to test the function of the innate immune system. We here assessed the association between whole-blood leukocyte responsiveness

  18. Use of temporary nursing staff and nosocomial infections in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sung-Heui; Brewer, Carol S; Kelly, Maureen; Spencer, Alexandra

    2015-04-01

    To examine the nature and prevalence of the use of temporary nursing staff in intensive care units and relationships between the use of temporary nursing staff and the occurrence of nosocomial infections (central line-associated blood stream infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia). Hiring temporary nurses raises controversial issues with respect to nurse staffing, care processes and patient outcomes, yet empirical findings regarding the use of temporary nurses are mixed. Whether adverse patient outcomes in intensive care units are related to the use of temporary nursing staff remains unexamined. A retrospective longitudinal design was used. Data were collected monthly from 12 intensive care units at six hospitals; 144 ICU-month data points were used for the analysis. Chi-square, anova and logit regression models were used to examine the research questions. The intensive care units used higher levels of temporary nursing staff, but the use of temporary nursing staff was not significantly associated with nosocomial infections. Nurses' perceptions regarding staffing and resource adequacy were significantly associated with nosocomial infections. No evidence was found to link the use of temporary nursing staff and nosocomial infections. Instead, nurses' perceptions of staffing adequacy were related to nosocomial infections. Given the greater use of temporary nursing staff in intensive care units, nurse managers in intensive care units need to monitor the levels of temporary nurse staffing and develop a systematic approach for hospitals to assist in these nurses' adjustment, which can reduce the burden of both temporary and permanent intensive care unit nurses. In addition to quantitative measures of nurse staffing, nurses' perceptions regarding staffing adequacy can be used to measure nurse staffing in relation to adverse patient outcomes. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Do cost savings from reductions in nosocomial infections justify additional costs of single-bed rooms in intensive care units? A simulation case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatsafavi, Hessam; Niknejad, Bahar; Zadeh, Rana; Sadatsafavi, Mohsen

    2016-02-01

    Evidence shows that single-patient rooms can play an important role in preventing cross-transmission and reducing nosocomial infections in intensive care units (ICUs). This case study investigated whether cost savings from reductions in nosocomial infections justify the additional construction and operation costs of single-bed rooms in ICUs. We conducted deterministic and probabilistic return-on-investment analyses of converting the space occupied by open-bay rooms to single-bed rooms in an exemplary ICU. We used the findings of a study of an actual ICU in which the association between the locations of patients in single-bed vs open-bay rooms with infection risk was evaluated. Despite uncertainty in the estimates of costs, infection risks, and length of stay, the cost savings from the reduction of nosocomial infections in single-bed rooms in this case substantially outweighed additional construction and operation expenses. The mean value of internal rate of return over a 5-year analysis period was 56.18% (95% credible interval, 55.34%-57.02%). This case study shows that although single-patient rooms are more costly to build and operate, they can result in substantial savings compared with open-bay rooms by avoiding costs associated with nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidemiological markers of Serratia marcescens isolates causing nosocomial infections in Spain (1981-1991).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boquete, T; Vindel, A; Martin-Bourgon, C; Azañedo, L; Sáez-Nieto, J A

    1996-12-01

    The distribution of epidemiological markers (serotyping and phage-typing) of Serratia marcescens isolates from nosocomial episodes (63 nosocomial cutbreaks with 475 isolates, and 1208 sporadic cases) received in our laboratory during the period 1981-1991 was studied. The records for 1683 isolates from Spanish hospitals have been analyzed. In relation with the sporadic cases, the predominant types were serotype O6 (13.4%) and serotype O14 (11.4%); polyagglutinable strains accounted for 15.6%; in outbreaks, type O14 is clearly predominant (27.4%). Phage-typing was a good secondary marker, with a 87.9% of typability; the number of lytic patterns was very high, extended patterns (six or more phages) being the most frequent. We have studied the characteristics of S. marcescens isolates causing infections in the nosocomial environment in Spain.

  1. Nosocomial bloodstream infection in a neonatal intensive care unit of a medical center: a three-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ya-Chun; Chiu, Yu-Chiao; Wang, Jen-Hsien; Lin, Hsiao-Chuan; Lin, Hung-Chih; Su, Bai-Horng; Chiu, Hsiu-Hui

    2002-09-01

    Bloodstream infections are the most frequent nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units. This retrospective study surveyed the epidemiologic characteristics of nosocomial bloodstream infections which occurred in the neonatal intensive care unit from January 1, 1997 to December 31, 1999. The overall infection patient rate was 5.5% in the 3-year period, and the overall infection patient-day rate was 4.4 per 1000 patient-days. Low birth weight was a risk factor for bloodstream infections. The rate of infection for neonates with birth weight below 1000 g ranged from 36.6% to 45.8% (1997: 36.6%; 1998: 45.8% and 1999: 38.9%). The most common pathogens causing nosocomial bloodstream infection were: Staphylococcus aureus (18.5%) (with 92% oxacillin-resistant), Acinectobacter baumannii (16.3%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.9%), Escherichia coli (9.6%), and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (8.1%). The mortality due to nosocomial bloodstream infection was highest among gram-negative bacteria, especially with P. aeruginosa (45.5%). Therefore, surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infection and successful strategies to decrease nosocomial bloodstream infection, such as infection control and optimal antibiotic use, are warranted.

  2. [Evaluation of antibiotic resistance in the frame of the surveillance system for nosocomial infections. Strong and weak points].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serban, Roxana; Codiţă, Irina

    2010-01-01

    the system of sanitary units that fit the needs of the program fir microbiological identification and investigation of nosocomial infections; intensification of the training activities of persons involved in the program, regardless of the level of responsibility and the acknowledgement of each person's responsibilities in nosocomial infection monitoring; external and internal control implementation in the laboratories: selection of aspects concerning the emergence and spread of antibiotic resistance that come out during surveillance in order to be studied using molecular methods for the emphasizing of mechanisms and causes, in view of implementing measures for prevention and control; evaluation of the necessity for molecular investigation in view of identifying resistant bacterial clones in the hospitals in Romania etc.

  3. [Secular trends in the etiology of nosocomial infection at a teaching hospital in Taiwan, 1981-1994].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M L; Chen, Y C; Pan, H J; Chang, S C; Yang, L S; Ho, S W; Luh, K T; Hsieh, W C; Chuang, C Y

    1995-08-01

    Surveillance system of nosocomial infection was established in 1980 at the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). To identify pathogens and the secular trends in the etiology of nosocomial infection from 1981 to 1994, the prospective, hospital-wide nosocomial surveillance data were analysed. During this period, 22,146 pathogens causing nosocomial infections were isolated. Gram-negative aerobic bacteria remained the major pathogens, but gram-positive cocci and fungi increased rapidly in the past 14 years. When the overall pathogen distribution is examined, Pseudomonas areuginosa was the most frequently isolated pathogen, but Candida albicans and other yeasts have taken the leading position since 1993. Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci also increase significantly in recent years. When the pathogens causing infection at the 4 major sites were examined. P. aeruginosa was the pathogen most often associated with respiratory tract and surgical wound infections. In blood stream and urinary tract infections, we observed Escherichia coli was replaced by C. albicans and other yeasts as a most common isolate in these years. In addition, C. albicans and other yeasts and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) are emerging as major nosocomial pathogens at NTUH. C. albicans and other yeast increased from 1.8% in 1981 to 14.9% in 1994 in the overall nosocomial infection. The increase was found in the blood stream (2.1% to 16.2%) and urinary tract infections (5.4% to 24.7%). Of 1,742 nosocomial S. aureus isolates, the percentage of MRSA rose from 12.5% in 1981 to 55.2% in 1994. The high percentage of MRSA was observed at 4 major anatomic sites of infection. In summary, significant shifts in the pathogens of nosocomial infection have occurred in the past 14 years at NTUH, and the distribution of nosocomial pathogens was similar to those reported in the United States in recent years.

  4. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol [Seoul National Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am [Dongguk Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-06-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes.

  5. Disinfection efficacy of an ultraviolet light on film cassettes for preventive of the nosocomial infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kweon, Dae Cheol; Jeon, Yong Woong; Cho, Am

    2001-01-01

    The bacterial infection on film cassette contact surface was examined at the diagnostic radiology department of the S. hospital. The objective of this study was to assess the contamination level on film cassette contact surface as a predictor of patient prevention from nosocomial infection and for improvement of the hospital environment. The laboratory result was identified non-pathologic bacterial in the five different cassette size of the contact surface. Film cassettes were exposed to ultraviolet light for 1, 2 and 3 minutes. Ultraviolet light disinfection is proven suitable for bacterial. The study concludes that presence of a bacterial infection will prevent a using antiseptic technique on film cassette contact surface. In addition education of nosocomial infection for radiographers will be required. In conclusion, ultraviolet is considered effective to irradiate bacterial. Additionally, two minutes are required to sterilize film cassettes

  6. Acquired Aplastic Anemia After Nosocomial Serratia marcescens Bone Marrow Infection in an Elderly Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao-Wei Wang

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old female patient with a multiple medical history developed refractory pancytopenia during treatment for peptic ulcer, bacteremia, pneumonia, and respiratory failure. Bone marrow biopsy revealed hypocellularity with few hematopoietic cells, which was indicative of aplastic anemia. Common causes including viral infection, mycobacterial infection, environmental exposure, congenital bone marrow disorder, and hematologic malignancy were primarily excluded. Identical Serratia marcescens cultures were isolated from the central venous catheter tip and bone marrow, and the pancytopenia improved gradually with proper antibiotics treatment. This case indicates that nosocomial S. marcescens infection may cause potentially fatal acquired aplastic anemia. Crucial issues in avoiding aplastic anemia include confronting increasing mortality and morbidity caused by nosocomial infection, improving environmental hygiene, early diagnosis of proper etiology, and adequate antibiotics treatment.

  7. Measures to prevent nosocomial infections during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Paula; Bassi, Gianluigi L; Torres, Antonio

    2012-02-01

    Endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation are lifesaving measures in critically ill patients. However, these interventions increase the risk of respiratory infections, particularly ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP). VAP constitutes a serious burden for the healthcare system and worsens the patient's outcomes; thus, several preventive strategies have been implemented. This communication reviews the current knowledge on VAP pathogenesis and the latest preventive measures. Pathogen-laden oropharyngeal secretions leak across the endotracheal tube (ETT) cuff; thus, a continuous control of the internal cuff pressure and cuffs made of polyurethane improve sealing effectiveness and associated risks of infections. Subglottic secretions aspiration prevents VAP, and the latest evidence demonstrated a reduction in the incidence of late-onset VAP. The role of ETT biofilm in the pathogenesis of VAP is not fully elucidated. Nevertheless, antimicrobial-coated ETTs have showed beneficial effects in VAP incidence. Recent experimental evidence has challenged the benefits associated with the use of the semirecumbent position; yet, these findings need to be corroborated in clinical trials. The latest results from trials testing the effects of selective digestive decontamination (SDD) showed beneficial effects on patients' outcomes, but concerns remain regarding the emergence of bacterial resistance, specifically upon digestive tract re-colonization. The use of oropharyngeal decontamination with antiseptics and the use of probiotics are potential alternatives to SDD. There is consistent evidence that strategies affecting the primary mechanisms of VAP pathogenesis efficiently reduce the occurrence of the disease. Preventive measures should be implemented grouped into bundles to improve overall efficacy.

  8. Inherent Risk Factors for Nosocomial Infection in the Long Stay Critically Ill Child Without Known Baseline Immunocompromise: A Post –Hoc Analysis of the CRISIS Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcillo, Joseph A; Dean, J Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, KJS; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J; Harrison, Rick; Burr, Jeri; Willson, Douglas F.; Nicholson, Carol; Bell, Michael J.; Berg, Robert A.; Shanley, Thomas P.; Heidemann, Sabrina M; Dalton, Heidi; Jenkins, Tammara L.; Doctor, Allan; Webster, Angie

    2016-01-01

    Background Nosocomial infection remains an important health problem in long stay (> 3 days) pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Admission risk factors related to the development of nosocomial infection in long stay immune competent patients in particular are not known. Methods Post-hoc analysis of the previously published Critical Illness Stress induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) prevention trial database, to identify baseline risk factors for nosocomial infection. Because there was no difference between treatment arms of that study in nosocomial infection in the population without known baseline immunocompromise, both arms were combined and the cohort that developed nosocomial infection was compared with the cohort that did not. Results There were 254 long stay PICU patients without known baseline immunocompromise. Ninety (35%) developed nosocomial infection, and 164 (65%) did not. Admission characteristics associated with increased nosocomial infection risk were increased age, higher PRISM III score, the diagnoses of trauma or cardiac arrest, and lymphopenia (p infection at admission was associated with reduced risk of developing nosocomial infection (p nosocomial infection development (p = 0.07). Conclusions These data suggest that increasing age, cardiac arrest, and lymphopenia predispose long stay PICU patients without known baseline immunocompromise to nosocomial infection. These findings may inform pre-hoc stratification randomization strategies for prospective studies designed to prevent nosocomial infection in this population. PMID:27753764

  9. Nosocomial Infection in Adult Patients Undergoing Veno-Arterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gwan Sic; Lee, Kyo Seon; Park, Choung Kyu; Kang, Seung Ku; Kim, Do Wan; Oh, Sang Gi; Oh, Bong Suk; Jung, Yochun; Kim, Seok; Yun, Ju Sik; Song, Sang Yun; Na, Kook Joo; Jeong, In Seok; Ahn, Byoung Hee

    2017-04-01

    Data on the frequency of nosocomial infections during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in adult populations remain scarce. We investigated the risk factors for nosocomial infections in adult patients undergoing venoarterial ECMO (VA-ECMO) support. From January 2011 to December 2015, a total of 259 patients underwent ECMO. Of these, patients aged 17 years or less and patients undergoing ECMO for less than 48 hours were excluded. Of these, 61 patients diagnosed with cardiogenic shock were evaluated. Mean patient age was 60.6 ± 14.3 years and 21 (34.4%) patients were female. The mean preoperative Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score was 8.6 ± 2.2. The mean duration of ECMO support was 6.8 ± 7.4 days. The rates of successful ECMO weaning and survival to discharge were 44.3% and 31.1%, respectively. There were 18 nosocomial infections in 14 (23.0%) patients. These included respiratory tract infections in 9 cases and bloodstream infections in a further 9. In multivariate analysis, independent predictors of infection during ECMO were the preoperative creatinine level (hazard ratio [HR], 2.176; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.065-4.447; P = 0.033) and the duration of ECMO support (HR, 1.400; 95% CI, 1.081-1.815; P = 0.011). A higher preoperative creatinine level and an extended duration of ECMO support are risk factors for infection. Therefore, to avoid the development of nosocomial infections, strategies to shorten the length of ECMO support should be applied whenever possible. © 2017 The Korean Academy of Medical Sciences.

  10. A Review of Nosocomial Infection at the Lagos university Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infection control program of the Lagos Universityteaching hospital was started in 1974 with an Infection Control team reporting to an Infection Control Committee. There is currently no functioning Infection Control Committee. An analysis of data of a hospital- wide surveillance obtained between November 1993 ...

  11. Inherent Risk Factors for Nosocomial Infection in the Long Stay Critically Ill Child Without Known Baseline Immunocompromise: A Post Hoc Analysis of the CRISIS Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carcillo, Joseph A; Dean, J Michael; Holubkov, Richard; Berger, John; Meert, Kathleen L; Anand, Kanwaljeet J S; Zimmerman, Jerry; Newth, Christopher J; Harrison, Rick; Burr, Jeri; Willson, Douglas F; Nicholson, Carol; Bell, Michael J; Berg, Robert A; Shanley, Thomas P; Heidemann, Sabrina M; Dalton, Heidi; Jenkins, Tammara L; Doctor, Allan; Webster, Angie

    2016-11-01

    Nosocomial infection remains an important health problem in long stay (>3 days) pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) patients. Admission risk factors related to the development of nosocomial infection in long stay immune competent patients in particular are not known. Post-hoc analysis of the previously published Critical Illness Stress induced Immune Suppression (CRISIS) prevention trial database, to identify baseline risk factors for nosocomial infection. Because there was no difference between treatment arms of that study in nosocomial infection in the population without known baseline immunocompromise, both arms were combined and the cohort that developed nosocomial infection was compared with the cohort that did not. There were 254 long stay PICU patients without known baseline immunocompromise. Ninety (35%) developed nosocomial infection, and 164 (65%) did not. Admission characteristics associated with increased nosocomial infection risk were increased age, higher Pediatric Risk of Mortality version III score, the diagnoses of trauma or cardiac arrest and lymphopenia (P risk of developing nosocomial infection (P risk factors (P < 0.05); whereas trauma tended to be related to nosocomial infection development (P = 0.07). These data suggest that increasing age, cardiac arrest and lymphopenia predispose long stay PICU patients without known baseline immunocompromise to nosocomial infection. These findings may inform pre-hoc stratification randomization strategies for prospective studies designed to prevent nosocomial infection in this population.

  12. The impact of nosocomially-acquired resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in a burn unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, Alexis D; Shankowsky, Heather A; Swanson, Todd; Lee, Jonathan; Tredget, Edward E

    2007-07-01

    Nosocomially-acquired Pseudomonas aeruginosa remains a serious cause of infection and septic mortality in burn patients. This study was conducted to quantify the impact of nosocomially-transmitted resistant P. aeruginosa in a burn population. Using a TRACS burn database, 48 patients with P. aeruginosa resistant to gentamicin were identified (Pseudomonas group). Thirty-nine were case-matched to controls without resistant P. aeruginosa cultures (control group) for age, total body surface area, admission year, and presence of inhalation injury. Mortality and various morbidity endpoints were examined, as well as antibiotic costs. There was a significantly higher mortality rate in the Pseudomonas group (33% vs. 8%, p products used (packed cells 51.1 +/- 8.0 vs. 21.1 +/- 3.4, p < 0.01; platelets 11.9 +/- 3.0 vs. 1.4 +/- 0.7, p < 0.01) were all significantly higher in the Pseudomonas group. Cost of antibiotics was also significantly higher ($2,658.52 +/- $647.93 vs. $829.22 +/- $152.82, p < 0.01). Nosocomial colonization or infection, or both, of burn patients with aminoglycoside-resistant P. aeruginosa is associated with significantly higher morbidity, mortality, and cost of care. Increased resource consumption did not prevent significantly higher mortality rates when compared with that of control patients. Thus, prevention, identification, and eradication of nosocomial Pseudomonas contamination are critical for cost-effective, successful burn care.

  13. Trends in nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant microorganisms in Spanish pediatric intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan Garcia, Iolanda; Esteban Torné, Elisabeth; Bustinza Arriortua, Amaya; de Carlos Vicente, Juan Carlos; García Soler, Patricia; Concha Torre, José Andrés; Flores González, José Carlos; Madurga Revilla, Paula; Palomar Martínez, Mercedes

    2016-05-01

    Nosocomial infections (NI) are a major healthcare problem. National surveillance systems enable data to be compared and to implement new measures to improve our practice. A multicentre, prospective, descriptive and observational study was conducted using the data from surveillance system for nosocomial infections created in 2007 for Spanish pediatric intensive care units. Data were collected for one month, between 01 and 31 March, for every study year (2008-2012). The objective was to report 5-years of NI surveillance data, as well as trends in infections by multidrug resistant organisms in Spanish pediatric intensive care units. A total of 3667 patients were admitted to the units during the study period. There were 90 (2.45%) patients with nosocomial infections. The mean rates during the 5 years study were: central line-associated bloodstream infection, 3.8/1000 central venous catheter-days, Ventilator-associated pneumonia 7.5/1000 endotracheal tube-days, and catheter-associated urinary tract infections 4.1/1000 urinary catheter-days. The comparison between the 2008 and 2009 rates for nosocomial infections did not show statistically significant differences. All rates homogeneously decreased from 2009 to 2012: central line-associated bloodstream infection 5.83 (95% CI 2.67-11.07) to 0.49 (95% CI 0.0125-2.76), P=0.0029; ventilator-associated pneumonia 10.44 (95% CI 5.21-18.67) to 4.04 (95% CI 1.48-8.80), P=0.0525; and Catheter-associated urinary tract infections 7.10 (95% CI 3.067-13.999) to 2.56 (95% CI 0.697-6.553), P=0.0817; respectively. The microorganism analysis: 63 of the 99 isolated bacteria (63.6%) were Gram-negative bacteria (36.5% were resistant), 19 (19.2%) Gram-positive bacteria, and 17 (17.2%) were Candida spp. infections. The local surveillance systems provide information for dealing with nosocomial infections rates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights

  14. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital, Cameroon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouetchognou, Julienne Stéphanie; Ateudjieu, Jérôme; Jemea, Bonaventure; Mesumbe, Edmond Nzene; Mbanya, Dora

    2016-12-08

    Nosocomial infections (NI) represent a real public health problem in developing countries. Their surveillance is recommended to provide needed information for better control. The aim of this study was to describe the frequency and distribution of NI in the Yaoundé University Teaching Hospital (YUTH). It was a longitudinal and descriptive study targeting hospitalized patients in the intensive care, gynaecological, surgical and neonatal units. Each consenting patient was administered a questionnaire at the beginning of the study and followed up daily for the duration of their hospitalization using a standardized grid to detect all nosocomial infections. Cumulative incidence was used to estimate NI frequency. There were 307 patients included. The cumulative incidence and specific mortality rate of NI were 19.21% (16.9-21.5) and 28% (16.2-42.5) respectively. Septicaemia (20.34%), infection of the skin and soft tissues (20.34%) and urinary tract infections (15.25%) were the most frequent type of NI. Klebsiella spp. was the most frequently isolated bacterium (27%). Nosocomial infections contribute to high hospital morbidity in the Yaounde University Teaching Hospital. Strategies need to be identified for a sustainable and continuous monitoring of NI in all health facilities of Cameroon. In addition, Further studies should identify NI determinants and interventions for efficient and better control.

  15. [Is there a relationship between rectal colonization and nosocomial infection of patients in intensive care unit?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeşilbağ, Zuhal; Çağatay, Arif Atahan; Karadeniz, Aslı; Başaran, Seniha; Orhun, Günseli; Ergin Özcan, Perihan; Özsüt, Halit; Eraksoy, Haluk

    2015-07-01

    Nosocomial infections caused by multidrug-resistant (MDR) microorganisms are a major problem in intensive care units (ICUs) with high mortality and morbidity rates and the prior colonization is an important risk factor for these infections. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of rectal colonization of MDR microorganisms and the association between the microorganisms that caused colonization and infection in the patients with nosocomial infections in ICUs. Rectal swabs were obtained on the day of 0, 3, 7, 14, 21 and weekly thereafter from 80 patients over 18 years of age hospitalized in ICU for more than 48 hours, and cultured for vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE), methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- producing gram-negative bacilli (GNB) and carbapenem-resistant enteric and nonenteric bacilli. Patients whose rectal swabs were not obtained on admission (on the day of 0), were excluded even they were hospitalized more than 48 hours. Bile esculin agar containing 64 μg/mL ceftazidime and 6 μg/mL vancomycin, chromogenic MRSA agar and blood agar media, MacConkey agar containing 1 mg/L ceftazidime and ceftriaxone, and 5 mL tryptic soy broth media containing 10 µg imipenem and meropenem discs were used for identification. Identification of GNB was determined by conventional methods and ESBL production was determined by double-disc synergy test. Patients have been followed up for nosocomial infections. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed with standard microbiological methods. In 37 (46%) of the 80 patients, at least one MDR microorganism was isolated in rectal swab cultures on the day of 0. The most common microorganisms were ESBL-positive E.coli (19%), followed by ESBL-positive K.pneumoniae (13%), carbapenem-resistant P.aeruginosa (10%), ESBL-positive K.oxytoca (3%), MRSA (1%), VRE (1%), carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter sp. (1%) and carbapenem

  16. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  17. A Review of Nosocomial Infection at the Lagos university Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The infection control program of the Lagos Universityteaching hospital was started in 1974 with an Infection Control team reporting to an Infection Control Committee. There is currently no functioning ... were the most common pathogens accounting for 75% of all organisms isolated. The prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus ...

  18. The burden of nosocomial staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection in South Korea: a prospective hospital-based nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chung-Jong; Kim, Hong-Bin; Oh, Myoung-don; Kim, Yunhee; Kim, Arim; Oh, Sung-Hee; Song, Kyoung-Ho; Kim, Eu; Cho, Yong; Choi, Young; Park, Jinyong; Kim, Baek-Nam; Kim, Nam-Joong; Kim, Kye-Hyung; Lee, Eun; Jun, Jae-Bum; Kim, Young; Kiem, Sung; Choi, Hee; Choo, Eun; Sohn, Kyung-Mok; Lee, Shinwon; Chang, Hyun; Bang, Ji; Lee, Su; Lee, Jae; Park, Seong; Jeon, Min; Yun, Na

    2014-11-14

    We estimated the nationwide burden of nosocomial S. aureus bloodstream infection (SA-BSI), a major cause of nosocomial infection, in South Korea. To evaluate the nationwide incidence of nosocomial SA-BSI, cases of SA-BSI were prospectively collected from 22 hospitals with over 500 beds over 4?months. Data on patient-days were obtained from a national health insurance database containing the claims data for all healthcare facilities in South Korea. The additional cost of SA-BSI was estimated through a matched case?control study. The economic burden was calculated from the sum of the medical costs, the costs of caregiving and loss of productivity. Three hundred and thirty nine cases of nosocomial SA-BSI were included in the study: 254 cases of methicillin-resistant SA-BSI (MRSA-BSI) and 85 cases of methicillin-susceptible SA-BSI (MSSA-BSI). Death related to BSI occurred in 81 cases (31.9%) of MRSA-BSI and 12 cases (14.1%) of MSSA-BSI. The estimated incidence of nosocomial MRSA-BSI was 0.12/1,000 patient-days and that of nosocomial MSSA-BSI, 0.04/1,000 patient-days. The estimated annual cases of nosocomial BSI were 2,946 for MRSA and 986 for MSSA in South Korea. The additional economic burden per case of nosocomial SA-BSI was US $20,494 for MRSA-BSI and $6,914 for MSSA-BSI. Total additional annual cost of nosocomial SA-BSI was $67,192,559. In view of the burden of nosocomial SA-BSI, a national strategy for reducing nosocomial SA-BSI is urgently needed in South Korea.

  19. [Prevalance of nosocomial infections in tetraplegic upper extremity surgery. Prospective study of twenty patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kron, C; Revol, M; Felten, A; Marie, O; Cormerais, A; Laffont, I; Servant, J M

    2002-02-01

    Many risk factors of nosocomial infection may be met with tetraplegic patients. The objective of this work was to study the prevalence of colonization by 3 multiresistants bacteria (methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Klebsiella pneumoniae with widened spectrum beta lactamase or multi-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii) on this population. It was about a prospective study for which we included 20 consecutive patients coming from a rehabilitation of long stay center to have a surgical operation of palliative reanimation of the upper limb. For each patient, the first morning of his hospitalization, many sites cultures were carried out for bacteriological analysis whose results were returned in 48 h to the operator. No patient was excluded. Five patients (25%) showed the presence of SARM. One patient (5%) showed the presence of Klebsiela pneumoniae. One of the patients carrying a SARM was also carrying Acinetobacter baumannii. Overall 6 patients were contaminated (30%) but no postoperative infection occurred, neither at the time of the hospitalization nor after the exit of the service. The various risk factors of nosocomial infection appearance met in tetraplegic patient were analyzed. This study showed that the cares of tetraplegic patients limited to the maximum the risk of nosocomial infection appearance (no one in this series) in spite of an important contamination met in this type of population which presents long durations of hospitalization, main risk factor regularly met.

  20. [Time series analysis of Enterobacter cloacae nosocomial infections in children hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahati, Buli; Ma, Zhi-Hua; Abudouhaer, Abulaiti

    2015-09-01

    To characterize the time distribution of the incidence of Enterobacter cloacae nosocomial infections in children hospitalized in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University. The clinical data of children with Enterobacter cloacae nosocomial infections in the PICU of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University between January 2010 and December 2013 were collected. The monthly number of cases of Enterobacter cloacae nosocomial infections was recorded, and time series analysis was performed using SPSS 21.0 software. The obtained prediction model was verified using the data from January to June in 2014. A total of 157 cases of Enterobacter cloacae nosocomial infections were reported in the PICU between January 2010 and December 2013, including 33 cases in 2010, 35 cases in 2011, 37 cases in 2012, and 52 cases in 2013. Time series analysis of the monthly number of cases of nosocomial infections reveals a fitted curve with a clear pattern of seasonal variation (R2=0.702, Ljung-Box Q(18)=36.021, P=0.004), with peaks in May, June, and July. The verification using the data from January to June in 2014 showed small differences between the predicted values and the actual values. In the PICU of the First Affiliated Hospital of Xinjiang Medical University, the incidence of Enterobacter cloacae nosocomial infections is high in May, June, and July every year. The prediction model is accurate and can provide a reference for infection prevention.

  1. Evaluation of the relationship between plasma transfusion and nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery in children younger than 1 year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chenouard, Alexis; Rozé, Jean-Christophe; Hanf, Matthieu; Macher, Julie; Liet, Jean-Michel; Gournay, Véronique; Gras-Le Guen, Christèle; Joram, Nicolas

    2015-02-01

    Recent data have suggested a link between plasma transfusion and the development of nosocomial infections in critically ill children. However, to our knowledge, no study has specifically focused on this association among children undergoing cardiac surgery. Thus, the main objective of this study was to analyze the relationship between plasma transfusion after cardiac surgery and the risk of nosocomial infections, including bloodstream infections, mediastinitis, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, in children younger than 1 year. Observational single-center study. A 12-bed tertiary PICU in a university hospital in France. Children less than 1 year admitted after cardiac surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass between November 2007 and December 2012. None. Data from 233 children were analyzed, of which 94 children (40%) had been transfused with plasma during their PICU stay. Fifty-six episodes of nosocomial infections (51 children) were reported, yielding a nosocomial infection ratio of 24%. The unadjusted odds ratio for developing nosocomial infections associated with plasma transfusion was 4.1 (95% CI, 2.1-7.9; p nosocomial infections in children (< 1 yr old) after adjustment for a propensity score.

  2. THE “CHALLENGING” MULTIDRUG-RESISTANT PATHOGENS OF NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS IN CRITICALLY ILL PATIENTS (A LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. V. Chernenkaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Changes in the structure of the main causative agents of nosocomial infections and significant spread of multidrug­resistant strains of bacteria are a natural biological response for antibiotics that selectively inhibit pathogens and contribute to selection, survival and growth of drug resistant strains of bacteria. In this literature review we present the change of structure of the major causative microorganisms of nosocomial septic infections and theirs resistance to antibiotics for the last 70 years. 

  3. Nosocomial infection disease. ; What is MRSA. Innai kansensho. ; MRSA towa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiramatsu, K. (Juntendo University, Tokyo (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    The spread use of antibiotics has solved communicable diseases having strong toxicity and sacrificed a large number of people, except in some developing countries. However, recently a new type infection disease has been spreading among hospitalized patients whose infection resistance has become feeble, called the in-hospital infection. Strains resistant to penicillin and streptomycin have emerged and spread as an in-hospital infection bacteria. This is the MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus). This refers not only methicillin, but also aureus which is resistant to almost all of {beta}-lactam based antibiotics. This paper describes features of MRSA infection, mechanism of the resistance in MRSA, methicillin resistant gene distribution and its significance. Reactions of MRSA with penicillin-binding protein (PBP) and {beta}-lactam antibiotics are shown. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  4. ICU ward design and nosocomial infection rates: a cross-sectional study in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiller, A; Schröder, C; Gropmann, A; Schwab, F; Behnke, M; Geffers, C; Sunder, W; Holzhausen, J; Gastmeier, P

    2017-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the effects of hospital and ward design on multi-faceted infection control. Definitive evidence is rare and the state of knowledge about current ward design is lacking. To collect data on the current status of ward design for intensive care units (ICUs) and to analyse associations between particular design factors and nosocomial infection rates. In 2015, operational infrastructure data were collected via an online questionnaire from ICUs participating voluntarily in the German nosocomial infection surveillance system (KISS). A multi-variate analysis was subsequently undertaken with nosocomial infection rates from the KISS database from 2014 to 2015. In total, 534 ICUs submitted data about their operational infrastructure. Of these, 27.1% of beds were hosted in single-bed rooms with a median size of 18m 2 (interquartile range 15-21m 2 ), and 73.5% of all ICU beds had a hand rub dispenser nearby. The authors were able to match 266 ICUs in the multi-variate analysis. ICUs with openable windows in patient rooms were associated with lower device-associated lower respiratory tract infections [odds ratio (OR) 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58-0.90]. ICUs with >40% two-bed rooms were associated with lower primary bloodstream infection rates (OR 0.66, 95% CI 0.51-0.86). Only minor associations were found between design factors and ICU infection rates. Most were surrogates for other risk factors. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Economic burden of nosocomial infections caused by vancomycin-resistant enterococci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puchter, Laura; Chaberny, Iris Freya; Schwab, Frank; Vonberg, Ralf-Peter; Bange, Franz-Christoph; Ebadi, Ella

    2018-01-01

    Nosocomial infections due to vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) have become a major problem during the last years. The purpose of this study was to investigate the economic burden of nosocomial VRE infections in a European university hospital. A retrospective matched case-control study was performed including patients who acquired nosocomial infection with either VRE or vancomycin-susceptible enterococci (VSE) within a time period of 3 years. 42 cases with VRE infections and 42 controls with VSE infections were matched for age, gender, admission and discharge within the same year, time at risk for infection, Charlson comorbidity index (±1), stay on intensive care units and non-intensive care units as well as for the type of infection, using criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The median overall costs per case were significantly higher than for controls (EUR 57,675 vs. EUR 38,344; p  = 0.030). Costs were similar between cases and controls before onset of infection (EUR 17,893 vs. EUR 16,600; p  = 0.386), but higher after onset of infection (EUR 37,971 vs. EUR 23,025; p  = 0.049). The median attributable costs per case for vancomycin-resistance were EUR 13,157 ( p  = 0.036). The most significant differences in costs between cases and controls turned out to be for pharmaceuticals (EUR 6030 vs. EUR 2801; p  = 0.008) followed by nursing staff (EUR 8956 vs. EUR 4621; p  = 0.032), medical products (EUR 3312 vs. EUR 1838; p  = 0.020), and for assistant medical technicians (EUR 3766 vs. EUR 2474; p  = 0.023). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed that costs were driven independently by vancomycin-resistance (1.4 fold; p  = 0.034). This analysis suggested that nosocomial VRE infections significantly increases hospital costs compared with VSE infections. Therefore, hospital personal should implement control measures to prevent VRE transmission.

  6. Clinical Characteristics of Nosocomial Rotavirus Infection in Children in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Te Lee

    2008-10-01

    Conclusion: NRI may cause significant morbidity in hospitalized children, especially young infants and those with underlying diseases. Infection control with hospital surveillance, strict isolation and cohort care should be adopted to prevent the spread of rotavirus among special care units.

  7. [Nosocomial infection due to Trichosporon asahii in a critical burned patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamayo Lomas, Luis; Domínguez-Gil González, Marta; Martín Luengo, Ana Isabel; Eiros Bouza, José María; Piqueras Pérez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection is an important cause of morbimortality in patients with severe burns. The advances in burn care therapy have considerably extended the survival of seriously burned patients, exposing them to infectious complications, notably fungal infections, with increased recognition of invasive infections caused by Candida species. However, some opportunistic fungi, like Trichosporon asahii, have emerged as important causes of nosocomial infection. A case of nosocomial infection due to T. asahii in a severely ill burned patient successfully treated with voriconazole is presented. The management of invasive fungal infections in burned patients, from diagnosis to selection of the therapeutic protocol, is often a challenge. Early diagnosis and treatment are associated with a better prognosis. In this case report, current treatment options are discussed, and a review of previously published cases is presented. Due to the difficulty in the diagnosis of invasive mycoses and their high associated mortality rates, it is advisable to keep a high degree of clinical suspicion of trichosporonosis in susceptible patients, including burned patients. The isolation of T. asahii in clinical specimens of this type of host must raise clinical alert, since it may precede an invasive infection. Copyright © 2014 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Influence of supplemental parenteral nutrition approach on nosocomial infection in pediatric intensive care unit of Emergency Department: a retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Lai, Xiaoquan; Liu, Chenxi; Xiong, Yuqi; Zhang, Xinping

    2015-10-06

    Nutritional support for patients in the intensive-care unit (ICU) is a part of standard care which promotes medical quality and decreases nosocomial infection. Supplemental parenteral nutrition (SPN) approach (enteral nutrition (EN) combined with parenteral nutrition (PN) when EN alone is insufficient) has become one major concern in nutrition research field. This research aims to explore the following relationships: (i) the relationship between SPN and nosocomial infection, (ii) the relationship between early and late SPN initiation and the development of nosocomial infection. A retrospective study was conducted in patients who met the inclusion criteria from February 2012 to February 2015 in Pediatric ICU (PICU). Patients were classified into two groups according to nutrition delivery approach-SPN group and EN alone group. Then SPN group were further divided into two subgroups by initiation timing, which were defined as early-initiation SPN and late-initiation SPN group respectively. Age, gender, serum albumin at admission, severity of disease, length of stay in PICU, nutrition delivery approach, amounts of delivered caloric intake and occurence of nosocomial infection were recorded. Univariate analysis and binary logistic regression analysis were performed to identify the risk factors and assess the independent effect of SPN approach on nosocomial infection in PICU of Emergency Department. 204 patients were included in our study. Compared with EN alone group, patients delivered by SPN approach had a higher nosocomial infection rate (34.0 vs.10.9%, p nosocomial infection in the logistic regression analysis model (OR = 3.40; 95% CI, 1.13 ~ 10.19; p = 0.029). Serum albumin at admission (OR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84 ~ 0.97; p = 0.008), mechanical ventilation (OR = 3.85; 95% CI, 1.43 ~ 10.39; p = 0.008), severity of disease (OR = 3.79; 95% CI, 1.03 ~ 13.99; p = 0.045) and PICU length of stay (OR = 1.23; 95% CI, 1.11

  9. Positive impact of infection prevention on the management of nosocomial outbreaks at an academic hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dik, Jan-Willem H; Sinha, Bhanu; Lokate, Mariëtte; Lo-Ten-Foe, Jerome R; Dinkelacker, Ariane G; Postma, Maarten J; Friedrich, Alexander W

    2016-10-01

    Infection prevention (IP) measures are vital to prevent (nosocomial) outbreaks. Financial evaluations of these are scarce. An incremental cost analysis for an academic IP unit was performed. On a yearly basis, we evaluated: IP measures; costs thereof; numbers of patients at risk for causing nosocomial outbreaks; predicted outbreak patients; and actual outbreak patients. IP costs rose on average yearly with €150,000; however, more IP actions were undertaken. Numbers of patients colonized with high-risk microorganisms increased. The trend of actual outbreak patients remained stable. Predicted prevented outbreak patients saved costs, leading to a positive return on investment of 1.94. This study shows that investments in IP can prevent outbreak cases, thereby saving enough money to earn back these investments.

  10. Microbial Characteristics of Nosocomial Infections and Their Association with the Utilization of Hand Hygiene Products: A Hospital-Wide Analysis of 78,344 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Song; Wang, Meng; Wang, Gefei; Wu, Xiuwen; Guan, Wenxian; Ren, Jianan

    Nosocomial infections are the main adverse events during health care delivery. Hand hygiene is the fundamental strategy for the prevention of nosocomial infections. Microbial characteristics of nosocomial infections in the Asia-Pacific region have not been investigated fully. Correlation between the use of hand hygiene products and the incidence of nosocomial infections is still unknown. This study investigates the microbial characteristics of nosocomial infections in the Asia-Pacific region and analyzes the association between the utilization of hand hygiene products and the incidence of nosocomial infections. A total of 78,344 patients were recruited from a major tertiary hospital in China. Microbial characteristics of major types of nosocomial infections were described. The association between the utilization of hand hygiene products and the incidence of nosocomial infections was analyzed using correlation and regression models. The overall incidence of nosocomial infections was 3.04%, in which the incidence of surgical site infection was 1%. Multi-drug resistance was found in 22.8% of all pathogens, in which multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were 56.6% and 54.9%, respectively. The utilization of hand hygiene products (including hand sanitizer, soap and paper towel) was associated negatively with the incidence of surgical site infection in surgical departments and the incidence of nosocomial infections in non-intensive care unit (ICU) departments (especially in surgical departments). Regression analysis further identified that higher utilization of hand hygiene products correlated with decreased incidence of major types of nosocomial infections. Multi-drug-resistant organisms are emerging in Asia-Pacific health care facilities. Utilization of hand hygiene products is associated with the incidence of nosocomial infections.

  11. [Nosocomial infections due to human coronaviruses in the newborn].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagneur, A; Legrand, M C; Picard, B; Baron, R; Talbot, P J; de Parscau, L; Sizun, J

    2002-01-01

    Human coronaviruses, with two known serogroups named 229-E and OC-43, are enveloped positive-stranded RNA viruses. The large RNA is surrounded by a nucleoprotein (protein N). The envelop contains 2 or 3 glycoproteins: spike protein (or protein S), matrix protein (or protein M) and a hemagglutinin (or protein HE). Their pathogen role remains unclear because their isolation is difficult. Reliable and rapid methods as immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction allow new researches on epidemiology. Human coronaviruses can survive for as long as 6 days in suspension and 3 hours after drying on surfaces, suggesting that they could be a source of hospital-acquired infections. Two prospective studies conducted in a neonatal and paediatric intensive care unit demonstrated a significant association of coronavirus-positive nasopharyngal samples with respiratory illness in hospitalised preterm neonates. Positive samples from staff suggested either a patient-to-staff or a staff-to-patient transmission. No cross-infection were observed from community-acquired respiratory-syncitial virus or influenza-infected children to neonates. Universal precautions with hand washing and surface desinfection could be proposed to prevent coronavirus transmission.

  12. Prevention of nosocomial infections in neonatal intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, Paolo; De Luca, Daniele; Stronati, Mauro; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne; Ruffinazzi, Giulia; Luparia, Martina; Tavella, Elena; Boano, Elena; Castagnola, Elio; Mostert, Michael; Farina, Daniele

    2013-02-01

    Neonatal sepsis causes a huge burden of morbidity and mortality and includes bloodstream, urine, cerebrospinal, peritoneal, and lung infections as well as infections starting from burns and wounds, or from any other usually sterile sites. It is associated with cytokine - and biomediator-induced disorders of respiratory, hemodynamic, and metabolic processes. Neonates in the neonatal intensive care unit feature many specific risk factors for bacterial and fungal sepsis. Loss of gut commensals such as Bifidobacteria and Lactobacilli spp., as occurs with prolonged antibiotic treatments, delayed enteral feeding, or nursing in incubators, translates into proliferation of pathogenic microflora and abnormal gut colonization. Prompt diagnosis and effective treatment do not protect septic neonates form the risk of late neurodevelopmental impairment in the survivors. Thus prevention of bacterial and fungal infection is crucial in these settings of unique patients. In this view, improving neonatal management is a key step, and this includes promotion of breast-feeding and hygiene measures, adoption of a cautious central venous catheter policy, enhancement of the enteric microbiota composition with the supplementation of probiotics, and medical stewardship concerning H2 blockers with restriction of their use. Additional measures may include the use of lactoferrin, fluconazole, and nystatin and specific measures to prevent ventilator associated pneumonia. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  13. Low incidence of multidrug-resistant bacteria and nosocomial infection due to a preventive multimodal nosocomial infection control: a 10-year single centre prospective cohort study in neurocritical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spatenkova, Vera; Bradac, Ondrej; Fackova, Daniela; Bohunova, Zdenka; Suchomel, Petr

    2018-03-07

    Nosocomial infection (NI) control is an important issue in neurocritical care due to secondary brain damage and the increased morbidity and mortality of primary acute neurocritical care patients. The primary aim of this study was to determine incidence of nosocomial infections and multidrug-resistant bacteria and seek predictors of nosocomial infections in a preventive multimodal nosocomial infection protocol in the neurointensive care unit (NICU). The secondary aim focused on their impact on stay, mortality and cost in the NICU. A10-year, single-centre prospective observational cohort study was conducted on 3464 acute brain disease patients. There were 198 (5.7%) patients with nosocomial infection (wound 2.1%, respiratory 1.8%, urinary 1.0%, bloodstream 0.7% and other 0.1%); 67 (1.9%) with Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL); 52 (1.5%) with Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), nobody with Vancomycin-resistant enterococcus (VRE). The protocol included hygienic, epidemiological status and antibiotic policy. Univariate and multivarite logistic regression analysis was used for identifying predictors of nosocomial infection. From 198 NI patients, 153 had onset of NI during their NICU stay (4.4%; wound 1.0%, respiratory 1.7%, urinary 0.9%, bloodstream 0.6%, other 0.1%); ESBL in 31 (0.9%) patients, MRSA in 30 (0.9%) patients. Antibiotics in prophylaxis was given to 63.0% patients (59.2 % for operations), in therapy to 9.7% patients. Predictors of NI in multivariate logistic regression analysis were airways (OR 2.69, 95% CI 1.81-3.99, pnosocomial infection control management was efficient; it gave low rates of nosocomial infections (4.2%) and multidrug-resistant bacteria (ESBL 0.9%, MRSA 0.9% and no VRE). Strong predictors for onset of nosocomial infection were accesses such as airways and urine catheters, NICU stay, antibiotic prophylaxis, wound complications and transfusion. This study confirmed nosocomial infection is associated with worse outcome

  14. The Mortality Rate of Nosocomial Infection in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU of Taleghani Educational and Treatment Center, Tabriz, 2013

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    Parvin Abbasian

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : Information about nosocomial infections (NIs is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. Neonates admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU are at high-risk of developing nosocomial infection. The aim of this study was to determine the mortality rate of nosocomial infections and the distribution of pathogens among newborns who were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit in Taleghani educational and treatment center, Tabriz. Material and Methods : This was a cross-sectional study. The sampling method was census. The inclusion criteria were dead infants who developed signs of infection after 48 hours of hospitalization and those who had symptoms at the admission were excluded. Data were collected through hospital records and were analyzed using Excel software. Results: From 904 infants admitted to NICU, 39 (4.3% acquired hospital infection. Mortality from nosocomial infections in NICU was 20.5% that was 12% of the total deaths. Coagulase-negative staphylococcal Cook (37.5% and Escherichia coli (25% were the most commonly identified agents among dead neonates. Conclusion: For more reduction in nosocomial infection and its mortality rate, mercury hygiene principles and also optimizing bed spaces are recommended. ​

  15. [Risk of nosocomial infection in intertropical Africa--part 3: health care workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebaudet, S; Kraemer, P; Savini, H; De Pina, J-J; Rapp, C; Demortiere, F; Simon, F

    2007-06-01

    Parts of the nosocomial infections issue are the professionally-acquired infections of health care workers. This problem is widely neglected in sub-Saharan Africa, and little is known on the subject, in spite of the high prevalence of blood-borne infections such as HIV or hepatitis B and C, and air-borne diseases like tuberculosis. Besides, unsafe practices and accidents like blood exposures are more frequent than in western countries. This is due to the lack of political concern, of safer equipment and of specific teachings. Most of this severe infections' treatments are long, difficult or unavailable in Subsaharan Africa. The loss of contaminated health care workers can then become devastating for their family and the fragile health care structures of those developing countries. Finally, one should not underestimate the risk of infection transmission from health care provider to patient, like in several past outbreaks of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

  16. Nosocomial urinary tract infections and resistance profile to antibiotics

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    Hasan Naz

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the risk factors, laboratuary results, distrubition of pathogens and sensitivity to antibiotics in patients with hospital acquired urinary tract infections (HAUTI. 161 HAUTI patients were diagnosed. The most common predisposing factors were identified as long term hospitalization, urinary catheterization, hospitalization at intensive care unit and neurologic diseases. The most commom pathogens isolated were Escherichia coli 33 (29.5 %, Pseudomonas spp. 32 (28.6 % and Klebsiella spp. 12 (10.7 %. The lowest rates of resistance in E.coli, Pseudomonas spp. and Klebsiella spp. were observed to amikacin (respectively 3 %, 9 %, 8 %, to imipenem (9 %, 41 %, 8 %, to piperacilin/tazobactam (PIP/TAZ (24 %, 47 %, 17 % and to ciprofloxasin (52 %, 69 %, 25 %. Mortality was detected in 31(19% of 161 patients diagnosed with HAUTI. As a result, high rate resistance was found in bacterial microorganism, especially in Pseudomonas spp.

