WorldWideScience

Sample records for international invited guest

  1. WHO's International EMF Project (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Repacholi, M.H.

    1999-01-01

    The International Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) Project assesses health and environmental effects of exposure to static and time varying electric and magnetic fields in the frequency range 0-300 GHz. The Project facilitates a coordinated international response to the concerns about possible health effects of exposure to EMF, assesses the scientific literature, identifies gaps in knowledge needing further research to improve health risk assessments and encourages focused research to fill gaps in knowledge. When the results of this research are published, they will be incorporated into WHO's Environmental Health Criteria monographs where formal health risk assessments are made on exposure to EMF. These monographs provide a database that facilitates the development of internationally acceptable standards for EMF exposure. This paper reviews the International EMF Project activities related to WHO's EMF research requirements and focuses on specific questions raised during the scientific reviews that need to be considered in future epidemiological studies. (author)

  2. Geocognition Research: An International Discipline (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libarkin, J.

    2009-12-01

    Geocognition and geoscience education research have experienced a dramatic increase in research productivity and graduate student training in the past decade. At this writing, over twelve U.S. graduate programs dedicated to geocognition and geoscience education research exist within geoscience departments, with numerous other programs housed within education. International research programs are experiencing similar increases in these research domains. This insurgence of graduate training opportunities is due in large part to several factors, including: An increased awareness of the importance of Earth Systems Science to public understanding of science, particularly in light of global concern about climate change; new funding opportunities for science education, cognitive science, and geoscience education research; and, engagement of a significant part of the geosciences and education communities in writing new standards for Earth Systems literacy. Existing research programs blend geoscience content knowledge with research expertise in education, cognitive science, psychology, sociology and related disciplines. Research projects reflect the diversity of interests in geoscience teaching and learning, from investigations of pedagogical impact and professional development to studies of fundamental geocognitive processes.

  3. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Tianlong Gu; Shenghui Liu

    2011-01-01

    This special issue comprises of 14 selected papers from the International Workshop on Computer Science for Environmental Engineering and EcoInformatics (CSEEE 2011). The conferences received 860 paper submissions from 15 countries and regions, of which 450 were selected for presentation after a rigorous review process. From these 450 research papers, through two rounds of reviewing, the guest editors selected 14 as the best papers on the Networking Technologies and Information track of the Co...

  4. Invitation

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Monday, 11 October Gala-Concert to celebrate 50 years of CERN Jack Liebeck (violin) and Katya Apekisheva (piano) Works by C. Debussy, S. Prokofiev, and L. van Beethoven CERN, Main Auditorium, 20:00 For CERN staff and their families With the assistance of PPARC (UK) Free tickets available at the CERN Press Office (50-1-048). Maximum four tickets per person. For more information on the performers, see: http://www.jackliebeck.com/CERN50/JL.htm http://www.jackliebeck.com/CERN50/KA.htm The "WIENER SCHUBERTBUND" celebrates CERN's 50th "DEUTSCHE MESSE" By Franz Schubert performed by the "WIENER SCHUBERTBUND" On the occasion of the Organization's Fiftieth Anniversary, Mr Hans-Walter Gérard Schober, Honorary Consul-General of Austria in Geneva, is pleased to invite all those working at CERN to a mass at which Franz Schubert's German Mass will be sung by the Vienna Schubert Choral Society. This renown men's choir, founded in 1863. Eminent composers, including Richard Strauss, Wilhelm Kinzel, a...

  5. International Guests Management: Considerations from the Adjustment of International Expatriates in China and Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aletéia de Moura Carpes

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available To meet customer expectations and exploit the advantages of locating a particular country, some companies moving their offices and commercial activities to other countries (TANURE, CYRINO and PENIDO, 2007. The executive who is working on a unit of the foreign company is given the name of expatriate and it plays an important role for the company to achieve the desired result in the international environment. The international expatriate adjustment would be major factor in the development of the company's international activities and is defined by Ali (2003 as the comfort level of the worker in the host country. Realizing the lack of qualitative research that have occurred as the adjustment of the individual, it was through the accounts of ten expatriates in China and Spain this process through model Black, Mendenhall and Oddou (1991, which considers that the adjustment starts even before the change of country. Among other findings, there is the absence of pre-transfer preparation of the teams from the Personnel Management and the influence of cultural difference in the adjustment of individuals.

  6. Guest editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1995-07-15

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982.

  7. Guest editor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    Full text: Guest Editor for this special issue of the CERN Courier on the applications of accelerators was Dewi M. Lewis of Amersham International pic, UK. Dr. Lewis was educated at the Physics Department, University of Wales, Swansea, and learnt his accelerator physics as Engineer-in- Charge at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings before joining industry in 1979 at the beginning of the boom for commercial cyclotrons. Having managed the installation of Amersham's second and third isotope production cyclotrons in the UK, his industrial experience encompassed isotope manufacturing and business management in radiopharmaceuticals and organization of joint ventures. Following closure of several research reactors in 1990, his responsibilities extended to reactor isotope production as well as technology transfer with international laboratories. He was responsible for creation of the first Russian 'weapons to ploughshares' joint venture with the Radioisotope Association, Mayak and the Russian Atomic Energy Ministry. Dr. Lewis currently chairs the European Radiopharmaceutical Industry's committee on future reactor isotopes and is currently involved in the technical development for accelerator technology. Amersham International is one of the world's leading isotope companies, engaged in development, manufacturing, international sales and distribution of radioisotope products in markets for healthcare, research compounds and industrial products. Formerly part of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Agency, Amersham was one of the first companies to be privatized in 1982

  8. EDITORIAL: Invited review and topical lectures from the 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagorodny, A.; Kocherga, O.

    2007-05-01

    The 13th International Congress on Plasma Physics (ICPP 2006) was organized, on behalf of the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP series, by the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine and the Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics (BITP) and held in Kiev, Ukraine, 22 26 May 2006. The Congress Program included the topics: fundamental problems of plasma physics; fusion plasmas; plasmas in astrophysics and space physics; plasmas in applications and technologies; complex plasmas. A total of 305 delegates from 30 countries took part in the Congress. The program included 9 invited review lectures, 32 invited topical and 313 contributed papers (60 of which were selected for oral presentation). The Congress Program was the responsibility of the International Program Committee: Anatoly Zagorodny (Chairman) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Olha Kocherga (Scientific Secretary) Bogolyubov Institute for Theoretical Physics, Ukraine Boris Breizman The University of Texas at Austin, USA Iver Cairns School of Physics, University of Sydney, Australia Tatiana Davydova Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Tony Donne FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics, Rijnhuizen, The Netherlands Nikolai S Erokhin Space Research Institute of RAS, Russia Xavier Garbet CEA, France Valery Godyak OSRAM SYLVANIA, USA Katsumi Ida National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Alexander Kingsep Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute', Russia E P Kruglyakov Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Russia Gregor Morfill Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Germany Osamu Motojima National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Jef Ongena ERM-KMS, Brussels and EFDA-JET, UK Konstantyn Shamrai Institute for Nuclear Research, Ukraine Raghvendra Singh Institute for Plasma Research, India Konstantyn Stepanov Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Ukraine Masayoshi Tanaka National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan Nodar Tsintsadze Physics Institute, Georgia The

  9. P. Gluckman Chief Science Advisor to the Prime Minister, New Zealand signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations R. Voss. Accompanied by A. Bell throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    P. Gluckman Chief Science Advisor to the Prime Minister, New Zealand signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations R. Voss. Accompanied by A. Bell throughout.

  10. 15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    15th March 2011 - Singapore National Research Foundation Permanent Secretary(National Research and Development)T. M. Kian signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting CMS control centre with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  11. 9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    9 August 2011 - United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights N. Pillay signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  12. 28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    28 October 2013- Former US Vice President A. Gore signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry, Head of International Relations R. Voss, Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  13. 11 June 2012 - Austrian Federal Minister of Labour, Social Affairs and Consumer Protection R. Hundstorfer signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Ambassador to the UN C. Strohal (CERN-HI-120611334)

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    11 June 2012 - Austrian Federal Minister of Labour, Social Affairs and Consumer Protection R. Hundstorfer signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Ambassador to the UN C. Strohal (CERN-HI-120611334)

  14. 18 August 2011 - Armenian Yerevan Physics Institute Director A. Chilingarian visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with A. Ballarino; signing the guest book with Adviser T. Kurtyka and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    18 August 2011 - Armenian Yerevan Physics Institute Director A. Chilingarian visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with A. Ballarino; signing the guest book with Adviser T. Kurtyka and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  15. New Horizons Pluto Flyby Guest Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, M.; Turney, D.; Fisher, S.; Carr, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    On July 14, 2015, after 9.5 years of cruise, NASA's New Horizons spacecraft flew past the Pluto system to gather first images humankind had ever seen on Pluto and its five moons. While much has been discovered about the Pluto system since New Horizons launch in 2006, the system has never been imaged at high resolution and anticipation of the "First Light" of the Pluto system had been anticipated by planetary enthusiasts for decades. The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL), which built and operates New Horizons, was the focal point for gathering three distinct groups: science and engineering team members; media and public affairs representatives; and invited public, including VIP's. Guest operations activities were focused on providing information primarily to the invited public and VIP's. High level objectives for the Guest Operations team was set to entertain and inform the general public, offer media reaction shots, and to deconflict activities for the guests from media activities wherever possible. Over 2000 people arrived at APL in the days surrounding closest approach for guest, science or media operations tracks. Reaction and coverage of the Guest Operations events was universally positive and global in impact: iconic pictures of the auditorium waving flags during the moment of closest approach were published in media outlets on every continent. Media relations activities ensured coverage in all key media publications targeted for release, such as the New York Times, Science, Le Monde, and Nature. Social and traditional media coverage of the events spanned the globe. Guest operations activities are designed to ensure that a guest has a memorable experience and leaves with a lifelong memory of the mission and their partnership in the activity. Results, lessons learned, and other data from the New Horizons guest operations activity will be presented and analyzed.

  16. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolly Samson

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It is an honor and a pleasure to have the December 2013 issue of Higher Learning Research Communications dedicate its issue to selected papers from the 4th International Conference on Teaching and Learning, held in Bangkok in November, 2013. The conference theme, Higher Learning in the ASEAN Context, highlights the emerging community of ten Southeast Asian nations and the upcoming launch of the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC in 2015. The AEC will affect higher education systems in Southeast Asia in terms of harmonization of higher education and student mobility. This emerging regional demographic gives us a glimpse of the future of transnational education. The papers selected for this issue represent research both within and outside of ASEAN, all touching on aspects of transnational education. Jeannin reports on how diversity affects students’ learning in an international classroom in Thailand. Billingham, Gragg, and Bentley (Australia highlight technology integration as an internationalizing practice. Ling considers challenges and outcomes of bilingual teaching and learning at the graduate level in Vietnam, contributing to the postgraduate educational field, which has not been amply explored in this matter. Stetz and Bauman (US ask us to rethink the efficacy of recording our lectures for online viewing. Hartfield (Australia, Beltram-Cruz (Philippines, and Cruz (Philippines review new pedagogical paradigms utilizing technology. Al-Masum and Chowdhury report on problems and progress at Bangladesh Open University in bringing higher education to an underserved population. Throughout this issue, the authors bring a sense of internationality and the transnational transformation of higher education, along with the ubiquity of technology in the hands of the students and its impact on our teaching and learning styles. This issue of the HLRC Journal highlights some impacts that ASEAN and the AEC can and will have on higher education everywhere.

  17. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn Ai Lin Teo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This section contains upgraded papers originally published at The CIB W099 International Conference on "Modelling and Building Health and Safety”, which was organised and hosted by the Department of Building, National University of Singapore (NUS. It was held on 10 -11 September 2012 at the Marina Bay Sands Expo and Convention Center, Singapore.  The focal objectives of this section are to explore the integration and application of new techniques, technologies and strategies towards attaining verifiable improvements in occupational safety and health in construction.

  18. 9 September 2016 - A. Krivas, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Lithuania to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva meeting CERN Director-General F. Gianotti and signing the Guest Book with Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle and Adviser for Relations with the Republic of Lithuania C. Schäfer

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr. Andrius Krivas Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Republic of Lithuania signing the CERN Guest book with Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle and advisor C. Schaefer

  19. A Survey of Phenomena in Ionized Gases. Invited Papers. A Collection of Invited Papers Presented at the Eighth International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Invited review papers from the Proceedings of the Eighth Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases, which was organized by the Technische Hochschule Wien and the Österreichische Studiengesellschaft für Atomenergie, and held in Vienna, 27 August - 2 September 1967. The IAEA and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics supported the organizers. Contents: Introductory papers (3 papers); Collision processes (4 papers); Waves and beams in plasmas (6 papers); Surface phenomena (3 papers); Lasers (3 papers); Low pressure discharges (1 paper); Selected topics in plasma physics (2 papers); High pressure discharges (3 papers); Probe techniques and theory (4 papers); Basic data and fundamental plasma processes (4 papers); Summary (1 paper). Each paper is in its original language (20 English, 3 French, 9 Russian and 2 German) and is preceded by an abstract in English, with a second one in the original language if this is not English. (author)

  20. 8th international workshop on plasma edge theory in fusion devices. Abstracts of invited and contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sipilae, S.K.; Heikkinen, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    The 8th International Workshop on Plasma Edge Theory in Fusion Devices, held at Dipoli Congress Centre, Espoo, Finland, is organised on behalf of the International Scientific Committee by Helsinki University of Technology and VTT (Technical Research Centre of Finland). Similar to the seven preceding Workshops, it addresses the theory for the boundary layer of magnetically confined fusion plasmas. It reflects the present status of the theory for the edge region of fusion plasmas. Emphasis is placed on the development of theory and of appropriate numerical methods as well as on self-consistent modelling of experimental data (including also empirical elements). The following topics are covered: basic edge plasma theory, models of special phenomena and edge control, and integrated edge plasma modelling. The International Scientific Committee has selected the papers and compiled the scientific programme. All other arrangements have been made by the Local Organising Committee. The Workshop is supported by the European Commission, High-Level Scientific Conferences. This Book of Abstracts contains the scientific programme and the abstracts of the invited and contributed papers. The Workshop has seven invited lectures of 60 minutes duration (including 10 minutes for discussion). In addition, 10 contributed papers were selected for oral presentation of 30 minutes duration (including five minutes for discussion). All oral presentations are given in plenary sessions. The remaining 34 contributed papers are presented as posters in three sessions. The invited lectures and contributed oral papers are presented also as posters. All invited and contributed papers will be refereed and published also as a regular issue of the journal Contributions to Plasma Physics. (orig.)

  1. International Voluntourism as Secular Pilgrimage: A Case Study of Hosts and Guests in a Small Panamanian Town

    OpenAIRE

    Edles, Laura Desfor

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I discuss the social dynamics of international ‘voluntourism’ in Santa Catalina, a small town on the Pacific coast of Panama that has become a tourist mecca in the last two decades. Through my collection of documentary, interview, and ethnographic data, I contribute to on-going debates about the appropriateness and impact of volunteer tourism in developing countries (McGehee 2009, 2012; Palacios 2010; Tomazos and Butler 2012). While existing research tends to focus on the volun...

  2. Invited and contributed papers presented by the theory group at the joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop 'theory of fusion plasmas'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-09-01

    In this report eight invited and contributed papers of the theory group are included which were presented at joint Varenna-Lausanne international workshop on 'theory of fusion plasmas'. (author) figs., tabs., refs

  3. Nuclear Structure: Dubna Symposium 1968. Invited Papers from the International Symposium on Nuclear Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1968-01-01

    Invited papers of a Symposium organized by the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, supported by IUPAP and IAEA, and held in Dubna from 4 to 11 July 1968. The meeting was attended by about 450 scientists from 30 countries. The volume contains the invited papers, all by distinguished scientists, and the discussions and short contributions that followed the presentation of these papers. Contents: I. Nuclear structure at low excitations (15 papers) ; II. Nuclear structure at high excitations (6 papers): III. Open problems in nuclear physics (3 papers); IV. Equilibrium deformations (6 papers); V. General properties of nuclei (6 papers); VI. Closing remarks; List of contributions; List of seminar papers; List of participants; Author index. All papers, discussions and short contributions are in English; the abstracts are in English and Russian, which were the working languages of the Symposium. (author)

  4. 29 November 2013 - U. Humphrey Orjiako Nigerian Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Mission to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations R. Voss, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Multimedia

    Noemi Caraban

    2013-01-01

    29 November 2013 - U. Humphrey Orjiako Nigerian Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Mission to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations R. Voss, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and the ALICE cavern with ALICE Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  5. 9th January 2012 - Indonesian Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Triansyah Djani to to the United Nations, WTO and other International Organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser E. Tsesmelis, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

    CERN Document Server

    Estelle Spirig

    2012-01-01

    9th January 2012 - Indonesian Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador Triansyah Djani to to the United Nations, WTO and other International Organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser E. Tsesmelis, visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela.

  6. 30 August 2011 - Médecins sans frontières International President U. K Karunakara signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser for Life Sciences M. Dosanjh; visiting CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    30 August 2011 - Médecins sans frontières International President U. K Karunakara signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser for Life Sciences M. Dosanjh; visiting CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli.

  7. 17 September 2013 - Estonian Minister of Education and Research J. Aaviksoo signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R- Heuer; visiting the TOTEM facility with TOTEM Collaboration Spokesperson S. Giani; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. International Relations Adviser R. Voss present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    17 September 2013 - Estonian Minister of Education and Research J. Aaviksoo signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R- Heuer; visiting the TOTEM facility with TOTEM Collaboration Spokesperson S. Giani; in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka and visiting the CMS cavern with CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela. International Relations Adviser R. Voss present.

  8. 11 July 2012 - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador M. Alemu Getahun, Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    11 July 2012 - Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Ambassador M. Alemu Getahun, Permanent Representative of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss.

  9. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  10. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Invited papers and discussions. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The levels and biological effects resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation are continuously reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Since its creation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued recommendations on protection against ionizing radiation. The UNSCEAR estimates and the ICRP recommendations have served as the basis for national and international safety standards on radiation safety, including those developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the international standards are based on the plausible assumption that, above the unavoidable background radiation dose, the probability of effects increases linearly with dose, i.e. on a 'linear, no threshold' (LNT) assumption. However, in recent years the biological estimates of health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and the regulatory approach to the control of low level radiation exposure have been much debated. To foster information exchange on the relevant issues, an International Conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and WHO in co-operation with UNSCEAR, was held from 17-21 November 1997 at Seville, Spain. These Proceedings contain the invited special reports, keynote papers, summaries of discussions, session summaries and addresses presented at the opening and closing of the Conference

  11. An outstanding guest

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The person celebrating CERN's 25th anniversary whose photograph we published last week was not just any guest. Readers have pointed out that it was Wim Klein, whose remarkable abilities are part of CERN's history. Well known as one of the best "human calculators", Wim was recruited by CERN in 1957 to verify computer programs, which at the time were still stumbling. Moreover, he regularly beat their speed in calculating and gave breath-taking demonstrations. During one such demonstration in September 1973, he calculated the 19th root of a 133-digit number in less than 2 minutes !

  12. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics Invited papers from the 15th International Congress on Plasma Physics combined with the 13th Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, Leopoldo

    2011-07-01

    , amongst others, the following topics: fundamentals of plasma physics, fusion plasmas, plasmas in astrophysics and space physics, plasma applications and technologies, complex plasmas, high energy density plasmas, quantum plasmas and laser-plasma interaction. A total of 180 delegates from 34 different countries took part in ICPP-LAWPP-2010, and 60 delegates received financial assistance from the Local Organizing Committee, thanks to the support granted by the International Union for Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP) and by CCHEN. The ICPP-LAWPP-2010 Program was established by the following Program Committee: • Carlos Alejaldre, ITER • Maria Virginia Alves, Brazil • Julio Herrera, Mexico • Günter Mank, IAEA • George Morales, USA • Padma Kant Shukla, Germany • Guido Van Oost, Belgium • Leopoldo Soto, Chile (Chairman) This Program Committee was formed of selected members from the International Advisory Committee of the ICPP and from the International Advisory Committee of the LAWPP (http://www.icpp-lawpp-2010.cl/page/committees.php). In particular, plenary lectures and invited topical lectures were selected by the Program Committee from a list of nominated lectures presented by the International Advisory Committees of both ICPP and LAWPP. Also, the classification of oral and poster presentations was established by the Program Committee. The Congress included 15 invited plenary talks, 33 invited topical talks, 45 oral contributions, and 160 poster contributions. Most of the plenary and topical lectures are published in this special issue of Plasma Physics and Controlled Fusion. The papers were refereed according to the usual standards of the journal. Prior to ICPP-LAWPP 2010, an important activity usually associated with the Latin American Workshop on Plasma Physics took place. This activity was the LAWPP School on Plasma Physics, which was open to participants from all over the world, providing basic training to students and young researchers. The School was

  13. Invitation to the 17th international congress on photosynthesis research in 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amerongen, van Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The 17th International Congress on Photosynthesis will be held from August 7 to 12, 2016 in Maastricht, The Netherlands. The congress will include an opening reception, 15 plenary lectures, 28 scientific symposia, many poster sessions, displays by scientific companies, excursions, congress

  14. 1. international spring school and symposium on advances in materials science; invited lectures. Proceedings. V.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    The 1 st international conference on advances in materials science was held on 15-20 March, 1994 in cairo. The specialist discussed material science formation, development and observation. The application of advances in material science technique in the field of atomic energy, structure design, microelectronic structure were discussed at the meeting. more than 400 papers were presented in the meeting.

  15. 1. international spring school and symposium on advances in materials science; invited lectures. Proceedings. V.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The 1 st international conference on advances in materials science was held on 15-20 March, 1994 in cairo. The specialist discussed material science formation, development and observation. The application of advances in material science technique in the field of atomic energy, structure design, microelectronic structure were discussed at the meeting. more than 400 papers were presented in the meeting

  16. Guest Editor's Introduction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frattasi, Simone; Gimmler, Antje

    2008-01-01

    The IEEE Society on Social Implications of Technology, through the publication of this special issue of IEEE Technology & Society Magazine, invites researchers in mobile engineering, mobile human-computer interaction, social science and other related disciplines to submit papers on cooperation...

  17. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities. Book of invited and contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-08-01

    In the past decade, seismic evaluation of existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) has been an issue in western countries (particularly for the east of North America and for older NPPs in Europe) as well as in eastern European countries where systematic reviews of NPPs were carried out. Several Member States have still on-going seismic upgrading programmes. Presently. projects of plant life extension create an additional interest in safety evaluation of existing NPPs. Seismic evaluation is also an issue for other nuclear facilities. In western countries. some older facilities (laboratories, research reactors, fuel plants...) have been designed without taking into account (or poorly taking into account) earthquake input, even on seismic sites. In eastern countries, the situation is not yet clearly evaluated. In several countries concerns are expressed regarding research reactors. Generally speaking, the seismic evaluation of these nuclear facilities is not so advanced as the evaluation of NPPs and presents a wider range of different situations. Those safety issues raised by the seismic evaluation of existing NPPs are addressed in an IAEA Safety Report 'Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants' (2003). Other nuclear facilities are, at least partly, covered by IAEA-TECDOC 1347 'Design of Nuclear Facilities other than NPPs in Relation to External Events, with a Special Emphasis on Earthquake' (2003) that supersedes the former TECDOC 348 'Earthquake Resistant Design of Nuclear Facilities with Limited Radioactive Inventory' (1985). Concurrently with the publishing of relevant documentation, the IAEA has organized this Symposium in order to foster the exchange of information on topical issues in seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities, with the aim of: consolidating an international consensus on the present status of these issues; promoting a homogeneous engineering approach of their resolution; identifying the needs for strengthening international co

  18. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities. Book of invited and contributed papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-08-01

    In the past decade, seismic evaluation of existing Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) has been an issue in western countries (particularly for the east of North America and for older NPPs in Europe) as well as in eastern European countries where systematic reviews of NPPs were carried out. Several Member States have still on-going seismic upgrading programmes. Presently. projects of plant life extension create an additional interest in safety evaluation of existing NPPs. Seismic evaluation is also an issue for other nuclear facilities. In western countries. some older facilities (laboratories, research reactors, fuel plants...) have been designed without taking into account (or poorly taking into account) earthquake input, even on seismic sites. In eastern countries, the situation is not yet clearly evaluated. In several countries concerns are expressed regarding research reactors. Generally speaking, the seismic evaluation of these nuclear facilities is not so advanced as the evaluation of NPPs and presents a wider range of different situations. Those safety issues raised by the seismic evaluation of existing NPPs are addressed in an IAEA Safety Report 'Seismic Evaluation of Existing Nuclear Power Plants' (2003). Other nuclear facilities are, at least partly, covered by IAEA-TECDOC 1347 'Design of Nuclear Facilities other than NPPs in Relation to External Events, with a Special Emphasis on Earthquake' (2003) that supersedes the former TECDOC 348 'Earthquake Resistant Design of Nuclear Facilities with Limited Radioactive Inventory' (1985). Concurrently with the publishing of relevant documentation, the IAEA has organized this Symposium in order to foster the exchange of information on topical issues in seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities, with the aim of: consolidating an international consensus on the present status of these issues; promoting a homogeneous engineering approach of their resolution; identifying the needs for strengthening international co

  19. Measurement of internal magnetic field pitch using Li pellet injection on TFTR (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terry, J.L.; Marmar, E.S.; Howell, R.B.; Bell, M.; Cavallo, A.; Fredrickson, E.; Ramsey, A.; Schmidt, G.L.; Stratton, B.; Taylor, G.; Mauel, M.E.

    1990-01-01

    A diagnostic technique which measures the direction of the internal magnetic field pitch angle has been used successfully on TFTR. The technique requires the injection of high-speed Li pellets. The magnetic field direction is measured by observing the polarization direction of the intense visible line emission from Li + (λ∼5485 A, 1s2p 3 P 0,1,2 →1s2s 3 S 0 ) in the pellet ablation cloud. The presence of the large (primarily toroidal) magnetic field causes the line to be split due to the Zeeman effect, and the unshifted π component is polarized with its polarization direction parallel to the local magnetic field. In devices with sufficiently strong fields (B approx-gt 4.5 T), the Zeeman splitting of the line is large enough, relative to the linewidth of each Zeeman component, that enough residual polarization remains. Because the pellet moves about 1 cm before the Li + is ionized (τ ionization approx-lt 10 μs), the time history of the polarization direction (as the pellet penetrates from the outside toward the plasma center) yields the local magnetic field direction. In the TFTR experiment, spatial resolution of the measurement is typically ∼7 cm, limited by the requirement that a large number of photons must be collected in order to make the measurement of the polarization angle. Typically, the pitch of the field is measured with an accuracy of ±0.01 rad, limited by the photon statistics. The measurements of the internal field pitch angle, combined with external magnetic measurements, have been used in a code which finds the solution of the Grad--Shafranov equation, yielding the equilibrium which is the best fit to the measured inputs

  20. Astrobee Guest Science Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jose; Smith, Marion F; Wheeler, Dawn; Fluckiger, Lorenzo

    2017-01-01

    The Astrobee Research Facility will maintain three identical free-flying Astrobee robots on the ISS. After the Astrobees are launched and commissioned in 2018, they will replace the SPHERES robots that have been operating on the ISS since 2006 (Fig. 2). Over the years, the SPHERES have been among the most-used payloads on the ISS, supporting dozens of experiments from a variety of guest scientists. In the next section, we'll talk about past SPHERES experiments as possible inspiration for your future research on Astrobee. Compared to SPHERES, the Astrobee robots will offer many new capabilities and will require less astronaut time to support, so we hope the new facility will be able to fly experiments much more often.

  1. NASA International Year of Astronomy 2009 Programs: Impacts and Future Plans (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, H.; Smith, D.; Stockman, S. A.

    2009-12-01

    The opportunity offered by the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) 2009 to increase the exposure of the public and students to NASA discoveries in astronomy resulted in several innovative programs which have reached audiences far and wide. Some examples of the impact of these programs and building on the success of these programs beyond 2009 will be discussed in this talk. The spectacular success of the traveling exhibit of NASA images to public libraries around the country prompted NASA to extend it to include more libraries. As a part of the IYA Cornerstone project From Earth To The Universe, NASA images were displayed at non-traditional sites such as airports, parks, and music festivals, exposing them to an audience which would otherwise have been unaware of them. The NASA IYA Student Ambassadors engaged undergraduate and graduate students throughout the U.S. in outreach programs they created to spread NASA astronomy to their local communities. NASA’s Afterschool Universe provided IYA training to community-based organizations, while pre-launch teacher workshops associated with the Kepler and WISE missions were designed to engage educators in the science of these missions. IYA activities have been associated with several missions launched this year. These include the Hubble Servicing Mission 4, Kepler, Herschel/Planck, LCROSS. NASA’sIYA website and Go Observe! feature remain popular. The associated IYA Discovery Guides and Observing with NASA MicroObservatory activities have guided the public and students to perform their own observations of the night sky and to interpret them. NASA intends to work with its Science Education and Public Outreach Forums (SEPOF) to develop a strategy to take forward the best of its IYA2009 plans forward so as to build on the momentum generated by IYA2009 and continue to keep the public and students engaged in the scientific exploration of the universe.

  2. The International River Interface Cooperative: Public Domain Software for River Flow and Morphodynamics (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, J. M.; Shimizu, Y.; McDonald, R.; Takebayashi, H.

    2009-12-01

    The International River Interface Cooperative is an informal organization made up of academic faculty and government scientists with the goal of developing, distributing and providing education for a public-domain software interface for modeling river flow and morphodynamics. Formed in late 2007, the group released the first version of this interface (iRIC) in late 2009. iRIC includes models for two and three-dimensional flow, sediment transport, bed evolution, groundwater-surface water interaction, topographic data processing, and habitat assessment, as well as comprehensive data and model output visualization, mapping, and editing tools. All the tools in iRIC are specifically designed for use in river reaches and utilize common river data sets. The models are couched within a single graphical user interface so that a broad spectrum of models are available to users without learning new pre- and post-processing tools. The first version of iRIC was developed by combining the USGS public-domain Multi-Dimensional Surface Water Modeling System (MD_SWMS), developed at the USGS Geomorphology and Sediment Transport Laboratory in Golden, Colorado, with the public-domain river modeling code NAYS developed by the Universities of Hokkaido and Kyoto, Mizuho Corporation, and the Foundation of the River Disaster Prevention Research Institute in Sapporo, Japan. Since this initial effort, other Universities and Agencies have joined the group, and the interface has been expanded to allow users to integrate their own modeling code using Executable Markup Language (XML), which provides easy access and expandability to the iRIC software interface. In this presentation, the current components of iRIC are described and results from several practical modeling applications are presented to illustrate the capabilities and flexibility of the software. In addition, some future extensions to iRIC are demonstrated, including software for Lagrangian particle tracking and the prediction of

  3. Advantages and difficulties of implementation of the international GNA standards in sustainable mining development. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masaitis, A.

    2013-12-01

    Conflicts in the development of mining projects are now common between the mining proponents, NGO's and communities. These conflicts can sometimes be alleviated by early development of modes of communication, and a formal discussion format that allows airing of concerns and potential resolution of problems. One of the methods that can formalize this process is to establish a Good Neighbor Agreement (GNA), which deals specifically with challenges in relationships between mining operations and the local communities. It is a new practice related to mining operations that are oriented toward social needs and concerns of local communities that arise during the normal life of a mine, which can achieve sustainable mining practices in both developing and developed countries. The GNA project being currently developed at the University of Nevada, Reno in cooperation with the Newmont Mining Corporation has a goal to create an open company/community dialog that is based on the international standards and that will help identify and address sociological and environmental concerns associated with mining, as well as find methods for communication and conflict resolution. GNA standards should be based on trust doctrine, open information access, and community involvement in the decision making process. It should include the following components: emergency response and community communications; environmental issues, including air and water quality standards; reclamation and recultivation; socio-economic issues: transportation, safety, training, and local hiring; and financial issues, particularly related to mitigation offsets and community needs. The GNA standards help identify and evaluate conflict criteria in mining/community relationships; determine the status of concerns; focus on the local political and government systems; separate the acute and the chronic concerns; determine the role and responsibilities of stakeholders; analyze problem resolution feasibility; maintain the

  4. Frof Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J. W. LEE

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available GUEST EDITORIALThis special issue of TOJDE is centred around the theme of ‘Web 2.0 and Social Software in Distance Education’. The Web 2.0 (O’Reilly, 2005 movement, epitomised by such nascent technologies as blogs, wikis, RSS, podcasting, as well as tag-based folksonomies, social networking, collaborative editing and peer-to-peer (P2P media sharing applications, is purported to be redefining the way we conceive and make use of the Internet, and is enjoying considerable attention and popularity in both mainstream society and education. A major aim of this issue is to encourage ongoing discussion on the question of whether, and if so, in what ways, the advent and continued growth of Web 2.0 and social software has specific implications for the field of online and web-based distance education. The special issue opens with an article by P. Clint Rogers, Stephen W. Liddle, Peter Chan, Aaron Doxey and Brady Isom (all from the USA argue that the emergence of Web 2.0 technologies, and the possibilities and the realities they represent, are fuelling profound changes to theoretical views of learning and teaching. According to the authors, in contrast to earlier e-learning efforts that simply replicated traditional models of learning and teaching in online environments, ‘E-Learning 2.0’ offers opportunities to move away from the highly centralised industrial model of learning of the past era, towards achieving individual empowerment within a global learning community. They also argue that as the personal, social and flexible technologies of Web 2.0 proliferate, the importance of re-usability and interoperability will also increase; correspondingly there is also a need for standardisation efforts to support the attainment of these goals. The second article, focuses on the use of specific Web 2.0 technologies written by Abdullah Kuzu (Anadolu University, Turkey looks at pre-service teachers’ perceptions of the use of blogs for instruction and

  5. 13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli (visit)

    2013-01-01

    13 September 2013 - Chairman of the Board of Directors of the von Karman Institute Kingdom of Belgium J.-P. Contzen visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department N. Delruelle and signing the guest book with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. International Relations Adviser T. Kurtyka present.

  6. 27 February 2012- Thai Minister of Science and Technology P. Suraswadi with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis and CMS Collaboration Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck signing the guest book in the 6th floor conference room, building 60 and visiting CMS underground experimental area at LHC Point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    27 February 2012- Thai Minister of Science and Technology P. Suraswadi with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis and CMS Collaboration Former Deputy Spokesperson A. De Roeck signing the guest book in the 6th floor conference room, building 60 and visiting CMS underground experimental area at LHC Point 5.

  7. 8 May 2013 - Swedish European Spallation Source Chief Executive Officer J. H. Yeck in the ATLAS visitor centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton (also present M. Nessi, R. Garoby and E. Tsesmelis); signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    8 May 2013 - Swedish European Spallation Source Chief Executive Officer J. H. Yeck in the ATLAS visitor centre and experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton (also present M. Nessi, R. Garoby and E. Tsesmelis); signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis.

  8. 10 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of India to the Conference on Disarmament, United Nations Office at Geneva Ambassador Mehta signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser R. Voss;in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and ALICE underground experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    10 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of India to the Conference on Disarmament, United Nations Office at Geneva Ambassador Mehta signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser R. Voss;in the LHC tunnel at Point 2 and ALICE underground experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz.

  9. 1 April 2011 - Croatian Rudjer Boskovic Institute (RBI)Director-General D. Ramljak visiting CMS Control Centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Walckiers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien brice

    2011-01-01

    1 April 2011 - Croatian Rudjer Boskovic Institute (RBI)Director-General D. Ramljak visiting CMS Control Centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Walckiers.

  10. 23rd June 2010 - IATA Director-General and CEO G. Bisignani signing the guest book with Research and Computing Director S. Bertolucci; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura; throughout accompanied by Adviser for International relations M. Bona.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - IATA Director-General and CEO G. Bisignani signing the guest book with Research and Computing Director S. Bertolucci; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura; throughout accompanied by Adviser for International relations M. Bona.

  11. 22nd September 2010 - Korean Minister of Education, Science and Technology J.-H. Lee signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting ALICE exhibition with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft; accompanied throughout by Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice ; JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    22nd September 2010 - Korean Minister of Education, Science and Technology J.-H. Lee signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting ALICE exhibition with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Schukraft; accompanied throughout by Adviser R. Voss.

  12. 30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    30th November 2010 - Norwegian Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs State Secretary R. Valle signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci; visiting CERN Computer Centre with Information Technology Department Head F. Hemmer.

  13. 12 December 2012 - US NSF Physics Division Acting Director D. Caldwell signing the guest book with Adviser for the US R. Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela and ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Samuel Morier-Genoud

    2012-01-01

    12 December 2012 - US NSF Physics Division Acting Director D. Caldwell signing the guest book with Adviser for the US R. Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; CMS Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela and ATLAS Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford present.

  14. 6 November 2013 - Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office and Other international organizations in Geneva Ambassador J. Balmaceda Serigos signing the guest book with Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton (Spouse, Son and First Secretary present).

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    6 November 2013 - Permanent Representative of Chile to the United Nations Office and Other international organizations in Geneva Ambassador J. Balmaceda Serigos signing the guest book with Adviser for Latin America J. Salicio Diez; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton (Spouse, Son and First Secretary present).

  15. 30 January 2012 - Danish National Research Foundation Chairman of board K. Bock and University of Copenhagen Rector R. Hemmingsen visiting ATLAS underground experimental area, CERN Control Centre and ALICE underground experimental area, throughout accompanied by J. Dines Hansen and B. Svane Nielsen; signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Document Server

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    30 January 2012 - Danish National Research Foundation Chairman of board K. Bock and University of Copenhagen Rector R. Hemmingsen visiting ATLAS underground experimental area, CERN Control Centre and ALICE underground experimental area, throughout accompanied by J. Dines Hansen and B. Svane Nielsen; signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  16. 28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    28th February 2011 - Turkish Minister of Foreign Affairs A. Davutoğlu signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; meeting the CERN Turkish Community at Point 1; visiting the ATLAS control room with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  17. 24th August 2010 - Bhutan Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office, Ambassador Y. Dorji signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the source and linacs and the CMS control centre, building 354, with Austrian Physicist M. Hoch.

    CERN Document Server

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    24th August 2010 - Bhutan Permanent Representative to the United Nations Office, Ambassador Y. Dorji signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the source and linacs and the CMS control centre, building 354, with Austrian Physicist M. Hoch.

  18. 18 June 2012 - DST Global Founder Y. Milner signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the AD facility in building 193 with AEGIS Collaboration Spokesperson M. Doser and Adviser for the Russian Federation T. Kurtyka. Managing Director I. Osborne also present with Mrs J. Milner and DST Global A. Lebedkina.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    18 June 2012 - DST Global Founder Y. Milner signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the AD facility in building 193 with AEGIS Collaboration Spokesperson M. Doser and Adviser for the Russian Federation T. Kurtyka. Managing Director I. Osborne also present with Mrs J. Milner and DST Global A. Lebedkina.

  19. 25 June 2010 - Founder Chairman of the Japanese Science and Technology in Society Forum K. Omi signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Adviser J. Ellis and Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    25 June 2010 - Founder Chairman of the Japanese Science and Technology in Society Forum K. Omi signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Adviser J. Ellis and Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni.

  20. 27 February 2012 - German Secretary General, Volkswagen Foundation, W. Krull signing the guest book with Director for Administration and general infrastructure S. Lettow and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre and ATLAS underground experimental area with Collaboration Member T. Wengler.

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 February 2012 - German Secretary General, Volkswagen Foundation, W. Krull signing the guest book with Director for Administration and general infrastructure S. Lettow and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre and ATLAS underground experimental area with Collaboration Member T. Wengler.

  1. 20 December 2013 - R. M. Cordeiro Dunlop Ambassador Permanent Representative of Brazil to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with CMS Collaboration, CERN Team Leader A. Petrilli and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General. Accompanied by J. Salicio and R. Voss throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    20 December 2013 - R. M. Cordeiro Dunlop Ambassador Permanent Representative of Brazil to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with CMS Collaboration, CERN Team Leader A. Petrilli and signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General. Accompanied by J. Salicio and R. Voss throughout.

  2. 8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

  3. 13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    13 February 2012 - World Economic Forum Founder and Executive Chairman K. Schwab and Chairperson and Co-Founder Schwab Foundation for Social Entrepreneurship H. Schwab (Mrs)in the ATLAS experimental area at LHC Point 1 with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  4. 12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    12 December 2013 - Sir Konstantin Novoselov, Nobel Prize in Physics 2010, signing the guest book with International Relations Adviser E. Tsesmelis; visiting the ATLAS experimental cavern with Spokesperson D. Charlton; in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry. I. Antoniadis, CERN Theory Group Leader, accompanies throughout.

  5. 14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    14th March 2011 - Australian Senator the Hon. K. Carr Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research in the ATLAS Visitor Centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti,visiting the SM18 area with G. De Rijk,the Computing centre with Department Head F. Hemmer, signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer with Head of International relations F. Pauss

  6. 1 April 2014 - President of the Parliament of the Principality of Liechtenstein A. Frick and his delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    1 April 2014 - President of the Parliament of the Principality of Liechtenstein A. Frick and his delegation visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez and signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis present throughout.

  7. 14 November 2013 - Bangladesh Ministry of Education Secretary K.AN. Chowdhury signing an Expression of Interest and CERN guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Ambassador to the UNOG A. Hannan and CERN Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    14 November 2013 - Bangladesh Ministry of Education Secretary K.AN. Chowdhury signing an Expression of Interest and CERN guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Ambassador to the UNOG A. Hannan and CERN Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis also present.

  8. 11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    11 July 2011 - Carleton University Ottawa, Canada Vice President (Research and International) K. Matheson in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti, accompanied by Adviser J. Ellis and signing the guest book with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  9. 26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

  10. 17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Pantelia, Anna

    2014-01-01

    17 January 2014 - Y. Sakurada Japanese Senior Vice Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology signing the Guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 with Technology Department Head J.M. Jiménez. Head of International Relations R. Voss present throughout.

  11. 5 December 2011 - Chilean President of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica J. M. Aguilera in the ATLAS visitor centre with Adviser J. Salicio Diez and ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    VMO Team

    2011-01-01

    5 December 2011 - Chilean President of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica J. M. Aguilera in the ATLAS visitor centre with Adviser J. Salicio Diez and ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry.

  12. 3rd December 2010 - President Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich (ETHZ)President R. Eichler signing the Guest Book with CERN Head of International Relations and ETHZ F. Pauss and visiting CMS service cavern at LHC Point 5.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    3rd December 2010 - President Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zürich (ETHZ)President R. Eichler signing the Guest Book with CERN Head of International Relations and ETHZ F. Pauss and visiting CMS service cavern at LHC Point 5.

  13. 19 September 2011 - Japan Science and Technology Agency President K. Kitazawa visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with engineer M. Bajko; the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist T. Kondo; signing the guest book with Adviser R.Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    19 September 2011 - Japan Science and Technology Agency President K. Kitazawa visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with engineer M. Bajko; the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist T. Kondo; signing the guest book with Adviser R.Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  14. 5 June 2013 - Sri Lankan Senior Minister of Scientific Affairs T. Vitharana signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer, in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser R. Voss and in the CMS cavern with CERN Team leader A. Petrilli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    5 June 2013 - Sri Lankan Senior Minister of Scientific Affairs T. Vitharana signing the guest book with Director-General R. Heuer, in the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with International Relations Adviser R. Voss and in the CMS cavern with CERN Team leader A. Petrilli.