  17. Factors associated with catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the effects of other concomitant nosocomial infections in intensive care units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temiz, Ekrem; Piskin, Nihal; Aydemir, Hande; Oztoprak, Nefise; Akduman, Deniz; Celebi, Guven; Kokturk, Furuzan

    2012-05-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are the most common nosocomial infections in intensive care units (ICUs). The objectives of this study were to describe the incidence, aetiology, and risk factors of CAUTIs in ICUs and to determine whether concomitant nosocomial infections alter risk factors. Between April and October 2008, all adult catheterized patients admitted to the ICUs of Zonguldak Karaelmas University Hospital were screened daily, and clinical and microbiological data were collected for each patient. Two hundred and four patients were included and 85 developed a nosocomial infection. Among these patients, 22 developed a CAUTI alone, 38 developed a CAUTI with an additional nosocomial infection, either concomitantly or prior to the onset of the CAUTI, and 25 developed nosocomial infections at other sites. The CAUTI rate was 19.02 per 1000 catheter-days. A Cox proportional hazard model showed that in the presence of other site nosocomial infections, immune suppression (hazard ratio (HR) 3.73, 95% CI 1.47-9.46; p = 0.006), previous antibiotic usage (HR 2.06, 95% CI 1.11-3.83; p = 0.023), and the presence of a nosocomial infection at another site (HR 1.82, 95% CI 1.04-3.20; p = 0.037) were the factors associated with the acquisition of CAUTIs with or without a nosocomial infection at another site. When we excluded the other site nosocomial infections to determine if the risk factors differed depending on the presence of other nosocomial infections, female gender (HR 2.67, 95% CI 1.03-6.91; p = 0.043) and duration of urinary catheterization (HR 1.07 (per day), 95% CI 1.01-1.13; p = 0.019) were found to be the risk factors for the acquisition of CAUTIs alone. Our results showed that the presence of nosocomial infections at another site was an independent risk factor for the acquisition of a CAUTI and that their presence alters risk factors.

  18. A Descriptive Study of Nosocomial Infections in an Adult Intensive Care Unit in Fiji: 2011-12

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    Keshni Naidu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections in an intensive care unit (ICU are common and associated with a high mortality but there are no published data from the Oceania region. A retrospective study in Fiji’s largest ICU (2011-12 reported that 114 of a total 663 adult ICU admissions had bacteriological culture-confirmed nosocomial infection. The commonest sites of infection were respiratory and bloodstream. Gram negative bacteria were the commonest pathogens isolated, especially Klebsiella pneumoniae (extended-spectrum β-Lactamase-producing, Acinetobacter, and Pseudomonas species. Mortality for those with a known outcome was 33%. Improved surveillance and implementation of effective preventive interventions are needed.

  19. Multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from nosocomial respiratory and urinary infections in Aleppo, Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahfoud, Maysa; Al Najjar, Mona; Hamzeh, Abdul Rezzak

    2015-02-19

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa represents a serious clinical challenge due to its frequent involvement in nosocomial infections and its tendency towards multidrug resistance. This study uncovered antibiotic susceptibility patterns in 177 isolates from inpatients in three key hospitals in Aleppo, the largest city in Syria. Exceptionally low susceptibility to most routinely used antibiotics was uncovered; resistance to ciprofloxacin and gentamicin was 64.9% and 70.3%, respectively. Contrarily, susceptibility to colistin was the highest (89.1%). Multidrug resistance was rife, found at a rate of 53.67% among studied P. aeruginosa isolates.

  20. Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morfill, G E; Shimizu, T; Steffes, B; Schmidt, H-U

    2009-01-01

    A new, very efficient, large area scalable and robust electrode design for plasma production in air at atmosphere pressures has been developed and tested. This has made the development of a 'plasma dispenser' for hospital disinfection possible, which has certain advantages over current fluid disinfection systems. The properties of this device are presented, in particular the bactericidal and fungicidal efficiency, and the advantages are described. Such plasma dispensers could play an important role in the future fight against the alarming and growing threat posed by nosocomial (=hospital and community associated) bacterial infections.

  1. Nosocomial infections-a new approach towards preventive medicine using plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morfill, G E; Shimizu, T; Steffes, B; Schmidt, H-U [Max-Planck Institute for extraterrestrial physics, Giessenbachstrasse, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hospital Munich Schwabing, Koelner Platz 1, D-80804 Muenchen (Germany)], E-mail: gem@mpe.mpg.de

    2009-11-15

    A new, very efficient, large area scalable and robust electrode design for plasma production in air at atmosphere pressures has been developed and tested. This has made the development of a 'plasma dispenser' for hospital disinfection possible, which has certain advantages over current fluid disinfection systems. The properties of this device are presented, in particular the bactericidal and fungicidal efficiency, and the advantages are described. Such plasma dispensers could play an important role in the future fight against the alarming and growing threat posed by nosocomial (=hospital and community associated) bacterial infections.

  2. [Legal aspects of the health care institution liability for nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garus-Pakowska, Anna; Szatko, Franciszek; Pakowski, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the basic concepts concerning the liability of health care institution for nosocomial infections are presented. The principles of ex contracto and ex delicto liabilities, as well as the concept of so-called anonymous guilt are discussed. The range of duties for both the health care institution and the employed medical personnel is indicated, the duties and the consequences of their non-fulfillment are systematized, and the obligatory jurisdiction concerning the functioning of prima facie evidence is considered. The author aimed at explaining the principles governing the civil liability of health care institutions and their employees.

  3. [Causative agents of neonatal nosocomial infections and their resistance to antibiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković-Denić, Ljiljana; Durisić, Jasna; Nikolić, Tatjana; Ramadani, Ruzdi; Ilić, Slobodanka; Stevanović, Slobodanka

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the most frequent microorganisms in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). A 6-month prospective study was conducted in a NICU. All neonatal hospital infections were registered, and microorganisms were isolated by standard methods. Their susceptibility to antibiotics was tested using the disk diffusion method. One hundred and fifty-four neonatal nosocomial infections were detected. 87% of all infections were supported by a microbiological diagnosis, and 144 pathogens were isolated Gram-negative bacteria were dominant (80%). The most commonly isolated microorganisms were Acinetobacter spp. (47.9%), Pseudomonas spp, (23.6%), Klebsiella/Enterobacter spp. (8.3%). Coagulase-negative staphylococci (8.3%) and Staphylococcus aureus (6.3%) were the most frequent reported gram-positive bacteria. All microorganisms showed resistance to most of commonly used antibiotics. Environmental control around neonatal patients and strict antibiotic policy are important in prevention of nosocomial transmission of resistant bacteria in the NICUs.

  4. [Nosocomial infection in patients hospitalized in 2005-2011. the St. Lukas District Hospital in Tarnów].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wałaszek, Marta; Wolak, Zdzisław; Dobroś, Wiesław

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the occurrence and the structure of nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients, and also to indicate the possibility of lowering the infection rates in the St. Lukas District Hospital in Tarnow. Data from 207 673 patients hospitalized in the years 2005-2011 have been collected and analyzed using standard statistical tools and definitions of nosocomial infections, issued by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The surgical side infections (SSI) were proved to be the most commonly found, with 20% of all infections. There were also frequent bloodstream infections (BSI) 19%, as well as urinary tract (UTI) and gastrointestinal infections (IPP) 18%, while pneumonia (PNEU) appeared to be slightly less common, with 13% of all infections. The other types of infections represented 11%. The infection rates for clean surgical sites per 100 clean procedures were on average 0.7. Subsequently, average amounts per 1000 person-days were as follows: 16.7 for pneumonia (VAP, ventilator-associated pneumonia), 2.4 for catheter-related urinary tract infections (UTI), and 6.2 for bloodstream infections (CLA-BSI, central line-associated). Knowing the structure of infections is crucial for planning precise and cautious actions aimed at reducing the frequency of nosocomial infections.

  5. Nosocomial bloodstream infections in Brazilian pediatric patients: microbiology, epidemiology, and clinical features.

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    Carlos Alberto Pires Pereira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nosocomial bloodstream infections (nBSIs are an important cause of morbidity and mortality and are the most frequent type of nosocomial infection in pediatric patients. METHODS: We identified the predominant pathogens and antimicrobial susceptibilities of nosocomial bloodstream isolates in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age in the Brazilian Prospective Surveillance for nBSIs at 16 hospitals from 12 June 2007 to 31 March 2010 (Br SCOPE project. RESULTS: In our study a total of 2,563 cases of nBSI were reported by hospitals participating in the Br SCOPE project. Among these, 342 clinically significant episodes of BSI were identified in pediatric patients (≤16 years of age. Ninety-six percent of BSIs were monomicrobial. Gram-negative organisms caused 49.0% of these BSIs, Gram-positive organisms caused 42.6%, and fungi caused 8.4%. The most common pathogens were Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS (21.3%, Klebsiella spp. (15.7%, Staphylococcus aureus (10.6%, and Acinetobacter spp. (9.2%. The crude mortality was 21.6% (74 of 342. Forty-five percent of nBSIs occurred in a pediatric or neonatal intensive-care unit (ICU. The most frequent underlying conditions were malignancy, in 95 patients (27.8%. Among the potential factors predisposing patients to BSI, central venous catheters were the most frequent (66.4%. Methicillin resistance was detected in 37 S. aureus isolates (27.1%. Of the Klebsiella spp. isolates, 43.2% were resistant to ceftriaxone. Of the Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates, 42.9% and 21.4%, respectively, were resistant to imipenem. CONCLUSIONS: In our multicenter study, we found a high mortality and a large proportion of gram-negative bacilli with elevated levels of resistance in pediatric patients.

  6. Nosocomial Infections During Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation: Incidence, Etiology, and Impact on Patients' Outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasselli, Giacomo; Scaravilli, Vittorio; Di Bella, Stefano; Biffi, Stefano; Bombino, Michela; Patroniti, Nicolò; Bisi, Luca; Peri, Anna Maria; Pesenti, Antonio; Gori, Andrea; Alagna, Laura

    2017-10-01

    To study incidence, type, etiology, risk factors, and impact on outcome of nosocomial infections during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data. Italian tertiary referral center medical-surgical ICU. One hundred five consecutive patients who were treated with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation from January 2010 to November 2015. None. Ninety-two patients were included in the analysis (48.5 [37-56] years old, simplified acute physiology score II 37 [32-47]) who underwent peripheral extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (87% veno-venous) for medical indications (78% acute respiratory distress syndrome). Fifty-two patients (55%) were infected (50.4 infections/1,000 person-days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation). We identified 32 ventilator-associated pneumonia, eight urinary tract infections, five blood stream infections, three catheter-related blood stream infections, two colitis, one extracorporeal membrane oxygenation cannula infection, and one pulmonary-catheter infection. G+ infections (35%) occurred earlier compared with G- (48%) (4 [2-10] vs. 13 [7-23] days from extracorporeal membrane oxygenation initiation; p infections. Younger age (2-35 years old) was independently associated with higher risk for nosocomial infections. Twenty-nine patients (31.5%) died (13.0 deaths/1,000 person-days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation). Infected patients had higher risk for death (18 vs. 8 deaths/1,000 person-days of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation; p = 0.037) and longer ICU stay (32.5 [19.5-78] vs. 19 [10.5-27.5] days; p = 0.003), mechanical ventilation (36.5 [20-80.5] vs. 16.5 [9-25.5] days; p 50 years old), reason for connection different from acute respiratory distress syndrome, higher simplified acute physiology score II, diagnosis of ventilator-associated pneumonia, and infection by multidrug-resistant bacteria were independently associated to increased death rate. Infections (especially ventilator

  7. Nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance pattern in open-heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran

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    Heydarpour, Fatemeh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients undergoing open heart surgery have a relatively high risk of acquiring nosocomial infections. The development of antibiotic-resistant infections is associated with prolonged hospital stays and mortalities.Objectives: The present study was conducted to investigate nosocomial infections and the antibiotic resistance pattern in bacteria causing these infections in open heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah in the west of Iran over a 4-year period from March 2011 to March 2014.Materials and methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 135 cases of nosocomial infection among open heart surgery patients. The demographic characteristics and the risk factors of each case of infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI protocol. The data collected were then analyzed in SPSS-16.Results: Out of the 6,000 patients who underwent open heart surgery during this 4-year period at the selected hospital, nosocomial infections developed in 135 patients (2.25%, 59.3% of whom were female and 40.7% male. Surgery site infection (SSI, pneumonia (PNEU, urinary tract infection (UTI and blood stream infection (BSI affected 52.6%, 37%, 9.6% and 0.8% of the cases, respectively. , spp. and were the most common bacteria causing the nosocomial infections. was most frequently resistant to imipenem (23.3% spp. to gentamicin (38.5% to co-trimoxazole (54.2%. Conclusion: SSI had a high prevalence in this study. Further studies should therefore be conducted to examine the risk factors associated with SSI in open heart surgery. Various studies have shown that antibiotic resistance patterns are different in different regions. Finding a definitive treatment therefore requires an antibiogram.

  8. Reduction in Rate of Nosocomial Respiratory Virus Infections in a Children's Hospital Associated With Enhanced Isolation Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lorry G; Kohn, Nina; Nullet, Susan; Hill, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether the use of enhanced isolation precautions (droplet and contact precautions) for inpatients with respiratory tract viral infections is associated with a reduction in rate of nosocomial viral respiratory infections. DESIGN Quasi-experimental study with the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infection as the primary dependent variable and rate of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection as a nonequivalent dependent variable comparator. SETTING Cohen Children's Medical Center of NY, a tertiary-care children's hospital attached to a large general hospital. INTERVENTION During years 1 and 2 (July 2012 through June 2014), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee's recommended isolation precautions for inpatients with selected respiratory virus infections were in effect. Enhanced isolation precautions were in effect during years 3 and 4 (July, 2014 through June, 2016), except for influenza, for which enhanced precautions were in effect during year 4 only. RESULTS During the period of enhanced isolation precautions, the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infections with any of 4 virus categories decreased 39% from 0.827 per 1,000 hospital days prior to enhanced precautions to 0.508 per 1,000 hospital days (Pinfections, the rates decreased 58% from 0.317 per 1,000 hospital days to 0.134 per 1,000 hospital days during enhanced precautions (Pnosocomial C. difficile infection. CONCLUSIONS Enhanced isolation precautions for inpatients with respiratory virus infections were associated with a reduction in the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infections. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:152-156.

  9. Nosocomial infections and antibiotic resistance pattern in open-heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarpour, Fatemeh; Rahmani, Youssef; Heydarpour, Behzad; Asadmobini, Atefeh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Patients undergoing open heart surgery have a relatively high risk of acquiring nosocomial infections. The development of antibiotic-resistant infections is associated with prolonged hospital stays and mortalities. Objectives: The present study was conducted to investigate nosocomial infections and the antibiotic resistance pattern in bacteria causing these infections in open heart surgery patients at Imam Ali Hospital in Kermanshah in the west of Iran over a 4-year period from March 2011 to March 2014. Materials and methods: The present cross-sectional study was conducted on 135 cases of nosocomial infection among open heart surgery patients. The demographic characteristics and the risk factors of each case of infection were recorded. The antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out using the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) protocol. The data collected were then analyzed in SPSS-16. Results: Out of the 6,000 patients who underwent open heart surgery during this 4-year period at the selected hospital, nosocomial infections developed in 135 patients (2.25%), 59.3% of whom were female and 40.7% male. Surgery site infection (SSI), pneumonia (PNEU), urinary tract infection (UTI) and blood stream infection (BSI) affected 52.6%, 37%, 9.6% and 0.8% of the cases, respectively. E.coli , Klebsiella spp. and S. aureus were the most common bacteria causing the nosocomial infections. E. coli was most frequently resistant to imipenem (23.3%) Klebsiella spp. to gentamicin (38.5%) S. aureus to co-trimoxazole (54.2%). Conclusion: SSI had a high prevalence in this study. Further studies should therefore be conducted to examine the risk factors associated with SSI in open heart surgery. Various studies have shown that antibiotic resistance patterns are different in different regions. Finding a definitive treatment therefore requires an antibiogram.

  10. Serum procalcitonin for the early recognition of nosocomial infection in the critically ill patients: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Pierre Emmanuel; Kus, Emmanuel; Aho, Serge; Prin, Sébastien; Doise, Jean-Marc; Olsson, Nils-Olivier; Blettery, Bernard; Quenot, Jean-Pierre

    2009-04-22

    The usefulness of procalcitonin (PCT) measurement in critically ill medical patients with suspected nosocomial infection is unclear. The aim of the study was to assess PCT value for the early diagnosis of bacterial nosocomial infection in selected critically ill patients. An observational cohort study in a 15-bed intensive care unit was performed. Seventy patients with either proven (n = 47) or clinically suspected but not confirmed (n = 23) nosocomial infection were included. Procalcitonin measurements were obtained the day when the infection was suspected (D0) and at least one time within the 3 previous days (D-3 to D0). Patients with proven infection were compared to those without. The diagnostic value of PCT on D0 was determined through the construction of the corresponding receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In addition, the predictive value of PCT variations preceding the clinical suspicion of infection was assessed. PCT on D0 was the best predictor of proven infection in this population of ICU patients with a clinical suspicion of infection (AUROCC = 0.80; 95% CI, 0.68-0.91). Thus, a cut-off value of 0.44 ng/mL provides sensitivity and specificity of 65.2% and 83.0%, respectively. Procalcitonin variation between D-1 and D0 was calculated in 45 patients and was also found to be predictive of nosocomial infection (AUROCC = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.79-0.98) with a 100% positive predictive value if the +0.26 ng/mL threshold value was applied. Comparable results were obtained when PCT variation between D-2 and D0, or D-3 and D0 were considered. In contrast, CRP elevation, leukocyte count and fever had a poor predictive value in our population. PCT monitoring could be helpful in the early diagnosis of nosocomial infection in the ICU. Both absolute values and variations should be considered and evaluated in further studies.

  11. Epidemiological Surveillance of Bacterial Nosocomial Infections in the Surgical Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custovic, Amer; Smajlovic, Jasmina; Hadzic, Sadeta; Ahmetagic, Sead; Tihic, Nijaz; Hadzagic, Haris

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Intensive care units (ICUs) are associated with a greater risk of developing nosocomial infections (NIs) than other departments. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the rate, the site and causative organisms of NIs in the surgical ICU at University Clinical Center Tuzla. Methods: All patients admitted to the surgical ICU were followed prospectively, for the development of NIs (January-December 2010). Determination of NIs was performed using standardized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) criteria. Results: 94 out of 834 patients (11.27%) developed NIs. Respiratory tract infections were seen in 56 (60%), urinary tract infections in 15 (16%) and gastrointestinal tract infections in 8 (9%) patients. Other infections identified were surgical site, bloodstream and skin infections. Gram-negative organisms were reported in approximately 75% of cases (78.7% extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producers). Klebsiella pneumoniae was the commonest (51.0%), followed by Proteus mirabilis (21.3%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (10.6%). Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (16%), and Clostridium difficile (9.6%) were the commonest among gram-positive bacteria. Conclusion: Respiratory and urinary tract infections made up the great majority of NIs. ICU patients are more susceptible to NIs, emphasizing the importance of continuous surveillance and enforcement of specific infection control measures. PMID:24757393

  12. Neonatal nosocomial bloodstream infections at a referral hospital in a middle-income country: burden, pathogens, antimicrobial resistance and mortality.

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    Dramowski, Angela; Madide, Ayanda; Bekker, Adrie

    2015-08-01

    Data on nosocomial bloodstream infection (BSI) rates, pathogens, mortality and antimicrobial resistance in African neonates are limited. Nosocomial neonatal BSI at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town were retrospectively reviewed between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. Laboratory and hospital data were used to determine BSI rates, pathogen profile, mortality and antimicrobial resistance in selected nosocomial pathogens. Of 6521 blood cultures taken over 5 years, 1145 (17.6%) were culture-positive, and 717 (62.6%) discrete nosocomial BSI episodes were identified. Nosocomial BSI rates remained unchanged over time (overall 3.9/1000 patient days, 95% CI 3.6-4.2, χ(2) for trend P = 0.23). Contamination rates were relatively high (5.1%, 95% CI 4.6-5.7%). Among BSI pathogens, Gram-negatives predominated (65% vs 31% Gram-positives and 4% fungal); Klebsiella pneumoniae (235, 30%), Staphylococcus aureus (112, 14%) and Enterococci (88, 11%) were most prevalent. Overall crude BSI mortality was 16% (112/717); Gram-negative BSI was significantly associated with mortality (P = 0.007). Mortality occurred mostly in neonates of very low (33/112, 29%) or extremely low (53/112, 47%) birthweight. Deaths attributed to nosocomial BSI declined significantly over time (χ(2) for trend P = 0.01). The prevalence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens was high: methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 66%, multidrug-resistant A. baumanni 90% and extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing K. pneumoniae 73%. The burden of nosocomial neonatal BSI at this middle-income country referral neonatal unit is substantial and remained unchanged over the study period, although attributable mortality declined significantly. Nosocomial BSI pathogens exhibited high levels of antimicrobial resistance.

  13. Nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit: Incidence, risk factors, outcome and associated pathogens in a public tertiary teaching hospital of Eastern India.

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    Dasgupta, Sugata; Das, Soumi; Chawan, Neeraj S; Hazra, Avijit

    2015-01-01

    The increased morbidity and mortality associated with nosocomial infections in the intensive care unit (ICU) is a matter of serious concern today. To determine the incidence of nosocomial infections acquired in the ICU, their risk factors, the causative pathogens and the outcome in a tertiary care teaching hospital. This was a prospective observational study conducted in a 12 bedded combined medical and surgical ICU of a medical college hospital. The study group comprised 242 patients admitted for more than 48 h in the ICU. Data were collected regarding severity of the illness, primary reason for ICU admission, presence of risk factors, presence of infection, infecting agent, length of ICU and hospital stay, and survival status and logistic regression analysis was done. The nosocomial infection rate was 11.98% (95% confidence interval 7.89-16.07%). Pneumonia was the most frequently detected infection (62.07%), followed by urinary tract infections and central venous catheter associated bloodstream infections. Prior antimicrobial therapy, urinary catheterization and length of ICU stay were found to be statistically significant risk factors associated with nosocomial infection. Nosocomial infection resulted in a statistically significant increase in length of ICU and hospital stay, but not in mortality. Nosocomial infections increase morbidity of hospitalized patients. These findings can be utilized for planning nosocomial infection surveillance program in our setting.

  14. Nosocomial infections in the medical ICU: a retrospective study highlighting their prevalence, microbiological profile and impact on ICU stay and mortality.

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    Pradhan, Neeta P; Bhat, S M; Ghadage, D P

    2014-10-01

    1. To study the prevalence of nosocomial infections in the Medical ICU. 2. To determine common microorganisms causing nosocomial infections in the ICU and their antibiotic- sensitivity profile. 3. To study the impact of nosocomial infections on ICU stay and mortality. A retrospective 1 year analysis of nosocomial infections in the Medical ICU at Smt. Kashibai Navale Medical College and Hospital, Pune, between January and December 2011 was carried out. Prevalence of nosocomial infections was determined; sites of nosocomial infections and common causative microorganisms were identified; their antibiotic-sensitivity profiles were studied. The group of patients with nosocomial infections was matched with a control group drawn from the pool of patients without nosocomial infections; this matching was done with respect to age, gender and clinical diagnosis. Period of ICU stay and patient mortality rates in the two groups were analysed. A total of 366 ICU patient records were analysed. Of these, 32 patients were found-to have developed 35 nosocomial infections (9.6% prevalence), of which respiratory infections were the commonest (65.8%), followed by urinary infections (17.1%) and dual infections (urinary plus respiratory) (17.1%).The most frequently isolated microorganism causing respiratory infections was Acinetobacter (40.4%), 21% isolates of which were multidrug resistant; whereas the most frequently isolated microorganism causing urinary tract infections was Pseudomonas (38.4%). Average ICU stay in patients with and without nosocomial infections was 16.5 and 6.4 days respectively; whereas mortality in the two groups was 28.1% and 31.2% respectively. Overall ICU mortality was 19.9%. The nosocomial infection rate in our ICU was in keeping with the rate in many industrialised countries. The most common site of nosocomial infection was the respiratory tract, followed by the urinary tract. Acinetobacter was the commonest respiratory isolate, whereas Pseudomonas was the

  15. Characteristics of nosocomial infection and its effects on the survival of chemotherapy patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lili; Li, Yan; Zhang, Xia; Li, Hongxia

    2017-12-01

    The present study was planned to investigate the characteristics of nosocomial infection and its effects on the survival in advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Retrospective analysis was performed for the 169 chemotherapy patients with NSCLC and nosocomial infection during hospitalization in Binzhou City Central Hospital from March, 2013 to January, 2015. In addition, 170 patients without nosocomial infection were also involved as a control group. The distribution of major drug resistance of Gram-negative (G - ) and Gram-positive (G + ) were analyzed. The survival conditions of the patients were analyzed according to the nosocomial infection occurrence. The risk factors of nosocomial infection in patients with NSCLC were analyzed by univariate and multivariate logistic analysis. The percentage of G + infection was 45.6% while G - infection was 54.4%. Nosocomial infections were most common in respiratory system. The median survival time of the observation group was shorter than that of the control group (Pinfection was the most common type of infection in nosocomial infection of the patients with NSCLC. The occurrence of infection seriously affected the survival time of patients. Attention is required to the patients older than 60 years undergoing treatment with glucocorticoids as well as immunosuppressive agents.

  16. [Bacteriologic and clinical analysis of nosocomial infections in patients from the intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikodemski, T

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate what pathogens are mainly responsible for infection among all hospitalised at our ITU patients, to define the influence of antibiotic use on the aetiology of nosocomial infection. The research was conducted on a six-bedded surgical ITU in a 700-bed teaching hospital from January 1995 till June 1996. In August 1995 we changed infection control protocols (more stress on: handwashing with antiseptic soaps and routine microbiological culture for early prediction of infection) and antibiotic guidelines on our ITU (third generation cephalosporins, fluoroquinolones and Vancomycin were used only as the last option and never in prevention). 1276 samples for microbiological culture were obtained in routine manner. From 60% positive cultures 1216 strains were isolated (Tab. 1) and resistance to antibiotics were defined (Tab. 3). Monthly antibiotic consumption was expressed in defined daily dose (DDD) for 1000 hospitalisation-days. DDD = (X/Y)/Z x x 1000, were: X-cumulative antibiotic consumption during analysed period (g), Y-standard daily dose (g/24 h), Z-number of hospitalisation-days during analysed period (Tab. 2). Values were expressed as the mean +/- standard error (SE). Relationships between variables were analysed using linear correlation. All data were categorised for the frequency table. Statistically significant differences were considered to exist when calculated p values were less than 0.05. There were no statistically significant differences in the number of treated patients, length of stay and mortality rate on our ITU in 18 months. 58% of isolated strains were Gram-negative bacteria especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa (22%) and Acinetobacter spp. (16%) and Proteus spp. (9%). The commonly isolated Gram-positive bacteria were Enterococcus faecalis (14%), Staphylococcus aureus (12%)--of which 90% were MRSA. In 8% of cases we have isolated Candida spp. Monthly antibiotic consumption was displayed in table 2. Trend analysis

  17. [Infection prevention check-in and infection prevention check-out to prevent nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, A; Schilling, M; Heidecke, C D

    2010-02-01

    A precondition for the success of the prevention of SSI is the complete realisation of the proven anti-infective measures in form of the multi-barrier strategy or the so-called bundles. In daily practice it is important to follow the fixed instructions, i. e., to ensure a high compliance. In much the same way as an airline pilot or co-pilot must examine whether all instruments are functioning before each take-off, a comparable procedure should be developed as a pre-operative control for the observance of all -defined measures by the responsible surgeon and for the post-operative supervision by the patient. For the control of the observance of the defined pre-operative prevention measures, a check list with 12 items was developed, named the "infection prevention check-in". The check list is authorised by the responsible surgeon be-fore each operation. For the surveillance of the general hygiene in the post-operative period the "infection prevention check-out" with 14 items was developed. Thereby the patient is able to evaluate the staff's compliance with the hygienic measures at the time of dismissal. With the introduction of the check-lists a simple means is given to involve both the team of the surgeons and the ward staff, together with the patient, into the infection prophylaxis even more effectively. In order to assess the success of those measures, the influence on the rate of SSI is to be determined prospectively. Georg Thieme Verlag Stuttgart, New York.

  18. Experience With Nosocomial Infection in Children Under 5 Treated in an Urban Diarrheal Treatment Center in Bangladesh

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    K. M. Shahunja MBBS

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to evaluate the factors associated with nosocomial infections (NIs in under-5 children and in bacterial isolates from their blood, urine, and stool. We reviewed all under-5 hospitalized children with clinically diagnosed NIs in the inpatient ward at Dhaka Hospital of International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh, between January and December 2012. Comparison was made among the children with (cases = 71 and without NI (controls = 142. NI was defined as the development of new infection 48 hours after admission. Bacterial isolates in urine, blood, and stool were found in 11/52 (21%, 9/69 (13%, and 2/16 (12% respectively. In logistic regression analysis, the children with NI were independently associated with severe acute malnutrition, congenital anomaly, invasive diarrhea, urinary tract infection on admission, and use of intravenous cannula during hospitalization. Thus, identification of these simple clinical parameters may help in preventive measures being taken to reduce the rate of NIs in such children.

  19. Transfusion of platelets, but not of red blood cells, is independently associated with nosocomial infections in the critically ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engele, Leo J; Straat, Marleen; van Rooijen, Ingeborg H M; de Vooght, Karen M K; Cremer, Olaf L; Schultz, Marcus J; Bos, Lieuwe D J; Juffermans, Nicole P

    2016-12-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusion has been associated with nosocomial infection in the critically ill patients. However, this association may be confounded by length of stay, as prolonged intensive care unit (ICU stay) increases both risk of infection and risk of transfusion. Also, it is not known whether specific blood products have differential risks. In this prospective multicentre cohort study, the risk of bacterial infections associated with transfusion products in critically ill (ICU) patients was determined in an integrated statistical model, using Cox proportional hazard analysis to account for attrition bias. In all acutely admitted patients with a length of stay of >48 h between 1 January 2011 and 31 December 2012, the occurrence of nosocomial infections in the ICU was prospectively monitored using CDC criteria. Of 3502 screened patients, 476 (13.6 %) developed a nosocomial infection. These patients had higher APACHE IV scores, had longer ICU length of stay and were more frequently transfused compared to patients without an infection. Logistic regression showed that RBC transfusion was a risk factor for infection [odds ratio (OR) 1.98, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.54-2.55, p infection [hazard ratio (HR) 1.36, 95 % CI 1.10-1.69, p = 0.004] and between platelet transfusion and infection (HR 1.46, 95 % CI 1.18-1.81, p infection independently from other transfusion products (HR 1.40, 95 % CI 1.03-1.90, p = 0.03). In critically ill patients, transfusion of platelets, but not of RBCs and plasma, is an independent risk factor for acquiring a nosocomial infection.

  20. Correlation between levofloxacin consumption and the incidence of nosocomial infections due to fluoroquinolone-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-Hsiu; Liu, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Yi-Chun; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Lee, Yuarn-Jang

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between fluoroquinolone resistance in Escherichia coli isolates causing nosocomial infection and hospital antibiotic consumption were investigated. Restriction of levofloxacin use was implemented to control the incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli in the hospital. The study was conducted from January 2004 to December 2010. Antimicrobial agent consumption was obtained from the pharmacy computer system and presented as the defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days every 6 months. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli isolates causing nosocomial infections was obtained from the Department of Infection Control every 6 months. An antimicrobial stewardship program, restricting levofloxacain use, was implemented in July 2007. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli causing nosocomial infections was significantly correlated with fluoroquinolone usage (p = 0.005), but not with the use of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins, piperacillin-tazobactam, or carbapenems. Parenteral (p = 0.002), oral (p = 0.018), and total levofloxacin (p = 0.001) use were significantly correlated with the extent of fluoroquinolone resistance. With a reduction of levofloxacin use, a decrease of the incidence of fluoroquinolone resistance in E coli isolates was observed. There is a significant correlation between levofloxacin use and the incidence of nosocomial fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli isolates. The incidence of fluoroquinolone-resistant E coli could be reduced by limiting levofloxacin consumption. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Application of protein typing in molecular epidemiological investigation of nosocomial infection outbreak of aminoglycoside-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Min; Tang, Min; Ding, Yinghuan; Wu, Zecai; Xiang, Chengyu; Yang, Kui; Zhang, Zhang; Li, Baolin; Deng, Zhenghua; Liu, Jinbo

    2017-12-16

    Pseudomonas aeruginosan has emerged as an important pathogen elated to serious infections and nosocomial outbreaks worldwide. This study was conducted to understand the prevalence of aminoglycoside (AMG)-resistant P. aeruginosa in our hospital and to provide a scientific basis for control measures against nosocomial infections. Eighty-two strains of P. aeruginosa were isolated from clinical departments and divided into AMG-resistant strains and AMG-sensitive strains based on susceptibility test results. AMG-resistant strains were typed by drug resistance gene typing (DRGT) and protein typing. Five kinds of aminoglycoside-modifying enzyme (AME) genes were detected in the AMG-resistant group. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were classified into three types and six subtypes by DRGT. Four protein peaks, namely, 9900.02, 7600.04, 9101.25 and 10,372.87 Da, were significantly and differentially expressed between the two groups. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were also categorised into three types and six subtypes at the distance level of 10 by protein typing. AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa was cloned spread in our hospital; the timely implementation of nosocomial infection prevention and control strategies were needed in preventing outbreaks and epidemic of AMG-resistant P. aeruginosa. SELDI-TOF MS technology can be used for bacterial typing, which provides a new method of clinical epidemiological survey and nosocomial infection control.

  2. [Nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in the intensive care units of a national hospital of Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chincha, Omayra; Cornelio, Elia; Valverde, Violeta; Acevedo, Mónica

    2013-01-01

    In order to describe the incidence of nosocomial infections associated to invasive devices in intensive care units (UCI) of the National Hospital Cayetano Heredia, a retrospective observational study was conducted using the data from the Office of Epidemiology and Environmental Health from 2010 to 2012. A total number of 222 nosocomial infections were reported; the general medicine UCI reported the highest incidence of pneumonia cases associated to a mechanical ventilator in 1000 days of use of the device (28.6); infection of the blood stream associated to central venous catheter (11.9), and infection of the urinary tract associated to a catheter (8,1). The main infectious agents isolated were Pseudomona sp. (32.3%) in the emergency UCI, negative Staphylococcus coagulasa (36%) in the general medicine UCI and Candida sp (69.2%) in the Surgery UCI. The rates of infections associated to invasive devices were high as in other national hospitals with limited resources and infrastructure.

  3. Nosocomial infections among acute leukemia patients in China: An economic burden analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaohui; Yan, Tianyuan; Liu, Yunhong; Wang, Jingna; Li, Yingxia; Wang, Shuhui

    2016-10-01

    The economic burden associated nosocomial infections (NIs) in patients with acute leukemia (AL) in China was unclear. A prospective study was conducted to quantify the medical cost burden of NIs among AL patients. Nine hundred ninety-four patients diagnosed with AL between January 2011 and December 2013 were included. Relevant necessary information was extracted from the hospital information system and hospital infection surveillance system. The primary outcome was incidence of NIs and the secondary was economic burden results, including extra medical costs and prolonged length of stay (LOS). We estimated the total incremental cost of NIs by comparing all-cause health care costs in patients with versus without infections. Prolonged duration of stay was compared in patients with different infections. Of 994 patients with AL, 277 (27.9%) experienced NIs. NI was associated with a total incremental cost of $3,092 per patient ($5,227 vs $2,135; P economic burden on patients with AL. The study highlights the influence of NIs on LOS and health care costs and appeal to the establishment of prophylactic measures for NIs to reduce the unnecessary waste of medical resources in the long run. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A review of nosocomial norovirus outbreaks: infection control interventions found effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, J D; Lee, M B

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to review documented outbreaks of enteric illness associated with nosocomial norovirus infections and to identify modes of transmission, morbidity and mortality patterns, and recommendations for control. Searches of electronic databases, public health publications, and federal, state/provincial public health websites were completed for 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2010. Computer-aided searches of literature databases and systematic searches of government websites identified 54 relevant outbreak reports. Transmission routes included person-to-person (18.5%), foodborne (3.7%) and in the majority (77.8%) the route was unknown. Actions taken during the outbreak to control infection included restricting the movements of patients and staff (22.5%), enhanced environmental cleaning (13.6%) and hand hygiene (10.3%). Rapid identification of norovirus outbreaks in hospitals is vital for the immediate implementation of infection control measures and isolation of infected individuals in this mainly immunocompromised population. Studies that statistically evaluate infection control measures are needed.

  5. N-CDAD in Canada: Results of the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program 1997 N-CDAD Prevalence Surveillance Project

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    Meaghen Hyland

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A 1996 preproject survey among Canadian Hospital Epidemiology Committee (CHEC sites revealed variations in the prevention, detection, management and surveillance of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD. Facilities wanted to establish national rates of nosocomially acquired CDAD (N-CDAD to understand the impact of control or prevention measures, and the burden of N-CDAD on health care resources. The CHEC, in collaboration with the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control (Health Canada and under the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program, undertook a prevalence surveillance project among selected hospitals throughout Canada.

  6. Role of Mental Disorders in Nosocomial Infections after Hip Fracture Treatment

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    Enrique Guerado

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between mental disorders (MDs and iatrogenic complications after hip fracture surgery has been poorly studied. Among iatrogenic complications, nosocomial infections (NIs are a major factor in hip fracture surgery. The aim of this paper was to determine whether patients with a MD and a hip fracture develop more NIs after hip surgery than patients with no MD. We studied 912 patients who underwent surgery for a hip fracture (223 patients with a MD who underwent surgery for a hip fracture and 689 control patients without a MD who also underwent surgery for a hip fracture and followed them after surgery. Univariable and multivariable analyses were performed using simple and multiple logistic regression analysis (confidence interval, crude and adjusted odds ratios, and P value. We found that MDs, gender, and comorbidities were not associated with a higher risk of developing a NI after surgery for a hip fracture. Only age increases the risk of a NI.

  7. Nosocomial infections with metallo-beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa: molecular epidemiology, risk factors, clinical features and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucena, A; Dalla Costa, L M; Nogueira, K S; Matos, A P; Gales, A C; Paganini, M C; Castro, M E S; Raboni, S M

    2014-08-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) have emerged as one of the most important bacterial resistance mechanisms because of their ability to hydrolyse virtually all β-lactam agents. MBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa (MBL-PA) are an important cause of nosocomial infections, particularly in intensive care units (ICUs), where they are associated with serious infections and present a significant clinical risk. To assess the molecular epidemiology, risk factors and outcomes of nosocomial infections caused by MBL-PA in a teaching hospital in Southern Brazil. From January 2001 to December 2008, 142 carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from distinct clinical samples from hospitalized patients. These isolates were screened for MBLs, and underwent polymerase chain reaction, sequencing and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Patients infected with carbapenem-resistant MBL-PA were considered as cases, and patients infected with non-MBL-PA were considered as controls. Eighty-four of 142 patients with positive carbapenem-resistant P. aeruginosa cultures met the criteria of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention for infection. Fifty-eight patients were infected with MBL-PA (69%) and 26 patients were infected with non-MBL-PA (31%). Multi-variate analysis revealed that ICU stay [P = 0.003, odds ratio (OR) 4.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.15-14.01] and urinary tract infection (P = 0.001, OR 9.67, 95% CI 1.72-54.48) were important risk factors for MBL-PA infection. Patients infected with MBL-PA showed faster onset of infection (P = 0.002) and faster progression to death (P = 0.04). These results showed the severity of MBL-PA infections, and demonstrated the urgent need for strategies to improve infection control measures to prevent an increase in these nosocomial infections. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Nutritional status and nosocomial infections among adult elective surgery patients in a Mexican tertiary care hospital.

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    Judith Rodríguez-García

    Full Text Available Controversy exists as to whether obesity constitutes a risk-factor or a protective-factor for the development of nosocomial Infection (NI. According to the obesity-paradox, there is evidence that moderate obesity is a protective-factor. In Mexico few studies have focused on the nutritional status (NS distribution in the hospital setting.The aim of this study was to estimate the distribution of NS and the prevalence of nosocomial infection NI among adult elective surgery (ES patients and to compare the clinical and anthropometric characteristics and length of stays (LOS between obese and non-obese patients and between patients with and without NI.We conducted a cross-sectional study with a sample (n = 82 adult ES patients (21-59 years old who were recruited from a tertiary-care hospital. The prevalences of each NS category and NI were estimated, the assessments were compared between groups (Mann-Whitney, Chi-squared or the Fisher's-exact-test, and the association between preoperative risk-factors and NI was evaluated using odds ratios.The distribution of subjects by NS category was: underweight (3.66%, normal-weight (28.05%, overweight (35.36%, and obese (32.93%. The prevalence of NI was 14.63%. The LOS was longer (p<0.001 for the patients who developed NI. The percentages of NI were: 33.3% in underweight, 18.52% in obese, 17.39% in normal-weight, and 6.90% in overweight patients.The prevalence of overweight and obesity in adult ES patients is high. The highest prevalence of NI occurred in the underweight and obese patients. The presence of NI considerably increased the LOS, resulting in higher medical care costs.

  9. Epidemiology of nosocomial infections in selected neonatal intensive care units in Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efird, Meica M; Rojas, Mario A; Lozano, Juan M; Bose, Carl L; Rojas, María X; Rondón, Martín A; Ruiz, Gloria; Piñeros, Juan G; Rojas, Catherine; Robayo, Guillermo; Hoyos, Angela; Gosendi, Maria E; Cruz, Hernan; Leon, Angela

    2005-08-01

    The epidemiology of nosocomial infections (NI) in neonatal intensive care units in developing countries has been poorly studied. We conducted a prospective study in selected neonatal units in Colombia, SA, to describe the incidence rate, causative organisms, and interinstitutional differences. Data were collected prospectively from February 20 to August 30, 2001 from eight neonatal units. NI was defined as culture-proven infection diagnosed after 72 h of hospitalization, resulting in treatment with antibiotics for >3 days. Linear regression models were used to describe associations between institutional variables and NI rates. A total of 1504 infants were hospitalized for more than 72 h, and therefore, at risk for NI. Of all, 127 infections were reported among 80 patients (5.3%). The incidence density rate was 6.2 per 1000 patient-days. Bloodstream infections accounted for 78% of NIs. Gram-negative organisms predominated over gram-positive organisms (55 vs 38%) and were prevalent in infants < or =2000 g (54%). The most common pathogens were Staphylococcus epidermidis (26%) and Klebsiella pneumonia (12%). Gram-negative organisms predominate in Colombia among infants <2000 g. The emergence of gram-negative organisms and their associated risk factors requires further study.

  10. Studies on incidence and prevention of nosocomial infection of urinary tract endoscopies by different antimicrobial agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasanien, Y.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial infections occur world wide and affect both developed and resource-poor countries. Infections acquired in health care settings are among the major causes of death and increased morbidity among hospitalized patients. They are a significant burden both for the patient and for public health. A prevalence survey conducted under the auspices of WHO in 55 hospitals of 14 countries representing 4 WHO Regions (Europe, Eastern Mediterranean, South-East Asia and Western Pacific) showed an average of 8.7% of hospital patients had nosocomial infections. At any time, over 1.4 million people worldwide suffer from infectious complications acquired in hospital (Tikhomirov , 1987 ) . In medical practice, an object should be disinfected or sterilized depending on its intended use. Items that come in direct contact with mucous membranes, such as endoscopes, require a high level of disinfection (Ayliffe et al., 2000) . The major problems leading to inadequate decontamination are inappropriate or incomplete decontamination methods, for example, choice of disinfectant and duration of contact, as well as use of water or other fluids of poor microbiological quality for decontamination (Fallis , 1994 ). Endoscopes had been used widely for the diagnosis and therapy of medical disorders and were used increasingly for performing laparoscopic surgery. Currently, greater than 10,000,000 gastrointestinal endoscopic procedures were performed each year. Endoscopes were contaminated routinely by microorganisms during clinical use. Failure to employ appropriate cleaning, disinfection, or sterilization of endoscopes have been responsible for multiple nosocomial outbreaks and serious, sometimes life-threatening infections (Spach et al ., 1993 ). Because the endoscope comes into intimate contact with mucous membranes, high-level disinfection was the current reprocessing standard after each patient use. High level disinfection refered to the use of a chemical sterilant at shorter exposure

  11. Validación de un programa de vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales Validation of a nosocomial infections surveillance program

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    M. Sigfrido Rangel-Frausto

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Validar el programa de vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales y conocer la morbilidad y la mortalidad. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Un médico especialmente capacitado, realizó vigilancia intensiva de todos los pacientes admitidos en el hospital. Los casos de infección fueron discutidos con otros dos médicos y el resultado se comparó con la vigilancia rutinaria. Se incluyó a todos los pacientes hospitalizados del 11 de julio al 12 de agosto de 1995, que no tenían un proceso infeccioso activo o que no manifestaban un periodo de incubación a su ingreso. Se siguieron diariamente y se registraron datos de: edad, sexo y padecimiento de ingreso. Se recabó información sobre tratamiento antimicrobiano, microrganismo aislado y susceptibilidad. Se evaluó el estado clínico final y se estimó el tiempo de estancia hospitalaria. RESULTADOS. De 429 pacientes, 45 desarrollaron infección nosocomial (casos y 384 no lo hicieron (controles. La incidencia de infecciones nosocomiales fue de 10.48/100. La sensibilidad y la especificidad del programa fueron de 93.3 y 98.7%, respectivamente. La mortalidad en los infectados fue de 11.11%, y en el grupo de los no infectados, de 2.4%. El promedio de estancia hospitalaria fue de 20 y 11 días, para infectados y no infectados, respectivamente (pOBJECTIVES. To validate the nosocomial infections surveillance system, establish its impact in morbi-mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Surveillance of every single patient admited during a one month period was done by one of us (DMG. Each posibile case was discussed with two other hospital epidemiologists (SPLR, MSRF. This intensive surveillance was compared against the routinely surveillance performed by the nurses. We included all hospitalized patients between 11th July and 12th of August according to CDC (Atlanta, GA nosocomial infections definitions. Patients were followed everyday and information about age, gender, underlying diagnosis, microorganisms responsible

  12. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: the ENIRRIs project

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    Gennaro De Pascale

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI, defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs, supported by the European Respiratory Society, has been recently established, with the aim at studying all respiratory tract infective episodes except community-acquired ones. A multicentre, observational study is in progress, enrolling more than 1000 patients fulfilling the clinical, biochemical and radiological findings consistent with a LRTI. This article describes the methodology of this study. A specific interest is the clinical impact of non-ICU-acquired nosocomial pneumonia requiring ICU admission, non-ventilator-associated LRTIs occurring in the ICU, and ventilator-associated tracheobronchitis. The clinical meaning of microbiologically negative infectious episodes and specific details on antibiotic administration modalities, dosages and duration are also highlighted. Recently released guidelines address many unresolved questions which might be answered by such large-scale observational investigations. In light of the paucity of data regarding such topics, new interesting information is expected to be obtained from our network research activities, contributing to optimisation of care for critically ill patients in the ICU.

  13. Hospital costs associated with nosocomial infections in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillo-García, Áurea; Aldana-Espinal, Josefa M; Olry de Labry-Lima, Antonio; Valencia-Martín, Raquel; López-Márquez, Reyes; Loscertales-Abril, Mercedes; Conde-Herrera, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    To estimate the additional cost attributable to nosocomial infection (NI) in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) and related factors. A prospective cohort study was conducted in all children admitted to the PICU of a tertiary-care pediatric hospital between 2008 and 2009. Descriptive and bivariate analyses were conducted of total direct costs due to PICU stay and medical procedures in patients with and without NI. A log-linear regression model was performed to determine the factors associated with higher total cost. A total of 443 patients were studied and the prevalence of NI was 11.3%. The difference in the median total cost was €30,791.4 per patient between groups with and without NI. The median cost of PICU length of stay in patients with NI was almost eight times higher than the median cost of patients without NI. In patients with NI, the highest costs related to medical procedures were associated with antibiotics, enteral and parenteral feeding, and imaging tests. In the multivariate model, the factors associated with higher cost were infection, the performance of cardiovascular surgery, urgent admission, a higher pediatric risk mortality score, and the presence of immunosuppression. By contrast, older children and those with surgical admission generated lower cost. NI was associated with an increase in total cost, which implies that the prevention of these infections through specific interventions could be cost-effective and would help to increase the safety of healthcare systems. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  14. The Immune Response against Acinetobacter baumannii, an Emerging Pathogen in Nosocomial Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Patiño, María Guadalupe; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Licona-Limón, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the etiologic agent of a wide range of nosocomial infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and skin infections. Over the last 45 years, an alarming increase in the antibiotic resistance of this opportunistic microorganism has been reported, a situation that hinders effective treatments. In order to develop effective therapies against A. baumannii it is crucial to understand the basis of host–bacterium interactions, especially those concerning the immune response of the host. Different innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells have been identified as important effectors in the defense against A. baumannii; among them, neutrophils represent a key immune cell indispensable for the control of the infection. Several immune strategies to combat A. baumannii have been identified such as recognition of the bacteria by immune cells through pattern recognition receptors, specifically toll-like receptors, which trigger bactericidal mechanisms including oxidative burst and cytokine and chemokine production to amplify the immune response against the pathogen. However, a complete picture of the protective immune strategies activated by this bacteria and its potential therapeutic use remains to be determined and explored. PMID:28446911

  15. The Immune Response againstAcinetobacter baumannii, an Emerging Pathogen in Nosocomial Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Patiño, María Guadalupe; García-Contreras, Rodolfo; Licona-Limón, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is the etiologic agent of a wide range of nosocomial infections, including pneumonia, bacteremia, and skin infections. Over the last 45 years, an alarming increase in the antibiotic resistance of this opportunistic microorganism has been reported, a situation that hinders effective treatments. In order to develop effective therapies against A. baumannii it is crucial to understand the basis of host-bacterium interactions, especially those concerning the immune response of the host. Different innate immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells have been identified as important effectors in the defense against A. baumannii ; among them, neutrophils represent a key immune cell indispensable for the control of the infection. Several immune strategies to combat A. baumannii have been identified such as recognition of the bacteria by immune cells through pattern recognition receptors, specifically toll-like receptors, which trigger bactericidal mechanisms including oxidative burst and cytokine and chemokine production to amplify the immune response against the pathogen. However, a complete picture of the protective immune strategies activated by this bacteria and its potential therapeutic use remains to be determined and explored.

  16. Risk factors for nosocomial infection in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit

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    Ana Carolina Vieira Costa Fernandes Távora

    Full Text Available This study was designed to describe the epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. This study was a retrospective cohort from January to December, 2003. All neonates admitted to the NICU. Infection surveillance was conducted according to the NNIS, CDC. Chi-square test and logistic regression model were performed for statistical analyses. The study was conducted at a public, tertiary referral NICU of a teaching hospital in the Northeast of Brazil. A total of 948 medical records were reviewed. Overall NI incidence rate was 34%. The main neonatal NI was bloodstream infection (68.1%, with clinical sepsis accounting for 47.2%, and pneumonia was the second most common NI (8.6%. Multivariate analysis identified seven independent risk factors for NIs: birth weight, exposure to parenteral nutrition, percutaneous catheter, central venous catheter or mechanical ventilation, abruptio placentae and mother's sexually transmitted disease (STD. Neonates from mothers with STD or abruptio placentae, those weighing less than 1,500 g at birth or those who used invasive devices were at increased risk for acquiring NI.

  17. Nosocomial Transmission of C. difficile in English Hospitals from Patients with Symptomatic Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Esther; Gasparrini, Antonio; Guy, Rebecca; Cookson, Barry; Hope, Russell; Jit, Mark; Robotham, Julie V.; Deeny, Sarah R.; Edmunds, W. John

    2014-01-01

    Background Recent evidence suggests that less than one-quarter of patients with symptomatic nosocomial Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) are linked to other in-patients. However, this evidence was limited to one geographic area. We aimed to investigate the level of symptomatic CDI transmission in hospitals located across England from 2008 to 2012. Methods A generalized additive mixed-effects Poisson model was fitted to English hospital-surveillance data. After adjusting for seasonal fluctuations and between-hospital variation in reported CDI over time, possible clustering (transmission between symptomatic in-patients) of CDI cases was identified. We hypothesised that a temporal proximity would be reflected in the degree of correlation between in-hospital CDI cases per week. This correlation was modelled through a latent autoregressive structure of order 1 (AR(1)). Findings Forty-six hospitals (33 general, seven specialist, and six teaching hospitals) located in all English regions met our criteria. In total, 12,717 CDI cases were identified; seventy-five per cent of these occurred >48 hours after admission. There were slight increases in reports during winter months. We found a low, but statistically significant, correlation between successive weekly CDI case incidences (phi = 0.029, 95%CI: 0.009–0.049). This correlation was five times stronger in a subgroup analysis restricted to teaching hospitals (phi = 0.104, 95%CI: 0.048–0.159). Conclusions The results suggest that symptomatic patient-to-patient transmission has been a source of CDI-acquisition in English hospitals in recent years, and that this might be a more important transmission route in teaching hospitals. Nonetheless, the weak correlation indicates that, in line with recent evidence, symptomatic cases might not be the primary source of nosocomial CDI in England. PMID:24932484

  18. Nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit during 16 years: 1997-2012

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    Jane Eire Urzedo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Surveillance of nosocomial infections (NIs is an essential part of quality patient care; however, there are few reports of National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN surveillance in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs and none in developing countries. The purpose of this study was to report the incidence of NIs, causative organisms, and antimicrobial susceptibility patterns in a large cohort of neonates admitted to the NICU during a 16-year period. Methods The patients were followed 5 times per week from birth to discharge or death, and epidemiological surveillance was conducted according to the NHSN. Results From January 1997 to December 2012, 4,615 neonates, representing 62,412 patient-days, were admitted to the NICU. The device-associated infection rates were as follows: 17.3 primary bloodstream infections per 1,000 central line-days and 3.2 pneumonia infections per 1,000 ventilator-days. A total of 1,182 microorganisms were isolated from sterile body site cultures in 902 neonates. Coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS (34.3% and Staphylococcus aureus (15.6% were the most common etiologic agents isolated from cultures. The incidences of oxacillin-resistant CoNS and Staphylococcus aureus were 86.4% and 28.3%, respectively. Conclusions The most important NI remains bloodstream infection with staphylococci as the predominant pathogens, observed at much higher rates than those reported in the literature. Multiresistant microorganisms, especially oxacillin-resistant staphylococci and gram-negative bacilli resistant to cephalosporin were frequently found. Furthermore, by promoting strict hygiene measures and meticulous care of the infected infants, the process itself of evaluating the causative organisms was valuable.

  19. [Analysis of death risk factors for nosocomial infection patients in an ICU: a retrospective review of 864 patients from 2009 to 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinrong; Gao, Pan; Guo, Shufen; Liu, Yajing; Shao, Liye; Kang, Hongshan; Zhang, Jinchao; Liu, Shuhong; Gao, Xiuling; Cui, Zhaobo

    2016-08-01

    To investigate the mortality risk factors of nosocomial infection patients in intensive care unit (ICU), and to guide clinicians to take effective control measures. A retrospectively cohort study was conducted. The relevant information of patients with nosocomial infection treated in ICU of Hengshui Harrison International Peace Hospital Affiliated to Hebei Medical University from June 2009 to December 2015 was analyzed. The patients who admitted to ICU again, with length of ICU stay less than 48 hours, without first etiology of screening within 48 hours of ICU admission, or without complete pathogenic information were excluded. The gender, age, diagnosis, length of ICU stay, invasive operation, nutritional status, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation II (APACHEII) score, sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score, distribution and drug resistance of the pathogens, and procalcitonin (PCT) levels at 7 days after nosocomial infection were recorded. The risk factors leading to death in patients with nosocomial infection were analyzed by logistic regression, and the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) was drawn to evaluate the predictive value of all risk factors on the outcome of patients with nosocomial infection. In 864 enrolled patients with male of 54.75% and mean age of (63.50±15.80) years, 732 (84.72%) patients survived and 132 (15.28%) died. Compared with survivors, the non-survivors had higher age (years: 65.47±15.32 vs. 58.15±13.27), incidence of urgent trachea intubation (32.58% vs. 22.81%), deep venous catheterization (83.33% vs. 63.25%), and multiple drug-resistant infection (65.91% vs. 33.20%), longer length of ICU stay (days: 13.56±4.29 vs. 10.29±4.32) and duration of coma (days: 7.36±2.46 vs. 5.48±2.14), lower albumin (g/L: 23.64±8.47 vs. 26.36±12.84), higher APACHEII score (19.28±5.16 vs. 17.56±5.62), SOFA score (8.55±1.34 vs. 6.43±2.65), and PCT (μg/L: 3.06±1.36 vs. 2.53±0.87, all P 0.05). The low respiratory

  20. Nosocomial Infections in Iranian Pediatric Patients With Burn Injuries: A Review

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    Mohammad Sadegh Rezai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: Nosocomial infections (NIs are the most common life-threatening complications and leading cause of morbidity and mortality in pediatric patients with burn injuries. It is estimated that annually two million infections, 90000 deaths, and 4.5 billion USD in excess healthcare costs are imposed by NIs. Herein, we reviewed the articles related to NIs in Iranian pediatric patients with burn injuries. Evidence Acquisition: A review of epidemiologic studies on NI in pediatric patients with burn injuries in Iran was performed by searching studies indexed in PubMed, Google scholar, Iranmedex, Magiran, SID databases, published in English language in 2014. Keywords for searching included “Nosocomial Infections”, “Hospital- acquired infection”, “Healthcare- associated infections”, “burn”, “children”, “pediatric”, and “Iran”. All articles related to NIs in pediatric patients with burn injuries or about general population with burn injuries, which included pediatric population up to the age 18 years in Iran, were included. Articles out of the definition for age group or lack of significant data, outpatients, and patients selected for reconstructive surgeries were excluded. Results: Of 43 reviewed articles, nine eligible articles were selected. The male to female ratio was 1.6:1. The age ranged from birth to 18 years with the mean of 3.4 years. Overall incidence of NIs was 20.94%. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30.39%, Klebsiella pneumonia (17.54%, Acinetobacter (17.47%, and Staphylococcus aureus (14.98% were the most common prominent isolates with high antibiotic resistance isolated from the cultures of different sites of infections including burn wound. Vancomycin was highly specific antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria isolates. All spices of Acinetobacter were multidrug resistant. The mean of mortality rate was 8.75%. Conclusions: In spite of higher incidence of NIs in children with burn injuries, there are no well

  1. The impact of Rotavirus mass vaccination on hospitalization rates, nosocomial Rotavirus gastroenteritis and secondary blood stream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlamy, Manuela; Kofler, Sabine; Orth, Dorothea; Würzner, Reinhard; Heinz-Erian, Peter; Streng, Andrea; Prelog, Martina

    2013-03-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effects of universal mass vaccination (UMV) against rotavirus (RV) on the hospitalization rates, nosocomial RV infections and RV-gastroenteritis (GE)-associated secondary blood stream infections (BSI). The retrospective evaluation (2002-2009) by chart analysis included all clinically diagnosed and microbiologically confirmed RV-GE cases in a large tertiary care hospital in Austria. The pre-vaccination period (2002-2005) was compared with the recommended and early funded (2006-2007) and the funded (2008-2009) vaccination periods. Primary outcomes were RV-GE-associated hospitalizations, secondary outcomes nosocomial RV disease, secondary BSI and direct hospitalization costs for children and their accompanying persons. In 1,532 children with RV-GE, a significant reduction by 73.9% of hospitalized RV-GE cases per year could be observed between the pre-vaccination and the funded vaccination period, which was most pronounced in the age groups 0-11 months (by 87.8%), 6-10 years (by 84.2%) and 11-18 years (88.9%). In the funded vaccination period, a reduction by 71.9% of nosocomial RV-GE cases per year was found compared to the pre-vaccination period. Fatalities due to nosocomial RV-GE were only observed in the pre-vaccination period (3 cases). Direct costs of hospitalized, community-acquired RV-GE cases per year were reduced by 72.7% in the funded vaccination period. The reduction of direct costs for patients (by 86.9%) and accompanying persons (86.2%) was most pronounced in the age group 0-11 months. UMV may have contributed to the significant decrease of RV-GE-associated hospitalizations, to a reduction in nosocomial RV infections and RV-associated morbidity due to secondary BSI and reduced direct hospitalization costs. The reduction in nosocomial cases is an important aspect considering severe disease courses in hospitalized patients with co-morbidities and death due to nosocomial RV-GE.

  2. The ORION statement: guidelines for transparent reporting of outbreak reports and intervention studies of nosocomial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Sheldon P; Cooper, Ben S; Kibbler, Chris C; Cookson, Barry D; Roberts, Jenny A; Medley, Graham F; Duckworth, Georgia; Lai, Rosalind; Ebrahim, Shah; Brown, Erwin M; Wiffen, Phil J; Davey, Peter G

    2007-04-01

    The quality of research in hospital epidemiology (infection control) must be improved to be robust enough to influence policy and practice. In order to raise the standards of research and publication, a CONSORT equivalent for these largely quasi-experimental studies has been prepared by the authors of two relevant systematic reviews, following consultation with learned societies, editors of journals, and researchers. The ORION (Outbreak Reports and Intervention Studies Of Nosocomial infection) statement consists of a 22 item checklist, and a summary table. The emphasis is on transparency to improve the quality of reporting and on the use of appropriate statistical techniques. The statement has been endorsed by a number of professional special interest groups and societies. Like CONSORT, ORION should be considered a "work in progress", which requires ongoing dialogue for successful promotion and dissemination. The statement is therefore offered for further public discussion. Journals and research councils are strongly recommended to incorporate it into their submission and reviewing processes. Feedback to the authors is encouraged and the statement will be revised in 2 years.

  3. [Influence of nosocomial infection on mortality in an intensive care unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz Molina, C; Martínez de la Concha, D; Salcedo Leal, I; Masa Calles, J; De Irala Estévez, J; Fernández-Crehuet Navajas, R

    1998-01-01

    To evaluate the association between nosocomial infections (NI) and the mortality of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients, adjusting for the effect on mortality of other predictive variables. Prospective study on 944 concurrent patients admitted for at least 24 hours in the ICU of a tertiary level hospital between February and November of 1994. The association between NI (diagnosed using CDC criteria) and mortality was studied using multivariable logistic regression. The cummulative incidence of mortality in the ICU was 11.2% (CI95% = 9.9-12.5). This incidence was significantly higher in infected patients with a crude mortality relative risk of 2.2 (CI95% = 1.5-3.1). In the multivariable analysis, the effect of NI (global, pneumonias, of the urinary tract and bacteriemias) on adjusted mortality depended on the patient's Acute Pysiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) score. With low APACHE II scores, NI was associated with an increased mortality risk. Conversely, with higher APACHE II scores, the relevance of NI as a determinant of mortality decreased and prognosis was mainly associated with the patient's severity of illness. The association between NI and mortality, adjusting for other prognostic factors for mortality, is confirmed.

  4. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings

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    Volpato, Richard [Cassiano Antonio de Moraes University Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Campi de Castro, Claudio [University of Sao Paulo Medical School, Department of Radiology, Cerqueira Cesar, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Hadad, David Jamil [Cassiano Antonio de Moraes University Hospital, Nucleo de Doencas Infecciosas, Department of Internal Medicine, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya da [Laboratorio de Patologia PAT, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Filho, Ezequiel Leal [UNIMED Diagnostico, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Vitoria, ES (Brazil); Marcal, Leonardo P. [The University of Texas M D Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Unit 1473, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-09-15

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5 %), small nodules (61.5 %), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4 %), and collections (26.9 %). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8 %), and collections (15.4 %). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1 %), small nodules (42.3 %), nodules (15.4 %), and collections (11.5 %). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. (orig.)

  5. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Acinetobacter clinical isolates and emerging antibiogram trends for nosocomial infection management

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    Muhammad Sohail

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Introduction: The drug resistant Acinetobacter strains are important causes of nosocomial infections that are difficult to control and treat. This study aimed to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of Acinetobacter strains isolated from different clinical specimens obtained from patients belonging to different age groups. METHODS: In total, 716 non-duplicate Acinetobacter isolates were collected from the infected patients admitted to tertiary-care hospitals at Lahore, Pakistan, over a period of 28 months. The Acinetobacter isolates were identified using API 20E, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed and interpreted according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. RESULTS: The isolation rate of Acinetobacter was high from the respiratory specimens, followed by wound samples. Antibiotic susceptibility analyses of the isolates revealed that the resistance to cefotaxime and ceftazidime was the most common, in 710 (99.2% specimens each, followed by the resistance to gentamicin in 670 (93.6% isolates, and to imipenem in 651 (90.9% isolates. However, almost all isolates were susceptible to tigecycline, colistin, and polymyxin B. CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed the alarming trends of resistance of Acinetobacter strains isolated from clinical specimens to the various classes of antimicrobials. The improvement of microbiological techniques for earlier and more accurate identification of bacteria is necessary for the selection of appropriate treatments.

  6. Nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial infections following laparoscopic surgery: CT imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volpato, Richard; Campi de Castro, Claudio; Hadad, David Jamil; Silva Souza Ribeiro, Flavya da; Filho, Ezequiel Leal; Marcal, Leonardo P.

    2015-01-01

    To identify the distribution and frequency of computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with nosocomial rapidly growing mycobacterial (RGM) infection after laparoscopic surgery. A descriptive retrospective study in patients with RGM infection after laparoscopic surgery who underwent CT imaging prior to initiation of therapy. The images were analyzed by two radiologists in consensus, who evaluated the skin/subcutaneous tissues, the abdominal wall, and intraperitoneal region separately. The patterns of involvement were tabulated as: densification, collections, nodules (≥1.0 cm), small nodules (<1.0 cm), pseudocavitated nodules, and small pseudocavitated nodules. Twenty-six patients met the established criteria. The subcutaneous findings were: densification (88.5 %), small nodules (61.5 %), small pseudocavitated nodules (23.1 %), nodules (38.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (15.4 %), and collections (26.9 %). The findings in the abdominal wall were: densification (61.5 %), pseudocavitated nodules (3.8 %), and collections (15.4 %). The intraperitoneal findings were: densification (46.1 %), small nodules (42.3 %), nodules (15.4 %), and collections (11.5 %). Subcutaneous CT findings in descending order of frequency were: densification, small nodules, nodules, small pseudocavitated nodules, pseudocavitated nodules, and collections. The musculo-fascial plane CT findings were: densification, collections, and pseudocavitated nodules. The intraperitoneal CT findings were: densification, small nodules, nodules, and collections. (orig.)

  7. Risk factors for nosocomial infections in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation supportive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Geqin; Li, Binfei; Lan, Haili; Wang, Juan; Lu, Lanfei; Feng, Xueqin; Luo, Xihua; Yan, Haizhong; Mu, Yuejing

    2017-11-22

    The aim of this study was to analyze risk factors for nosocomial infection (NI) in patients receiving extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) support. Clinical NI data were collected from patients who received ECMO support therapy, and analyzed retrospectively. Among 75 ECMO patients, 20 were found to have developed NI (infection rate 26.7%); a total of 58 pathogens were isolated, including 43 strains of gram-negative bacteria (74.1%) and 15 strains of gram-positive bacteria (25.9%). Multi-drug resistant strains were highly concentrated and were mainly shown to be Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and coagulase-negative staphylococci. Incidence of NI was related to the duration of ECMO support therapy and the total length of hospital stay, and the differences were statistically significant (P<.05). A prolonged period of ECMO support extended the hospital stay, but it did not increase the mortality rate. However, an elevated level of lactic acid increased the mortality rate in this study population. ECMO-associated secondary NIs correlated significantly with the length of hospital stay and with the duration of ECMO support. Therefore, to reduce the incidence of ECMO-associated NIs, preventive strategies that aim to shorten the duration of ECMO support therapy and avoid lengthy hospitalization should be applied, wherever possible. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Incidence and clinical implication of nosocomial infections associated with implantable biomaterials – catheters, ventilator-associated pneumonia, urinary tract infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenbichler, Josef Peter; Assadian, Ojan; Boeswald, Michael; Kramer, Axel

    2012-01-01

    Health care associated infections, the fourth leading cause of disease in industrialised countries, are a major health issue. One part of this condition is based on the increasing insertion and implantation of prosthetic medical devices, since presence of a foreign body significantly reduces the number of bacteria required to produce infection. The most significant hospital-acquired infections, based on frequency and potential severity, are those related to procedures e.g. surgical site infections and medical devices, including urinary tract infection in catheterized patients, pneumonia in patients intubated on a ventilator and bacteraemia related to intravascular catheter use. At least half of all cases of nosocomial infections are associated with medical devices. Modern medical and surgical practices have increasingly utilized implantable medical devices of various kinds. Such devices may be utilized only short-time or intermittently, for months, years or permanently. They improve the therapeutic outcome, save human lives and greatly enhance the quality of life of these patients. However, plastic devices are easily colonized with bacteria and fungi, able to be colonized by microorganisms at a rate of up to 0.5 cm per hour. A thick biofilm is formed within 24 hours on the entire surface of these plastic devices once inoculated even with a small initial number of bacteria. The aim of the present work is to review the current literature on causes, frequency and preventive measures against infections associated with intravascular devices, catheter-related urinary tract infection, ventilator-associated infection, and infections of other implantable medical devices. Raising awareness for infection associated with implanted medical devices, teaching and training skills of staff, and establishment of surveillance systems monitoring device-related infection seem to be the principal strategies used to achieve reduction and prevention of such infections. The intelligent use

  9. Fact-finding survey of nosocomial infection control in hospitals in Vietnam and application to training programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, Hiroshi; Hung, Nguyen Viet; Thu, Truong Anh

    2009-12-01

    Nosocomial infection control is crucial for improving the quality of medical care. It is also indispensable for implementing effective control measures for severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the possible occurrence of a human influenza pandemic. The present authors, in collaboration with Vietnamese hospital staff, performed a fact-finding survey of nosocomial infection control in hospitals in northern Vietnam and compared the results with those of a survey conducted 4 years previously. Remarkable improvement was recognized in this period, although there were considerable differences between the central hospitals in Hanoi and local hospitals. In the local hospitals, basic techniques and the systems for infection control were regarded as insufficient, and it is necessary to improve these techniques and systems under the guidance of hospitals in the central area. Based on the results of the survey, programs were prepared and training courses were organized in local hospitals. Evaluation conducted after the training courses showed a high degree of satisfaction among the trainees. The results of the survey and the training courses conducted during the study period are expected to contribute to the improvement of nosocomial infection control in remote areas of Vietnam.

  10. Nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Finnish tertiary care hospital: a retrospective cohort study of 2175 episodes during the years 1999-2001 and 2005-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huttunen, Reetta; Åttman, Emilia; Aittoniemi, Janne; Outinen, Tuula; Syrjänen, Jaana; Kärki, Tommi; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2015-01-01

    Nosocomial infections are major causes of morbidity in hospitalized patients. Retrospective laboratory-based surveillance during 1999-2001 and 2005-2010 identified 2175 cases of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) in Tampere University Hospital (TAUH), Finland. Analysis revealed that 57% of BSIs were caused by a gram-positive organism, 27% by a gram-negative organism, 5% by a fungal organism, and 11% were polymicrobial. The most common cause of nosocomial BSI was coagulase-negative staphylococci (23%). Candida species caused 5% of the infections. The 7-day and 30-day case fatalities were 8% (161/2158) and 15% (313/2175), respectively, and were highest in BSIs caused by Candida albicans (22% and 44%) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17% and 25%). The median age of patients was 54 years in 1999-2001, 57 years in 2005-2007, and 60 years in 2008-2010 (p nosocomial BSI decreased during the years studied: 7-day and 30-day case fatalities were 9% and 16% during 1999-2001, 8.5% and 16% during 2005-2007, and 5% and 12% during 2008-2010, respectively (p infections predominate in nosocomial BSIs. The median age of patients with nosocomial BSI has risen during the study years. The case fatality associated with nosocomial BSI has decreased.

  11. Incidence of Nosocomial Infections in a Big University Affiliated Hospital in Shiraz, Iran: A Six-month Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askarian, Mehrdad; Mahmoudi, Hilda; Assadian, Ojan

    2013-03-01

    Nosocomial infections (NIs) are one of the most important health issues, particularly in developing countries, because these infections cause high mortality and morbidity, and economic and human resource loss as a consequence. To date, most surveillance studies have been conducted in developed countries, and only a few have been performed in Iran. All of the few Iranian studies have been performed using paper-based collection forms, and none was conducted with the aid of an electronic patient data retrieving and collecting tool. The aim of this study is to determine the incidence of NIs in a big university hospital of Shiraz, with the help of specifically programmed surveillance software merging electronically the available patient data and the infection results input manually. The study was conducted prospectively through 6 months from 21(st) March up to 22(nd) September 2006, in a 374-bedded educational hospital. All patients admitted during this period were included in the study and examined everyday for detecting four types of NIs: surgical site infection (SSI), urinary tract infection (UTI), pneumonia (PNEU), and blood stream infection (BSI). Centres for Disease Control and Prevention National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance system criteria were applied. 4013 patients were admitted in the hospital. The overall infection rate was 4.14, and UTI, SSI, BSI, and PNEU rates were 1.82, 1.22, 0.5, and 0.5, respectively, per 1000 patient days of admission. The results of this study showed that the frequency of NI in the investigated hospital was not higher than in many other reported surveillance results from other countries. This, however, might be a bias as the administration of antibiotics was very high in this study and the quality of microbiological investigation might have influenced significantly, resulting in more false-negative results than expected. Overall, the use of the Iranian National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System Software proved to be

  12. Molecular epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of Saprochaete capitata (Blastoschizomyces capitatus) isolates causing nosocomial infection in Kayseri/Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, A Nedret; Atalay, M Altay; Timur, Demet; Demir, Gonca; Kaynar, Leylagül

    2016-08-01

    Saprochaete capitata isolates have emerged as important nosocomial pathogens, among immunosuppressed or neutropenic patients, and a rare cause of nosocomial infection in the hematology-bone marrow unit (HBMU) and the intensive care unit (ICU). The purpose of this study was to molecular epidemiology and antifungal susceptibility of S. capitata (Blastoschizomyces capitatus) isolates causing nosocomial infection at Kayseri in Turkey. During a period from 2012 to 2015, a total of 20 S. capitata strains were obtained from patients hospitalized at Erciyes University Hospital. The identification of S. capitata was performed by phenotypic and biochemical methods; this was confirmed by molecular methods by DNA sequencing analysis. Genotyping of S.capitata isolates from different patients was determined to by the repetitive sequence PCR (repPCR) using the DiversiLab System (BioMerieux). More than half of the patients with S. capitata infections were hospitalized in the hematology-oncology unit (60%). The patients mainly included those using intravascular devices (90%), and receiving parenteral antibiotics (85%); the mortality rate was 55%. The microbiological investigation failed to identify S. capitata in the hospital environment. All isolates were resistant to caspofungin (>32). However, the MIC90 values for voriconazole, amphotericin B, and fluconazole against all of the isolates were 0.125, 0.25, and 1μg/ml, respectively. The S. capitata strains belonged to five clones (A-E) which were determined by the use of rep-PCR and Clone C was found to be predominant. S. capitata isolates are an important cause of nosocomial infection in the HBMU and ICUs.

  13. Detection of OXA-Type Carbapenemase Genes in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Nosocomial Infections in Isfahan Hospitals, Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Vajihe Karbasizade; Leila Heidari; Reyhaneh Jafari

    2016-01-01

    "> Background: Acinetobacter baumannii as one of the causes of nosocomial infections has becomeresistant to almost all antimicrobial agents. The emergence of resistance to carbapenems, one ofthe last drugs on the shelf, is the major concern about A. baumannii antimicrobial resistance.Resistance to carbapenems is mediated by production of class B and D carbapenemases. The aimof this study was to detect the resistance genes including blaOXA-23, 24, 51, and 58 in A. baumanniiisolates from nos...

  14. Results from the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program on Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae, 2010 to 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mataseje, Laura F.; Abdesselam, Kahina; Vachon, Julie; Mitchel, Robyn; Bryce, Elizabeth; Roscoe, Diane; Boyd, David A.; Embree, Joanne; Katz, Kevin; Kibsey, Pamela; Simor, Andrew E.; Taylor, Geoffrey; Turgeon, Nathalie; Langley, Joanne; Gravel, Denise; Amaratunga, Kanchana

    2016-01-01

    Carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) are increasing globally; here we report on the investigation of CPE in Canada over a 5-year period. Participating acute care facilities across Canada submitted carbapenem-nonsusceptible Enterobacteriaceae from 1 January 2010 to 31 December 2014 to the National Microbiology Laboratory. All CPE were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibilities, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, multilocus sequence typing, and plasmid restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and had patient data collected using a standard questionnaire. The 5-year incidence rate of CPE was 0.09 per 10,000 patient days and 0.07 per 1,000 admissions. There were a total of 261 CPE isolated from 238 patients in 58 hospitals during the study period. blaKPC-3 (64.8%) and blaNDM-1 (17.6%) represented the highest proportion of carbapenemase genes detected in Canadian isolates. Patients who had a history of medical attention during international travel accounted for 21% of CPE cases. The hospital 30-day all-cause mortality rate for the 5-year surveillance period was 17.1 per 100 CPE cases. No significant increase in the occurrence of CPE was observed from 2010 to 2014. Nosocomial transmission of CPE, as well as international health care, is driving its persistence within Canada. PMID:27600052

  15. Impact of education on knowledge, attitudes and practices among various categories of health care workers on nosocomial infections

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    Suchitra J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices among the different health care workers (HCWs on nosocomial infections. Methods : A total of 150 HCWs, doctors (n=50, nurses (n=50 and ward aides (n=50 were included. A questionnaire was administered to the HCWs to assess their knowledge, attitudes and practices on nosocomial infections. A scoring system was devised to grade those (KAP score. They were further subjected to a series of similar questionnaires at intervals of 6, 12 and 24 months after an education module. Subjects in each category of staff (n=10 were observed for compliance to hand washing practices in the ward in the post-education period. Statistical analysis was done using statistical software. Results : The study showed an increase in the number of subjects in each category scoring good and excellent in the post-education questionnaire; however this declined with the progress of time. It was observed that the compliance level to hand washing practices differed among the different HCWs. Total compliance was 63.3% and ward aides were most compliant 76.7% (adjusted Wald 95% CI= 58.80-88.48. Conclusions : Education has a positive impact on retention of knowledge, attitudes and practices in all the categories of staff. There is a need to develop a system of continuous education for all the categories of staff. In order to reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections, compliance with interventions are mandatory.

  16. Detection of OXA-Type Carbapenemase Genes in Acinetobacter baumannii Isolates from Nosocomial Infections in Isfahan Hospitals, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe Karbasizade

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available "> Background: Acinetobacter baumannii as one of the causes of nosocomial infections has becomeresistant to almost all antimicrobial agents. The emergence of resistance to carbapenems, one ofthe last drugs on the shelf, is the major concern about A. baumannii antimicrobial resistance.Resistance to carbapenems is mediated by production of class B and D carbapenemases. The aimof this study was to detect the resistance genes including blaOXA-23, 24, 51, and 58 in A. baumanniiisolates from nosocomial infections in Isfahan hospitals.Methods: A total number of 456 clinical specimens were collected from nosocomial infections andevaluated in order to isolate A. baumannii strains. After identification of the isolates, the antibioticsensitivity to carbapenems was assessed using disk diffusion method. The resistance genes of blaOXA-23, 24, 51, and 58 were detected by multiplex PCR method.Results: Fifty A. baumannii isolates were isolated from clinical specimens. Fifty two percent ofthe isolates showed phenotypic resistance to the carbapenems (imipenem and meropenem.According to PCR results, 88% of resistant isolates had ≥1 blaOXA gene. The frequency of resistantisolates bearing blaOXA-23, blaOXA-24 and blaOXA-58 were 77%, 38% and 15% respectively.Conclusions: This study showed the high frequency of carbapenem resistance genes among A.baumannii isolates. Therefore, adopting an appropriate strategy to confine the spreading of thesestrains and also implementing new treatment regimens are necessary.

  17. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolates in Nosocomial and Community-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latifpour, Mohammad; Gholipour, Abolfazl; Damavandi, Mohammad Sadegh

    2016-03-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is a family member of Enterobacteriaceae. Isolates of K. pneumoniae produce enzymes that cause decomposition of third generation cephalosporins. These enzymes are known as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL). Resistance of K. pneumoniae to beta-lactamase antibiotics is commonly mediated by beta-lactamase genes. The aim of this study was to identify the ESBL produced by K. pneumoniae isolates that cause community-acquired and nosocomial urinary tract infections within a one-year period (2013 to 2014) in Kashani and Hajar university hospitals of Shahrekord, Iran. From 2013 to 2014, 150 strains of K. pneumoniae isolate from two different populations with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were collected. The strains were then investigated by double disk synergism and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The study population of 150 patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections were divided to two groups of 75 each. We found that 48 of the K. pneumoniae isolates in the patients with nosocomial infection and 39 isolates in those with community-acquired infections produced ESBL. The prevalence of TEM1, SHV1 and VEB1 in ESBL-producing isolates in nosocomial patients was 24%, 29.3% and 10.6%, and in community-acquired patients, 17.3%, 22.7% and 8%, respectively. The prevalence of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolate is of great concern; therefore, continuous investigation seems essential to monitor ESBL-producing bacteria in patients with nosocomial and community-acquired infections.

  18. Nosocomial infections in HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The interaction between tuberculosis and HIV-infected infection is well known and is responsible for the increase in the ... in the incidence of tuberculosis (TB) ..... la-zoster infections. In: Pickering LJ, ed. Red Book: 2003 Report of the Committee on Infectious Diseases. 26th ed. Elk Grove. Village, IL: American Academy of ...

  19. Nosocomial urinary tract infections caused by extended-spectrum beta-lactamase uropathogens: Prevalence, pathogens, risk factors, and strategies for infection control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouassida, Khaireddine; Jaidane, Mehdi; Bouallegue, Olfa; Tlili, Ghassen; Naija, Habiba; Mosbah, Ali Tahar

    2016-01-01

    Our goal was to investigate the prevalence and antibiogram pattern of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production among uropathogens using isolates from urine samples collected at the Department of Urology in the Sahloul Hospital, Tunisia We also aimed to identify the risk factors for nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs) in patients who underwent transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and the measures for infection control. Laboratory records of a five-year period from January 2004 to December 2008 were submitted for retrospective analysis to determine the incidence of ESBL infections. A total of 276 isolates were collected. A case-control study involving comparisons between two groups of patients who underwent TURP was performed to determine the risk factors for ESBL infection. Group 1, designated case subjects, included 51 patients with nosocomial UTI after TURP. Group 2, designated control subjects, consisted of 58 randomly selected patients who underwent TURP without nosocomial UTI in the same period. Factors suspected to be implicated in the emergence of ESBL infection were compared between the two groups in order to identify risk factors for infection. A univariate regression analysis was performed, followed by a multivariate one. The annual prevalence of ESBL infection ranged from 1.3-2.5%. After performing univariate and multivariate regression analysis, the main risk factors for ESBL infections were identified as: use of antibiotics the year preceding the admission, duration of catheter use, and bladder washout (p=0.012, p=0.019, and pnosocomial UTIs.

  20. Risk Factors and Prognosis of Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections Caused by Extended-Spectrum-β-Lactamase-Producing Escherichia coli▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús; Picón, Encarnación; Gijón, Paloma; Hernández, José Ramón; Cisneros, Jose M.; Peña, Carmen; Almela, Manuel; Almirante, Benito; Grill, Fabio; Colomina, Javier; Molinos, Sonia; Oliver, Antonio; Fernández-Mazarrasa, Carlos; Navarro, Gemma; Coloma, Ana; López-Cerero, Lorena; Pascual, Alvaro

    2010-01-01

    Extended-spectrum-β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (ESBLEC) is an increasing cause of community and nosocomial infections worldwide. However, there is scarce clinical information about nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by these pathogens. We performed a study to investigate the risk factors for and prognosis of nosocomial BSIs due to ESBLEC in 13 Spanish hospitals. Risk factors were assessed by using a case-control-control study; 96 cases (2 to 16% of all nosocomial BSIs due to E. coli in the participating centers) were included; the most frequent ESBL was CTX-M-14 (48% of the isolates). We found CTX-M-15 in 10% of the isolates, which means that this enzyme is emerging as a cause of invasive infections in Spain. By repetitive extragenic palindromic sequence-PCR, most isolates were found to be clonally unrelated. By multivariate analysis, the risk factors for nosocomial BSIs due to ESBLEC were found to be organ transplant (odds ratio [OR] = 4.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.4 to 15.7), the previous use of oxyimino-β-lactams (OR = 6.0; 95% CI = 3.0 to 11.8), and unknown BSI source (protective; OR = 0.4; 95% CI = 0.2 to 0.9), and duration of hospital stay (OR = 1.02; 95% CI = 1.00 to 1.03). The variables independently associated with mortality were a Pitt score of >1 (OR = 3.9; 95% CI = 1.2 to 12.9), a high-risk source (OR = 5.5; 95% CI = 1.4 to 21.9), and resistance to more than three antibiotics, apart from penicillins and cephalosporins (OR = 6.5; 95% CI = 1.4 to 30.0). Inappropriate empirical therapy was not associated with mortality. We conclude that ESBLEC is an important cause of nosocomial BSIs. The previous use of oxyimino-β-lactams was the only modifiable risk factor found. Resistance to drugs other than penicillins and cephalosporins was associated with increased mortality. PMID:20181897

  1. Assessing the nosocomial infections' rate and the antibiotic resistance pattern among the patient hospitalized in beheshti hospital during 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manijeh Kadkhodaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: Nosocomial infection is associated with increased mortality, morbidity, and length of stay. Detection of infection, identify the etiology of bacterial antibiotic resistance pattern, is necessary given the widespread use of antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant organisms. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was done on 288 patients admitted to the Beheshti Hospitals in Kashan based on NNIS definitions according to the state of Health and Medical education. In this study infections and antibiotic resistance symptoms were found. Data analyses were performed with Chi-square test. Results: Among the 288 patients studied, with mean out of hospital infection was 0.80%. Most cases of infection associated were pneumonia. The highest rates of infection were in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU with 51.7%. Nosocomial infection in ICU wards was associated with increased mortality and morbidity. The most common types were ventilator-associated pneumonia. Among the microorganisms, negative Gram was seen more. The common pathogens were including Acinetobacter, Escherichia coli, and Klebsiella. Antimicrobial resistance was generally increasing and had emerged from selective pressure from antibiotic use and transmission through health staff. Conclusion: This study showed a correlation between antibiotic use and resistance of microorganisms is significant. Hence, it seems that reducing aggressive acts and conduct hygiene education and monitoring act of antibiotics is necessary to prevent antibiotic resistance.

  2. Application of highly portable MinION nanopore sequencing technology for the monitoring of nosocomial tuberculosis infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Bates

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Referral hospitals in sub-Saharan Africa concentrate large numbers of tuberculosis (TB and multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB patients, failed by community TB services. We have previously shown, from enhanced screening and through autopsy studies, a significant burden of missed TB infections at the University Teaching Hospital, Lusaka, Zambia, with many patients dying or being discharged without treatment. With minimal TB isolation facilities and minimal political will to invest in broader screening and isolation, the risk of nosocomial transmission is likely to be extremely high. Studies from other hospitals in low burden settings and in South Africa have shown that next generation sequencing (NGS is a very powerful tool for rapidly sequencing whole TB genomes and comparing them to confirm or rule out nosocomial transmission. The established platforms for NGS analysis, such as Illumina, are very expensive, immobile, and require regular maintenance, making them a costly inclusion on a research proposal or programmatic intervention grant in Africa. MinION nanopore sequencing has changed the NGS landscape with cheap portable sequencers, rapid simple library preparation (15 min, and automated real-time analysis tools. The application of highly portable MinION nanopore sequencing technology for the monitoring of nosocomial TB infection will be discussed. Preliminary data from our pediatric pneumonia study will demonstrate the detection of TB in induced sputum from children admitted to the University Teaching Hospital.

  3. Hospital-acquired influenza: a synthesis using the Outbreak Reports and Intervention Studies of Nosocomial Infection (ORION) statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voirin, N; Barret, B; Metzger, M-H; Vanhems, P

    2009-01-01

    Nosocomial influenza outbreaks occur in almost all types of hospital wards, and their consequences for patients and hospitals in terms of morbidity, mortality and costs are considerable. The source of infection is often unknown, since any patient, healthcare worker (HCW) or visitor is capable of transmitting it to susceptible persons within hospitals. Nosocomial influenza outbreak investigations should help to identify the source of infection, prevent additional cases, and increase our knowledge of disease control to face future outbreaks. However, such outbreaks are probably underdetected and underreported, making routes of transmission difficult to track and describe with precision. In addition, the absence of standardised information in the literature limits comparison between studies and better understanding of disease dynamics. In this study, reports of nosocomial influenza outbreaks are synthesised according to the ORION guidelines to highlight existing knowledge in relation to the detection of influenza cases, evidence of transmission between patients and HCWs and measures of disease incidence. Although a body of evidence has confirmed that influenza spreads within hospitals, we should improve clinical and virological confirmation and initiate active surveillance and quantitative studies to determine incidence rates in order to assess the risk to patients.