  15. 31 Jannuary 2012 - Pakistan COMSATS Executive Director I. E. Qureshi visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; Exchange of gifts and signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    31 Jannuary 2012 - Pakistan COMSATS Executive Director I. E. Qureshi visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 2 with ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and International Relations Adviser R. Voss; Exchange of gifts and signature of the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  16. 1 October 2013 - British Minister of State for Trade and Investment Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint signing the guest book with Head of Internationals Relations R. Voss; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 and the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Members K. Behr and J. Catmore.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    1 October 2013 - British Minister of State for Trade and Investment Lord Green of Hurstpierpoint signing the guest book with Head of Internationals Relations R. Voss; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 1 and the ATLAS experimental cavern with ATLAS Collaboration Members K. Behr and J. Catmore.

  17. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerraoui, Rachid; Vinoski, Steve

    1997-09-01

    The organization of a distributed system can have a tremendous impact on its capabilities, its performance, and its ability to evolve to meet changing requirements. For example, the client - server organization model has proven to be adequate for organizing a distributed system as a number of distributed servers that offer various functions to client processes across the network. However, it lacks peer-to-peer capabilities, and experience with the model has been predominantly in the context of local networks. To achieve peer-to-peer cooperation in a more global context, systems issues of scale, heterogeneity, configuration management, accounting and sharing are crucial, and the complexity of migrating from locally distributed to more global systems demands new tools and techniques. An emphasis on interfaces and modules leads to the modelling of a complex distributed system as a collection of interacting objects that communicate with each other only using requests sent to well defined interfaces. Although object granularity typically varies at different levels of a system architecture, the same object abstraction can be applied to various levels of a computing architecture. Since 1989, the Object Management Group (OMG), an international software consortium, has been defining an architecture for distributed object systems called the Object Management Architecture (OMA). At the core of the OMA is a `software bus' called an Object Request Broker (ORB), which is specified by the OMG Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification. The OMA distributed object model fits the structure of heterogeneous distributed applications, and is applied in all layers of the OMA. For example, each of the OMG Object Services, such as the OMG Naming Service, is structured as a set of distributed objects that communicate using the ORB. Similarly, higher-level OMA components such as Common Facilities and Domain Interfaces are also organized as distributed objects that can

  18. PREFACE: Selected invited contributions from the International Conference on Magnetism (Karlsruhe, Germany, 26-31 July 2009) Selected invited contributions from the International Conference on Magnetism (Karlsruhe, Germany, 26-31 July 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goll, Gernot; Löhneysen, Hilbert v.; Loidl, Alois; Pruschke, Thomas; Richter, Manuel; Schultz, Ludwig; Sürgers, Christoph; Wosnitza, Jochen

    2010-04-01

    in a plenary talk. The IUPAP Young Scientist Award on Magnetism was presented to S O Valenzuela, E Saitoh and T Kimura. The sessions were held in the Stadthalle Karlsuhe operated by the Karlsruher Messe- und Kongress-GmbH (KMK). We are grateful to Ms M Mäkelburg (KMK) for organizing the conference site impeccably. The conference was attended by 1552 participants from 48 countries, with approximately 50 per cent from overseas. The program entailed six plenary talks (40 min each), with 16 half-plenary and 41 invited talks (30 min) and 298 contributed talks (15 min). Extended lunch breaks and evenings were devoted to poster sessions, with a total of 1632 posters presented. All submitted papers were reviewed in order to meet the standards of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter and Journal of Physics: Conference Series. The referees made every effort to ensure that the manuscripts submitted for publication in the proceedings reached a high standard. The tremendous work in organizing the paper classification and refereeing procedures was carried out by the Publication Committee which was headed by J Wosnitza, and comprised, in addition, Th Pruschke, M Richter and L Schultz. We also thank G Douglas, IOP Publishing, for his support with the preparation of these proceedings. We gratefully acknowledge the help of L Behrens, E Maass and B Schelske in preparing the conference. The conference would not have been possible without G Goll (conference secretary) and C Sürgers (finances). I thank them for their help. Thanks also go to the many students in blue t-shirts who helped to manage the conference. We are grateful for the financial support of Universität Karlsruhe (TH) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (both institutions merged to form the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) as of 1 October 2009), the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (IUPAP), the City of Karlsruhe, Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German National Science Foundation), and the European

  19. Guest loyalty in hospitality industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagić Snježana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The continuous growth of competition in the hospitality sector has created the need to retain guests and prevent them from switching company due to better offer or saturation. Loyal customers are a valuable asset for catering companies, not only because of the awareness of the effects of customer loyalty. They tend to spread word-of-mouth advertising, more tolerant to price changes, as well as they casually create a linkage to their friends, relatives, colleagues, and other probable consumers and thus enable businesses to uphold a guest's base. By recognizing loyalty guests' importance, the global hospitality industry created monetary and non-monetary rewards for loyal visitors, delayed gratification (points collection and immediate rewards, as well as numerous other reward systems that try to keep them. To win customer loyalty, together with all benefits arising from it, caterers need to become familiar with factors, which determine guests' loyalty. The paper will show the results of research regarding the impact of the service quality and guests' satisfaction to their loyalty. Many authors have confirmed that employees' satisfaction affected customers' satisfaction, so this paper will give an answer does it influence on customers' loyalty as well.

  20. The paradoxical path towards the memorable guest experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    d'Ambrosio, Luigi; Madsen, Jan Halberg

    This paper examines the design of hospitality and tourism experiences staged for international tourists in the emerging Italian destination Campi Flegrei on the Bay of Naples. In particular, this case focuses on the paradox that Campi Flegrei (CF) hospitality providers around the Lake Avernus face...... in the conceptualisation of the guest experience in the context of a non-DMO governed destination....

  1. 8 March 2012 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador R. van Schreven, Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz; throughout accompanied by Former Deputy Department Head and Senior Physicist L. Linssen.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    8 March 2012 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador R. van Schreven, Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to the United Nations Office and other international organisations at Geneva, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS experimental area with Deputy Spokesperson Y. Schutz; throughout accompanied by Former Deputy Department Head and Senior Physicist L. Linssen.

  2. 14th September 2011 - US Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy S. Koonin signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    CERN-HI-1109234 48, from left to right: ALICE Collaboration USA National Coordination J. Harris, ATLAS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Under Secretary for Science, Department of Energy S. Koonin, Adviser for the US R. Voss, Special Assistant to Under Secretary for Science C. Lin, CMS Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson and Spokesperson elect 2012-2013 J. Incandela and LHC Collaboration S. Stone.During his tour of the LHC superconducting magnet test hall he saw one of the superconducting inner-triplet magnets contributed by Fermilab to the LHC. His visit also included the CMS, ATLAS and ALICE experiments as well as the CERN Control Centre.

  3. Foreword by the guest editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanka Stričević

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This issue of Libellarium includes papers from the invited speakers who gave lectures at the Summer School in User Studies (SSUS organized by the Department of Information Sciences and held at the University of Zadar, 11. - 14. April, 2012. The SSUS is associated with the Knowledge Society and Information Transfer PhD programme at the Department of Information Sciences at the University of Zadar. This programme is designed for Croatian and international doctoral students in the field of theories and studies of information needs and use, as well as the field of reading and learning concepts and strategies in digital environment. The main goal of the Summer School 2012 was to introduce the participants to the most recent research, the latest developments and the newly emerged concepts in the fields of users’ information behaviour, learning and education in the digital age, information literacy theories and concepts, as well as the reading paradigms. In the recent times the information society changes rapidly which influences processing and the approaches to information while it changes the existing paradigms of learning and education. New literacies emerge and reading, as the key competency necessary to access the information, changes its forms and practices. The SUSS organized the above mentioned issues in three segments: Users’ information behaviour, Literacy and reading in the digital environment, and Learning and education in the digital age. In the Users’ information behaviour segment this issue of Libellarium contains articles from two invited speakers and two doctoral students who discuss the subject from different viewpoints. Paul Sturges starts with the assumption that people are much more dependent than they realise on information and ideas that are acquired and processed by areas of the brain, not always immediately accessible to the conscious mind. Polona Vilar discusses information behaviour of scholars and scholarly practice

  4. From the Guest Editor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milun Babić

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The special issue of the journal Thermal Science is dedicated to fifty anniversary of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Kragujevac (MFKG, Serbia. We cannot miss this opportunity to point out that Faculty owe its existence, development and today high and internationally recognized rating to its founders from the industry, government, local community, and especially to the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Belgrade. Professors of the Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Belgrade with their attitude towards science and education have implemented highly sensitive gyroscope into their ancestors which is moving them toward quality and creation of well accepted results in every social and R&D context. For development of thermal science, energy and energy efficiency science at MFKG twenty years ago, and for creation of conditions for education of experts in these areas, special tribute should be made to our dear professors: Academician Zoran Zarić, Ph. D. (science advisor at Vinča Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Zoran Protić, Ph. D. (professor at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Belgrade, and Svetislav Stojković, Ph. D. (professor at Faculty of Mechanical Engineering in Kragujevac. Their work, humanistic and creative power have made a lift that we as their followers are using to rise and glide on science and university dome which I hope is visible in this special issue of the journal Thermal Science. In this special issue of the journal Thermal Science have been published 25 papers of the researchers from the MFKG and also from other faculties with which the Faculty, especially Department for Energy and Process Engineering, has long term successful research and educational co-operation. All the paper have been revised according to high standards of the journal Thermal Science which have brought the journal to the list of world famous journals in the area of thermal science, energy and energy efficiency science. It may be out of the

  5. Foreign Guests in Ancient Greece

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zora Žbontar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Xenía was a special relationship between a foreign guest and his host in Ancient Greece. The ritual of hosting a foreigner included an exchange of objects, feasting, and the establishment of friendship between people from different social backgrounds. This relationship implied trust, loyalty, friendship, and mutual aid between the people involved. Goods and services were also exchanged without any form of payment. There were no formal laws governing xenía – it was based entirely on a moral appeal. Mutual appreciation between the host and the guest was established during the ritual, but the host did retain a certain level of superiority over the guest. Xenía was one of the most important institutions in Ancient Greece. It had a lot of features and obligations similar to kinship and marriage. In literary sources the word xénos varies in meaning from “enemy stranger”, “friendly stranger”, “foreigner”, “guest”, “host” to “ritual friend”, and it is often hard to tell which usage is appropriate in a given passage. The paper describes the emphasis on hospitality towards foreigners. It presents an example of a depiction indicating xenía is presented, as well as several objects which were traded during the ritual. The paper also addresses the importance of hospitality in Greek drama in general, especially with examples of violations of the hospitality code.

  6. 76 FR 13598 - Notice of Funding Availability: Inviting Applications for McGovern-Dole International Food for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-14

    ... Applications for McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program's Micronutrient... the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition (McGovern-Dole) Program... through FAS's McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition (McGovern-Dole) Program...

  7. From the Guest Editors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragoslava D Stojiljković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Part one of this issue of the journal Thermal Science is devoted again to the topic of internal combustion engines. These topics deal with motor vehicle energy efficiency, engine performances and exhaust emissions, the application of alternative fuels and the improvements of engine processes. Actually, all these topics dictate the future of motor industry. Over the past two decades, the motor industry has progressively risen to the challenge of reducing the impact of its products on air quality and has already started to address this additional challenge of reducing the climate change impacts of road transport. Many developments based on conventional fossil fuels and technologies are currently being pursued and will continue to contribute to these objectives. The motor industry is also developing the use of alternative fuels and breakthrough vehicle technologies that have the potential to reduce further the climate change impact of the use of motor vehicles. The motor industry has a history of successfully responding to society's mobility needs. In addition to addressing consumer desires for convenient, safe, comfortable and efficient personal transport and cost-effective commercial vehicles, industry has also embraced the wider societal requirement of minimizing the environmental impact of road transport. By 2010, the quality of tail pipe emissions for new vehicles will be such that any further regulated reduction will have a minimal environmental impact. By then, sufficient part of the existing vehicle fleet will have been replaced by newer, less polluting vehicles, to ensure a significant reduction of total emissions from present levels. Any future technological developments in this area will be driven by different factors; namely possible climate change by reducing emissions of known greenhouse gases, dependence on non-European oil reserves and the long term need for sustainable renewable energy sources. In global, regional and national

  8. 76 FR 45223 - Notice of Funding Availability: Inviting Applications for McGovern-Dole International Food for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    ... Applications for McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program Announcement Type... program promotes education, child development, and food security for poor [[Page 45224

  9. ADVANCES IN NUCLEAR PHYSICS. International Symposium Dedicated to the 50th Anniversary of Institutional Physics Research in Romania. Abstracts of invited talks, oral contributions and posters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poenaru, D.N.; Enulescu, A.; Stoica, S.

    1999-01-01

    This document contains the Abstracts of the invited talks, oral contributions and posters presented in the International Symposium Dedicated to the 50th Anniversary of Institutional Physics Research in Romania. Horia Hulubei was born in November 15, 1896 in Iassy and died in November 22, 1972. He graduated in 1926 and in 1927 went in Paris and worked with the Physical Chemistry Laboratory of Sorbonne and took his PhD in 1933 with Professor Jean Perrin in the field of X-ray spectroscopy, a domain in which he became one of the best specialists of the time. His papers treated a large area of subjects from the multiple Compton effects, predicted and experimentally discovered by him, Raman spectra, the X-ray spectra of gases obtained in collaboration with Yvette Cauchois, the identification of elements by X-ray spectroscopy, etc. Winner of two prises of Paris Academy of Sciences, he was elected Corresponding Member of this prestigious French institution. He was also a Directeur de Recherches at the French National Centre of Scientific Research (CNRS). In Romania, he founded in 1949 at Bucharest, the Institute of Atomic Physics, a realization of his dream to build a modern institution of Western type in his own country, tightly connected with the rest of scientific world by international cooperation. The lectures given at this symposium will be published by World Scientific Publishing Co. while the oral contributions and posters will be published in Romanian Journal of Physics. The abstracts of all these communications are dealing with current research conducted in the Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering in the field of nuclear structure, elementary particle and fields, applications of isotopes and radiation, etc. A number of these communications have been presented by invited prominent scientists of abroad, many of them working in collaboration with the scientific staff of the Romanian institutes and universities

  10. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes {sup 129}Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of {sup 129}Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, {sup 129}Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature.

  11. Distribution of metal and adsorbed guest species in zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chmelka, B.F.

    1989-12-01

    Because of their high internal surface areas and molecular-size cavity dimensions, zeolites are used widely as catalysts, shape- selective supports, or adsorbents in a variety of important chemical processes. For metal-catalyzed reactions, active metal species must be dispersed to sites within the zeolite pores that are accessible to diffusing reactant molecules. The distribution of the metal, together with transport and adsorption of reactant molecules in zeolite powders, are crucial to ultimate catalyst performance. The nature of the metal or adsorbed guest distribution is known, however, to be dramatically dependent upon preparatory conditions. Our objective is to understand, at the molecular level, how preparatory treatments influence the distribution of guest species in zeolites, in order that macroscopic adsorption and reaction properties of these materials may be better understood. The sensitivity of xenon to its adsorption environment makes 129 Xe NMR spectroscopy an important diagnostic probe of metal clustering and adsorbate distribution processes in zeolites. The utility of 129 Xe NMR depends on the mobility of the xenon atoms within the zeolite-guest system, together with the length scale of the sample heterogeneity being studied. In large pore zeolites containing dispersed guest species, such as Pt--NaY, 129 Xe NMR is insensitive to fine structural details at room temperature

  12. Capturing the guest experience in hotels phase one : theoretical background and development of the guest experience scan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marle, van R.S.F. (Rienk); Pijls, R. (Ruth); Schreiber, G.H. (Gerrit)

    2011-01-01

    The goal for the coming years is to get insight in the guest experience in hotels. What is guest experience? How to measure guest experience? What is the relation between guest experience and guest loyalty? And finally, what tangible elements in the physical environment of hotels and the contact

  13. Invitation to the 17th international congress on photosynthesis research in 2016 : photosynthesis in a changing world

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amerongen, Herbert; Croce, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The 17th International Congress on Photosynthesis will be held from August 7 to 12, 2016 in Maastricht, The Netherlands. The congress will include an opening reception, 15 plenary lectures, 28 scientific symposia, many poster sessions, displays by scientific companies, excursions, congress dinner,

  14. 76 FR 55869 - Notice of Funding Availability: Inviting Applications for the McGovern-Dole International Food...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-09

    ... Applications for the McGovern-Dole International Food for Education and Child Nutrition Program; Correction... Education and Child Nutrition (McGovern-Dole) program. The notice stated that eligible applicants could... highest-level result of this framework is ``Improved Literacy of School-aged Children.'' Proposals that do...

  15. Quantitative analysis of the guest-concentration dependence of the mobility in a disordered fluorene-arylamine host-guest system in the guest-to-guest regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H. T.; Hof, A.J.; Lu, M.; Blom, P. W. M.; de Vries, R. J.; Coehoorn, R.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transport in a polyspirobifluorene derivative with copolymerized N,N,N',N'-tetraaryldiamino biphenyl (TAD) hole transport units is investigated as a function of the TAD content. For TAD concentrations larger than 5%, guest-to-guest transport is observed. It is demonstrated that in this

  16. Quantitative analysis of the guest-concentration dependence of the mobility in a disordered fluorene-arylamine host-guest system in the guest-to-guest regime

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicolai, H.T.; Hof, A.J.; Lu, M.; Blom, P.W.M.; Vries, R.J. de; Coehoorn, R.

    2011-01-01

    The charge transport in a polyspirobifluorene derivative with copolymerized N,N,N',N'-tetraaryldiamino biphenyl (TAD) hole transport units is investigated as a function of the TAD content. For TAD concentrations larger than 5, guest-to-guest transport is observed. It is demonstrated that in this

  17. The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO): Four Years Operating on the International Space Station (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, C. O.; Nahorniak, J.; Tufillaro, N.; Kappus, M.

    2013-12-01

    The Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO) is the first spaceborne imaging spectrometer designed to sample the coastal ocean. HICO images selected coastal regions at 92 m spatial resolution with full spectral coverage (88 channels covering 400 to 900 nm) and a high signal-to-noise ratio to resolve the complexity of the coastal ocean. Under sponsorship of the Office of Naval Research, HICO was built by the Naval Research Laboratory, which continues to operate the sensor. HICO has been operating on the International Space Station since October 2009 and has collected over 8000 scenes for more than 50 users. As Project Scientist I have been the link to the international ocean optics community primarily through our OSU HICO website (http://hico.oregonstate.edu). HICO operations are now under NASA support and HICO data is now also be available through the NASA Ocean Color Website (http://oceancolor.gsfc.nasa.gov ). Here we give a brief overview of HICO data and operations and discuss the unique challenges and opportunities that come from operating on the International Space Station.

  18. Measurement of local, internal magnetic fluctuations via cross-polarization scattering in the DIII-D tokamak (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barada, K., E-mail: kshitish@ucla.edu; Rhodes, T. L.; Crocker, N. A.; Peebles, W. A. [University of California-Los Angeles, P.O. Box 957099, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2016-11-15

    We present new measurements of internal magnetic fluctuations obtained with a novel eight channel cross polarization scattering (CPS) system installed on the DIII-D tokamak. Measurements of internal, localized magnetic fluctuations provide a window on an important physics quantity that we heretofore have had little information on. Importantly, these measurements provide a new ability to challenge and test linear and nonlinear simulations and basic theory. The CPS method, based upon the scattering of an incident microwave beam into the opposite polarization by magnetic fluctuations, has been significantly extended and improved over the method as originally developed on the Tore Supra tokamak. A new scattering geometry, provided by a unique probe beam, is utilized to improve the spatial localization and wavenumber range. Remotely controllable polarizer and mirror angles allow polarization matching and wavenumber selection for a range of plasma conditions. The quasi-optical system design, its advantages and challenges, as well as important physics validation tests are presented and discussed. Effect of plasma beta (ratio of kinetic to magnetic pressure) on both density and magnetic fluctuations is studied and it is observed that internal magnetic fluctuations increase with beta. During certain quiescent high confinement operational regimes, coherent low frequency modes not detected by magnetic probes are detected locally by CPS diagnostics.

  19. Facilitate, Collaborate, Educate: the Role of the IRIS Consortium in Supporting National and International Research in Seismology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, D. W.; Beck, S. L.

    2009-12-01

    Over the twenty-five years since its founding in 1984, the IRIS Consortium has contributed in fundamental ways to change the practice and culture of research in seismology in the US and worldwide. From an original founding group of twenty-two U.S. academic institutions, IRIS membership has now grown to 114 U.S. Member Institutions, 20 Educational Affiliates and 103 Foreign Affiliates. With strong support from the National Science Foundation, additional resources provided by other federal agencies, close collaboration with the U.S. Geological Survey and many international partners, the technical resources of the core IRIS programs - the Global Seismographic Network (GSN), the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL), the Data Management System (DMS) and Education and Outreach - have grown to become a major national and international source of experimental data for research on earthquakes and Earth structure, and a resource to support education and outreach to the public. While the primary operational focus of the Consortium is to develop and maintain facilities for the collection of seismological data for basic research, IRIS has become much more than an instrument facility. It has become a stimulus for collaboration between academic seismological programs and a focus for their interactions with national and international partners. It has helped establish the academic community as a significant contributor to the collection of data and an active participant in global research and monitoring. As a consortium of virtually all of the Earth science research institutions in the US, IRIS has helped coordinate the academic community in the development of new initiatives, such as EarthScope, to strengthen the support for science and argue for the relevance of seismology and its use in hazard mitigation. The early IRIS pioneers had the foresight to carefully define program goals and technical standards for the IRIS facilities that have stood

  20. 9 JUne 2016 - Permanent Representative of the Republic of Poland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva Ambassador P. Stachańczyk signing the guest book with CERN Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Piotr Stachańczyk Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Republic of Poland to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  1. Invited Article: An active terahertz polarization converter employing vanadium dioxide and a metal wire grating in total internal reflection geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xudong; Chen, Xuequan; Parrott, Edward P. J.; Han, Chunrui; Humbert, Georges; Crunteanu, Aurelian; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2018-05-01

    Active broadband terahertz (THz) polarization manipulation devices are challenging to realize, but also of great demand in broadband terahertz systems. Vanadium dioxide (VO2) shows a promising phase transition for active control of THz waves and provides broadband polarization characteristics when integrated within grating-type structures. We creatively combine a VO2-based grating structure with a total internal reflection (TIR) geometry providing a novel interaction mechanism between the electromagnetic waves and the device, to realize a powerful active broadband THz polarization-controlling device. The device is based on a Si-substrate coated with a VO2 layer and a metal grating structure on top, attached to a prism for generating the TIR condition on the Si-VO2-grating interface. The grating is connected to electrodes for electrically switching the VO2 between its insulating and conducting phases. By properly selecting the incident angle of the THz waves, the grating direction, and the incident polarization state, we first achieved a broadband intensity modulator under a fused silica prism with an average modulation depth of 99.75% in the 0.2-1.1 THz region. Additionally, we realized an active ultra-broadband quarter-wave converter under a Si prism that can be switched between a 45° linear rotator and a quarter wave converter in the 0.8-1.5 THz region. This is the first demonstration of an active quarter-wave converter with ultra-broad bandwidth performance. Our work shows a highly flexible and multifunctional polarization-controlling device for broadband THz applications.

  2. Have the Guests Perceived Superior Value?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levyda Levyda

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to describe guests’ perceived value by using a multidimensional approach. From previous research, guests’ perceived value consisted of some functional value, emotional value, and social value. Based on guest experience, and functional value consisted of physical evidence, guest room, food and beverage, hotel staff, and price. This research was conducted in four-star hotels in Jakarta. The respondents were the guests who had stayed in four-star hotels. The number of the respondent was 405. The data were obtained by using self-administered questionnaires. This research shows that guests have not perceived superior value. Some of the values and the necessary efforts need to be improved.

  3. 28 August 2013 - Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Ireland to the United Nations Office and specialized institutions in Geneva Mr G. Corr signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHCb experimental area with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with International Relations Adviser for Ireland E. Tsesmelis. Accompanied throughout by R. McNulty.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    28 August 2013 - Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Ireland to the United Nations Office and specialized institutions in Geneva Mr G. Corr signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; visiting the LHCb experimental area with LHCb Collaboration Spokesperson P. Campana and visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 8 with International Relations Adviser for Ireland E. Tsesmelis. Accompanied throughout by R. McNulty.

  4. 6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice, JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

  5. 9 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Spain to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other International Organisations, Ambassador A. Santos Maraver signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; in the CERN Control Centre with N. Catalan; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela; throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Salicio Diez and Former Physics Deputy Department Head L. Alvarez Gaumé.

    CERN Multimedia

    Visual Media Office

    2012-01-01

    9 February 2012 - Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Spain to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other International Organisations, Ambassador A. Santos Maraver signing the guest book with CERN Director-General; in the CERN Control Centre with N. Catalan; visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 and CMS underground experimental area with Collaboration Spokesperson J. Incandela; throughout accompanied by Adviser J. Salicio Diez and Former Physics Deputy Department Head L. Alvarez Gaumé.

  6. 21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

  7. 6 January 2011 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador M. Kovačič, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Slovenia to the United Nations Office and other international Organisations at Geneva (and Permanent Mission Staff)signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre, ATLAS underground area and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Adviser T. Kurtyka.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    6 January 2011 - Extraordinary and plenipotentiary Ambassador M. Kovačič, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Slovenia to the United Nations Office and other international Organisations at Geneva (and Permanent Mission Staff)signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer; in the ATLAS visitor centre, ATLAS underground area and LHC tunnel with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and Adviser T. Kurtyka.

  8. By invitation only

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2011-01-01

    The Hôtel Métropole in Brussels is a legendary conference venue that will ring a bell to all physicists. 100 years after the first meeting of the Conseil de Physique Solvay, a representative group of the world’s most eminent physicists met again in October this year in the Excelsior Room to discuss “The Theory of the Quantum World”. Three members of CERN's Theory Group were invited to participate. Gian Giudice, one of them, shares with us his thoughts and impressions about this exclusive conference.   Attendees at the 25th Solvay Conference on Physics, Brussels. Photo provided by "International Solvay Institutes". “In the tradition of the Solvay Conferences, this is a discussion-oriented meeting with few talks by rapporteurs.” Thus reads the Introduction to the Scientific Programme of the Solvay Conference on Physics. In the Conference programme, the rapporteurs speak for only 30 minutes,...

  9. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery | Enslin | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 106, No 8 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Functional neurosurgery. JMN Enslin. Abstract. No Abstract.

  10. Guest driven structural transformation studies of a luminescent metal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    at room temperature often render MOFs which gener- ally encapsulate low boiling solvents as free guests in the pores. These MOFs generally exhibit flexible char- acter because they often lose those trapped guests upon air drying of the MOFs crystals and undergo struc- tural variations, often termed as guest induced ...

  11. Unwelcome Guests: Extoic Forest Pests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun Jiang-Hua

    2002-01-01

    Exotic forest pests cost China and the United States billions of dollars each year. Current regulatory systems worldwide are over-whelmed with the increasing volume of international trade. Trade in nursery stock, wood products, pallets and dunnage have proven the most common means of transport for exotic forest pests. Despite our best efforts, pests such as chestnut...

  12. Switchable host-guest systems on surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying-Wei; Sun, Yu-Long; Song, Nan

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: For device miniaturization, nanotechnology follows either the "top-down" approach scaling down existing larger-scale devices or the "bottom-up' approach assembling the smallest possible building blocks to functional nanoscale entities. For synthetic nanodevices, self-assembly on surfaces is a superb method to achieve useful functions and enable their interactions with the surrounding world. Consequently, adaptability and responsiveness to external stimuli are other prerequisites for their successful operation. Mechanically interlocked molecules such as rotaxanes and catenanes, and their precursors, that is, molecular switches and supramolecular switches including pseudorotaxanes, are molecular machines or prototypes of machines capable of mechanical motion induced by chemical signals, biological inputs, light or redox processes as the external stimuli. Switching of these functional host-guest systems on surfaces becomes a fundamental requirement for artificial molecular machines to work, mimicking the molecular machines in nature, such as proteins and their assemblies operating at dynamic interfaces such as the surfaces of cell membranes. Current research endeavors in material science and technology are focused on developing either a new class of materials or materials with novel/multiple functionalities by shifting host-guest chemistry from solution phase to surfaces. In this Account, we present our most recent attempts of building monolayers of rotaxanes/pseudorotaxanes on surfaces, providing stimuli-induced macroscopic effects and further understanding on the switchable host-guest systems at interfaces. Biocompatible versions of molecular machines based on synthetic macrocycles, such as cucurbiturils, pillararenes, calixarenes, and cyclodextrins, have been employed to form self-assembled monolayers of gates on the surfaces of mesoporous silica nanoparticles to regulate the controlled release of cargo/drug molecules under a range of external stimuli

  13. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from the international meeting on 'New Frontiers in Numerical Relativity' (Albert Einstein Institute, Potsdam, Germany, 17 21 July 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campanelli, M.; Rezzolla, L.

    2007-06-01

    Traditionally, frontiers represent a treacherous terrain to venture into, where hidden obstacles are present and uncharted territories lie ahead. At the same time, frontiers are also a place where new perspectives can be appreciated and have often been the cradle of new and thriving developments. With this in mind and inspired by this spirit, the Numerical Relativity Group at the Albert Einstein Institute (AEI) organized a `New Frontiers in Numerical Relativity' meeting on 17 21 July 2006 at the AEI campus in Potsdam, Germany. It is an interesting historical remark that the suggestion of the meeting was first made in the late summer of 2005 and thus at a time that for many reasons has been a turning point in the recent history of numerical relativity. A few months earlier (April 2005) in fact, F Pretorius had announced the first multi-orbit simulations of binary black holes and computed the waveforms from the inspiral, merger and ring-down (`Numerical Relativity', Banff International Research Station, Banff, Canada, 16 21 April 2005). At that time, the work of Pretorius served as an important boost to the research in this field and although no other group has yet adopted the techniques he employed, his results provided the numerical relativity community with clear evidence that the binary black hole problem could be solved. A few months later (November 2005), equally striking results were presented by the NASA Goddard and Texas/Brownsville groups, who also reported, independently, multi-orbit evolutions of binary black holes using numerical techniques and formulations of the Einstein equations which were markedly distinct from those suggested by Pretorius (`Numerical Relativity 2005', Goddard Space Flight Centre, Greenbelt, MD, USA, 2 4 November 2005). A few months later other groups were able to repeat the same simulations and obtain equivalent results, testifying that the community as a whole had reached comparable levels of maturity in both the numerical

  14. 6 JUne 2016 - Permanent Representative of Greece to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland Ambassador A. Korka signing the guest book with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti.

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Ms Anna Korka Ambassador Permanent Representative of Greece to the United Nations Office at Geneva and other international organisations in Switzerland; Also present: Deputy Permanent Representative I. Tsaousis, Member State Liaison Officer E. Tsesmelis, Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle and Head of Member State Relations P. Wells.

  15. 26 August 2016 - K. Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the CERN Guest book with Adviser P. Fassnacht

    CERN Multimedia

    Bennett, Sophia Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Kinga Singye Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Bhutan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva Friday 26 August 2016

  16. Be My Guest: A Survey of Mass Communication Students' Perception of Guest Speakers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Patrick F.; Craig, Clay

    2017-01-01

    The use of guest speakers as a pedagogical technique across disciplines at the college level is hardly novel. However, empirical assessment of journalism and mass communication students' perceptions of this practice has not previously been conducted. To fill this gap, this article presents results from an online survey specifically administered to…

  17. Guest Foreword by Lord Phillips KG PC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas A. Phillips

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Rt Hon The Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers KG PC, President of the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland Ambition and excellence. Those two words epitomize Qatar. Under the leadership of his Highness the Emir, this small State has set out to make an impact on the world that belies its size. Ambitious was the plan to have an international broadcasting station. Ambitious was the plan to build from scratch a Museum of Islamic Art. Ambitious was the bid – the successful bid to host the World Cup in 2022. Ambitious is the bid to stage the Olympic Games in 2020. Qatar not merely has ambitions, it realizes its ambitions. And when it does so it is not enough to say that the result is ‘world class’, for Qatar sets out to be a world leader in whatever it puts its hand to. Excellence is the norm. Al Jazeera has established itself as the broadcasting station of choice for many throughout the world. The Doha Museum of Islamic Art is recognized as being second to none. In addition, the scale and standard of development in Doha itself is setting new standards of excellence in the fields of architecture and civil engineering. Thus when Qatar focuses its energies on education and the law, high achievements are expected. I shall have the honour of helping to achieve those expectations when I succeed Lord Woolf as President of Qatar’s new and impressive Civil and Commercial Court. The College of Law at Qatar University is already achieving excellence in the field of legal education. So, naturally, all expect great things of this new International Review of Law and I am delighted to have been invited to welcome it by this foreword. The range of the first edition is both international and topical. Those countries that have experienced the turbulence of the Arab Spring are settling new constitutions, and other countries are bent on constitutional reform designed to avoid such turbulence. So an erudite article on

  18. Guest Foreword from Michael Thomas CMG QC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Thomas

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available I am delighted to be invited to attend upon this launch of the International Review of Law, conceived and now delivered into the world by the College of Law of the University of Qatar under Dr. Jon Truby’s leadership. This new and most welcome contribution to global academic writing and contemporary legal criticism, should be of the greatest interest outside Qatar, if only for its provenance. The State of Qatar has become widely known and respected for its vision, its progressive outlook, and its determination to look beyond Arab culture and traditions for new ways of working with the rest of the world for the good of the region as a whole. It has made a bold commitment to engage with the accepted legal principles and processes that have served the needs of global mercantile and commercial activity so well over the last two centuries. his is demonstrated by the generous support given by His Highness the Emir to the Qatar Law Forum 2009, to be repeated in May this year, in which jurists and lawyers of great eminence are brought together in Doha to expound, explain and exchange ideas upon the importance of the rule of law, the universal key to principled and effective government, and the protection of individual freedom and dignity. One may also cite the recently established Civil and Commercial Court, served by appointed judges of international repute from many jurisdictions, that has opened its doors in Doha for dispute resolution and adjudication. I am privileged to chair the Regulatory Tribunal, an independent statuy body composed of lawyers from overseas with specialist experience in market regulation, to which incoming investors can appeal any disputes they make with Qatar Financial Centre (QFC Institutions such as the QFC Regulatory Authority and QFC Authority In the same way, the founding of Qatar University College of Law in 2006 has shown Qatar’s determination to train future generations of Qataris to build on the best of legal

  19. Guest Speakers in School-Based Sexuality Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRee, Annie-Laurie; Madsen, Nikki; Eisenberg, Marla E.

    2014-01-01

    This study, using data from a statewide survey (n = 332), examined teachers' practices regarding the inclusion of guest speakers to cover sexuality content. More than half of teachers (58%) included guest speakers. In multivariate analyses, teachers who taught high school, had professional preparation in health education, or who received…

  20. The benefit of guest loyalty programmes | La Rose | Research in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the literature review of this research, the following aspects are discussed: a loyalty programme and its use; the sort of loyalty programmes; the effects of a loyalty programme; and the wishes and needs of a leisure guest. Surveys were divided among 46 leisure guests of Apollo Hotels and Resorts in order to collect data on ...

  1. The recruitment mechanism in Spaish and U.S. guest worker programs: preventing fraud and abuse in worker selection and hiring

    OpenAIRE

    Minaya, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Fraudulent recruitment of authorized, temporary “guest workers” is a growing concern among international policy makers. Recruitment in many countries is regulated through a combination of immigration, criminal, and administrative laws. This paper will compare how two countries, Spain and the United States, regulate the recruitment of agricultural and low-skilled guest workers, a population generally vulnerable to fraud, based on a review of each country’s laws and relevant literature. The con...

  2. Science in the schoolhouse: an uninvited guest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, Timothy J; Tankersley, Melody

    2004-01-01

    Science and scientific thinking have not made a substantial impact on educational practice. In this discussion, we examine the relationship between science and education and delineate four reasons for characterizing science as an uninvited guest in schools: (a) Science is not highly regarded in society; (b) good science and bad science are often mistaken for one another; (c) the amount of current data is overwhelming; and (d) science is not easy for those who practice it (researchers), those who translate it (teacher educators), or those who consume it (teachers). We suggest several strategies to improve this relationship, including promoting standards of educational practice, emphasizing the role of teacher educators as translators of the research base into classroom practice, and linking student outcomes with the use of effective instructional practices.

  3. Defined Host-Guest Chemistry on Nanocarbon for Sustained Inhibition of Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Misra, Santosh K; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Ostadhossein, Alireza; Daza, Enrique; Tiwari, Saumya; Mittal, Shachi; Gryka, Mark C; Bhargava, Rohit; Pan, Dipanjan

    2016-08-22

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT-3) is known to be overexpressed in cancer stem cells. Poor solubility and variable drug absorption are linked to low bioavailability and decreased efficacy. Many of the drugs regulating STAT-3 expression lack aqueous solubility; hence hindering efficient bioavailability. A theranostics nanoplatform based on luminescent carbon particles decorated with cucurbit[6]uril is introduced for enhancing the solubility of niclosamide, a STAT-3 inhibitor. The host-guest chemistry between cucurbit[6]uril and niclosamide makes the delivery of the hydrophobic drug feasible while carbon nanoparticles enhance cellular internalization. Extensive physicochemical characterizations confirm successful synthesis. Subsequently, the host-guest chemistry of niclosamide and cucurbit[6]uril is studied experimentally and computationally. In vitro assessments in human breast cancer cells indicate approximately twofold enhancement in IC 50 of drug. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence imaging demonstrate efficient cellular internalization. Furthermore, the catalytic biodegradation of the nanoplatforms occur upon exposure to human myeloperoxidase in short time. In vivo studies on athymic mice with MCF-7 xenograft indicate the size of tumor in the treatment group is half of the controls after 40 d. Immunohistochemistry corroborates the downregulation of STAT-3 phosphorylation. Overall, the host-guest chemistry on nanocarbon acts as a novel arsenal for STAT-3 inhibition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Defined Host–Guest Chemistry on Nanocarbon for Sustained Inhibition of Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostadhossein, Fatemeh; Misra, Santosh K.; Mukherjee, Prabuddha; Ostadhossein, Alireza; Daza, Enrique; Tiwari, Saumya; Mittal, Shachi; Gryka, Mark C.; Bhargava, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 3 (STAT-3) is known to be overexpressed in cancer stem cells. Poor solubility and variable drug absorption are linked to low bioavailability and decreased efficacy. Many of the drugs regulating STAT-3 expression lack aqueous solubility; hence hindering efficient bioavailability. A theranostics nanoplatform based on luminescent carbon particles decorated with cucurbit[6]uril is introduced for enhancing the solubility of niclosamide, a STAT-3 inhibitor. The host–guest chemistry between cucurbit[6]uril and niclosamide makes the delivery of the hydrophobic drug feasible while carbon nanoparticles enhance cellular internalization. Extensive physicochemical characterizations confirm successful synthesis. Subsequently, the host–guest chemistry of niclosamide and cucurbit[6]uril is studied experimentally and computationally. In vitro assessments in human breast cancer cells indicate approximately twofold enhancement in IC50 of drug. Fourier transform infrared and fluorescence imaging demonstrate efficient cellular internalization. Furthermore, the catalytic biodegradation of the nanoplatforms occur upon exposure to human myeloperoxidase in short time. In vivo studies on athymic mice with MCF-7 xenograft indicate the size of tumor in the treatment group is half of the controls after 40 d. Immunohistochemistry corroborates the downregulation of STAT-3 phosphorylation. Overall, the host–guest chemistry on nanocarbon acts as a novel arsenal for STAT-3 inhibition. PMID:27545321

  5. The guest-worker in Western Europe--an obituary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castles, S

    1986-01-01

    The significance of guest workers is examined for six Western European countries. It is found that "the dynamics of the migratory process led to family reunification and settlement, against the original intentions of the workers, employers and states concerned. The recruitment of guest-workers stopped after 1974, but many migrants stayed on, becoming permanent ethnic minorities, in a situation of economic and social crisis. It is argued that guest-worker systems inevitably lead to permanent migration in the long run, and that it is better to plan for orderly settlement through appropriate policies." excerpt

  6. An Invitation to Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Schleicher, Dierk

    2011-01-01

    This "Invitation to Mathematics" consists of 14 contributions, many from the world's leading mathematicians, which introduce the readers to exciting aspects of current mathematical research. The contributions are as varied as the personalities of active mathematicians, but together they show mathematics as a rich and lively field of research. The contributions are written for interested students at the age of transition between high school and university who know high school mathematics and perhaps competition mathematics and who want to find out what current research mathematics is

  7. The Intersection of Environmental Variability, Policy, and Human Values: International Treaties, Yukon River Salmon, and Food Security in a Changing Arctic (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlach, S.; Loring, P. A.; Murray, M. S.

    2009-12-01

    2009 was a particularly devastating year for rural communities of the Yukon River in Alaska. For a number of reasons, including annual variability in Chinook and Chum salmon runs, imperfect monitoring and information, “best practices” management decisions by regulatory agencies, and international treaty obligations related to conservation and total allowable catch allocation, the smokehouses and freezers of many Alaska Native families, particularly those in up-river communities in the Yukon Flats region, are empty; a problem that has prompted Alaska’s Governor Sean Parnell to ask the US Federal Government to declare a disaster. However, depending on whom you ask, this year’s management of these resources, which provide food security and enable self-reliance in rural communities, may be evaluated as a failure or as a success. How can we reconcile an institutional assessment that claims success as defined in terms of internationally-agreed upon conservation and escapement goals, with the negative economic and health impacts on communities? We use this case to illustrate how the whole Yukon River watershed and drainage, including Alaska and Canada, provides an elegant, geographic context for the discussion and analysis of the human dimensions of environmental change and regional sustainability. Policymakers have arguably gone to great lengths to reconcile competing ‘uses’ of the Yukon River, including commercial and subsistence uses as well as conservation goals, but while managers continue to strive to be ‘adaptive learners’ in their approach to balancing these goals, the impacts on rural communities are immediate and cumulative, synergistic, temporally and spatially scaled, and directly related to rural livelihoods, community health, well-being and sustainability. The cost of this ‘adaptive’ process may be too high, both for the ecosystem and for the people who live there. Are we asking too much of the Yukon River? Are we asking too much of the

  8. Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial: Health financing lessons from Thailand for South Africa on the path towards universal health coverage. Mark Blecher, Anban Pillay, Walaiporn Patcharanarumol, Warisa Panichkriangkrai, Viroj Tangcharoensathien, Yot Teerawattananon, Supasit Pannarunothai, Jonatan Davén ...