  4. [Clinical experience with tigecycline in the treatment of nosocomial infections caused by isolates exhibiting prevalent resistance mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, M J; García-Rey, C; Barberán, J; Aguilar, L

    2009-03-01

    This article reviews the clinical experience with tigecycline in the treatment of infections caused by microorganisms with prevalent resistance mechanisms among nosocomial microbiota, as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, multidrug- resistant Acinetobacter baumannii and enterobacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases. Most of articles found in the literature describe the use of tigecycline in the treatment of severe infections (sepsis and septic shock, nosocomial pneumonia and ventilator-associated pneumonia...) produced by multidrug-resistant microorganisms, in patients with multiple comorbidities (admitted in ICU, with malignancies, transplants and/or immunodepressed...) and in many occasions after failures of previous antibiotic treatments. Favourable outcomes with tigecycline are reported in most articles. However, an accurate global assessment is difficult since, in addition to the described confounding factors, there are concomitant or sequential antibiotic treatments in several communications, and lack of relevant clinical (as comorbidities), microbiological (as susceptibility) and outcome (different criteria by different authors) data in others. More even, the described series are retrospective and lack of control groups. Nevertheless the usefulness of this revision is based on the fact that in daily clinical practice the use of tigecycline will increase, since epidemiology of specific hospital medical units shows multidrug resistance among nosocomial isolates and tigecycline can be one of the scarce available compounds active against multidrug-resistant strains/clones.

  5. Rational approaches to the therapy of nosocomial infections caused by gram-positive microorganisms in cancer p

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Aginova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infections caused by gram-positive organisms, including Staphylococcus aureus and enterococci (Enterococcus faecium and Enterococcus faecalis are steadily increasing in almost all clinics around the world. Cancer patients have a higher risk of hospital-acquired infections than non-cancer patients. Cancer patients are immunosuppressed due to increased use of broad-spectrum antibiotics and chemotherapy drugs, radiation therapy, surgery and use of steroids. This paper presents an analysis of resistance of gram-positive bacterial pathogens to antimicrobial agents to determine treatment strategy for cancer patients.

  6. Comparison of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome between monomicrobial and polymicrobial Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial bloodstream infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenzel Richard P

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some studies of nosocomial bloodstream infection (nBSI have demonstrated a higher mortality for polymicrobial bacteremia when compared to monomicrobial nBSI. The purpose of this study was to compare differences in systemic inflammatory response and mortality between monomicrobial and polymicrobial nBSI with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Methods We performed a historical cohort study on 98 adults with P. aeruginosa (Pa nBSI. SIRS scores were determined 2 days prior to the first positive blood culture through 14 days afterwards. Monomicrobial (n = 77 and polymicrobial BSIs (n = 21 were compared. Results 78.6% of BSIs were caused by monomicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (MPa and 21.4% by polymicrobial P. aeruginosa infection (PPa. Median APACHE II score on the day of BSI was 22 for MPa and 23 for PPa BSIs. Septic shock occurred in 33.3% of PPa and in 39.0% of MPa (p = 0.64. Progression to septic shock was associated with death more frequently in PPa (OR 38.5, CI95 2.9–508.5 than MPa (OR 4.5, CI95 1.7–12.1. Maximal SIR (severe sepsis, septic shock or death was seen on day 0 for PPa BSI vs. day 1 for MPa. No significant difference was noted in the incidence of organ failure, 7-day or overall mortality between the two groups. Univariate analysis revealed that APACHE II score ≥20 at BSI onset, Charlson weighted comorbidity index ≥3, burn injury and respiratory, cardiovascular, renal and hematologic failure were associated with death, while age, malignant disease, diabetes mellitus, hepatic failure, gastrointestinal complications, inappropriate antimicrobial therapy, infection with imipenem resistant P. aeruginosa and polymicrobial nBSI were not. Multivariate analysis revealed that hematologic failure (p Conclusion In this historical cohort study of nBSI with P. aeruginosa, the incidence of septic shock and organ failure was high in both groups. Additionally, patients with PPa BSI were not more acutely ill, as judged by APACHE II

  7. Prevalence and Antibiogram of Microbial Agents Causing Nosocomial Urinary Tract Infection in Surgical Ward of Dhaka Medical College Hospital

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    Tashmin Afroz Binte Islam

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial infections pose substantial risk to patients receiving care in hospitals. In Bangladesh, this problem is aggravated by inadequate infection control due to poor hygiene, resource and structural constraints and lack of awareness regarding nosocomial infections. Objective: We carried out this study to determine the prevalence of different microorganisms from urine in surgery ward and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern against various antibiotics. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was carried out in Department of Microbiology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka over a period of 12 months from July 2011 to June 2012. A total of 52 urine specimens were collected from catheterized patients admitted in general surgery ward of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH and incubated in blood agar, MacConkey agar media and the isolates were identified by different biochemical tests – oxidase test and reaction in MIU (motility indole urease and Simmon’s citrate and TSI (triple sugar iron media. ESBL producers were detected by double-disk synergy test (DDST. Results: Bacteria were isolated from 35 specimens and Escherichia coli was the commonest isolate (23, 65.71% followed by Pseudomonas aeruginosa 6 (17.14%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 3 (8.57%, Acinetobacter baumannii 2 (5.72% and Proteus vulgaris 1 (2.86% respectively. Among the isolates, 10 (28.57% ESBL producers were detected and the highest ESBL production was observed in Escherichia coli (8, 22.85% followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae 1 (2.86% and Pseudomonas aeruginosa 1 (2.86%. The isolates were resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial agents. Conclusion: The emergence of multi-drug resistant (MDR bacteria poses a difficult task for physicians who have limited therapeutic options. However, the high rate of nosocomial infections and multi-resistant pathogens necessitate urgent comprehensive interventions of infection control.

  8. Epidemiologic and microbiologic evaluation of nosocomial infections associated with Candida spp in children: A multicenter study from Istanbul, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutcu, Murat; Salman, Nuran; Akturk, Hacer; Dalgıc, Nazan; Turel, Ozden; Kuzdan, Canan; Kadayifci, Eda Kepenekli; Sener, Dicle; Karbuz, Adem; Erturan, Zayre; Somer, Ayper

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish species distribution of Candida isolates from pediatric patients in Istanbul, Turkey, and to determine risk factors associated with nosocomial Candida infections. This study was conducted between June 2013 and June 2014 by participation of 7 medical centers in Istanbul. Candida spp strains isolated from the clinical specimens of pediatric patients were included. Clinical features were recorded on a standardized data collection sheet. A total of 134 systemic Candida infections were identified in 134 patients. The patients were admitted in pediatric and neonatal intensive care units (41.8% and 9.7%, respectively) and in pediatric wards (48.5%). Candida albicans was the most prevalent species (47%), followed by Candida parapsilosis (13.4%), Candida tropicalis (8.2%), Candida glabrata (4.5%), Candida lusitaniae (3.7%), Candida kefyr (2.2%), Candida guilliermondii (1.5%), Candida dubliniensis (0.7%), and Candida krusei (0.7%). Types of Candida infections were candidemia (50.7%), urinary tract infection (33.6%), surgical site infection (4.5%), central nervous system infection (3.7%), catheter infection (3.7%), and intra-abdominal infection (3.7%). In multivariate analysis, younger age (1-24 months) and detection of non-albicans Candida spp was found to be risk factors associated with candidemia (P = 0.040; odds ratio [OR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.06-15.86; and P = 0.02; OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.10-5.53, respectively). This study provides an update for the epidemiology of nosocomial Candida infections in Istanbul, which is important for the management of patients and implementation of appropriate infection control measures. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation of the antibiotic susceptibility patterns of pathogens causing nosocomial infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaman, Akgun; Kibar, Filiz; Buyukcelik, Ozlem; Tasova, Yesim; Inal, A.S.; Saltoglu, Nese; Kurtaran, Behice; Dundal, Ismail H.

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the resistance patterns of bacteria causing nosocomial infections. The outcome of this resistance was followed for 3 years. This study was carried out during 2000 to 2002 at a university hospital in Turkey. The resistance patterns of 570 bacteria (390 Gram-negative, 180 Gram-positive) against meropenem, imipenem, ceftazidime, cefotaxime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, ciprofloxacin and tobramycin were investigated using the E-test. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) production was determined using ceftazidime and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid E-test strips. Meropenem was the most effective antibiotic against Gram-negative organisms (89.0%); this was followed by imipenem (87.2%) and piperacillin/tazobactam (66.4%). The most active antibiotic against Gram-positive bacteria was imipenem (87.2%) and this was followed by piperacillin/tazobactam (81.7%) and meropenem (77.8%). The rates of production of ESBL by Escherichia coli were 20.9%, Klebsiella pneumoniae 50% and Serratia marcescens were 46.7%. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase production increased each year (21.7%, 22.1% and 45.5%). All of the ESBL producing isolates were sensitive to meropenem and 98.5% sensitive to imipenem. AmpC beta-lactamase was produced by 20.9% of the Enterobacter species spp, Citrobacter spp. and Serratia marcescens. All of these were sensitive to meropenem and 77.8% to imipenem and ciprofloxacin. Multi-drug resistance rates in Acinetobacter spp were 45.4% and 37.7% in Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates. As in the entire world, resistance to antibiotics is a serious problem in our country. Solving of this problem depends primarily on prevention of the development of resistance. (author)

  10. Risk factors and outcomes for nosocomial infection after prosthetic vascular grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fariñas, María Carmen; Campo, Ana; Duran, Raquel; Sarralde, José Aurelio; Nistal, Juan Francisco; Gutiérrez-Díez, José Francisco; Fariñas-Álvarez, Concepción

    2017-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine risk factors for nosocomial infections (NIs) and predictors of mortality in patients with prosthetic vascular grafts (PVGs). This was a prospective cohort study of all consecutive patients who underwent PVG of the abdominal aorta with or without iliac-femoral involvement and peripheral PVG from April 2008 to August 2009 at a university hospital. Patients younger than 15 years and those with severe immunodeficiency were excluded. The follow-up period was until 3 years after surgery or until death. There were 261 patients included; 230 (88.12%) were male, and the mean age was 67.57 (standard deviation, 10.82) years. The reason for operation was aortic aneurysm in 49 (18.77%) patients or lower limb arteriopathy in 212 (81.23%) patients. NIs occurred in 71 (27.20%) patients. Of these, 42 were surgical site infections (SSIs), of which 61.9% occurred in the lower extremities (14 superficial, 10 deep, and 2 PVG infections) and 38.1% in the abdomen (7 superficial, 7 deep, and 2 PVG infections); 15 were respiratory tract infections; and 15 were urinary tract infections. Active lower extremity skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) at the time of surgery was a significant predictor of NI for both types of PVG (abdominal aortic PVG: adjusted odds ratio [OR], 12.6; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-138.19; peripheral PVG: adjusted OR, 2.43; 95% CI, 1.08-5.47). Other independent predictors of NI were mechanical ventilation (adjusted OR, 55.96; 95% CI, 3.9-802.39) for abdominal aortic PVG and low hemoglobin levels on admission (adjusted OR, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.71-0.99) and emergent surgery (adjusted OR, 4.39; 95% CI, 1.51-12.74) for peripheral PVG. The in-hospital mortality rate was 1.92%. The probability of surviving the first month was 0.96, and significant predictors of mortality were active lower extremity SSTI (adjusted risk ratio [RR], 12.07; 95% CI, 1.04-154.75), high postsurgical glucose levels (adjusted RR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1

  11. [Nosocomial urinary tract and surgical site infection rates in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukuke, Hendrick Mbutshu; Kasamba, Eric; Mahuridi, Abdulu; Nlandu, Roger Ngatu; Narufumi, Suganuma; Mukengeshayi, Abel Ntambue; Malou, Vicky; Makoutode, Michel; Kaj, Françoise Malonga

    2017-01-01

    In Intertropical Africa hospitalized patients are exposed to a risk of nosocomial infections. The dearth of published data on this subject limits the descriptive analysis of the situation. This study aimed to determine the incidence, the germs responsible for these infections and the risk factors of nosocomial infections in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba, Lubumbashi, Democratic Republic of the Congo. We conducted a descriptive, longitudinal study from 1 October 2014 to 1 January 2015. Our study population consisted of 207 women who had been hospitalized in the Maternity Ward at the General Referral Hospital in Katuba. We carried out a comprehensive data collection. Nosocomial infection rate accounted for 15.5%. Parturient women who had been hospitalized for more than three days were three times more likely to develop a nosocomial infection (p=0.003), while those who had had a complicated delivery were four times more likely to be at risk of developing nosocomial infection (p = 0.000). Escherichia coli was the most isolated causative agent (38.1%), followed by Citrobacter freundi (23.8%), Acinobacter baumani (.18, 2%), Staphylococcus aureus (18.2%), Enterococcus aureus (14.3%) and Pseudomonas aeroginosa (9.1%). Ampicillin was the most prescribed antibiotic, to which isolated microbes were resistant. It is necessary to improve hospital hygiene and to conduct further study to examine the similarity between germs strains in the environment and those in biological fluids.

  12. Epidemiology and risk factors for nosocomial bloodstream infections in solid organ transplants over a 10-year period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berenger, B M; Doucette, K; Smith, S W

    2016-04-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplantation (SOT). We sought to determine the types of nosocomial BSIs and risk factors for them in SOT. Prospectively collected databases of all SOT and nosocomial BSIs occurring at our institution for a 10-year period were reviewed. From 2003-2012, we observed 157 nosocomial BSI episodes in 2257 SOTs, the majority of which were caused by staphylococci and enterococci (67.5%). The most common sources of BSI were central line, organ space, respiratory, and gastrointestinal. Kidney transplant patients had the lowest risk of acquiring a BSI compared with other SOT types. Lung transplant patients were at increased risk of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus BSI and heart transplant patients were at increased risk of a Candida albicans BSI, when compared to other organ transplant types. When coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) or C. albicans was isolated, the central line was most often the source. The implementation of central-line bundles during the study period correlated temporally with a decreased rate of CoNS BSI. Over the 10-year period, vancomycin-resistant enterococci became the most common enterococcal BSI. Donor-positive cytomegalovirus status was associated with an increased risk of BSI, when compared to donor-negative patients. This study demonstrates the common sources, risk factors, and causative organisms of BSI, which can guide empiric antibiotic choices, and highlights areas where preventative interventions could be targeted to prevent nosocomial BSI in SOT. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Early Expansion of Circulating Granulocytic Myeloid-derived Suppressor Cells Predicts Development of Nosocomial Infections in Patients with Sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhel, Fabrice; Azzaoui, Imane; Grégoire, Murielle; Pangault, Céline; Dulong, Joelle; Tadié, Jean-Marc; Gacouin, Arnaud; Camus, Christophe; Cynober, Luc; Fest, Thierry; Le Tulzo, Yves; Roussel, Mikael; Tarte, Karin

    2017-08-01

    Sepsis induces a sustained immune dysfunction responsible for poor outcome and nosocomial infections. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) described in cancer and inflammatory processes may be involved in sepsis-induced immune suppression, but their clinical impact remains poorly defined. To clarify phenotype, suppressive activity, origin, and clinical impact of MDSCs in patients with sepsis. Peripheral blood transcriptomic analysis was performed on 29 patients with sepsis and 15 healthy donors. A second cohort of 94 consecutive patients with sepsis, 11 severity-matched intensive care patients, and 67 healthy donors was prospectively enrolled for flow cytometry and functional experiments. Genes involved in MDSC suppressive functions, including S100A12, S100A9, MMP8, and ARG1, were up-regulated in the peripheral blood of patients with sepsis. CD14 pos HLA-DR low/neg monocytic (M)-MDSCs were expanded in intensive care unit patients with and without sepsis and CD14 neg CD15 pos low-density granulocytes/granulocytic (G)-MDSCs were more specifically expanded in patients with sepsis (P sepsis. G-MDSCs, made of immature and mature granulocytes expressing high levels of degranulation markers, were specifically responsible for arginase 1 activity. High initial levels of G-MDSCs, arginase 1, and S100A12 but not M-MDSCs were associated with subsequent occurrence of nosocomial infections. M-MDSCs and G-MDSCs strongly contribute to T-cell dysfunction in patients with sepsis. More specifically, G-MDSCs producing arginase 1 are associated with a higher incidence of nosocomial infections and seem to be major actors of sepsis-induced immune suppression.

  14. Nosocomial infection surveillance in a surgical intensive care unit in Spain, 1996-2000: a time-trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lizan-Garcia, Maxima; Peyro, Ramon; Cortina, Manuel; Crespo, Maria Dolores; Tobias, Aurelio

    2006-01-01

    To establish the occurrence, distribution, and secular time trend of nosocomial infections (NIs) in a surgical intensive care unit (ICU). Follow-up study in a teaching hospital in Spain. In May 1995 we established an nosocomial infection surveillance system in our surgical ICU. We collected information daily for all patients who were in the ICU for at least 48 hours (546 patients from 1996 through 2000). We used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definitions and criteria for infections. Monthly, we determined the site-specific incidence densities of NIs, the rates of medical device use, and the Poisson probability distribution, which determined whether the case count equalled the number of expected cases (the mean number of cases during the previous year, with extreme values excluded). We compared yearly and monthly infection rates by Poisson regression, using site-specific NIs as a dependent variable and year and month as dummy variables. We tested annual trends with an alternative Poisson regression model fitting a single linear trend. The average rate of catheter-associated urinary tract infections was 8.4 per 1000 catheter-days; that of ventilator-associated pneumonia, 21 per 1000 ventilator-days; and that of central line-associated bloodstream infections, 30 per 1000 central line-days. The rate of urinary tract infections did not change over the study period, but there was a trend toward decreases in the rates of central line-associated bloodstream infections and ventilator-associated pneumonia. An NI surveillance and control program contributed to a progressive decrease in NI rates.

  15. Incidence of nosocomial infections in a big university affiliated hospital in Shiraz, Iran: A six-month experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrdad Askarian

    2013-01-01

    Conclusions: The results of this study showed that the frequency of NI in the investigated hospital was not higher than in many other reported surveillance results from other countries. This, however, might be a bias as the administration of antibiotics was very high in this study and the quality of microbiological investigation might have influenced significantly, resulting in more false-negative results than expected. Overall, the use of the Iranian National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System Software proved to be useful and allowed both rapid data collection and detailed data analysis.

  16. Randomised clinical trial: a Lactobacillus GG and micronutrient-containing mixture is effective in reducing nosocomial infections in children, vs. placebo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzese, E; Fedele, M C; Bruzzese, D; Viscovo, S; Giannattasio, A; Mandato, C; Siani, P; Guarino, A

    2016-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are a major public health issue and preventative strategies using probiotics and micronutrients are being evaluated. To investigate the efficacy of a mixture of Lactobacillus GG and micronutrients in preventing nosocomial infections in children. A randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in hospitalised children. Children (6 months to 5 years of age) received Lactobacillus GG (6 × 10(9) CFU/day) together with vitamins B and C and zinc or placebo, for 15 days, starting on the first day of hospitalisation. The incidence of gastrointestinal and respiratory nosocomial infections after discharge was determined by follow-up telephone call at 7 days. After 3 months, another telephone call estimated the incidence of further infections during follow-up. Ninety children completed the follow-up. Of 19/90 children with a nosocomial infection (20%), 4/45 children (9%) were in the treatment group and 15/45 (33%) in the placebo group (P = 0.016). Specifically, 2/45 (4%) children in the treatment group vs. 11/45 (24%) children in the placebo group (P = 0.007) presented with diarrhoea. The duration of hospitalisation was significantly shorter in the treatment group (3.9 days ± 1.7 vs. 4.9 ± 1.2; P = 0.003). At the follow-up, a total of 11/45 (24.4%) children in the treatment group had at least one episode of infection compared to 22/45 (48.9%) in the placebo group (P = 0.016). A mixture containing Lactobacillus GG and micronutrients may reduce the incidence of nosocomial infections, supporting the hypothesis that this may represent a valid strategy to prevent nosocomial infections. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Nosocomial infection characteristics in a burn intensive care unit: analysis of an eleven-year active surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öncül, Oral; Öksüz, Sinan; Acar, Ali; Ülkür, Ersin; Turhan, Vedat; Uygur, Fatih; Ulçay, Asım; Erdem, Hakan; Özyurt, Mustafa; Görenek, Levent

    2014-08-01

    The objective of this study was to describe nosocomial infection (NI) rates, risk factors, etiologic agents, antibiotic susceptibility, invasive device utilization and invasive device associated infection rates in a burn intensive care unit (ICU) in Turkey. Prospective surveillance of nosocomial infections was performed according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) criteria between 2001 and 2012. The data was analyzed retrospectively. During the study period 658 burn patients were admitted to our burn ICU. 469 cases acquired 602 NI for an overall NI rate of 23.1 per 1000 patient days. 109 of all the cases (16.5%) died. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (241), Acinetobacter baumannii (186) and Staphylococcus aureus (69) were the most common identified bacteria in 547 strains. Total burn surface area, full thickness burn, older age, presence of inhalation injury were determined to be the significant risk factors for acquisition of NI. Determining the NI profile at a certain burn ICU can lead the medical staff apply the appropriate treatment regimen and limit the drug resistance. Eleven years surveillance report presented here provides a recent data about the risk factors of NI in a Turkish burn ICU. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  18. The changing pattern of antimicrobial resistance within 42,033 Escherichia coli isolates from nosocomial, community and urology patient-specific urinary tract infections, Dublin, 1999-2009.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cullen, Ivor M

    2012-04-01

    To investigate the changing pattern of antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli urinary tract infection over an eleven year period, and to determine whether E. coli antibiotic resistance rates vary depending on whether the UTI represents a nosocomial, community acquired or urology patient specific infection.

  19. The Sustained Rotavirus Vaccination Impact on Nosocomial Infection, Duration of Hospital Stay, and Age: The RotaBIS Study (2005-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standaert, Baudouin; Strens, Danielle; Li, Xiao; Schecroun, Nadia; Raes, Marc

    2016-12-01

    The benefits of rotavirus (RV) vaccination in developed countries have focused on reductions in mortality, hospitalization and medical visits, and herd protection. We investigated other aspects related to RV-induced nosocomial infection, duration of hospital stay, age shift, and sustained vaccine impact (VI) over time. RotaBIS (Rotavirus Belgian Impact Study; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01563146) annually collects retrospective data on hospitalization linked to RV testing in children up to 5 years old from 11 pediatric wards located all over Belgium. Data from 2005 to 2012 have been split in pre- (2005-2006) and post-vaccination (2007-2012) period. Information was collected on age, gender, RV test result, nosocomial infection caused by RV and duration of hospital stay. Over the 6-year period after the introduction of the RV vaccine, an 85% reduction in nosocomial infections was observed (221 in 2005 to 33 in 2012, p nosocomial infections. A pronounced age shift (+24%, p nosocomial infection to infants ≤2 months old was observed, increasing with length of post-vaccination period. VI was maintained over the follow-up (±79% VI per birth cohort). A decrease was seen depending on age, 85% (95% CI 76-91%) in the youngest to 63% (95% CI 22-92%) in the oldest age group. The higher reduction in nosocomial infection may affect the overall average duration of hospital stay for RV infection. No change in VI by birth cohort, but a reduction by age group was observed. These findings could be important for decision-makers considering the introduction of universal mass RV vaccination programs. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier, NCT01563146. GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals SA (Rixensart, Belgium).

  20. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial infection trends in Hospital universiti sains Malasia during 2002-2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Talib, Hasnain I.; Yean, Chan Y

    2010-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major nosocomial pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality in many hospitals worldwide.The aim of the present study was to assess the burden of MRSA nosocomial infection,its association with factors of interest, and its antimicrobial susceptibility.This was a retrospective analysis of a database of all s aureus that were cultured from patients admitted to the defferent wards of hospital universiti sains malasia(HUSM) over a aperiod of 6 years.The MRSA infections rate was 10.0 Per 1000 hospital admissions.The incidence density rate of MRSA infections during the study period was 1.8 per 1000 patient-days,with annual rates ranging from 0.95 to 3.47 per 1000 patients-days.Duration of hospitalization,previous antibiotic use,and bedside invasive proceures of MRSa infections were found in orthopedic wards (25.3%) followed by surgical wards (18.2%) amd omtensive care units(ICU) (16.4%).All MRSA isolates were resistant to erythromycin (98.0%),co-trimoxazole (94.0%)and gentamicin (92.0%)clindamycin was the best antibiotic with only 6% resistance.All MRSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin.The rate of the noscomial MRSA infection per 1000 admissions was higher than that in other studies.The three factors associated most signaficantly with acquired MRSA infections included duration of hospitalization,antibiotic use,and bedside invasive procedures.This study confirmed that vancomycin-resistant s aureus has not yet been established in HUSM (Author).

  1. International Conference “Urogenital Infections and Tuberculosis” in Novosibirsk, Russia, Has Opened New Perspectives in the Fight against Tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchavenya, Ekaterina; Felker, Irina; Brizhatyuk, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The first International Conference “Urogenital Infections and Tuberculosis” was held in Novosibirsk 24–26 October 2013. Three hundred and twelve delegates from 73 cities in 16 countries took part in the conference. Actual problems of urogenital tract infection (UTI) including tuberculosis (TB) as a specific infection were discussed, including: nosocomial infections in urology, various aspects of prostate biopsy, epidemiology and diagnosis of urogenital tuberculosis, gender and age related characteristics of urinary tract infections, and male infertility, etc.

  2. International Conference “Urogenital Infections and Tuberculosis” in Novosibirsk, Russia, Has Opened New Perspectives in the Fight against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterina Kulchavenya

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The first International Conference “Urogenital Infections and Tuberculosis” was held in Novosibirsk 24–26 October 2013. Three hundred and twelve delegates from 73 cities in 16 countries took part in the conference. Actual problems of urogenital tract infection (UTI including tuberculosis (TB as a specific infection were discussed, including: nosocomial infections in urology, various aspects of prostate biopsy, epidemiology and diagnosis of urogenital tuberculosis, gender and age related characteristics of urinary tract infections, and male infertility, etc.

  3. Secular trends in nosocomial infections and mortality associated with noninvasive ventilation in patients with exacerbation of COPD and pulmonary edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girou, Emmanuelle; Brun-Buisson, Christian; Taillé, Solenne; Lemaire, François; Brochard, Laurent

    2003-12-10

    Randomized controlled trials have shown that the use of noninvasive ventilation (NIV) reduces the need for endotracheal intubation and invasive mechanical ventilation and reduces complication rates and mortality in selected groups of patients. But whether these benefits translate to a clinical setting is unclear. To evaluate longitudinally the routine implementation of NIV and its effect on patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or severe cardiogenic pulmonary edema (CPE). Retrospective, observational cohort study using prospectively collected data from January 1, 1994, through December 31, 2001. A 26-bed medical intensive care unit (ICU) of a French university referral hospital. A cohort of 479 consecutive patients ventilated for acute exacerbation of COPD or CPE. The ICU mortality and incidence rates of ICU-acquired infections. A significant increase in NIV use and a concomitant decrease in mortality and ICU-acquired infection rates were observed over the study years. With adjustment for relevant covariates and propensity scores, NIV was identified as an independent factor linked with a reduced risk of death in the cohort (odds ratio [OR], 0.37; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18-0.78), whereas a high severity score on admission (OR, 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.10) and the occurrence of a nosocomial infection (OR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.62-5.84) were independently associated with death. Rates of ICU-acquired pneumonia decreased from 20% in 1994 to 8% in 2001 (P =.04). Implementing routine use of NIV in critically ill patients with acute exacerbation of COPD or severe CPE was associated with improved survival and reduction of nosocomial infections.

  4. Assessment of ultrasound equipment as a possible source of nosocomial infection in Lagos state hospitals and radio-diagnostic centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akpochafor, M.O.; Eze, C.U.; Adeneye, S.O.; Ajekigbe, A.T.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To assess the role of ultrasound equipment as a possible source of nosocomial infection in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Methods: Microbiological cultures were carried out on samples obtained from ultrasound probes, gel and couch before and after scanning period. Cultures were incubated in a culture plate (Chocolate and MacConkey agar) for 48 h at a temperature of 37 ° in order to grow microorganism, after which the culture plate was examined microscopically against a bright light in order to identify the isolated organisms based on their colonial characteristics. Results: Transabdominal ultrasound probes, transvaginal probe, ultrasound couch and ultrasound gel all were contaminated with microorganisms. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent and most common organisms found (33.8%). Other organisms such as Staphylococcus epidermidis (15.4%), Candida albicans (6.2%), aerobic spore formers (26.2%), Klebsiella pneumonia (6.2%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (3.1%), among others were also identified. Conclusion: The ultrasound equipment posed a significant risk for infection transmission. Patients who underwent ultrasonography within the period of the study had significant chances of being infected with Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis and Aerobic spore formers. - Highlights: • Ultrasound equipment has been shown to be a possible source of nosocomial infection for patient undergoing ultrasonography. • The study showed that Staphylococcus aureus was the most commonly isolated organism. • Transabdominal probe was the most commonly contaminated ultrasound equipment in the finding. • The ultrasound gel was also contaminated with organisms like S. aureus, etc. • There was a statistical significant difference between site of collection of sample and growth density of microorganisms (p = 0.03)

  5. Moisturizing body milk as a reservoir of Burkholderia cepacia: outbreak of nosocomial infection in a multidisciplinary intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Maull, Elena; Terradas, Roser; Segura, Concepción; Planells, Irene; Coll, Pere; Knobel, Hernando; Vázquez, Antonia

    2008-01-01

    An outbreak of severe nosocomial Burkholderia cepacia infections in patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU), including investigation of the reservoir, is described. Over a period of 18 days, isolates of Burkholderia cepacia were recovered from different biological samples from five patients who were admitted to a multidisciplinary 18-bed intensive care unit. Isolation of B. cepacia was associated with bacteraemia in three cases, lower respiratory tract infection in one and urinary tract infection in one. Contact isolation measures were instituted; new samples from the index patients and adjacent patients were collected; and samples of antiseptics, eau de Cologne and moisturizing body milk available in treatment carts at that time were collected and cultured. B. cepacia was isolated from three samples of the moisturizing body milk that had been applied to the patients. Three new hermetically closed units, from three different batches, were sent for culture; two of these were positive as well. All strains recovered from environmental and biological samples were identified as belonging to the same clone by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. The cream was withdrawn from all hospitalization units and no new cases of B. cepacia infection developed. Moisturizing body milk is a potential source of infection. In severely ill patients, the presence of bacteria in cosmetic products, even within accepted limits, may lead to severe life-threatening infections.

  6. [Distribution and drug resistance of pathogenic bacteria strains in nosocomial infection in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center from 2006 to 2007].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yue-Li; Zhao, Qing-Yu

    2009-05-01

    Tumor patients have an increased risk of nosocomial infection due to hypoimmunity. Infection may affect antitumor therapies and even lead to death. This study aimed to investigate the susceptible factors, the distribution and drug resistance of the pathogens from tumor patients who suffered from nosocomial infection. Clinical records of 952 infected patients in Cancer Center of Sun Yat-sen University during 2006-2007 were reviewed. The infection rate, pathogen spectum and drug resistance of nosocomial infection were analyzed with EXCEL8.0 and SPSS10.0 software. Among the 952 patients, pathogens were detected in 794 patients, with a rate of 83.4%. Of the 794 patients, 321 (40.4%) had gram-negative bacilli (GNB) infection (mainly caused by Escherichia coli), 265 (33.4%) had fungi infection (mainly caused by Candida albicans), and 208 (26.2%) had gram-positive cocci (GPC) infection (mainly caused by staphylococcus and streptococcus species). According to drug sensitivity and resistance test, GNB were sensitive to imipenem and amikacin, but strongly resistant to ampicillin with a rate of >90%; GPC were sensitive to vancomycin, but highly resistant against ampicillin; the fungi were sensitive to amphotericin B, voriconazole and flucytosine, but less sensitive to fluconazol. GNB comprises the majority of pathogens separated from the hospitalized tumor patients in Cancer Center of Sun Yat-sen University from 2006 to 2007. Rational use of antibiotics based on drug sensitivity test could reduce fungi infection and drug resistance, therefore, help to prevent and control nosocomial infection effectively.

  7. The outcome and timing of death of 17,767 nosocomial bloodstream infections in acute care hospitals in Finland during 1999-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontula, Keiju S K; Skogberg, Kirsi; Ollgren, Jukka; Järvinen, Asko; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2018-02-17

    Few studies covering all patient groups and specialties are available regarding the outcome of nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSI). We analyzed the role of patient characteristics and causative pathogens of nosocomial BSIs reported by the hospitals participating in national surveillance in Finland during 1999-2014, in terms of outcome, with particular interest in those leading to death within 2 days (i.e. early death). National nosocomial BSI surveillance was laboratory-based and hospital-wide. Data on nosocomial BSIs was collected by infection control nurses, and dates of death were obtained from the national population registry with linkage to national identity codes. A total of 17,767 nosocomial BSIs were identified; 557 BSIs (3%) were fatal within 2 days and 1150 (6%) within 1 week. The 1-month case fatality was 14% (2460 BSIs), and 23% of the deaths occurred within 2 days and 47% within 1 week. The patients who died early were older than those who survived > 28 days, and their BSIs were more often related to intensive care. Gram-positive bacteria caused over half of the BSIs of patients who survived, whereas gram-negative bacteria, especially Pseudomonas aeruginosa, caused more often BSIs of patients who died early, and fungi BSIs of patients who died within 1 week. A significant portion of patients with nosocomial BSIs died early, which underlines the importance of rapid recognition of BSI. Hospital-wide surveillance data of causative pathogens can be utilized when composing recommendations for empiric antimicrobial treatment in collaboration with clinicians, as well as when promoting infection prevention.

  8. Nosocomial Mycobacterium bovis-bacille Calmette-Guérin infections due to contamination of chemotherapeutics: case finding and route of transmission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vos, Margreet C.; de Haas, Petra E. W.; Verbrugh, Henri A.; Renders, Nicole H. M.; Hartwig, Nico G.; de Man, Peter; Kolk, Arend H. J.; van Deutekom, Henk; Yntema, J. L.; Vulto, Arnold G.; Messemaker, Marja; van Soolingen, Dick

    2003-01-01

    We studied nosocomial infections due to Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) Onco-TICE bacteria, transmitted by contamination of medication prepared in BCG Onco-TICE-contaminated hoods in the pharmacy, in 5 immunocompromised patients at 3 hospitals. The BCG strains cultured from the

  9. Nosocomial bloodstream infections caused by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to third-generation cephalosporins, Finland, 1999-2013: Trends, patient characteristics and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelius, Timi; Jalava, Jari; Kärki, Tommi; Möttönen, Teemu; Ollgren, Jukka; Lyytikäinen, Outi

    2016-01-01

    Few systematically collected multi-centre surveillance data on nosocomial bloodstream infections (BSI) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae have been published. To evaluate trends, patient characteristics and mortality of such infections, nosocomial BSI data reported by the 4-17 hospitals participating in the prospective laboratory-based surveillance during 1999-2013 were analysed. Data were collected by local infection control nurses, patient-days were obtained from the hospital's administrative database, and dates of deaths from the population registry. Resistance to third-generation cephalosporins was further examined in the national reference laboratory. A total of 16 028 nosocomial BSIs were identified; 2217 (14%) were caused by E. coli and 661 (4%) by K. pneumoniae; 207 (7%) were non-susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins, with an increasing trend from 0% in 1999 to 17% in 2013. Patient characteristics did not differ significantly between BSIs caused by third-generation susceptible and resistant E. coli and K. pneumonia, but the case fatality tended to be higher. Most (88%) of the isolates reported as non-susceptible to third-generation cephalosporins had ESBL phenotype, CTX-M (79%) being the most common enzyme. A sharp increase in nosocomial BSIs caused by ESBL producing bacteria was observed. Identification of patients for screening pose a challenge, emphasising the role of infection control guidelines and antibiotic policy in prevention.

  10. Nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum identified by MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 from a blood culture of a septic patient

    OpenAIRE

    Warnke, Philipp; K?ller, Thomas; Stoll, Paul; Podbielski, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum isolated from a blood culture of a 75-year-old septic male patient. Matrix-assisted laser desorption?ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Vitek 2 succeeded in identification of the isolate.

  11. International Conference “Urogenital Infections and Tuberculosis” in Novosibirsk, Russia, Has Opened New Perspectives in the Fight against Tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Ekaterina Kulchavenya; Irina Felker; Elena Brizhatyuk

    2014-01-01

    The first International Conference ?Urogenital Infections and Tuberculosis? was held in Novosibirsk 24?26 October 2013. Three hundred and twelve delegates from 73 cities in 16 countries took part in the conference. Actual problems of urogenital tract infection (UTI) including tuberculosis (TB) as a specific infection were discussed, including: nosocomial infections in urology, various aspects of prostate biopsy, epidemiology and diagnosis of urogenital tuberculosis, gender and age related cha...

  12. Nosocomial and community infections due to class A extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBLA-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. in southern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Wollheim

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence of class A extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp., and to investigate clonality among ESBL-producing isolates of nosocomial and community infections. METHODS: The study involved 354 nosocomial infections samples and 992 community infections samples, obtained between 2003 and 2006 at Caxias do Sul, RS. The detection of ESBL was performed by the disk-diffusion test. Presence of blaCTX-M, blaSHV and blaTEM β-lactamase genes was evaluated by PCR, and genomic typing was determined by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. RESULTS: Higher frequency of ESBL-producing isolates were detected among nosocomial samples of E. coli (6.7% and Klebsiella (43.7%, than those obtained from community infections (0.4% and 2.6%. blaTEM and blaCTX were the most prevalent ESBL gene families in both E. coli and Klebsiella isolates. Different pulsotypes were obtained among ESBL-producing E. coli and 11 clones for Klebsiella spp., which occurred over the years and in different hospital wards. Among ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, 74.3% transferred ESBL genes by conjugation and exhibited concomitant decreased aminoglycosides susceptibility. CONCLUSION: ESBL-producing E. coli, and especially K. pneumoniae are essentially a nosocomial problem, and their dissemination to the community is relatively limited. The great genetic variability observed among ESBL-producing bacteria indicates polyclonal spread and high transference of ESBL genes between bacteria in the hospital environment. This information is of paramount importance for nosocomial infection control.

  13. Relationships between the importation, transmission, and nosocomial infections of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: an observational study of 112 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Makoto; Ying, Jian; Huttner, Benedikt; Evans, Martin; Maw, Matthew; Nielson, Christopher; Rubin, Michael A; Greene, Tom; Samore, Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    The study of hospital methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) epidemiology is complicated by its transmissibility. Our objective was to understand how MRSA importation and transmission influence MRSA nosocomial infections in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers (VAMCs). We performed hospital-level analyses of acute-care MRSA admission prevalence, acquisition rates, and incident nosocomial clinical culture (INCC) rates, each a surrogate measure of importation, transmission, and nosocomial infection, respectively. We studied 112 VAMCs from October 2007 through September 2010, after the start of a bundled intervention including active surveillance for MRSA. We analyzed data using generalized linear mixed models. A total of 2.9 million surveillance tests were collected from 1.4 million patient admissions. Overall MRSA admission prevalence was 11.4%, acquisition was 5.2 per 1000 patient-days at risk, and INCC was 1.8 per 1000 patient-days at risk. A 10% increase in a hospital's average admission prevalence was associated with a 9.7% increase in its weekly acquisition rates (P transmission contributed to lower rates of nosocomial MRSA infection.

  14. Infecção hospitalar e mortalidade Infección hospitalar y mortalidad Nosocomial infection and mortality

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    Ruth Natalia Teresa Turrini

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Realizou-se estudo retrospectivo do registro de 69 óbitos ocorridos em hospital pediátrico em 1993 para identificar a relação da infecção hospitalar com o óbito. As principais infecções diagnosticadas foram as pneumonias e infecções de corrente sangüínea com um predomínio de bactérias gram-negativas. Em 30,4% das crianças, a infecção hospitalar foi causa direta do óbito e em 50,8% foi contribuinte. A infecção hospitalar foi mais importante como causa de óbito nos pacientes com afecção classificada como não fatal à admissão.Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo de registro de 69 óbitos ocurridos en un hospital pediátrico, en 1993, para identificar la relación de la infección hospitalar con el óbito. Las principales infecciones diagnosticadas fueron pneumonias e infecciones de la corriente sanguínea con predominio de bacterias gram-negativas. En 30.4% de los niños, la infección hospitalar fue la causa directa del óbito y en 50.8% fue contribuyente. La infeción hospitalar fue más importante como causa de óbito en los pacientes com afección clasificada como no fatal a la admisión.A retrospective study with 69 deaths ocurred at a pediatric hospital in 1993 was undertaken to identify the relationship of nosocomial infection with death. Pneumonia and bloodstream infection were the main site of infection: A higher prevalence of gram-negative bacteria was also observed. The hospital infection was causally related to death in 30,4% and contributed to death in 50,8% of children. The nosocomial infection was causally related to death more frequently in patients classified as having a non fatal disease at admission.

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Presepsin As a Marker of Nosocomial Infections of the Central Nervous System: A Prospective Observational Study

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    Sergey A. Abudeev

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundNosocomial CNS infection (NI-CNS is a common and serious complication in neurocritical care patients. Timely, accurate diagnosis of NI-CNS is crucial, yet current infection markers lack specificity and/or sensitivity. Presepsin (PSP is a novel biomarker of macrophage activation. Its utility in NI-CNS has not been explored. We first determined the normal range of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF PSP in a control group without brain injury before collecting data on CSF PSP levels in neurocritical care patients. Samples were analyzed in four groups defined by systemic and neurological infection status.ResultsCSF PSP levels in 15 control patients without neurological injury were 50–100 pg/ml. Ninety-seven CSF samples were collected from 21 neurocritical care patients. In patients without NI-CNS or systemic infection, CSF PSP was 340.4 ± 201.1 pg/ml. Isolated NI-CNS was associated with CSF PSP levels of 640.8 ± 235.5 pg/ml, while levels in systemic infection without NI-CNS were 580.1 ± 329.7 pg/ml. Patients with both NI-CNS and systemic infection had CSF PSP levels of 1,047.7 ± 166.2 pg/ml. In neurocritical care patients without systemic infection, a cut-off value of 321 pg/ml gives sensitivity and specificity for NI-CNS of 100 and 58.3%, respectively.ConclusionCSF PSP may prove useful in diagnosing NI-CNS, but its current utility is as an additional marker only.

  16. Catheter-related urinary nosocomial infections in intensive care units: An epidemiologic study in North of Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezai, Mohammad Sadegh; Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Nikkhah, Attieh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in developing countries. The aim of this study was to investigate the incidence of nosocomial catheter- associated UTI and its related factors in hospitalized patients in intensive care units of hospitals affiliated to Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, in 2014. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on patients who were admitted in hospitals and urinary catheterization was performed for them. Beds of intensive care units were followed-up for the occurrence of catheter-associated UTI for 14 months. Data were analyzed using SPSS Version 16. Results: Our results showed that of the 1409 patients (11648 catheter - days), the incidence of catheter-related UTI was 18.2% (among 256 individuals) equals to 21.987 per 1,000 catheter - days. E. coli was the most important cause of UTI. The results show that the history of the underlying disease, duration of catheterization and perineal washing were significantly associated with the incidence of UTIs. Conclusion: The findings of this study show a high incidence of UTIs caused by catheters in ICU. The incidence of this infection increased hospital length of stay and hospital cost. It seems that the necessary use of urinary catheters and its reduced duration use can be effective in decreasing this incidence. PMID:28702145

  17. Risk of nosocomial respiratory syncytial virus infection and effectiveness of control measures to prevent transmission events: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Clare E; McKenzie, Bruce C; Coope, Caroline; Rajanaidu, Subhadra; Paranthaman, Karthik; Pebody, Richard; Nguyen-Van-Tam, Jonathan S; Higgins, Julian P T; Beck, Charles R

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) causes a significant public health burden, and outbreaks among vulnerable patients in hospital settings are of particular concern. We reviewed published and unpublished literature from hospital settings to assess: (i) nosocomial RSV transmission risk (attack rate) during outbreaks, (ii) effectiveness of infection control measures. We searched the following databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, together with key websites, journals and grey literature, to end of 2012. Risk of bias was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias tool or Newcastle-Ottawa scale. A narrative synthesis was conducted. Forty studies were included (19 addressing research question one, 21 addressing question two). RSV transmission risk varied by hospital setting; 6-56% (median: 28·5%) in neonatal/paediatric settings (n = 14), 6-12% (median: 7%) in adult haematology and transplant units (n = 3), and 30-32% in other adult settings (n = 2). For question two, most studies (n = 13) employed multi-component interventions (e.g. cohort nursing, personal protective equipment (PPE), isolation), and these were largely reported to be effective in reducing nosocomial transmission. Four studies examined staff PPE; eye protection appeared more effective than gowns and masks. One study reported on RSV prophylaxis for patients (RSV-Ig/palivizumab); there was no statistical evidence of effectiveness although the sample size was small. Overall, risk of bias for included studies tended to be high. We conclude that RSV transmission risk varies widely during hospital outbreaks. Although multi-component control strategies appear broadly successful, further research is required to disaggregate the effectiveness of individual components including the potential role of palivizumab prophylaxis. © 2016 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. N-CDAD in Canada: Results of the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program 1997 N-CDAD Prevalence Surveillance Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Meaghen; Ofner-Agostini, Marianna; Miller, Mark; Paton, Shirley; Gourdeau, Marie; Ishak, Magued

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A 1996 preproject survey among Canadian Hospital Epidemiology Committee (CHEC) sites revealed variations in the prevention, detection, management and surveillance of Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (CDAD). Facilities wanted to establish national rates of nosocomially acquired CDAD (N-CDAD) to understand the impact of control or prevention measures, and the burden of N-CDAD on health care resources. The CHEC, in collaboration with the Laboratory Centre for Disease Control (Health Canada) and under the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program, undertook a prevalence surveillance project among selected hospitals throughout Canada. OBJECTIVE: To establish national prevalence rates of N-CDAD. METHODS: For six weeks in 1997, selected CHEC sites tested all diarrheal stools from inpatients for either C difficile toxin or C difficile bacteria with evidence of toxin production. Questionnaires were completed for patients with positive stool assays who met the case definitions. RESULTS: Nineteen health care facilities in eight provinces participated in the project. The overall prevalence of N-CDAD was 13.0% (95% CI 9.5% to 16.5%). The mean number of N-CDAD cases were 66.3 cases/100,000 patient days (95% CI 37.5 to 95.1) and 5.9 cases/1000 patient admissions (95% CI 3.4 to 8.4). N-CDAD was found most frequently in older patients and those who had been hospitalized for longer than two weeks in medical or surgical wards. CONCLUSIONS: This national prevalence surveillance project, which established N-CDAD rates, is useful as 'benchmark' data for Canadian health care facilities, and in understanding the patterns and impact of N-CDAD. PMID:18159321

  19. Prospective evaluation of a multi-factorial prevention strategy on the impact of nosocomial infection in very-low-birthweight infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, C; Hart, J; Vemgal, P; Harrison, C

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the impact of a multi-factorial intervention on nosocomial infection in very-low-birthweight infants. Consecutive infants with a birth weight less than 1500 g, born between February 2002 and February 2003, were included in this prospective study. The first six-month period (control) included surveillance of current practice. The intervention began in the seventh month and included: (i) changes to handwashing solutions with hand hygiene education; (ii) standardization of intravascular device (IV) insertion with specialized packs; (iii) changes to skin antiseptic solutions (2% aqueous chlorhexidine and 1% chlorhexidine in ethanol); and (iv) mandatory removal or replacement of peripheral IV after 48 hours and removal once enteral intake was > 120 mL/kg/day. Demographic data and details of every device were collected prospectively. Bloodstream infections (BSIs), length of stay (LOS), length of ventilation (LOV) and death were recorded and the rate of nosocomial BSI was calculated. Overall, 174 newborns required 1359 devices. The two cohorts were similar for birth weight and gestation. There was a reduction in nosocomial BSIs from 21% to 9% (control vs. intervention) (P = 0.05, confidence intervals 0.19-1.0). There was no significant difference in LOS, LOV, or mortality. Four infants had complications from 2% chlorhexidine. In conclusion, implementation of the multi-factorial prevention strategy reduced nosocomial BSIs. Alternative antiseptic solutions are needed to reduce the complications caused by 2% aqueous chlorhexidine.

  20. Five-year decreased incidence of surgical site infections following gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement surgery through active surveillance by the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H J; Adiyani, L; Sung, J; Choi, J Y; Kim, H B; Kim, Y K; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, Sang-Oh; Han, S H; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H M; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Yoo, J D; Koo, H-S; Cho, E H; Lee, K W

    2016-08-01

    Surveillance of healthcare-associated infection has been associated with a reduction in surgical site infection (SSI). To evaluate the Korean Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (KONIS) in order to assess its effects on SSI since it was introduced. SSI data after gastrectomy, total hip arthroplasty (THA), and total knee arthroplasty (TKA) between 2008 and 2012 were analysed. The pooled incidence of SSI was calculated for each year; the same analyses were also conducted from hospitals that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years. Standardized SSI rates for each year were calculated by adjusting for SSI risk factors. SSI trends were analysed using the Cochran-Armitage test. The SSI rate following gastrectomy was 3.12% (522/16,918). There was a significant trend of decreased crude SSI rates over five years. This trend was also evident in analysis of hospitals that had participated for more than three years. The SSI rate for THA was 2.05% (157/7656), which decreased significantly from 2008 to 2012. The risk factors for SSI after THA included the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance risk index, trauma, reoperation, and age (60-69 years). The SSI rate for TKA was 1.90% (152/7648), which also decreased significantly during a period of five years. However, the risk-adjusted analysis of SSI did not show a significant decrease for all surgical procedures. The SSI incidence of gastrectomy and prosthetic joint replacement declined over five years as a result of active surveillance by KONIS. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A prediction tool for nosocomial multi-drug Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli infections in critically ill patients - prospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Anupama; Mukhopadhyay, Amartya; Li, Jialiang; Yuen, Eugene Goh Yu; Tambyah, Paul Ananth

    2014-11-25

    The widespread use of empiric broad spectrum antibiotics has contributed to the global increase of Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli (RGNB) infections in intensive care units (ICU). The aim of this study was to develop a tool to predict nosocomial RGNB infections among ICU patients for targeted therapy. We conducted a prospective observational study from August'07 to December'11. All adult patients who were admitted and stayed for more than 24 hours at the medical and surgical ICU's were included. All patients who developed nosocomial RGNB infections 48 hours after ICU admission were identified. A prediction score was formulated by using independent risk factors obtained from logistic regression analysis. This was prospectively validated with a subsequent cohort of patients admitted to the ICUs during the following time period of January-September 2012. Seventy-six patients with nosocomial RGNB Infection (31bacteremia) were compared with 1398 patients with Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome (SIRS) without any gram negative bacterial infection/colonization admitted to the ICUs during the study period. The following independent risk factors were obtained by a multivariable logistic regression analysis - prior isolation of Gram negative organism (coeff: 1.1, 95% CI 0.5-1.7); Surgery during current admission (coeff: 0.69, 95% CI 0.2-1.2); prior Dialysis with end stage renal disease (coeff: 0.7, 95% CI 0.1-1.1); prior use of Carbapenems (coeff: 1.3, 95% CI 0.3-2.3) and Stay in the ICU for more than 5 days (coeff: 2.4, 95% CI 1.6-3.2). It was validated prospectively in a subsequent cohort (n = 408) and the area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the GSDCS score for predicting nosocomial ICU acquired RGNB infection and bacteremia was 0.77 (95% CI 0.68-0.89 and 0.78 (95% CI 0.69-0.89) respectively. The GSDCS (0-4.3) score clearly differentiated the low (0-1.3), medium (1.4-2.3) and high (2.4-4.3) risk patients, both for RGNB infection (p:0.003) and bacteremia (p:0

  2. Trends in the incidence rate of device-associated infections in intensive care units after the establishment of the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J Y; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, S-O; Kim, H B; Han, S H; Choi, H J; Kim, Y K; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Eun, B W; Kim, D W; Koo, H-S; Bae, G-R; Lee, K

    2015-09-01

    The effectiveness of continuous nationwide surveillance on healthcare-associated infections should be investigated in each country. To assess the rate of device-associated infections (DAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) since the establishment of the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS). Nationwide data were obtained on the incidence rate of DAI in ICUs reported to KONIS by all participating hospitals. The three major DAIs were studied: ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), central line-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI), and catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). The pooled and year-wise incidence rates (cases per 1000 device-days) of these DAIs were determined for the period 2006 and 2012. In addition, data from institutions that had participated in KONIS for at least three consecutive years were analysed separately. The number of ICUs participating in KONIS gradually increased from 76 in 2006 to 162 in 2012. Between 2006 and 2012, the incidence rate per 1000 device-days for VAP decreased significantly from 3.48 to 1.64 (F = 11, P Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Infecciones nosocomiales: tendencias seculares de un programa de control en México Nosocomial infections: Secular trends of a control program in Mexico

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    Samuel Ponce de León

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Determinar la frecuencia de infecciones nosocomiales en el Instituto Nacional de la Nutrición Salvador Zubirán (INNSZ desde la instauración del programa de vigilancia hasta la actualidad y conocer su impacto en estancia hospitalaria y mortalidad. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo, retrospectivo y retrolectivo en un hospital de referencia de tercer nivel de atención. Se obtuvieron las frecuencias, el tipo y la distribución de infecciones nosocomiales de la base de datos del Departamento de Epidemiología Hospitalaria entre 1991 y 1996. Se determinó en cada paciente el grado de gravedad de su enfermedad mediante la escala de McCabe-Jackson, así como la edad promedio y el tiempo de estancia hospitaria. Se aplicó la prueba de ji² para tendencias de los diferentes parámetros evaluados. El estudio se dividió en tres etapas: prerremodelación (1991-1993, remodelación (1994-1995 y posremodelación (1996. Se compararon los periodos prerremodelación contra posremodelación. RESULTADOS. Durante este periodo (1991-1996 la tasa de infecciones nosocomiales fue de 8.6 por 100 egresos en promedio, con una disminución de 20% en su frecuencia a lo largo del mismo (pOBJECTIVE. To know the trend of nosocomial infections rates at a third level hospital since the begining of the infection control program until the present and to evaluate the impact in mortality and length of hospital stay. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A study descriptive, retrospective and retrolective was done in a reference hospital providing tertiary care in Mexico City. Recorded data included rates, type of nosocomial infections and distribution of nosocomial infections from the database of Hospital Epidemiology Division between 1991 to 1996. In every patient the degree of severity disease was evaluated according to the McCabe-Jackson's scale, we also collected age and the length of stay. Statistical analysis was done with chi² test for tendencies of

  4. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: the ENIRRIs project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pascale, Gennaro; Ranzani, Otavio T.; Nseir, Saad; Chastre, Jean; Welte, Tobias; Antonelli, Massimo; Navalesi, Paolo; Garofalo, Eugenio; Bruni, Andrea; Coelho, Luis Miguel; Skoczynski, Szymon; Longhini, Federico; Taccone, Fabio Silvio; Grimaldi, David; Salzer, Helmut J. F.; Lange, Christoph; Froes, Filipe; Artigas, Antoni; Díaz, Emili; Vallés, Jordi; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Panigada, Mauro; Comellini, Vittoria; Fasano, Luca; Soave, Paolo M.; Spinazzola, Giorgia; Luyt, Charles-Edouard; Alvarez-Lerma, Francisco; Marin, Judith; Masclans, Joan Ramon; Chiumello, Davide; Pezzi, Angelo; Schultz, Marcus; Mohamed, Hafiz; van der Eerden, Menno; Hoek, Roger A. S.; Gommers, D. A. M. P. J.; Di Pasquale, Marta; Civljak, Rok; Kutleša, Marko; Bassetti, Matteo; Dimopoulos, George; Nava, Stefano; Rios, Fernando; Zampieri, Fernando G.; Povoa, Pedro; Bos, Lieuwe D.; Aliberti, Stefano; Torres, Antoni; Martín-Loeches, Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    The clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU) patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs), supported by

  5. Intensive care unit patients with lower respiratory tract nosocomial infections: The ENIRRIs project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Pascale, G. (Gennaro); Ranzani, O.T. (Otavio T.); Nseir, S. (Saad); Chastre, J. (Jean); Welte, T. (Tobias); Antonelli, M. (Massimo); P. Navalesi; Garofalo, E. (Eugenio); Bruni, A. (Andrea); Coelho, L.M. (Luis Miguel); S. Skoczyński (Szymon); Longhini, F. (Federico); F.S. Taccone (Fabio); Grimaldi, D. (David); Salzer, H.J.F. (Helmut J. F.); Lange, C. (Christoph); Froes, F. (Filipe); A. Artigas (Antonio); Díaz, E. (Emili); Vallés, J. (Jordi); A.H. Rodriguez; Panigada, M. (Mauro); Comellini, V. (Vittoria); Fasano, L. (Luca); Soave, P.M. (Paolo M.); Spinazzola, G. (Giorgia); Luyt, C.-E. (Charles-Edouard); Alvarez-Lerma, F. (Francisco); Marin, J. (Judith); Masclans, J.R. (Joan Ramon); Chiumello, D. (Davide); A. Pezzi (Angelo); M.J. Schultz (Marcus); Mohamed, H. (Hafiz); M. van der Eerden (Menno); Hoek, R.A.S. (Roger A. S.); D.A.M.P.J. Gommers (Diederik); di Pasquale, M. (Marta); Civljak, R. (Rok); Kutleša, M. (Marko); M. Bassetti (Matteo); Dimopoulos, G. (George); Nava, S. (Stefano); Rios, F. (Fernando); Zampieri, F.G. (Fernando G.); Povoa, P. (Pedro); Bos, L.D. (Lieuwe D.); S. Aliberti (Stefano); A. Torres; I. Martin-Loeches

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe clinical course of intensive care unit (ICU) patients may be complicated by a large spectrum of lower respiratory tract infections (LRTI), defined by specific epidemiological, clinical and microbiological aspects. A European network for ICU-related respiratory infections (ENIRRIs),

  6. An investigation of radiographers' mobile phone use and the success of an awareness campaign at reducing the nosocomial infection risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crofton, C C; Foley, S J

    2018-02-01

    Mobile phone use by healthcare workers (HCWs) is widespread. Studies have shown that HCW's mobile phones can harbour pathogens associated with nosocomial infections. This study investigated whether an awareness campaign will result in an improvement in radiographers' phone and hand hygiene practices. Radiographers working in the general department of two university hospitals were invited to participate. One hospital was assigned as the experiment hospital and the other as a control. In the experiment hospital, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) testing of each participant's mobile phone determined the cleanliness of its surface. A corresponding survey was completed to determine their current practices and level of awareness. Subsequently, an infection control poster campaign took place for a one-month period, followed by re-testing. In the control hospital, the ATP testing and survey were also completed before and after a one-month period, but without a poster campaign. Radiographers were generally unaware of the infection risks associated with mobile phone use with 44% of all participants never cleaning their phone. The campaign successfully improved phone hygiene frequency and method in the experiment hospital. However, it did not improve hand hygiene practices and actual phone cleanliness (mean ATP count reductions of 10% (experiment hospital) and 20% (control)). The ATP testing as a less direct form of intervention showed similar levels of success in comparison to the poster campaign. A multifaceted educational approach is likely to be most effective in raising awareness and changing radiographers' phone and hand hygiene practices. Copyright © 2017 The College of Radiographers. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Implementation of tuberculosis infection control measures in designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China: are we doing enough to prevent nosocomial tuberculosis infections?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bin; Liu, Min; Gu, Hua; Wang, Xiaomeng; Qiu, Wei; Shen, Jian; Jiang, Jianmin

    2016-03-03

    Tuberculosis (TB) infection control measures are very important to prevent nosocomial transmission and protect healthcare workers (HCWs) in hospitals. The TB infection control situation in TB treatment institutions in southeastern China has not been studied previously. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the implementation of TB infection control measures in TB-designated hospitals in Zhejiang Province, China. Cross-sectional survey using observation and interviews. All TB-designated hospitals (n=88) in Zhejiang Province, China in 2014. Managerial, administrative, environmental and personal infection control measures were assessed using descriptive analyses and univariate logistic regression analysis. The TB-designated hospitals treated a median of 3030 outpatients (IQR 764-7094) and 279 patients with confirmed TB (IQR 154-459) annually, and 160 patients with TB (IQR 79-426) were hospitalised in the TB wards. Most infection control measures were performed by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including regular monitoring of TB infection control in high-risk areas (49%), shortening the wait times (42%), and providing a separate waiting area for patients with suspected TB (46%) were sometimes neglected. N95 respirators were available in 85 (97%) hospitals, although only 44 (50%) hospitals checked that they fit. Hospitals with more TB staff and higher admission rates of patients with TB were more likely to set a dedicated sputum collection area and to conduct annual respirator fit testing. TB infection control measures were generally implemented by the TB-designated hospitals. Measures including separation of suspected patients, regular monitoring of infection control practices, and regular fit testing of respirators should be strengthened. Infection measures for sputum collection and respirator fit testing should be improved in hospitals with lower admission rates of patients with TB. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to

  8. Nosocomial infections and resistance pattern of common bacterial isolates in an intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital in Nigeria: A 4-year review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliyasu, Garba; Daiyab, Farouq Muhammad; Tiamiyu, Abdulwasiu Bolaji; Abubakar, Salisu; Habib, Zaiyad Garba; Sarki, Adamu Muhammad; Habib, Abdulrazaq Garba

    2016-08-01

    Infection is a major determinant of clinical outcome among patients in the intensive care unit. However, these data are lacking in most developing countries; hence, we set out to describe the profile of nosocomial infection in one of the major tertiary hospitals in northern Nigeria. Case records of patients who were admitted into the intensive care unit over a 4-year period were retrospectively reviewed. A preformed questionnaire was administered, and data on clinical and microbiological profile of patients with documented infection were obtained. Eighty-our episodes of nosocomial infections were identified in 76 patients. Road traffic accident (29/76, 38.2%) was the leading cause of admission. The most common infections were skin and soft tissue infections (30/84, 35.7%) followed by urinary tract infection (23/84, 27.4%). The most frequent isolates were Staphylococcus aureus (35/84, 41.7%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (18/84, 21.4%), and Escherichia coli (13/84, 15.5%). High rate of resistance to cloxacillin (19/35, 54.3%) and cotrimoxazole (17/26, 65.4%) was noted among the S aureus isolates. All the Enterobacteriaceae isolates were susceptible to meropenem, whereas resistance rate to ceftriaxone was high (E coli, 55.6%; K pneumoniae, 71.4%; Proteus spp, 50%). Infection control practice and measures to curtail the emergence of antimicrobial resistance need to be improved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Social marketing: applying commercial strategies to the prevention of nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sax, Hugo; Longtin, Yves; Alvarez-Ceyssat, Raymonde; Bonfillon, Chantal; Cavallero, Sabrina; Dayer, Pierre; Ginet, Claude; Herrault, Pascale

    2009-04-01

    Although a large proportion of healthcare-associated infections are avoidable, healthcare workers do not always practice evidence-based preventive strategies. Marketing technologies might help to improve patient safety. This article presents the basic principles of marketing and its potential use to promote good infection control practices. The marketing mix (Product, Price, Place, and Promotion) should be taken into account to induce behaviour change. By placing the emphasis on the perceived "profits" for healthcare workers the approach might lose its moral aspect and gain in effectiveness. VigiGerme, a non-commercial registered trademark, applies social marketing techniques to infection control and prevention.

  10. Hospital costs associated with nosocomial infections in a pediatric intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Áurea Morillo-García

    2015-07-01

    Conclusions: NI was associated with an increase in total cost, which implies that the prevention of these infections through specific interventions could be cost-effective and would help to increase the safety of healthcare systems.

  11. Statistical inference and modelling for nosocomial infections and the incorporation of whole genome sequence data

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    Worby, Colin J.

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs) remain a problem worldwide, and can cause severe illness and death. The increasing level of antibiotic resistance among bacteria that cause HCAIs limits infection treatment options, and is a major concern. Statistical modelling is a vital tool in developing an understanding of HCAI transmission dynamics. In this thesis, stochastic epidemic models are developed and used with the aim of investigating methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) tra...

  12. Nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients in the burn unit of Hospital Universitario San José, Popayán - Colombia

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    Yeni Arroyave

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To determine the prevalence and microbiological behavior of the infections in hospitalized patients in the burn unit of the University Hospital San José ( HUSJ at Popayan, Colombia, 2010-2011. Methods: A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted in patients admitted to the burn unit of HUSJ between the years 2010–2011. Patients were characterized sociodemographic and clinically. The prevalence of nosocomial infections was estimated. Frequency and antibiotic resistance of microorganisms isolated was described. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 15. Results. 113 patients was enrolled, the average age was 17.7 years and male gender predominated (55.8%. Hot liquids (64.6% were the principal cause, the average of body surface area burned was 11.3% and the average hospital stay was 19.8 days. 13.3% of the patients had some nosocomial infection. The most frequently diagnosed infections were sepsis (24%, urinary tract infection (20% and pneumonia (20%. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent bacteria (41.7% followed by Staphylococcus epidermidis, mostly meticilino-resistant. The mean length of hospital stay and burned surface area (BSA in patients with diagnosis of infection was 36.6 days and 17.3% respectively. Conclusions. The prevalence of infection is similar to that reported in Colombia. The resistance of the isolates was high. The meticilinoresistance of Staphylococcus was associated with clindamicina resistance.

  13. Weather parameters and nosocomial bloodstream infection: a case-referent study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldeira, Silvia Maria; da Cunha, Antonio Ribeiro; Akazawa, Renata Tamie; Moreira, Rayana Gonçalves; de Souza, Lenice do Rosário; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate if temperature and humidity influenced the etiology of bloodstream infections in a hospital from 2005 to 2010. METHODS The study had a case-referent design. Individual cases of bloodstream infections caused by specific groups or pathogens were compared with several references. In the first analysis, average temperature and humidity values for the seven days preceding collection of blood cultures were compared with an overall “seven-days moving average” for the study period. The second analysis included only patients with bloodstream infections. Several logistic regression models were used to compare different pathogens and groups with respect to the immediate weather parameters, adjusting for demographics, time, and unit of admission. RESULTS Higher temperatures and humidity were related to the recovery of bacteria as a whole (versus fungi) and of gram-negative bacilli. In the multivariable models, temperature was positively associated with the recovery of gram-negative bacilli (OR = 1.14; 95%CI 1.10;1.19) or Acinetobacter baumannii (OR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.16;1.37), even after adjustment for demographic and admission data. An inverse association was identified for humidity. CONCLUSIONS The study documented the impact of temperature and humidity on the incidence and etiology of bloodstream infections. The results correspond with those from ecological studies, indicating a higher incidence of gram-negative bacilli during warm seasons. These findings should guide policies directed at preventing and controlling healthcare-associated infections. PMID:25830871

  14. Infecção hospitalar em uma unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal do Sul do Brasil Nosocomial infections in a neonatal intensive care unit in South Brazil

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    Karla Dal-Bó

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Descrever a incidência e a epidemiologia da infecção hospitalar em recém-nascidos internados em unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal de um hospital no sul de Santa Catarina. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo de coorte prospectivo durante 1 ano, com 239 neonatos que permaneceram internados após 48 horas da admissão. Os critérios utilizados para diagnóstico de infecção estiveram de acordo com os preconizados pelo Center for Disease Control and Prevention e pela Agência Nacional de Vigilância Sanitária. RESULTADOS: A incidência de infecção hospitalar foi de 45,8%, sendo a infecção primária na corrente sanguínea o principal motivo de internação (80,7%, seguida da pneumonia (6,7%. O Staphylococcus coagulase negativo foi o agente mais encontrado nas hemoculturas e como colonizante na unidade estudada. A prematuridade foi o motivo de internação prevalente. A taxa de mortalidade geral foi de 12,1%, e a mortalidade por infecção nosocomial foi de 33,8%. CONCLUSÕES : A incidência de infecção nosocomial na unidade estudada está acima da reportada por outros estudos nacionais, sendo a infecção primária na corrente sanguínea e a pneumonia os principais sítios de infecção hospitalar.OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the incidence and epidemiology of nosocomial infection in newborns who were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit in a hospital in south Santa Catarina, Brazil. METHODS: A prospective cohort study was conducted for 1 year among 239 neonates who remained as in-patients 48 hours after admission. The criteria that were used to diagnose infection were in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Health Surveillance Agency. RESULTS: The incidence of nosocomial infection was 45.8%. The primary reasons for admission were primary bloodstream infection (80.7% and pneumonia (6.7%. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most commonly identified agent

  15. Klebocin typing of Klebsiella species isolated from nosocomial infection in intensive care unit.

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    Pal R

    1997-10-01

    Full Text Available Klebocin typing and antibiotic resistance have been studied for 518 strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae, [106 from intensive care unit (ICU sites, 182 from ICU staff flora, 192 from patient flora and 38 from clinical specimens]. The overall typability was 71.62%. The most common mnemonic types among various sources were 111, 211, and 112. Of the total strains tested, 28.37% strains were found to be untypable. These strains are labelled as "444". When klebocin typing was used in association with antibiogram, in 86.84% cases of clinical infection probable source of infection could be detected. Thus a combination of two typing methods poses a significant contribution in epidemiological studies.

  16. [Five steps to decreasing nosocomial infections in large immature premature infants: A quasi-experimental study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García González, Ana; Leante Castellanos, José Luis; Fuentes Gutiérrez, Carmen; Lloreda García, José María; Fernández Fructuoso, José Ramón; Gómez Santos, Elisabet; García González, Verónica

    2017-07-01

    An evaluation is made of the impact of a series of five interventions on the incidence of hospital-related infections in a level iii neonatal unit. Quasi-experimental, pre-post intervention study, which included preterm infants weighing 1,500g at birth or delivered at <32 weeks gestation, admitted in the 12 months before and after the measures were implemented (January 2014). The measures consisted of: optimising hand washing, following a protocol for insertion and handling of central intravenous catheters, encouraging breastfeeding; applying a protocol for rational antibiotic use, and establishing a surveillance system for multi-resistant bacteria. The primary endpoint was to assess the incidence of hospital-acquired infections before and after implementing the interventions. Thirty-three matched patients were included in each period. There was an incidence of 8.7 and 2.7 hospital-related infections/1,000 hospital stay days in the pre- and post-intervention periods, respectively (P<.05). Additionally, patients in the treatment group showed a statistically-significant decrease in days on mechanical ventilation, use of blood products, and vasoactive drugs. The strategy, based on implementing five specific measures in a unit with a high rate of hospital-related infections, proved effective in reducing their incidence. This reduction could contribute to lowering the use of mechanical ventilation, blood products, and vasoactive drugs. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Nosocomial blood stream infection in intensive care units at Assiut University Hospitals (Upper Egypt with special reference to extended spectrum β-lactamase producing organisms

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    Mahmoud Mohammed A

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim This study investigated the nosocomial blood stream infection (BSI in the adult ICUs in Assiut university hospitals to evaluate the rate of infection in different ICUs, causative microorganisms, antimicrobial resistance, outcome of infection, risk factors, prevalence of extended spectrum B-lactamase producing organisms and molecular typing of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains to highlight the role of environment as a potential source of nosocomial BSI. Methods This study was conducted over a period of 12 months from January 2006 to December 2006. All Patients admitted to the different adult ICUs were monitored daily by attending physicians for subsequent development of nosocomial BSI. Blood cultures were collected from suspected patients to detect the causative organisms. After antimicrobial susceptibility testing, detection of ESBLs was conducted among gram negative isolates. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates were tested by PCR to determine the most common group of B-lactamase genes responsible for resistance. Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates from infected patients and those isolated from the environment were typed by RAPD technique to investigate the role of environment in transmission of infection. Results The study included 2095 patients who were admitted to different ICUs at Assiut University Hospitals from January 2006 to December 2006. Blood samples were collected from infected patients for blood cultures. The colonies were identified and antibiotic sensitivities were performed. This study showed that the rate of nosocomial BSI was 75 per 1000 ICU admissions with the highest percentages in Trauma ICU (17%. Out of 159 patients with primary bloodstream infection, 61 patients died representing a crude mortality rate of 38%. Analysis of the organisms causing BSI showed that Gram positive organisms were reported in 69.1% (n = 121; MRSA was the most prevalent (18.9%, followed by methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococci (16

  18. The step from a voluntary to a mandatory national nosocomial infection surveillance system: the influence on infection rates and surveillance effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The German national nosocomial infection surveillance system, KISS, has a component for very low birth weight (VLBW) infants (called NEO-KISS) which changed from a system with voluntary participation and confidential data feedback to a system with mandatory participation and confidential feedback. Methods In order to compare voluntary and mandatory surveillance data, two groups were defined by the surveillance start date. Neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) parameters and infection rates of the NICUs in both groups were compared. In order to analyze the surveillance effect on primary bloodstream infection rates (BSI), all VLBW infants within the first three years of participation in both groups were considered. The adjusted effect measures for the year of participation were calculated. Results An increase from 49 NICUs participating in 2005 to 152 in 2006 was observed after the introduction of mandatory participation. A total of 4280 VLBW infants was included in this analysis. Healthcare-associated incidence densities rates were similar in both groups. Using multivariate analysis with the endpoint primary BSI rate and comparing the first and third year of participation lead to an adjusted incidence rate ratio (IRR) of 0.78 (CI95 0.66-0.93) for old (voluntary) and 0.81 (CI95 0.68-0.97) for new (mandatory) participants. Conclusions The step from a voluntary to a mandatory HCAI surveillance system alone may lead to substantial improvements on a countrywide scale. PMID:22958509

  19. Antibiotic consumption to detect epidemics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in a burn centre: A paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Anne; Voirol, Pierre; Krähenbühl, Marie; Bonnemain, Claire-Lise; Fournier, Camille; Pantet, Olivier; Pagani, Jean-Luc; Revelly, Jean-Pierre; Dupuis-Lozeron, Elise; Sadeghipour, Farshid; Pannatier, André; Eggimann, Philippe; Que, Yok-Ai

    2016-05-01

    The control of antibiotic resistance and nosocomial infections are major challenges for specialized burn centres. Early detection of those epidemic outbreaks is crucial to limit the human and financial burden. We hypothesize that data collected by antibiotic consumption medico-economic surveys could be used as warning signal to detect early nosocomial outbreaks. A retrospective analysis was conducted that included all burn patients staying >48h on the Lausanne BICU (Burn Intensive Care Unit) between January 2001 and October 2012 who received systemic therapeutic antibiotics. Infection episodes were characterized according to predefined criteria. Antibiotic consumption data, obtained from the quarterly surveillance of drug consumption surveys, were translated into defined daily doses (DDDs). In total, 297 out of 414 burn patients stayed >48h, giving a total of 7458 'burn-days'. We identified 610 infection episodes (burn wound [32.0%], respiratory [31.1%], and catheter [21.8%]), from 774 microorganisms. Pseudomonas aeruginosa (26.2%), Staphylococcus aureus (11.5%), and Candida albicans (7.0%) were the main pathogens. We observed three distinct outbreaks of P. aeruginosa infections in 2002-2003, 2006, and 2009-2011. These outbreaks correlated with an increase in the DDDs of anti-Pseudomonas antibiotics. Our data support a paradigm shift in the epidemiological surveillance of nosocomial P. aeruginosa epidemics in burn centres, using the rise in antibiotic consumption as an early trigger to initiate the molecular typing of P. aeruginosa strains and the reinforcement of standard infection control procedures. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Vigilancia de infecciones nosocomiales en un hospital de cardiología Nosocomial infections surveillance in a cardiology and thoracic diseases hospital

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    Julio D. Molina-Gamboa

    1999-01-01

    vigilancia eficaz que elimine al mínimo las fluctuaciones en la captación de los casos durante el periodo vacacional del personal del equipo de control de infecciones, ya que el subregistro de los casos puede traer como consecuencia la pérdida de control sobre las infecciones hospitalarias y la aparición de brotes epidémicos.OBJECTIVES. To describe a nosocomial infection surveillance in a cardiology and thoracic diseases hospital in Northern Mexico during its initial months of activity. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Restrospective report of nosocomial infection surveillance performed by the infection control team with patient visits, clinical records, microbiology reports, and direct information obtained by health personnel. General and specific infection rates were analized by the chi² test and the Student t test. RESULTS. General infection rate was 4.99 during the 17 month period. Monthly infection rates changed significantly during infection control team vacations. By site of infection, surgical wound infection were the most common (1.14, followed by urinary tract infections (1.08, and bacteremia (0.72. However, when we grouped bacteremias and other cateter related infections, this intravascular access related infections were the most frequent (1.73. Gram positive organisms were most commonly isolated in nosocomial infections, except in pneumonias (gram negative organism and urinary tract infections (Candida spp.. Mortality related to nosocomial infection was high (21.7%, and at least one third of those deaths was directly related to the infection. In hospital stay and cost were also increase with nosocomial infections. CONCLUSIONS. Nosocomial infection is common in interventional cardiology hospitals, producing high mortality and rising costs and length of stay. We need a more efective nosocomial infections surveillance system to eliminate changes in monthly case detection produced by the infection control team vacations, since this underregistry could result in lost of

  1. Emergence of Community-Genotype Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus in Korean Hospitals: Clinical Characteristics of Nosocomial Infections by Community-Genotype Strain

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    Kim, So Hyun; Baek, Jin Yang; Lee, Nam Yong; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Kang, Cheol-In; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2017-01-01

    Background As community-genotype methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains spread into hospitals, the genotypes of the MRSA strains causing hospital-acquired (HA) infections have become more diverse. We describe clinical characteristics of nosocomial MRSA infections by a community-genotype of sequence type (ST) 72. Materials and Methods A case-control study was designed among patients with HA-MRSA infections. Forty patients with infections caused by ST72-MRSA SCCmec type IV were selected as cases. Cases were matched to the controls with 106 patients infected with ST5/ST239 MRSA, which are representative hospital genotypes in Korea. Results Patients infected with ST72 isolates were younger than those with ST5/ST239 isolates. Female gender predominated among ST72 MRSA group compared to ST5/ST239 MRSA group. Solid tumor was a more frequent underlying disease in MRSA infections by ST72 isolates, whereas underlying renal, lung, heart, and neurologic diseases were more frequently found in those by ST5/ST239 isolates. The most common type of infection was pneumonia in both ST72 and ST5/ST239 groups (45.0% vs. 51.9%), followed by skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI). Female gender and underlying solid tumor were identified to be independent predictors for MRSA infections by ST72 isolates. All-cause mortality rates (20.0% vs. 30.2%) were not different between the groups. Conclusion A community-genotype MRSA, ST72 isolate has emerged as a nosocomial pathogen presenting as hospital-acquired pneumonia and SSTI. Although differences in underlying disorders were found, the distribution of infection type and mortality rate did not differ between the groups. PMID:28608660

  2. Genetic Analysis of Integrons among Methicillin-resistant and Susceptible Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

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    Somayyeh Moatti

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Integrons are mobile genetic elements that play an important role in dissemination of antibiotic resistance genes. The aim of present study is to determine the antibiotic resistance profile, frequency of integrons genes (class 1, 2, 3 and compare it between MRSA and MSSA isolates from clinical infections. Materials and Methods: 50 MRSA and 50 MSSA isolates from March to September 2015 were isolated from infection site of hospitalized patients referred to Valiasr hospital Arak, Iran were subjected to this study. All isolates were tested for susceptibility to antibiotics using disk diffusion method. Then, the mecA gene was studied to validate resistance. The frequency of integrons (class 1, 2, 3 and the variable region genes like qacE 1 and sul1 in isolates were determined by PCR method. Results: The highest antibiotic resistances rate in isolates was found for clindamycin. All of the isolates were susceptibel to vancomycin. 80% of MRSA and 40% of the MSSA isolates carried class 1 integrons, whereas class 2 integron were found in 12 % and 4% of MRSA and MSSA isolates, respectively. Also, all isolates that were class 1 integron gene positive contain qacE 1 and sul1 genes. Class 3 integrons were not found. Conclusion: The high frequency of class 1 integron in MRSA and MSSA isolates associated with high rate of antibiotic resistance indicating that may be integrons play an important role facilitating the spread of antimicrobial resistance in this region. Clinical doctors and infection control committee should take this issue seriously.

  3. Trends in the distribution and antimicrobial susceptibility of causative pathogens of device-associated infection in Korean intensive care units from 2006 to 2013: results from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J Y; Kwak, Y G; Yoo, H; Lee, S-O; Kim, H B; Han, S H; Choi, H J; Kim, H Y; Kim, S R; Kim, T H; Lee, H; Chun, H K; Kim, J-S; Eun, B W; Kim, D W; Koo, H-S; Cho, E-H; Lee, K

    2016-04-01

    For all countries, information on pathogens causing healthcare-associated infections is important in order to develop proper strategies for preventing and treating nosocomial infections. To assess the change in frequencies and antimicrobial resistance of pathogens causing device-associated infections (DAIs) in intensive care units (ICUs) in South Korea between July 2006 and June 2014. Data from the Korean Nosocomial Infections Surveillance System (KONIS) were analysed, including three major DAI types in ICUs. The frequency of Gram-negative bacteria gradually increased for central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) and ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) (from 24.6% to 32.6% and from 52.8% to 73.5%, respectively). By contrast, the frequency of Gram-positive bacteria decreased from 58.6% to 49.2% for CLABSI, and from 44.3% to 23.8% for VAP (P infection. The meticillin resistance rate in S. aureus decreased from 95% to 90.2% (P nosocomial pathogens for CLABSI and VAP has increased. The prevalence of A. baumannii causing DAIs in Korean ICUs has increased rapidly, as has the rate of carbapenem resistance in these bacteria. Copyright © 2016 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A Fatal Case of Multidrug Resistant Acinetobacter Necrotizing Fasciitis: The Changing Scary Face of Nosocomial Infection

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    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Necrotizing fasciitis is an uncommon soft-tissue infection, associated with high morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and treatment are crucial for survival. Acinetobacter baumannii is rarely associated with necrotizing fasciitis. Wound infections due to A. baumannii have been described in association with severe trauma in soldiers. There are only sporadic reports of monomicrobial A. baumannii necrotizing fasciitis. We report a unique case of monomicrobial necrotizing fasciitis caused by multidrug resistant (MDR A. baumannii, in absence of any preceding trauma, surgery, or any obvious breech in the continuity of skin or mucosa. A 48-year-old woman with history of HIV, asthma, hypertension, and tobacco and excocaine use presented with acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. She was treated for pneumonia for 7 days and was successfully extubated. All septic work-up was negative. Two days later, she developed rapidly spreading nonblanching edema with bleb formation at the lateral aspect of right thigh. Emergent extensive debridement and fasciotomy were performed. Operative findings and histopathology were consistent with necrotizing fasciitis. Despite extensive debridement, she succumbed to septic shock in the next few hours. Blood, wound, and tissue cultures grew A. baumannii, sensitive only to amikacin and polymyxin. Histopathology was consistent with necrotizing fasciitis.

  5. Novel use of antimicrobial hand sanitizer in treatment of nosocomial acinetobacter infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Meghan; Watson, Luke R; Torress-Cook, Alfonso; Watson, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Colonization of wounds with multidrug-resistant organisms is a difficult orthopedic problem. Acinetobacter infections are especially difficult because they are resistant to all currently available antibiotics. We present the use of a novel skin sanitizer, Stay Byotrol Clean (Byotrol Inc, Spartanburg, South Carolina), to treat a multidrug-resistant wound infection. A 31-year-old T10 paraplegic man presented with chronic bilateral stage IV decubitus trochanteric ulcers. Cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus. The ulcers were initially treated with irrigation and debridement and vancomycin, levaquin, and cefepime. After 4 months of aggressive treatment, the cultures continued to be positive for Escherichia coli and Acinetobacter baumannii. The patient was started on amikacin and tigecycline. Despite 1 additional month of aggressive wound care, debridements, and intravenous antibiotics, the cultures continued to grow A baumannii and Pseudomonas aerug. The A baumannii was resistant to all available antibiotics tested. The ulcers were then treated with daily application of Stay Byotrol Clean hand and skin sanitizer. Four days later, cultures were negative for any bacterial growth, with no A baumannii. After 1 week, the ulcers showed new granulation tissue with no visible necrotic tissue. After 3 months of treatment, the ulcers had healed. Stay Byotrol Clean is nonirritating and contains no iodine or alcohol. It is currently being used for decolonization of patients on admission to the hospital, however, there is great potential for its use in wound treatment, preoperative surgical sterilization, and orthopedic devices.

  6. The potential role of stethoscopes as a source of nosocomial infection

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    Neetu Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Infectious diseases can be transmitted in various ways . Indirect transmission or vehicle-borne transmission of infection can occur through various agents like instruments, utensils, water, or food. In hospital settings, transmission of infection through contaminated medical devices is always a possibility. Stethoscope is the symbol of health professionals. However, the diaphragm and bells of the stethoscopes have been shown to harbor pathogenic and nonpathogenic microorganisms. Aims: 1 To determine the degree of contamination of stethoscopes used by clinicians and nurses. 2 To identify various microbes from such contaminated stethoscopes and to assess their role as potential pathogens. 3 To determine the effectiveness of 70% ethanol as a disinfecting agent. Materials and Methods: Stethoscopes of 50 healthcare workers from different departments were included in the study. Bacteriological cultures of the samples were done on blood agar and MacConkey agar plates. Organisms were identified by conventional phenotypic methods. Antibiotic sensitivity test (ABST of the microorganisms was performed by Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. Results: Average number of colonies on each stethoscope was 30 . Pathogenic microorganisms including Staphylococcus aureus, Acinetobacter species, Citrobacter species, Pseudomonas stutzeri, Bacillus species, and Aspergillus fumigatus were identified. Among the potential pathogenic organisms, coagulase-negative staphylococci were isolated. Numbers of colonies were highest among the stethoscopes sampled from surgery ward and Medical Intensive Care Unit MICU. Conclusion: Stethoscopes harbor potential pathogens capable of surviving on their surfaces. Despite their best intentions, health professionals can act as a vector for transmission of disease. Disinfecting procedures may be necessary between consecutive patients. Attention to simple preventive strategies can reduce the disease transmission rate.

  7. [Characteristic situation on prevention of nosocomial infection in the hospital for the severely multi-disabled--experiences in care and treatment of 4 kinds of viral hepatitis].

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    Machida, Y; Tanaka, H; Yano, Y; Yano, T; Yoshida, K

    1997-12-01

    We experienced Hepatitis A, B, C and fulminant hepatitis due to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in our hospital for the severely multi-disabled (SMD) who had both severe motor and intellectual disabilities, and some of whom might be further complicated by blindness and/or deafness. In this hospital, 100 SMDs are hospitalized. Case 1: The disabled, 25 year old male, was transmitted Hepatitis A from a nurse. Case 2: The disabled, 60 year old female carrier of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) who has been cared for more than 10 years. Case 3: The disabled, 46 year old male carrier of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) (RNA type 3), has been cared for more than 4 years. Case 4: The disabled, 39 year old male, had a fever of 39 degrees C for 9 days and suddenly died. He was diagnosed as fulminant hepatitis due to HSV-1 by necropsy. The hospitals for SMD are characteristic in prevention of nosocomial infections; 1) The disabled infected is not aware of the fact that he or she is the source of infection and that the other disabled living with him or her are in risk of infection, because of their severe mental condition. 2) All of the disabled need complete or incomplete helps for activities of daily life (ADL), so that the disabled who is the carrier of some pathogen constantly gives risk of infection to staffs, including medical staffs (doctor, nurse and therapist), psychologist and helpers by bloody secretion from wounds, saliva, urine, feces as well as menstrual blood. 3) If a carrier of some pathogen is hospitalized, the staffs should serve under risk of infection involving blood-mediated infectious disease for many years, because SMDs are permitted lifelong stay in the hospitals for SMD, which also play a role of care house or institution, by public expense in Japan. In case of an outbreak of Hepatitis A, nosocomial infection ended in the original case (a nurse), another nurse and a case of the disabled by general treatment and care against communicable diseases of the digestive

  8. Antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria causing nosocomial urinary tract infections in an Iranian referral teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Rasool; Ehsanpoor, Mohsen; Khorvash, Farzin; Shokri, Dariush

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Gram-negative bacilli are the most important cause of nosocomial urinary tract infections (UTIs). The production of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzymes is a common mechanism of resistance among these bacteria. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of ESBL producing Gram-negative bacteria causing nosocomial UTI in a referral hospital as well as their susceptibility pattern to the most commonly used antibiotics. Methods: In a prospective cross-sectional study performed over a 6-month period, urinary specimens obtained from hospitalized patients with documented culture-proved nosocomial UTI (age range of 1-87 years). Isolated aerobic Gram-negative bacteria underwent further microbiologic tests for detection of ESBL, as well as antimicrobial susceptibility test using Kirby-Bauer (disk diffusion) and E-test methods. Findings: During the study period, 213 urine samples were detected to have growth of Gram-negative organism. Escherichia coli was the most frequently isolated organism (61%). ESBL was detected in 102 isolates including 38.5% of E. coli, 39.5% of Klebsiella pneumonia, 88.5% of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 100% of Acinetobacter baumannii strains. Imipenem and meropenem were the most effective antibiotics on E. coli and K. pneumoniae strains. P. aeruginosa and A. baumannii strains showed high resistance to all tested antibiotics. Conclusion: Large numbers of Gram-negative bacteria causing nosocomial UTIs produce ESBL with most being multidrug-resistant. Therefore, routine ESBL detection testing and subsequent antibiogram with disk diffusion method could be useful to determine the best treatment options for UTI. PMID:24991629

  9. Incidencia de la infección nosocomial en cirugía general: Hospital «Joaquín Albarrán» (2002 a 2008 Nosocomial infection incidence in general surgery: "Joaquín Albarrán" Hospital (2002-2008

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    Humberto Guanche Garcell

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. La infección constituye una de las complicaciones más temidas de los procedimientos quirúrgicos y continúan siendo un problema frecuente en los servicios sanitarios. No obstante, no existen reportes sobre las tendencias de las tasas de incidencia de infecciones nosocomiales en Cuba. El objetivo de este estudio fue describir la incidencia de las infecciones nosocomiales en el Servicio de Cirugía General del Hospital Clinicoquirúrgico «Joaquín Albarrán», en el período de 2002 a 2008. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio descriptivo de análisis de series temporales. Se calculó la tasa de incidencia acumulada de infección nosocomial y la tasa de incidencia acumulada de infección del sitio quirúrgico, en ambos casos con sus respectivos intervalos de confianza al 95 %. Se determinó la proporción de infecciones según localización. RESULTADOS. En 10714 pacientes egresados se realizaron 8752 intervenciones quirúrgicas. Se diagnosticaron 642 pacientes con infección nosocomial (6 % [IC 95 % 5,55; 6,45], 479 de ellos con infección del sitio quirúrgico (5,5 % [IC 95 % 5,02; 5,98]; en ambos casos con ligera tendencia al decremento en el período. Las infecciones del sitio quirúrgico constituyeron la infección nosocomial más frecuente (70,4 % de los pacientes, seguida de las infecciones del torrente sanguíneo (21,9 %. CONCLUSIONES. Se observa una tendencia a disminuir la incidencia de infección nosocomial y de la infección del sitio quirúrgico en los pacientes del servicio de cirugía general. Dicha tendencia puede incrementarse mediante la modificación de las estrategias de vigilancia y la consolidación de las prácticas de prevención de las infecciones nosocomiales.INTRODUCTION: The infection is one of the more fearsome complications of surgical procedures and remains a frequent problem in health services. However, there are not reports on the trends of incidence rates of nosocomial infections in Cuba. The aim of

  10. Are healthcare workers' mobile phones a potential source of nosocomial infections? Review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulger, Fatma; Dilek, Ahmet; Esen, Saban; Sunbul, Mustafa; Leblebicioglu, Hakan

    2015-10-29

    Mobile communication devices help accelerate in-hospital flow of medical information, information sharing and querying, and contribute to communications in the event of emergencies through their application and access to wireless media technology. Healthcare-associated infections remain a leading and high-cost problem of global health systems despite improvements in modern therapies. The objective of this article was to review different studies on the relationship between mobile phones (MPs) and bacterial cross-contamination and report common findings. Thirty-nine studies published between 2005 and 2013 were reviewed. Of these, 19 (48.7%) identified coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS), and 26 (66.7%) identified Staphylococcus aureus; frequency of growth varied. The use of MPs by healthcare workers increases the risk of repetitive cyclic contamination between the hands and face (e.g., nose, ears, and lips), and differences in personal hygiene and behaviors can further contribute to the risks. MPs are rarely cleaned after handling. They may transmit microorganisms, including multiple resistant strains, after contact with patients, and can be a source of bacterial cross-contamination. To prevent bacterial contamination of MPs, hand-washing guidelines must be followed and technical standards for prevention strategies should be developed.