  9. A Different Guest Worker Story: Roma Guest Workers – a Transnational Minority in Transmigration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Banić-Grubišić

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available he paper considers the ambiguity of the term ‘guest worker’, based on the example of economic migrants who belong to the Roma population. Over the last fifty years, members of the Roma minority have migrated to Western European countries for different reasons (economic, political and social reasons, and there is no official data on the precise number of Roma who have migrated abroad, whether permanently or temporarily. It is possible to establish a number of categories of Roma immigrants who reside permanently or temporarily in Western European countries. These are: the so-called “classic guest workers” who, through legal or illegal means went to work abroad in the 60’s and 70’s, and mostly settled permanently in the host countries; Roma refugees from Kosovo and/or asylum seekers who left the country during the wars in the 90’s, and who were returned to Serbia after the signing of the Readmission treaty; and those Roma who represent occasional economic migrants: people who, after Serbia was put on the white Schengen list (the liberalization of the visa policy for citizens of Serbia, spend three months at a time working abroad. Even though these three categories of Roma workers have different reasons for migrating from and returning to Serbia, the majority of the population perceives them as a unified, distinct whole – as guest workers. The paper is the result of fieldwork conducted in South-Eastern Serbia, in the village of Minicevo.

  10. Nanoparticle guests in lyotropic liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dölle, Sarah; Park, Ji Hyun; Schymura, Stefan; Jo, Hyeran; Scalia, Giusy; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    In this chapter we discuss the benefits, peculiarities and main challenges related to nanoparticle templating in lyotropic liquid crystals. We first give a brief bird's-eye view of the field, discussing different nanoparticles as well as different lyotropic hosts that have been explored, but then quickly focus on the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in surfactant-based lyotropic nematic phases. We discuss in some detail how the transfer of orientational order from liquid crystal host to nanoparticle guest can be verified and which degree of ordering can be expected, as well as the importance of choosing the right surfactant and its concentration for the stability of the nanoparticle suspension. We introduce a method for dispersing nanoparticles with an absolute minimum of stabilizing surfactant, based on dispersion below the Krafft temperature, and we discuss the peculiar phenomenon of filament formation in lyotropic nematic phases with a sufficient concentration of well-dispersed carbon nanotubes. Finally, we describe how the total surfactant concentration in micellar nematics can be greatly reduced by combining cat- and anionic surfactants, and we discuss how nanotubes can help in inducing the liquid crystal phase close to the isotropic-nematic boundary.

  11. Ready to sell our program. Anybody who is interested in learning Indonesian experience is invited to take part in the BKKBN's international training program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suyono, H

    1996-01-01

    The Indonesian Family Planning Program was officially launched in 1970 when President Suharto developed the National Family Planning Coordinating Board (BKKBN) to administrate the national family planning program. The inauguration of the family planning program came at the heels of a special demand by the people with very strong support of the ulama. The program was subsequently developed and expanded into remote areas in 1976. In 1992, a family-based approach to family planning was implemented in which every village family was made responsible for family planning. The program is based upon a very strong political commitment at the highest level as well as at the provincial, district, subdistrict, and village levels; it continuously innovates; every community can name its family planning program as it likes; and there is constant feedback to the community. Indonesia's family planning program strategies are as follows: it is suggested that couples in which the wife is aged 20-30 years have only two children; it is recommended that women over age 30 have no more children due to the comparatively high risks of pregnancy at that age; considerable effort is given to encourage youths to not become pregnant and bear children; numerous chairmen of small community family planning groups are appointed; and social and cultural conditions have been created in which people work for family planning activities. People interested in learning from the Indonesian experience in family planning may participate in the BKKBN's international training program.

  12. Invited presentations. College on soil physics 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabriels, D.M.; Ghirardi, G.; Nielsen, D.R.; Pla Sentis, I.; Skidmore, E.L.

    2004-01-01

    The present book is a partial compilation of contributions from selected former participants of the College on Soil Physics invited to make presentations related to their achievements as a result of attending the College. It also serves as a testimony of the existing links between soil physicists throughout the world strengthened by the support and programs of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics originally envisioned by Abdus Salam to foster the growth of advanced studies and physics research in developing countries

  13. Invited presentations. College on soil physics 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabriels, D M [Univ. Ghent (Belgium); Ghirardi, G [Univ. Trieste (Italy); Nielsen, D R [Univ. California (United States); Pla Sentis, I [Univ. Lleida (Spain); Skidmore, E L [Kansas State Univ. (United States)

    2004-05-15

    The present book is a partial compilation of contributions from selected former participants of the College on Soil Physics invited to make presentations related to their achievements as a result of attending the College. It also serves as a testimony of the existing links between soil physicists throughout the world strengthened by the support and programs of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics originally envisioned by Abdus Salam to foster the growth of advanced studies and physics research in developing countries.

  14. Mechanism of host-guest complexation by cucurbituril.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, César; Hudgins, Robert R; Nau, Werner M

    2004-05-12

    The factors affecting host-guest complexation between the molecular container compound cucurbit[6]uril (CB6) and various guests in aqueous solution are studied, and a detailed complexation mechanism in the presence of cations is derived. The formation of the supramolecular complex is studied in detail for cyclohexylmethylammonium ion as guest. The kinetics and thermodynamics of complexation is monitored by NMR as a function of temperature, salt concentration, and cation size. The binding constants and the ingression rate constants decrease with increasing salt concentration and cation-binding constant, in agreement with a competitive binding of the ammonium site of the guest and the metal cation with the ureido carbonyl portals of CB6. Studies as a function of guest size indicate that the effective container volume of the CB6 cavity is approximately 105 A(3). It is suggested that larger guests are excluded for two reasons: a high activation barrier for ingression imposed by the tight CB6 portals and a destabilization of the complex due to steric repulsion inside. For example, in the case of the nearly spherical azoalkane homologues 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-ene (DBH, volume ca. 96 A(3)) and 2,3-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]oct-2-ene (DBO, volume ca. 110 A(3)), the former forms the CB6 complex promptly with a sizable binding constant (1300 M(-1)), while the latter does not form a complex even after several months at optimized complexation conditions. Molecular mechanics calculations are performed for several CB6/guest complexes. A qualitative agreement is found between experimental and calculated activation energies for ingression as a function of both guest size and state of protonation. The potential role of constrictive binding by CB6 is discussed.

  15. Fiscal 2000 report on research exchange/technical guidance project, international research exchange project, and invitation program for overseas researchers; 2000 nendo kenkyu koryu gijutsu shido jigyo / kokusai kenkyu koryu jigyo kaigai kenkyusha shohei jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    With the purpose of promoting research exchanges with developing countries concerning preservation of the global environment, ICETT (International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer) invited two researchers from Center of Environmental Protection and Chemical Safety, Institute of Industrial Chemistry, Ministry of Industry, Vietnam. The period was from September 19 to December 17, 2000, and the subject was a basic research on environmentally friendly wastewater treatment technology utilizing bacteria in soils. In an experimental system, five reaction layers made of vinyl chloride tubes having a diameter of 16 cm and a height of 50 cm are serially connected, with a suitable filler used for each as a tank for precipitation of heavy metals and treatment of BOD, for anaerobic denitrification, for decomposition of aerobic COD, BOD, etc., for phosphorus treatment, and for bleaching (deodorizing), and with domestic wastewater treated through contact filtration. In spite of a limited period, from the obtained experimental results, the quality of water after the treatment was Class B or higher in the Japanese environmental standards for rivers, lakes and coastal waters, showing high practicability of this system. Further, some pieces of consideration were given additionally to the application in Vietnam. (NEDO)

  16. Penerapan Aplikasi Web Di Hotel Arinda Guest House Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ade Mubarok

    2017-09-01

    Abstract Hotel was a thriving industry very fast with the advent of the information technology. One factor that can provide comfort is the existence of the information rapid to a reservation hotel. Several problems that ordinarily encountered hotel management and customers as it tough for rapid information, do check in and the payment of requiring guests come to the hotel, include families in village records the guest log and make a report manually.In writing thesis this, writer build a application of hotel by adopting information technology. The model used to the development of software is the method waterfall, which begins with analysis needs adapted to systems are go at the hotel arinda guest house, design system and software, coding, testing, and implementation.So that this research produce information system a reservation hotel web-based. Of interface ease of use user and showing functionality that can be used to at the check in , the hotel , faster information and save time prospective guest on do reservations , efficient in recording the guest log and reports.   Keywords: Website, Aplication, Hotel Arinda Guest House, checked in, Waterfall.

  17. A Room with a Viewpoint Revisited: Descriptive Norms and Hotel Guests' Towel Reuse Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E.

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal prox...

  18. Computer-science guest-lecture series at Langston University sponsored by the U.S. Geological Survey; abstracts, 1992-93

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, K. S.

    1994-01-01

    Langston University, a Historically Black University located at Langston, Oklahoma, has a computing and information science program within the Langston University Division of Business. Since 1984, Langston University has participated in the Historically Black College and University program of the U.S. Department of Interior, which provided education, training, and funding through a combined earth-science and computer-technology cooperative program with the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). USGS personnel have presented guest lectures at Langston University since 1984. Students have been enthusiastic about the lectures, and as a result of this program, 13 Langston University students have been hired by the USGS on a part-time basis while they continued their education at the University. The USGS expanded the offering of guest lectures in 1992 by increasing the number of visits to Langston University, and by inviting participation of speakers from throughout the country. The objectives of the guest-lecture series are to assist Langston University in offering state-of-the-art education in the computer sciences, to provide students with an opportunity to learn from and interact with skilled computer-science professionals, and to develop a pool of potential future employees for part-time and full-time employment. This report includes abstracts for guest-lecture presentations during 1992-93 school year.

  19. Eastern Sources of Invitational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryback, David

    1993-01-01

    Presents historical perspective suggesting that invitational theory shares many beliefs with ancient Eastern philosophies. Submits that teachers and other educators who embrace the invitational perspective may benefit from an understanding of Eastern principles. Briefly describes Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Zen Buddhism, and their relevance to…

  20. Terpsichorean Architecture: Guest Editor’s Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Mitchell

    2011-09-01

    light to form and how we hear ourselves live in that form.’ This special issue, guest edited by Tony Mitchell, University of Technology Sydney, contains papers that discuss a wide range of different modes and forms of music and music writing in all fields, and in many parts of the world, from a perspective of history, performance, and architecture (including ‘natural’ architectural forms.

  1. Guest editorial - Networked collaboration, sharing and response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olav Skundberg

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available  This issue of Seminar.net contains three articles that were written in connection with a Norwegian e-learning conference titled “Networked collaboration, sharing and response”. The conference was held in Mars 2008 in Trondheim, and the presentations from the conference is available (in norwegian language at http://www.nvu.no. Networked collaboration was chosen as a theme because collaboration is important to achieve learning, according to the social-constructivistic pedagogy that has a strong standing in Norway, but how should this occur on the net? Sharing of content, as in digital learning resources, is a phenomenon with increasing popularity as described in the OECD-report “Giving Knowledge for Free”. But to achieve reuse of content, not only publishing it, it is important with a networked community where the plethora of information can be sorted with relevance to specific topics. Response is about guiding, coaching and tutoring. In what ways may resources and tools be used to move in the direction of solving Bloom’s two sigma problem/challenge? The first article, by Morten Flate Paulsen, shows how cooperative learning can be implemented successfully so that students have optimal individual freedom within online learning communities. The second article, by Carl F. Dons, shows how student teachers can be prepared to deal with pupils who have a wide range of experiences of the digital world. The third and last article, by Kristin Dale, is sharing experiences with multiple choice-tests to give midterm responses to students. In addition, this issue has a commentary article by Rune Krumsvik discussing the need to develop new practices for teachers and students on the background of the digital developments. The conference and articles covers three big themes. It may be difficult to find more important issues, apart from finding money and time to support its development. Olav Skundberg, guest editorAssociate professor

  2. Total Quality Management Implementation and Guest Satisfaction in Hospitality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Knežević

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Total quality management (TQM has become a modern system of constant improvement of the quality of all company activities. The purpose of this study is to measure the expectations and satisfaction of the guests concerning the attribute quality of the hotel product. Furthermore obtained results were compared in such a way as to analyse particularly the reviews of hotels which have implemented TQM and have the ISO 9001 certificates with reviews from hotels which have not implemented TQM and do not have the ISO 9001 certificates. The conducted analysis included 55 hotels in Serbia belonging to the 4- and 5-star categories, i.e. 1308 guests who have stayed in them. The results show that between the observed groups of guests there are fewer differences in expectations than in perception, and that generally speaking guests who have stayed in the hotels that have implemented TQM are more satisfied. The biggest difference concerning the guest satisfaction with the quality of service in the observed hotels is noticeable in relation to the employees and the value-for-money.

  3. Creating intentionally inviting schools through professional development: an appreciative inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Steyn

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The professional development (PD of teachers plays an important role in schools; it is indispensable for continuous school development. When schools are exposed to new approaches to learning and teaching, teachers are granted the opportunities to change their thinking and behaviour. In 2009, two South African schools with specific inviting characteristics were nominated for the inviting school award given by the International Alliance for Invitational Education (IAIE. However, the inviting characteristics of these schools were not explicitly intentional according to the IE philosophy, therefore they had to follow a professional development programme aimed at raising teachers’ awareness of invitational education (IE. Workshops were held to equip staff members with IE knowledge and skills, and to increase their understanding of their current practices with a view of making them more intentionally inviting. The study focused on the following two questions: What are the positive experiences of teaching staff concerning the current approach to teaching and learning in schools?; and What strategies may be introduced to assist teachers and their schools in becoming intentionally inviting? These two questions are based on appreciative inquiry (AI and IE. A qualitative research design was most appropriate for the purpose of this study. An analysis of the data revealed two categories (the discovery phase: discovering the best of what exists in the school and the dreaming phase: creating a new future on which AI is based.

  4. INVITATION FROM THE UBS

    CERN Multimedia

    UBS SA

    2000-01-01

    Via its Web pages (http://www.ubs.com), the UBS offers you direct access to all its telebanking services, namely:information relating to accounts and custody accounts (balances, debits and credits);stock market information and placing of orders;domestic and foreign payment transactions.These supplementary and inexpensive banking services mean that you no longer have to go to the bank to obtain the information you require and are not therefore limited by bank opening times.The UBS will be holding two sessions on the CERN site to present this modern product on:25.4.2000 (in French),26.4.2000 (in English).The agenda will be as follows:12.00 to 12.40 p.m.Presentation of the product;12.40 to 13.10 p.m.Question-and-answer session;13.10 to 14.00 p.m.Buffet and discussions.To enable us to meet your requirements and to expedite matters, we invite you to register for one of these sessions by sending an e-mail or letter to:pierre.guyenon@ubs.com before 7.4.2000 indicating:your surname and first name, the account number(...

  5. Temperature-regulated guest admission and release in microporous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang (Kevin); Shang, Jin; Gu, Qinfen; Awati, Rohan V.; Jensen, Nathan; Grant, Andrew; Zhang, Xueying; Sholl, David S.; Liu, Jefferson Z.; Webley, Paul A.; May, Eric F.

    2017-06-01

    While it has long been known that some highly adsorbing microporous materials suddenly become inaccessible to guest molecules below certain temperatures, previous attempts to explain this phenomenon have failed. Here we show that this anomalous sorption behaviour is a temperature-regulated guest admission process, where the pore-keeping group's thermal fluctuations are influenced by interactions with guest molecules. A physical model is presented to explain the atomic-level chemistry and structure of these thermally regulated micropores, which is crucial to systematic engineering of new functional materials such as tunable molecular sieves, gated membranes and controlled-release nanocontainers. The model was validated experimentally with H2, N2, Ar and CH4 on three classes of microporous materials: trapdoor zeolites, supramolecular host calixarenes and metal-organic frameworks. We demonstrate how temperature can be exploited to achieve appreciable hydrogen and methane storage in such materials without sustained pressure. These findings also open new avenues for gas sensing and isotope separation.

  6. Importance of satisfaction and guests experience in hotel business organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milošević Srđan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hotel companies which operate in today's competitive environment must constantly work on improving their products and services, at the request of their guests. Customer satisfaction is the key to retaining existing and attracting new guests. To achieve this goal, managers in the hotel organizations have become aware of the fact that the quality of staying in hotel represent unique experience for tourists. Lot of papers are dealing with the exploration of this topic, it only proves its importance nowadays. However, insufficient attention is paid to the simultaneous study of experience of guests and their satisfaction through the offered models (indexes that are created for this purpose. The purpose of this paper is to show the importance of these issues and identify their potential symbiosis.

  7. Guest Controlled Nonmonotonic Deep Cavity Cavitand Assembly State Switching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Du; Barnett, J Wesley; Gibb, Bruce C; Ashbaugh, Henry S

    2017-11-30

    Octa-acid (OA) and tetra-endo-methyl octa-acid (TEMOA) are water-soluble, deep-cavity cavitands with nanometer-sized nonpolar pockets that readily bind complementary guests, such as n-alkanes. Experimentally, OA exhibits a progression of 1:1 to 2:2 to 2:1 host/guest complexes (X:Y where X is the number of hosts and Y is the number of guests) with increasing alkane chain length from methane to tetradecane. Differing from OA only by the addition of four methyl groups ringing the portal of the pocket, TEMOA exhibits a nonmonotonic progression of assembly states from 1:1 to 2:2 to 1:1 to 2:1 with increasing guest length. Here we present a systematic molecular simulation study to parse the molecular and thermodynamic determinants that distinguish the succession of assembly stoichiometries observed for these similar hosts. Potentials of mean force between hosts and guests, determined via umbrella sampling, are used to characterize association free energies. These free energies are subsequently used in a reaction network model to predict the equilibrium distributions of assemblies. Our models accurately reproduce the experimentally observed trends, showing that TEMOA's endo-methyl units constrict the opening of the binding pocket, limiting the conformations available to bound guests and disrupting the balance between monomeric complexes and dimeric capsules. The success of our simulations demonstrate their utility at interpreting the impact of even simple chemical modifications on supramolecular assembly and highlight their potential to aid bottom-up design.

  8. Rotaxane and catenane host structures for sensing charged guest species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langton, Matthew J; Beer, Paul D

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: The promise of mechanically interlocked architectures, such as rotaxanes and catenanes, as prototypical molecular switches and shuttles for nanotechnological applications, has stimulated an ever increasing interest in their synthesis and function. The elaborate host cavities of interlocked structures, however, can also offer a novel approach toward molecular recognition: this Account describes the use of rotaxane and catenane host systems for binding charged guest species, and for providing sensing capability through an integrated optical or electrochemical reporter group. Particular attention is drawn to the exploitation of the unusual dynamic properties of interlocked molecules, such as guest-induced shuttling or conformational switching, as a sophisticated means of achieving a selective and functional sensor response. We initially survey interlocked host systems capable of sensing cationic guests, before focusing on our accomplishments in synthesizing rotaxanes and catenanes designed for the more challenging task of selective anion sensing. In our group, we have developed the use of discrete anionic templation to prepare mechanically interlocked structures for anion recognition applications. Removal of the anion template reveals an interlocked host system, possessing a unique three-dimensional geometrically restrained binding cavity formed between the interlocked components, which exhibits impressive selectivity toward complementary anionic guest species. By incorporating reporter groups within such systems, we have developed both electrochemical and optical anion sensors which can achieve highly selective sensing of anionic guests. Transition metals, lanthanides, and organic fluorophores integrated within the mechanically bonded structural framework of the receptor are perturbed by the binding of the guest, with a concomitant change in the emission profile. We have also exploited the unique dynamics of interlocked hosts by demonstrating that an

  9. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Motsoaledi | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 4 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. A Motsoaledi. Abstract. No abstract ...

  10. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease | Meyers | South African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Medical Journal. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 105, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial: Chronic kidney disease. AM Meyers. Abstract. No abstract.

  11. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snježana Gagić

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and increased retention.Service quality is fundamental component which produce higher levels of guest satisfaction, which in turn lead to higher sales revenue.The main purpose of this study was to examine the quality dimensions that affect guest satisfaction in restaurant industry. Food and beverage quality, the quality of service delivery, physical environment and price fairness are analyzed as a key components of restaurant experience. The results could be helpful tool for restaurant managers to invest their resources more efficiently, making changes to crucial quality attributes that elicit the guests’ satisfaction level. A management approach focused on guest satisfaction can improve restaurant business performance.

  12. A light controlled cavitand wall regulates guest binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berryman, Orion B; Sather, Aaron C; Rebek, Julius

    2011-01-14

    Here we report a cavitand with a photochemical switch as one of the container walls. The azo-arene switch undergoes photoisomerization when subjected to UV light producing a self-fulfilled cavitand. This process is thermally and photochemically reversible. The reported cavitand binds small molecules and these guests can be ejected from the cavitand through this photochemical process.

  13. Guest Editorial | Frade | Journal of Student Affairs in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Student Affairs in Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 5, No 2 (2017) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Guest Editorial. Nelia Frade. Abstract. Tutoring and ...

  14. SANS contrast variation on a dendrimer host-guest complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleppinger, R.; Mortensen, K.; Meijer, E.W.

    2002-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique was used to study the configurational changes in an oligoethyleneoxy-functionalized poly(propyleneimine) dendrimer (host) when forming complexes with rose bengal (guest). Guinier fits to the scattering data recorded at max. contrast indicated a

  15. Guest-responsive structural adaptation of a rationally-designed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    adaptability of the TB core to undergo subtle structural changes in response to the guest that is included. The structural ... we report the design, synthesis and inclusion behaviour of a novel ..... Based on a rational design, we have shown from ...

  16. Forward by Guest Editors | Potgieter | African Journal on Conflict ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal on Conflict Resolution. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 15, No 3 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Forward by Guest Editors. Cheryl Potgieter, Paulus ...

  17. Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest Editorial From plants to medicine for management of sickle cell disorder. Charles Wambele. Abstract. No Abstract. Discovery and Innovation Vol. 18(1) 2006: 1-4. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/dai.v18i1.15718.

  18. USULAN PERBAIKAN PROSES BISNIS DENGAN KONSEP BUSINESS PROCESS REENGINEERING (STUDI KASUS : PERMATA GUEST HOUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhaswara Adhitya Wardhana

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Permata Guest House Semarang merupakan usaha bisnis yang bergerak di bidang jasa penginapan. Perkembangan skala bisnis Permata Guest House yang pesat tidak disertai dengan penataan dan pengelolaan proses bisnis (Business Process yang memadai, mengakibatkan banyak kemunculan keluhan dari stakeholder, yaitu dari pelanggan (customer, dan kalangan internal karyawan. Key Performance Indicator (KPI yang digunakan dalam penelitian terhadap Permata Guest House ini adalah KPI yang diturunkan dari Critical Success Factor (CSF. Pengukuran kinerja dilakukan dengan berdasarkan indikator performansi (Performance Indicator yang telah ditentukan pada observasi awal beserta ukuran dan target yang dicapai untuk tiap indikatornya. Dari hasil observasi awal didapatkan selisih indikator moral kerja dan loyalitas sebesar 20%, komplain keramahtamahan sebesar 16,67%, komplain penampilan dan sikap sebesar 16,67%, tingkat okupansi marketing sales sebesar 30%, dan kepuasan layanan sebesar 77,78%. Berdasarkan analisis pengukuran kinerja dan proses bisnis telah didapatkan faktor-faktor yang menyebabkan kinerja proses bisnis belum sesuai target, salah satu penyelesaian untuk dapat memperbaiki kinerja adalah dengan merancang ulang proses bisnis dengan menggunakan metode Business Process Reengineering (BPR. Dari hasil BPR perlu dilakukan peninjauan kembali (rethinking, perancangan ulang (redesign, dan evaluasi (retool terhadap model kinerja bisnis. Hasil dari rekayasa ulang proses bisnis berupa pembakuan usulan proses bisnis, penyusunan visi misi perusahaan, perancangan struktur organisasi dan job description, serta penyusunan Standart Operating Procedure Kata Kunci  : critical success factor, key performance indicator, business process reengineering   Abstract Permata Guest House Semarang is a business engaged in the lodging services. The development of business scale rapid Permata Guest House is not accompanied by the administration and management of business processes are

  19. Bid invitations for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zijl, N.A. van.

    1975-01-01

    Types of bid invitations, basic requirements on bid invitation documents, basic content of a turnkey bid invitation (bid invitation letter, instructions to the bidders, terms and conditions of the draft contract, technical specifications, site data and information), nuclear fuel procurement, differences turnkey - non-turnkey, legal, commerical, and technical matters concerning the contract document. (HP) [de

  20. Invitations received from potential predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences: a 12-month early-career researcher experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercier, Eric; Tardif, Pier-Alexandre; Moore, Lynne; Le Sage, Natalie; Cameron, Peter A

    2018-02-01

    This study aims to describe all unsolicited electronic invitations received from potential predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences over a 12-month period following the first publication as a corresponding author of a junior academician. Unsolicited invitations received at an institutional email address and perceived to be sent by predatory publishers or fraudulent conferences were collected. A total of 502 invitations were included of which 177 (35.3%) had subject matter relevant to the recipient's research interests and previous work. Two hundred and thirty-seven were invitations to publish a manuscript. Few disclosed the publication fees (32, 13.5%) but they frequently reported accepting all types of manuscripts (167, 70.5%) or emphasised on a deadline to submit (165, 69.6%). Invitations came from 39 publishers (range 1 to 87 invitations per publisher). Two hundred and ten invitations from a potential fraudulent conference were received. These meetings were held in Europe (97, 46.2%), North America (65, 31.0%), Asia (20.4%) or other continents (5, 2.4%) and came from 18 meeting organisation groups (range 1 to 137 invitations per organisation). Becoming an editorial board member (30), the editor-in-chief (1), a guest editor for journal special issue (6) and write a book chapter (11) were some of the roles offered in the other invitations included while no invitation to review a manuscript was received. Young researchers are commonly exposed to predatory publishers and fraudulent conferences following a single publication as a corresponding author. Academic institutions worldwide need to educate and inform young researchers of this emerging problem. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  1. Quality of customer service: perceptions from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joel L. Frater

    2007-01-01

    With data collected from guests in all-inclusive resorts in Jamaica, West Indies, the purposes of this study were to: (1) delineate unique dimensions of customer service perceptions among guests and (2) report the finding of a study that measured guests' perceptions of the quality of customer service in all-inclusive resorts. The study asked the following research...

  2. Field-induced detrapping in disordered organic semiconducting host-guest systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cottaar, J.; Coehoorn, R.; Bobbert, P.A.

    2010-01-01

    In a disordered organic semiconducting host-guest material, containing a relatively small concentration of guest molecules acting as traps, the charge transport may be viewed as resulting from carriers that are detrapped from the guest to the host. Commonly used theories include only detrapping due

  3. 14 November 2016 - Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary H. M. Cima, Permanent Representative of the Argentine Republic to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General F. Gianotti, Director for International Relations C. Warakaulle; Adviser J. Salicio Diez and V. Perez-Reale, CERN HR Department, are also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Héctor Marcelo Cima Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Argentine Republic to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  4. Fiscal 2000 project of inviting proposals for international joint research - invitation for international proposal (Energy conservation No.3). Achievement report on development of micro-scale boiling aided high efficiency heat removing device; 2000 nendo kokusai kyodo kenkyu teian kobo jigyo - kokusai teian kobo (shoe No.3). Micro scale boiling ni yoru kokoritsu honetsu device no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-03-01

    Studies are conducted about basic matters of heat transfer with boiling, such as critical heat flux intensification, prevention of dry-out, and the development of refrigerants suitable for use for heat transfer with boiling, for the purpose of developing boiling heat conduction type high-efficiency heat removing devices for use in electronics, and then heat removing devices usable as power devices in the future are experimentally designed. Activities are conducted in the three fields of (1) the study of basic micro-boiling technology, (2) development of micro-scale boiling element technology, and (3) international joint studies. Efforts are made to develop the technology of removing heat from ultrahigh heat fluxes using a micro-valve in field (1), to develop the technology of heat transfer by boiling in a micro-channel in field (2); and to develop the technology of critical heat flux intensification in a boiling heat exchanger in an electromagnetic field (3). In an effort to develop the technology of heat removal, a heat transfer plate is installed at the bottom of a path which is narrow, horizontal, and rectangular, and distilled water is allowed to flow and boil. Micro-bubble emission boiling occurs by a subcooling degree of 40K at an average flow rate of 0.5 m/s, and an ultrahigh heat flux of 2-7 times 10{sup 6} W/m{sup 2} is obtained. The value is 2-4 times as high as the current IC chip critical heat flux. (NEDO)

  5. 19 September 2011 - Austrian State Secretary for European and International Affairs W. Waldner, signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting CMS service cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Zerlauth.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoît Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    Austrian state secretary for foreign affairs, Wolfgang Waldner, left, was welcomed to CERN by Felicitas Pauss, head of international relations at CERN, on 19 September. While at CERN, he toured the CMS control room and underground experimental service cavern, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, and the Universe of Particles exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  6. GUEST SERVICES QUALITY ASSESMENT IN TOURISM, USING AN ATTRIBUTES SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    POPA LUMINITA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available It is considered that a weakness of the Romanian tourism offer is the quality of guest services. In this paper we established as an objective to examine in detail the importance given by the consumers to the components of guest service quality and their perceived performance, based on the three pillars of service quality: the material base (equipments, staff training and staff behavior. The emphasis is on the investigation regarding staff training and behaviour, taking into account the multiple attributes SERVQUAL scale. On the basis of this work lies a survey done in March-April 2010 on the population of Oradea, on a sample of 1060 people. Results confirm the importance granted to staff in ensuring quality of tourism services and their perceived relatively weak performance.

  7. Usability of Security Management:Defining the Permissions of Guests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Matthew; Stajano, Frank

    Within the scenario of a Smart Home, we discuss the issues involved in allowing limited interaction with the environment for unidentified principals, or guests. The challenges include identifying and authenticating guests on one hand and delegating authorization to them on the other. While the technical mechanisms for doing so in generic distributed systems have been around for decades, existing solutions are in general not applicable to the smart home because they are too complex to manage. We focus on providing both security and usability; we therefore seek simple and easy to understand approaches that can be used by a normal computer-illiterate home owner, not just by a trained system administrator. This position paper describes ongoing research and does not claim to have all the answers.

  8. Supramolecular polymeric materials via cyclodextrin-guest interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Akira; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakahata, Masaki

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cyclodextrins (CDs) have many attractive functions, including molecular recognition, hydrolysis, catalysis, and polymerization. One of the most important uses of CDs is for the molecular recognition of hydrophobic organic guest molecules in aqueous solutions. CDs are desirable host molecules because they are environmentally benign and offer diverse functions. This Account demonstrates some of the great advances in the development of supramolecular materials through host-guest interactions within the last 10 years. In 1990, we developed topological supramolecular complexes with CDs, polyrotaxane, and CD tubes, and these preparation methods take advantage of self-organization between the CDs and the polymers. The combination of polyrotaxane with αCD forms a hydrogel through the interaction of αCDs with the OH groups on poly(ethylene glycol). We categorized these polyrotaxane chemistries within main chain type complexes. At the same time, we studied the interactions of side chain type supramolecular complexes with CDs. In these systems the guest molecules modified the polymers and selectively formed inclusion complexes with CDs. The systems that used low molecular weight compounds did not show such selectivity with CDs. The multivalency available within the complex cooperatively enhances the selective binding of CD with guest molecules via the polymer side chains, a phenomenon that is analogous to binding patterns observed in antigen-antibody complexes. To incorporate the molecular recognition properties of CDs within the polymer side chains, we first prepared stimuli-responsive sol-gel switching materials through host-guest interactions. We chose azobenzene derivatives for their response to light and ferrocene derivatives for their response to redox conditions. The supramolecular materials were both redox-responsive and self-healing, and these properties resulted from host-guest interactions. These sol-gels with built in switches gave us insight for

  9. Journalism Education 2016 Vol 5(2): Guest Editor

    OpenAIRE

    Fowler-Watt, Karen

    2016-01-01

    “It’s the story that matters! Teaching journalism’s storytellers” Special Edition of Journalism Education Guest Editor: Karen Fowler-Watt, Bournemouth University, UK. Storytelling is the journalist’s craft skill. Shaped by the tenets of objectivity and accuracy, the news narrative informs the debate and brings us the human stories. If journalism is a craft, then the story is the journalist’s work of art. In a rapidly changing landscape of technological revolution, shifting business models and...

  10. Complaint Speech Act of Hotel and Restaurant Guests

    OpenAIRE

    Suryawan, I Nengah; Putra Yadnya, Ida Bagus; Puspani, Ida Ayu Made

    2016-01-01

    This paper is aimed at analyzing how complaint speech act of hotel and restaurant guests are performed and responded based on categories of speech acts and how they are performed considering the aspects of acts: locutionary, illocutionary, and perlocutionary. The method and technique of collecting data in this study is documentation method in which the data were collected using the technique of note taking and were qualitatively analyzed. The findings show that complaint of hotel and restaura...

  11. The Vital Components of Restaurant Quality that Affect Guest Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Snježana Gagić; Dragan Tešanović; Ana Jovičić

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, the trend of dining in restaurants has become quite prominent in Serbia. Frequent restaurant visits are not only the reflection of satisfying hedonistic needs, but also the result of increasing number of single-person households as well as adjustment to the European business hours.In an increasingly competitive environment, restaurants must be focused on guests using marketing concepts that identify their needs thus leading to their satisfaction and inc...

  12. ICNIRP Initiatives (invited paper)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhardt, J.H.

    1999-01-01

    The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) is the independent, non-governmental, scientific organisation, comprising all essential scientific disciplines, which, together with the WHO, is qualified to assess health effects of exposure to electromagnetic fields. ICNIRP uses the results of this assessment of draft health based exposure guidelines. The development of exposure guidelines requires a critical, in depth evaluation of the established scientific literature. The paper describes some criteria used for health risk assessment. Dosimetry is one of the most critical components of any scientific study assessing effects of electromagnetic fields on biological systems. Induced electric fields or current densities and specific absorption rate (SAR) are the fundamental and widely accepted dosimetric parameters. Significant recent dosimetric developments include the introduction of anatomically derived voxel-based electromagnetic models of the human body of various resolutions as well as varieties of effective numerical schemes. Due to these developments it is possible to analyse systematically the relationship between various exposure parameters and the fundamental dosimetric parameters. An appropriate metric for EMF epidemiology should be sufficiently comprehensive to allow the determination of the basic dosimetric quantities, their amplitudes and distribution in the human body. (author)

  13. Diagnostics on Z (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nash, T. J.; Derzon, M. S.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Leeper, R. J.; Porter, J. L.; Spielman, R. B.; Ruiz, C.; Cooper, G.; McGurn, J.

    2001-01-01

    The 100 ns, 20 MA pinch-driver Z is surrounded by an extensive set of diagnostics. There are nine radial lines of sight set at 12 o above horizontal and each of these may be equipped with up to five diagnostic ports. Instruments routinely fielded viewing the pinch from the side with these ports include x-ray diode arrays, photoconducting detector arrays, bolometers, transmission grating spectrometers, time-resolved x-ray pinhole cameras, x-ray crystal spectrometers, calorimeters, silicon photodiodes, and neutron detectors. A diagnostic package fielded on axis for viewing internal pinch radiation consists of nine lines of sight. This package accommodates virtually the same diagnostics as the radial ports. Other diagnostics not fielded on the axial or radial ports include current B-dot monitors, filtered x-ray scintillators coupled by fiber optics to streak cameras, streaked visible spectroscopy, velocity interferometric system for any reflector, bremsstrahlung cameras, and active shock breakout measurement of hohlraum temperature. The data acquisition system is capable of recording up to 500 channels and the data from each shot is available on the Internet. A major new diagnostic presently under construction is the BEAMLET backlighter. We will briefly describe each of these diagnostics and present some of the highest-quality data from them

  14. 13th September 2011 - H. E. Mr Kofi Annan, President, Kofi Annan Foundation, signing the guest book with Director for Administration and General Infrastructure S. Lettow, Head of International Relations F. Pauss, Director-General R. Heuer et International Relations Office Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    CERN-HI-1109231 tirage 13: with Mrs Kofi Annan CERN-HI-1109231 tirage 23 - 51: visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry CERN-HI-1109231 tirage 52 - 74: in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Spokesperson F. Gianotti and young international scientists N. Kanaya, C. Solans and S. Yacoob. Mrs Martti Van Dardel is also participating in the visit throughout.

  15. Multifunctional guest-host particles engineered by reversal nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Uh-Myong; Kaban, Burhan; Tomita, Andreea; Krekić, Kristijan; Klintuch, Dieter; Pietschnig, Rudolf; Ehresmann, Arno; Holzinger, Dennis; Hillmer, Hartmut

    2018-03-01

    Particulate polymeric microfibers with incorporated europium(III)oxide (Eu2O3) nanoparticles were introduced as a magneto-photoluminescent multifunctional material fabricated via reversal nanoimprint lithography. To specifically address the volume properties of these guest-host particles, the guest, Eu2O3, was milled down to an average particle size of 350 nm in diameter and mixed with the host-polymer, AMONIL®, before in situ hardening in the imprint stamp. The variation of the fabrication process parameters, i.e. delay time, spin coating speed, as well as the concentration of Eu2O3 nanoparticles was proven to have a significant impact on both the structure quality and the stamp release of the microfibers with respect to the formation of a thinner residual layer. Structural characterization performed by SEM revealed optimum fabrication process parameters for a homogeneous spatial distribution of Eu2O3 nanoparticles within the microfibers while simultaneously avoiding the formation of undesired agglomerates. The magneto-photoluminescent properties of Eu2O3 nanoparticles, i.e. a red emission at 613 nm and a paramagnetic response, were found to be superimposed to the optic and the diamagnetic behaviors of AMONIL®. The results imply that guest-host interdependence of these properties can be excluded and that the suggested technique enables for specific tailoring of particulate multifunctional materials with focus on their volume properties.

  16. On Postgleadowian Thermochronology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, M.

    2013-12-01

    Given that Andrew Gleadow was one of the earliest pioneers of thermochronology, his retirement is a testament to the maturity of our field. When Andy submitted his Ph.D. thesis in 1974, it would still be a year before Dodson (1973) received its first citation and seven until the word thermochronology appeared in print. The steady growth of the thermochronological literature through the 1980s was in good measure due to Andy having put the fission track method on a sound footing so it's entirely fitting that he should cap his career by realizing his early vision of fully-automated dating. However, by some measures, the field of thermochronology has stagnated over the past two decades. Did we reach steady state in ca. 1990 and is Andy's retirement a harbinger of an inevitable decline or are advances, such as automated fission track dating, spurring a renaissance? The answer to both questions may be yes. That part of our field that has largely overlooked the need for kinetic calibrations but instead relied on 'nominal closure temperature' conventions is becoming increasingly irrelevant, as witnessed by the pages of our leading journals. On the brighter side, thermochronometers for which customized Arrhenius relationships come as a by-product of the dating process (e.g., U+Th/He systems, 40Ar/39Ar MDD analysis) are increasingly being used to constrain multivariate thermomechanical models that can lead to unprecedented insights into otherwise unknowable parameters, such as paleotopography, fault slip-rate and ramp geometry, and crustal heat generation. However, inverse modelers have not yet developed the capacity to take advantage of the full spectrum of thermochronological data available from methods that reveal continuous thermal history information, largely due to computational limitations. To realize the full promise of thermochronology, the future Andy Gleadow's of our field will have to include those who pursue the full integration of methods for which internal

  17. Managing Guest as an Asset: a Conceptual Review in the Context of Accommodation Services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwi Suhartanto

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of a customer as an asset of business in the accommodation industry. The purpose of this article is to examine the value of guests as a firm asset and to propose a model for managing guests as an asset in the context of accommodation services. A guest is considered an asset due to its role in providing revenue to the accommodation firm. Because of this role, the accommodation guest needs to be managed appropriately. This article argues that guest service evaluation (i.e. service quality, perceived value, and guest satisfaction and service loyalty are important factors in the development of guest lifetime value. The proposed model of managing guests as an asset consists of marketing instruments, service evaluation, guest loyalty, and financial outcomes provides a comprehensive guide on how accommodation firms can manage the lifetime value of their guests. Finally, as there are limited studies examining this issue, future research should test the proposed model.

  18. Science under Siege (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagosian, R. B.; Wheeler, K. R.

    2013-12-01

    doing business. Failure to do so will result in less brain power addressing critical national needs, and ultimately the nation will lose its competitive edge as the world leader in innovation. Not every institution can be the world leader in every discipline and not every institution can afford to have all of the newest scientific instrumentation and infrastructure. We need to find new ways to collaborate within the academic research community as well as finding new partners internationally. We also need to develop new models to partner with industry to help fund the basic and applied research they need to transfer into products and services. Finally, we need to communicate the importance of supporting basic research and avoid the mounting movement to focus on solutions to our current problems. Far too often, the political process is demanding an immediate return on investment for research and the result is the lack of long-term commitment to basic research. This is a short-sighted and alarming trend, which threatens our ability to acquire the knowledge needed to apply to challenges and questions not yet envisioned, but which nonetheless, may be critical to our society in the coming decades. While it is tempting to sell the seed corn in tough times, we must protect it so that the next generation of scientists will have the tools, knowledge, and ability to meet the grand challenges of their generation.

  19. Lost Impacts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, P. H.; Stickle, A. M.

    2009-12-01

    into ice and plasticene layers over clear acrylic blocks allow assessing internal damage. These experiments reveal that low-impedance surface layers approaching 1 to 2 projectile diameters effectively shield the substrate from shock damage for impact angles less than 30 degrees. Missing craters (and relict crater roots) within ice-rich deposits on Mars illustrate the rapid erasure the impact record. Numerous small pedestal craters (crater diameter 50km), however, occur at low latitudes but are localized in certain regions where even thicker deposits (locally >2km) have been removed, uncovering a preserved Noachian landscape. Crater statistics further document this missing cratering record. Thick Pleistocene ice sheets on Earth would have played a similar role for the removal of terrestrial cratering record. We calculate that a crater as large as 15km in diameter formed by an oblique impact could have been effectively erased, except for dispersed ejecta containing shocked impactor relicts and a disturbed substrate. While plausible, evidence for specific missing events (e.g., the proposed YB impact) must be found in still-preserved ice layers and sediments.

  20. Invitational Education: Theory, Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haigh, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Invitational Theory argues that learning is enhanced when learners are positively encouraged or "invited" into the educational experience. Arising from perceptual and self-concept theory, Invitational Pedagogy is constructed on four principles: respect for people, trust, optimism and intentionality, and upon five pillars: people, places, policies,…

  1. Separation of radionuclides using host-guest materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, V.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis is focused on the development of complex procedure with using commercially available sorbents to separate anthropogenic actinides 237 Np, 241 Am, 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu and their determination in the liquid radioactive wastes by using alpha spectrometry. Abilities of using commercially available sorbent AnaLig(R)Pu-02 gel from IBC Advanced Technologies, Inc. were tested, this product belongs to host-guest materials based on molecular recognition technology. This material is capable of selectively capturing actinides in oxidation state IV. To adjust the oxidation state of 238 Pu and 239 , 240 Pu was used NaNO 2 . Pu(IV) forms in the medium of nitric acid complexes, [Np(NO 3 ) 6 ] - , which are captured on the column. For the second monitored radionuclide, neptunium is typical valence V, Np(V) in the concentrated nitric acid produces strong complexes, [Np(NO 3 ) 6 ] - , which are capable of the sorption on the column of AnaLig(R)Pu-02 gel. The most common state of americium in aqueous solutions is III. Whereas in this oxidation state, americium do not form complexes in 8 mol·dm -3 nitric acid is the result of the flow-through. On the base of experimental obtained results, solution of 0.1 mol·dm -3 NH 4 I in 9 mol·dm -3 HCl was selected for elution of plutonium. Neptunium was eluted from the column using 9 mol·dm -3 of HCl with addition of 0.5 cm 3 TiCl 3 . Optimizing conditions for the separation procedure was performed by using model solution of radioactive waste which was prepared according to the chemical composition of radioactive concentrate from NPP Mochovce and NPP Bohunice. The effect of the concentration of Fe 3+ , the effect of the concentration of the HCl, the effect of the concentration of the solution of NH 4 I and the effect of the volume of this solution to the yields of 238 Pu were studied. And also was studied the effect of 9 mol·dm -3 of HCl and the effect of volume of 15 % TiCl 3 to the yields of 237 Np. Sorbent DGA(R) Resin from

  2. Thermodynamic Stability of Structure H Hydrates Based on the Molecular Properties of Large Guest Molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Tezuka, Kyoichi; Taguchi, Tatsuhiko; Alavi, Saman; Sum, Amadeu K.; Ohmura, Ryo

    2012-01-01

    This paper report analyses of thermodynamic stability of structure-H clathrate hydrates formed with methane and large guest molecules in terms of their gas phase molecular sizes and molar masses for the selection of a large guest molecule providing better hydrate stability. We investigated the correlation among the gas phase molecular sizes, the molar masses of large molecule guest substances, and the equilibrium pressures. The results suggest that there exists a molecular-size value for the ...

  3. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    OpenAIRE

    Milan Bradić; Ljiljana Kosar; Bojana Kalenjuk

    2013-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores) given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in...

  4. Invitation systems and identification in Late Iron Age southern Scandinavia? The gold foil figures from a new perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baastrup, Maria Panum

    2016-01-01

    of a person’s true identity and in the dependency upon magnates in southern Scandinavia during the 6th–8th centuries AD. The gold foil figures may have been tokens issued by the magnate and served as invitations to special events, at a time when there was apparently a preoccupation with organising cult...... activities at the elite residences and restricting places at and admission to such events. The figures did not guarantee that it was the right guests who arrived on these occasions, but presenting this type of token may have minimised the risk of allowing in impostors....

  5. Tweens on the Internet - communication in virtual guest books

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnBritt Enochsson

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available  Today digital communication is a natural part of young people’s social life. It has increased drastically during the last few years, and there are still a lot of questions about what this means, and how this new media affects communication. This study focuses on young people of 11-13, i.e.the age between children and teenagers, also called tweens. In a large study, the overall aim is to see what communication in the Internet community LunarStorm means to them in their social life. This particular paper reports on the content of the asynchronous communication in the participants’ digital guest books, which is one of the main channels for communication between the participants. A group of 15 tweens from a small village in Sweden were studied when communicating in Sweden’s largest Internet community, LunarStorm. The research method used was what is usually described as cyber ethnography. The contributions in the participants’ digital guest books are not written by the guest book owners themselves, which means that the focus is on the collective aspects of this communication, and not from a specific children’s point of view. Qualitative analyses were made of the content of 947 contributions in the participants’ guest books in order to make a statistical analysis. Most of the participants’ communication was between friends in the same geographical neighbourhood concerning how things are going, what to do, when to meet and similar things. The contributions were divided into three categories: (1 Social chat (2 Chain letters, and (3 Messages incomprehensible to outsiders. The information-category was divided into three sub-categories depending on the emotions expressed. 44% of the total messages were considered as emotionally neutral information, 39% as kind or encouraging, and also with an aim to sort things out, and 6% of the total messages contained insults and elements of anger. Among the younger users of the Internet community

  6. Guest Room Lighting at the Hilton Columbus Downtown

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2014-06-30

    At the Hilton Columbus Downtown hotel in Ohio, DOE's Better Buildings Alliance conducted a demonstration of Next Generation Luminaires-winning downlights installed in all guest rooms and suites prior to the hotel's 2012 opening. After a post-occupancy assessment, the LED downlights not only provided the aesthetic appearance and dimming functionality desired, but also provided 50% energy savings relative to a comparable CFL downlight and enabled the lighting power to be more than 20% below that allowed by code. This document is a summary case study of the report.

  7. The hotel comment card: a motivator of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfred W. Ogle

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This   paper   explores   the   traditional   pen   and   paper   hotel   comment   card   (HCC   from   the  guests’  perspective  to  gain  an  insight  and  to  improve  its  effectiveness.  The  HCC  has  long  been   the  predominant  method  of  soliciting  guest  feedback.  Although  electronic  methods  of  collection  are  now  available  the  HCC  has  a  sense  of  familiarity,  has  general  acceptance,  and   is   widely   employed.   Initially,   a   literature   review   of   the   hotel   comment   card   is  provided.  Then,  the  study  explores  how  frequent  guests  categorize  HCC  attributes.  These  attributes  are  then  extended  to  include  evaluation  criteria  identified  in  the  literature  and  desired  by  hotel  managers.    The  extended  evaluation  criterion  is  then  used  to  explore  how  frequent  hotel  guests  believe  that  future  HCCs  may  motivate  guests  to  provide  feedback   and   assist   in   the   co-­creation   of   value.   The   overall   finding   is   that   the   HCCs   design   and  execution  can  be  improved.

  8. Permanent and reversible gels: transport of guests and guest-host interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schlick, S.; Pilař, Jan

    2000-01-01

    Roč. 159, - (2000), s. 187-195 ISSN 1022-1360. [SPSJ International Polymer Conference: Polymer Science and Industrial Research in the Fast-changing Age /7./. Yokohama, 26.10.1999-29.10.1999] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 149 Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 0.406, year: 2000

  9. Inviting In the Private Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-10-01

    private sector . After all, corruption does not just involve government. Business people and lawyers and citizens pay the bribes, even as they condemn bribery. They should be invited to become part of the solution. But how? The first point to note is that business people and citizens know where corruption exists and how corrupt systems work. Citizens understand how bribery shapes the services they receive or don’t receive. Accountants know the illicit games played with audits and taxes. Lawyers understand corrupt legal practices. Business people know all about corrupt

  10. The Solar-Stellar Connection (NAG5-6124: SOHO Guest Investigator Program)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Thomas R.

    1997-01-01

    The following is a final report from the SOHO Guest Investigator program to use the SUMER far-UV spectrometer to obtain imaging spectroscopy in support of the goals of the so-called "solar-stellar connection." In particular, a major emphasis was utilization of the long-slit time-resolved maps of the solar surface in bright far-UV emission lines to deduce how particular aspects of the temporally and spatially averaged line profiles trace back to individual structural features of the magnetically disturbed outer atmosphere; to help interpret the unresolved line profiles from high quality stellar observations (say, with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph). The researchers served two tours of duty in the SOHO Operations Center as SUMER planners, during which time we conducted an extensive series of observing programs. These can be divided into three general categories: surface mapping, translimb spectroscopy, and active region diagnostics. We have analyzed some of the large volumes of data to the point where we have presented them in poster papers, and in invited papers at national and international meetings. Listed below are the titles of the preliminary publications we have written, including brief abstracts to indicate the main results. (1) Chromospheric structure and Dynamics-- Observations -- The chromosphere is a highly structured dynamic 'layer' of the solar outer atmosphere. Here, not only are the effects of mechanical heating first evident (moving upward in altitude from the deep photosphere), but also the amount of nonradiative energy deposited is far greater than in the albeit much hotter overlying transition region and corona. Further, the chromosphere is by far the thickest zone of the solar atmosphere with respect to the pressure scale height. A major goal of stellar astrophysics is to understand how the chromosphere is heated and why it adopts its peculiar structure. A cursory examination of solar filtergrams and high-resolution movies demonstrates

  11. Binding of chemical warfare agent simulants as guests in a coordination cage: contributions to binding and a fluorescence-based response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christopher G P; Piper, Jerico R; Ward, Michael D

    2016-05-07

    Cubic coordination cages act as competent hosts for several alkyl phosphonates used as chemical warfare agent simulants; a range of cage/guest structures have been determined, contributions to guest binding analysed, and a fluorescent response to guest binding demonstrated.

  12. A Student-Centered Guest Lecturing: A Constructivism Approach to Promote Student Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Guo, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Student engagement has become a big challenge in higher education, especially when distance learning is getting more and more popular. Guest lecturing is a popular method to bring relevance to the classroom and engage in students. Ground on the theory of constructivism, this paper introduces a student-centered guest lecturing that allows students…

  13. PPII propensity of multiple-guest amino acids in a proline-rich environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Mahmoud; Babin, Volodymyr; Sagui, Celeste; Roland, Christopher

    2011-07-07

    There has been considerable debate about the intrinsic PPII propensity of amino acid residues in denatured polypeptides. Experimentally, this scale is based on the behavior of guest amino acid residues placed in the middle of proline-based hosts. We have used classical molecular dynamics simulations combined with replica-exchange methods to carry out a comprehensive analysis of the conformational equilibria of proline-based host oligopeptides with multiple guest amino acids including alanine, glutamine, valine, and asparagine. The tracked structural characteristics include the secondary structural motifs based on the Ramachandran angles and the cis/trans isomerization of the prolyl bonds. In agreement with our recent study of single amino acid guests, we did not observe an intrinsic PPII propensity in any of the guest amino acids in a multiple-guest setting. Instead, the experimental results can be explained in terms of (i) the steric restrictions imposed on the C-terminal guest amino acid that is immediately followed by a proline residue and (ii) an increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds due to the presence of guest residues. In terms of the latter, we found that the more guests added to the system, the larger the increase in the trans content of the prolyl bonds, which results in an effective increase in the PPII content of the peptide.

  14. FY 1999 project report on the invitation program for developing countries. International researcher exchange project - Researcher exchange/technical guidance project; 1999 nendo kenkyu koryu gijutsu shido jigyo / kokusai kenkyu koryu jigyo kaigai kenkyusha shohei jigyo hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    For the promotion of research exchanges on global environmental preservation with developing countries, Ms. Malee Santikunaporn, lecturer of Faculty of Engineering, Thammasat University, Bankok, Thailand was invited. Desulfurization/denitrification facilities, which are being widely spread in developed countries, have marked effects, but high prices are an obstacle to the spread in developing countries. To make them spread in developing countries, it is needed to develop the technology which is low in price and meets the actual state in developing countries. As a technology with high viability, a system to simultaneously remove SOx and NOx was cited in which Cu is used as catalyst and adsorbent and into which the catalyst regeneration process is integrated. Considering it, technical exchanges on Cu-SiO{sub 2} catalyst as the basic theme were made during September 26 - December 23, 1999. Through visits on and exchanges with Tokyo Institute of Technology, ICEET, University of Kyoto, etc., understanding was deepened about how each country is tackling environmental problems. The theme 'Oxidative sorption of SO2 by Cu-SiO{sub 2} catalyst: characteristics of catalyst' could deepen knowledge/information of the developmental research as a system for simultaneous removal of SOx/NOx. The data obtained indicated great practicality of Cu-SiO{sub 2}. (NEDO)

  15. Controlling the Host-Guest Interaction Mode through a Redox Stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalóki, György; Croué, Vincent; Carré, Vincent; Aubriet, Frédéric; Alévêque, Olivier; Levillain, Eric; Allain, Magali; Aragó, Juan; Ortí, Enrique; Goeb, Sébastien; Sallé, Marc

    2017-12-18

    A proof-of-concept related to the redox-control of the binding/releasing process in a host-guest system is achieved by designing a neutral and robust Pt-based redox-active metallacage involving two extended-tetrathiafulvalene (exTTF) ligands. When neutral, the cage is able to bind a planar polyaromatic guest (coronene). Remarkably, the chemical or electrochemical oxidation of the host-guest complex leads to the reversible expulsion of the guest outside the cavity, which is assigned to a drastic change of the host-guest interaction mode, illustrating the key role of counteranions along the exchange process. The reversible process is supported by various experimental data ( 1 H NMR spectroscopy, ESI-FTICR, and spectroelectrochemistry) as well as by in-depth theoretical calculations performed at the density functional theory (DFT) level. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Hydrogen bonding assemblies in host guest complexes with 18-crown-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonari, M. S.; Simonov, Yu. A.; Kravtsov, V. Ch.; Lipkowski, J.; Ganin, E. V.; Yavolovskii, A. A.

    2003-02-01

    Recent X-ray crystal structural data for two novel 1:2 host-guest complexes of 18-crown-6 with neutral organic molecules, thiaamide hydrazide of 2-aminobenzoic acid and thiaamide hydrazide of 4-amino-1,2,5-thiadiazole-3-carbonic acid are reported. The supramolecular structures of these two and five relative complexes are discussed from the point of view of participation of donor groups in coordination with the crown ether, and donor and acceptor groups in the self-assembly of the guest molecules. Guest molecules have incorporated amine and hydrazine moieties as proton donors and carbonyl oxygen and sulfur (in thiadiazole and in thiaamine moieties) as proton acceptors. The guest-guest interactions appeared to be crucial in the final architecture.

  17. A Pyrene- and Phosphonate-Containing Fluorescent Probe as Guest Molecule in a Host Polymer Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacqueline Marchand-Brynaert

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available New host-guest materials have been prepared by incorporation of a home-made organic probe displaying a pyrene motif and a phosphonate function into a regular amphiphilic copolymer. Using powder X-Ray diffraction, photoluminescence and FT-IR spectroscopy, we have been able to study the non-covalent interactions between the host matrix and the guest molecule in the solid state. Interestingly, we have shown that the matrix directs the guest spatial localization and alters its properties. Thanks to the comparison of pyrene vs. N-pyrenylmaleimide derivatives, the influence of the chemical nature of the guest molecules on the non-covalent interactions with the host have been studied. In addition, using polyethylene glycol as a reference host, we have been able to evidence a true matrix effect within our new insertion materials. The phosphonated guest molecule appears to be a novel probe targeting the hydrophilic domain of the host copolymer.

  18. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bohner

    Full Text Available Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204, descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room" and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous. Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  19. A room with a viewpoint revisited: descriptive norms and hotel guests' towel reuse behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohner, Gerd; Schlüter, Lena E

    2014-01-01

    Field experiments on descriptive norms as a means to increase hotel guests' towel reuse [1] were replicated and extended. In two hotels in Germany (Study 1: N = 724; Study 2: N = 204), descriptive norm messages suggesting that 75% of guests had reused their towels, or a standard message appealing to environmental concerns, were placed in guests' bathrooms. Descriptive norm messages varied in terms of proximity of the reference group ("hotel guests" vs. "guests in this room") and temporal proximity (currently vs. two years previous). Reuse of towels was unobtrusively recorded. Results showed that reuse rates were high overall and that both standard and descriptive norm messages increased reuse rates compared to a no-message baseline. However, descriptive norm messages were not more effective than the standard message, and effects of proximity were inconsistent across studies. Discussion addresses cultural and conceptual issues in comparing the present findings with previous ones.

  20. Highlights from the first International ecancer Conference on Oncology and Radiotherapy, 6-7 May 2016, Santiago, Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Leonardo Carmona; Amendola, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    The first international ecancer conference on oncology and radiotherapy was held in Santiago de Chile on 6 and 7 May 2016. It was chaired by Dr Beatriz Amendola, Professor Gordon McVie and Professor Umberto Veronesi. Specialists from Europe and America were invited as guest lecturers. Over 300 people are attended the conference from all areas of oncology, doctors, physicists, medical technologists, nurses, residents, students, social workers, journalists, pharmaceutical chemists, from all over the country and abroad, including India. The success was achieved as a result of the multidisciplinary approach to the pathologies, which prompted significant interest from the audience. The 'eContouring' course (radio-oncologists) was taken by a large number of participants, the result of great interest in the subject, and the undoubtable merit of the guest instructors. For the opening ceremony, we were honoured with the presence of Professor Gordon McVie, Founder of ecancer, Dr Beatriz Amendola, President of the symposium and Dr Jorge Jimenez, President of Foro Nacional de Cancer Chile, and former Minister of Health.

  1. STRATEGIC MARKETING ALTERNATIVES AT AGRO-TOURISM GUEST HOUSE LEVEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta-Andreea ANDREIANA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available During the last years, tourists started to turn away from the mass tourism and consider the alternative one. Therefore, various forms of tourism were born, among which the rural tourism, to be regarded from two perspectives: it contributes to local and regional development and brings benefits to tourism by creating a new, higher quality holiday concept. This requires the participation of local authorities in the preparing of area development strategies, involving the inhabitants and local traders. By following up the dramatic condition of the Romanian tourism, the insufficient development of the rural tourism and the low involvement degree of the local authorities, we proposed an assessment and recommended strategic marketing alternatives for the improvement of the current condition of the agro tourism guest houses.

  2. Understanding hospitality house guests' needs: a brief case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Mary Katherine Waibel

    2011-08-01

    A.E. Kazak's (2006) call to develop theory-driven and empirically supported programs aimed at strengthening the competencies of families affected by pediatric illness applies to both medical and nonmedical facilities and institutions that care for pediatric patients and their loved ones. M.K.W. Duncan and A. Blugis (in press, this issue) note that despite the intuitive and practical nature of Maslow's Hierarchy of Needs, no theory translates into an infallible understanding of any individual guest's needs or a program of universally applied best practice standards for meeting those needs. Using Maslow's theory as a framework, this brief report describes the complexity and fluidity of one mother's needs during her stay at a hospitality house following the birth of her premature twin babies. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Communication of Slovenian Tourism Workers with Italian guests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Gomzi Praprotnik

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For an Italian guest, getting to know Slovenia as a tourist destination is inevitably connected with getting to know the Slovenian cuisine. Italians are a nation eagerly developing the culture of food, and therefore the gastronomic offer in a certain environment and at a certain time is for them often the basis for a comprehensive perception of the said destination. A good offer, a suitable marketing and an attractive presentation of typical Slovenian dishes play an important role in getting to know natural and cultural heritage as they can widen the knowledge about people and places, eliminate prejudice and strengthen intercultural cooperation. Kind and professional staff, knowledge of the language, civilisation, cultural habits, and differences may be the factors contributing to the assertion of local products and services, and to educating the users of restaurant and tourism services.

  4. 13 May 2016 - Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Permanent Representative of the Republic of Azerbaijan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva V. Sadiqov signing the guest book with Head of Associate Member and Non-Member State Relations E. Tsesmelis and Adviser C. Schäfer. Permanent Mission First Secretary H. Huseynov is also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Vaqif Sadiqov Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Republic of Azerbaijan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  5. 4 July 2016 - S. Dalil Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Director-General F. Gianotti. P. Fassnacht present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    Her Excellency Dr Suraya Dalil Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  6. Sales Education beyond the classroom: Building participative learning experiences in Sales Management through the CMGS Method (Case Method with Guest Speakers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luis Ruizalba Robledo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The overarching goal of working through the CMGSMethod (Case Method with GuestSpeakers in Sales Management courses is toprovide Marketing students with practical knowledge about how a sales managercan deal with a wide variety of possible professional scenarios. Even when thecase method itself is an excellent way to equip students for their prospectiveemployment, the potential of this method can be enhanced with innovativepedagogical tools. Firstly, eight sales managers were invited to the SalesManagement Course as guest speakers. Students were required to prepare forthese sessions, gathering information about the speaker’s sector andidentifying areas of special interest. Each speaker shared their hands-onexperience and offered an overview of their field in a workshop, whileanswering the students’ questions. These sessions increased the interaction ofstudents with sales professionals, who presented their insights into a careerin sales management. The learning experiences built through these workshopswere narrated by the students in the course blog. Secondly, students were askedto present a scientific paper with the aim of bridging the gap between highereducation and cutting-edge research. This article portrays the reasoning behindthe course as well as the different steps followed during the process. Thecourse finished with encouraging results, suggesting the desirability ofincorporating PL (participative learning experiences into any marketingcourse.

  7. Performance Concept in Buildings. Volume 1: Invited Papers. Proceedings of a Symposium Jointly Sponsored by the International Union of Testing and Research Laboratories for Materials and Structures (RILEM), the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), and the International Council for Building Research Studies and Documentation (CIB) (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, May 2-5, 1972).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Bruce E., Ed.

    Volume 1 contains all the invited papers accepted for the symposium. The subject matter covered in the papers includes physiological, anthropometrical, psychological, sociological, and economic human requirements and methods of evaluation; physical requirements and methods of evaluation in mechanical, acoustical, thermal, dimensional stability,…

  8. Public access to Indian geographical data - Guest editorial

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Narasimha, R.; Shetye, S.R.

    . 79, NO. 4, 25 AUGUST 2000 391 In this issue Public access to Indian Geographical Data In late 1997 the Indian Academy of Sciences set up a Panel on Scientific Data of Public Interest to examine all issues concerning scientific data... available in the country. The mem- bers of the Panel are R. Narasimha (Chairman), S. Dhawan, M. Gadgil, I. Nath, S. Shetye (Secretary). In early 1998 the Panel issued a public announcement outlining its concerns and inviting suggestions on how...

  9. An invitation to critical mathematics education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovsmose, Ole

    An Invitation to Critical Mathematics Education deals with a range of crucial topics. Among these are students’ foreground, landscapes of investigation, and mathematics in action. The book is intended for a broad audience: educators, students, teachers, policy makers, anybody interested...... in the further development of mathematics education. The book discusses concerns and preoccupation. This way it provides an invitation into critical mathematics education....

  10. A Tunable Cyclic Container: Guest-Induced Conformational Switching, Efficient Guest Exchange, and Selective Isolation of C70 from a Fullerene Mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Pritam; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2017-07-18

    An adaptable cyclic porphyrin dimer with highly flexible linkers has been used as an artificial molecular container that can efficiently encapsulate various aromatic guests (TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 ) through strong π-π interactions by adjusting its cavity size and conformation. The planar aromatic guest (TCNQ) can be easily and selectively exchanged with larger aromatic guests (C 60 /C 70 ). During the guest-exchange process, the two porphyrin rings switch their relative orientation according to the size and shape of the guests. This behavior of the cyclic container has been thoroughly investigated by using UV/Vis spectroscopy, NMR spectroscopy, and X-ray crystal structure determination of the host-guest assemblies. The electrochemical and photophysical studies demonstrated the occurrence of photoinduced electron transfer from bisporphyrin to TCNQ/C 60 /C 70 in the respective host-guest assemblies. The cyclic host can form complexes with C 60 and C 70 with association constants of (2.8±0.2)×10 5 and (1.9±0.3)×10 8  m -1 , respectively; the latter value represents the highest binding affinity for C 70 reported so far for zinc(II) bisporphyrinic receptors. This high selectivity for the binding of C 70 versus C 60 allows the easy extraction and efficient isolation of C 70 from a C 60 /C 70 fullerene mixture. Experimental evidence was substantiated by DFT calculations. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Host–Guest Chirality Interplay: A Mutually Induced Formation of a Chiral ZMOF and Its Double-Helix Polymer Guests

    KAUST Repository

    Luo, Xiaolong

    2016-01-12

    A novel homochiral zeolite-like metal-organic framework (ZMOF), [(Cu4I4) (dabco)2]·[Cu2(bbimb)]·3DMF (JLU-Liu23, dabco =1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]-octane, H2bbimb =1,3-bis(2-benzimidazol)benzene, DMF = N,N-dimethylformamide), has been successfully constructed to host unprecedented DNA-like [Cu2(bbimb)]n polymers with double-helicity. The host-guest chirality interplay permitted the induced formation of an unusual gyroid MOF with homochirality and helical channels in the framework for the first time, JLU-Liu23. Importantly, the enantiomeric pairs (23P, 23M) can be promoted and isolated in the presence of appropriate chiral inducing agents, affording enantioselective separation of chiral molecules as well as small gas molecules. © 2016 American Chemical Society.

  12. Selecting non-classified hotels in Kenya: what really matters for business guests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex K Kivuva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-classified hotels, which comprise small hotels and guest houses, are important accommodation providers offering limited services and products as compared to the classified hotels. Through guest satisfaction, they can achieve repeat business and also get new business through word of mouth from previous guests. The main focus is for the hoteliers to know exactly the determinants of selection of hotels by their guests. In this case, the focus was on non-classified hotels in Mtwapa town at the Kenyan coast. The study adopted a cross-sectional descriptive survey design. Results from this study clearly indicate that all aspects of hotel operations are important to business guests’ selection of a non-classified hotel. However, it was revealed that this was not on equal basis. Results indicate that the core product (guestroom comfortability, hygiene and cleanliness were the most important factors in determining guests’ selection of where to stay. This research therefore suggests that any efforts towards quality improvement in a hotel should focus primarily on ensuring customer satisfaction with the guestroom. While acknowledging the importance of all aspects of hotel operations, managers should recognize the importance of the guestroom and its facilities towards hotel selection and overall customer satisfaction. Therefore, it is imperative that managers channel their resources towards improving guest services in the guestrooms in accordance with the requirements of the clientele. This includes such aspects as the look of the guest rooms, facilities provided in the guest rooms and comfortability of the bed and mattress.

  13. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, B.; Wang, L. L.; Du, L.; Pan, Y.; Lai, Zhiping; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Du, H. L.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Diffusion as a function of guest molecule length and functionalization in flexible metal–organic frameworks

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, B.

    2016-05-11

    Understanding guest diffusion in nanoporous host-guest systems is crucial in the efficient design of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) for chemical separation and drug delivery applications. In this work, we investigated the effect of molecule length on the diffusion rate in the zeolitic imidazolate framework 8 (ZIF-8), trying to find a simple and straightforward variable to characterize the complicated guest diffusion. We found that, counter-intuitively, long guest molecules can diffuse as quickly as short molecules; the diffusion coefficient of ethyl acetate for example is of the same order of magnitude as ethane and ethanol, as excludes the existence of a simple relationship between molecule length and diffusion rate. This phenomenon is explained by a study of the contributions of intra- and inter-cage movement to overall transport. Steric confinement limits the degrees of freedom of long guest molecules, shortening their residence time and increasing the efficiency of radial diffusion. In contrast, shorter molecules meander within MOF cages, reducing transport. Furthermore, the energy barrier of inter-cage transport also does not exhibit a simple dependence on a guest molecule length, attributing to the effect of the type of functional group on diffusion. Guests over varying lengths were investigated by using theoretical methods, revealing that the guest diffusion in ZIF-8 depends on the number of contiguous carbon atoms in a molecule, rather than its overall length. Thus, we proposed simple criteria to predict arbitrary guest molecule diffusivity in ZIF-8 without time-consuming experimentation. © 2016 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Perception of service quality in agrotourism accommodations: Impact on guest loyalty and re-visit intentions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chryssoula Chatzigeorgiou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the development of a conceptual model that demonstrates the dynamic nature of the relationship between service quality and guest satisfaction in the agrotourism accommodation sector, based on theories derived from social psychology and previous research in the marketing, management, and services literature. The model was tested using sample data from guests of four different agrotourism firms, and was modified because of empirical results. The final model improves understanding of the relationship between service quality and guest satisfaction because these constructs were examined from the process perspective of an agrotourism accommodation experience; it portrays service quality and satisfaction in the context of a complete system.

  16. Business Guests Satisfaction in the Hotel Industry: A Case Study of North American Hotel Chains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Bradić

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers the problem of satisfaction of business guests with hotel brands in North America. In analysis we used the guests responses (scores given for 12 different elements of hotel product. In order to arrive at more accurate results, monitored hotel chains are grouped into price tiers. The aim of this paper is to indicate what facilities and services the North American business guests appreciate most. Industry trends and results may be beneficial to all hoteliers, especially in business tourism segment.

  17. Get Your Hotel Operations Team Onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Doug

    2018-01-01

    As hospitality industry trainers know, using symbols and models can help trainees grasp abstract concepts and make seemingly-complex paradigms easy to understand. Seems like is a good time for the hotel industry to update its model, so let’s get your team onboard The Tricycle of Guest Service. When you think about it, a tricycle is a perfect model for a positive guest experience. For one, it has three wheels, just like the three components of a memorable guest stay. The back wheels repres...

  18. Impact of second reminder invitation on uptake of screening and cancer detection in BreastCheck.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fleming, P

    2012-01-01

    This research aims to quantify the impact of reminder invitations on uptake and cancer detection in Ireland. Examination of BreastCheck\\'s clinical database (2000-2010) to determine number of women screened following first invitation and after reminder; comparison by age group and screening phase with outcomes of recall rate, cancer detection and true positive rates. Of 819,182 first invitations sent 448,974 (54.8%) women attended. 245,157 (66.2%) women attended after reminder invitations, increasing uptake by 29.9% to 694,131 (84.7%) and cancers detected by 1,550 (35%). Women awaiting a reminder were less likely recalled for assessment 9,555 (3.9%) than respondents to first invitation 2,887 (4.04%) (p=0.004). Younger, mainly initial women were more likely recalled for assessment after first invitation. There was no difference between cohorts for cancer detection rate or true positive rate. Reminders increased uptake, supporting international evidence. For programme efficiency attendance at first invitation is optimal. For maximum programme effectiveness attendance must be encouraged with reminders.

  19. 2 March 2011 - Swedish State Secretary to the Minister for Enterprise and Energy C. Håkansson Boman signing the guest book wit Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; in the ATLAS visitor centre with P. Grafstrom; troughout accompanied by Deparment Head T. Pettersson.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    She was welcomed to CERN by Felicitas Pauss, head of international relations. The visit included a presentation about the LHC Computing Grid project and a tour of the LHC superconducting magnet test hall and the ATLAS visitor centre.

  20. 2 February 2016 - Signature of CERN guest book by Ambassador of Montenegro to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva N.Kaluđerović with Adviser C. Schäfer. S. Damjanovic is also present.

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2016-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Nebojša Kaluđerović Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary Permanent Representative of Montenegro to the United Nations Office and other international organisations in Geneva

  1. Fiscal 2000 cooperative basic project for investigation of efficiency in international energy consumption. Project for inviting researchers from developing countries (Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam); 2000 nendo kokusai energy shohi koritsuka chosa nado kyoryoku kiso jigyo hokokusho. Hatten tojokoku kenkyusha shohei jigyo (Indonesia, Philippines, Tai, Vietnam)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-02-01

    As a part of international cooperation concerning global environmental issues, ICETT (International Center for Environmental Technology Transfer) invited administrative officers, engineers, etc., of developing countries, for the purpose of encouraging experts connected with energy conservation and environmental protection technologies, providing training on the administrative technique, antipollution technologies, energy conservation technologies, etc. The training period was from December 3 to 21, 2000, with 12 participants attended, three each from four countries, Indonesia, Philippines, Thailand and Vietnam. The contents of the technological instruction were such that cases in Japan concerning energy conservation and environmental protection were introduced generally from the administrative measures to the technological countermeasures, as were done conventionally. In the area of the environmental protection, lectures and tours on wastewater treatment were added as industrial wastewater control measures. In the subject of new energy, micro hydraulic power was added which is in progress for example in Indonesia under an aid from Japan. In the energy conservation technology, a supplementary lecture was given on the concept and methodology of an environment-protective type production technology, with emphasis placed on the energy conservation and environmental protection in manufacturing plants and production processes. (NEDO)

  2. Cluster analysis as a tool of guests segmentation by the degree of their demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damijan Mumel

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Authors demonstrate the use of cluster analysis in finding out (ascertaining the homogenity/heterogenity of guests as to the degree of their demand. The degree of guests’ demand is defined according to the importance of perceived service quality components measured by SERVQUAL, which was adopted and adapted, according to the specifics of health spa industry in Slovenia. Goals of the article are: (a the identification of the profile of importance of general health spa service quality components, and (b the identification of groups of guests (segments according to the degree of their demand in the research in 1991 compared with 1999. Cluster analysis serves as useful tool for guest segmentation since it reveals the existence of important differences in the structure of guests in the year 1991 compared with the year 1999. The results serve as a useful database for management in health spas.

  3. Motivations of farm tourism hosts and guests in the South West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    rich and varied landscape, long tradition of farming and ... of visitors who stay at your farm / establishment? 2 How would .... walks, and the children all loved the animals. .... During the short time .... Guests relive happy memories of past times.

  4. Guest-host chemistry with dendrimers—binding of carboxylates in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ficker, Mario; Petersen, Johannes Fabritius; Hansen, Jon Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Recognition and binding of anions in water is difficult due to the ability of water molecules to form strong hydrogen bonds and to solvate the anions. The complexation of two different carboxylates with 1-(4-carbomethoxypyrrolidone)-terminated PAMAM dendrimers was studied in aqueous solution using...... the carboxylate-dendrimer interaction selectively. The binding stoichiometry for 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate was found to be two strongly bound guest molecules per dendrimer and an additional 40 molecules with weak binding affinity. The NOESY NMR showed a clear binding correlation of sodium 3-hydroxy-2-naphthoate...... with the lyophilic dendrimer core, possibly with the two high affinity guest molecules. In comparison, sodium 2-naphthoate showed a weaker binding strength and had a stoichiometry of two guests per dendrimer with no additional weakly bound guests. This stronger dendrimer interaction with sodium 3-hydroxy-2...

  5. Structural transitions and guest/host complexing of liquid crystal helical nanofilaments induced by nanoconfinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hanim; Ryu, Seong Ho; Tuchband, Michael; Shin, Tae Joo; Korblova, Eva; Walba, David M; Clark, Noel A; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2017-02-01

    A lamellar liquid crystal (LC) phase of certain bent-core mesogenic molecules can be grown in a manner that generates a single chiral helical nanofilament in each of the cylindrical nanopores of an anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane. By introducing guest molecules into the resulting composite chiral nanochannels, we explore the structures and functionality of the ordered guest/host LC complex, verifying the smectic-like positional order of the fluidic nematic LC phase, which is obtained by the combination of the LC organization and the nanoporous AAO superstructure. The guest nematic LC 4'- n -pentyl-4-cyanobiphenyl is found to form a distinctive fluid layered ordered LC complex at the nanofilament/guest interface with the host 1,3-phenylene bis[4-(4-nonyloxyphenyliminomethyl)benzoate], where this interface contacts the AAO cylinder wall. Filament growth form is strongly influenced by mixture parameters and pore dimensions.

  6. Photocaged Competitor Guests: A General Approach Toward Light-Activated Cargo Release From Cucurbiturils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Miguel A; Basílio, Nuno; Moro, Artur J; Domingues, Mara; González-Delgado, José A; Arteaga, Jesús F; Pischel, Uwe

    2017-09-21

    A general approach toward the light-induced guest release from cucurbit[7]uril by means of a photoactivatable competitor was devised. An o-nitrobenzyl-caged competitor is photolyzed to generate a competitive guest that can displace cargo from the host macrocycle solely based on considerations of chemical equilibrium. With this method the release of terpene guests from inclusion complexes with cucurbit[7]uril was demonstrated. The binding of the herein investigated terpenes, all being lead fragrant components in essential oils, has been characterized for the first time. They feature binding constants of up to 10 8  L mol -1 and a high differential binding selectivity (spanning four orders of magnitude for the binding constants for the particular set of terpenes). By fine-tuning the photoactivatable competitor guest, selective and also sequential release of the terpenes was achieved. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Influence of adsorption thermodynamics on guest diffusivities in nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Published experimental data, underpinned by molecular simulations, are used to highlight the strong influence of adsorption thermodynamics on diffusivities of guest molecules inside ordered nanoporous crystalline materials such as zeolites, metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), and zeolitic imidazolate

  8. The "third option": Oscilliatory migrations of retired guest workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonijević Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this study is focused on new migration tendencies of retired guest workers. This paper represents one part of a study conducted during 2014 in eastern Serbia and Vienna regarding life strategies of retired labor migrants. In domestic (Serbian social sciences this subject was neglected, but recently it has attracted global social scientific attention with an idea of interdisciplinary merge of migration and age studies. To the day, global literature has only covered retired migrant laborers return to their home countries, but recent studies show changes in migration tendencies of retired laborers of many different nationalities, who have spent their work age in Western Europe. These new migration patterns were called “oscillatory movement” or as a new, alternative “third option”. They are only a form of seasonal and circular migrations which present the most dominant fashion of modern migrant mobility in Europe. Therefore we wanted to see what is the situation with labor migrants from Serbia – do they return to Serbia once they retire or not, and what are their reasons for choosing to live on “two addresses”. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177035: Antropološko proučavanje Srbije – od kulturnog nasleđa do modernog društva

  9. Relationship between the cohesion of guest particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangal, Sharad; Gengenbach, Thomas; Millington-Smith, Doug; Armstrong, Brian; Morton, David A V; Larson, Ian

    2016-05-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effects cohesion of small surface-engineered guest binder particles on the flow behaviour of interactive mixtures. Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) - a model pharmaceutical binder - was spray-dried with varying l-leucine feed concentrations to create small surface-engineered binder particles with varying cohesion. These spray-dried formulations were characterised by their particle size distribution, morphology and cohesion. Interactive mixtures were produced by blending these spray-dried formulations with paracetamol. The resultant blends were visualised under scanning electron microscope to confirm formation of interactive mixtures. Surface coverage of paracetamol by guest particles as well as the flow behaviour of these mixtures were examined. The flow performance of interactive mixtures was evaluated using measurements of conditioned bulk density, basic flowability energy, aeration energy and compressibility. With higher feed l-leucine concentrations, the surface roughness of small binder particles increased, while their cohesion decreased. Visual inspection of the SEM images of the blends indicated that the guest particles adhered to the surface of paracetamol resulting in effective formation of interactive mixtures. These images also showed that the low-cohesion guest particles were better de-agglomerated that consequently formed a more homogeneous interactive mixture with paracetamol compared with high-cohesion formulations. The flow performance of interactive mixtures changed as a function of the cohesion of the guest particles. Interactive mixtures with low-cohesion guest binder particles showed notably improved bulk flow performance compared with those containing high-cohesion guest binder particles. Thus, our study suggests that the cohesion of guest particles dictates the flow performance of interactive mixtures. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Eliciting Information on Sensitive Matters Without Inviting ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Eliciting Information on Sensitive Matters. Without Inviting Respondents' ... methods based on Randomized Response tech- niques. ... while collecting data on some sensitive issues are well ..... Suppose there is an association of professionals.

  11. Incommensurate host-guest structures in compressed elements: Hume—Rothery effects as origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degtyareva, V F

    2015-01-01

    Discovery of the incommensurate structure in the element Ba under pressure 15 years ago was followed by findings of a series of similar structures in other compressed elements. Incommensurately modulated structures of the host-guest type consist of a tetragonal host structure and a guest structure. The guest structure forms chains of atoms embedded in the channels of host atoms so that the axial ratio of these subcells along the c axis is not rational. Two types of the host-guest structures have been found so far: with the host cells containing 8 atoms and 16 atoms; in these both types the guest cells contain 2 atoms. These crystal structures contain a non-integer number of atoms in their unit cell: tI11* in Bi, Sb, As, Ba, Sr, Sc and tI19* in Na, K, Rb. We consider here a close structural relationship of these host-guest structures with the binary alloy phase Au 3 Cd 5 -tI32. This phase is related to the family of the Hume-Rothery phases that is stabilized by the Fermi sphere-Brillouin zone interaction. From similar considerations for alkali and alkaline-earth elements a necessary condition for structural stability emerges in which the valence electrons band overlaps with the upper core electrons and the valence electron count increases under compression. (paper)

  12. Exploring Environmental Awareness and Behavior among Guests at Hotels That Apply Water-Saving Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariadna Gabarda-Mallorquí

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate guest profiles at a hotel that has created a best-practices water management model to determine how different types of guests contribute to saving water during their stay. To do this, we analyzed levels of environmental awareness and pro-environmental behavior among the guests. Information was gathered through 648 structured surveys with guests at Hotel Samba in the Spanish seaside resort of Lloret de Mar between September 2015 and August 2016. Cluster analysis revealed four profiles of guests with different sociodemographic characteristics and different levels of awareness and proactivity in relation to water conservation. We combined our findings to develop a framework that illustrates how the two dimensions of environmental awareness and pro-environmental behavior are related in this setting. This article provides new insights into how hotel guests’ environmental awareness and engagement can influence a hotel’s water-saving efforts. These insights should help hotel operators to devise new, guest-centered strategies for saving water.

  13. Structural Consequences of Anionic Host-Cationic Guest Interactions in a Supramolecular Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Johnson, Darren W.; Szigethy, Geza; Davis, Anna V.; Teat, Simon J.; Oliver, Allen G.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-07-09

    The molecular structure of the self-assembled supramolecular assembly [M{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} has been explored with different metals (M = Ga{sup III}, Fe{sup III}, Ti{sup IV}) and different encapsulated guests (NEt{sub 4}{sup +}, BnNMe{sub 3}{sup +}, Cp{sub 2}Co{sup +}, Cp*{sub 2}Co{sup +}) by X-ray crystallography. While the identity of the metal ions at the vertices of the M{sub 4}L{sub 6} structure is found to have little effect on the assembly structure, encapsulated guests significantly distort the size and shape of the interior cavity of the assembly. Cations on the exterior of the assembly are found to interact with the assembly through either {pi}-{pi}, cation-{pi}, or CH-{pi} interactions. In some cases, the exterior guests interact with only one assembly, but cations with the ability to form multiple {pi}-{pi} interactions are able to interact with adjacent assemblies in the crystal lattice. The solvent accessible cavity of the assembly is modeled using the rolling probe method and found to range from 253-434 {angstrom}{sup 3}, depending on the encapsulated guest. Based on the volume of the guest and the volume of the cavity, the packing coefficient for each host-guest complex is found to range from 0.47-0.67.

  14. Force and Stress along Simulated Dissociation Pathways of Cucurbituril-Guest Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velez-Vega, Camilo; Gilson, Michael K

    2012-03-13

    The field of host-guest chemistry provides computationally tractable yet informative model systems for biomolecular recognition. We applied molecular dynamics simulations to study the forces and mechanical stresses associated with forced dissociation of aqueous cucurbituril-guest complexes with high binding affinities. First, the unbinding transitions were modeled with constant velocity pulling (steered dynamics) and a soft spring constant, to model atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. The computed length-force profiles yield rupture forces in good agreement with available measurements. We also used steered dynamics with high spring constants to generate paths characterized by a tight control over the specified pulling distance; these paths were then equilibrated via umbrella sampling simulations and used to compute time-averaged mechanical stresses along the dissociation pathways. The stress calculations proved to be informative regarding the key interactions determining the length-force profiles and rupture forces. In particular, the unbinding transition of one complex is found to be a stepwise process, which is initially dominated by electrostatic interactions between the guest's ammoniums and the host's carbonyl groups, and subsequently limited by the extraction of the guest's bulky bicyclooctane moiety; the latter step requires some bond stretching at the cucurbituril's extraction portal. Conversely, the dissociation of a second complex with a more slender guest is mainly driven by successive electrostatic interactions between the different guest's ammoniums and the host's carbonyl groups. The calculations also provide information on the origins of thermodynamic irreversibilities in these forced dissociation processes.