  11. Nosocomial outbreak of serious canine infectious tracheobronchitis (kennel cough) caused by canine herpesvirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Kazuo; Ogawa, Hiroyuki; Maeda, Ken; Imai, Ayako; Ohashi, Emi; Matsunaga, Satoru; Tohya, Yukinobu; Ohshima, Takahisa; Mochizuki, Masami

    2010-04-01

    Canine herpesvirus (CHV; Canid herpesvirus 1) is principally a perinatal pathogen of pregnant bitches and newborn pups and secondarily a respiratory tract pathogen of older pups and dogs. Infectious disease of the canine respiratory tract frequently occurs among dogs in groups, in which it is called " infectious tracheobronchitis" (ITB). Mortality from ITB is generally negligible, and the clinical importance of CHV as an ITB pathogen is considered to be low. The present report describes a novel ITB outbreak accompanied by death among aged dogs in an animal medical center. Most inpatient dogs had received medications that could induce immunosuppression. CHV was the only pathogen identified, and several CHV isolates were recovered in cell culture. No other viral pathogens or significant bacterial pathogens were found. Molecular and serological analyses revealed that the causative CHV isolates were from a single source but that none was a peculiar strain when the strains were compared with previous CHV strains. The virus had presumably spread among the dogs predisposed to infection in the center. The present results serve as a warning to canine clinics that, under the specific set of circumstances described, such serious CHV outbreaks may be expected wherever canine ITB occurs.

  12. Nosocomial infections by Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase producing enterobacteria in a teaching hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seibert, Gabriela; Hörner, Rosmari; Meneghetti, Bettina Holzschuh; Righi, Roselene Alves; Forno, Nara Lucia Frasson Dal; Salla, Adenilde

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze the profile of patients with microorganisms resistant to carbapenems, and the prevalence of the enzyme Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase in interobacteriaceae. Methods Retrospective descriptive study. From the isolation in bacteriological tests ordered by clinicians, we described the clinical and epidemiological characteristics of patients with enterobacteria resistants to carbapenems at a university hospital, between March and October 2013. Results We included 47 isolated patients in this study, all exhibiting resistance to carbapenems, including 9 patients who were confirmed as infected/colonized with K. pneumoniae carbapenemase. Isolation in tracheal aspirates (12; 25.5%) predominated. The resistance to ertapenem, meropenem, and imipenem was 91.5%, 83.0% and 80.0%, respectively. Aminoglycosides was the class of antimicrobials that showed the highest sensitivity, 91.5% being sensitive to amikacin and 57.4% to gentamicin. Conclusion The K. pneumoniae carbapenemase was an important agent in graun isotaling in hospital intection. The limited therapeutic options emphasize the need for rapid laboratory detection, as well as the implementation of measures to prevent and control the spread of these pathogens. PMID:25295446

  13. Resistance Markers and Genetic Diversity in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Recovered from Nosocomial Bloodstream Infections

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    Hanoch S. I. Martins

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, phenotypic and genotypic methods were used to detect metallo-β-lactamases, cephalosporinases and oxacillinases and to assess genetic diversity among 64 multiresistant Acinetobacter baumannii strains recovered from blood cultures in five different hospitals in Brazil from December 2008 to June 2009. High rates of resistance to imipenem (93.75% and polymyxin B (39.06% were observed using the disk diffusion (DD method and by determining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC. Using the disk approximation method, thirty-nine strains (60.9% were phenotypically positive for class D enzymes, and 51 strains (79.6% were positive for cephalosporinase (AmpC. Using the E-test, 60 strains (93.75% were positive for metallo-β-lactamases (MβLs. All strains were positive for at least one of the 10 studied genes; 59 (92.1% contained blaVIM-1, 79.6% contained blaAmpC, 93.7% contained blaOXA23 and 84.3% contained blaOXA51. Enterobacteria Repetitive Intergenic Consensus (ERIC-PCR analysis revealed a predominance of certain clones that differed from each other. However, the same band pattern was observed in samples from the different hospitals studied, demonstrating correlation between the genotypic and phenotypic results. Thus, ERIC-PCR is an appropriate method for rapidly clustering genetically related isolates. These results suggest that defined clonal clusters are circulating within the studied hospitals. These results also show that the prevalence of MDR A. baumannii may vary among clones disseminated in specific hospitals, and they emphasize the importance of adhering to appropriate infection control measures.

  14. Nasal Nosocomial Myiasis Infection Caused by Chrysomya bezziana (Diptera: Calliphoridae Following the Septicemia: A Case Report

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    Seyed Farzin MIRCHERAGHI

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A 74 yr old woman from Gonabad, southern part of Khorasan Razavi Province of Iran was admitted to a Hospital of Gonabad, because of respiratory distress, exertional dyspnea and fever. Close contact with domes­tic animals, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, and completely resolved pulmonary tuberculosis (TB in remote past, were nota­ble parts of her past medical history. Due to clinical, paraclinical and radio­graphic findings and because of recent hospitalization, she was admitted to internal medicine ward with the diagnosis of health care associated pneumo­nia (HCAP. Despite the application of broad-spectrum antibiotics and ap­propriate supportive care, she had a poor response to the treatment. During the daily visit in Intensive Care Unit (ICU, numerous white larvae were de­tected in both nostrils. Further investigation of oropharynx and tracheal tube aspiration, showed no more larvae in mentioned parts. An hour later, nasal spontaneous bleeding occurred. Otorhinolaryngology consultation was per­formed and led to surgical procedure. In ENT examination, there were nu­merous larvae and massive clot formation in both inferior meatuses and distal nasal septum perforation. Thirty-seven extracted larvae were transferred to Medical Entomology lab by vial 70% ethanol and 5 live larvae for rearing. After pre­cise investigation by aid of light microscopy, the larvae were identified as Chrysomya bezziana. Due to discovered 2nd larvae stage and duration of hospitalization, this infestation was identified as nasal myiasis.

  15. Infecciones nosocomiales. Experiencia en un hospital pediátrico de tercer nivel Nosocomial infections. An experience in a high-specialty pediatric hospital

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    Rita Delia Díaz-Ramos

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Se describen los resultados de la vigilancia epidemiológica en un nuevo hospital pediátrico de alta especialidad, de 1990 al primer semestre de 1997, y se comparan con resultados previos del mismo. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se analizaron el número total y el tipo de infecciones, para obtener la tasa de incidencia y la densidad de incidencia de acuerdo con el servicio, la división médica o quirúrgica para los diferentes grupos de edad y el estado inmunológico. RESULTADOS. La incidencia global de infecciones nosocomiales durante este periodo fue de 25.7 por 100 egresos, con una disminución progresiva durante los últimos tres años. Aunque los pacientes inmunocomprometidos se infectaron más que los inmunocompetentes, la diferencia no fue significativa. Las tres infecciones más frecuentes fueron las neumonías, las infecciones relacionadas con líneas vasculares y las infecciones respiratorias altas. Es posible que estas últimas contribuyan a la elevación de las tasas globales de incidencia de infecciones nosocomiales. CONCLUSIONES. El cambio en la epidemiología de las infecciones respecto a experiencias propias previas, ha creado la necesidad de implantar programas para prevenir los problemas más frecuentes. Es necesario intensificar los diferentes programas de prevención y fomentar su difusión para abatir estas infecciones a corto plazo.OBJECTIVES. To describe the results of an epidemiologic surveillance program, from 1990 to the first semester of 1997, in a new high-specialty pediatric hospital and perform a comparison with previous reports.MATERIAL AND METHODS The total number and type of nosocomial infections, the incidence rate and density incidence for department and division, for different age groups and according to immune statues were registered. RESULTS. The global incidence of nosocomial infections during the period was 25.7 per 100 discharges, with a progressive decrease during the last three years. Although

  16. The impact of an education program on hand hygiene compliance and nosocomial infection incidence in an urban neonatal intensive care unit: an intervention study with before and after comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Helder, Onno K.; Brug, Johannes; Looman, Caspar W. N.; van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Kornelisse, René F.

    2010-01-01

    Nosocomial bloodstream infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neonatal intensive care units. Appropriate hand hygiene is singled out as the most important measure in preventing these infections. However, hand hygiene compliance among healthcare professionals remains low despite

  17. Incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the focus of infection and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative microorganism in a university hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riu, Marta; Chiarello, Pietro; Terradas, Roser; Sala, Maria; Garcia-Alzorriz, Enric; Castells, Xavier; Grau, Santiago; Cots, Francesc

    2017-04-01

    To estimate the incremental cost of nosocomial bacteremia according to the causative focus and classified by the antibiotic sensitivity of the microorganism.Patients admitted to Hospital del Mar in Barcelona from 2005 to 2012 were included. We analyzed the total hospital costs of patients with nosocomial bacteremia caused by microorganisms with a high prevalence and, often, with multidrug-resistance. A control group was defined by selecting patients without bacteremia in the same diagnosis-related group.Our hospital has a cost accounting system (full-costing) that uses activity-based criteria to estimate per-patient costs. A logistic regression was fitted to estimate the probability of developing bacteremia (propensity score) and was used for propensity-score matching adjustment. This propensity score was included in an econometric model to adjust the incremental cost of patients with bacteremia with differentiation of the causative focus and antibiotic sensitivity.The mean incremental cost was estimated at &OV0556;15,526. The lowest incremental cost corresponded to bacteremia caused by multidrug-sensitive urinary infection (&OV0556;6786) and the highest to primary or unknown sources of bacteremia caused by multidrug-resistant microorganisms (&OV0556;29,186).This is one of the first analyses to include all episodes of bacteremia produced during hospital stays in a single study. The study included accurate information about the focus and antibiotic sensitivity of the causative organism and actual hospital costs. It provides information that could be useful to improve, establish, and prioritize prevention strategies for nosocomial infections.

  18. Ability to predict the development of surgical site infection in cardiac surgery using the Australian Clinical Risk Index versus the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance-derived Risk Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figuerola-Tejerina, A; Bustamante, E; Tamayo, E; Mestres, C A; Bustamante-Munguira, J

    2017-06-01

    Surgical site infection (SSI) is a major infectious complication that increases mortality, morbidity, and healthcare costs. There are scores attempting to classify patients for calculating SSI risk. Our objectives were to validate the Australian Clinical Risk Index (ACRI) in a European population after cardiac surgery, comparing it against the National Nosocomial Infections Surveillance-derived risk index (NNIS) and analyzing the predictive power of ACRI for SSI in valvular patients. All the patients that who underwent cardiac surgery in a tertiary university hospital between 2011 and 2015 were analyzed. The patients were divided into valvular and coronary groups, excluding mixed patients. The ACRI score was validated in both groups and its ability to predict SSI was compared to the NNIS risk index. We analyzed 1,657 procedures. In the valvular patient group (n: 1119), a correlation between the ACRI score and SSI development (p < 0.05) was found; there was no such correlation with the NNIS index. The area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) was 0.64 (confidence interval [CI] 95%, 0.5-0.7) for ACRI and 0.62 (95% CI, 0.5-0.7) for NNIS. In the coronary group (n: 281), there was a correlation between ACRI and SSI but no between NNIS and SSI. The ACRI AUC was 0.70 (95% CI, 0.5-0.8) and the NNIS AUC was 0.60 (95% CI, 0.4-0.7). The ACRI score has insufficient predictive power, although it predicts SSI development better than the NNIS index, fundamentally in coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Further studies analyzing determining factors are needed.

  19. Costos secundarios por infecciones nosocomiales en dos unidades pediátricas de cuidados intensivos Secondary costs due to nosocomial infections in two pediatric intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Navarrete-Navarro

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Estimar los costos asociados a infecciones nosocomiales en niños tratados en dos unidades de terapia intensiva. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio parcial de costos en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Neonatales (UCIN y en la Unidad de Cuidados Intensivos Pediátricos (UTIP de un hospital infantil de tercer nivel de atención médica. Se investigaron los costos de las pruebas diagnósticas y de los recursos terapéuticos empleados, así como el exceso de estancia hospitalaria debida a la presencia de una infección nosocomial. RESULTADOS. Se detectaron 102 infecciones, 46 en UCIN y 56 en UTIP, en el lapso de un año, tiempo que duró el estudio. El costo promedio por infección fue de 91 698 pesos y el gasto global fue de 9.3 millones de pesos. Neumonía, flebitis y septicemia abarcaron 65% de los costos. En los niños infectados se registró una estancia hospitalaria extra de 9.6 días, 13.7 exámenes de laboratorio y 3.3 cultivos en promedio, debido a la presencia de una infección intrahospitalaria. La estancia hospitalaria representó 97% del gasto total. CONCLUSIONES. Esta evaluación representa una estimación de costos directos de infección. Los resultados justifican el establecimiento de programas preventivos agresivos para reducir las complicaciones dentro de los hospitales.OBJECTIVES. We estimated associated costs to nosocomial infections in two pediatric intensive care units in Mexico City. MATERIAL AND METHODS. A transversal study in the neonatal (NICU and pediatric (PICU intensive care units, was done. We reviewed use and cost of diagnostic procedures, medications, and excess of hospital stay. RESULTS. There were 102 infections, 46 in the NICU and 56 in the PICU. The average cost per infection was $11,682 USD and the overall expense was 1,184.71 USD. Infected children had an excess of hospital stay of 9.6 days, 13.7 more laboratory tests and 3.3 more cultures. Hospital stay represented 97% of the overall cost

  20. [Evaluation of policies in the procedures for food handling to prevent nosocomial infections in general hospitals and public institutions of health in Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva Martínez, Sebastián; Macías-Hernández, Alejandro Ernesto; de la Torre-Rosas, Alethse; Polanco González, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the implementation and proper use of policies and procedures for food handling to prevent nosocomial gastrointestinal infections in major General Hospitals and Public Institutions of Health in Mexico. We performed a cross-sectional study of food services in 54 second-level general hospitals from these institutions: Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS), Institute of Security and Social Services for State Workers (ISSSTE), and the Ministry of Health (SESA). A questionnaire was made to identify risk factors for food contamination. In the statistical analysis, we determined the relative frequency of food handling complying with the norm; a qualitative analysis was performed using an intentional non-probabilistic sampling, targeting department heads, managers, and operational staff. The qualitative variables were verified through non-parametric tests. From 54 hospitals evaluated, 81% had procedure and operation manuals, 35% prepared and stored food according to NOM-251-SSA1-2009, 52% performed ongoing training, 62% had a record of microbiological analysis done to staff and 81% done to foods, and 31% had first in first out (FIFO) temperature control systems. Second-level health institutions in Mexico have deficiencies in the implementation of norms and procedures to handle, store, and prepare food that can lead to gastrointestinal outbreaks of nosocomial infections in patients, health staff, and visitors. In order to ensure the quality of food preparation for distribution and consumption in hospitals, it is necessary that food services comply with current norms and regulations, updating policies and procedures, and training their staff continuously.

  1. Nosocomial pneumonia in critically ill patients

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    Dandagi Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The care of critically ill patients in the intensive care unit (ICU is a primary component of modern medicine. ICUs create potential for recovery in patients who otherwise may not have survived. However, they may suffer from problems associated with of nosocomial infections. Nosocomial infections are those which manifest in patients 48 hours after admission to hospital. Nosocomial infections are directly related to diagnostic, interventional or therapeutic procedures a patient undergoes in hospital, and are also influenced by the bacteriological flora prevailing within a particular unit or hospital. Urinary tract infections are the most frequent nosocomial infection, accounting for more than 40% of all nosocomial infections. Critical care units increasingly use high technology medicine for patient care, hemodynamic monitoring, ventilator support, hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, and a large battery of powerful drugs, particularly antibiotics to counter infection. It is indeed a paradox that the use of high-tech medicine has brought in its wake the dangerous and all too frequent complication of nosocomial infections

  2. [Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinosci, A; Doit, C; Koehl, B; Belhacel, K; Mariani Kurkdjian, P; Melki, I; Renaud, A; Lemaitre, C; Ammar Khodja, N; Blachier, A; Bonacorsi, S; Faye, A; Lorrot, M

    2016-11-01

    Rotavirus is the most common cause of gastroenteritis in children requiring hospitalization. It is a very resistant and contagious virus causing nosocomial gastroenteritis. In France, the vaccine against rotavirus has been available since 2006, but the vaccine is not recommended for infant vaccination. The aim of this retrospective study was to describe nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis (NRGE) and to assess its impact on children hospitalized in the General Pediatrics Department of Robert-Debré Hospital (Paris) between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2013. We analyzed the demographic characteristics of children (age, term birth, underlying diseases) and the severity of the NRGE (oral or intravenous hydration), and assessed whether these children could benefit from vaccination against rotavirus. One hundred thirty-six children presented nosocomial rotavirus infection, with an incidence of 2.5 NRGE per 1000 days of hospitalization. The incidence of NRGE was stable between 2009 and 2013 despite the introduction of specific hygiene measures. The average age of the children was 7 months (range: 0.5-111 months). Most often NRGE occurred in children hospitalized for respiratory diseases (65% of cases) and requiring prolonged hospitalization (median: 18 days). One-third of children were born premature (25%). Hydration was oral in 80 patients (59%), by intravenous infusion in 18 patients (13%), and intraosseous in one patient. Half of the patients were aged less than 5 months and could benefit from the protection afforded by vaccination. NRGE are common. Rotavirus mass vaccination should have a positive impact on the incidence of NRGE by reducing the number of children hospitalized for gastroenteritis, therefore indirectly reducing the number of hospital cross-infections of hospitalized children who are too young to be vaccinated. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of Device-associated Nosocomial Infections Caused By Gram-negative Bacteria in a Trauma Intensive Care Unit in Libya

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    Abdulaziz Zorgani

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Device-associated nosocomial infections (DANIs have a major impact on patient morbidity and mortality. Our study aimed to determine the distribution rate of DANIs and causative agents and patterns of antibiotic resistance in the trauma-surgical intensive care unit (ICU. Methods: Our study was conducted at Abusalim Trauma Hospital in Tripoli, Libya. All devices associated with nosocomial infections, including central venous catheters (CVC, endotracheal tubes (ETT, Foley’s urinary catheters, chest tubes, nasogastric tubes (NGT, and tracheostomy tubes, were removed aseptically and examined for Gram-negative bacteria (GNB. Results: During a one-year study period, 363 patients were hospitalized; the overall mortality rate was 29%. A total of 79 DANIs were identified, the most common site of infection was ETT (39.2%, followed by urinary catheters (19%, NGTs (18%, tracheostomy tubes (11%, CVCs (10%, and chest tubes (3%. The most frequently isolated organisms were Klebsiella pneumonia, Acinetobacter baumannii, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (30%, 20%, and 14%, respectively. Extremely high resistance rates were observed among GNB to ampicillin (99%, cefuroxime (95%, amoxicillin-clavulante (92%, and nitrofurantoin (91%. Lower levels of resistance were exhibited to amikacin (38%, imipenem (38%, and colistin (29%. About 39% of the isolates were defined as multi-drug resistant (MDR. Overall, extended spectrum β-lactmase producers were expressed in 39% of isolates mainly among K. pneumonia (88%. A. baumannii isolates exhibited extremely high levels of resistance to all antibiotics except colistin (100% sensitive. In addition, 56.3% of A. baumannii isolates were found to be MDR. P. aeruginosa isolates showed 46%–55% effectiveness to anti-pseudomonas antibiotics. Conclusion: High rates of DANI’s and the emergence of MDR organisms poses a serious threat to patients. There is a need to strengthen infection control within the ICU environment

  4. Epidemiology of four main nosocomial infections in Iran during March 2007 - March 2008 based on the findings of a routine surveillance system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahraei, Seyed Mohsen; Eshrati, Babak; Masoumi Asl, Hosein; Pezeshki, Zahra

    2012-12-01

    Annually, around six million patients are admitted to hospitals in Iran. Information about the prevalence of nosocomial infections (NIs) is necessary for both appropriate management and establishment of preventative measures in hospitals. This article is based on the findings of the Nosocomial Infection Surveillance System (NISS) which has been providing information on NIs in Iran since March 2007.  NISS covers 95 hospitals throughout Iran, each with over 200 beds. There are four main infections: urinary tract infection (UTI), surgical site infection (SSI), bloodstream infection (BSI) and pneumonia (PNEU) included in NISS. Reports are completed on forms that have been provided based on national guidelines. In all selected hospitals there is one designated nurse who conducts infection control activities and is trained in the detection and reporting of NIs based on NISS guidelines. During March 2007 - March 2008, a total of 1,879,356 patients were admitted to the selected hospitals. The total detected NIs were 10557 with a prevalence of 0.57%. Of these, UTI was the most prevalent infection (32.2%) and BSI was the least (16.3%). Based on gender, females had more UTI, whereas PNEU was the highest in males. Of reported NIs, 9% were detected in children less than five years of age and included BSI (45%), PNEU (20%), SSI (19%) and UTI (16%). There were 26% reported NIs in the age group over 65 years, of which the most prevalent infections were UTI (42%) followed by PNEU (31%), SSI (15%) and BSI (12%). NIs were most often detected in intensive care units (ICUs; 26.7%), followed by surgery wards (12.8%). In comparison with other studies and the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates, the rate of NIs appears to be less according to NISS. NISS has the capability to provide basic information for efficient management and control measures, in addition to indicating variations in NIs based on gender, age and location (hospital ward). In order to have a more realistic estimate

  5. Effect of gingival and dental plaque antiseptic decontamination on nosocomial infections acquired in the intensive care unit: a double-blind placebo-controlled multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourrier, François; Dubois, Didier; Pronnier, Philippe; Herbecq, Patrick; Leroy, Olivier; Desmettre, Thibaut; Pottier-Cau, Elodie; Boutigny, Hervé; Di Pompéo, Christophe; Durocher, Alain; Roussel-Delvallez, Micheline

    2005-08-01

    To document the effect of gingival and dental plaque antiseptic decontamination on the rate of nosocomial bacteremias and respiratory infections acquired in the intensive care unit (ICU). Prospective, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled efficacy study. Six ICUs: three in university hospitals and three in general hospitals. A total of 228 nonedentulous patients requiring endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation, with an anticipated length of stay > or =5 days. Antiseptic decontamination of gingival and dental plaque with a 0.2% chlorhexidine gel or a placebo gel, three times a day, during the entire ICU stay. Demographic and clinical characteristics, organ function data (Logistic Organ Dysfunction score), severity of condition (Simplified Acute Physiologic Score), and dental plaque status were assessed at baseline and until 28 days. Bacteriologic sampling of dental plaque and saliva was done every 5 days, and blood, tracheal aspirate, and bronchoalveolar lavage cultures were performed when appropriate. The primary efficacy end point was the incidence of bacteremia, bronchitis, and ventilator-associated pneumonia, expressed as a percentage and per 1000 ICU days. All baseline characteristics were similar between the treated and the placebo groups. The incidence of nosocomial infections was 17.5% (13.2 per 1000 ICU days) in the placebo group and 18.4% (13.3 per 1000 ICU days) in the plaque antiseptic decontamination group (not significant). No difference was observed in the incidence of ventilator-associated pneumonia per ventilator or intubation days, mortality, length of stay, and care loads (secondary end points). On day 10, the number of positive dental plaque cultures was significantly lower in the treated group (29% vs. 66%; p dental plaque were not eradicated by the antiseptic decontamination. No side effect was reported. Gingival and dental plaque antiseptic decontamination significantly decreased the oropharyngeal colonization by aerobic

  6. Prevalence of carbapenem-resistant organisms and other Gram-negative MDRO in German ICUs: first results from the national nosocomial infection surveillance system (KISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maechler, F; Peña Diaz, L A; Schröder, C; Geffers, C; Behnke, M; Gastmeier, P

    2015-04-01

    Standardized prevalence and incidence data on carbapenem-resistant organisms (CRO) and, as a relevant subgroup, carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) are scarce. CRO-surveillance within the German nosocomial infection surveillance system (KISS) aims to provide epidemiological surveillance data on CRO colonizations and infections. CRO-surveillance is part of a KISS-module for the surveillance of multidrug-resistant organisms (MDRO). MDRO-KISS methods require surveillance of all patients admitted to the ward and standardized documentation of imported and ICU-acquired cases. Data on all MDRO-carriers including colonization and infection with MDRO are collected. All presented data were routine data collected from January 1st 2013 until December 1st 2013 in accordance with the German Protection against Infection Act (IfSG). 341 ICUs submitted data on MDRO during the first year. In total, 5,171 cases of multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MRGN) were identified. 848 were CRO (16%). 325 CRO-cases were acquired within the ICU (38%), and 373 CRO-patients had an infection (44%). CRO-prevalence was 0.29 per 100 patients. Acquisition rate of MRGN was 1.32 per 1,000 patient days. This rate is more than doubled the acquisition rates of other MDRO under surveillance within MDRO-KISS (0.57 MRSA, 0.49 VRE). CRO-acquisition rate was 0.3 per 1,000 patient days. Incidence density of MRGN infections bacteria was 0.58 per 1,000 patient days (CRO 0.15/1,000 patient days). To date, CRO are common in German ICUs and the relatively large proportions of ICU-acquired CRO and infections emphasize their potential to cause outbreaks. High MRGN infection rates and high ESBL prevalence data from clinical studies suggest a lack of MRGN identification in asymptomatic carriers.

  7. Demand for care and nosocomial infection rate during the first influenza AH1N1 2009 virus outbreak at a referral hospital in Mexico City Demanda asistencial y tasa de infección nosocomial durante el primer brote de influenza AH1N1 2009 en un hospital de referencia en la Ciudad de México

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    Rogelio Pérez-Padilla

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Comparison of routine hospital indicators (consults at the Emergency Room (ER and hospital admissions during the 2009 pandemic of the influenza AH1N1 virus at the national referral hospital for respiratory diseases in Mexico City. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The outbreak was from April to mid-May 2009 and two control periods were used:2009 (before and after the outbreak,and during April-May from 2007 and 2008. RESULTS: During the outbreak total consultation at the ER increased six times compared with the 2007-2008 control period and 11 times compared with the 2009 control period. Pneumonia- or influenza-related ER consultations increased 23.2 and 15.3%, respectively. The rate of nosocomial infection during the outbreak was 13.6 and that of nosocomial pneumonia was 6 per/100 hospital discharges, a two-fold and three-fold increase compared to the control periods respectively. CONCLUSIONS: During the outbreak,mean severity of admitted patients increased,with a rise in in-hospital mortality and nosocomial infections rate, including nosocomial pneumonia.OBJETIVO: Comparación de indicadores hospitalarios de rutina (consultas de urgencia, admisiones hospitalarias etc. durante la pandemia de influenzaAH1N1 2009 en un hospital de referencia para enfermedades respiratorias de la Ciudad de México. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: El brote se consideró de abril a la mitad de mayo de 2009 y se comparó con dos periodos control: el de 2009 (antes y después del brote, y durante abril y mayo de 2007 y 2008. RESULTADOS: Durante el brote las consultas de urgencia crecieron seis veces comparadas con el periodo control 2007-2008 y 11 veces contra el periodo control de 2009. Las consultas por neumonía o influenza incrementaron 23.2 y 15.3% comparadas contra los periodos control, respectivamente. La tasa de infección nosocomial durante el brote fue de 13.6 y la de neumonía nosocomial de 6.0 por 100 egresos hospitalarios, el doble y el triple de la documentada en los

  8. Nosocomial pathogens

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic organisms in the environment of the neonatal unit, 92 swabs were randomly collected from cots, incubators and various ...

  9. Três anos de avaliação das taxas de infecção nosocomial em UTI Tres años de evaluación de las tasas de infección nosocomial en UCI Three-year evaluation of nosocomial infection rates of the ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Necla Dereli

    2013-02-01

    infecciones relacionadas con la asistencia a la sanidad (IRAS entre las UCIs de diferentes hospitales y las unidades del mismo hospital. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: De enero de 2007 a diciembre de 2010, un estudio de vigilancia retrospectivo fue realizado para identificar infecciones nosocomiales, tasas de infecciones relacionadas con los dispositivos y agentes causantes en la unidad de cuidados intensivos (UCI de anestesiología. Las IRAS se definieron de acuerdo con los criterios del Centro de Control y Prevención de Enfermedades (CDC y las infecciones relacionadas con los dispositivos invasivos definidas de acuerdo con los criterios del Sistema Nacional de Vigilancia de Infecciones Nosocomiales (NNIS. RESULTADOS: Durante dos años, se evaluaron 939 pacientes dentro de un universo de 7.892 pacientes/día. Las tasas de IRAS alcanzaron el umbral del 53% en 2007, 29,15% en 2008, 28,85% en 2009 y 16,62% en 2010. La IRAS más frecuente fue la infección de la corriente sanguínea. La tasa de infección de tejido suave y de la piel fue la segunda. Entre los pacientes con infecciones nosocomiales, los agentes causantes más a menudo encontrados fueron Gr (- 56,68%, Gr (+ 31,02% y la candidiasis 12,3%. CONCLUSIONES: La incidencia de IRAS en la UCI de nuestro hospital fue alta en comparación con las tasas turcas globales obtenidas en el Refik Saydam Center en 2007. Cuando las tasas de infecciones relacionadas con los dispositivos se compararon entre 2007 y 2008, fueron mayores en el 2007. Las tasas de infecciones relacionadas con los dispositivos en 2008 quedaron por debajo del promedio nacional a causa de las medidas de control de infección. Como la tasa de infecciones relacionada con el catéter urinario todavía permanece alta, debemos esforzarnos más en el sentido de controlar las infecciones.BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Evaluating the incidence of nosocomial and invasive device-related infections enables the comparison of the health care associated infection (HAI between the

  10. BACTERIAL PREVALENCE, ANTIBIOTIC SENSITIVITY PATTERN AND PREDISPOSING FACTORS IN PATIENTS OF NOSOCOMIAL URINARY TRACT INFECTION (UTI VISITED THE TERTIARY CARE HOSPITAL IN JAMNAGAR REGION, WESTERN GUJARAT, INDIA

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    Prakash Somabhai Modi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Nosocomial UTI is the most common bacterial infection ranging from asymptomatic bacterial to septicaemia. Gram-negative bacteria contribute 80-85% of UTI and 15-20% by gram positive with major contribution by E. coli. The aim of the study is to assess the bacterial prevalence, drug sensitivity pattern and predisposing factors in nosocomial UTI. MATERIALS AND METHODS 778 midstream urine samples were tested by conventional methods of which 282 (36.25% samples were identified as positive for bacteria. All the isolates were subjected to antibiotic sensitivity testing. Statistical analysis was done by Chi-square test. RESULTS Bacterial prevalence was 36.25%. 87.95% UTI were caused by gram negative while 12.05% cases were due to gram-positive bacteria. Most prevalent bacterium was E. coli (48.23%. Piperacillin+tazobactam were identified as most sensitive drug for all gram-negative isolates. Among the gram-positive isolates, coagulase-positive bacteria like Staph aureus were sensitive to all tested drugs while coagulase-negative bacteria were less sensitive to all exposed drugs and Enterococcus produced 75% sensitivity rate to vancomycin, teicoplanin and linezolid. UTI was common between 40-60 years (37.23% with mean age 44.23±20.05 and P value was >0.05. High frequency observed in men (55.32% than women (44.68%, (P >0.05. 53.19% cases had history of catheterisation (P <0.001. CONCLUSION Variable sensitivity pattern and increasing drug resistance observed in uropathogen, so study emphasise over antibiotic sensitivity testing before prescribing empirical therapy, understanding the risk factors helps to contain the UTI.

  11. Identification of antigens from nosocomial Acinetobacter baumannii clinical isolates in sera from ICU staff and infected patients using the antigenome technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafarieh, Tina; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Hashemi, Ali; Taheri, Sodabeh; Yardel, Vahid; Jamaati, Hamidreza; Moosavi, Seyed Mahdi; Mosaffa, Nariman

    2017-09-30

    Nosocomial infections with a bacterial origin are considered one of the most dangerous threats to global health. Among the causes of these infections, Acinetobacter baumannii is playing a significant role, and the present study aimed‏ to determine the immunogenic proteins of this bacteria. Clinical isolates of A. baumannii were obtained from positive sputum cultures of intensive care unit (ICU) patients confirmed by Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the OXA-51 gene, and sera was obtained from 20 colonized patients. In addition, 20 and 30 serum samples were collected from ICU nurses and healthy controls, respectively. All the samples were screened in the presence of antibodies against A. baumannii by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). IgG purified from the serum samples by affinity chromatography was used to isolate the bacteria by the Magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) procedure. After the bacteria were cultured, the identified antigen proteins were studied by western blotting and Mass spectrometry (MS). The MS results were analyzed with MASCOT software and revealed a 35 KD protein, which corresponds to outer membrane protein A (OmpA) of A. baumannii, a 25 KD band, which is a carbapenem-associated resistance protein precursor, and a 60 KD protein band, identified as a stress-induced bacterial acidophilic repeat motif protein. According to the properties of immunogen antigens and bio informatics tools, the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) can be used as a vaccine candidate in animal models.

  12. Prevention of nosocomial infection in critically ill patients by selective decontamination of the digestive tract. A randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, L A; Martín, M J; Pita, S; Paz, J; Seco, C; Margusino, L; Villanueva, R; Durán, M T

    1992-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of a method of Selective Decontamination of the Digestive Tract (SDD) on colonization, nosocomial infection (NI), bacterial resistance, mortality and economic costs. Randomized, double blind, placebo controlled study. Polyvalent intensive care unit (ICU) of a tertiary care hospital with 27 beds. 101 patients with > 3 days of mechanical ventilation and > 5 days of stay, without infection at the start of the study. 47 belonged to the Treated Group (TG) and 54 to the Placebo Group (PG). The TG was given Cefotaxime i.v. (6 g/day) for the first four days and an association of Polymyxin E, Tobramycin and Amphotericin B at the oropharyngeal and gastrointestinal level throughout the whole stay. In the TG, colonization by gram-negative agents at oropharyngeal, tracheal and gastrointestinal level fell significantly. There was a significant drop in the overall, respiratory and urinary NI (26% vs 63%, p < 0.001; 15% vs 46%, p < 0.001; 9% vs 31%, p < 0.01). The overall mortality and NI related mortality was less in the TG (21% vs 44%, p < 0.05; 2% vs 20%, p < 0.01). The economic costs, mechanical ventilation time and length of stay were similar. The percentage of bacterial isolations resistant to Cefotaxime and Tobramycin was greater in the TG (38% vs 15% and 38% vs 9%, p < 0.001). colonization by gram-negative bacilli, NI and the mortality related to it can be modified by SDD. Continuous bacteriological surveillance is necessary.

  13. Nosocomial infection in long-term care facilities. A survey in a Brazilian psychiatric hospital Infecção hospitalar em instituições de longa permanência. Pesquisa em hospital psiquiátrico brasileiro

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    Regina Capanema de ALMEIDA

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Nosocomial infection among male patients in a public psychiatric hospital was studied and the definitions for use in long-term care facilities were employed for diagnosis. The overall nosocomial infection rate was 6.7 per 1,000 day inpatients; 55.6% of these infections were identified in the respiratory tract, 50% of them being respiratory viral diseases; 38.9% of the nosocomial infections involved the eyes, ears, nose, throat and mouth, and 5.6% involved the skin and soft tissues. The epidemiological characteristics and the main clinical alterations of these inpatients were also identified.Foi estudada a Infecção Hospitalar (IH em pacientes masculinos internados em hospital psiquiátrico público e as definições sugeridas para uso em instituições de longa permanência (ILPs/Long-Term Care Facilities-LTCFs foram utilizadas para diagnóstico das IH. A taxa global de IH foi de 6,7 por 1000 pacientes-dia, 55,6% das infecções foram identificadas no trato respiratório, sendo que 50% dessas eram viroses respiratórias; 38,9% das IH relacionavam-se aos olhos, ouvidos, nariz, garganta e boca e 5,6% a pele e partes moles. As características epidemiológicas e as principais alterações clínicas desses pacientes também foram identificadas.

  14. Impact of antibiotic exposure on occurrence of nosocomial carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infection: a case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chusri, Sarunyou; Silpapojakul, Kachornsakdi; McNeil, Edward; Singkhamanan, Kamonnut; Chongsuvivatwong, Virasakdi

    2015-02-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) infection is one of the most important healthcare associated diseases worldwide. Although antibiotic use is recognized as a risk factor for CRAB infection, the impact of antibiotic class and length of use on CRAB infection is still unclear. A case-control study was conducted in adult intensive care units and general wards of Songklanagarind Hospital, a tertiary-care hospital in southern Thailand, to investigate the effect of different antibiotic exposure and the duration of use on the risk of developing CRAB infection. Cases were defined as patients with carbapenem-susceptible A. baumannii (CSAB) or CRAB infection. Controls were randomly selected from patients and matched 1:1 with cases using ward and date of admission. Multinomial logistic regression was used to compute relative risk ratios (RRR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for CRAB infection. Of 197 cases with A. baumannii infection, there were 139 with CRAB infection and 58 with CSAB infection. Compared to the control group, use of fluoroquinolones, broad-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems for more than three days increased the risk of CRAB infection with RRR (95% CI) of 81.2 (38.1-862.7), 31.3 (9.9-98.7) and 112.1 (7.1-1770.6), respectively. The RRR (95% CI) for one to three day treatment of fluoroquinolones, broad-spectrum cephalosporins and carbapenems were 5.4 (0.8-38.7), 6.2 (0.1-353.2) and 63.3 (15.6-256.9), respectively. Long-term use of certain antibiotics and even short term use of carbapenems increased the risk of CRAB infection. In this setting, use of these antibiotics, especially carbapenems, should be limited to reduce CRAB infection. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Nosocomial coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections in bone marrow transplantation recipients with central vein catheter. A 5-year prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhard, D; Elishoov, H; Strauss, N; Naparstek, E; Nagler, A; Simhon, A; Raveh, D; Slavin, S; Or, R

    1996-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to examine coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections in bone marrow transplantation (BMT) patients with central vein catheters by investigating incidence, clinical relevance, risk factors, methicillin resistance, clinical impact of initial empiric antimicrobial therapy without vancomycin, and management of documented catheter-related infections. A 5-year prospective study was conducted with daily evaluation of 242 BMT patients during hospitalization, including clinical assessment and blood culture via the Hickman/Broviac catheter. If fever or infected appearance occurred, peripheral blood cultures or exit site cultures, respectively, were done. Results showed a septicemia incidence of 7.0%, including in 6 patients following colonization, in 1 patient with tunnel infection, in 1 patient with thrombophlebitis, in 1 patient with exit site infection, and in 8 patients with septicemia of unknown origin. Total colonization incidence was 7%, with colonization only in 11 patients who had 16 episodes; incidence of exit site infection was 3.7%. Age > or = 18 years was the only identified risk factor for developing staphylococcal infection (P = 0.03). Despite a methicillin resistance rate of 45% and omission of vancomycin from the routine initial empiric antimicrobial regimen, the clinical course of coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections was relatively benign. A single patient, who experienced marrow rejection, died on day +31 with septicemia and only one patient experienced microbiological failure with recurrent colonization. Bacteria grown in both aerobic and anaerobic bottles were more likely true bacteremia than contaminant (P = 0.03). We conclude that the hazard of coagulase-negative staphylococcal infection does not mandate inclusion of a glycopeptide in the initial empiric antimicrobial regimen in BMT patients, even during febrile neutropenia. Hickman/Broviac-related staphylococcal infections, except for tunnel infection or

  16. Antibiotic resistance of gram-negative bacilli isolated from pediatric patients with nosocomial bloodstream infections in a Mexican tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Miguel Ángel; Alcántar-Curiel, Maria Dolores; Jiménez-Galicia, César; Rios-Sarabia, Nora; Pacheco, Sabino; De la Cruz, Miguel Ángel

    2013-01-01

    Gram-negative bacilli are the most common bacteria causing nosocomial bloodstream infections (NBSIs) in Latin American countries. The antibiotic resistance profiles of Gram-negative bacilli isolated from blood cultures in pediatric patients with NBSIs over a 3-year period in a tertiary care pediatric hospital in Mexico City were determined using the VITEK-2 system. Sixteen antibiotics were tested to ascertain the resistance rate and the minimum inhibitory concentration using the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth micro-dilution method as a reference. A total of 931 isolates were recovered from 847 clinically significant episodes of NBSI. Of these, 477 (51.2%) were caused by Gram-negative bacilli. The most common Gram-negative bacilli found were Klebsiella pneumoniae (30.4%), Escherichia coli (18.9%), Enterobacter cloacae (15.1%), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (9.9%), and Acinetobacter baumannii (4.6%). More than 45 and 60% of the K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolates, respectively, were resistant to cephalosporins, and 64% of the E. coli isolates were resistant to fluoroquinolones. A. baumannii exhibited low rates of resistance to antibiotics tested. In the E. cloacae and P. aeruginosa isolates, no rates of resistance higher than 38% were observed. In this study, we found that the proportion of NBSIs due to antibiotic-resistant organisms is increasing in a tertiary care pediatric hospital of Mexico.

  17. Protecting health workers from nosocomial Hepatitis B infections: A review of strategies and challenges for implementation of Hepatitis B vaccination among health workers in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malewezi, Bridget; Omer, Saad B; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Araru, Trish

    2016-12-01

    The Sub-Saharan region has the highest Hepatitis B virus (HBV) rates, and health workers are at an increased risk of contracting nosocomial HBV infection. Vaccination of health workers plays a critical role in protecting them from sequelae of HBV; however, health-worker vaccination remains a challenge for many countries. This study was conducted to review practices/measures and challenges in the Sub-Saharan region relating to vaccination of health workers against HBV. We performed a literature review of articles addressing any aspect of HBV vaccination of health workers in the Sub-Saharan region sourced from PubMed, Embase, and Web of Science, including a case study of Malawi policies and strategies in training institutions and facilities. Our findings indicated that HBV awareness and vaccination were relatively high, but vaccination rates were lower, with 4.6-64.4% of those "ever vaccinated" completing the vaccination regimen. There was also great variation in the proportion of health workers exhibiting natural immunity from previous exposure (positive for anti-Hepatitis B core antibodies; 41-92%). Commonly cited reasons for non-uptake of vaccine included cost, lack of awareness of vaccine availability, and inadequate information concerning the vaccine. Countries in this region will require locally relevant data to develop cost-effective strategies that maximize the benefit to their health workers due to the great diversity of HBV epidemiology in the region. Copyright © 2016 Ministry of Health, Saudi Arabia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Comportamiento de infecciones nosocomiales en un período de doce años Behavior of nosocomial infections in a 12-year period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Ravelo González

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCCIÓN. Son objetivos de esta presentación determinar el comportamiento de las infecciones nosocomiales en el Servicio de Neonatología del Hospital General Provincial Docente de Morón y describir los tipos de infecciones, los factores predisponentes, los microorganismos aislados y la resistencia de dichos gérmenes a los antibióticos de uso habitual en nuestro medio. MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio observacional descriptivo en el período de marzo de 1995 a diciembre de 2006. La obtención de los datos fue por revisión documental (historias clínicas y estos se presentan en tablas de distribución de frecuencia. Se realizaron medidas de tendencia central (media aritmética y mediana. RESULTADOS. La tasa de infección observada fue de 12,3. La sepsis generalizada fue el tipo de infección que más se presentó, y sus factores de riesgo más importantes fueron el bajo peso al nacer y la prematuridad. El estafilococo coagulasa-negativo fue el microorganismo más aislado en estudios microbiológicos. En todos los tubos endotraqueales estudiados se obtuvo crecimiento de gérmenes, así como también en catéteres venosos. Los gérmenes grampositivos presentaron elevada resistencia a las penicilinas y cefalosporinas de primera generación. CONCLUSIONES. Las infecciones nosocomiales constituyen un importante problema en nuestro servicio, y se debe trabajar para optimizar la intervención intensiva a nuestros pacientes y actuar sobre sus factores de riesgo.INTRODUCTION. This paper is aimed at determining the behavior of nosocomial infections in the Neonatology Service of the Provincial General Hospital of Morón and at describing the types of infections, the predisposing factors, the isolated microorganisms and the resistance of these germs to the usual antibiotics in our environment. METHODS. An observational descriptive study was carried out from March 1995 to December 2006. Data were obtained by documentary review (medical histories and

  19. Acinetobacter spp. as nosocomial pathogens: Epidemiology and resistance features

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    Saad B. Almasaudi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The genus Acinetobacter is a major cause of nosocomial infections; it is increasingly being associated with various epidemics and has become a widespread concern in a variety of hospitals worldwide. Multi-antibiotic resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, is now recognized to be of great clinical significance. Numerous reports relay to the spread of A. baumannii in the hospital settings which leads to enhanced nosocomial outbreaks associated with high death rates. However, many other Acinetobacter spp. also can cause nosocomial infections. This review focused on the role of Acinetobacter spp. as nosocomial pathogens in addition to their persistence, antimicrobial resistance patterns and epidemiology. Keywords: Acinetobacter, Nosocomial infections, Multi-drug resistance, Epidemiology, Characteristics

  20. Transfusion of leukocyte-depleted red blood cells is not a risk factor for nosocomial infections in critically ill children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wal, Judith; van Heerde, Marc; Markhorst, Dick G.; Kneyber, Martin C. J.