  15. Effect of Hydrophobic Chain Length on the Stability and Guest Exchange Behavior of Shell-Sheddable Micelles Formed by Disulfide-Linked Diblock Copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Haiyan; Li, Yixia; Yang, Jinxian; Ye, Xiaodong

    2017-10-19

    Reduction-responsive micelles hold enormous promise for application as drug carriers due to the fast drug release triggered by reducing conditions and high anticancer activity. However, the effect of hydrophobic chain length on the stability and guest exchange of reduction-responsive micelles, especially for the micelles formed by diblock copolymers containing single disulfide group, is not fully understood. Here, shell-sheddable micelles formed by a series of disulfide-linked copolymer poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caprolactone) (PEG-SS-PCL) containing the same chain length of PEG but different chain lengths of hydrophobic block PCL were prepared and well characterized. The influence of the chain length of hydrophobic PCL block on the stability and guest exchange of PEG-SS-PCL micelles was studied by the use of both dynamic laser light scattering (DLS) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The results show that longer PCL chains lead to a slower aggregation rate and guest exchange of micelles in the aqueous solutions containing 10 mM dithiothreitol (DTT). The cell uptake of the shell-sheddable PEG-SS-PCL micelles in vitro shows that the amount of internalization of dyes loaded in PEG-SS-PCL micelles increases with the chain length of hydrophobic PCL block investigated by flow cytometric analysis and confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  16. Time to finger point or fix? An invitation to join ongoing efforts to promote ethical authorship and other good publication practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Karen L; Gertel, Art; Hamilton, Cindy W; Jacobs, Adam; Snyder, Gene P

    2013-01-01

    In this commentary, we present evidence that unethical authorship (eg, guest and ghost authoring) and other publication practices are not restricted to the pharmaceutical industry; they also occur in academia. Such practices are not an industry problem--they are a research problem. To enhance trust in industry-sponsored research, companies have made rapid and far-reaching changes to their publication guidelines, policies, and procedures. Professional medical writers have adopted, and continue to implement, these changes. Although evidence indicates that industry practices are improving, there is certainly more to do, both in industry and academia. We invite readers to join ongoing efforts to promote ethical publication practices.

  17. International banker to speak at Virginia Tech

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2004-01-01

    International banker David Bieri will give a talk, "Why Central Banks Manage Reserves," on Monday, April 5, 11 a.m. in 1045 Pamplin Hall on the Virginia Tech campus. His talk is part of the "International Business and Culture" guest lecture series sponsored by the Pamplin College of Business. The talk is free and open to the public.

  18. 11 CFR 100.137 - Invitations, food, and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Invitations, food, and beverages. 100.137...) Exceptions to Expenditures § 100.137 Invitations, food, and beverages. The cost of invitations, food, and... invitations, food and beverages provided by the individual on behalf of the candidate does not exceed $1,000...

  19. 11 CFR 100.77 - Invitations, food, and beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 11 Federal Elections 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Invitations, food, and beverages. 100.77...) Exceptions to Contributions § 100.77 Invitations, food, and beverages. The cost of invitations, food and... invitations, food and beverages provided by the individual on behalf of the candidate does not exceed $1,000...

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic and quantum theoretical study of host-guest interactions in clathrates: I. Hofmann type clathrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VLADIMIR M. PETRUSEVSKI

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Hofmann type clatharates are host-guest compounds with the general formula M(NH32M'(CN4·2G, in which M(NH32M'(CN4 is the host lattice and G is benzene, the guest molecule. In previous studies, host-guest interactions have been investigated by analyzing the RT and LNT vibrational (infrared, far infrared and Raman spectra of these clathrates. All the observed changes in the vibrational spectra of these clathrates are referred to a host-guest interaction originating from weak hydrogen bonding between the ammonia hydrogen atoms from the host lattice and the p electron cloud of the guest (benzene molecules. In order to obtain an insight into the relative importance of the local crystalline field vs. the anharmonicity effects on the spectroscopic properties of the guest species upon enclathration, as well as to explain the observed band shifts and splittings, several quantum theoretical approaches are proposed.

  1. Theoretical model estimation of guest diffusion in Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs)

    KAUST Repository

    Zheng, Bin

    2015-08-11

    Characterizing molecule diffusion in nanoporous matrices is critical to understanding the novel chemical and physical properties of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). In this paper, we developed a theoretical model to fastly and accurately compute the diffusion rate of guest molecules in a zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8). The ideal gas or equilibrium solution diffusion model was modified to contain the effect of periodical media via introducing the possibility of guests passing through the framework gate. The only input in our model is the energy barrier of guests passing through the MOF’s gate. Molecular dynamics (MD) methods were employed to gather the guest density profile, which then was used to deduce the energy barrier values. This produced reliable results that require a simulation time of 5 picoseconds, which is much shorter when using pure MD methods (in the billisecond scale) . Also, we used density functional theory (DFT) methods to obtain the energy profile of guests passing through gates, as this does not require specification of a force field for the MOF degrees of freedom. In the DFT calculation, we only considered one gate of MOFs each time; as this greatly reduced the computational cost. Based on the obtained energy barrier values we computed the diffusion rate of alkane and alcohol in ZIF-8 using our model, which was in good agreement with experimental test results and the calculation values from standard MD model. Our model shows the advantage of obtaining accurate diffusion rates for guests in MOFs for a lower computational cost and shorter calculation time. Thus, our analytic model calculation is especially attractive for high-throughput computational screening of the dynamic performance of guests in a framework.

  2. Report on the international symposium on radiological issues for Fukushima's revitalized future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Nobuhiro

    2015-12-01

    On May 30 - 31, 2015, the fourth and last convention entitled 'International Symposium on Radiological Issues for Fukushima's Revitalized Future' was held in Iizaka Onsen, Fukushima city, under auspices of Institute of Environmental Radioactivity at Fukushima University and other organizations. The following four subjects were the main topics of this symposium: Decontamination/radioactive waste; Environmental radiation/external exposure; Marine/agricultural products, food, internal exposure; and Issues at the Fukushima Daiichi NPP site. The program included 2 invited lectures by overseas guest speakers, 12 oral presentations, 80 poster presentations, and 2 panel discussion sessions, in which over 600 participants consisting of researchers, experts, community dwellers, and young students had lively discussion in a warm and friendly atmosphere. It is noteworthy that several poster presentations were given by high school and junior college students in Fukushima in this international symposium. This report is a collection of the presentation slides and the transcriptions of Q and A sessions for oral lectures as well as the transcriptions of the panel discussion sessions. (J.P.N.)

  3. Computations between metallocalix(4)arene host and a series of four oil-based fuel pollutant guests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pathak, D.A.; Street, N.C.

    2006-01-01

    Calculations using PM3 and mechanics methods on metallocalix(4)arene hosts (1-10) and substituted dibenzothiophene guests (A-D), which are generally known as oil-based fuel pollutants, show that host-guest formation is energetically favored. Calculations have been carried out for both 1/1 and 1/4 ratios of host/guest. There is no direct bonding between the metal center of the host and the sulfur of the guest in the host-guest complex. Sterically hundered dibenzothiophene guests show similar energies to the unhindered analogs. For calix(4)arenas (5-10) in partial cone conformations and having hydrogen rather than p-tert-butyl groups on the wide rim, host-guest formation occurs within the narrow rim rather than the wide rim. Host-guest association appears to occur via Pie-Pie interactions between host and guest phenyl groups rather than via metal-sulfur bonding. The study has importance especially in oil refining to obtain environmentally safe fuel oils and help supramolecular chemists in designing and synthesizing more sophisticated host molecules for the removal of sulfur from crude oil / refinery oil. (author)

  4. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry can greatly improve the selectivity of biomolecule-ligand binding on account of recognition-directed interactions. In addition, functional structures and the actuation of supramolecular assemblies in molecular systems can be controlled efficiently through various host-guest chemistry. Together, these highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited as an alternative methodology for applications in the field of programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular soft materials through the reversible binding between complementary components. Many processes in living systems such as biotransformation, transportation of matter, and energy transduction begin with interfacial molecular recognition, which is greatly influenced by various external stimuli at biointerfaces. Detailed investigations about the molecular recognition at interfaces can result in a better understanding of life science, and further guide us in developing new biomaterials and medicines. In order to mimic complicated molecular-recognition systems observed in nature that adapt to changes in their environment, combining host-guest chemistry and surface science is critical for fabricating the next generation of multifunctional biointerfaces with efficient stimuli-responsiveness and good biocompatibility. In this Account, we will summarize some recent progress on multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces and biosurfaces fabricated by cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and highlight their potential applications including drug delivery, bioelectrocatalysis, and reversible adsorption and resistance of peptides, proteins, and cells. In addition, these biointerfaces and biosurfaces demonstrate efficient response toward various external stimuli, such as UV light, pH, redox chemistry, and competitive guests. All of these external stimuli can aid in mimicking the biological stimuli evident in complex biological environments

  5. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  6. 27 October 2014 - L. Pistelli Vice Minister at Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Italian Republic

    CERN Multimedia

    Guillaume, Jeanneret

    2014-01-01

    Mr Lapo Pistelli Vice Minister at Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Member of the Italian Parliament (Chamber of Deputies), Italian Republic, signing the Guest Book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer ; Physics Department Head L. Mapelli also present

  7. 27 October 2014 - H.E. Mr Ney Samol Ambassador Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Cambodia to the United Nations Office and other international organizations in Geneva

    CERN Multimedia

    Brice, Maximilien

    2014-01-01

    His Excellency Mr Ney Samol Ambassador Permanent Representative of the Kingdom of Cambodia to the United Nations Office and other international organizations in Geneva signing the Guest Book with Deputy Head of International Relations E. Tsesmelis

  8. Invited Colloquium on Negotiating the Complexities of Multilingual Assessment, AAAL Conference 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menken, Kate; Shohamy, Elana

    2015-01-01

    The invited colloquium on New Directions in Language Assessment held at the American Association for Applied Linguistics (AAAL) annual meeting in Portland, Oregon on March 22, 2014 brought together an international panel of scholars to together explore the possibilities and challenges of translanguaging and bi/multilingual approaches in…

  9. Guest editorial preface : Special Issue on Advances in Computer Entertainment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Anton; Romão, Teresa; Cheok, Adrian D.

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of the International Journal of Creative Interfaces and Computer Graphics contains a selection of papers from ACE 2012, the 9th International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment (Nijholt et al., 2012). ACE is the leading scientific forum for dissemination of

  10. Nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems for nanomedicine and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zilong; Song, Nan; Menz, Ryan; Pingali, Bharadwaj; Yang, Ying-Wei; Zheng, Yuebing

    2015-05-01

    Synthetic macrocyclic host compounds can interact with suitable guest molecules via noncovalent interactions to form functional supramolecular systems. With the synergistic integration of the response of molecules and the unique properties at the nanoscale, nanoparticles functionalized with the host-guest supramolecular systems have shown great potentials for a broad range of applications in the fields of nanoscience and nanotechnology. In this review article, we focus on the applications of the nanoparticles functionalized with supramolecular host-guest systems in nanomedicine and healthcare, including therapeutic delivery, imaging, sensing and removal of harmful substances. A large number of examples are included to elucidate the working mechanisms, advantages, limitations and future developments of the nanoparticle-supramolecule systems in these applications.

  11. Magnetic ordering in TCNQ-based metal–organic frameworks with host–guest interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Xuan; Saber, Mohamed R.; Prosvirin, Andrey P.; Reibenspies, Joseph H.; Sun, Lei; Ballesteros-Rivas, Maria; Zhao, Hanhua; Dunbar, Kim R. (MIT); (TAM)

    2015-09-03

    Host–guest interactions between the aromatic molecules benzene, toluene, aniline and nitrobenzene and the redox-active TCNQ-based metal–organic framework (MOF), Fe(TCNQ)(4,4'-bpy) (1) (TCNQ = 7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane), have been found to modulate spontaneous magnetization behaviours at low temperatures. An analogous MOF, Mn(TCNQ)(4,4'-bpy) (2) with isotropic Mn(II) ions as well as the two-dimensional compound Fe(TCNQ)(DMF)2·2DMF (3·2DMF), were also prepared as models for studying the effects of single-ion magnetic anisotropy and structural distortion on spin canting. The results indicate guest-dependent long range magnetic ordering occurs at low temperatures, which correlates with the electrostatic and steric effects of the incorporated aromatic guests.

  12. The educational attainment of the children of the Danish ”guest worker” immigrants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Vibeke; Smith, Nina

    This paper analyses the educational attainment of young first generation immigrants in Denmark who are children of the ‘guest workers’ who immigrated from Turkey, Pakistan and Ex-Yugoslavia in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Beside the traditional intergenerational transmission mechanism, we...... analyse potential immigrant-specific factors as language proficiency, attending mother-tongue courses and expectations concerning out or return migration from Denmark. The results show that intergenerational transmission effects are strong among ‘guest worker’ immigrants, especially among men. Other...... important factors are Danish language proficiency, age at first marriage and a number variables reflecting parents’ and own attitudes concerning education, marriage and family. However, the ‘guest worker’ immigrants are not a homogenous group. The analyses reveal large differences between Turkish, Pakistani...

  13. Carbohydrate-Based Host-Guest Complexation of Hydrophobic Antibiotics for the Enhancement of Antibacterial Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Daham; Joo, Sang-Woo; Shinde, Vijay Vilas; Cho, Eunae; Jung, Seunho

    2017-08-08

    Host-guest complexation with various hydrophobic drugs has been used to enhance the solubility, permeability, and stability of guest drugs. Physical changes in hydrophobic drugs by complexation have been related to corresponding increases in the bioavailability of these drugs. Carbohydrates, including various derivatives of cyclodextrins, cyclosophoraoses, and some linear oligosaccharides, are generally used as host complexation agents in drug delivery systems. Many antibiotics with low bioavailability have some limitations to their clinical use due to their intrinsically poor aqueous solubility. Bioavailability enhancement is therefore an important step to achieve the desired concentration of antibiotics in the treatment of bacterial infections. Antibiotics encapsulated in a complexation-based drug delivery system will display improved antibacterial activity making it possible to reduce dosages and overcome the serious global problem of antibiotic resistance. Here, we review the present research trends in carbohydrate-based host-guest complexation of various hydrophobic antibiotics as an efficient delivery system to improve solubility, permeability, stability, and controlled release.

  14. Particulate Matter Concentration Levels in South Central Richmond, California (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, B.; Byias, C.; Cuff, K. E.; Diaz, J.; Love, K.; Marks-Block, T.; McLane, F.; Mollique, Z.; Montes, E.; Ross, R.; Washington, B.

    2009-12-01

    South Central Richmond, California is the home of one of the nation’s most innovative green workforce training centers, Richmond BUILD - Green Jobs Training facility. A near constant stream of young people engaged in training activities, instructors, invited guests, and journalists of various ages can be seen moving in and out of the facility nearly every day of the week throughout a given year. Additionally, the comings and goings of young children and adults associated with a mid-sized elementary school just north of the facility contributes to the general area’s substantial human traffic. Unfortunately, however, a major highway, Interstate 580, a major thoroughfare, 23rd Street and a railway line operated by Burlington Northern Santa Fe, Union Pacific, and the Richmond Pacific Railroad frame the triangular area within which these two sites are situated. In addition, a major petrochemical complex and several shipping facilities are located less than three kilometers away north and west of this area. As part of a general assessment of air quality in this heavily human traveled area, we conducted a study of particulate matter (PM) concentrations over a five-month period beginning in August of 2009. Measurements were made at a variety of locations, and results were used to map the spatial distribution of PM of various sizes. Regions of high concentration levels were identified, and these particular areas then were monitored over time. Preliminary results of our study indicate that regions with high concentrations are consistent across the range of particle sizes measured, which suggests a common source for PM found in the study area. As these regions are located close to a major thoroughfare and railway line, we believe that diesel-burning vehicles are major contributors to the PM levels found in the study area. Time series results suggest a fairly strong correlation between higher than average PM concentrations and abnormally high wind gusts. On days when wind

  15. COUNTER-INTERVENTION, INVITATION, BOTH, OR NEITHER ?

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eliasn

    2 See Testimony by David H. Shinn, Somalia: U.S. Govrenemnt Policy and Challenges, ... a state of relative peace—one that can be best described as cold peace. ... denied sending its troops to Somalia until it formally declared war on 24 ...... Lebanese government, the invitation of the USSR by the dubious government of.

  16. Monte Carlo Codes Invited Session

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trama, J.C.; Malvagi, F.; Brown, F.

    2013-01-01

    This document lists 22 Monte Carlo codes used in radiation transport applications throughout the world. For each code the names of the organization and country and/or place are given. We have the following computer codes. 1) ARCHER, USA, RPI; 2) COG11, USA, LLNL; 3) DIANE, France, CEA/DAM Bruyeres; 4) FLUKA, Italy and CERN, INFN and CERN; 5) GEANT4, International GEANT4 collaboration; 6) KENO and MONACO (SCALE), USA, ORNL; 7) MC21, USA, KAPL and Bettis; 8) MCATK, USA, LANL; 9) MCCARD, South Korea, Seoul National University; 10) MCNP6, USA, LANL; 11) MCU, Russia, Kurchatov Institute; 12) MONK and MCBEND, United Kingdom, AMEC; 13) MORET5, France, IRSN Fontenay-aux-Roses; 14) MVP2, Japan, JAEA; 15) OPENMC, USA, MIT; 16) PENELOPE, Spain, Barcelona University; 17) PHITS, Japan, JAEA; 18) PRIZMA, Russia, VNIITF; 19) RMC, China, Tsinghua University; 20) SERPENT, Finland, VTT; 21) SUPERMONTECARLO, China, CAS INEST FDS Team Hefei; and 22) TRIPOLI-4, France, CEA Saclay

  17. Invitation to medical image processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitasaka, Takayuki; Suenaga, Yasuhito; Mori, Kensaku

    2010-01-01

    This medical essay explains the present state of CT image processing technology about its recognition, acquisition and visualization for computer-assisted diagnosis (CAD) and surgery (CAS), and future view. Medical image processing has a series of history of its original start from the discovery of X-ray to its application to diagnostic radiography, its combination with the computer for CT, multi-detector raw CT, leading to 3D/4D images for CAD and CAS. CAD is performed based on the recognition of normal anatomical structure of human body, detection of possible abnormal lesion and visualization of its numerical figure into image. Actual instances of CAD images are presented here for chest (lung cancer), abdomen (colorectal cancer) and future body atlas (models of organs and diseases for imaging), a recent national project: computer anatomy. CAS involves the surgical planning technology based on 3D images, navigation of the actual procedure and of endoscopy. As guidance to beginning technological image processing, described are the national and international community like related academic societies, regularly conducting congresses, textbooks and workshops, and topics in the field like computed anatomy of an individual patient for CAD and CAS, its data security and standardization. In future, protective medicine is in authors' view based on the imaging technology, e.g., daily life CAD of individuals ultimately, as exemplified in the present body thermometer and home sphygmometer, to monitor one's routine physical conditions. (T.T.)

  18. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes. 2. Effects of molecular properties of guests and surface functionalities of dendrimers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jingjing; Cheng, Yiyun; Wu, Qinglin; Zhao, Libo; Xu, Tongwen

    2009-08-06

    The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is investigated by NMR techniques, including (1)H NMR and 2D-NOESY studies. The effects of molecular properties of drug molecules (protonation ability and spatial steric hindrance of charged groups) and surface functionalities of dendrimers (positively charged amine groups and negatively charged carboxylate groups) on the host-guest interactions are discussed. Different interaction mechanisms between dendrimers and drug molecules are proposed on the basis of NMR results. Primary amine- and secondary amine-containing drugs preferentially bind to negatively charged dendrimers by strong electrostatic interactions, whereas tertiary amine and quaternary ammonium-containing drugs have weak binding ability with dendrimers due to relatively low protonation ability of the tertiary amine group and serious steric hindrance of the quaternary ammonium group. Positively charged drugs locate only on the surface of negatively charged dendrimers, whereas negatively charged drugs locate both on the surface and in the interior cavities of positively charged dendrimers. The host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes is promising for the development of new drug delivery systems.

  19. Phase changes induced by guest orientational ordering of filled ice Ih methane hydrate under high pressure and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirai, H; Tanaka, T; Yagi, T; Matsuoka, T; Ohishi, Y; Ohtake, M; Yamamoto, Y

    2014-01-01

    Low-temperature and high-pressure experiments were performed with filled ice Ih structure of methane hydrate under pressure and temperature conditions of 2.0 to 77.0 GPa and 30 to 300 K, respectively, using diamond anvil cells and a helium-refrigeration cryostat. Distinct changes in the axial ratios of the host framework were revealed by In-situ X-ray diffractometry. Splitting in the CH vibration modes of the guest methane molecules, which was previously explained by the orientational ordering of the guest molecules, was observed by Raman spectroscopy. The pressure and temperature conditions at the split of the vibration modes agreed well with those of the axial ratio changes. The results indicated that orientational ordering of the guest methane molecules from orientational disordered-state occurred at high pressures and low temperatures, and that this guest ordering led to the axial ratio changes in the host framework. Existing regions of the guest disordered-phase and the guest ordered-phase were roughly estimated by the X-ray data. In addition, above the pressure of the guest-ordered phase, another high pressure phase was developed at a low-temperature region. The deuterated-water host samples were also examined and isotopic effects on the guest ordering and phase changes were observed.

  20. PREFACE: International Conference on Advancement in Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST): Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganikhodjaev, Nasir; Mukhamedov, Farrukh; Hee, Pah Chin

    2013-04-01

    The 4th International Conference on the Advancement of Science and Technology 2012 (iCAST 2012), with theme 'Contemporary Mathematics, Mathematical Physics and their Applications', took place in Kuantan, Malaysia, from Wednesday 7 to Friday 9 November 2012. The conference was attended by more than 100 participants, and hosted about 160 oral and poster papers by more than 140 pre-registered authors. The key topics of the 4th iCAST 2012 include Pure Mathematics, Applied Mathematics, Theoretical/Mathematical Physics, Dynamical Systems, Statistics and Financial Mathematics. The scientific program was rather full since after the Keynote and Invited Talks in the morning, four parallel sessions ran every day. However, according to all attendees, the program was excellent with a high level of talks and the scientific environment was fruitful; thus all attendees had a creative time. The conference aimed to promote the knowledge and development of high-quality research in mathematical fields concerned with the application of other scientific fields as well as modern technological trends in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, economics, sociology and environmental sciences. We would like to thank the Keynote and the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to 4th iCAST 2012. We would also like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. We cannot end without expressing our many thanks to International Islamic University Malaysia and our sponsors for their financial support . This volume presents selected papers which have been peer-reviewed. The editors hope that it may be useful and fruitful for scholars, researchers, and advanced technical members of the industrial laboratory facilities for developing new tools and products. Guest Editors Nasir Ganikhodjaev, Farrukh Mukhamedov and Pah Chin Hee The PDF contains the committee lists, board list and biographies of the plenary speakers.

  1. Impact of Industry Guest Speakers on Business Students' Perceptions of Employability Skills Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebe, L.; Sibson, R.; Roepen, D.; Meakins, K.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insights into the perceptions and expectations of Australian undergraduate business students (n=150) regarding the incorporation of guest speakers into the curriculum of a leadership unit focused on employability skills development. The authors adopted a mixed methods approach. A survey was conducted, with quantitative results…

  2. Circularly Polarized Luminescence from Inorganic Materials: Encapsulating Guest Lanthanide Oxides in Chiral Silica Hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Masumi; Liu, Xin-Ling; Tsunega, Seiji; Nakajima, Erika; Abe, Shunsuke; Nakashima, Takuya; Kawai, Tsuyoshi; Jin, Ren-Hua

    2018-05-02

    Recently, circularly polarized luminescence (CPL)-active systems have become a very hot and interesting subject in chirality- and optics-related areas. The CPL-active systems are usually available by two approaches: covalently combining a luminescent centre to chiral motif or associating the guest of luminescent probe to a chiral host. However, all the chiral components in CPL materials were organic, although the luminescent components were alternatively organics or inorganics. Herein, the first totally inorganic CPL-active system by "luminescent guest-chiral host" strategy is proposed. Luminescent sub-10 nm lanthanide oxides (Eu 2 O 3 or Tb 2 O 3 ) nanoparticles (guests) were encapsulated into chiral non-helical SiO 2 nanofibres (host) through calcination of chiral SiO 2 hybrid nanofibres, trapping Eu 3+ (or Tb 3+ ). These lanthanide oxides display circular dichroism (CD) optical activity in the ultraviolet wavelength and CPL signals around at 615 nm for Eu 3+ and 545 nm for Tb 3+ . This work has implications for inorganic-based CPL-active systems by incorporation of various luminescent guests within chiral inorganic hosts. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Charge transport in disordered organic host-guest systems: effects of carrier density and electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yimer, Y.Y.; Bobbert, P.A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2008-01-01

    We investigate charge transport in disordered organic host–guest systems with a bimodal Gaussian density of states (DOS). The energy difference between the two Gaussians defines the trap depth. By solving the Pauli master equation for the hopping of charge carriers on a regular lattice with site

  4. Charge transport in disordered organic host-guest systems: effects of carrier density and electric field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yimer, Y.Y.; Bobbert, P.A.; Coehoorn, R.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate charge transport in disordered organic host–guest systems with a bimodal Gaussian density of states. The energy difference between the peaks of the two Gaussians defines the trap depth. By solving the Pauli master equation for the hopping of charge carriers on a regular lattice we

  5. Inquiry about key dimensions of service qualities and guests satisfaction in restaurants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrovski Darko D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of marketing experts in catering, restaurants especially, have recently been preoccupied by measuring the service quality. Business in competitive and turbulent surrounding requires that restaurants continually improve their products, which is based on guests specific demands and wishes. Comprehension of how consumers see catering offer and research on factors that determine consumers satisfaction are the key for achieving business aims. The aim of this study is an identification of key components of service qualities which restaurants and their influence on guests satisfaction offer. Measures of descriptive statistics, explorative factor and multiple regressive analysis were used in order to achieve the aims of the research. The facts were collected by using the survey. Results of the research highlight 3 key elements of the service quality that restaurants offer and those are: professionalism of personnel, understanding of guests, paying individual attention and meeting specific demands. The first two components include attributes that evince statistically important influence on guests satisfaction. Finds of conducted survey help managers and restaurateurs determine factors they will focus on during the making marketing strategy which will supply high level of consumers satisfaction on one side, and long-term profitability on the other side.

  6. Critical guest concentration and complete tuning pattern appearing in the binary clathrate hydrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, J.H.; Lee, H. [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering; Kim, D.Y. [SK Engineering and Construction, Jongno-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, J. [Hanwha Chemical R and D Center, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.W. [Kongju National Univ., Cheonan, Chungnam (Korea, Republic of); Ripmeester, J.A. [National Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada). Steacie Inst. for Molecular Sciences

    2008-07-01

    Clathrate hydrates, or gas hydrates, are stabilized by van der Waals interaction between a guest molecule and a host framework. Because of their property, they are a potential resource in the exploitation of natural gas hydrates, as a material for the sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), as a means of storage and transportation of natural gas, as well as hydrogen storage. Clathrate hydrate research can be divided into two categories that emphasize either macroscopic or microscopic approaches. However, these two approaches need to be closely linked for a better understanding of the structures and processes involving both natural phenomena and hydrates for industrial processes. Details on the molecular scale that concern the less usual properties of clathrate hydrates remain unknown. This paper presented the results of a study that reported on the existence of a critical guest concentration (CGC) and established the complete tuning pattern that occurred in the binary hydrates, including water-soluble hydrate formers (promoters) and water-insoluble guests. The paper presented the experimental procedures, including formation of the methane (CH{sub 4}) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) binary hydrate; a schematic diagram of the experimental apparatus; and formation of the CH{sub 4} and t-BuNH{sub 2} binary hydrate. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic measurements and thermodynamic measurements were also presented. It was concluded that the CGC value appeared to primarily depend on the chemical nature of a liquid guest component participating in the binary hydrate formation. 10 refs., 2 tabs., 9 figs.

  7. Molecular Recognition of Vesicles : Host-Guest Interactions Combined with Specific Dimerization of Zwitterions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuhl, Jens; Fenske, Tassilo; Stuart, Marc C. A.; Wibbeling, Birgit; Schmuck, Carsten; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2010-01-01

    The aggregation of beta-cyclodextrin vesicles can be induced by an adamantyl-substituted zwitterionic guanidiniocarbonylpyrrole carboxylate guest molecule (1). Upon addition of 1 to the cyclodextrin vesicles at neutral pH, the vesicles aggregate (but do not fuse), as shown by using UV/Vis and

  8. Edit What do guests value most in Airbnb accommodations? An application of the hedonic pricing approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Dogru

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Private rooms, entire homes, laundry, free parking, kitchens - these are just some of the amenities that Airbnb guests are looking for in accommodations. Using data from the Greater Boston Area, Dr. Dogru and Osman Pekin uncover how these amenities affect Airbnb nightly rates.

  9. Edit What do guests value most in Airbnb accommodations? An application of the hedonic pricing approach

    OpenAIRE

    Tarik Dogru; Osman Pekin

    2017-01-01

    Private rooms, entire homes, laundry, free parking, kitchens - these are just some of the amenities that Airbnb guests are looking for in accommodations. Using data from the Greater Boston Area, Dr. Dogru and Osman Pekin uncover how these amenities affect Airbnb nightly rates.

  10. Synthesis of C3-symmetric tri(alkylamino) guests and their interaction with cyclodextrins

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednaříková, T.; Tošner, Z.; Horský, Jiří; Jindřich, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 81, 1-2 (2015), s. 141-152 ISSN 0923-0750 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : cyclodextrin * supramolecular interactions * C3-symmetric guests Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 1.253, year: 2015

  11. Do the COX-2 inhibitors still have a role to play? : guest editorial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Do the COX-2 inhibitors still have a role to play? : guest editorial. A Beeton. Abstract. No Abstract Available Southern African Journal of Anaesthesia & Analgesia Vol.11(2) 2005: 55-60. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Article Metrics. Metrics ...

  12. Energy-cascade organic photovoltaic devices incorporating a host-guest architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menke, S Matthew; Holmes, Russell J

    2015-02-04

    In planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic devices (OPVs), broad spectral coverage can be realized by incorporating multiple molecular absorbers in an energy-cascade architecture. Here, this approach is combined with a host-guest donor layer architecture previously shown to optimize exciton transport for the fluorescent organic semiconductor boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) when diluted in an optically transparent host. In order to maximize the absorption efficiency, energy-cascade OPVs that utilize both photoactive host and guest donor materials are examined using the pairing of SubPc and boron subnaphthalocyanine chloride (SubNc), respectively. In a planar heterojunction architecture, excitons generated on the SubPc host rapidly energy transfer to the SubNc guest, where they may migrate toward the dissociating, donor-acceptor interface. Overall, the incorporation of a photoactive host leads to a 13% enhancement in the short-circuit current density and a 20% enhancement in the power conversion efficiency relative to an optimized host-guest OPV combining SubNc with a nonabsorbing host. This work underscores the potential for further design refinements in planar heterojunction OPVs and demonstrates progress toward the effective separation of functionality between constituent OPV materials.

  13. Innkeeper's Liability for Loss Suffered by Guests:Drake v Dow

    OpenAIRE

    Du Plessis, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Drake v Dow is concerned with the issue of strict liability attributed to innkeepers for loss suffered by guests. The case also contains an entertaining foray into the historical development of the law of delict in Scotland and may therefore be of interest to legal historians.

  14. Challenge, Confrontation, and Exhortation as Intentional Invitations by Professional Helpers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, John J.

    1996-01-01

    Examines intentional invitations that challenge, confront, exhort, and persuade people to change their behaviors. Assumes that the sender controls the "intention" and that the receiver determines the degree of "inviting." Suggests that elements of the invitational model serve as a framework to create acceptable inducements in…

  15. Unanticipated guest motion during a phase transition in a ferroelastic inclusion compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollingsworth, Mark D; Peterson, Matthew L; Pate, Kevin L; Dinkelmeyer, Brian D; Brown, Michael E

    2002-03-13

    Urea inclusion compounds (UICs) have been used as tools to understand ferroelastic domain switching and molecular recognition during crystal growth. Although the vast majority of UICs contain helical arrangements of host H-bonds, those containing guests with the formula X(CH(2))(6)Y (X, Y = Br, Cl, CN, NC) adopt an alternative P2(1)/n packing mode in which the host molecules exist as stacked loops of urea hexamers. Such structures may be further separated into two classes, ones distorted away from hexagonal symmetry along [100] (Br(CH(2))(6)Br, Br(CH(2))(6)Cl, and Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl) and those distorted along [001] (e.g. NC(CH(2))(6)CN). In each of these systems, guests exist as equilibrium mixtures of gauche conformers whose populations control the direction and magnitude of the observed distortion. Such UICs are potentially ferroelastic, but the n-glide requires that domains are not related by a simple rotation-translation mechanism as in the helical systems. Ferroelastic (degenerate) domain reorientation would necessitate a large-scale reorganization of the urea framework and rupture of numerous H-bonds. Coupled with distortions of 2 to 10%, this mechanism-based barrier to domain switching has precluded observation of this phenomenon. To prepare ferroelastic UICs with minimal distortions from hexagonal symmetry, attempts were made to form solid solutions of UICs containing guests from the two classes. This failed, however: solid solution formation of the stacked loop form is usually possible within a series (e.g. with Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl and Br(CH(2))(6)Br), but not between series (e.g. Cl(CH(2))(6)Cl and NC(CH(2))(6)CN). Crystals of Cl(CH(2))(6)CN/urea, in which a single guest contains substituents from each class, are distorted along [001] by only 0.5% from hexagonal symmetry at 298 K and exhibit ferroelastic domain reorientation at high forces. At -66 degrees C, Cl(CH(2))(6)CN/urea undergoes a topotactic phase transition that is unexpectedly nontopochemical. The

  16. Berger Peter L., Invitation à la sociologie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Marquis

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available L’invitation à la sociologie de Peter Berger est la réédition d’un ouvrage initiale­ment paru en 1963. Né en 1929, P. Berger est un des grands noms de la sociologie amé­ricaine actuelle, notamment connu chez nous pour un ouvrage coécrit avec Th. Luck­­mann et paru trois ans après la première édition de Invitation à la sociologie : The Social Construction of Reality, qui constitue une étape importante dans l’approche dite du constructivisme social en réactivant la tradition phénoménologique en...

  17. Nurses as 'guests'--a study of a concept in light of Jacques Derrida's philosophy of hospitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oresland, Stina; Lutzén, Kim; Norberg, Astrid; Rasmussen, Birgit H; Määttä, Sylvia

    2013-04-01

    As revealed in previous empirical research, nurses describe their position in home-based nursing care (HBNC) as that of 'guests' in the patient's home. Such a description is problematic as 'guests' might not be considered to belong to the realm of professionalism. As Jacques Derrida's work on hospitality has received wide publicity, sparking theoretical and philosophical discussion about host and guest, the aim of this study was to explore how the concept 'guests' can be understood in the light of Derrida's philosophy of hospitality. The study revealed that (a) guest must be considered a binary concept; and (b) hospitality should be regarded as an exchange of giving and receiving between a host and a guest. The present study demonstrated that it is important to reflect on the meaning of the concepts used by nurses in HBNC. Further theoretical and empirical exploration of the concept 'hospitality' would be fruitful, i.e. what is patients' understanding of 'hospitality' and 'hostility' related to nurses' descriptions of themselves as 'guests' in the patient's home. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z.

    2014-01-01

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E T (guest), lies higher than that of the host, E T (host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E T (guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E T (guest)>E T (host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E T (guest) to E T (host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again

  19. Recruiting Future Engineers Through Effective Guest Speaking In Elementary School Classrooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kevin Young

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, the author describes how engineers can increase the number of future engineers by volunteering as guest speakers in the elementary school classroom. The paper is divided into three main subjects. First, the importance of engineers speaking directly with young students is discussed. Next, several best practice techniques for speaking with young students are described. Finally, information on getting started as a guest speaker is presented, and a list of resources available to guest speakers is provided. The guest engineer speaking to an elementary school audience (ages 6-11) performs a critical role in encouraging young students to pursue a career in engineering. Often, he or she is the first engineer these students meet in person, providing a crucial first impression of the engineering career field and a positive visual image of what an engineer really looks like. A dynamic speaker presenting a well-delivered talk creates a lasting, positive impression on students, influencing their future decisions to pursue careers in engineering. By reaching these students early in life, the guest speaker will help dispel the many prevailing stereotypes about engineers which discourage so many students, especially young women, from considering this career. The guest speaker can ensure young students gain a positive first impression of engineers and the engineering career field by following some best practice techniques in preparing for and delivering their presentation. The author, an electrical engineer, developed these best practice techniques over the past 10 years while presenting over 350 talks on engineering subjects to elementary school students as a volunteer speaker with the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho National Laboratory’s Speakers Bureau. Every engineer can make a meaningful contribution toward reversing the predicted shortfall of future engineers by volunteering to speak with young students at the elementary school level. Elementary school

  20. Engineering responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest molecular recognition for functional applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jinming; Liu, Shiyong

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: All living organisms and soft matter are intrinsically responsive and adaptive to external stimuli. Inspired by this fact, tremendous effort aiming to emulate subtle responsive features exhibited by nature has spurred the invention of a diverse range of responsive polymeric materials. Conventional stimuli-responsive polymers are constructed via covalent bonds and can undergo reversible or irreversible changes in chemical structures, physicochemical properties, or both in response to a variety of external stimuli. They have been imparted with a variety of emerging applications including drug and gene delivery, optical sensing and imaging, diagnostics and therapies, smart coatings and textiles, and tissue engineering. On the other hand, in comparison with molecular chemistry held by covalent bonds, supramolecular chemistry built on weak and reversible noncovalent interactions has emerged as a powerful and versatile strategy for materials fabrication due to its facile accessibility, extraordinary reversibility and adaptivity, and potent applications in diverse fields. Typically involving more than one type of noncovalent interactions (e.g., hydrogen bonding, metal coordination, hydrophobic association, electrostatic interactions, van der Waals forces, and π-π stacking), host-guest recognition refers to the formation of supramolecular inclusion complexes between two or more entities connected together in a highly controlled and cooperative manner. The inherently reversible and adaptive nature of host-guest molecular recognition chemistry, stemming from multiple noncovalent interactions, has opened up a new platform to construct novel types of stimuli-responsive materials. The introduction of host-guest chemistry not only enriches the realm of responsive materials but also confers them with promising new applications. Most intriguingly, the integration of responsive polymer building blocks with host-guest recognition motifs will endow the former with

  1. Gender parity trends for invited speakers at four prominent virology conference series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalejta, Robert F; Palmenberg, Ann C

    2017-06-07

    Scientific conferences are most beneficial to participants when they showcase significant new experimental developments, accurately summarize the current state of the field, and provide strong opportunities for collaborative networking. A top-notch slate of invited speakers, assembled by conference organizers or committees, is key to achieving these goals. The perceived underrepresentation of female speakers at prominent scientific meetings is currently a popular topic for discussion, but one that often lacks supportive data. We compiled the full rosters of invited speakers over the last 35 years for four prominent international virology conferences, the American Society for Virology Annual Meeting (ASV), the International Herpesvirus Workshop (IHW), the Positive-Strand RNA Virus Symposium (PSR), and the Gordon Research Conference on Viruses & Cells (GRC). The rosters were cross-indexed by unique names, gender, year, and repeat invitations. When plotted as gender-dependent trends over time, all four conferences showed a clear proclivity for male-dominated invited speaker lists. Encouragingly, shifts toward parity are emerging within all units, but at different rates. Not surprisingly, both selection of a larger percentage of first time participants and the presence of a woman on the speaker selection committee correlated with improved parity. Session chair information was also collected for the IHW and GRC. These visible positions also displayed a strong male dominance over time that is eroding slowly. We offer our personal interpretation of these data to aid future organizers achieve improved equity among the limited number of available positions for session moderators and invited speakers. IMPORTANCE Politicians and media members have a tendency to cite anecdotes as conclusions without any supporting data. This happens so frequently now, that a name for it has emerged: fake news. Good science proceeds otherwise. The under representation of women as invited

  2. The C-terminal peptide of Aquifex aeolicus riboflavin synthase directs encapsulation of native and foreign guests by a cage-forming lumazine synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azuma, Yusuke; Zschoche, Reinhard; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-06-23

    Encapsulation of specific enzymes in self-assembling protein cages is a hallmark of bacterial compartments that function as counterparts to eukaryotic organelles. The cage-forming enzyme lumazine synthase (LS) from Bacillus subtilis (BsLS), for example, encapsulates riboflavin synthase (BsRS), enabling channeling of lumazine from the site of its generation to the site of its conversion to vitamin B 2 Elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying the assembly of these supramolecular complexes could help inform new approaches for metabolic engineering, nanotechnology, and drug delivery. To that end, we investigated a thermostable LS from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS) and found that it also forms cage complexes with the cognate riboflavin synthase (AaRS) when both proteins are co-produced in the cytosol of Escherichia coli A 12-amino acid-long peptide at the C terminus of AaRS serves as a specific localization sequence responsible for targeting the guest to the protein compartment. Sequence comparisons suggested that analogous peptide segments likely direct RS complexation by LS cages in other bacterial species. Covalent fusion of this peptide tag to heterologous guest molecules led to their internalization into AaLS assemblies both in vivo and in vitro , providing a firm foundation for creating tailored biomimetic nanocompartments for medical and biotechnological applications. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Guest Editorial: Processes of Radicalization and De-Radicalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Della Porta

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The study of radicalization and de-radicalization, understood as processes leading towards the increased or decreased use of political violence, is central to the question of how political violence emerges, how it can be prevented, and how it can be contained. The focus section of this issue of the International Journal of Conflict and Violence addresses radicalization and de-radicalization, seeking to develop a more comprehensive understanding of the processes, dynamics, and mechanisms involved and taking an interdisciplinary approach to overcome the fragmentation into separate disciplines and focus areas. Contributions by Pénélope Larzillière, Felix Heiduk, Bill Kissane, Hank Johnston, Christian Davenport and Cyanne Loyle, Veronique Dudouet, and Lasse Lindekilde address repressive settings, legitimacy, institutional aspects, organizational outcomes, and dynamics in Europe, Asia, Africa, and North and South America.

  4. Observation of the energy transfer sequence in an organic host–guest system of a luminescent polymer and a phosphorescent molecule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basel, Tek; Sun, Dali; Gautam, Bhoj; Valy Vardeny, Z., E-mail: val@physics.utah.edu

    2014-11-15

    We used steady state optical spectroscopies such as photoluminescence and photoinduced absorption (PA), and magnetic-field PA (MPA) for studying the energy transfer dynamics in films and organic light emitting diodes (OLED) based on host–guest blends with different guest concentrations of the fluorescent polymer poly-[2-methoxy, 5-(2′-ethyl-hexyloxy)phenylene vinylene] (MEHPPV-host), and phosphorescent molecule PtII-tetraphenyltetrabenzoporphyrin [Pt(tpbp); guest]. We show that the energy transfer process between the excited states of the host polymer and guest molecule takes a ‘ping-pong’ type sequence, because the lowest guest triplet exciton energy, E{sub T}(guest), lies higher than that of the host, E{sub T}(host). Upon photon excitation the photogenerated singlet excitons in the host polymer chains first undergo a Förster resonant energy transfer process to the guest singlet manifold, which subsequently reaches E{sub T}(guest) by intersystem crossing. Because E{sub T}(guest)>E{sub T}(host) there is a subsequent Dexter type energy transfer from E{sub T}(guest) to E{sub T}(host). This energy transfer sequence has profound influence on the photoluminescence and electroluminescence emission spectra in both films and OLED devices based on the MEHPPV-Pt(tpbp) system. - Highlights: • We studied electroluminescence of OLEDs based on host–guest blends. • The emission efficiency decreases with the guest concentration. • We found a dominant Dexter energy transfer from the triplet(guest) to triplet(host). • Energy transfer occurs from the host to guest and back to the host again.

  5. L'invisible invité

    OpenAIRE

    Frémy, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: ""They’re a kind of cabin or hut, very basic and awkwardly assembled, wedged into the space of the balcony between the guardrail and the wall of the building.The vertical sides are made of plywood, canvas or tarp, and are topped by a vegetal roofing that is more or less dry, more or less green, threaded with palm wattle. These huts are opaque and seem to communicate with apartments…" Excerpt from L’Invisible invité by Anne Frémy, english by Bruce Bender...

  6. "You Want Your Guests to Be Happy in This Business": Hoteliers' Decisions to Adopt Voluntary Smoke-Free Guest-Room Policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Patricia A; Malone, Ruth E

    2018-01-01

    To explore why some hotels have implemented 100% smoke-free policies voluntarily, the perceived consequences of doing so, and media responses. Qualitative study of hotel management and quantitative content analysis of media coverage of smoke-free hotels. Hotels and media based in the United States. Eleven representatives of 5 independent and 4 chain hotels. Other data included 265 news items about smoke-free hotels. We conducted 30-minute semi-structured interviews with hotel representatives and analyzed the data using qualitative content analysis. We also searched 3 online news databases for news items about hotels in our study, and collaboratively coded retrieved items; we analyzed the content and slant of news items. Business considerations, including guest requests, competitor action, and cost savings, were the primary motivations for implementing 100% smoke-free guest-room policies. Health concerns played a minimal role. Hotels received positive feedback from customers and employees. Media coverage was favorable, emphasizing positive aspects of going smoke-free; the overall slant of news items was positive or neutral. However, few hotels marketed the change. Since hotel customers and employees are likely to experience long periods of smoke exposure and smoke-free hotels appear to be so well received, it may be timely to pursue policies making all hotels smoke-free.

  7. Sensitive and Specific Guest Recognition through Pyridinium-Modification in Spindle-Like Coordination Containers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneswari, Nagarajan; Dai, Feng-Rong; Chen, Zhong-Ning

    2018-05-02

    An elaborately designed pyridinium-functionalized octanuclear zinc(II) coordination container 1-Zn was prepared through the self-assembly of Zn 2+ , p-tert-butylsulfonylcalix[4]arene, and pyridinium-functionalized angular flexible dicarboxylate linker (H 2 BrL1). The structure was determined by a single-crystal X-ray diffractometer. 1-Zn displays highly sensitive and specific recognition to 2-picolylamine as revealed by drastic blueshifts of the absorption and emission spectra, ascribed to the decrease of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character of the container and the occurrence of intermolecular charge transfer between the host and guest molecules. The intramolecular charge transfer plays a key role in the modulation of the electronic properties and is tunable through endo-encapsulation of specific guest molecules. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Optimization of the host–guest system within an OLED using different models of mobility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adames Prada, Rosana, E-mail: rdadamesp@unal.edu.co; Ardila Vargas, Angel Miguel, E-mail: amardilav@unal.edu.co

    2014-12-15

    To optimize the host–guest system of organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), it were performed simulations by doping a small molecule organic semiconductor (acting as host) with the transition organometallic complex known as Ir(ppy){sub 2}(acac) (acting as a guest). The simulation was carried out using simOLED with different mobility models: the Pool–Frenkel Model (PFM), the Extended Gaussian Disorder Model (EGDM) and Extended Correlated Disorder Model (ECDM), with the aim to determine the magnitude of some parameters like temperature, applied electric field, film thickness and charge carrier density that improve the electrical and optical properties of OLEDs with a more simplified structure like ITO/CBP/CBP:Ir(ppy){sub 2}(acac)/TPBi/LiF/Al.

  9. Knowledge of Deaths in Hotel Rooms Diminishes Perceived Value and Elicits Guest Aversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, Jesse M; Curtin, Emma R; Jong, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Guest deaths are an inevitable aspect of the hospitality industry. In Study 1, participants read a vignette in which the previous guest died of natural causes, suicide, or homicide. Those who learned of a death (a) saw the room as less valuable, (b) opted to stay in a more basic room in which no death occurred, despite both rooms being offered for free, and (c) anticipated feeling uneasy when imagining an overnight stay. In Study 2, we investigated the persistence of this bias. Perceived room value and anticipatory well-being can be expected to return to baseline levels only many years after the death event. Similar to "stigmatized properties" in real estate, these data confirm an irrational and recalcitrant cognitive bias surrounding consumers' views of death-affected hotel rooms.

  10. Importance of location and exterior of city hotels as elements of guest satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tepavčević Jelena

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Business practices and attitudes of tourists show that hospitality represents the primary factor in the development of urban tourism. It is considered that, besides the exclusive appearance, there is no business success for hotel properties without a proper location. It is known that a typical tourist would like to be close enough to tourist attractions, to be able to reach them on foot. This paper deals with the importance of location and exterior of urban hotels on guests decision on the selection and overall satisfaction with hotel products. The survey was conducted in the hotels two largest urban centers in Serbia (Belgrade and Novi Sad. The aim of the research is an insight into the real impact of location and exterior when assessing the guest satisfaction. Descriptive statistical analysis, t-test and regression analysis were used for statistical data processing.

  11. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Praveen, E-mail: pmalik100@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Dr. B.R. Ambedkar National Institute of Technology, Jalandhar 144011, Punjab (India); Raina, K.K. [Liquid Crystal Group, Materials Research Laboratory, School of Physics and Materials Science, Thapar University, Patiala 147004, Punjab (India)

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that approx1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  12. Dissociation behavior of pellet shaped mixed gas hydrate samples that contain propane as a guest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, Taro; Sakamoto, Yasuhide; Ohtake, Michika; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Komai, Takeshi; Haneda, Hironori; Yoon, Ji-Ho; Ohga, Kotaro

    2006-01-01

    The dissociation kinetics of mixed gas hydrates that contain propane as a guest molecule have been investigated. The mixed gas hydrates used in this work were artificially prepared using the binary gas mixture of methane-propane and the ternary gas mixture of methane-ethane-propane. The crystal structures and the guest compositions of the mixed hydrates were clearly identified by using Raman spectroscopy and gas chromatography. The dissociation rates of the gas hydrates observed under several isothermal and isobaric conditions were discussed with an analytical model. The isobaric conditions were achieved by pressurizing with mixed gases using buffer cylinders, which had similar compositions to those of the initial gases used for synthesizing each hydrate sample. Interestingly, the calculated result agreed well with the experimentally observed results only when the composition of the vapor phase was assumed to be identical with that of the hydrate phase instead of the bulk (equilibrium) gas composition

  13. Dichroic dye-dependent studies in guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malik, Praveen; Raina, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Guest-host polymer-dispersed liquid crystal (GHPDLC) films were prepared using a nematic liquid crystal, photo-curable polymer and dichroic dye (anthraquinone blue) by polymerization-induced phase separation (PIPS) technique. Non-ionic dichroic dye (1%, 2% and 4% wt./wt. ratio) was taken as guest in PDLC host. Polarizing microscopy shows that in the absence of electric field, liquid crystal (LC) droplets in polymer matrix mainly exhibit bipolar configuration, however, relatively at higher field, maltese-type crosses were observed. Our results show that ∼1% dye-doped PDLC film shows better transmission and faster response times over pure polymer-dispersed nematic liquid crystal (PDNLC) and higher concentrated (2% and 4%) GHPDLC films.

  14. Toward Improved Force-Field Accuracy through Sensitivity Analysis of Host-Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jian; Fenley, Andrew T.; Henriksen, Niel M.; Gilson, Michael K.

    2015-01-01

    Improving the capability of atomistic computer models to predict the thermodynamics of noncovalent binding is critical for successful structure-based drug design, and the accuracy of such calculations remains limited by non-optimal force field parameters. Ideally, one would incorporate protein-ligand affinity data into force field parametrization, but this would be inefficient and costly. We now demonstrate that sensitivity analysis can be used to efficiently tune Lennard-Jones parameters of aqueous host-guest systems for increasingly accurate calculations of binding enthalpy. These results highlight the promise of a comprehensive use of calorimetric host-guest binding data, along with existing validation data sets, to improve force field parameters for the simulation of noncovalent binding, with the ultimate goal of making protein-ligand modeling more accurate and hence speeding drug discovery. PMID:26181208

  15. Porphyrinic supramolecular daisy chains incorporating pillar[5]arene-viologen host-guest interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Fathalla, Maher; Strutt, Nathan; Srinivasan, Sampath; Katsiev, Khabiboulakh; Hartlieb, Karel J.; Bakr, Osman; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2015-01-01

    A porphyrin functionalised with pillar[5]arene and a viologen at its 5- and 15-meso positions assembles in a head-to-tail manner, producing linear supramolecular daisy chains in dichloromethane. At high concentrations, it forms an organogel which has been investigated by electron microscopy and rheological measurements, paving the way for the preparation of other functional supramolecular assemblies which harness viologen"⊂" pillararene host-guest interactions.

  16. Dielectric relaxation of guest molecules in a clathrate structure of syndiotactic polystyrene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urakawa, Osamu; Kaneko, Fumitoshi; Kobayashi, Hideo

    2012-12-13

    Structure and dynamics of semicrystalline polymer films composed of syndiotactic polystyrene (sPS) and 2-butanone were examined through X-ray diffraction, polarized FTIR, and dielectric relaxation measurements. The X-ray and FTIR measurements revealed its crystal structure to be δ-clathrate containing 2-butanone molecules inside. The carbonyl group of 2-butanone in the crystal was found to orient preferentially parallel to the ac plane of the crystal through the polarized ATR FTIR measurements. Dielectric measurements were also conducted on these film samples to see only the relaxation dynamics of 2-butanone thanks to the high dielectric intensity of 2-butanone compared to sPS. Two relaxation modes denoted by slow and fast modes appeared. The former was assigned to the motion of 2-butanone molecules entrapped in the cavities of the crystalline (δ-form) and the latter to those in the amorphous region. We focused on the slow mode in order to elucidate the specific dynamics of the guest molecule confined in the crystalline region. The relaxation time of the slow mode was about 4 orders of magnitude longer than that of liquid 2-butanone. This suggests that the dynamics of guest molecules is highly restricted due to the high barrier to conformational and/or orientational change of the guest molecule in the cavity of δ-crystal. Furthermore, the dielectric intensity Δε of the slow mode was much smaller than the one calculated from that of bulk liquid 2-butanone and the guest concentration in the crystalline region (the intensity was only 10% of the estimated value from the bulk liquid data). This result also indicates that the free rotational motion of 2-butanone molecules is restricted inside the crystal. This will be consistently related to the weak uniplanar orientation of the carbonyl group of 2-butanone parallel to the ac plane revealed by the X-ray and polarized ATR FTIR measurements.

  17. The metaphor of nurse as guest with ethical implications for nursing and healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, Constance L

    2005-10-01

    Current healthcare advertising and customer relations terminology acknowledge that healthcare providers, including nurses, are to act as hosts for persons who enter into healthcare agencies and institutions. Indeed, much has been written aligning nursing and other healthcare services with consumer-oriented roles of the hospitality service industry commonly associated with hotels and restaurants. From a human becoming perspective, this article discusses possible ethical, administrative, and practice implications of nurses acting as guests entering into the lives of those we serve.

  18. Porphyrinic supramolecular daisy chains incorporating pillar[5]arene-viologen host-guest interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Fathalla, Maher

    2015-05-18

    A porphyrin functionalised with pillar[5]arene and a viologen at its 5- and 15-meso positions assembles in a head-to-tail manner, producing linear supramolecular daisy chains in dichloromethane. At high concentrations, it forms an organogel which has been investigated by electron microscopy and rheological measurements, paving the way for the preparation of other functional supramolecular assemblies which harness viologen"⊂" pillararene host-guest interactions.

  19. The synthesis and host-guest applications of synthetic receptor molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osner, Zachary R.

    2011-12-01

    Host-guest chemistry involves the complimentary binding between two molecules. Host molecules have been synthesized to bind negative, positive, and neutral molecules such as proteins and enzymes, and have been used as optical sensors, electrochemical sensors, supramolecular catalysts, and in the pharmaceutical industry as anti-cancer agents.1 The field of nanoscience has exploited guest-host interactions to create optical sensors with colloidal gold and Dip-Pen nanolithography technologies. Gold nanoparticles, have been functionalized with DNA, and have been developed as a selective colorimetric detection system, that upon binding turns the solution from a red to blue in color.2 Cyclotriveratrylene (CTV) 1 is a common supramolecular scaffold that has been previously employed in guest-host chemistry, and the construction of CTV involves the cyclic trimerization of veratryl alcohol via the veratryl cation.3 Due to the rigid bowl shaped structure of CTV, CTV has been shown to act as a host molecule for fullerene-C60.4 Lectin binding receptor proteins are a specific class of proteins found in bacteria, viruses, plants, and animals that can bind to complimentary carbohydrates. It is these lectins that are believed to be responsible for cell-cell interactions and the formation of biofilms in pathenogenic bacteria.5 P. aeruginosa is a pathenogenic bacterium, shown to have a high resistance to many antibiotics, which can form biofilms in human lung tissue, causing respiratory tract infections in patients with compromised immune systems. 5 I will exploit guest-host interactions to create synthetic supramolecular and carbohydrate receptor molecules to that will be of use as biological sensing devices via self-assembled monolayers on solid surfaces and nanoparticle technologies. *Please refer to dissertation for references/footnotes.

  20. Molecular binding thermodynamics of spherical guests by β-cyclodextrins bearing aromatic substituents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Nan; Chen, Yong; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Wang, Li-Hua; Mao, Wen-Zhao; Liu, Yu, E-mail: yuliu@nankai.edu.cn

    2014-01-20

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Different conformation of β-CD derivatives. • Enthalpy gain. • High binding ability. - Abstract: The molecular binding behaviors of two β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) derivatives bearing 1,2,3-triazole moieties, i.e. mono-6-deoxy-6-{4-(8-oxymethylquinolino)[1,2,3]triazolyl}-β-CD (1) and mono-6-deoxy-6-{4-(8-oxymethylnaphthol)[1,2,3]triazolyl}-β-CD (3), and their analogs without 1,2,3-triazole moieties, i.e. mono-6-deoxy-6-(8-oxymethylquinolino)-β-CD (2) and mono-6-deoxy-6-(8-oxymethylnaphthol)-β-CD (4) toward spherical guests (±)-borneol and (±)-camphor were investigated to elucidate how substituent moiety of host affects the binding abilities by 2D NMR as well as microcalorimetric titrations in aqueous phosphate buffer solution (pH 7.20) at 298.15 K. The binding modes of host–guest interactions obtained from 2D NMR displayed that host CDs without triazole moieties gave better induce-fit efficiency between hosts and guests, leading to stronger binding abilities. Thermodynamically, the inclusion complexation was driven by enthalpy with the stoichiometry of 1:1. Another factor contributed to the enhanced binding abilities was the enthalpy gain with the smaller entropy loss.

  1. Paramagnetic NMR investigation of dendrimer-based host-guest interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Wang

    Full Text Available In this study, the host-guest behavior of poly(amidoamine (PAMAM dendrimers bearing amine, hydroxyl, or carboxylate surface functionalities were investigated by paramagnetic NMR studies. 2,2,6,6-Tetramethylpiperidinyloxy (TEMPO derivatives were used as paramagnetic guest molecules. The results showed that TEMPO-COOH significantly broaden the ¹H NMR peaks of amine- and hydroxyl-terminated PAMAM dendrimers. In comparison, no paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE was observed between TEMPO-NH₂, TEMPO-OH and the three types of PAMAM dendrimers. The PRE phenomenon observed is correlated with the encapsulation of TEMPO-COOH within dendrimer pockets. Protonation of the tertiary amine groups within PAMAM dendrimers plays an important role during this process. Interestingly, the absence of TEMPO-COOH encapsulation within carboxylate-terminated PAMAM dendrimer is observed due to the repulsion of TEMPO-COO- anion and anionic dendrimer surface. The combination of paramagnetic probes and ¹H NMR linewidth analysis can be used as a powerful tool in the analysis of dendrimer-based host-guest systems.

  2. Hotel guest's $14.5 million jury verdict set aside on appeal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-20

    A Missouri Court of Appeals judge reversed a $14.5 million judgement against [name removed] Inc., which had been held liable for the beating and sexual assault of a guest in its hotel. The guest, identified as [name removed], had requested an upgrade to a concierge room, to increase her safety, but the hotel did not fill her request. When [name removed] opened her hotel room door the next morning, an assailant attacked, beat and raped her. The assailant escaped hotel security, but was later apprehended. The initial case against [name removed] and the assailant resulted in a $22.5 million judgement for [name removed] Both parties appealed. [Name removed] prevailed in its argument that the initial trial judge misinstructed the jury, and that [name removed] was unable to show clear and convincing evidence that the hotel's willful or conscious disregard for guest safety caused the situation. However, the court ruled against [name removed] on the basis of [name removed]'s fear-of-AIDS claim, because of her exposure to the virus.

  3. Synthesis and Guest Recognition of Switchable Pt-Salphen Based Molecular Tweezers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorien Benda

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Molecular tweezers are artificial receptors that have an open cavity generated by two recognition units pre-organized by a spacer. Switchable molecular tweezers, using a stimuli-responsive spacer, are particularly appealing as prototypes of the molecular machines that combine mechanical motion and allosteric recognition properties. In this present study, the synthesis of switchable molecular tweezers composed of a central terpyridine unit substituted in 4,4″ positions by two Pt(II-salphen complexes is reported. The terpyridine ligand can be reversibly converted upon Zn(II coordination from a free ‘U’-shaped closed form to a coordinated ‘W’ open form. This new substitution pattern enables a reverse control of the mechanical motion compared to the previously reported 6,6″ substituted terpyridine-based tweezers. Guest binding studies with aromatic guests showed an intercalation of coronene in the cavity created by the Pt-salphen moieties in the closed conformation. The formation of 1:1 host-guest complex was investigated by a combination of NMR studies and DFT calculations.

  4. Host-Guest Interaction of Cucurbit[8]uril with N-(3-Aminopropyl)cyclohexylamine: Cyclohexyl Encapsulation Triggered Ternary Complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Yu; Wang, Chuan-Zeng; Tian, Mengkui; Tao, Zhu; Ni, Xin-Long; Prior, Timothy J; Redshaw, Carl

    2018-01-15

    The host-guest interaction of a series of cyclohexyl-appended guests with cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8]) was studied by ¹H NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structure revealed that two cycloalkane moieties can be simultaneously encapsulated in the hydrophobic cavity of the Q[8] host to form a ternary complex for the first time.

  5. Host-Guest Interaction of Cucurbit[8]uril with N-(3-Aminopropylcyclohexylamine: Cyclohexyl Encapsulation Triggered Ternary Complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The host-guest interaction of a series of cyclohexyl-appended guests with cucurbit[8]uril (Q[8] was studied by 1H NMR spectroscopy, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC, and X-ray crystallography. The X-ray structure revealed that two cycloalkane moieties can be simultaneously encapsulated in the hydrophobic cavity of the Q[8] host to form a ternary complex for the first time.

  6. Identification of Guest-Host Inclusion Complexes in the Gas Phase by Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, De´bora C.; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan; Da Silva, Jose´ P.

    2015-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students follow a step-by-step procedure to prepare and study guest-host complexes in the gas phase using electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Model systems are the complexes of hosts cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) and cucurbit[8]uril (CB8) with the guest 4-styrylpyridine (SP). Aqueous solutions of CB7 or CB8…

  7. QUALITY MEASUREMENT IN RESTAURANT INDUSTRY FROM THE MARKETING PERSPECTIVE: A COMPARISON OF GUESTS' AND MANAGERS' QUALITY PERCEPTIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Kukanja, Marko

    2017-01-01

    Restaurant quality management, as a fairly new area of research, requires frequent and critical academic monitoring. Previous studies have highlighted the importance of several quality attributes for the restaurant industry. However, up until now no study has compared both ¬– restaurant managers` and guests' quality perceptions from the marketing mix (7P) perspective. This paper analyses differences in quality perceptions between managers and guests. Two samples – 207 valid questionnaires obt...

  8. Cucurbit[8]uril-Containing Multilayer Films for the Photocontrolled Binding and Release of a Guest Molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Henning; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Schönhoff, Monika

    2016-03-15

    The powerful host-guest chemistry of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) was employed to obtain photoresponsive polyelectrolyte multilayer films for the reversible and photocontrolled binding and release of an organic guest molecule. For this purpose, we designed and synthesized a polyelectrolyte with azobenzene side groups. Then, CB[8] was associated with the azo side group to obtain a supramolecular host-guest complex that was further used as building block in order to prepare photoresponsive and CB[8]-containing polyelectrolyte multilayer films. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and a dissipative quartz crystal microbalance are employed to monitor the formation of the host-guest complex and the layer-by-layer self-assembly of the multilayer films, respectively. We demonstrate that the photoresponsive properties of the azo side groups are maintained before and after host-guest complexation with CB[8] in solution and within the multilayer films, respectively. A guest molecule was then specifically included as second binding partner into the CB[8]-containing multilayer films. Subsequently, the release of the guest was performed by UV light irradiation due to the trans-cis isomerization of the adjacent azo side groups. Re-isomerization of the azo side groups was achieved by VIS light irradiation and enabled the rebinding of the guest into CB[8]. Finally, we demonstrate that the photocontrolled binding and release within CB[8]-containing multilayer films can reliably and reversibly be performed over a period of more than 2 weeks with constant binding efficiency. Therefore, we expect such novel type of photosensitive films to have promising future applications in the field of stimuli-responsive nanomaterials.

  9. Student Theological Research as an Invitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Badke

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Seminary students, despite having graduated from bachelors programs, struggle to make sense of the goals, processes, skills, and resources of research as graduate students. Beyond brief introductions to research, a scattered number of seminaries have developed either a separate theological information literacy course or have taken a through-the-curriculum approach to enhancing the information abilities of students. The former, however, separates information literacy from the curriculum, while the latter is difficult to implement and maintain. Living in a world of information glut, seminary professors are finding that traditional information dissemination models of education are becoming less viable. What is more, such models tend to teach students about a discipline rather than inviting them into it. These problems present a unique opportunity to place the teaching of information literacy at the foundation of theological education. With such an approach, students may be invited into the disciplines of their professors and enabled to practice these disciplines, thus becoming equipped to turn knowledge into praxis.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopic and gravimetric study of some Hofmann-CBA-Type Host and host-guest compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aytekin, M.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this study, similar to Hofmann type M(C 4 H 7 NH 2 ) 2 Ni(CN) 4 (M=Ni or Co) host and M(C 4 H 7 NH 2 ) 2 Ni(CN) 4 .nG (M=Ni or Co; G=benzene, 1,2-, 1,3-dichlorobenzene; n=the number of guest) hostguest compounds were obtained chemically. The infrared spectra of these compounds were recorded with FT-IR spectrometer in the spectroscopic region of 4000cm-1-400cm-1. From these spectra the vibrational wave numbers of ligand molecule, Ni(CN) 4 2 - ion and guest molecules were determined. The absorption and the liberation processes of the guest molecules in the host compounds were examined at room temperature by gravimetric method. Otherwise, it was seen that the molecular structure was supported by making instrumental analysis of host and some host-guest compounds. By analysing the structures of host and host-guest compounds were found to be similar to those of Hofmann type compounds, ligand molecule cyclobutylamine were coordinated to M metal atom from cyclobutylamine's nitrogen atom, the guest molecules were imprisoned in the structural cavities between the sheets

  11. PREFACE: International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, S. N.; Mishra, A.; Dutta, A. K.; Sen, P.

    2012-05-01

    The International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP2012) took place in Indore, India, on 4-5 February 2012. The conference was hosted by the School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001. The objective of the conference was to provide a platform for interaction among scientists, teachers, researchers and students, and to share their ideas, thoughts and scientific findings in various areas of physics. ICRTP2012 attracted a total of 130 abstracts submitted by scientists from 7 different countries. The conference included an inaugural talk and 13 Invited talks. Aside from regular oral contributions, 118 posters were presented. A particular highlight of the conference was a special session for oral presentations by young PhD students. The aim of this session was to provide a platform for the budding scientists to present their recent findings in the presence of their community. The two best oral presentations, judged by a special three-member committee, were awarded prizes. Similarly the two best posters, judged by a committee of five experts, were also awarded prizes. It is our pleasure to thank the members of the International Advisory Committee and Local Organizing Committee for their invaluable help, especially for their proposals for invited talks. A total of 82 papers were submitted to be considered for publication and 59 papers were accepted for inclusion in the proceedings. All the papers were reviewed, and we wish to thank to all the referees for their support. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for their financial support of the organization of ICRTP2012. Support from Marketing Centre (India), Indore and Transolutions, Indore is also appreciated. Finally, we express our sincere thanks to our university administration for their continuous support. Special thanks go to all the faculty members, administrative staff and students of the School of Physics for their tireless efforts in organizing

  12. International co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    A brief account of activities in international co-operation carried out by the Nuclear power plants Jaslovske Bohunice in 1997 is presented. Professionality of the Bohunice NPPs staff was highly appreciated by inviting them to be the OSART team members

  13. Invitational Conference on Measurement in Education; Proceedings (of the) Eleventh Southeastern Conference (December 8-9, 1972). Pre-Session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goolsby, Thomas M., Jr., Comp.

    Three papers presented at the pre-session to the 11th Invitational Conference on Measurement in Education are provided. These papers are: "Public Schools in Transition. . . One Student Body, Its Needs and Directions" by George R. Rhodes, Jr., "Man to Mankind: The International Dimension of Teacher Education" by David G. Imig, and "Measurement for…

  14. PLASMA-2005: International Conference on Research and Applications of Plasmas combined with the 3. German-Polish Conference on Plasma Diagnostics for Fusion and Applications and the 5. French-Polish Seminar on Thermal Plasma in Space and Laboratory. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ksiazek, K.

    2005-01-01

    The International Conferences 'PLASMA' have been organized in Poland every two years since 1993. The German-Polish Conferences on Plasma Diagnostics were started in 2002, and the French-Polish Seminars on Thermal Plasmas were initiated in 1997. To reduce a number of topical conferences and to improve an exchange of information among different plasma research groups it was agreed to organize for the first time the triple conference at the Opole University, Poland, on September 6-9, 2005. The chairman of the International Scientific Committee (ISC) was Professor Marek J. Sadowski from IPJ in Swierk, and the co-chairmen were Professor Thomas Klinger of the IPP-Greifswald and Professor Michel Dudeck of the CNRS-Orleans. The chairman of LOC was Professor Jozef Musielok of the Opole University. This conference was designed for interested scientists, engineers and students from all the countries, but particularly for these from the Central and Eastern Europe (see http://draco.uni.opole.pl/plasma2005). The scientific programme of the conference embraced almost all directions of plasma research and technology, i.e.: 1. Elementary processes and general theory of plasma; 2. Plasmas in tokamaks, stellerators and related experiments; 3. plasmas in Z-pinch and PF discharges; 4. Plasmas produced by intense laser beams; 5. Plasmas of micro-wave and glow discharges; 6. Plasmas in spark- and arc-discharges; 7. Plasmas in space; 8. Diagnostics and experimental facilities; 9. Applications of quasi-stationary and pulsed plasmas. Participants of the conference were 127 plasma experts (including 23 invited speakers) from 13 different countries, as well as several honorary guests from local authorities and the most important plasma research centers in Poland. Most numerous groups came from Poland (58 persons), Germany (15 persons), France (14 persons), Czech Republic (11 persons), Russia (7 persons), and Ukraine (6 persons). The participants came also from Belarus, Hungary, Iran, Japan

  15. 78 FR 16915 - Internal Revenue Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... activities of certain taxpayers under the passive activity loss and credit limitations of Internal Revenue... request for OMB approval. All comments will become a matter of public record. Comments are invited on: (a...

  16. Plateau's problem an invitation to varifold geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Frederick J Almgren, Jr

    2001-01-01

    There have been many wonderful developments in the theory of minimal surfaces and geometric measure theory in the past 25 to 30 years. Many of the researchers who have produced these excellent results were inspired by this little book--or by Fred Almgren himself. The book is indeed a delightful invitation to the world of variational geometry. A central topic is Plateau's Problem, which is concerned with surfaces that model the behavior of soap films. When trying to resolve the problem, however, one soon finds that smooth surfaces are insufficient: Varifolds are needed. With varifolds, one can obtain geometrically meaningful solutions without having to know in advance all their possible singularities. This new tool makes possible much exciting new analysis and many new results. Plateau's problem and varifolds live in the world of geometric measure theory, where differential geometry and measure theory combine to solve problems which have variational aspects. The author's hope in writing this book was to encour...

  17. INVITATION to CERN pensioners and personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    DG Unit

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Foundation for Research into Ageing, AETAS, will be holding its research award ceremony at CERN on Wednesday 10 June 2009. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony and, in particular, a lecture given by Professor Osman RATIB Professor of Medicine, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Medical Informatics and Head of the Division of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital of Geneva "Progress in medical imaging" WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2009 AT 5:00 P.M. CERN MAIN AUDITORIUM (Bldg.500) The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Jean-Pierre Michel, President of the AETAS Foundation. Refreshments will be offered by the Foundation

  18. INVITATION to CERN pensioners and personnel

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    The Swiss Foundation for Research into Ageing, AETAS, will be holding its research award ceremony at CERN on Wednesday 10 June 2009. You are cordially invited to attend the ceremony and, in particular, a lecture given by Professor Osman RATIB Professor of Medicine, Head of the Department of Medical Imaging and Medical Informatics and Head of the Division of Nuclear Medicine at the University Hospital of Geneva "Progress in medical imaging" WEDNESDAY 10 JUNE 2009 AT 5.00 P.M. CERN MAIN AUDITORIUM, (Bldg.500) The lecture will be followed by a discussion moderated by Professor Jean-Pierre Michel, President of the AETAS Foundation. Drinks will be offered by the Foundation

  19. Young Women's Experiences of Resisting Invitations to Use Illicit Drugs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Corinne V.; O'Neill, Linda K.

    2011-01-01

    Ten young women were interviewed regarding their experiences of resisting invitations to use illicit drugs. Hermeneutic phenomenology was used to gather and analyze information. One key theme was the motivations that inspired women to refuse drug offers. Young women resisted drug invitations because of their desires to be authentic, protect their…

  20.   Personal invitations for population-based breast cancer screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saalasti-Koskinen, Ulla; Mäkelä, Marjukka; Saarenmaa, Irma

    2010-01-01

    participation free of charge and the benefits of detecting breast cancer early. Harm associated with screening was seldom mentioned; no unit mentioned the possibility of false-negative results or overtreatment. CONCLUSION: The screening units provided very variable information, which often was biased toward......RATIONALE AND OBJECTIVES: Women who are invited for breast cancer screening should get enough information about the benefits and harms of screening to make an informed decision on participation. Personal invitations are an important source of information, because all invited women receive them....... The objective of this study was to evaluate the information breast cancer screening units send to women invited for screening in Finland. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was sent to all breast cancer screening units in Finland in 2005 and 2008, and the information (eg, invitations, results letters...

  1. "First Convention of Lunar Explorers" - Invitation to the media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-03-01

    The first LUNEX Convention will bring together lunar explorers from all backgrounds, including professionals, amateur space enthusiasts and interested visitors from the public. During the Convention numerous oral presentations will prompt detailed discussions on all aspects of future lunar exploration: the Moon as a geology laboratory or an astronomical platform; the knowledge of lunar geography needed to land and move on the surface; the implications of finding water-ice on the Moon and whether this might be detected by forthcoming missions; the architecture of lunar habitats; what would be needed in the future for the Moon to support life; cultural and social aspects; and the scientific motivation for returning to the Moon. The Convention will also be the main public event in 2001 at which SMART-1 is presented. SMART-1, due to be launched in 2002 will test solar electric propulsion and other innovative approaches for future deep space probes. It is the first European satellite to be sent towards the Moon. Visitors to the Palais de la Découverte will be able to view a model of SMART-1. On 9 March, at 09:00, the media is invited to hear about the LUNEX objectives and activities and to learn about the European Space Agency’s SMART-1 mission within the broader context of ESA’s Planetary Exploration Programme. Background information on LUNEX The Lunar Explorers Society (LUNEX) is an international organization created by 200 founder members in July 2000. LUNEX was founded at the end of the 4th Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon (ICEUM4), organised by ESA and the International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG). Its aim is to promote the exploration of the Moon for the benefit of humanity, bridging the gap between space agencies and the general public to promote planetary exploration and space. The Lunar Explorers Society invites all interested individuals to become members. Background information on SMART-1 SMART-1 is the first of ESA

  2. Modeling Perceived Quality, Customer Satisfaction and Probability of Guest Returning to the Destination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Blagojevic Popovic

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In the hotel industry, it is a well-known fact that, despite of quality and variety of services provided, there is a low probability that the guests will return. This research is focused on identifying the basic factors of the hotel offer, which could determine the influence on the correlation between the guests’ satisfaction and the probability of their return. The objective of the article is to explore the relationship between the guests’ satisfaction with the quality hotel services in total (including the tourist offer of the place and the probability of his return to the same destination. The questionnaire method was applied in the survey, and the data were analysed based on factor analysis. Thereafter, the model for forecasting the probability of the guests returning to the destination was established, by using the example of Montenegrin tourism. The model represents a defined framework for the guest’s decision-making process. It identifies two main characteristics of guest experiences: satisfaction and rated quality (of the destination’s overall hotel service and tourist offer. The same model evaluates the impact of the above factors on the probability of the guests’ returning to the same destination. The starting hypothesis was the existence of a high degree of correlation between the guests’ satisfaction (with the destination’s hotel services and tourist offer and the probability of returning to the selected Montenegrin destinations. The research confirmed the above-mentioned hypothesis. The results have revealed that there are significant differences in perceived quality, i.e. satisfaction between the target groups of Eastern and Western European tourists

  3. A general equilibrium model of guest-worker migration: the source-country perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djajic, S; Milbourne, R

    1988-11-01

    "This paper examines the problem of guest-worker migration from an economy populated by identical, utility-maximizing individuals with finite working lives. The decision to migrate, the rate of saving while abroad, as well as the length of a migrant's stay in the foreign country, are all viewed as part of a solution to an intertemporal optimization problem. In addition to studying the microeconomic aspects of temporary migration, the paper analyses the determinants of the equilibrium flow of migrants, the corresponding domestic wage, and the level of welfare enjoyed by a typical worker. Effects of an emigration tax are also investigated." excerpt

  4. The websites of Japanese Ryokan and eWOM: their impacts on guests' expectation and experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Jimura, Takamitsu

    2011-01-01

    The research aims to investigate the impacts of the websites of ryokan and e-WordOf-Mouth (eWOM) available at the websites of Japanese e-travel agents on the guests' expectation for and experience at ryokan. The research stems from interpretivism and mainly adopts an inductive approach. Netnography is selected as a research strategy. The top three ryokan in terms of sales ranking are chosen. eWOM about these three are analysed, focusing on the impacts of websites and eWOM in developing the gu...

  5. Leadership Lessons Learned From Being A Guest When The Hotel Was Overbooked

    OpenAIRE

    Kennedy, Doug

    2017-01-01

    Earlier this month I observed a difficult situation playing out at hotel where I was a guest, and it provided an invaluable reminder of just how important effective leadership is when things go wrong in the hotel business. The story is that I was traveling back from a trip to the Middle East where I had taken my college age daughter to practice the Arabic she is learning at University. To split up 16 hours of flying time, I planned for us to stay overnight in Rome, Italy at a hotel I had ...

  6. Guest Editorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    In the 1980s and 1990s, progress in fuel cell and battery research evolved mainly around materials development, empirical approaches, and efforts focusing mostly separately on either the microscale (electrodes and electrolytes) or the macroscale (systems, thermodynamics, and balance......-of-plant). Since the 2000s, with the advent of more powerful computing and modeling resources, and the general progress in the field, it has seen a shift to the merging of scales, the possibility of 3D probing and quantification with fuel cell stacks and battery packs becoming the focal point. In parallel...

  7. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Jean-Henry Morin; Shiguo Lian; Xin Wang; David Llewellyn-Jones

    2010-01-01

    I..IntroductionConsumers and consumer electronics are increasingly using the Internet for distribution of multimedia content, including digital versions of books, articles, music, video, games, software and images. The ease with which multimedia contents can be copied and redistributed makes the Internet well suited for unauthorized copying, modification and redistribution. The rapid adoption of new technologies such as high-bandwidth connections, wireless networks, and peer-to-peer networks ...

  8. Guest Editorial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    ohannesburg (South Africa) and Edith Cowan ... This work is licensed to the publisher under the Creative Commons Attributions License 3.0 ... education, has been a long and arduously thought ... pregnancy and birthing leave us wondering how this.

  9. Guest Editorial

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    denise

    these life-worlds. In our first manuscript, Meltdown in the Midst of. Beauty, we find an existential crisis of sorts between the blurry lines of partaking as a participant but also being a researcher in an early childhood artist's studio. Learning to listen to the children's ideas and go with them on a learning journey is paramount to.

  10. Guest Editorial

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For example, on the basis of observed spectra one can perform ... can give us information about the kinematical properties of emission gas. Condi- .... and plasmas in technology, such as laser welding and piercing of metals and light sources ...

  11. Guest Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Bamond

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This volume of HLRC is dedicated to the emergent and rapidly growing interest in English Medium Instruction as a major driver in the internationalization of higher education. It focuses on sharing knowledge and experience in CLIL (Content and Language Integrated Learning and EMI (English Medium Instruction from different universities in Eastern and European countries as a means to reflect and improve upon teaching and learning. As editors, we would like to kick this volume off with a review of one of the most comprehensive and relevant publications on the topic in recent times, The Higher Education Language Landscape: Ensuring Quality in English Language Degree Programmes, (2013.  Following the book review is a short question and answer section with its authors and renowned experts in the field, David Marsh, Victor Pavón Vázquez, and María Jesús Frigols Martín. We would like to extend our gratitude to all three for providing us with their insights, which are, no doubt, of great use to higher education institutions considering embarking upon or improving English-taught degree programs.

  12. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Shiguo Lian; Chu-Sing Yang; Stefanos Gritzalis

    2012-01-01

    Multimedia Information Networking and Security include a number of related topics such as information networking, communication, security and sharing services, etc., Significant attention has been paid in the past years to design flexible and powerful solutions to this field, as the rapid development of communication technology, utilizing network to realize global communications has become the trend of information exchange. Although the Internet has reached great success in contributing to ...

  13. Guest Editorial

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio Teixeira; Anna Tzanakaki; Davide Careglio; Miroslaw Klinkowski

    2010-01-01

    The evolution of communication networks is driven by a huge increase of end user traffic and bandwidth demands due to the recent massive deployment of broadband access technologies as well as the outburst of new network applications and emerging service oriented applications. The observed trends are accompanied by the advances in optical technologies which have enabled the development of long‐distance and high‐capacity transmission systems. Nowadays the role of optics in communication network...

  14. Guest Editorial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Jiabing; Xu, Lie; Flynn, Damian

    2017-01-01

    In the last decade, renewable energy, in particular wind and solar energy, has experienced one of the most substantial growths of any power generation source. At present, in many areas across the world, wind and solar energy are providing substantial proportions of the total electrical demand......, rising to over 50% in certain regions. However, many renewable energy sources, e.g. modern variable speed wind turbines and photovoltaic systems, are significantly different from conventional thermal and hydropower generating technologies, since they synchronize to the electricity grid via power...... electronics converters, and so are not directly responsive to system frequency transients. As a result, there are significant challenges for maintaining a reliable and secure power system, particularly in areas with high penetration of wind/solar energy. On the other hand, flexible control strategies can give...

  15. 76 FR 2349 - Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Business and International Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-13

    ... DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Postsecondary Education; Overview Information; Business and International Education Program Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal year (FY) 2011. Catalog... Business and International Education (BIE) Program provides grants to enhance international business...

  16. Non-Porous Iron(II)-Based Sensor: Crystallographic Insights into a Cycle of Colorful Guest-Induced Topotactic Transformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Santiago; Feltham, Humphrey L C; Brooker, Sally

    2016-11-21

    Materials capable of sensing volatile guests at room temperature by an easily monitored set of outputs are of great appeal for development as chemical sensors of small volatile organics and toxic gases. Herein the dinuclear iron(II) complex, [Fe II 2 (L) 2 (CH 3 CN) 4 ](BF 4 ) 4 ⋅2 CH 3 CN (1) [L=4-(4-methylphenyl)-3-(3-pyridazinyl)-5-pyridyl-4H-1,2,4-triazole], is shown to undergo reversible single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformations upon exposure to vapors of different guests: 1 (MeCN)⇌2 (EtOH)→3 (H 2 O)⇌1 (MeCN). Whilst 1 and 2 remain dimetallic, SCSC to 3 involves conversion to a 1D polymeric chain (due to a change in L bridging mode), which, remarkably, can undergo SCSC de-polymerization, reforming dimetallic 1. Additionally, SC-XRD studies of two ordered transient forms, 1TF3 and 2TF3, confirm that guest exchange occurs by diffusion of the new guests into the non-porous lattices as the old guests leave. These reversible SCSC events also induce color and magnetic responses. Indeed dark red 1 is spin crossover active (T 1/2 ↓ 356 K; T 1/2 ↑ 369 K), whilst orange 2 and yellow 3 remain high spin. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Invited review, recent developments in brachytherapy source dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meigooni, A.S.

    2004-01-01

    Application of radioactive isotopes is the treatment of choice around the globe for many cancer sites. In this technique, the accuracy of the radiation delivery is highly dependent on the accuracy of radiation dosimetry around individual brachytherapy sources. Moreover, in order to have compatible clinical results, an identical method of source dosimetry must be employed across the world. This problem has been recently addressed by task group 43 from the American Association of Medical Physics with a protocol for dosimetric characterization of brachytherapy sources. This new protocol has been further updated using published data from international sources, by a new Task Group from the American Association of Medical Physics. This has resulted in an updated protocol known as TG43U1 that has been published in March 2004 issue of Medical Physics. The goal of this presentation is to review the original Task Group 43 protocol and associated algorithms for brachytherapy source dosimetry. In addition, the shortcomings of the original protocol that has been resolved in the updated recommendation will be highlighted. I am sure that this is not the end of the line and more work is needed to complete this task. I invite the scientists to join this task and complete the project, with the hope of much better clinical results for cancer patients

  18. PREFACE: International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, Shashank N.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Gaur, Abhijeet

    2014-09-01

    The International Conference on Recent Trends in Physics (ICRTP 2014) was held at Indore, India, during 22-23 February 2014. The conference was hosted by the School of Physics, Devi Ahilya University, Indore - 452001. The objective of the conference was to provide a platform for interaction among scientists, teachers, researchers and students, and to share their ideas, thoughts and scientific findings in various areas of physics, including condensed matter and materials physics, laser and plasma physics. ICRTP 2014 attracted a total of 103 abstracts submitted by scientists from France, Germany, Hungary, India, Italy and Portugal. The conference included an inaugural talk and 17 invited talks. PhD students presented their work in the form of posters. Presented posters were judged by a panel of five experts. Two best posters were awarded prizes. It is our pleasure to thank the members of the Advisory Committee and Local Organizing Committee for their invaluable help, especially for their proposals for invited talks. A total of 80 papers were submitted to be considered for publication and 68 papers have been accepted for inclusion in the proceedings. All the papers were reviewed, and we wish to thank all the referees for their support and prompt reviewing of the papers. We are grateful to the University Grants Commission (UGC), New Delhi, India for their financial support. Personally, we would like to thank all the volunteers without whom the conference would not have been functional. We express our sincere thanks to our university administration for their continuous support. Special thanks go to all the faculty members, administrative staff and students of the School of Physics for their tireless efforts in organizing ICRTP 2014. Finally, we deeply appreciate the assistance of Ms Sarah Toms, Conference Publishing Coordinator, Journal of Physics Conference Series (JPCS), IOP Publishing Ltd, UK, for all help in getting ICRTP 2014 published in JPCS. Indore, 28 July 2014

  19. Multiple Authorship in Scientific Manuscripts: Ethical Challenges, Ghost and Guest/Gift Authorship, and the Cultural/Disciplinary Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Dobránszki, Judit

    2016-10-01

    Multiple authorship is the universal solution to multi-tasking in the sciences. Without a team, each with their own set of expertise, and each involved mostly in complementary ways, a research project will likely not advance quickly, or effectively. Consequently, there is a risk that research goals will not be met within a desired timeframe. Research teams that strictly scrutinize their modus operandi select and include a set of authors that have participated substantially in the physical undertaking of the research, in its planning, or who have contributed intellectually to the ideas or the development of the manuscript. Authorship is not an issue that is taken lightly, and save for dishonest authors, it is an issue that is decided collectively by the authors, usually in sync with codes of conduct established by their research institutes or national ministries of education. Science, technology and medicine (STM) publishers have, through independent, or sometimes coordinated efforts, also established their own sets of guidelines regarding what constitutes valid authorship. However, these are, for the greater part, merely guidelines. A previous and recent analysis of authorship definitions indicates that the definitions in place regarding authorship and its validity by many leading STM publishers is neither uniform, nor standard, despite several of them claiming to follow the guidelines as set forward by the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors or ICMJE. This disparity extends itself to ghost and guest authorship, two key authorship-related issues that are examined in this paper to assess the extent of discrepancies among the same set of STM publishers and what possible influence they might have on publishing ethics.