    Objectives: Transfusion of red blood cells is increasingly linked with adverse outcomes in critically ill children. We tested the hypothesis that leukocyte-depleted red blood cell transfusions were independently associated with increased development of bloodstream infections, ventilator-associated

  1. [Epidemic and control strategy on nosocomial outbreak of norovirus gastroenteritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian

    2008-10-01

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis in human beings and frequently cause the outbreaks of nosocomial infections. Based on the pathogenic characteristics of noroviruses, this article describes the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of norovirus gastroenteritis outbreak in hospital and explores the measures to prevent and control the nosocomial outbreak.

  2. Distribution of potential nosocomial pathogens in a hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Distribution of potential nosocomial pathogens in a hospital environment. ... length of service were significant determining factors for the carriage rate of the isolates in the individuals examined. The findings of the study showed that the hospital may be a potential reservoir of organisms likely to cause nosocomial infections.

  3. Factores de riesgo de infección nosocomial después de cirugía cardíaca pediátrica Risk factors of nosocomial infection after cardiac surgery in children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Bravo Pérez de Ordaz

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Los niños con defectos cardíacos congénitos presentan un riesgo elevado de infección nosocomial cuando son operados. La elevada morbilidad y mortalidad debido a infección posoperatoria afecta a los resultados de la cirugía cardíaca. El objetivo del estudio fue identificar los factores preoperatorios, perioperatorios y posoperatorios relacionados con el riesgo de infección en este tipo de cirugía. Fueron examinadas las historias clínicas de los pacientes con cirugía cardíaca, operados en el Cardiocentro «William Soler» entre el 1 de septiembre de 2002 y el 31 de agosto de 2003. Se obtuvieron diferentes variables para comparar el grupo de pacientes con infección nosocomial y los que no desarrollaron infección. Fueron excluidos los pacientes fallecidos en las primeras 48 horas después de operados y aquellos que ya presentaron evidencias de infección en el momento de la cirugía. La muestra quedó conformada por 251 pacientes, de ellos 53 (21,1 % presentaron 76 infecciones nosocomiales (tasa de infección nosocomial = 30,2 %. El análisis univariado reveló que los factores de riesgo de infección nosocomial fueron la edad, el peso corporal, el volumen de sangrado posoperatorio, la presencia de cardiopatía cianótica, esternón abierto, bajo gasto cardíaco, dificultad respiratoria, desnutrición y reintervención. El análisis multivariado reveló que los factores de riesgo independiente fueron: cardiopatías cianóticas (p = 0,00; B: 1,14; Exp (B: 3,13, dificultad respiratoria (p = 0,00; B: 1,30; Exp (B: 3,67 y reintervención (p = 0,02; B: 1,45; Exp (B: 4,29.

  4. Multiresistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae causing an outbreak of nosocomial bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Vertiz, A; Alcantar-Curiel, D; Cuauhtli, M; Daza, C; Gayosso, C; Solache, G; Horta, C; Mejia, F; Santos, J I; Alpuche-Aranda, C

    2001-11-01

    This article describes an outbreak of bloodstream infection due to clonal dissemination of multiresistant Klebsiella pneumoniae in a neonatal area, during August 1999, in Mexico City General Hospital. The intestinal tract was the likely reservoir, and intensification of Contact Precaution measures contained the outbreak.

  5. Previous Antibiotic Exposure and Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns of Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Isolated from Patients with Nosocomial Infections

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    Zorana M. Djordjevic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The alarming spread of antibiotic-resistant bacteria causing healthcare-associated infections has been extensively reported in recent medical literature. Aims: To compare trends in antimicrobial consumption and development of resistance among isolates of Acinetobacter spp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa that cause hospital infections. Study Design: Cross-sectional study. Methods: A study was conducted in a tertiary healthcare institution in central Serbia, during the 7-year period between January 2009 and December 2015. The incidence rate of infections caused by Acinetobacter or Pseudomonas, as well as their resistance density to commonly used antibiotics, were calculated. Utilization of antibiotics was expressed as the number of defined daily doses per 1000 patient-days. Results: A statistically significant increase in resistance density in 2015 compared to the first year of observation was noted for Acinetobacter, but not for Pseudomonas, to third-generation cephalosporins (p=0.008, aminoglycosides (p=0.005, carbapenems (p=0.003, piperacillin/tazobactam (p=0.025, ampicillin/sulbactam (p=0.009 and tigecycline (p=0.048. Conclusion: Our study showed that there is an association between the resistance density of Acinetobacter spp. and utilization of carbapenems, tigecycline and aminoglycosides. A multifaceted intervention is needed to decrease the incidence rate of Acinetobacter and Pseudomonas hospital infections, as well as their resistance density to available antibiotics

  6. Prevalencia de infecciones nosocomiales en niños: encuesta de 21 hospitales en México Nosocomial infections in children: Prevalence survey in 21 public hospitals in Mexico

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    Carlos Avila-Figueroa

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO. Determinar la prevalencia de infecciones nosocomiales, los factores de riesgo, su microbiología, la prevalencia de uso de antibióticos y la mortalidad asociada en niños hospitalizados. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Se realizó un estudio transversal en 21 hospitales públicos que atienden a niños. Se incluyeron pacientes desde recién nacidos hasta de 17 años de edad. Los riesgos ajustados se estimaron mediante regresión logística múltiple. RESULTADOS. En 1 183 niños estudiados se identificaron 116 pacientes con infección nosocomial, con una prevalencia de 9.8% (IC95% 8.1-11.6. Los sitios de infección más frecuentes fueron: neumonía (25%, sepsis/bacteriemia (19% e infección del tracto urinario (5%. El principal microrganismo identificado en hemocultivo fue Klebsiella pneumoniae (31%. La prevalencia de uso de antibióticos fue de 49% con una variación de entre 3 y 83%. Mediante regresión logística múltiple se encontraron cuatro factores independientemente asociados con el desarrollo de infección nosocomial: exposición a catéteres intravenosos (RM 3.3, IC95% 1.9-5.9, alimentación parenteral (RM 2.1, IC95% 1.0-4.5, ventilación mecánica (RM 2.3, IC95% 1.2-4.1 y ser recién nacido de bajo peso (RM 2.6, IC95% 1.0-6.8. La mortalidad general fue de 4.8%; sin embargo, el riesgo de morir en pacientes con infección nosocomial fue del doble comparado con los no infectados (RM 2.6, IC95% 1.3-5.1. CONCLUSIONES. Esta evaluación rápida, usando una metodología estándar, ha permitido caracterizar la epidemiología de las infecciones nosocomiales en niños. Los resultados dieron lugar a programas preventivos dirigidos específicamente al cuidado de catéteres intravasculares y al uso de ventilación asistida, a fin de reducir la ocurrencia de sepsis/bacteriemia y neumonías, infecciones nosocomiales de alta prevalencia y mortalidad.OBJECTIVES. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of nosocomial infections

  7. Antibiotic resistance in healthcare-related and nosocomial spontaneous bacterial peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Philipp; Nischalke, Hans Dieter; Krämer, Benjamin; Goeser, Felix; Kaczmarek, Dominik J; Schlabe, Stefan; Parcina, Marijo; Nattermann, Jacob; Hoerauf, Achim; Strassburg, Christian P; Spengler, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) can be life threatening in patients with liver cirrhosis. In contrast to community-acquired SBP, no standard treatment has been established for healthcare-related and nosocomial SBP. We prospectively collected healthcare-related and nosocomial SBP cases from March 2012 till February 2016 at the Department of Internal Medicine I of the University of Bonn and analysed the prevalence of antibiotic resistance among the isolated bacteria. SBP was diagnosed according to international guidelines. Ciprofloxacin, ceftriaxone and meropenem were used as reference substance for resistance to quinolones, third-generation cephalosporins and carbapenems, respectively. Ninety-two SBP episodes in 86 patients were identified: 63 episodes (69%) were nosocomial. Escherichia coli, Klebsiella species, enterococci and streptococci were most frequently isolated. Frequencies of these microorganisms were comparable for healthcare-related and nosocomial SBP (14% vs. 11%, 14% vs. 8%, 14% vs. 5% and 10% vs. 6%, respectively). In general, antibiotic resistance was higher in isolates from nosocomial than from healthcare-related SBP (50% vs. 18% for quinolones, 30% vs. 11% for piperacillin-tazobactam; P > 0·05), but comparable concerning third-generation cephalosporins (30% vs. 33%). All microorganisms were sensitive to carbapenems apart from nosocomial infections with Enterococcus faecium (n = 3) and Candida albicans (n = 1) due to intrinsic resistance or lack of microbiological efficacy, respectively. No multidrug-resistant microorganisms were detected. Resistance to initial antibiotic treatment affected 30-day survival negatively (18% vs. 68%; P = 0·002). Resistance to initial antibiotic treatment was associated with increased mortality. With resistance to cephalosporins being frequent, piperacillin-tazobactam or carbapenems might be preferred as treatment of SBP. © 2016 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  8. The effects of nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis on the length of hospital stay and cost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundeslioglu, Özlem O; Tekin, Recep; Cevik, Saliha; Palanci, Yılmaz; Yazıcıoglu, Atilla

    2016-02-28

    In this study, the goal was to evaluate the impact of nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis in pediatric patients by determining the incidence of nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis, the resulting duration of hospital stay, and direct cost. To our knowledge, this is the first study in Turkey that evaluates the impact of pediatric nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis on duration of hospital stay and calculates the direct cost. Forty-nine patients who were diagnosed with nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis and hospitalized were included in the study. Nosocomial infection rates, organ systems affected by the nosocomial infections, and patients who had nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis were identified. A direct cost analysis of patients who were diagnosed with nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis was performed using copies of the invoices for the hospital bills. During the study period, there were 49 cases of nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis. The length of hospitalization was extended, on average, by more than 6.3 days in cases of nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis. The cost of hospitalization for patients with nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis was on average 1,554 ± 2,067 US dollars, compared to a cost of only 244 ± 103 US dollars for patients who did not have nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis. This difference in cost was statistically significant (p gastroenteritis is important because it significantly prolongs hospital stay and increases the social and economic burden of the hospitalization. Nosocomial rotavirus gastroenteritis can be reduced with prevention measures such as handwashing, isolation, and cohorting.

  9. The importance of the day of the week and duration of data collection in prevalence surveys of nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosselló-Urgell, J; Vaqué-Rafart, J; Armadans-Gil, L L; Vaquero-Puerta, J L; Elorza-Ricart, J M; Quintas-Fernández, J C; Hidalgo-Pardo, O; Arévalo-Alonso, J M

    2004-06-01

    In a national prevalence survey setting, we studied whether the day of week selected for data collection, and the number of days needed to complete the survey, were associated with the prevalence of hospital-acquired infection (HAI). The EPINE (Estudio de Prevalencia de las Infecciones Nosocomiales en España) database (1990-2002) was analysed for the purposes of the study. Adjusting for the admission day in the week, the number of intrinsic risk factors, the number of extrinsic risk factors and the prevalence length of stay, a 'weekend effect' was confirmed in this study. The day of the week selected for data collection was related to the presence of infection in the surveyed patients, showing for the period of Saturday-Monday a higher prevalence of patients with HAI (adjusted OR 1.08, 95%CI 1.05-1.10). There was a crude positive trend between number of weeks and prevalence, but the number of days involved in data collection was finally not associated with the prevalence of HAI, once adjustment for hospital size was made. The percentage of repeated records increased linearly with hospital size, and the frequency of infections was higher within this group (OR 2.8, 95%CI 2.6-3.0). The results of this study highlight the need for encouraging hospitals to shorten the time spent in obtaining a prevalence survey. If it is impossible to carry out the survey within the limits of one day, data collection should then be limited to that period of the week, Tuesday to Friday. Copyright 2004 The Hospital Infection Society

  10. Risk factors associated with multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii nosocomial infections at a tertiary care hospital in Makkah, Saudi Arabia - a matched case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gethamy, Manal M; Faidah, Hani S; Adetunji, Hamed Ademola; Ashgar, Sami S; Mohanned, Tayeb K; Mohammed, Al-Haj; Khurram, Muhammad; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine risk factors for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) nosocomial infections in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Methods We performed a hospital-based, matched case–control study in patients who were admitted to Al Noor Specialist Hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 August 2012. The study included cases of A. baumannii nosocomial infection and controls without infection. Controls were matched to cases by age and ward of admission. Results The most frequent site of infection was the respiratory tract (77.3%). Susceptibility to antimicrobial MDR-AB was 92.0% for ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, while it was 83.3% for imipenem, 83.0% for trimethoprim, 79.0% for amikacin, and 72.7% for gentamicin. Multiple logistic regression of risk factors showed that immunosuppression (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.5–5.6; p = 0.002), clinical outcome (OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.3–0.9; p = 0.01), invasive procedures (OR = 7.9; 95% CI 1.8–34.2; p = 0.002), a central venous catheter (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.5–5.6; p = 0.000), and an endotracheal tube (OR = 3.4; 95% CI 1.6–7.3; p = 0.001) were associated with MDR-AB. Conclusions Acinetobacter nosocomial infections are associated with admission to the ICU (Intensive care unit) and exposure to invasive procedures. PMID:28480813

  11. Risk factors associated with multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii nosocomial infections at a tertiary care hospital in Makkah, Saudi Arabia - a matched case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gethamy, Manal M; Faidah, Hani S; Adetunji, Hamed Ademola; Haseeb, Abdul; Ashgar, Sami S; Mohanned, Tayeb K; Mohammed, Al-Haj; Khurram, Muhammad; Hassali, Mohamed A

    2017-06-01

    Objective To determine risk factors for multi-drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDR-AB) nosocomial infections in intensive care units in a tertiary care hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia. Methods We performed a hospital-based, matched case-control study in patients who were admitted to Al Noor Specialist Hospital between 1 January 2012 and 31 August 2012. The study included cases of A. baumannii nosocomial infection and controls without infection. Controls were matched to cases by age and ward of admission. Results The most frequent site of infection was the respiratory tract (77.3%). Susceptibility to antimicrobial MDR-AB was 92.0% for ceftazidime and ciprofloxacin, while it was 83.3% for imipenem, 83.0% for trimethoprim, 79.0% for amikacin, and 72.7% for gentamicin. Multiple logistic regression of risk factors showed that immunosuppression (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.5-5.6; p = 0.002), clinical outcome (OR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.3-0.9; p = 0.01), invasive procedures (OR = 7.9; 95% CI 1.8-34.2; p = 0.002), a central venous catheter (OR = 2.9; 95% CI 1.5-5.6; p = 0.000), and an endotracheal tube (OR = 3.4; 95% CI 1.6-7.3; p = 0.001) were associated with MDR-AB. Conclusions Acinetobacter nosocomial infections are associated with admission to the ICU (Intensive care unit) and exposure to invasive procedures.

  12. Ten-year surveillance of nosocomial bloodstream infections: trends of aetiology and antimicrobial resistance in a comprehensive cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passerini, R; Ghezzi, Tl; Sandri, Mt; Radice, D; Biffi, R

    2011-01-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) are one of the major life-threatening infectious conditions in cancer patients and are responsible for prolonged hospital stays, high healthcare costs and significant mortality. Several clinical trials have reported an improved survival in patients treated with appropriate empirical broad-spectrum antibiotic therapy. Early detection of pathogens and determination of their susceptibility are essential for the optimization of treatment. Variability between hospitals is substantial and requires the individual analysis of local trends. The aim of this study is to assess the local epidemiology of BSI in a single cancer centre over a 10-year period. Retrospective microbiological surveillance of all febrile/infective episodes occurring in oncological and surgical patients in a high-volume cancer centre between January 1999 and December 2008 were considered. Patients' data were collected, processed and analyzed using the epidemiological resource of the Virtuoso Plus software (Metafora Informatica Srl, Milano, Italy). Spearman's rank correlation coefficient, including the two-tailed test of significance, was used to investigate trends of incidence and rate of antibiotic resistance over the 10-year period. A total of 13,058 blood cultures (BCs) were performed in 2,976 patients. BCs were positive in 2,447 tests, representing 740 infective/febrile episodes: 358 (48%) in medical oncology and 382 (52%) in surgical wards. Gram-positives were responsible for the majority of episodes in oncological and surgical divisions (about 63% and 55%, respectively). Gram-positives were also the most common organism in non-catheter-related BSIs (CRBSIs) both in medical oncology (75%) and in surgical divisions (50%). Enterococci showed an increased resistance to levofloxacin, from 5.6% to 25.7% (p = 0.02) and to erythromycin, from 41.7% to 61.4%, (p = 0.05). Similarly, coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS) developed resistance to levofloxacin and ciprofloxacin

  13. [Validation of the structure and resources of nosocomial infection control team in hospitals ascribed to VINCat program in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limón, Enrique; Pujol, Miquel; Gudiol, Francesc

    2014-07-01

    The main objective of this study was to validate the structure of the infection control team (ICT) in the hospitals adhered to VINCat program and secondary objective was to establish the consistency of resources of each center with the requirements established by the program. Qualitative research consisting of an ethnographic study using participant observation during the years 2008-2010. The centers were stratified in three groups by complexity and beds. The instrument was a semistructured interview to members of the ICT. The transcription of the interview was sent to informants for validation. In November 2010 a questionnaire regarding human resources and number hours dedicated to the ICT was sent. During 2008-2010, 65 centers had been adhered to VINCat program. In 2010, the ICT of Group I hospitals had a mean of two physician, one in full-time and one nurse for every 230 beds. In Group II, one physician part-time and one nurse per 180 beds and in Group III a physician and a nurse for every 98 beds, both part-time. In 2010, all hospitals had a structured ICT, an operative infection committee, and a hospital member representing the center at the program as well as enough electronic resources. The hospitals participating in the program have now VINCat an adequate surveillance structure and meet the minimum technical and human resources required to provide high-quality data. However human resources are not guaranteed. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  14. [Contemporary view on the role of bacteriophages in evolution of nosocomial strains and prophylaxis of healthcare associated infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zueva, L P; Aslanov, B I; Akimkin, V G

    2014-01-01

    One of the actual problems of contemporary healthcare are healthcare associated infections (HAI). An important aspect of study of HAI problem is the study of evolution of hospital strains causing HAI. The knowledge accumulated to date in the field of bacteria genetics gives evidence on the significant role of phages in the mechanism of virulence obtaining by pathogenic and opportunistic microorganisms. The studies of the authors of this article show that bacteriophages may play a significant role in the formation of virulent properties in hospital conditions that in different hospitals with participation of phages form virulent and antibiotic resistant hospital strains of HAI causative agents. At the same time bacteriophages are effective means for HAI therapy and prophylaxis. Under the condition of mass and irrational use of antibiotics, HAI causative agents form multiple resistance to the existing antibacterial preparations. In this regard bacteriophages as antimicrobial agents become especially actual. To date in Russian and foreign literature considerable material has been accumulated that shows high effectiveness of bacteriophages under the conditions of rational use. The aim of this review is to evaluate contemporary achievements in the field of study of bacteriophage role in evolution of hospital strains and therapy and prophylaxis of healthcare associated infections.

  15. Antimicrobial Activity of Ephedra pachyclada Methanol Extract on Some Enteric Gram Negative Bacteria Which Causes Nosocomial Infections by Agar Dilution Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Sadeghi Dosari

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Past history indicates that plants were served as an important source of medicine. Otherwise, in developing countries people use medicinal plants against infectious disease because they cannot afford expensive drugs. Due to increasing rate of drug-resistant diseases, there is an urgent need to detect novel antimicrobial compounds from medicinal plants. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine Antimicrobial activity of Ephedra pachyclada methanol extract on some enteric Gram-negative bacteria which causes nosocomial infections by agar dilution method. Methods In this cross-sectional study, in order to examine the antimicrobial effects of Ephedra pachyclada extract on intestinal Gram-negative bacteria, we exposed them to 0/128, 0/25, 0/5, 1, 2, 4 and 8 mg/mL of the extract. Ephedra pachyclada was collected from Jiroft Heights and methanolic extract was prepared with maceration method, during which, 50 gr powder of Ephedra pachyclada was dissolved in 300 mL of 80% methanol. Results In this study, the antibacterial effects of Ephedra pachyclada extract on Gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Escherichia coli (PTCC-O157, Escherichia coli (ATCC-25922, Klebsiella pnemoniae, Serratia marcescens was investigated, defining the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC by agar dilution method. It has been demonstrated that methanolic extract of Ephedra pachyclada affect intestinal Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusions The result showed that, Ephedra pachyclada extract has effective antimicrobial ingredients which are cheap and readily available. It can be used for medicinal purposes in the production of antimicrobial drug.

  16. Determination of the Antimicrobial Effects of Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Cannabis Sativa on Multiple Drug Resistant Bacteria Isolated from Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Sarmadyan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: The science of identification and employment of medicinal plants dates back to the early days of man on earth. Cannabis (hashish is the most common illegal substance used in the United States and was subjected to extensive research as a powerful local disinfecting agent for mouth cavity and skin and an anti-tubercular agent in 1950. Methods: Clinical strains were isolated from hospitalized patients in Vali-e-Asr Hospital of Arak. The hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis (5 g was prepared following liquid-liquid method and drying in 45˚C. The antimicrobial properties of the extract were determined through disk diffusion and determination of MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration. Results: First, the sensitivity of bacteria was detected based on disk diffusion method and the zone of inhibition was obtained for MRSA (12 mm, S.aureus 25923 (14 mm, E. coli ESBL+: (10 mm, and Klebsiella pneumoniae (7 mm. Disk diffusion for Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter demonstrated no inhibitory zones. Through Broth dilution method, MIC of cannabis extract on the bacteria was determined: E.coli 25922: 50µg/ml, E.coli ESBL+:100 µg/ml, S.aureus 25923:25 µg/ml, MRSA: 50 µg/ml, Pseudomona aeroginosaESBL+> 100 µg/ml, Pseudomonas: 100 µg/ml, Klebsiella pneumoniae: 100 µg/ml, and Acinetobacter baumannii> 1000. Conclusion: The maximum anti-microbial effect of the hydro-alcoholic extract of cannabis was seen for gram positive cocci, especially S. aureus, whereas non-fermentative gram negatives presented resistance to the extract. This extract had intermediate effect on Enterobacteriacae family. Cannabis components extracted through chemical analysis can perhaps be effective in treatment of nosocomial infections.

  17. An outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection in a special-care baby unit of a community hospital in United Arab Emirates: the importance of the air conditioner duct as a nosocomial reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uduman, S A; Farrukh, A S; Nath, K N R; Zuhair, M Y H; Ifrah, A; Khawla, A D; Sunita, P

    2002-11-01

    We report an outbreak of Serratia marcescens infection in a special-care baby unit (SCBU) of a university-affiliated community hospital in the United Arab Emirates. The outbreak involved 36 infants and lasted for 20 weeks. Seven of the colonized infants developed invasive illnesses in the form of bacteraemia (four cases), bacteraemic meningitis (two) and clinical sepsis (one). Three other term infants had purulent conjunctivitis. There were five deaths with an overall mortality of 14%. S. marcescens was cultured from airflow samples from the air conditioning (AC) which was the reservoir of infection in this outbreak. Elimination of the nosocomial source and outbreak containment were eventually achieved by specialized robotic cleaning of the entire AC duct system of the SCBU. Strict adherence to the infection control policies was reinforced to prevent transmission of cross-infection. Copyright 2002 The Hospital Infection Society

  18. Characterization of carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex isolates from nosocomial bloodstream infections in southern Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourabbas, Bahman; Firouzi, Roya; Pouladfar, Gholamreza

    2016-03-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important opportunistic bacterial pathogen responsible for serious infections in hospitalized patients. From a total of 78 consecutive non-repetitive Acinetobacter spp. isolates from patients with blood infections, 61 were carbapenem resistant, which were positive for blaOXA-51-like (96.7%), blaOXA-23-like (77 %), blaOXA-58-like (8.1%) and blaOXA-40-like genes (32.8%) by multiplex PCR. The isolates were identified as A. baumannii (n = 59) and Acinetobacter nosocomialis (n = 2). Also, we found a case of Acinetobacter junii, causing bacteraemia, that possessed the IMP gene. High levels of resistance were observed to fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, tigecycline and to the beta-lactam antibiotics, including piperacillin/tazobactam and ampicillin/sulbactam. ISAba1 was present in 96.7% of all Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii complex (Acb) isolates. Also, 33 (54.1%) and 23 (37.7%) isolates harboured ISAba1 upstream of blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-51-like genes, respectively, though this was not observed in A. nosocomialis isolates. No relationship was observed between the presence of ISAba1 upstream of oxacillinase genes and the level of carbapenem resistance in all Acb isolates. Only two genes encoding metallo-beta-lactamase (VIM, SPM) were detected in all Acb isolates. This suggests that carbapenem resistance in blood-isolate Acb is mostly due to the presence of acquired carbapenemases. This is the first report from Iran on the identification of A. nosocomialis isolates that possess multiple oxacillinase genes and lack upstream ISAba1.

  19. [Investigation of biofilm-associated antibiotic susceptibilities of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from catheter-related nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayındır Bilman, Fulya; Can, Füsun; Kaya, Melek; Yazıcı, Ayşe Canan

    2013-07-01

    Risks for development of local and/or systemic infections are the most important complications of catheters that are widely used during hospitalization process. The aims of this study were to investigate and compare the antibiotic susceptibilities of methicillin-resistant staphylococci isolated from catheters, in planktonic and biofilm forms, and to evaluate the antimicrobial effects of antibiotics on those forms alone and in combinations. A total of 30 strains [15 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 15 methicillin-resistant coagulase-negative staphylococci (MR-CNS)] isolated from catheter cultures of patients hospitalized in different clinics and intensive care units in Baskent University Medical School Hospital between 2006-2009, were included in the study. The antibiotic sensitivities of MRSA and MR-CNS isolates were investigated in vitro in planktonic phase and on sessile cells after biofilm was formed. Vancomycin, ciprofloxacin, rifampicin, gentamicin, meropenem, tigecycline, linezolid, ceftazidime and cephazolin were used for antibiotic susceptibility testing. The sensitivity of planktonic cells to antibiotics was primarily investigated, so that minimal inhibitor concentration (MIC) and minimal bactericidal concentration (MBC) values were determined by broth microdilution method. Afterwards, each strain was transformed to sessile cell in a biofilm environment, and MIC and MBC values were also determined for sessile cells. Double and triple antibiotic combinations were prepared, the effectiveness of combinations were studied on both planktonic and biofilm cells with multiple-combination bactericidal testing (MCBT) method. The data set obtained from planktonic and biofilm cells for each antibiotic analyzed via two proportion z test. Statistically significant decreases were found in the sensitivities of sessile cells when compared to planktonic cells (pantibiotic combinations also showed the susceptibility decrease between planktonic and

  20. Response to Alert on Possible Infections with Mycobacterium chimaera From Contaminated Heater-Cooler Devices in Hospitals Participating in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program (CNISP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Dominik; Macri, Jennifer; Hota, Susy; Amaratunga, Kanchana; Davis, Ian; Johnston, Lynn; Lee, Bonita; Pelude, Linda; Science, Michelle; Smith, Stephanie; Wong, Alice

    2018-04-01

    Canadian hospitals were made aware of the risk of Mycobacterium chimaera infection associated with heater-cooler units (HCUs) through alerts issued by the US food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In response, most hospitals conducted retrospective reviews for infections, informed exposed patients, and initiated a requirement for informed consent with HCU use. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:482-484.

  1. Cotton textiles modified with citric acid as efficient anti-bacterial agent for prevention of nosocomial infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof Vukušić, Sandra; Flinčec Grgac, Sandra; Budimir, Ana; Kalenić, Smilja

    2011-01-01

    . The current protocols and initiatives in infection control could be improved by the use of antimicrobial agents applied on cotton carbohydrate polymer. PMID:21328723

  2. Nosocomial transmission of Cupriavidus pauculus during extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stovall, S H; Wisdom, C; McKamie, W; Ware, W; Dedman, H; Fiser, R T

    2010-01-01

    Patients undergoing extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) are at increased risk of infection. We present the first known report of nosocomial infection with Cupriavidus pauculus attributable to contamination from ECMO equipment and describe the measures taken to halt subsequent infections. A cluster of infections in ECMO patients should prompt team members to consider contamination of equipment with environmental pathogens as a possible cause.

  3. Infecção urinária hospitalar por leveduras do gênero Candida Nosocomial urinary tract infections by Candida species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D.R. DE OLIVEIRA

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: O isolamento de leveduras na urina não indica necessariamente infecção, porém a infecção do trato urinário por Candida constitui um problema hospitalar crescente. Neste estudo, o significado clínico da candidúria foi investigado em hospital universitário brasileiro. MÉTODOS: Em 1998, Candida spp. foi isolada na urina de 166 pacientes internados no Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto-SP. Os prontuários médicos de 100 destes pacientes, com candidúria detectada depois de três ou mais dias de hospitalização, foram revisados sobre aspectos microbiológicos, epidemiológicos e clínicos referentes a esse episódio. RESULTADOS: C. tropicalis foi isolada em 53% e C. albicans em 36% dos casos. Em 76% do doentes, a urocultura mostrou mais de 20.000 colônias de leveduras/mL. Doenças subjacentes crônicas, como neuropatias, cardiopatias e outras neoplasias e trauma foram freqüentes. Dos pacientes, 25% tinham diabetes mellitus. Os principais fatores predisponentes associados com candidúria foram: antibioticoterapia prévia (93%, sonda vesical de demora (83%, cirurgia nos últimos 60 dias (48%, insuficiência renal (32%, infecção bacteriana simultânea (28% e uso de corticosteróides (20% ou imunossupressores (10%. Apenas 43/100 pacientes foram tratados, 42 com fluconazol ou anfotericina B. No período de 60 dias após o episódio de candidúria, 40% dos doentes faleceram. CONCLUSÕES: Na presente casuística, as espécies não-albicans de Candida foram os principais agentes de candidúria, sendo considerados patógenos emergentes do trato urinário em pacientes gravemente enfermos. Foram, ainda, observadas doenças subjacentes, fatores de risco e alta mortalidade comumente associados com a candidíase do trato urinário.BACKGROUND: Isolation of a yeast in urine does not necessarily indicate infection, but Candida urinary tract infection is an increasing nosocomial problem. In this study the

  4. Infecciones nosocomiales en un servicio de cirugía cardíaca pediátrica Nosocomial infections in the pediatric cardiac surgery service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Alberto Bravo Pérez de Ordaz

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Las infecciones nosocomiales son responsables de una elevada tasa de morbilidad y mortalidad en el paciente pediátrico crítico. Los niños con defectos cardíacos congénitos que reciben una cirugía cardíaca presentan las más altas tasas de infección nosocomial entre todos los pacientes críticos. Los objetivos del presente trabajo fueron determinar la incidencia posquirúrgica de las infecciones nosocomiales en la unidad de cuidados intensivos cardiovascular, identificar los sitios de localización y los gérmenes más frecuentes, así como caracterizar la muestra en cuanto a duración de la asistencia ventilatoria mecánica y la mortalidad. Del total de 251 pacientes, 53 (21,1 % presentaron 76 infecciones nosocomiales (tasa de infección nosocomial de 30,2 %, y de ellos 37 (69,8 % tuvieron solamente un episodio y 16 pacientes (30,1 % presentaron 2 o más. El tipo más frecuente de infección nosocomial fue la infección del torrente sanguíneo (50 %, seguido por la infección superficial de la herida quirúrgica (28,7 % y neumonía nosocomial (15,7 %. Los microorganismos más comunes aislados fueron el estafilococo coagulasa-negativo (35,9 %, la Pseudomonas aeruginosa (17,9 % y estafilococo coagulasa-positivo (12,8 %. Los pacientes con infección nosocomial requirieron mayor tiempo de ventilación mecánica (81,7 h frente a 14,4 h y presentaron mayor mortalidad (20,8 % frente a 4 %. Se concluyó que 2 de cada 10 pacientes operados presentaron una infección nosocomial, que el torrente sanguíneo fue el sitio de localización más frecuente y el estafilococo coagulasa-negativo, el germen causal predominante. Los niños infectados nosocomialmente necesitaron mayor tiempo de ventilación mecánica y presentaron una supervivencia inferior al resto de los pacientes.

  5. Clinical Performance of the (1,3)-β-d-Glucan Assay in Early Diagnosis of Nosocomial Candida Bloodstream Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Del Bono, Valerio; Delfino, Emanuele; Furfaro, Elisa; Mikulska, Malgorzata; Nicco, Elena; Bruzzi, Paolo; Mularoni, Alessandra; Bassetti, Matteo; Viscoli, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Microbiological diagnosis of nosocomial candidemia is negatively affected by suboptimal culture yield. Alternative methods are not fully reliable as an aid in candidemia diagnosis. Recently, the detection of (1,3)-β-d-glucan (BG) has been shown to be very promising in this setting. We carried out a prospective study on the clinical usefulness of BG detection in early diagnosis of candidemia. BG detection was performed in patients with fever unresponsive to antibacterial agents and risk factor...

  6. Internal Jugular Vein Thrombosis following Oropharyngeal Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asli Bostanci

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein thrombosis (IJVT is a rare condition which may lead to life-threatening complications such as sepsis and pulmonary embolism. Prolonged central venous catheterization, intravenous (IV drug use, trauma, and radiotherapy are the most frequent causes of the IJVT. IJVT that develops after the oropharyngeal infection is a quite rare situation today. In this paper, a 37-year-old woman was presented; swelling occurred on her neck after acute tonsillitis and she was diagnosed with IJVT through Doppler ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging and managed without complications. Early diagnosis and conservative treatment with broad-spectrum IV antibiotics and anticoagulant agents have a critical importance for the prevention of fatal complications.

  7. Healthcare-Associated Clostridium difficile Infections and Strain Diversity in Pediatric Hospitals in the Canadian Nosocomial Infection Surveillance Program, 2007-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Saux, Nicole; Gravel, Denise; Mulvey, Michael; Moore, Dorothy; Langley, Joanne M; Richardson, Susan; Quach, Caroline; Choi, Kelly Baekyung; Miller, Mark; Katz, Kevin

    2015-12-01

    Children with healthcare-associated Clostridium difficile infection were identified. The incidence increased from 3.2/10,000 patient days in 2007 to 5.2/10,000 patient days in 2011 (p < 0.001). Of 169 isolates, the most common North American Pulsed-Field (NAP) types were NAP4 (n = 43; (25.4%), and NAP1 (n = 25;14.8%) while 55 (32.6%) were non-assigned NAP types. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Pernille; Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Kjaeldgaard, P

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To describe a nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis during four months after June 1989. SETTING--A department of infectious diseases in Copenhagen, seeing about half the patients with AIDS in Denmark. SUBJECTS--73 HIV antibody negative subjects and 60 antibody positive subjects.......05). CONCLUSIONS--The clinical and epidemiological findings indicate that infection was the consequence of very small inocula. Increased sensitivity to cryptosporidiosis may be an unrecognised side effect of oral sulphonamide treatment in patients with AIDS....

  9. Nosocomial Candidiasis: Antifungal Stewardship and the Importance of Rapid Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Castanheira, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Candidemia and other forms of candidiasis are associated with considerable excess mortality and costs. Despite the addition of several new antifungal agents with improved spectrum and potency, the frequency of Candida infection and associated mortality have not decreased in the past two decades. The lack of rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests has led to considerable overuse of antifungal agents resulting in increased costs, selection pressure for resistance, unnecessary drug toxicity, and adverse drug interactions. Both the lack of timely diagnostic tests and emergence of antifungal resistance pose considerable problems for antifungal stewardship. Whereas antifungal stewardship with a focus on nosocomial candidiasis should be able to improve the administration of antifungal therapy in terms of drug selection, proper dose and duration, source control and de-escalation therapy, an important parameter, timeliness of antifungal therapy, remains a victim of slow and insensitive diagnostic tests. Fortunately, new proteomic and molecular diagnostic tools are improving the time to species identification and detection. In this review we will describe the potential impact that rapid diagnostic testing and antifungal stewardship can have on the management of nosocomial candidiasis. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The International Society for Human and Animal Mycology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Uso de diagramas de controle na vigilância epidemiológica das infecções hospitalares Use of statistical process control charts in the epidemiological surveillance of nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aglai Arantes

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Monitorizar a tendência de ocorrência e identificar surtos de infecções hospitalares utilizando diagramas de controles. MÉTODOS: No período de janeiro de 1998 a dezembro de 2000, a ocorrência de infecções hospitalares foi avaliada em uma coorte de 460 pacientes, internados em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Pediátrica de um hospital universitário, segundo os conceitos e critérios da metodologia do sistema "National Nosocomial Infection Surveillance", do "Centers for Disease Control" (EUA. Os gráficos foram construídos de acordo com a distribuição probabilística de Poisson. Quatro linhas horizontais foram plotadas. A linha central foi representada pela incidência média das infecções hospitalares no período estudado e as linhas de alerta superior e de controle superior foram calculadas a partir de dois e três desvios-padrão acima da incidência média das infecções hospitalares, respectivamente. Os surtos de infecção hospitalar foram identificados quando sua incidência mensal permaneceu acima da linha do limite de controle superior. RESULTADOS: A incidência média de infecções hospitalares por mil pacientes dia foi de 20. Um surto de infecção do trato urinário foi identificado em julho de 2000, cuja taxa de infecção foi de 63 por mil pacientes dia, ultrapassando a linha de controle superior, configurando um período epidêmico. CONCLUSÕES: A utilização dos diagramas de controle do nível endêmico, tanto por avaliação global e sítio específica, possibilitou identificar e distinguir das variações naturais nas taxas de ocorrência de infecções hospitalares aquelas de causas incomuns, como os surtos ou epidemias, dispensando o uso de cálculos e testes de hipóteses.OBJECTIVE: To monitor occurrence trends and identify clusters of nosocomial infection (NI using statistical process control (SPC charts. METHODS: Between January 1998 and December 2000 nosocomial infection occurrence was evaluated

  11. The importance of tissue penetration in achieving successful antimicrobial treatment of nosocomial pneumonia and complicated skin and soft-tissue infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: vancomycin and linezolid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Gary E; Wells, Elizabeth M

    2010-03-01

    The rising prevalence of nosocomial methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and the recent emergence of community-associated MRSA are major clinical, public health, and economic challenges. MRSA is a leading cause of nosocomial pneumonia and complicated skin and soft-tissue infections (cSSTI). Vancomycin and linezolid are two commonly used antimicrobial agents with activity against Gram-positive pathogens, particularly MRSA, that are used to treat both nosocomial pneumonia and cSSTI. Recently, the therapeutic efficacy of vancomycin in the treatment of hospitalized patients with MRSA infections has been questioned due to the emergence of MRSA strains with reduced susceptibility to vancomycin together with concerns related to inadequate dosing and poor tissue penetration of the drug. A literature review was conducted to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pulmonary and tissue penetration of vancomycin and linezolid. Using MEDLINE and EMBASE, the most relevant articles in English published over the past 25 years (up to October 2008) were identified and summarized. Studies in human volunteers and adult patients that measured concentrations of antibiotic in serum, epithelial lining fluid (ELF), and tissue were selected for further review. For both drugs, pharmacokinetic studies were conducted in diverse patient populations and employed varying techniques to measure tissue concentrations. Vancomycin concentrations in ELF ranged from 5 to 25% of simultaneous plasma levels, while concentrations in whole homogenized lung tissue were slightly higher (24-41%). Distribution of vancomycin into soft tissue was variable. For linezolid, overall mean concentrations in ELF and in soft tissue were generally similar or higher than simultaneous plasma levels, although variability in tissue penetration across studies in healthy volunteers and patients was seen. The studies included in this review vary greatly in their designs and patient populations; this, together with

  12. Process improvement plan for the reduction of nosocomial pneumonia in patients on ventilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicotra, D; Ulrich, C

    1996-07-01

    Pneumonia is a frequently occurring nosocomial infection that often results in serious illness and death of the patient. In one hospital, after the discovery of a ventilator-associated nosocomial infection rate that was higher than the national standard, a multidisciplinary team was formed. The team followed the FOCUS-PDCA model of quality improvement to identify methods to improve the nosocomial pneumonia infection rate for mechanically ventilated patients. Three areas of potential improvement were identified: trial of a closed suction system, policies and procedures for cleaning of ventilators, and staff education. Additionally, a research project was conducted to identify predictors of ventilator-associated nosocomial pneumonia. These projects resulted in a reduction of the ventilator-associated nosocomial pneumonia infection rate to 8.3/ 1,000 ventilator days and a cost savings of more than $580,000.

  13. Neonatal intensive care unit: Reservoirs of Nosocomial pathogens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Improvement in the care and treatment of neonates had contributed to their increased survival. Nosocomial infection remains an important problem in intensive care units. Hospital wards had been shown to act as reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms associated with infection. To assess the prevalence of pathogenic ...

  14. Risk of nosocomial bacteria transmissions: evaluation of cleaning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There exists a small but definite risk of nosocomial infection transmission attributable to ultrasonography probes and coupling gels. Objective: Our objective was to ascertain whether the current method of probe disinfection in between patients is adequate to prevent cross infection, and to determine the best and ...

  15. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia: role of linezolid in the People's Republic of China

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    Lesher B

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Beth Lesher,1 Xin Gao,1 Yixi Chen,2 Zhengyin Liu3 1Pharmerit International, Bethesda, MD, USA; 2Pfizer Investment Co. Ltd, 3Department of Infectious Disease, Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, People’s Republic of China Abstract: The burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA nosocomial pneumonia in the People’s Republic of China is high, with methicillin-resistance rates greater than 80% reported for patients with S. aureus pneumonia treated in intensive care units. Historically, vancomycin was the treatment of choice for patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infections. Recent evidence suggests that the minimum inhibitory concentration for vancomycin is increasing. Additionally, patients treated with vancomycin require monitoring of vancomycin trough concentrations and can develop nephrotoxicity. Linezolid is a treatment option for patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infections that can be administered either intravenously or orally. Analysis of data from a worldwide linezolid surveillance program initiated in the year 2004 shows no evidence of increasing linezolid minimum inhibitory concentrations. The clinical efficacy of linezolid for patients with gram-positive, including MRSA, nosocomial pneumonia, was evaluated in numerous studies. In general, results from these studies show higher or similar clinical success with no mortality difference for linezolid compared to vancomycin treated patients. Results from a Phase IV study enrolling patients with MRSA-confirmed nosocomial pneumonia suggest higher clinical cure rates for linezolid compared to vancomycin treated patients. Although acquisition costs are higher for linezolid compared to vancomycin therapy, evidence suggests similar overall medical costs. Cost-analysis results from a Chinese perspective show that linezolid dominated vancomycin therapy for MRSA nosocomial pneumonia in ~35% of

  16. Nosocomial Legionnaires’ Disease: Clinical and Radiographic Patterns

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    Thomas J Marrie

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available From 1981 to 1991, 55 patients (33 males, 22 females, mean age 58.6 years with nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease were studied. The mortality rate was 64%. One-half of the patients developed nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease within three weeks of admission. A surprising clinical feature was the low rate of findings of consolidation on physical examination, despite the fact that 52% of patients had this finding on chest radiograph. More than one-half of patients had pre-existing lung disease, rendering a radiographic diagnosis of pneumonia due to Legionella pneumophila impossible in 16% of cases despite microbiological confirmation. Nineteen per cent of patients who had blood cultures done had a pathogen other than L pneumophila isolated, suggesting dual infection in at least some of the patients. When the clinical and radiographic findings were combined it was noted that 40% of patients had one of three patterns suggestive of nosocomial Legionnaires’ disease: rapidly progressive pneumonia, lobar opacity and multiple peripheral opacities. However, in 60% of patients there were no distinctive features.

  17. International Spinal Cord Injury Urinary Tract Infection Basic Data Set

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetz, L L; Cardenas, D D; Kennelly, M

    2013-01-01

    To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research.......To develop an International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Urinary Tract Infection (UTI) Basic Data Set presenting a standardized format for the collection and reporting of a minimal amount of information on UTIs in daily practice or research....

  18. Hospital-Acquired Urinary Tract Infections: Results of a Cohort Study Performed in an Internal Medicine Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobão, Maria João; Sousa, Paulo

    2017-09-29

    Urinary tract infections are the most frequent healthcare associated infections, being related to both high costs and morbidity. Our intention was to carry out an epidemiological characterization of hospital acquired urinary tract infections that occurred in an internal medicine department of a Portuguese hospital. Retrospective cohort study (historic cohort). Data were analysed from a systematic random sample of 388 patients, representative of the 3492 admissions occurred in 2014 in that department. One in four patients underwent the placement of a bladder catheter [24.7% (n = 96); 95% CI: 20% - 29%], 36.5% (95% CI: 33% - 48%) of which in the absence of clinical criteria for that procedure. The global cumulative incidence rate for nosocomial urinary tract infections was 4.6% (95% CI: 2.5% - 6.7%). Most hospital acquired urinary tract infections (61.1%) were related to bladder catheter use. We quantified 3.06 infections / 1000 patient-days and 14.5 infections / 1000 catheter-days. Catheter associated urinary tract infection occurred at an early stage of hospitalization. The vast majority of patients (66.7%) that developed a catheter associated urinary tract infection were subjected to bladder catheter placement at emergency department. Seventy one per cent of catheter associated urinary tract infection occurred in patients that were subjected to bladder catheter placement without criteria. These results point to an excessive and inadequate use of urinary catheters, highlighting the need for judicious use taking into account the formal clinical indications. The incidence of catheter associated urinary tract infection is similar to what we found in other studies. Nevertheless we found a very high incidence density per catheter-days that may foresee a problem probably related to the absence of early withdrawal of the device, and to both bladder catheter placement and maintenance practices. A significant part of catheter associated urinary tract infection

  19. Frequency of nosocomial pneumonia in ICU Qazvin Razi hospital (2013

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    S. Makhlogi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nosocomial pneumonia is the most prevalent cause of hospital-acquired infection in intensive care units (ICU. The aim of this research was to detect the frequency and predisposing factors of nosocomial Ventilator Associated Pneumonia, by cross sectional study on 188 patients that were hospitalized in ICU Qazvin Razi Hospital. Using questionnaire based on the national nosocomial infection surveillance system (NNIS data collected and analyzed. The average age of patients was 51±24 years old, 37 hospitalized patients (19/6% in the fourth day of admission were affected Ventilator Associated Pneumonia. The most common pathogenesis of causing nosocomial pneumonia were klebsiella in 13 patients (35/1%, staph in 8 patients (21/6%, sodomona in 8 patients (21/6%, ecoli in 3 patients (8/1%, cetrobacter in 2 patients (5/4%, antrococus and Proteus each of them in 1 patient (each 2/7%. Considering (19/6% frequency of nosocomial pneumonia in this study, it’s necessary to act standard protocols in nursing care and medication process.

  20. Surveillance of nosocomial infections in a Mexican community hospital: how are we doing? Vigilancia epidemiológica de infecciones nosocomiales en un hospital comunitario de México: ¿Cómo vamos?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes García-García

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE. To compare the nosocomial infection (NI rate obtained from a retrospective review of clinical charts with that from the routine nosocomial infection surveillance system in a community hospital. MATERIAL AND METHODS. Retrospective review of a randomized sample of clinical charts.Results were compared to standard surveillance using crude and adjusted analyses. RESULTS. A total of 440 discharges were reviewed, there were 27 episodes of NIs among 22 patients. Cumulated incidence was 6.13 NI per 100 discharges. Diarrhea, pneumonia and peritonitis were the most common infections. Predictors of NI by Cox regression analysis included pleural catheter (HR 16.38, entry through the emergency ward, hospitalization in the intensive care unit (HR 7.19, and placement of orotracheal tube (HR 5.54. CONCLUSIONS. Frequency of NIs in this community hospital was high and underestimated. We identified urgent needs in the areas of training and monitoring.OBJETIVO. Comparar la tasa de infecciones nosocomiales (IN resultante de la revisión retrospectiva de expedientes clínicos con los resultados del sistema rutinario de vigilancia de IN de un hospital general. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS. Revisión retrospectiva de una muestra seleccionada aleatoriamente de expedientes clínicos. Comparación con los resultados obtenidos por el sistema rutinario de vigilancia de IN. Análisis bivariado y multivariado de datos retrospectivos. RESULTADOS. De 440 egresos hubo 27 episodios de IN en 22 pacientes. La incidencia acumulada fue de 6.13 IN por 100 egresos. Las infecciones más frecuentes fueron diarrea, neumonía y peritonitis. Los predictores de IN fueron catéter pleural (HR 16.38, ingreso por urgencias y estancia en cuidados intensivos (HR 7.19, y colocación de tubo orotraqueal (HR 5.54. CONCLUSIONES. La frecuencia de IN fue elevada y subestimada por el sistema rutinario. Identificamos necesidades urgentes de monitoreo y entrenamiento en áreas específicas.

  1. Quantifying the risk of nosocomial infection within Ebola Holding Units: a retrospective cohort study of negative patients discharged from five Ebola Holding Units in Western Area, Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arkell, Paul; Youkee, Daniel; Brown, Colin S; Kamara, Abdul; Kamara, Thaim B; Johnson, Oliver; Lado, Marta; George, Viginia; Koroma, Fatmata; King, Matilda B; Parker, Benson E; Baker, Peter

    2017-01-01

    A central pillar in the response to the 2014 Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in Sierra Leone was the role of Ebola Holding Units (EHUs). These units isolated patients meeting a suspect case definition, tested them for EVD, initiated appropriate early treatment and discharged negative patients to onward inpatient care or home. Positive patients were referred to Ebola Treatment Centres. We aimed to estimate the risk of nosocomial transmission within these EHUs. We followed up a cohort of 543 patients discharged with a negative EVD test from five EHUs in the Western Area, Sierra Leone, and examined all line-listed subsequent EVD tests from any facility in the Western Area to see whether the patient was retested within 30 days, matching by name, age and address. We defined possible readmissions as having the same name and age but uncertain address, and confirmed readmissions where name, age and address matched. We found a positive readmission rate of 3.3% (18 cases), which included 1.5% confirmed readmissions (8 cases) and 1.8% possible readmissions (10 cases). This is lower than rates previously reported. We cannot ascertain whether EVD was acquired within the EHUs or from re-exposure in the community. No demographic or clinical variables were identified as risk factors for positive readmission, likely due to our small sample size. These findings support the EHU model as a safe method for isolation of suspect EVD patients and their role in limiting the spread of EVD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Characteristics of Nosocomial MRSA in Assir Central Hospital, Abha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Over a six-month period a study of Staphylococcus aureus isolates from clinical specimens of patients with nosocomial infections in Assir Central Hospital (ACH), Abha, Saudi Arabia, between September 2003 and February 2004, was carried out. Isolation and identification of Staphylococcus aureus was performed using ...

  3. Drug-resistant post-neurosurgical nosocomial Acinetobacter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The majority of carbapenem-resistant isolates were resistant to at least three other antibiotic classes. The emergence of postsurgical multi-drug resistant Acinetobacter meningitis highlights the importance of implementing preventative strategies towards nosocomial infections. Key words: Acinetobacter baumannii, resistance ...

  4. Prevalence of internal parasite infections of cattle in the communal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of internal parasite infections of cattle in the communal farming areas of Mashonaland East Province, Zimbabwe. G D Vassilev. Abstract. (Zimbabwe Veterinary Journal, 1999, 30(1): 1-18). Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT.

  5. Random effect modelling of patient-related risk factors in orthopaedic procedures: results from the Dutch nosocomial infection surveillance network 'PREZIES'.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muilwijk, J; Walenkamp, G H I M; Voss, Andreas; Wille, Jan C; Hof, Susan van den

    2006-01-01

    In the Dutch surveillance for surgical site infections (SSIs), data from 70277 orthopaedic procedures with 1895 SSIs were collected between 1996 and 2003. The aims of this study were: (1) to analyse the trends in SSIs associated with Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria; (2) to estimate

  6. Las infecciones nosocomiales y la calidad de la atención médica The nosocomial infections and the quality of medical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Navarrete-Navarro

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo más importante de un programa de control de calidad en hospitales es reducir el riesgo de adquirir una infección, la morbilidad y los costos asociados. Es indispensable la organización de un equipo con liderazgo técnico y humanístico que permita: a identificar los problemas, b determinar la importancia de cada uno de ellos, c encontrar sus causas, d proponer soluciones y e evaluar continuamente todo el programa. El desarrollo de estas cualidades técnicas y humanísticas por parte del líder y los miembros del programa, así como el uso continuo de las herramientas mencionadas, han producido el único programa validado y altamente efectivo de control de calidad en los hospitales.The main objective of a hospital-acquired infections control program is to decrease the risk of acquisition and the morbidity and costs associated. The organization of a team with technical and humanistic leadership is essential. Every infection control program must also develop strategies that allow: a identification of the problems, b to establish the importance of each one, c to determine their causes, d to develop solutions and e the evaluation of the recomended solutions. The development of technical and humanistic habilities by the leader and the members of the team, and the use of the tools mentioned above have produced the only validate and highly effective program of quality improvement in the hospital.

  7. Study on chemical analysis, antioxidant and in vitro antifungal activities of essential oil from wild Vitex agnus-castus L. seeds growing in area of Argan Tree of Morocco against clinical strains of Candida responsible for nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asdadi, A; Hamdouch, A; Oukacha, A; Moutaj, R; Gharby, S; Harhar, H; El Hadek, M; Chebli, B; Idrissi Hassani, L M

    2015-12-01

    To study the composition, the antioxidant activity and the in vitro antifungal action anti-Candida species of essential oils extracted from seeds of Vite xagnus-castus L. The essential oils were extracted using Clevenger-type apparatus and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The antioxidant activity was analyzed using the DPPH free radical-scavenging method. Susceptibility tests for Candida albicans (12), C. dubliniensis (1), C. glabrata (3), C. krusei (3), C. parapsilosis (6), C. lusitaniae (1), C. famata (1) and C. tropicalis (3) were expressed as inhibition zone by the disc-diffusion method and as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimal fungicidal concentration (MFC) by the broth macrodilution method, compared to amphotricin B and fluconazol as standard drugs. Major components were: 1,8-cineole (19.61%), sabinene (14.57%), α-pinene (9.76%), β-farnesene (6.04%), β-caryophyllene oxide (5.83%) and β-caryophyllene (5.02%). A low antioxidant activity was found (IC50=1.072mg/ml), but it can be exploited. V. agnus-castus seeds essential oils disosed a 35-58mm zone of inhibition (mean: 49mm) against all 30 isolates tested. In broth macrodilution method, all the tested Candida species were susceptible to the essential oils and this activity was concentration-dependent. MIC values varied from 0.13 to 2.13mg/ml V. agnus-castus seeds essential oils. Results of this study indicated that the oils of plant origin could be used as potential anti-Candida species causative agents of nosocomial infections. These oils exhibited a noticeable antifungal activity against the selected fungi. The natural antifungal substances are inexpensive and have fewer side effects, they may represent alternative therapies for candidiasis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. [Effectiveness and difficulty of education on nosocomial infection control for pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for students in the Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunakawa, Mitsuhiro; Matsumoto, Hiroyuki

    2009-03-01

    It has been planned to give pre-clinical practice in the clinic, so-called inclusive clinical practice phase I, for fifth-grade students in the School of Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Tokyo Medical and Dental University, to give them the clinical training needed to perform dental practice and clinical practicum for comprehensive patient care, namely inclusive clinical practice phase II. This study analyzed the educative efficiency of the class on nosocomial infection control (NIC) by comparing achievements pre- and post-test, and discussed appropriate education planning on the NIC for dental students. Sixty-two fifth-grade students in the 2007 academic year sat the pre- and post-tests; the mean score and standard deviation of these tests were 5.30 +/- 1.26 (n = 56) and 8.59 +/- 1.18 (n = 59), respectively. There was a statistically significant difference between them (paired t-test, p < 0.01). Another finding was that students with high scores in the post-test did not necessarily achieve high ratings in the pre-test. It is suggested that the introduction of pre- and post-tests and the clarification of main points in the class as a theme of NIC could be a useful tool for increasing the comprehension of students on the theme. Since students at lower grades will attend clinical practice in the university hospital, it is thought that students should be given NIC training early in the clinical course, and the current curriculum should be improved to increase the opportunity for students to study this important issue.

  9. High-protein enteral nutrition enriched with immune-modulating nutrients vs standard high-protein enteral nutrition and nosocomial infections in the ICU: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Zanten, Arthur R H; Sztark, François; Kaisers, Udo X; Zielmann, Siegfried; Felbinger, Thomas W; Sablotzki, Armin R; De Waele, Jan J; Timsit, Jean-François; Honing, Marina L H; Keh, Didier; Vincent, Jean-Louis; Zazzo, Jean-Fabien; Fijn, Harvey B M; Petit, Laurent; Preiser, Jean-Charles; van Horssen, Peter J; Hofman, Zandrie

    2014-08-06

    Enteral administration of immune-modulating nutrients (eg, glutamine, omega-3 fatty acids, selenium, and antioxidants) has been suggested to reduce infections and improve recovery from critical illness. However, controversy exists on the use of immune-modulating enteral nutrition, reflected by lack of consensus in guidelines. To determine whether high-protein enteral nutrition enriched with immune-modulating nutrients (IMHP) reduces the incidence of infections compared with standard high-protein enteral nutrition (HP) in mechanically ventilated critically ill patients. The MetaPlus study, a randomized, double-blind, multicenter trial, was conducted from February 2010 through April 2012 including a 6-month follow-up period in 14 intensive care units (ICUs) in the Netherlands, Germany, France, and Belgium. A total of 301 adult patients who were expected to be ventilated for more than 72 hours and to require enteral nutrition for more than 72 hours were randomized to the IMHP (n = 152) or HP (n = 149) group and included in an intention-to-treat analysis, performed for the total population as well as predefined medical, surgical, and trauma subpopulations. High-protein enteral nutrition enriched with immune-modulating nutrients vs standard high-protein enteral nutrition, initiated within 48 hours of ICU admission and continued during the ICU stay for a maximum of 28 days. The primary outcome measure was incidence of new infections according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) definitions. Secondary end points included mortality, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores, mechanical ventilation duration, ICU and hospital lengths of stay, and subtypes of infections according CDC definitions. There were no statistically significant differences in incidence of new infections between the groups: 53% (95% CI, 44%-61%) in the IMHP group vs 52% (95% CI, 44%-61%) in the HP group (P = .96). No statistically significant differences were

  10. Nosocomial diarrhea in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Marcon

    Full Text Available We made an epidemiological case-control study to examine risk factors for the development of diarrhea in the intensive care unit (ICU of a public hospital in Santo André, SP, from January to October 2002. Forty-nine patients with diarrhea (cases and 49 patients without diarrhea (controls, matched for age and gender, were included in the study. A stool culture and enzyme immunoassays for Clostridium difficile toxins A and B were performed on fecal specimens from diarrhea patients. Fourteen of them presented positive cultures for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and 22 patients presented positive ELISA for Clostridium diffícile. Nosocomial diarrhea was associated with several factors, including use of antibiotics (P=0.001, use of ceftriaxone (P=0.001, presence of infection (P=0.010 and length of hospital stay (P=0.0001.

  11. Screening for antimicrobial activity of ten medicinal plants used in Colombian folkloric medicine: A possible alternative in the treatment of non-nosocomial infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocampo Saul A

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The antimicrobial activity and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC of the extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Bixa orellana L., Cecropia peltata L., Cinchona officinalis L., Gliricidia sepium H.B. & K, Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, Justicia secunda Vahl., Piper pulchrum C.DC, P. paniculata L. and Spilanthes americana Hieron were evaluated against five bacteria (Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus β hemolític, Bacillus cereus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli, and one yeast (Candida albicans. These plants are used in Colombian folk medicine to treat infections of microbial origin. Methods Plants were collected by farmers and traditional healers. The ethanol, hexane and water extracts were obtained by standard methods. The antimicrobial activity was found by using a modified agar well diffusion method. All microorganisms were obtained from the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC. MIC was determined in the plant extracts that showed some efficacy against the tested microorganisms. Gentamycin sulfate (1.0 μg/ml, clindamycin (0.3 μg/ml and nystatin (1.0 μg/ml were used as positive controls. Results The water extracts of Bidens pilosa L., Jacaranda mimosifolia D.Don, and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed a higher activity against Bacillus cereus and Escherichia coli than gentamycin sulfate. Similarly, the ethanol extracts of all species were active against Staphylococcus aureus except for Justicia secunda. Furthermore, Bixa orellana L, Justicia secunda Vahl. and Piper pulchrum C.DC presented the lowest MICs against Escherichia coli (0.8, 0.6 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to gentamycin sulfate (0.9 8g/ml. Likewise, Justicia secunda and Piper pulchrum C.DC showed an analogous MIC against Candida albicans (0.5 and 0.6 μg/ml, respectively compared to nystatin (0.6 μg/ml. Bixa orellana L, exhibited a better MIC against Bacillus cereus (0.2 μg/ml than gentamycin sulfate (0.5 μg/ml. Conclusion This in vitro study

  12. Correlation Between ISAba1 Upstream ampC Gene and Resistance to Cefotaxime in Acinetobacter baumannii: A Serious Threat to Nosocomial Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Infections due to Acinetobacter baumannii have become a significant challenge in modern healthcare systems. The global upsurge of multidrug resistance in A. baumannii has created widespread problems in the treatment of patients. Objectives We examined the prevalence ISAmpC and its correlation with cefotaxime resistance. Materials and Methods Standard biochemical tests were used to identify isolates. Genomic species of the genus Acinetobacter were confirmed by Amplified Ribosomal DNA Restriction Analysis (ARDRA. The susceptibility of 50 A. baumannii isolates to a variety of antimicrobial agents was determined using the disk diffusion method and E-test strips. PCR was used to investigate the connection of insertion sequences and the ampC gene. Clonal relatedness was determined by Repetitive Extragenic Palindromic PCR. Results ISAba1 located upstream of blaampC was found in 24 (48% of the A. baumannii isolates. In all of the studied isolates that had ISAmpC, the MIC for cefotaxime was 64 - 256 μg/mL. Based on the REP-PCR patterns among the resistant isolates, the highest number of ISAmpC positive isolates belonged to type B (n = 19 and type C (n = 12. Conclusions ISAba1 has become an important factor in A. baumannii’s resistance to cefotaxime.

  13. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Med 1998;24:206-16. Alangaden GJ. Nosocomial Fungal Infections: Epidemiology, Infection Control, and Prevention. Infectious Disease Clinics ... 25:201-25. Zilberberg MD, Shorr AF. Fungal infections in the ICU. Infect Dis ... D. Nosocomial aspergillosis and building construction. Med Mycol 2009;47 ...

  14. Pharmacologic treatment options for nosocomial pneumonia involving methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maclayton, Darego O; Hall, Ronald G

    2007-02-01

    To discuss current and potential treatment options for nosocomial pneumonia due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). A MEDLINE search (1966-January 2007) was conducted to identify English-language literature on pharmacotherapy of nosocomial pneumonia and the bibliographies of pertinent articles. Programs and abstracts from infectious disease meetings were also searched. Search terms included MRSA, nosocomial pneumonia, pulmonary infections, vancomycin, quinupristin/dalfopristin, linezolid, daptomycin, tigecycline, dalbavancin, oritavancin, and ceftobiprole. DATA SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: All articles were critically evaluated and all pertinent information was included in this review. Vancomycin has been the drug of choice for MRSA infections for many years. Recent data suggest that linezolid may be superior to vancomycin in the treatment of MRSA nosocomial pneumonia. However, there are limitations to the available data. Therefore, prospective, randomized studies are needed before linezolid is recommended as the preferred first-line therapy. Other approved agents for nosocomial MRSA infections, such as quinupristin/dalfopristin and daptomycin, should not be used in the treatment of MRSA pneumonia, as they were inferior in clinical trials. Tigecycline has excellent activity against MRSA in vitro, but should not be routinely used for the treatment of MRSA pneumonia, as clinical data are lacking. In a Phase III clinical trial, an anti-MRSA cephalosporin, ceftobiprole, is being evaluated for effectiveness against nosocomial pneumonia. Investigational glycopeptides may eventually have a role in the treatment of nosocomial pneumonia, but data are currently lacking. Vancomycin is still the drug of choice for treatment of MRSA pneumonia, and linezolid should be used as an alternative agent. Linezolid should carry strong consideration for patients with vancomycin-induced nephrotoxicity or a documented lack of response to vancomycin. Tigecycline and

  15. Self-reported infections during international travel and notifiable infections among returning international travellers, Sweden, 2009-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Dahl

    Full Text Available We studied food and water-borne diseases (FWDs, sexually transmitted diseases (STDs, vector-borne diseases (VBDs and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme among Swedish international travellers, in order to identify countries associated with a high number of infections. We used the national database for notifiable infections to estimate the number of FWDs (campylobacteriosis, salmonellosis, giardiasis, shigellosis, EHEC, Entamoeba histolytica, yersinosis, hepatitis A, paratyphoid fever, typhoid fever, hepatitis E, listeriosis, cholera, STIs (chlamydia, gonorrhoea and acute hepatitis B, VBDs (dengue fever, malaria, West Nile fever, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever and diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria acquired abroad 2009-2013. We obtained number and duration of trips to each country from a database that monthly collects travel data from a randomly selected proportion of the Swedish population. We calculated number of infections per country 2009-2013 and incidence/million travel days for the five countries with the highest number of infections. Thailand had the highest number of FWDs (7,697, incidence 191/million travel days, STIs (1,388, incidence 34/million travel days and VBDs (358, incidence 9/million travel days. France had the highest number of cases of diseases vaccinated against in the Swedish childhood vaccination programme (8, 0.4/million travel days. Swedish travellers contracted most infections in Thailand. Special focus should be placed on giving advice to travellers to this destination.

  16. Nosocomial infections in a Brazilian neonatal intensive care unit: a 4-year surveillance study Infecções hospitalares em uma unidade de terapia intensiva neonatal brasileira: vigilância de quatro anos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Von Dollinger Brito

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Report the incidence of nosocomial infections, causative microorganisms, risk factors associated with and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern in the NICU of the Uberlândia University Hospital. METHODS: Data were collected through the National Healthcare Safety Network surveillance from January 2006 to December 2009. The patients were followed five times/week from their birth to their discharge or death. RESULTS: The study included 1,443 patients, 209 of these developed NIs, totaling 293 NI episodes, principally bloodstream infections (203; 69.3% and conjunctivitis (52; 17.7%. Device-associated infection rates were as follows: 17.3 primary bloodstream infections per 1,000 central line-days and 3.2 pneumonias per 1000 ventilator-days. The mortality rate in neonates with NI was 11.9%. Mechanical ventilation, total parenteral nutrition, orogastric tube, previous antibiotic therapy, use of CVC and birth weight of 751-1,000g appeared to be associated with a significantly higher risk of NI (p INTRODUÇÃO: Relatar a incidência das infecções hospitalares, microrganismos causadores, fatores de risco associados e o padrão de susceptibilidade aos antimicrobianos na UTI neonatal do Hospital Universitário de Uberlândia. MÉTODOS: Realizou-se vigilância National Healthcare Safety Network de janeiro de 2006 a dezembro de 2009. Os pacientes foram acompanhados cinco vezes por semana desde o seu nascimento até a alta ou óbito. RESULTADOS: O estudo incluiu 1.443 pacientes dos quais 209 desenvolveram infecção hospitalar, totalizando 293 episódios de IHs, com destaque para as infecções de corrente sanguínea (203; 69,3% e conjuntivite (52; 17,7%. As taxas de infecção associadas a dispositivos foram as seguintes: 17,3 infecções da corrente sanguínea primária por 1.000 CVC dia e 3,2 pneumonias por 1.000 ventiladores-dia. A taxa de mortalidade em recém-nascidos com infecções hospitalares foi de 11,9%. A ventilação mec

  17. Biofilm formation by Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates from device-associated nosocomial infections Formación de biopelículas por aislamientos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia recuperados de infecciones nosocomiales asociadas al uso de dispositivos médicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Passerini De Rossi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Medical devices are often colonized by bacteria which may cause severe infections. The aim of this work was to evaluate biofilm formation by S. maltophilia isolates from device-associated nosocomial infections. The 13 local isolates exhibited different capacities of biofilm formation on hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. All isolates formed strong biofilms in polystyrene microplates, while strong, moderate or weak biofilms were detected in borosilicate (BS or polypropylene (PP tubes. The proficiency of biofilm formation was better evaluated by the level of crystal violet staining expressed relative to the final culture density. The microscopic analysis of biofilms formed on glass coverslips revealed the presence of a matrix of exopolysaccharides and microcolonies typical of biofilm architecture. Isolates with increased adhesion to BS showed larger microcolonies. According to our results, twitching correlated well with attachment to the three abiotic surfaces tested, while swimming only showed a slight correlation with biofilm formation on PP. Poor correlation was observed between cell surface hydrophobicity and biofilm formation. One of the highest biofilm-producing isolates adhered to urethral catheters of different materials, and exhibited an increased resistance to oxidative stress, one of the common stresses encountered by bacteria during the infection process due to the immune response.El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar la formación de biopelículas por parte de aislamientos de Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. Los 13 aislamientos locales evaluados mostraron diferente capacidad de formar biopelículas en superficies hidrofílicas e hidrofóbicas. Todos ellos formaron biopelículas fuertes en microplacas de poliestireno (PS, mientras que se observaron biopelículas fuertes, moderadas o débiles en tubos de borosilicato (BS o polipropileno (PP. La medida del cristal violeta unido a la biopelícula expresada en función de la densidad

  18. Improved hidden Markov model for nosocomial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khader, Karim; Leecaster, Molly; Greene, Tom; Samore, Matthew; Thomas, Alun

    2014-12-01

    We propose a novel hidden Markov model (HMM) for parameter estimation in hospital transmission models, and show that commonly made simplifying assumptions can lead to severe model misspecification and poor parameter estimates. A standard HMM that embodies two commonly made simplifying assumptions, namely a fixed patient count and binomially distributed detections is compared with a new alternative HMM that does not require these simplifying assumptions. Using simulated data, we demonstrate how each of the simplifying assumptions used by the standard model leads to model misspecification, whereas the alternative model results in accurate parameter estimates. © The Authors 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Mathematics and its Applications. All rights reserved.

  19. [An automated registry program for nosocomial infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañón-González, Jorge Alberto; Polanco-González, Carlos; Samaniego-Mendoza, José Lino; Buhse, Thomas

    2014-12-01

    Las infecciones nosocomiales presentan un gran reto para la medicina hospitalaria, en general, y para las Unidades de Cuidados Intensivos, en particular. Su elevada prevalencia, la gran morbilidad y mortalidad asociadas, el incremento de la estancia hospitalaria y, en consecuencia, los costos de la atención médica han hecho que los programas de vigilancia, control y prevención de infecciones nosocomiales sean una parte toral de los protocolos de seguridad para el paciente y un indicador de calidad de la atención médica.

  20. Fatores associados à pneumonia nosocomial em indivíduos hospitalizados Factors associated with nosocomial pneumonia in hospitalized individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaís Feitosa Leitão de Oliveira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Identificar os fatores associados à pneumonia nosocomial em hospital público de Feira de Santana, Bahia. MÉTODOS: Este estudo caso-controle foi realizado em 211 indivíduos adultos (46 casos e 165 controles, com idade média de 41 anos, atendidos na Clínica Médica, Clínica Cirúrgica ou na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Adulta do Hospital Geral Clériston Andrade, em Feira de Santana. Os casos foram constituídos por indivíduos que desenvolveram infecção do trato respiratório (pneumonia nosocomial após admissão hospitalar. Os controles foram formados por não portadores de pneumonia nosocomial. Informações socioeconómicas, história médica, estilo de vida e hábitos de higiene bucal foram obtidos por meio de entrevistas. Os prontuários foram checados para registro da condição de saúde do indivíduo e diagnóstico de pneumonia. Exame clínico bucal foi realizado por cirurgião-dentista treinado. Na análise bivariada, foi estimado o odds ratio (OR como medida de associação e seus respectivos intervalos de confiança de 95% (IC 95% com uso do método de Mantel-Haenzel. RESULTADOS: A frequência de pneumonia nosocomial na amostra foi de 21,8%. A ocorrência de hipertensão e o tempo de internamento foram maiores nos casos do que nos controles (p 5 dias e ausência do fio dental e enxaguatório bucal como fatores possivelmente associados à pneumonia nosocomial, apontando-os como alvos efetivos de prevençãoOBJECTIVE: To identify factors associated with nosocomial pneumonia in individuals admitted to apublic hospital in Feira de Santana, Bahia. METHODS: This case control study was carried out in 211 adult individuals (46 cases and 165 controls, of a mean age of 41 years, treated at clinical wards, surgical wards or the adult intensive care unit of Cleriston Andrade General Hospital in Feira de Santana. The cases comprised individuals who developed respiratory tract infections (nosocomial pneumonia after hospital

  1. [International cooperation on problems in acute respiratory viral infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tůmová, B

    1996-03-01

    The annual occurrence of acute respiratory infections (ARI) of viral origin incl. influenza, the serious character of influenza epidemics and pandemics were the reason why a network of 110 national influenza centres and four international collaborating centres were created. This worldwide surveillance programme is coordinated by WHO. With advancing integration of Europe scientific groups were created which implement this programme in Europe. EUROSENTINEL analyzes the notified morbidity from influenza and ARI in eight participating countries, EUROGEIG concentrates on the programme of influenza prevention and the preparation of anti-pandemic provisions, EUROGROG associates 27 National influenza centres which in the course of the season exchange information on the incidence of influenza and other respiratory viruses. ESWI (European Scientific Working Group on Influenza) organizes clinical and epidemiological investigations on the influence of influenza infection and the impact of anti-flu vaccination; it tries to harmonize the surveillance programme and raise its standard and strives for joint research projects. The National reference laboratory in Prague participates in all these programmes and takes also active part in some projects.

  2. Nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis in AIDS patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravn, P; Lundgren, J D; Kjaeldgaard, P; Holten-Anderson, W; Højlyng, N; Nielsen, J O; Gaub, J

    1991-02-02

    To describe a nosocomial outbreak of cryptosporidiosis during four months after June 1989. A department of infectious diseases in Copenhagen, seeing about half the patients with AIDS in Denmark. 73 HIV antibody negative subjects and 60 antibody positive subjects admitted as inpatients during the transmission period of the outbreak (20 June-14 August), of whom 18 (17 with AIDS, one with AIDS related complex), developed cryptosporidiosis. Two further HIV negative subjects (one departmental secretary, one visiting relative) developed cryptosporidiosis. Cryptosporidia in stool samples, clinical symptoms, CD4 cell count, HIV antigen concentration, chemotherapeutic treatment. The source of the outbreak was identified as ice from an ice machine in the ward, contaminated by an incontinent, psychotic patient with cryptosporidiosis picking out ice for cold drinks. The mean incubation time was at least 13 days-that is, twice that in HIV-negative patients. Of the 18 patients with AIDS who developed cryptosporidiosis, five recovered, two were symptomless carriers, three died of unrelated causes, and eight died after prolonged diarrhoea. Among the 57 exposed HIV antibody positive inpatients (excluding two patients and the index case with cryptosporidiosis diagnosed elsewhere), significantly more of those who developed symptomatic cryptosporidiosis received oral sulphonamides than those who did not (91%, 10/11 v 48%, 21/44, p less than 0.05). The clinical and epidemiological findings indicate that infection was the consequence of very small inocula. Increased sensitivity to cryptosporidiosis may be an unrecognised side effect of oral sulphonamide treatment in patients with AIDS.

  3. Persistence of Nosocomial Pathogens on Various Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Ozlem; Altoparlak, Ulku; Ayyildiz, Ahmet; Kaynar, Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Fabrics can become contaminated with high numbers of microorganisms that may be pathogenic to patients in a hospital setting and can play an important role in the chain of infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the survival of several clinical bacterial and fungal isolates on several fabrics commonly used in hospitals. Materials and Methods: Bacterial and fungal survival was tested on the following materials, each of which are commonly used in our hospital: 100% smooth cotton, 60% cotton-40% polyester, 100% wool and 100% silk. One isolate each of Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida parapsilosis, Geotrichum candidum, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, vancomycin resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) positive Escherichia coli, inducible beta-lactamase (IBL) positive Pseudomonas aeruginosa, IBL-positive Acinetobacter baumannii and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were used to contaminate fabrics. The survival of these microorganisms was studied by testing the fabric swatches for microbial growth. Results: The median survival times for all the tested bacteria and fungi were as follows: 26 days on cotton, 26.5 days on cotton-polyester, 28 days on silk, and 30 days on wool. Among the bacterial species tested, E. faecium had the longest survival time on cotton-polyester fabrics. For the fungal isolates, it was observed that C. tropicalis and C. krusei survived for the shortest amount of time on cotton fabrics in the present study. Conclusion: This survival data indicate that pathogenic microorganisms can survive from days to months on commonly used hospital fabrics. These findings indicate that current recommendations for the proper disinfection or sterilization of fabrics used in hospitals should be followed to minimize cross-contamination and prevent nosocomial infections. PMID:25610201

  4. Surgical Site Infection Rate and Risk Factors among Obstetric Cases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Surgical Site infections are the second most frequently reported infections of all nosocomial infections among hospital patients. Among surgical patients in obstetrics, Surgical Site Infections were the most common nosocomial infections and the rate is higher in sub-Saharan Africa. There has not been a ...

  5. Risk Factors for Nosocomial Bacterremia Due to Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pujol (Miquel); C. Pena; R. Pallares (Roman); J. Ayats (Josefina); J. Ariza (Javier); F. Gudiol (Francesc)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractIn a prospective surveillance study (February 1990–December 1991) performed at a 1000-bed teaching hospital to identify risk factors for nosocomial methicillin-resistantStaphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia, 309 patients were found to be colonized (n=103; 33 %) or infected (n=206; 67

  6. Effect of infection on nutritional status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scrimshaw, N.S.

    1994-01-01

    All infections no matter how mild decrease nutrient intakes and increase nutrient losses even when subclinical. The losses include decreased intestinal absorption, direct loss of nutrient in the gut, internal diversion for metabolic responses to infection and increased BMR when fever is present. Infection influences in this way not only protein and energy status but also that of most other nutrients. The clinical importance of these consequences of infection depends on the prior state of the individual, the nature and duration of the infection and the diet of the individual during the infection, particularly dietary intake during the convalescent period and whether full recovery takes place before another infection occurs. In industrialized countries particular attention must be paid to the nutrition of hospitalized patients since they are frequently debilitated by their primary disease, morbidity, and their nutritional status. Morbidity and mortality are increased by nosocomial infections to which the poorly nourished individual is more susceptible. (author). Refs, 9 figs, 4 tabs

  7. Spontaneous Nosocomial Pseudomonas aeruginosa Meningitis Presenting as Trismus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. J. Parr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 78-year-old female receiving adjuvant postsurgical chemotherapy for colon adenocarcinoma who spontaneously developed nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis causing severe trismus. The patient was initially admitted for ileus, developing neck stiffness and trismus on the thirteenth day of admission. Cerebrospinal fluid grew pansensitive Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was consistent with bilateral subacute infarcts secondary to meningitis. The patient responded well to 21 days of broad spectrum antimicrobial therapy modified to ceftazidime alone following speciation and sensitivity. Outpatient follow-up at 46 days revealed normal maximal mouth opening with the ability to chew and tolerate a full diet. Trismus is a motor disturbance of the trigeminal nerve with difficulty in opening the mouth. Infectious etiologies commonly described include tetanus, odontogenic infections, or deep neck space infections. This is the first reported case of simultaneous nosocomial Pseudomonas meningitis and trismus in a patient with no history of neurosurgery or lumbar spinal manipulation.

  8. Phialemonium Fungemia: Two Documented Nosocomial Cases

    OpenAIRE

    Guarro, Josep; Nucci, Marcio; Akiti, Tiyomi; Gené, Josepa; Cano, Josep; Barreiro, M. Da Gloria C.; Aguilar, Carme

    1999-01-01

    Two fungal isolates recovered from the blood of two immunosuppressed patients are described as Phialemonium curvatum. One patient died, while the other, who was infected with Exophiala jeanselmei at the same time, survived after successful treatment with itraconazole. Analysis of internal transcribed spacer sequences demonstrated that the isolates belonged to the same strain and that the source of infection was probably a catheter. The taxonomic position of P. curvatum is discussed, and Phial...

  9. 75 FR 63844 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... healthcare infection control and strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of healthcare-associated infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance, and related events in settings...

  10. 75 FR 50770 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Infectious Diseases (NCEZID), regarding: (1) The practice of hospital infection control; strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance...

  11. 75 FR 3912 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Control of Infectious Diseases (NCPDCID), regarding: (1) The practice of hospital infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections...

  12. 75 FR 29772 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee, (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections...

  13. 76 FR 29756 - Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee (HICPAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Healthcare Infection Control Practices... Healthcare Quality Promotion regarding (1) The practice of healthcare infection control; (2) strategies for surveillance, prevention, and control of infections (e.g., nosocomial infections), antimicrobial resistance...

  14. Treatment of Early Post-Op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0133 TITLE: Treatment of Early Post -op Wound Infection after Internal Fixation PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: William...14Sep2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Treatment of Early Post -Op Wound Infection after Internal 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0133 Fixation 5b. GRANT...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Severe fractures are common in modern warfare with fractures

  15. [Nosocomial Clostridium difficile diarrhea--adverse effect of antibiotic therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemeni, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    C. difficile is recognised as the main cause for colitis in hospitalised patients which are treated with antibiotics, chemotherapics or other drugs that disturb intestinal microbiota. Thus, a rapid and correct diagnostic of Clostridium difficile infections is essential for preventing nosocomial infection spread. Empiric therapy, regardless of the laboratory investigation results, is inadequate, especially in epidemic situations, as not all the cases of diarrhoea are due to C. difficile infection. Other risk factors for CDAD (Clostridiumn difficile Associated Diseases might be: prolonged hospitalization or residency in an asylum, age, existence of a severe chronic disease in the background nasogastric intubation, anti-ulcer drugs, at less extent gastrointestinal surgery, other immunosuppresive compounds etc. In our country, C. difficile infection is rather frequent in adults, though it is not always reported by clinicians. The circulation of endemic rybotype 027 in Romania is not well documented, the rybotype being extremely virulent and spread in other European countries. Hence the importance of extending the diagnostic capacity of C. difficile infection in order to allow detection of this rybotype among the strains isolated in our country.

  16. Impact of phytopathogen infection and extreme weather stress on internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in lettuce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Chongtao; Lee, Cheonghoon; Nangle, Ed; Li, Jianrong; Gardner, David; Kleinhenz, Matthew; Lee, Jiyoung

    2014-01-03

    Internalization of human pathogens, common in many types of fresh produce, is a threat to human health since the internalized pathogens cannot be fully inactivated/removed by washing with water or sanitizers. Given that pathogen internalization can be affected by many environmental factors, this study was conducted to investigate the influence of two types of plant stress on the internalization of Salmonella Typhimurium in iceberg lettuce during pre-harvest. The stresses were: abiotic (water stress induced by extreme weather events) and biotic (phytopathogen infection by lettuce mosaic virus [LMV]). Lettuce with and without LMV infection were purposefully contaminated with green fluorescence protein-labeled S. Typhimurium on the leaf surfaces. Lettuce was also subjected to water stress conditions (drought and storm) which were simulated by irrigating with different amounts of water. The internalized S. Typhimurium in the different parts of the lettuce were quantified by plate count and real-time quantitative PCR and confirmed with a laser scanning confocal microscope. Salmonella internalization occurred under the conditions outlined above; however internalization levels were not significantly affected by water stress alone. In contrast, the extent of culturable S. Typhimurium internalized in the leafy part of the lettuce decreased when infected with LMV under water stress conditions and contaminated with high levels of S. Typhimurium. On the other hand, LMV-infected lettuce showed a significant increase in the levels of culturable bacteria in the roots. In conclusion, internalization was observed under all experimental conditions when the lettuce surface was contaminated with S. Typhimurium. However, the extent of internalization was only affected by water stress when lettuce was infected with LMV. © 2013.

  17. Comparison of the Nosocomial Pneumonia Mortality Prediction (NPMP) model with standard mortality prediction tools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, M; Shetty, N; Gadekari, S; Thunga, G; Rao, K; Kunhikatta, V

    2017-07-01

    Severity or mortality prediction of nosocomial pneumonia could aid in the effective triage of patients and assisting physicians. To compare various severity assessment scoring systems for predicting intensive care unit (ICU) mortality in nosocomial pneumonia patients. A prospective cohort study was conducted in a tertiary care university-affiliated hospital in Manipal, India. One hundred patients with nosocomial pneumonia, admitted in the ICUs who developed pneumonia after >48h of admission, were included. The Nosocomial Pneumonia Mortality Prediction (NPMP) model, developed in our hospital, was compared with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), Mortality Probability Model II (MPM 72  II), Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II), Multiple Organ Dysfunction Score (MODS), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA), Clinical Pulmonary Infection Score (CPIS), Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia Predisposition, Insult, Response, Organ dysfunction (VAP-PIRO). Data and clinical variables were collected on the day of pneumonia diagnosis. The outcome for the study was ICU mortality. The sensitivity and specificity of the various scoring systems was analysed by plotting receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and computing the area under the curve for each of the mortality predicting tools. NPMP, APACHE II, SAPS II, MPM 72  II, SOFA, and VAP-PIRO were found to have similar and acceptable discrimination power as assessed by the area under the ROC curve. The AUC values for the above scores ranged from 0.735 to 0.762. CPIS and MODS showed least discrimination. NPMP is a specific tool to predict mortality in nosocomial pneumonia and is comparable to other standard scores. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus nosocomial pneumonia: role of linezolid in the People's Republic of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesher, Beth; Gao, Xin; Chen, Yixi; Liu, Zhengyin

    2016-01-01

    The burden of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) nosocomial pneumonia in the People's Republic of China is high, with methicillin-resistance rates greater than 80% reported for patients with S. aureus pneumonia treated in intensive care units. Historically, vancomycin was the treatment of choice for patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infections. Recent evidence suggests that the minimum inhibitory concentration for vancomycin is increasing. Additionally, patients treated with vancomycin require monitoring of vancomycin trough concentrations and can develop nephrotoxicity. Linezolid is a treatment option for patients with hospital-acquired MRSA infections that can be administered either intravenously or orally. Analysis of data from a worldwide linezolid surveillance program initiated in the year 2004 shows no evidence of increasing linezolid minimum inhibitory concentrations. The clinical efficacy of linezolid for patients with gram-positive, including MRSA, nosocomial pneumonia, was evaluated in numerous studies. In general, results from these studies show higher or similar clinical success with no mortality difference for linezolid compared to vancomycin treated patients. Results from a Phase IV study enrolling patients with MRSA-confirmed nosocomial pneumonia suggest higher clinical cure rates for linezolid compared to vancomycin treated patients. Although acquisition costs are higher for linezolid compared to vancomycin therapy, evidence suggests similar overall medical costs. Cost-analysis results from a Chinese perspective show that linezolid dominated vancomycin therapy for MRSA nosocomial pneumonia in ∼35% of bootstrap simulations whereas vancomycin dominated linezolid in less than 2% of bootstrap simulations. In summary, results from both clinical and economic studies, including studies conducted from a Chinese perspective, support the use of linezolid for the treatment of patients with MRSA nosocomial pneumonia.

  19. Sequence-based spa typing as a rapid screening method for the areal and nosocomial outbreaks of MRSA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narukawa, Munetoshi; Yasuoka, Akira; Note, Ryougo; Funada, Hisashi

    2009-07-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the leading cause of nosocomial infection and MRSA outbreaks have become a major problem. Therefore, the rapid and accurate typing of MRSA isolates is important for epidemiological surveys and nosocomial infection control. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is considered as the gold standard technique for MRSA typing, because of its high discriminatory power, but its procedure is rather complicated and time-consuming. The spa gene encodes a cell wall component of Staphylococcus aureus protein A, and exhibits polymorphism. Sequencing the spa gene is expected superior to PFGE in speed and data interpretation. In the present study, we evaluated whether spa typing of MRSA is useful for nosocomial outbreak analysis and epidemiological investigations. We analyzed 19 nosocomial outbreak isolates from 4 separate hospitals and 26 isolates from outpatients of Toyama University Hospital. Either PFGE or spa typing revealed a single nosocomial strain that appears unique to each hospital. Indeed, spa typing confirmed the four different strains, but PFGE demonstrated only 3 strains. With the total 45 isolates, PFGE showed 16 different patterns and spa typing showed 12 patterns. Moreover, we were able to analyze the spa gene in about 2 days, from sampling to obtaining the results, whereas it took about 7 days with PFGE. In conclusion, sequence-based spa typing shows comparable sensitivities to PFGE, and is a rapid and easy handling method. The sequence-based spa typing can be used as the rapid screening test when MRSA outbreak is suspected in areas and hospitals.

  20. Ceftolozane/tazobactam pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic‐derived dose justification for phase 3 studies in patients with nosocomial pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Benjamin W.; Huntington, Jennifer A.; Nicolau, David P.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Ceftolozane/tazobactam is an antipseudomonal antibacterial approved for the treatment of complicated urinary tract infections (cUTIs) and complicated intra‐abdominal infections (cIAIs) and in phase 3 clinical development for treatment of nosocomial pneumonia. A population pharmacokinetic (PK) model with the plasma‐to‐epithelial lining fluid (ELF) kinetics of ceftolozane/tazobactam was used to justify dosing regimens for patients with nosocomial pneumonia in phase 3 studies. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to determine ceftolozane/tazobactam dosing regimens with a >90% probability of target attainment (PTA) for a range of pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic targets at relevant minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for key pathogens in nosocomial pneumonia. With a plasma‐to‐ELF penetration ratio of approximately 50%, as observed from an ELF PK study, a doubling of the current dose regimens for different renal functions that are approved for cUTIs and cIAIs is needed to achieve >90% PTA for nosocomial pneumonia. For example, a 3‐g dose of ceftolozane/tazobactam for nosocomial pneumonia patients with normal renal function is needed to achieve a >90% PTA (actual 98%) for the 1‐log kill target against pathogens with an MIC of ≤8 mg/L in ELF, compared with the 1.5‐g dose approved for cIAIs and cUTIs. PMID:26096377

  1. Compliance to infection prevention and control guidelines among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nosocomial infections ,commonly known as hospital acquired infections (HAI) include several pathogens like Escherichia coli, Hepatitis viruses, HIV, Pseudomonas and Staphylococcus etc. These agents are transmitted directly or indirectly. Prevention and control of Nosocomial infections is the most important approach in ...

  2. Infection control practice in countries with limited resources.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alp, E.; Leblebicioglu, H.; Doganay, M.; Voss, A.

    2011-01-01

    Nosocomial infections and their control are a world-wide challenge. The prevalence of nosocomial infections is generally higher in developing countries with limited resources than industrialized countries. In this paper we aimed to further explain the differences with regard to infection control

  3. Aspects of infection in intensive care unit--prevention and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, K A; Hasan, M K; Chowdhury, M G; Akhter, H

    2010-07-01

    Nosocomial infections are the main source of infection in a hospitalized patient. Source of contaminant may be multiple. In a cardiac ICU the vulnerable open heart surgery patients are with multiple invasive lines and monitors. Pediatrics and neonates are more vulnerable because of their poor immunity and nutritional debility. Frequent indwelling line access makes a patient more prone to systemic infection with variable organisms. Our aim is to minimize the chances of hospital acquired infection as far as possible by the use of systemic approach to the patients as guided by the international standard hospital protocol.