  20. Host-guest complexes between cucurbit[n]urils and acetanilides having aminopropyl units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buaki-Sogo, Mireia; Montes-Navajas, Pedro; Alvaro, Mercedes; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2013-06-01

    2-(Propylamino)acetamide of aniline (1a), and bis-2-(propylamino)acetamide of ortho- (1b) and para-(1c) phenylenediamine form host-guest complexes with CB[6], CB[7] and CB[8] as evidenced by the variations in the (1)H NMR spectroscopy chemical shifts and observation in MALDI-TOF-MS and ESI-MS of ions at the corresponding mass. Binding constants for the 1:1 complexes were estimated from fluorescence titrations and were in the range 10(5)-10(6)M(-1). Models based on molecular mechanics for these supramolecular complexes are provided. In spite of the different geometries arising from the ortho- or para-substitution, phenylenediamides form complexes of similar strength in which the hydrophobic alkyl chains are accommodated inside the host cavity. Formation of these host-guest complexes in the solid state was also achieved by modifying an aminopropyl silica with chloroacetanilides and preparing three silica having analogues of compounds 1a-c anchored to the solid particles. Titrations showed, however, that these solids can adsorb a large percentage of CBs by unselective interactions that are not related to the formation of inclusion complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  2. Adsorption Mechanism of Inhibitor and Guest Molecules on the Surface of Gas Hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagasaki, Takuma; Matsumoto, Masakazu; Tanaka, Hideki

    2015-09-23

    The adsorption of guest and kinetic inhibitor molecules on the surface of methane hydrate is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. We calculate the free energy profile for transferring a solute molecule from bulk water to the hydrate surface for various molecules. Spherical solutes with a diameter of ∼0.5 nm are significantly stabilized at the hydrate surface, whereas smaller and larger solutes exhibit lower adsorption affinity than the solutes of intermediate size. The range of the attractive force is subnanoscale, implying that this force has no effect on the macroscopic mass transfer of guest molecules in crystal growth processes of gas hydrates. We also examine the adsorption mechanism of a kinetic hydrate inhibitor. It is found that a monomer of the kinetic hydrate inhibitor is strongly adsorbed on the hydrate surface. However, the hydrogen bonding between the amide group of the inhibitor and water molecules on the hydrate surface, which was believed to be the driving force for the adsorption, makes no contribution to the adsorption affinity. The preferential adsorption of both the kinetic inhibitor and the spherical molecules to the surface is mainly due to the entropic stabilization arising from the presence of cavities at the hydrate surface. The dependence of surface affinity on the size of adsorbed molecules is also explained by this mechanism.

  3. The effect of host relaxation and dynamics on guest molecule dynamics in H2/tetrahydrofuranhydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Vanessa K; Shoko, Elvis; Kearley, Gordon J

    2011-01-01

    We use ab initio molecular dynamics simulations to obtain classically the effects of H2O cage motions on the potential-energy surface (PES) of encapsulated H2 in the H2/tetrahydrofuran-hydrate system. The significant differences between the PES for the H2 in rigid and flexible cages that we find will influence calculation of the quantum dynamics of the H2. Part of these differences arises from the relaxation of the H2O cage around the classical H2, with a second part arising from the coupling of both translational and rotational motions of H2 with the H20 cage. We find that isotopic substitution of 2H for 1H of the H2O cage affects the coupling, which has implications for experiments that require the use of 2H2O, including inelastic neutron scattering that uses 2H2O cages in order to focus on the H2 guest dynamics. Overall, this work emphasizes the importance of taking into account cage dynamics in any approach used to understand the dynamics of H2 guests in porous framework materials.

  4. Thermosensitive Triterpenoid-Appended Polymers with Broad Temperature Tunability Regulated by Host-Guest Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Jie; Gao, Yuxia; Li, Ying; Yan, Qiang; Hu, Jun; Ju, Yong

    2017-09-05

    Thermoresponsive water-soluble polymers are of great importance since they typically show a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in aqueous media. In this research, the LCST change in broad temperature ranges of copolymers composed of natural glycyrrhetinic acid (GA)-based methacrylate and N,N'-dimethylacrylamides (DMAs) was investigated as a function of the concentration and the content of GA pendants. By complexation of GA pendants with β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), a side-chain polypseudorotaxane was obtained, which exhibited a significant increase in the LCST of copolymers. Moreover, the precisely reversible control of the LCST behavior was realized through adding a competing guest molecule, sodium 1-admantylcarboxylate. This work illustrates a simple and effective approach to endow water-soluble polymers with broad temperature tunability and helps us further understand the effect of a biocompatible host-guest complementary β-CD/GA pair on the thermoresponsive process. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Caged Molecular Glues as Photoactivatable Tags for Nuclear Translocation of Guests in Living Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisaka, Akio; Mogaki, Rina; Okuro, Kou; Aida, Takuzo

    2018-02-21

    We developed dendritic caged molecular glues ( Caged Glue-R) as tags for nucleus-targeted drug delivery, whose multiple guanidinium ion (Gu + ) pendants are protected by an anionic photocleavable unit (butyrate-substituted nitroveratryloxycarbonyl; BA NVOC). Negatively charged Caged Glue-R hardly binds to anionic biomolecules because of their electrostatic repulsion. However, upon exposure of Caged Glue-R to UV light or near-infrared (NIR) light, the BA NVOC groups of Caged Glue-R are rapidly detached to yield an uncaged molecular glue ( Uncaged Glue-R) that carries multiple Gu + pendants. Because Gu + forms a salt bridge with PO 4 - , Uncaged Glue-R tightly adheres to anionic biomolecules such as DNA and phospholipids in cell membranes by a multivalent salt-bridge formation. When tagged with Caged Glue-R, guests can be taken up into living cells via endocytosis and hide in endosomes. However, when the Caged Glue-R tag is photochemically uncaged to form Uncaged Glue-R, the guests escape from the endosome and migrate into the cytoplasm followed by the cell nucleus. We demonstrated that quantum dots (QDs) tagged with Caged Glue-R can be delivered efficiently to cell nuclei eventually by irradiation with light.

  6. Binding behaviors of p-sulfonatocalix[4]arene with gemini guests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Guo, Dong-Sheng; Liu, Yu

    2013-02-14

    A dozen of homoditopic cations, possessing different spacer lengths and rigidities, as well as sizes, shapes, and charges of terminal groups, were synthesized as candidate gemini guests for the complexation of p-sulfonatocalix[4]arenes (SC4A). The 12 gemini guests are divided into five species according to the different terminal groups: imidazolium (G1-G3), pyridinium (G4-G6), quinolinium (G7), viologen (G8-G11), and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DBO, G12). Their binding structures and stoichiometries with SC4A were examined by NMR spectroscopy, which is helpful to construct diverse highly ordered assemblies. The obtained results show that the length of the linkers, as well as the charge numbers on the end groups have a pronounced effect on the binding stoichiometry, whereas the size and shape of the terminal groups have no significant influence. Furthermore, both the stability constants and thermodynamic parameters of SC4A with the terminal subunits were determined by the isothermal titration calorimetry experiments, which are valuable to understand the binding behavior, giving quantitatively deep insight.

  7. A host-guest-recognition-based electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hao; Li, Hui; Wang, Qingjiang; He, Pingang; Fang, Yuzhi

    2012-05-15

    A sensitive electrochemical aptasensor for thrombin detection is presented based on the host-guest recognition technique. In this sensing protocol, a 15 based thrombin aptamer (ab. TBA) was dually labeled with a thiol at its 3' end and a 4-((4-(dimethylamino)phenyl)azo) benzoic acid (dabcyl) at its 5' end, respectively, which was previously immobilized on one Au electrode surface by AuS bond and used as the thrombin probe during the protein sensing procedure. One special electrochemical marker was prepared by modifying CdS nanoparticle with β-cyclodextrins (ab. CdS-CDs), which employed as electrochemical signal provider and would conjunct with the thrombin probe modified electrode through the host-guest recognition of CDs to dabcyl. In the absence of thrombin, the probe adopted linear structure to conjunct with CdS-CDs. In present of thrombin, the TBA bond with thrombin and transformed into its special G-quarter structure, which forced CdS-CDs into the solution. Therefore, the target-TBA binding event can be sensitively transduced via detecting the electrochemical oxidation current signal of Cd of CdS nanoparticles in the solution. Using this method, as low as 4.6 pM thrombin had been detected. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Foreword [International conference on algebra, analysis and quantum probability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    mathematicians from different countries and it was focused on contemporary issues in the theory of operator algebras and non-commutative integration, structure theory of non-associative algebras and their applications in the theory of dynamical systems and quantum probability. The Conference venue was the Mechanics and Mathematics Faculty of the National University of Uzbekistan and Institute of Mathematics. The program of conference included plenary and invited lectures (40 minutes), short communications (15 minutes) given by more than 100 participants, including invited speakers from Australia, Brazil, France, Germany, Italy, Malaysia, Russia, Spain, USA and Uzbekistan in the following main sections of the conference: Operator algebras and non-commutative integration; Structure theory of non-associative algebras; Quadratic operators and quantum probability; Theory of dynamical systems and statistical physics. We would like to thank the Invited Speakers for their significant contributions to the conference. We would also like to thank the members of the International Scientific Committee and the members of the Organizing Committee. We cannot end without expressing our many thanks to our sponsors for their financial support. Guest Editors: Shavkat Ayupov, Vladimir Chilin, Nasir Ganikhodjaev, Farrukh Mukhamedov, Isamiddin Rakhimov (paper)

  9. Supramolecular dendritic pi-conjugated systems: synthesis of glycinylurea functionalized pi-conjugated diphenylanthracene guests and their complexation with dendritic hosts. Part I.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Precup, F.S.; Schenning, A.P.H.J.; Meijer, E.W.; Hubca, G.

    2007-01-01

    Glycinylurea functionalized p-conjugated diphenylanthracene guests (DPA guests) that bind to adamantyl urea modified dendritic hosts were synthesized and fully characterized by NMR spectroscopy (1H-NMR, 13C-NMR) and MALDI-TOF-MS. The resulting supramolecular assemblies have been investigated with

  10. Enhancement of Wound Healing in Normal and Diabetic Mice by Topical Application of Amorphous Polyphosphate. Superior Effect of a Host–Guest Composite Material Composed of Collagen (Host and Polyphosphate (Guest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner E.G. Müller

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The effect of polyphosphate (polyP microparticles on wound healing was tested both in vitro and in a mice model in vivo. Two approaches were used: pure salts of polyphosphate, fabricated as amorphous microparticles (MPs, consisting of calcium and magnesium salts of polyP, “Ca–polyp-MPs” and “Mg–polyp-MPs”, and host–guest composite particles, prepared from amorphous collagen (host and polyphosphate (guest, termed “col/polyp-MPs”. Animal experiments with polyP on healing of excisional wounds were performed using both normal mice and diabetic mice. After a healing period of 7 days “Ca–polyp-MP” significantly improved re-epithelialization in normal mice from 31% (control to 72% (polyP microparticle-treated. Importantly, in diabetic mice, particularly the host–guest particles “col/polyp-MP”, increased the rate of re-epithelialization to ≈40% (control, 23%. In addition, those particles increased the expression of COL-I and COL-III as well as the expression the α-smooth muscle actin and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We propose that “Ca–polyp-MPs”, and particularly the host–guest “col/polyp-MPs” are useful for topical treatment of wounds.

  11. Molecular recognition: Comparative study of a tunable host-guest system by using a fluorescent model system and collision-induced dissociation mass spectrometry on dendrimers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pittelkow, M.; Nielsen, C.B.; Broeren, A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Host-guest interactions between the periphery of adamantylurea-functionalized dendrimers (host) and ureido acetic acid derivatives (guest) were shown to be specific, strong and spatially well-defined. The binding becomes stronger when using phosphonic or sulfonic acid derivatives. In the present...... work we have quantified the binding constants for the host-guest interactions between two different host motifs and six different guest molecules. The host molecules, which resemble the periphery of a poly(propylene imine) dendrimer, have been fitted with an anthracene-based fluorescent probe. The two...... host motifs differ in terms of the length of the spacer between a tertiary amine and two ureido functionalities. The guest molecules all contain an acidic moiety (either a carboxylic acid, a phosphonic acid, or a sulfonic acid) and three of them also contain an ureido moiety capable of forming multiple...

  12. Ionic core–shell dendrimers with a polycationic core: structural aspects and host–guest binding properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Coevering, R.; Bruijnincx, P.C.A.; Lutz, M.; Spek, A.L.; van Koten, G.; Klein Gebbink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The structural aspects and host–guest binding properties of ionic core–shell dendrimers [1]Br8 and [2]Br4, which bear a polycationic core and a neutral shell of Fréchet-type poly(benzyl aryl ether) dendrons, have been investigated by means of dendritic wedges [3]Br2 and [4]Br, that resemble one of

  13. Structural elucidation of dendritic host-guest complexes by X-ray crystallography and molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, T.; Pieterse, K.; Broeren, M.A.C.; Kooijman, H.; Spek, A.L.; Hilbers, P.A.J.; Meijer, E.W.

    2007-01-01

    The multiple monovalent binding of adamantyl-urea poly(propyleneimine) dendrimers with carboxylic acid-urea guests was investigated using molecular dynamics simulations and X-ray crystallography to better understand the structure and behavior of the dynamic multivalent complex in solution. The

  14. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe; Chandiran, Aravind Kumar; Moehl, Thomas; Harms, Hauke; Chavhan, Sudam; Tena-Zaera, Ramon; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Graetzel, Michael; Tetreault, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive

  15. Investigating the relative influences of molecular dimensions and binding energies on diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishna, R.; van Baten, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this article is to investigate the relative influences of molecular dimensions and adsorption binding energies on unary diffusivities of guest species inside nanoporous crystalline materials such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The investigations are based

  16. Host-Guest Interaction between Corona[n]arene and Bisquaternary Ammonium Derivatives for Fabricating Supra-Amphiphile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Lingda; Guo, Qing-Hui; Feng, Yuanning; Xu, Jiang-Fei; Wei, Yuhan; Li, Zhibo; Wang, Mei-Xiang; Zhang, Xi

    2017-06-13

    The interactions between a host, water-soluble corona[n]arene (S6-CAP), and a series of guests, bisquaternary ammonium derivatives (CnDAs), in water, were investigated. The host and guest can form 1:1 host-guest complex. Their binding constants decrease as the alkyl length of CnDAs increases, which can be tunable ranging from 10 3 to 10 6 M -1 . The binding processes are mainly entropy-driven, while the enthalpy changes also play an important role in enhancing the host-guest interactions. In addition, a supra-amphiphile was fabricated with S6-CAP and a normal surfactant bearing bisquaternary ammonium (C4R). The S6-CAP·C4R complex forms micellar aggregates in water, and the system possesses better assembling activity and dilution stability than its building block C4R. This study enriches the families of supra-amphiphiles with a new architecture, and employing such a supra-amphiphile in biofunctional materials is highly anticipated.

  17. Host-guest interaction of styrene and ethylbenzene in MIL-53 studied by solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shenhui; Li, Jing; Tang, Jing; Deng, Feng

    Solid-state NMR was utilized to explore the host-guest interaction between adsorbate and adsorbent at atomic level to understand the separation mechanism of styrene (St) and ethylbenzene (EB) in MIL-53(Al). 13 C- 27 Al double-resonance NMR experiments revealed that the host-guest interaction between St and MIL-53 was much stronger than that of EB adsorption. In addition, 13 C DIPSHIFT experiments suggested that the adsorbed St was less mobile than EB confined inside the MIL-53 pore. Furthermore, the host-guest interaction model between St, EB and MIL-53 was established on the basis of the spatial proximities information extracted from 2D 1 H- 1 H homo-nuclear correlation NMR experiments. According to the experimental observation from solid-state NMR, it was found that the presence of π-π interaction between St and MIL-53 resulted in the stronger host-guest interaction and less mobility of St. This work provides direct experimental evidence for understanding the separation mechanism of St and EB using MIL-53 as an adsorbent. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Solid-state {sup 2}H NMR investigations in guest-host systems and plastic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garibay, J.A.V.

    2004-07-01

    Variable temperature {sup 2}H NMR investigations have been carried out to study the molecular behavior of perdeuterated benzene and pyridine in the inclusion compound with tris-(1,2-dioxyphenyl)-cyclotriphosphazene. Here, a comprehensive variable temperature {sup 2}H NMR study is presented comprising line shape studies and relaxation experiments. The experimental data clearly indicate the presence of highly mobile guest species. Sample cooling gives rise to characteristic line shape effects that can be attributed to a slow-down of the rotational motion. Additional {sup 2}H NMR measurements were performed on the plastic crystal 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane where highly mobile species were observed. A quantitative analysis of the experimental data is achieved by appropriate computer simulations taking into account various molecular motions for each studied system. The analysis of these theoretical data give rise to the kinetic parameters that are in the order of related systems. (orig.)

  19. Stability of guest molecules in urea canal complexes by canal polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshii, Fumio; Makuuchi, Keizo

    1995-01-01

    It was found that various organic materials are attracted into urea canal by hexanediol diacrylate (HDDA) and long chain compounds. This means that materials which does not form complex by itself are induced in canal by HDDA and long chain compounds. To include with stability perfumes, insecticides, attractants and repellents in urea canal, leaf alcohol was used as a model compound for guest molecules in the canal. The leaf alcohol from the canal released gradually over many days and the release was inhibited for 15 days by long chain compounds and for 30 days by polymerized HDDA after irradiation. After releasing, the leaf alcohol in the canal remained 25 % stable for long chain compounds and 40 % for polymerized HDDA. The dose required for stabilization of leaf alcohol in the urea canal by canal polymerization of HDDA was 30 kGy. (author)

  20. Driving Forces Controlling Host-Guest Recognition in Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingrosso, Francesca; Altarsha, Muhannad; Dumarçay, Florence; Kevern, Gwendal; Barth, Danielle; Marsura, Alain; Ruiz-López, Manuel F

    2016-02-24

    The formation of supramolecular host-guest complexes is a very useful and widely employed tool in chemistry. However, supramolecular chemistry in non-conventional solvents such as supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2 ), one of the most promising sustainable solvents, is still in its infancy. In this work, we explored a successful route to the development of green processes in supercritical CO2 by combining a theoretical approach with experiments. We were able to synthesize and characterize an inclusion complex between a polar aromatic molecule (benzoic acid) and peracetylated-β-cyclodextrin, which is soluble in the supercritical medium. This finding opens the way to wide, environmental friendly, applications of scCO2 in many areas of chemistry, including supramolecular synthesis, reactivity and catalysis, micro and nano-particle formation, molecular recognition, as well as enhanced extraction processes with increased selectivity. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Rational Design of Multifunctional Gold Nanoparticles via Host-Guest Interaction for Cancer-Targeted Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Hai; Lei, Qi; Luo, Guo-Feng; Jia, Hui-Zhen; Hong, Sheng; Liu, Yu-Xin; Cheng, Yin-Jia; Zhang, Xian-Zheng

    2015-08-12

    A versatile gold nanoparticle-based multifunctional nanocomposite AuNP@CD-AD-DOX/RGD was constructed flexibly via host-guest interaction for targeted cancer chemotherapy. The pH-sensitive anticancer prodrug AD-Hyd-DOX and the cancer-targeted peptide AD-PEG8-GRGDS were modified on the surface of AuNP@CD simultaneously, which endowed the resultant nanocomposite with the capability to selectively eliminate cancer cells. In vitro studies indicated that the AuNP@CD-AD-DOX/RGD nanocomposite was preferentially uptaken by cancer cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis. Subsequently, anticancer drug DOX was released rapidly upon the intracellular trigger of the acid microenvirenment of endo/lysosomes, inducing apoptosis in cancer cells. As the ideal drug nanocarrier, the multifunctional gold nanoparticles with the active targeting and controllable intracellular release ability hold the great potential in cancer therapy.

  2. Reconciling the discrepancies between crystallographic porosity and guest access as exemplified by Zn-HKUST-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldblyum, Jeremy I; Liu, Ming; Gidley, David W; Matzger, Adam J

    2011-11-16

    There are several compounds for which there exists a disconnect between porosity as predicted by crystallography and porosity measured by gas sorption analysis. In this paper, the Zn-based analogue of Cu(3)(btc)(2) (HKUST-1), Zn(3)(btc)(2) (Zn-HKUST-1; btc = 1,3,5-benzenetricarboxylate) is investigated. Conventional analysis of Zn-HKUST-1 by powder X-ray diffraction and gas sorption indicates retention of crystalline structure but negligible nitrogen uptake at 77 K. By using positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy, a densified surface layer preventing the entry of even small molecular species into the crystal framework is revealed. The material is shown to have inherent surface instability after solvent removal, rendering it impermeable to molecular guests irrespective of handling and processing methods. This previously unobserved surface instability may provide insight into the failure of other microporous coordination polymers to exhibit significant porosity despite crystal structures indicative of regular, interconnected, microporous networks.

  3. Invite your representative to work. Change the world. Here's how.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montell, Denise J

    2018-02-15

    Today's political climate can seem hostile to science. Alternative facts, climate change denial, and relabeling of actual news as fake news are discouraging phenomena for sure. But these trends make it more important than ever to engage our politicians. Take heart! There is something you can do. You can show your representatives firsthand the amazing things you do, evidence of the economic engine that your activities generate, and the real people behind the discoveries. I did, and it was fun. We invited our congressman to the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), and he accepted! For 2 hours, we explained and demonstrated efforts to cure blindness using stem cells, the medical implications of the discovery that cells can recover from the brink of death, a mosquito lab striving to eliminate insect-borne disease, and an Alzheimer's disease laboratory. Salud Carbajal peered through a microscope and met real scientists. Before his visit, he did not know what a postdoctoral fellow was, much less what stem cells look like. When he left he knew our names, how much money we bring into his district, and how important National Institutes of Health funding and international mobility are to our enterprise. Although I live in the United States, this approach should also apply to other democratic countries. If each of us converts one representative into a science champion, we can change the world. © 2018 Montell. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  4. Growth mode transition of tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates in the guest/host concentration boundary layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabase, Yuichiro; Nagashima, Kazushige

    2009-11-19

    Clathrate hydrates are known to form a thin film along a guest/host boundary. We present here the first report of tetrahydrofuran (THF) clathrate hydrate formation in a THF/water concentration boundary layer. We found that the THF-water system also forms a hydrate film separating the guest/host phases. The lateral growth rate of the film increases as supercooling increases. The thickness of the film at the growth tip decreases as supercooling and the lateral growth rate increase. These tendencies are consistent with reports of experiments for other hydrates and predictions of heat-transfer models. After film formation and slight melting, two types of growth modes are observed, depending on temperature T. At T = 3.0 degrees C, the film slowly thickens. The thickening rate is much lower than the lateral growth rate, as reported for other hydrates. At T agglomerate of small polycrystalline hydrates forms in each phase. Grain boundaries in the film and pore spaces in the agglomerate act as paths for permeation of each liquid. Timing when continuous nucleation starts is dominantly controlled by the time of initiation of liquid permeation through the film. Digital particle image velocimetry analysis of the agglomerate shows that it expands not by growth at the advancing front but rather by continuous nucleation in the interior. Expansion rates of the agglomerate tend to be higher for the cases of multipermeation paths in the film and the thinner film. We suppose that the growth mode transition to continuous nucleation is caused by the memory effect due to slight melting of the hydrate film.

  5. Computational Calorimetry: High-Precision Calculation of Host–Guest Binding Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    We present a strategy for carrying out high-precision calculations of binding free energy and binding enthalpy values from molecular dynamics simulations with explicit solvent. The approach is used to calculate the thermodynamic profiles for binding of nine small molecule guests to either the cucurbit[7]uril (CB7) or β-cyclodextrin (βCD) host. For these systems, calculations using commodity hardware can yield binding free energy and binding enthalpy values with a precision of ∼0.5 kcal/mol (95% CI) in a matter of days. Crucially, the self-consistency of the approach is established by calculating the binding enthalpy directly, via end point potential energy calculations, and indirectly, via the temperature dependence of the binding free energy, i.e., by the van’t Hoff equation. Excellent agreement between the direct and van’t Hoff methods is demonstrated for both host–guest systems and an ion-pair model system for which particularly well-converged results are attainable. Additionally, we find that hydrogen mass repartitioning allows marked acceleration of the calculations with no discernible cost in precision or accuracy. Finally, we provide guidance for accurately assessing numerical uncertainty of the results in settings where complex correlations in the time series can pose challenges to statistical analysis. The routine nature and high precision of these binding calculations opens the possibility of including measured binding thermodynamics as target data in force field optimization so that simulations may be used to reliably interpret experimental data and guide molecular design. PMID:26523125

  6. Science Diplomacy in the Geosciences (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sztein, E.; Casadevall, T.

    2013-12-01

    Science can provide advice to inform and support foreign policy objectives (science in diplomacy), diplomacy can facilitate international scientific cooperation (diplomacy for science), and scientific cooperation can improve international relations (science for diplomacy) (The Royal Society, 2010). Historically, science policy and science diplomacy have served to both build relationships with other countries, to raise the status of science across borders, and to produce concrete scientific/societal results. International scientific cooperation is necessary for the advancement of science in the U.S. and abroad, among other societal benefits. Among the wide spectrum of scientific challenges, natural hazards and global environmental change are of great international importance, not only for the development of the intellectual pursuit of science, but because of their very concrete effects on populations and natural systems. In general, science diplomacy policy is determined at the political level through bilateral and multilateral science and technology agreements and partnerships, while the practice of science diplomacy is usually in the hands of individual scientists. Among the U.S. government efforts are the Department of State's Science Envoy program (mostly active in Muslim-majority nations) and the United States Geological Survey-Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance's Volcano Disaster Assistance Program. Individual scientists and their institutions establish collaborations one-on-one, in small principal investigator or research group collaborations, in bilateral agreements between universities, or in activities organized under the auspices of larger programs, such as those of scientific unions or international organizations (National Research Council, 2012). Among many programs, the U.S. has strong participation in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), and in Future Earth (a global environmental change initiative) and the Integrated Research on

  7. "I’m a poor lonesome cowboy and a long way from home…": Serbian Documentary Films about Guest Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Krstić

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will analyze Serbian documentary films about guest workers dating from the last decade of the 20th and the first decade of the 21st century, using the perspective of visual anthropology. I question the popular cultural notions about guest workers in films Весеље у Ждрелу (A Celebration in Zdrelo by author Kamenko Katic, Звона позне јесени (The Bells of Late Autumn by author Zoran Milenovic, Кад је Милорад удавао ћерку (When Milorad Gave His Daughter in Marriage by author Vladimir Milisavljevic, Странац тамо, странац овде (A Foreigner There, a Foreigner Here by author Sandra Mandic and 242 метра живота (242 Meters of Life by author Novica Savic. The films deal with a number of issues: the economic aspects of guest workers’ lives, their liminal character, the issues of the second and third generations of guest workers, going away "temporarily" to work, and religious rituals. Even though the films were made recently, they all follow the lives of Vlach and Serbian, or rather Yugoslav guest workers who left to find temporary work abroad in Western Europe in the 1960’s and 1970’s. This serves the purpose of avoiding to deal with contemporary reasons for emigrating from Serbia and thus the possible critiques of current regimes or policies in power at the time the films were made.

  8. How to market budget hotels in Thailand to international people

    OpenAIRE

    Pitakanonda, Weetara

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to suggest how to market budget hotels in Thailand to international people by regarding two main areas, namely the factors controlled by hotels (Marketing mix), and individual aspects of consumer behaviour. Furthermore, another purpose of this paper is to investigate the important aspects needed by international guests in order to provide important information to budget hotel owners to develop their businesses so as to provide the best services to cust...

  9. International evaluation procedure for Supergrants

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Sergey Ivanets, director of the department of international integration at the Ministry of Education and Science, talks about the specifics of the evaluation procedures for inviting leading scientists (Decree of the Government of the Russian Federation dated April 9, 2010, N 220: "On Measures for Attracting Leading Scientists into Russian Higher Professional Educational Institutions")

  10. Responsive, Flexible and Scalable Broader Impacts (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decharon, A.; Companion, C.; Steinman, M.

    2010-12-01

    In many educator professional development workshops, scientists present content in a slideshow-type format and field questions afterwards. Drawbacks of this approach include: inability to begin the lecture with content that is responsive to audience needs; lack of flexible access to specific material within the linear presentation; and “Q&A” sessions are not easily scalable to broader audiences. Often this type of traditional interaction provides little direct benefit to the scientists. The Centers for Ocean Sciences Education Excellence - Ocean Systems (COSEE-OS) applies the technique of concept mapping with demonstrated effectiveness in helping scientists and educators “get on the same page” (deCharon et al., 2009). A key aspect is scientist professional development geared towards improving face-to-face and online communication with non-scientists. COSEE-OS promotes scientist-educator collaboration, tests the application of scientist-educator maps in new contexts through webinars, and is piloting the expansion of maps as long-lived resources for the broader community. Collaboration - COSEE-OS has developed and tested a workshop model bringing scientists and educators together in a peer-oriented process, often clarifying common misconceptions. Scientist-educator teams develop online concept maps that are hyperlinked to “assets” (i.e., images, videos, news) and are responsive to the needs of non-scientist audiences. In workshop evaluations, 91% of educators said that the process of concept mapping helped them think through science topics and 89% said that concept mapping helped build a bridge of communication with scientists (n=53). Application - After developing a concept map, with COSEE-OS staff assistance, scientists are invited to give webinar presentations that include live “Q&A” sessions. The webinars extend the reach of scientist-created concept maps to new contexts, both geographically and topically (e.g., oil spill), with a relatively small

  11. Book of abstracts. Invited and contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The book is a collection of abstracts submitted to the International Nuclear Physics Conference held on August 21-26, 1995 in Beijing, China. The conference is organized by China Institute of Atomic Energy. The main topics of the conference are: relativistic nuclear collisions, mesons and baryons in nuclei, hadron structure and quarks in nuclei, formation and properties of hot nuclei, nuclear reactions at low and intermediate energies, nuclear structure, radioactive nuclear beams, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interaction and symmetries, applied nuclear physics

  12. Smoke & Mirrors: The Canadian Tobacco War | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tobacco Control: An International Journal "A must read for potential or current lobbyists against ... a global leader in the public health crusade to regulate the powerful tobacco ... IDRC invites applications for the IDRC Research Awards 2019.

  13. CinéGlobe invites you to participate in a poster design competition

    CERN Multimedia

    Neal David Hartman

    2013-01-01

    For its 2014 publicity campaign, CinéGlobe invites CERN people to participate in a poster design competition.  The entries are now on display on the Pas Perdus in the main building, and the CERNois are invited to vote for their favourites.    CinéGlobe is the international festival of short films inspired by science that takes place every two years at CERN, in the Globe of Science and Innovation. From 18 to 23 March 2014, CERN will host the fourth edition of the festival. The mission of the CinéGlobe Film Festival is to challenge the commonly perceived divisions between science and art by demonstrating that they are both essential to interpreting our world. Open to short film creators from around the world, the CinéGlobe festival is truly international, the first three editions having attracted more than 4,000 entries from more than 100 countries around the globe.  In addition to screening...

  14. Book of abstracts. Invited and contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The book is a collection of abstracts submitted to the International Nuclear Physics Conference held in August 21-26 1995 in Beijing, China. The conference is organized by China Institute of Atomic Energy. The main topics of the conference are: relativistic nuclear collisions, mesons and baryons in nuclei, hadron structure and quarks in nuclei, formation and properties of hot nuclei, nuclear reactions at low and intermediate energies, nuclear structure, radioactive nuclear beams, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interaction and symmetries, applied nuclear physics. This second part contains papers about nuclear reactions at low and intermediate energies, nuclear structure, radioactive nuclear beams, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interaction and symmetries, applied nuclear physics, and the author index

  15. Invitation and Evaluation of Bids for Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This publication emphasizes the integrity and interdependence of various activities related to the bid invitation, technical and economic evaluation and contracting, it updates information included in the existing IAEA documents in order to better reflect the developments in the nuclear and energy industry, compiles a more compact and user friendly guidebook integrating the existing IAEA documents on the subject. It provides the necessary information to organize, guide and realize the activities related to the invitation, the technical and economic evaluation of bids, and contracting as an integrated process. Furthermore, this publication indicates how and to what degree the activities preceding the preparation of the bid invitation specification, the evaluation of bids and contracting could influence the process.

  16. Invitation to View Method with Advantages and Disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk BUYRUKOĞLU

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Taxpayers and tax administrators sometimes may experience tax dispute. These disputes may arise from the taxpayers as well as from the tax administrators. In resolving tax disputes, tax administrators and tax payers are the first, usually administratively, solution. Because while the tax revenues of the state are possible entered into the state treasury, the taxpayers will benefit from the advantages of administrative solutions. The state and taxpayer herein will be the winner. Invitation to view is one of the administrative remedies for tax disputes. With this practice taxpayers who have caused tax evasion penalty are invited by tax administrators to make a declaration on the condition that the tax examination of the tax disputes is not started and the dispatch process has not been done to the discretion comission. In this study, advantages and disadvantages will be addressed after the definition, legal support, purpose, scope and mechanism of Invitation to view.

  17. Receptivity to sexual invitations from strangers of the opposite gender

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Gert Martin; Hogh-Olesen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the primary conclusion from Clark and Hatfield's often cited field experiment ``Consent to Sex with a Stranger'' that men agree to sexual invitations from moderately attractive strangers of the opposite gender more readily than women do. In addition, this study investigated...... whether rates of consent are influenced by a subject's age, relationship status, rating of confederate attractiveness, and type of sexual invitation. A number of moderately attractive confederates of the opposite gender individually approached 173 men and 216 women. After a standard introduction...

  18. 24. International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids ICACS-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Book contains the abstracts of invited and contributed talks submitted for presentation at the 24 th International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids - ICACS-24. Out of nearly 200 submitted abstracts the International Programme Committee selected 46 oral and 89 poster contributions. Furthermore, 15 plenary invited lectures and the honorary Lindhard lecture are included in the scientific program. An additional tutorial day with 4 tutorial lectures is organised on Sunday prior to the Conference.

  19. Microcalorimetric and spectrographic studies on host-guest interactions of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- and M{beta}-cyclodextrin with resveratrol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Xu, Xiangyu; Liu, Min [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059, Shandong Province (China); Sun, Dezhi, E-mail: sundezhisdz@163.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059, Shandong Province (China); Li, Linwei, E-mail: lilinwei@lcu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Liaocheng University, Liaocheng 252059, Shandong Province (China)

    2010-10-20

    Thermal effects of inclusion processes of {alpha}-, {beta}-, {gamma}- and M{beta}-cyclodextrin with resveratrol (RES) in aqueous solutions were determined by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) with nanowatt sensitivity at the temperature of 298.15 K. Standard enthalpy changes, stoichiometry and equilibrium constants of the inclusion complexes were derived from the direct calorimetric data utilizing nonlinear simulation. The thermodynamic parameters were discussed in the light of weak interactions between the host and the guest molecules combining with UV spectral message. The results indicate that all of the complexes formed in the aqueous solutions are in 1:1 stoichiometry. The binding processes of {alpha}-, {beta}- and M{beta}-cyclodextrin with the guest are mainly driven by enthalpy, while that of {gamma}-cyclodextrin with the drug is driven by both enthalpy and entropy.

  20. Amides Do Not Always Work: Observation of Guest Binding in an Amide-Functionalized Porous Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Oguarabau; da Silva, Ivan; Argent, Stephen P; Cabot, Rafel; Savage, Mathew; Godfrey, Harry G W; Yan, Yong; Parker, Stewart F; Manuel, Pascal; Lennox, Matthew J; Mitra, Tamoghna; Easun, Timothy L; Lewis, William; Blake, Alexander J; Besley, Elena; Yang, Sihai; Schröder, Martin

    2016-11-16

    An amide-functionalized metal organic framework (MOF) material, MFM-136, shows a high CO 2 uptake of 12.6 mmol g -1 at 20 bar and 298 K. MFM-136 is the first example of an acylamide pyrimidyl isophthalate MOF without open metal sites and, thus, provides a unique platform to study guest binding, particularly the role of free amides. Neutron diffraction reveals that, surprisingly, there is no direct binding between the adsorbed CO 2 /CH 4 molecules and the pendant amide group in the pore. This observation has been confirmed unambiguously by inelastic neutron spectroscopy. This suggests that introduction of functional groups solely may not necessarily induce specific guest-host binding in porous materials, but it is a combination of pore size, geometry, and functional group that leads to enhanced gas adsorption properties.

  1. Predicting Complexation Thermodynamic Parameters of β-Cyclodextrin with Chiral Guests by Using Swarm Intelligence and Support Vector Machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luckhana Lawtrakul

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO and Support Vector Machines (SVMs approaches are used for predicting the thermodynamic parameters for the 1:1 inclusion complexation of chiral guests with β-cyclodextrin. A PSO is adopted for descriptor selection in the quantitative structure-property relationships (QSPR of a dataset of 74 chiral guests due to its simplicity, speed, and consistency. The modified PSO is then combined with SVMs for its good approximating properties, to generate a QSPR model with the selected features. Linear, polynomial, and Gaussian radial basis functions are used as kernels in SVMs. All models have demonstrated an impressive performance with R2 higher than 0.8.

  2. Effects of electron blocking and hole trapping of the red guest emitter materials on hybrid white organic light emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Lin-Ann; Vu, Hoang-Tuan; Juang, Fuh-Shyang; Lai, Yun-Jr; Yeh, Pei-Hsun; Tsai, Yu-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Hybrid white organic light emitting diodes (HWOLEDs) with fluorescence and phosphorescence hybrid structures are studied in this work. HWOLEDs were fabricated with blue/red emitting layers: fluorescent host material doped with sky blue material, and bipolar phosphorescent host emitting material doped with red dopant material. An electron blocking layer is applied that provides hole red guest emitter hole trapping effects, increases the charge carrier injection quantity into the emitting layers and controls the recombination zone (RZ) that helps balance the device color. Spacer layers were also inserted to expand the RZ, increase efficiency and reduce energy quenching along with roll-off effects. The resulting high efficiency warm white OLED device has the lower highest occupied molecule orbital level red guest material, current efficiency of 15.9 cd/A at current density of 20 mA/cm 2 , and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.34, 0.39)

  3. Effects of electron blocking and hole trapping of the red guest emitter materials on hybrid white organic light emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Lin-Ann; Vu, Hoang-Tuan [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China); Juang, Fuh-Shyang, E-mail: fsjuang@seed.net.tw [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China); Lai, Yun-Jr [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China); Yeh, Pei-Hsun [Raystar Optronics, Inc., 5F No. 25, Keya Rd. Daya Township, Taichung County, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Yu-Sheng [National Formosa University, Institute of Electro-Optical and Materials Science, Huwei, Yunlin County, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-01

    Hybrid white organic light emitting diodes (HWOLEDs) with fluorescence and phosphorescence hybrid structures are studied in this work. HWOLEDs were fabricated with blue/red emitting layers: fluorescent host material doped with sky blue material, and bipolar phosphorescent host emitting material doped with red dopant material. An electron blocking layer is applied that provides hole red guest emitter hole trapping effects, increases the charge carrier injection quantity into the emitting layers and controls the recombination zone (RZ) that helps balance the device color. Spacer layers were also inserted to expand the RZ, increase efficiency and reduce energy quenching along with roll-off effects. The resulting high efficiency warm white OLED device has the lower highest occupied molecule orbital level red guest material, current efficiency of 15.9 cd/A at current density of 20 mA/cm{sup 2}, and Commission Internationale de L'Eclairage coordinates of (0.34, 0.39)

  4. Complexation of triptycene-derived macrotricyclic polyether with paraquat derivatives, diquat, and a 2,7-diazapyrenium salt: guest-induced conformational changes of the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ying; Cao, Jing; Li, Peng-Fei; Zong, Qian-Shou; Zhao, Jian-Min; Guo, Jia-Bin; Xiang, Jun-Feng; Chen, Chuan-Feng

    2013-04-05

    Complexation between a triptycene-derived macrotricyclic polyether containing two dibenzo-[30]-crown-10 cavities and different functionalized paraquat derivatives, diquat, and a 2,7-diazapyrenium salt in both solution and solid state was investigated in detail. It was found that depending on the guests with different terminal functional groups and structures, the macrotricyclic polyether could form 1:1 or 1:2 complexes with the guests in different complexation modes in solution and also in the solid state. Especially, the conformation of the macrotricyclic polyether was efficiently adjusted by the encapsulated guests, which was to some extent similar to substrate-induced fit of enzymes. Moreover, the binding and releasing of the guests in the complexes could be controlled by potassium ions.

  5. Enhanced host–guest electrochemical recognition of herbicide MCPA using a b-cyclodextrin carbon nanotube sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Rahemi, V.; Vandamme, J.J.; Garrido, J.M.P.J.; Borges, F.; Brett, C.M.A.; Garrido, E.M.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for the determination of the chlorophenoxy herbicide MCPA has been developed, based on a combination of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with incorporated b-cyclodextrin and a polyaniline film modified glassy carbon electrode. The proposed molecular host–guest recogni-tion based sensor has a high electrochemical sensitivity for the determination of MCPA. The electrochemical behaviour of MCPA at the chemically modified electrode was investigated in detail by cyclic volta...

  6. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  7. Pressure-induced chemistry in a nitrogen-hydrogen host-guest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaulding, Dylan K.; Weck, Gunnar; Loubeyre, Paul; Datchi, Fréderic; Dumas, Paul; Hanfland, Michael

    2014-12-01

    New topochemistry in simple molecular systems can be explored at high pressure. Here we examine the binary nitrogen/hydrogen system using Raman spectroscopy, synchrotron X-ray diffraction, synchrotron infrared microspectroscopy and visual observation. We find a eutectic-type binary phase diagram with two stable high-pressure van der Waals compounds, which we identify as (N2)6(H2)7 and N2(H2)2. The former represents a new type of van der Waals host-guest compound in which hydrogen molecules are contained within channels in a nitrogen lattice. This compound shows evidence for a gradual, pressure-induced change in bonding from van der Waals to ionic interactions near 50 GPa, forming an amorphous dinitrogen network containing ionized ammonia in a room-temperature analogue of the Haber-Bosch process. Hydrazine is recovered on decompression. The nitrogen-hydrogen system demonstrates the potential for new pressure-driven chemistry in high-pressure structures and the promise of tailoring molecular interactions for materials synthesis.

  8. Formation of intercalation compound of kaolinite-glycine via displacing guest water by glycine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Wan; Zhou, Jing; Zhang, Zhenqian; Chen, Likun; Zhang, Zhongfei; Li, Yong; Ma, Ning; Du, Piyi

    2014-10-15

    The kaolinite-glycine intercalation compound was successfully formed by displacing intercalated guest water molecules in kaolinite hydrate as a precursor. The microstructure of the compound was characterized by X-ray diffraction, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscope. Results show that glycine can only be intercalated into hydrated kaolinite to form glycine-kaolinite by utilizing water molecules as a transition phase. The intercalated glycine molecules were squeezed partially into the ditrigonal holes in the silicate layer, resulting in the interlayer distance of kaolinite reaching 1.03nm. The proper intercalation temperature range was between 20°C and 80°C. An intercalation time of 24h or above was necessary to ensure the complete formation of kaolinite-glycine. The highest intercalation degree of about 84% appeared when the system was reacted at the temperature of 80°C for 48h. There were two activation energies for the intercalation of glycine into kaolinite, one being 21kJ/mol within the temperature range of 20-65°C and the other 5.8kJ/mol between 65°C and 80°C. The intercalation degree (N) and intercalation velocity (v) of as a function of intercalation time (t) can be empirically expressed as N=-79.35e(-)(t)(/14.8)+80.1 and v=5.37e(-)(t)(/14.8), respectively. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Study on luminescence characteristics of blue OLED with phosphor-doped host-guest structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhen; Liu, Fei; Zheng, Xin; Chen, Ai; Xie, Jia-feng; Zhang, Wen-xia

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we design and fabricate phosphor-doped host-guest structure organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), where the blue-ray iridium complex electrophosphorescent material FIrpic acts as object material. Properties of the device can be accommodated by changing the host materials, dopant concentration and thickness of the light-emitting layer. The study shows that the host material N,N'-dicarbazolyl-3,5-benzene (mCP) has a higher triplet excited state energy level, which can effectively prevent FIrpic triplet excited state energy backtracking to host material, thus the luminous efficiency is improved. When mCP is selected as the host material, the thickness of the light-emitting layer is 30 nm and the dopant concentration is 8 wt%, the excitons can be effectively confined in the light-emitting region. As a result, the maximum current efficiency and the maximum brightness of the blue device can reach 15.5 cd/A and 7 196.3 cd/m2, respectively.

  10. A Life in Science - Book release programme invite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    MY OF. CE EDUCA. ВРЕМЕ. STION AND. SCIENCE. OF SCIEN. CES. RESEARC,. AN INSTIT она не. A LIFE IN SCIENCE. Penguin Books India. Indian Academy of Sciences and. Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Bhopal cordially invite you for the release of book. A LIFE IN SCIENCE by C.N.R. Rao.

  11. Textbook Images: How Do They Invite Students into Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bungum, Berit

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of images in Norwegian physics textbooks for upper secondary school, and how they invite students into physics by means of visual communication. The concept of "framing" is used to investigate how the perspective in the image provides a sense of participation. It is found that older textbooks, where objects…

  12. The Intimate Correlation of Invitational Education and Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riner, Phillip S.

    2003-01-01

    Critics of Invitational Education and other self-concept approaches to learning have long argued that there is a lack of empirical data to support the claims that approaches to student instruction based on self-concept theory are central to effective learning. Ellis (2001) examines a number of these analyses where self-concept, self-esteem, and…

  13. Inviting Dialogue: An Alternative to Teaching in the Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Patricia Shelley

    1998-01-01

    Uses illustrations from a graduate seminar in the teaching of writing, a high school classroom, and a seventh-grade classroom to show the value of teacher-student dialog over teacher monologue, and to show teacher responses that resist the impulse to launch into the teacher's monologue, and instead invite dialog and turn the work of meaning-making…

  14. Adhering to the assumptions of invitational education: a case study ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African schools are constantly faced with evolving needs and challenges characterised by change. As in other countries, schools in South Africa encounter pressure to 'produce more for less' and at the same time to achiev e c ertain goals and standards. Transforming schools into inviting institutions requires a ...

  15. Invitation Refusals in Cameroon French and Hexagonal French

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farenkia, Bernard Mulo

    2015-01-01

    Descriptions of regional pragmatic variation in French are lacking to date the focus has been on a limited range of speech acts, including apologies, requests, compliments and responses to compliments. The present paper, a systematic analysis of invitation refusals across regional varieties of French, is designed to add to the research on…

  16. Fewer invited talks by women in evolutionary biology symposia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schroeder, J.; Dugdale, H.L.; Radersma, R.; Hinsch, M.; Buehler, D.M.; Saul, J.; Porter, L.; Liker, A.; De Cauwer, I.; Johnson, P. J.; Santure, A. W.; Griffin, A. S.; Bolund, E.; Ross, L.; Webb, T. J.; Feulner, P. G. D.; Winney, I.; Szulkin, M.; Komdeur, J.; Versteegh, M. A.; Hemelrijk, C. K.; Svensson, E. I.; Edwards, H.; Karlsson, M.; West, S. A.; Barrett, E. L. B.; Richardson, D. S.; van den Brink, V.; Wimpenny, J. H.; Ellwood, S. A.; Rees, M.; Matson, K.D.; Charmantier, A.; dos Remedios, N.; Schneider, N. A.; Teplitsky, C.; Laurance, W. F.; Butlin, R. K.; Horrocks, Nicholas

    Lower visibility of female scientists, compared to male scientists, is a potential reason for the under-representation of women among senior academic ranks. Visibility in the scientific community stems partly from presenting research as an invited speaker at organized meetings. We analysed the sex

  17. Computational Science in Armenia (Invited Talk)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marandjian, H.; Shoukourian, Yu.

    This survey is devoted to the development of informatics and computer science in Armenia. The results in theoretical computer science (algebraic models, solutions to systems of general form recursive equations, the methods of coding theory, pattern recognition and image processing), constitute the theoretical basis for developing problem-solving-oriented environments. As examples can be mentioned: a synthesizer of optimized distributed recursive programs, software tools for cluster-oriented implementations of two-dimensional cellular automata, a grid-aware web interface with advanced service trading for linear algebra calculations. In the direction of solving scientific problems that require high-performance computing resources, examples of completed projects include the field of physics (parallel computing of complex quantum systems), astrophysics (Armenian virtual laboratory), biology (molecular dynamics study of human red blood cell membrane), meteorology (implementing and evaluating the Weather Research and Forecast Model for the territory of Armenia). The overview also notes that the Institute for Informatics and Automation Problems of the National Academy of Sciences of Armenia has established a scientific and educational infrastructure, uniting computing clusters of scientific and educational institutions of the country and provides the scientific community with access to local and international computational resources, that is a strong support for computational science in Armenia.

  18. Mechanical measurement of hydrogen bonded host-guest systems under non-equilibrium, near-physiological conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Teresa; Cerrón, Fernando; Nieto-Ortega, Belén; Latorre, Alfonso; Somoza, Álvaro; Ibarra, Borja; Pérez, Emilio M

    2017-09-01

    Decades after the birth of supramolecular chemistry, there are many techniques to measure noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, under equilibrium conditions. As ensembles of molecules rapidly lose coherence, we cannot extrapolate bulk data to single-molecule events under non-equilibrium conditions, more relevant to the dynamics of biological systems. We present a new method that exploits the high force resolution of optical tweezers to measure at the single molecule level the mechanical strength of a hydrogen bonded host-guest pair out of equilibrium and under near-physiological conditions. We utilize a DNA reporter to unambiguously isolate single binding events. The Hamilton receptor-cyanuric acid host-guest system is used as a test bed. The force required to dissociate the host-guest system is ∼17 pN and increases with the pulling rate as expected for a system under non-equilibrium conditions. Blocking one of the hydrogen bonding sites results in a significant decrease of the force-to-break by 1-2 pN, pointing out the ability of the method to resolve subtle changes in the mechanical strength of the binding due to the individual H-bonding components. We believe the method will prove to be a versatile tool to address important questions in supramolecular chemistry.

  19. Smart protein biogate as a mediator to regulate competitive host-guest interaction for sensitive ratiometric electrochemical assay of prion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Peng; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhou, Jiawan; Xiong, Erhu; Li, Xiaoyu; Chen, Jinhua

    2015-11-01

    A novel competitive host-guest strategy regulated by protein biogate was developed for sensitive and selective analysis of prion protein. The methylene blue (MB)-tagged prion aptamer (MB-Apt) was introduced to the multiwalled carbon nanotubes-β-cyclodextrins (MWCNTs-β-CD) composites-modified glassy carbon (GC) electrode through the host-guest interaction between β-CD and MB. In the absence of prion, MB-Apt could be displaced by ferrocenecarboxylic acid (FCA) due to its stronger binding affinity to β-CD, resulting in a large oxidation peak of FCA. However, in the presence of prion, the specific prion-aptamer interaction drove the formation of protein biogate to seal the cavity of β-CD, which hindered the guest displacement of MB by FCA and resulted in the oxidation peak current of MB (IMB) increased and that of FCA (IFCA) decreased. The developed aptasensor showed good response towards the target (prion protein) with a low detection limit of 160 fM. By changing the specific aptamers, this strategy could be easily extended to detect other proteins, showing promising potential for extensive applications in bioanalysis.

  20. A targeted nanoglobular contrast agent from host-guest self-assembly for MR cancer molecular imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zhuxian; Han, Zhen; Lu, Zheng-Rong

    2016-04-01

    The clinical application of nanoparticular Gd(III) based contrast agents for tumor molecular MRI has been hindered by safety concerns associated with prolonged tissue retention, although they can produce strong tumor enhancement. In this study, a targeted well-defined cyclodextrin-based nanoglobular contrast agent was developed through self-assembly driven by host-guest interactions for safe and effective cancer molecular MRI. Multiple β-cyclodextrins attached POSS (polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane) nanoglobule was used as host molecule. Adamantane-modified macrocyclic Gd(III) contrast agent, cRGD (cyclic RGDfK peptide) targeting ligand and fluorescent probe was used as guest molecules. The targeted host-guest nanoglobular contrast agent cRGD-POSS-βCD-(DOTA-Gd) specifically bond to αvβ3 integrin in malignant 4T1 breast tumor and provided greater contrast enhancement than the corresponding non-targeted agent. The agent also provided significant fluorescence signal in tumor tissue. The histological analysis of the tumor tissue confirmed its specific and effective targeting to αvβ3 integrin. The targeted imaging agent has a potential for specific cancer molecular MR and fluorescent imaging. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A Nexus between Theory and Experiment: Non-Empirical Quantum Mechanical Computational Methodology Applied to Cucurbit[n]urilGuest Binding Interactions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hostaš, Jiří; Sigwalt, D.; Šekutor, M.; Ajani, Haresh; Dubecký, M.; Řezáč, Jan; Zavalij, P. Y.; Cao, L.; Wohlschlager, Ch.; Mlinaric-Majerski, K.; Isaacs, L.; Glaser, R.; Hobza, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 48 (2016), s. 17226-17238 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP208/12/G016 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : adamantane-/diamantane-skeleton guests * biomimetic complexes * BLYP-D3 quantum mechanical calculations * cucurbit[n]uril * host-guest complexes * primary ammonium loops Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  2. The Future of Climate Science (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, R.

    2010-12-01

    High Performance Computing is currently deployed in several centers for climate research, but not at the levels needed to achieve substantial success on a global basis, given the complexity of the problem. A quantum leap in capabilities will be necessary to handle next-generation climate models that integrate newly emerging sciences, high-resolution grids, and voluminous observational data from satellites and sophisticated ground devices. Dr. Bishop will discuss efforts to build an International Centre for Earth Simulation (ICES) based in Switzerland that takes an holistic systems approach, and that has the competence and resources to achieve new insights in this new decade, and is capable to globally influence public policy with respect to weather, climate, environment, disaster risk reduction and socio-economic development. On this progressively crowded and fragile planet, such a capability will be invaluable, Bishop believes, if not imperative, for our long-term survival. ICES could serve as a test-bed for large scale public and private development planning. Decision makers could ask ‘what if’ questions for major construction projects (such as China’s Three Gorges Dam), and then interactively evaluate alternative scenarios. Likewise, ICES could help uncover the possible unintended consequences of climate remediation and adaptation strategies, geo-engineering ideas, CO2 sequestration, deep sea drilling, etc. ICES would be a resource for building more resilient societies in an era of rapid climate change and frequent natural disasters (such as flooding, extreme weather events and volcanic ash clouds), and therefore of great consequence to our future well-being. It would ultimately play a major role in the education and training of policy-makers, the public, and future Earth Scientists - in conjunction with the current national and regional centers.

  3. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  4. EZID: Long term identifiers made easy (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scholarly research is producing ever increasing amounts of digital research data, and this data should be managed throughout the research life cycle both as part of good scientific practice, but also to comply with funder mandates, such as the 2013 OSTP Public Access Memo (http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/ostp_public_access_memo_2013.pdf). By assigning unique and persistent identifiers to data objects, data managers can gain control and flexibility over what can be a daunting task. This is due to the fact that the objects can be moved to new locations without disruption to links, as long as the identifier target is maintained. EZID is a tool that makes assigning and maintaining unique, persistent identifiers easy. It was designed and built by California Digital Library (CDL) and has both a user interface and a RESTful API. EZID currently offers services for two globally unique, persistent identifier schemes: Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and Archival Resource Keys (ARKs). DOIs are identifiers originating from the publishing world and are in widespread use for journal articles. CDL is able to offer DOIs because of being a founding member of DataCite (http://www.datacite.org/), an international consortium established to provide easier access to scientific research data on the Internet. ARKs are identifiers originating from the library, archive and museum community. Like DOIs, they become persistent when the objects and identifier forwarding information is maintained. DOIs and ARKs have a key role in data management and, therefore, in data management plans. DOIs are the recommended identifier for use in data citation, and ARKs provide the maximum flexibility needed for data documentation and management throughout the early phases of a project. The two identifier schemes are able to be used together, and EZID is made to work with both. EZID clients, coming from education, research, government, and the private sector, are utilizing the

  5. From Having Fun to Applause: The Study of Relationships among Festival Benefits, Festival Identity and Festival Support by Viewpoints of the Hosts and Guests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Chih Chang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The sustainable development of the festival depends on the support and participation of residents and tourists. There are a number of practical and theoretical gaps regarding the hosts and guests in festival literature. This study attempts to fill the host–guest gap based on the theory of reasoned action to construct and exam a relationship model. Taking the 2016 Summer Festival during busy season as an example in Hualien, 1165 questionnaires were valid, and data were analyzed by SEM (structural equation modeling. Results showed that the hosts had higher perception than the guests in terms of the festival benefits, identity, and support. This study has two concept models: the guest model and the host model. In the host model, the local-development benefits have more positive relationships to affect the festival support and festival identity than the recreation-experience benefits. On the other hand, the recreation-experience benefits could affect the festival support, but the festival identity could not in the guest model. The results of this study indicate that the festival organizers or the public sectors must be pay attention to the viewpoints of the guests and hosts in order to achieve the sustainable development objectives.

  6. Insertion of Guest Molecules into a Mixed Ligand Metal-Organic Framework via Single-Crystal-to-Single Crystal Guest Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Research Laboratory (ARL) in the 2012 Summer Intern Program. This research was supported by an appointment to the Research Participation Program at ARL...flexible and different from traditional microporous materials like zeolites, which are fully inorganic and thus lack synthetic flexibility. During...adsorbed into this porous structure. MOFs have a number of useful properties such as large internal surface areas (some as high as 10 3 –10 5 m 2 /g

  7. The Nature of Natural Hazards Communication (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontar, Y. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Some of the many issues of interest to natural hazards professionals include the analysis of proactive approaches to the governance of risk from natural hazards and approaches to broaden the scope of public policies related to the management of risks from natural hazards, as well as including emergency and environmental management, community development and spatial planning related to natural hazards. During the talk we will present results of scientific review, analysis and synthesis, which emphasize same new trends in communication of the natural hazards theories and practices within an up-to-the-minute context of new environmental and climate change issues, new technologies, and a new focus on resiliency. The presentation is divided into five sections that focus on natural hazards communication in terms of education, risk management, public discourse, engaging the public, theoretical perspectives, and new media. It includes results of case studies and best practices. It delves into natural hazards communication theories, including diffusion, argumentation, and constructivism, to name a few. The presentation will provide information about: (1) A manual of natural hazards communication for scientists, policymakers, and media; (2) An up-to-the-minute context of environmental hazards, new technologies & political landscape; (3) A work by natural hazards scientists for geoscientists working with social scientists and communication principles; (4) A work underpinned by key natural hazards communication theories and interspersed with pragmatic solutions; (5) A work that crosses traditional natural hazards boundaries: international, interdisciplinary, theoretical/applied. We will further explore how spatial planning can contribute to risk governance by influencing the occupation of natural hazard-prone areas, and review the central role of emergency management in risk policy. The goal of this presentation is to contribute to the augmentation of the conceptual framework

  8. Integrated Modelling - the next steps (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    modelling demonstrations and to achieve a critical mass of accessible linkable models. These models will be spread across the world and there will need to be a search mechanism to find them. If the benefits of integrated modelling are to become widely available, ways will have to be found to automate and hide the linking process. All the above will require considerable resources. It is proposed to build these resources by creating an international community of practice based upon the open source model. The talk will expand upon the research and development required.

  9. Benchmarking observational uncertainties for hydrology (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, H. K.; Krueger, T.; Freer, J. E.; Westerberg, I.

    2013-12-01

    There is a pressing need for authoritative and concise information on the expected error distributions and magnitudes in hydrological data, to understand its information content. Many studies have discussed how to incorporate uncertainty information into model calibration and implementation, and shown how model results can be biased if uncertainty is not appropriately characterised. However, it is not always possible (for example due to financial or time constraints) to make detailed studies of uncertainty for every research study. Instead, we propose that the hydrological community could benefit greatly from sharing information on likely uncertainty characteristics and the main factors that control the resulting magnitude. In this presentation, we review the current knowledge of uncertainty for a number of key hydrological variables: rainfall, flow and water quality (suspended solids, nitrogen, phosphorus). We collated information on the specifics of the data measurement (data type, temporal and spatial resolution), error characteristics measured (e.g. standard error, confidence bounds) and error magnitude. Our results were primarily split by data type. Rainfall uncertainty was controlled most strongly by spatial scale, flow uncertainty was controlled by flow state (low, high) and gauging method. Water quality presented a more complex picture with many component errors. For all variables, it was easy to find examples where relative error magnitude exceeded 40%. We discuss some of the recent developments in hydrology which increase the need for guidance on typical error magnitudes, in particular when doing comparative/regionalisation and multi-objective analysis. Increased sharing of data, comparisons between multiple catchments, and storage in national/international databases can mean that data-users are far removed from data collection, but require good uncertainty information to reduce bias in comparisons or catchment regionalisation studies. Recently it has

  10. 2008 Program for Invitation of Foreign Research Institutes to Jeonbuk Province and Enhancement of Technology Transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Shin, J. W.; Yang, S. T.; Kim, S. W.; Song, B. S.; Cho, S. W.; Han, C. S.; Lee, G. J.

    2009-08-01

    This project was carried out to establish long-term tactical partnership with foreign research institutions for technology exchanges and facilities, and to develop cooperation projects for the core technology. Technical bases for inviting foreign R and D centers to Jeonbuk province has been established through consulting discussion and signing arrangement on cooperation between ARTI and the partner institute. Discussion in-depth on an R and D center of Russian IBMP in Jeonbuk has been made and an agendum for the R and D center was submitted to the 13th Korea-Russian Federation Joint Committee on Nuclear Cooperation. Based on consensus that technology exchange and enhanced collaboration would be reciprocally beneficial, the second ARTI-TARRI joint seminar is scheduled at Jeongeup in September 2009, when further discussion will be made on the subsidiary arrangement to KAERI-JAEA MOU. An consultant meeting was done in order to strengthen international cooperation and to get advice on attracting foreign R and D centers at the Provincial Office in May 2009. A fact finding visit to iThemba LABS in south Africa was made to conclude a Letter of Understanding (LOU) for cooperation in R and D of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. The established collaborative relationship with world-leading research institutes such as IBMP, TARRI and iThemba LABS can make a role for inviting in the near future foreign R and D centers to Jeonbuk Province, and surely give a tactical influence on radiation industries in the Jeonbuk Province

  11. What band rocks the MTB? (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kind, J.; García-Rubio, I.; Gehring, A. U.

    2013-12-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are a polyphyletic group of bacteria that have been found in marine and lacustrine environments and soils [e.g. 1]. The hallmark of MTB is their intracellular formation of magnetosomes, single-domain ferrimagnetic particles that are aligned in chains. The chain configuration generates a strong magnetic dipole, which is used as magnetic compass to move the MTB into their favorable habit. The term band corresponds to a frequency window of microwaves in the gigahertz (GHz) range. Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) spectroscopy uses the microwave absorption in a magnetic field to analyze the anisotropy properties and the domain state of magnetic materials. Specific microwave frequency causes absorption in a characteristic magnetic field range. For the investigation of MTB we use S-band (4.02 GHz), X-band (9.47 GHz), and Q-band (34.16 GHz). Experiments on cultured MTB and on sediment samples of Holocene age showed that absorption in X- and Q-band occurs when the sample is in a saturated or nearly saturated state [2, 3]. By contrast, absorption in the S-band appears in lower magnetic fields, where the sample is far from saturation. All FMR spectra show two distinct low-field features that can be assigned to magnetite particles in chains, aligned parallel and perpendicular to the external magnetic field. The detailed separation of the parallel and perpendicular components in the bulk samples is hampered, because of the random orientation of the chains in the sample. The comparison of S-, X-, and Q-band shows that the lower the frequency the better the separation of the components. In the S-band FMR spectroscopy, the separation of chains parallel to the external magnetic field is supported by the internal field of the sample. This field is caused by the remanence that contributes to the external magnetic field to fulfill the resonance condition [3,4]. Considering the different FMR responses, it can be postulated that a lower microwave frequency

  12. Combining the Observations from Different GNSS (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dach, R.; Lutz, S.; Schaer, S.; Bock, H.; Jäggi, A.; Meindl, M.; Ostini, L.; Thaller, D.; Steinbach, A.; Beutler, G.; Steigenberger, P.

    2009-12-01

    For a very long time GPS has clearly dominated the use of GNSS measurements for scientific purposes. This picture is changing: we are moving from a GPS-only to a multi-GNSS world. This is, e.g., reflected by changing the meaning of the abbreviation IGS in March 2005 from International GPS to GNSS Service. The current situation can be described as follows: GPS has the leading role in the GNSS because it has provided a very stable satellite constellation over many years. Some of the currently active GPS satellites are nearly 15 years old. These old satellites are expected to be decommissioned within the next years. On the other hand, due to the increasing number of active GLONASS satellites and the improved density of multi-GNSS tracking stations in the IGS network, the quality of the GLONASS orbits has drastically improved during the last years. The European Galileo system is under development: currently two test satellites (GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B) are in orbit. The IOV (in-orbit-validation phase) will start soon. Also the first test satellites for the Chinese Compass system are in space. For the maximum benefit the observations of these GNSS will be processed in a combined multi-GNSS analysis in future. CODE (Center for Orbit Determination in Europe) is a joint venture between the Astronomical Institute of the University Bern (AIUB, Bern, Switzerland), the Federal Office of Topography (swisstopo, Wabern, Switzerland), the Federal Agency for Cartography and Geodesy (BKG, Frankfurt am Main, Germany), and the Institut für Astronomische und Physikalische Geodäsie of the Technische Universität München (IAPG/TUM, Munich, Germany). It acts as one of the global analysis centers of the IGS and has started in May 2003 with a rigorous combined processing of GPS and GLONASS measurements for the final, rapid, and even ultra-rapid product lines. All contributions from CODE to the IGS are in fact multi-GNSS products -- the only exception is the satellite and receiver clock

  13. Nursing homes as the perspective and reality of guest workers in old age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljubica Milosavljević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to present the results of research conducted as part of the “Ambivalent nostalgia in the cultural heritage of gastarbeiters” project of the Ethnological-anthropological society of Serbia. The research was conducted in Kučevo and Wienna in 2014. The research focused on older guest workers or gastarbeiters who are mostly in the status of disabled pensioners, and seniors whose family members work abroad. An important criterion for determining the gasterbeiter population was entering into the sphere of work in an active capacity, specified by the assumed “temporality” in the country of work; the determination of “seniority” is based on the criteria of exiting the active sphere of work. In this way a new kind of old person, a new kind of pensioner was formed – the foreign currency pensioner whose operating strategies are partly in the focus of this paper. Aside from these strategies, the paper analyzes the strategies employed by the family members of gastarbeiters facing the old age of their relatives who reside in their country of origin either permanently or on a semi-permanent basis; as well as the strategies which the Gerontological Society of Serbia tried to develop in cooperation with the former Ministry of Diaspora RS with the aim of attracting aging gastarbeiters to domestic nursing homes, as well as stimulating the diaspora to invest in such institutions in Serbia. In short, the life experiences and attitudes of 14 pensioners interviewed in Kučevo and Vienna on issues of old age, possible – or ongoing life in a nursing home, the differences and/or similarities between them and other old folks they encountered abroad or at home, as well as experiences with working with the aging gastarbeiter population shared by six employees in a private as well as a public nursing home in Kučevo, will be the object of analysis in this paper.

  14. 14 CFR 11.75 - Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for rulemaking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does FAA invite public comment on petitions... Rulemaking and for Exemption § 11.75 Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for rulemaking? Generally, FAA does not invite public comment on petitions for rulemaking. ...

  15. 48 CFR 52.232-31 - Invitation To Propose Financing Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Financing Terms. 52.232-31 Section 52.232-31 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION... Clauses 52.232-31 Invitation To Propose Financing Terms. As prescribed in 32.205(b) and 32.206, insert the following provision: Invitation To Propose Financing Terms (OCT 1995) (a) The offeror is invited to propose...

  16. PREFACE: International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism-ICSM2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Ali; Grasso, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) was held at the congress centre of Ankara University in Side, Antalya, between 25-29 August 2008. The conference was the first conference on the combined fields of superconductivity and magnetism organized in Turkey at international level, and it had broad international participation from 42 countries, with registered delegates numbering over 400. A quarter of the attendees were research students. The conference attracted many of the best known leading scientists and experts in the field of superconductivity and magnetism from all over the world. The scientific program involved the presentation and discussion of 336 papers, classified as 65 invited, 81 oral and 190 posters. Submission of papers for the proceedings was on a volunteer basis and we therefore had nearly half of the presented papers, i.e. 30 submitted invited papers, peer-reviewed by Superconductor Science and Technology, and 85 submitted contributing papers, peer-reviewed by the organizers through processes administered by the Editorial Board and Scientific Committee. Reviews were conducted by expert referees at professional level and with the scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal issue published by IOP Publishing. The invited papers on superconductivity and magnetism with superconductivity were considered and processed for Superconductor Science and Technology by IOP itself. Although there are missing papers from some of the plenary speakers, we believe that this special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SUST) and the corresponding issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) reflect most of the booming research in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism. We are very pleased to have worked with IOP on the conference proceedings, with special thanks to Dr Tom Miller and Dr Graham Douglas. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, about 93 papers were

  17. Enabling narrative pedagogy: inviting, waiting, and letting be.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ironside, Pamela M

    2014-01-01

    This article describes how teachers enable Narrative Pedagogy in their courses by explicating the Concernful Practice Inviting: Waiting and Letting Be. Narrative Pedagogy, a research-based, phenomenological approach to teaching and learning, extends conventional pedagogies and offers nursing faculty an alternative way of transforming their schools and courses. Using hermeneutic phenomenology, interview data collected over a 10-year period were analyzed by coding practical examples of teachers' efforts to enact Narrative Pedagogy. When Narrative Pedagogy is enacted, teachers and students focus on thinking and learning together about nursing phenomena and seek new understandings about how they may provide care in the myriad situations they encounter. Although the Concernful Practices co-occur, explicating inviting experiences can assist new teachers, and those seeking to extend their pedagogical literacy, by providing new understandings of how Narrative Pedagogy can be enacted.

  18. Invitation to the IAEA FR17 Conference on Fast Reactors, Russia, 2017

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rachkov, V.

    2013-01-01

    Russian Federation has a large successful experience of peaceful application of nuclear power and it is a leader in development of fast reactors that permit to create sustainable and safe base for future world nuclear power. Russian Government approved in 2010 a Federal Target Program “Nuclear power technologies of a new generation for period of 2010-2015 and with outlook to 2020” aimed at creation of new technological platform for future nuclear power based on fast reactors. State Atomic Energy Corporation “Rosatom” supports activities of the IAEA on strengthening international collaboration on fast reactors and invites IAEA to host next FR17 Conference on FRs in Russia in 2017

  19. PREFACE: 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Marc

    2008-07-01

    The 6th International Conference on Inverse Problems in Engineering: Theory and Practice (ICIPE 2008) belongs to a successful series of conferences held up to now following a three-year cycle. Previous conferences took place in Palm Coast, Florida, USA (1993), Le Croisic, France (1996), Port Ludlow, Washington, USA (1999), Angra dos Reis, Brazil (2002), and Cambridge, UK (2005). The conference has its roots on the informal seminars organized by Professor J V Beck at Michigan State University, which were initiated in 1987. The organization of this Conference, which took place in Dourdan (Paris) France, 15-19 June 2008, was made possible through a joint effort by four research departments from four different universities: LEMTA (Laboratoire de Mécanique Théorique et Appliquée, Nancy-Université) LMS (Laboratoire de Mécanique des Solides, Ecole Polytechnique, Paris) LMAC (Laboratoire de Mathématiques Appliquées, UTC Compiègne) LTN (Laboratoire de Thermocinétique, Université de Nantes) It received support from three organizations: SFT (Société Française de Thermique: French Heat Transfer Association) ACSM (Association Calcul de Structures et Simulation : Computational Structural Mechanics Association) GdR Ondes - CNRS (`Waves' Network, French National Center for Scientific Research) The objective of the conference was to provide the opportunity for interaction and cross-fertilization between designers of inverse methods and practitioners. The delegates came from very different fields, such as applied mathematics, heat transfer, solid mechanics, tomography.... Consequently the sessions were organised along mostly methodological topics in order to facilitate interaction among participants who might not meet otherwise. The present proceedings, published in the Journal of Physics: Conference Series, gathers the four plenary invited lectures and the full-length versions of 103 presentations. The latter have been reviewed by the scientific committee (see

  20. Proceedings of the 26th International Cryogenic Engineering Conference - International Cryogenic Material Conference 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Sharma, R. G.; Kar, S.

    2017-02-01

    International Conference ICEC 26 - ICMC 2016 was organized at New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016. Previous conference ICEC25-ICMC 2014 was held at the University of Twente, The Netherlands in July 2014. Next Conference ICEC 27- ICMC 2018 will be held at Oxford, UK during September 3-7, 2018 1. Introduction This is a biennial international conference on cryogenic engineering and cryogenics materials organized by the International Cryogenic Engineering Committee and the International Cryogenic Material Committee. For some years, the host country has been alternating between Europe and Asia. The present conference was held at the Manekshaw Convention Centre, New Delhi, India during March 7-11, 2016 and hosted jointly by the Indian Cryogenics Council (ICC) and the Inter-University Accelerator Centre (IUAC), New Delhi. Put all together as many as 547 persons participated in the conference. Out of these 218 were foreign delegates coming from 25 countries and the rest from India. 2. Inaugural Session & Course Lectures The pre conference short course lectures on “Cryocoolers” and “Superconducting Materials for Power Applications” were organized on 7th March. Cryocooler course was given jointly by Dr. Chao Wang from M/s. Cryomech, USA and Prof. Milind Atrey from IIT Bombay, India. The Course on Superconducting Materials was given by Prof. Venkat Selvamanickam from the University of Houston, USA. The conference was inaugurated in the morning of March 8th in a typical Indian tradition and in the presence of the Chief Guest, Dr. R Chidambaram (Principle Scientific Adviser to Govt. of India), Guest of Honour, Prof. H Devaraj (Vice Chairman University Grant Commission), Prof Marcel ter Brake ( Chair, ICEC Board), Prof. Wilfried Goldacker (Chair, ICMC board), Dr. D Kanjilal (Director IUAC), Dr R K Bhandari, (President, Indian Cryogenic Council ). Dr. T S Datta, Chair Local Organizing Committee coordinated the proceedings of the inaugural function. 3. Technical

  1. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R.; Zheng, Shao-Liang; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Clardy, Jon

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  2. Analysis of rapidly synthesized guest-filled porous complexes with synchrotron radiation: practical guidelines for the crystalline sponge method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramadhar, Timothy R. [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States); Zheng, Shao-Liang [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 02138 (United States); Chen, Yu-Sheng [ChemMatCARS, Center for Advanced Radiation Sources, The University of Chicago c/o Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois, 60439 (United States); Clardy, Jon, E-mail: jon-clardy@hms.harvard.edu [Department of Biological Chemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, Harvard Medical School, 240 Longwood Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts, 02115 (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This report describes complete practical guidelines and insights for the crystalline sponge method, which have been derived through the first use of synchrotron radiation on these systems, and includes a procedure for faster synthesis of the sponges. These guidelines will be applicable to crystal sponge data collected at synchrotrons or in-house facilities, and will allow researchers to obtain reliable high-quality data and construct chemically and physically sensible models for guest structural determination. A detailed set of synthetic and crystallographic guidelines for the crystalline sponge method based upon the analysis of expediently synthesized crystal sponges using third-generation synchrotron radiation are reported. The procedure for the synthesis of the zinc-based metal–organic framework used in initial crystal sponge reports has been modified to yield competent crystals in 3 days instead of 2 weeks. These crystal sponges were tested on some small molecules, with two being unexpectedly difficult cases for analysis with in-house diffractometers in regard to data quality and proper space-group determination. These issues were easily resolved by the use of synchrotron radiation using data-collection times of less than an hour. One of these guests induced a single-crystal-to-single-crystal transformation to create a larger unit cell with over 500 non-H atoms in the asymmetric unit. This led to a non-trivial refinement scenario that afforded the best Flack x absolute stereochemical determination parameter to date for these systems. The structures did not require the use of PLATON/SQUEEZE or other solvent-masking programs, and are the highest-quality crystalline sponge systems reported to date where the results are strongly supported by the data. A set of guidelines for the entire crystallographic process were developed through these studies. In particular, the refinement guidelines include strategies to refine the host framework, locate guests and determine

  3. Special report. Hospitals that are becoming 'hotel friendly' to guests ... and the role played by security officers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Faced with increasing competition, hospitals in New York City are developing programs to become more user friendly and, like hotels, to treat patients more as "guests" than as "customers." These programs, which have particular applications for security personnel, are also seeking to improve communications and relationships among the hospital's medical staff and other employees. In this report, we'll describe some of these efforts in which hospitals are turning to hoteliers, consultants, and others for advice in the area of customer service, and the role seen for hospital security.

  4. Passivation of ZnO Nanowire Guests and 3D Inverse Opal Host Photoanodes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Labouchere, Philippe

    2014-04-23

    A hierarchical host-guest nanostructured photoanode is reported for dye-sensitized solar cells. It is composed of ZnO nanowires grown in situ into the macropores of a 3D ZnO inverse opal structure, which acts both as a seed layer and as a conductive backbone host. Using a combination of self-assembly, hydrothermal or electrodeposition of single crystalline ZnO nanowires and TiO2 passivation, a novel photoanode with scattering capability for optimal light harvesting is fabricated. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Can we beat the biotin-avidin pair?: cucurbit[7]uril-based ultrahigh affinity host-guest complexes and their applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Dinesh; Khedkar, Jayshree K; Park, Kyeng Min; Kim, Kimoon

    2015-12-07

    The design of synthetic, monovalent host-guest molecular recognition pairs is still challenging and of particular interest to inquire into the limits of the affinity that can be achieved with designed systems. In this regard, cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]), an important member of the host family cucurbit[n]uril (CB[n], n = 5-8, 10, 14), has attracted much attention because of its ability to form ultra-stable complexes with multiple guests. The strong hydrophobic effect between the host cavity and guests, ion-dipole and dipole-dipole interactions of guests with CB portals helps in cooperative and multiple noncovalent interactions that are essential for realizing such strong complexations. These highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited in many applications including affinity chromatography, biomolecule immobilization, protein isolation, biological catalysis, and sensor technologies. In this review, we summarize the progress in the development of high affinity guests for CB[7], factors affecting the stability of complexes, theoretical insights, and the utility of these high affinity pairs in different challenging applications.

  6. Host-guest chemistry of dendrimer-drug complexes: 7. Formation of stable inclusions between acetylated dendrimers and drugs bearing multiple charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Min; Zhang, Jiahai; Wu, Qinglin; Xu, Tongwen; Cheng, Yiyun

    2012-03-15

    Drug molecules bearing multiple charges usually form precipitates with cationic dendrimers, which presents a challenge during the preparation of dendrimer inclusions for these drugs. In the present study, fully acetylated polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimers were proposed as stable vehicles for drug molecules bearing two negative charges such as Congo red and indocyanine green. NMR techniques including (1)H NMR and (1)H-(1)H NOESY were used to characterize the host-guest chemistry of acetylated dendrimer and these guest molecules. The cationic PAMAM dendrimer was found to form a precipitate with Congo red and indocyanine green, but the acetylated one avoided the formation of cross-linking structures in aqueous solutions. NOESY studies revealed the encapsulation of Congo red and indocyanine green within the interior cavities of PAMAM dendrimers at mild acidic conditions and acetylated dendrimers show much stronger ability to encapsulate the guest molecules than cationic ones. Also, UV-vis-NIR studies suggest that acetylated dendrimers significantly improve the photostability of indocyanine green and prevent the formation of indocyanine green J-aggregates in aqueous solutions. The present study provides a new insight into dendrimer-based host-guest systems, especially for those guest molecules bearing multiple charges. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  7. 4 September 2015 - Signature of the guest book by Ambassador Oh Joon, Seventy-first President, United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations in New York with Director for Administration and General infrastructure S. Lettow.

    CERN Multimedia

    Gadmer, Jean-Claude Robert

    2015-01-01

    4 September 2015 - Signature of the guest book by Ambassador Oh Joon, Seventy-first President, United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC), Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Republic of Korea to the United Nations in New York with Director for Administration and General infrastructure S. Lettow. Also present: Head of IT Department F. Hemmer with E. Bjorgo and F. Pisano visiting the UNITAR’s operational satellite applications programme on CERN site in building 597. The delegation is accompanied throughout by Adviser to the Director-General, in charge of Relations with International Organisations M. Bona.

  8. International Journal of Humanistic Studies: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Author Guidelines. The International Journal of Humanistic Studies invites submissions of research-based studies addressing current issues in the area of Humanistic Studies. Manuscripts should be between 6000 and 9000 words. The article must have a clear, crisp and concise title. Manuscripts are refereed anonymously; ...

  9. The United Nations University: The Concept, History, Structure, Financing, Objectives, Centres and Programmes. Guest Editorial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, J.

    2000-01-01

    The United Nations University (UNU) is an international academic organization which brings together leading international scholars to tackle world problems. This article describes for South African scholars, institutions, governments, and their agencies the importance of the work being undertaken by the UNU and encourages their participation. (EV)

  10. Invitation strategies and coverage in the population-based cancer screening programmes in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vale, Diama B; Anttila, Ahti; Ponti, Antonio; Senore, Carlo; Sankaranaryanan, Rengaswamy; Ronco, Guglielmo; Segnan, Nereo; Tomatis, Mariano; Žakelj, Maja P; Elfström, Klara M; Lönnberg, Stefan; Dillner, Joakim; Basu, Partha

    2018-03-21

    The aim of this study was to describe the compliance of the population-based cancer screening programmes in the European Union Member States to the invitation strategies enumerated in the European Guidelines and the impact of such strategies on the invitational coverage. Experts in screening programme monitoring from the respective countries provided data. Coverage by invitation was calculated as the proportion of individuals in the target age range receiving a screening invitation over the total number of annualized eligible population. The invitation strategies of 30 breasts, 25 cervical and 27 colorectal national or regional population-based screening programmes are described. Individual mail invitations are sent by 28 breasts, 20 cervical and 25 colorectal screening programmes. Faecal occult blood test kits are sent by post in 17 of the colorectal cancer screening programmes. The majority of programmes claimed to have a population registry, although some use health insurance data as the database for sending invitations. At least 95% invitation coverage was reached by 16 breast, six cervical and five colorectal screening programmes. Majority of the programmes comply with the invitation strategies enumerated in the European guidelines, although there is still scope for improvements. Coverage by invitation is below the desirable level in many population-based cancer screening programmes in European Union.

  11. Absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip host–guest systems in the SAMPL5 blind challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofoleanu, Florentina; Pickard, Frank C.; König, Gerhard; Huang, Jing; Damjanović, Ana; Baek, Minkyung; Seok, Chaok; Brooks, Bernard R.

    2016-01-01

    Herein, we report the absolute binding free energy calculations of CBClip complexes in the SAMPL5 blind challenge. Initial conformations of CBClip complexes were obtained using docking and molecular dynamics simulations. Free energy calculations were performed using thermodynamic integration (TI) with soft-core potentials and Bennett’s acceptance ratio (BAR) method based on a serial insertion scheme. We compared the results obtained with TI simulations with soft-core potentials and Hamiltonian replica exchange simulations with the serial insertion method combined with the BAR method. The results show that the difference between the two methods can be mainly attributed to the van der Waals free energies, suggesting that either the simulations used for TI or the simulations used for BAR, or both are not fully converged and the two sets of simulations may have sampled difference phase space regions. The penalty scores of force field parameters of the 10 guest molecules provided by CHARMM Generalized Force Field can be an indicator of the accuracy of binding free energy calculations. Among our submissions, the combination of docking and TI performed best, which yielded the root mean square deviation of 2.94 kcal/mol and an average unsigned error of 3.41 kcal/mol for the ten guest molecules. These values were best overall among all participants. However, our submissions had little correlation with experiments. PMID:27677749

  12. Supramolecular Host-Guest System as Ratiometric Fe3+ Ion Sensor Based on Water-Soluble Pillar[5]arene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Qianfang; Lü, Baozhong; Ji, Chendong; Cai, Yang; Yin, Meizhen

    2017-10-18

    Developing a specific, ratiometric, and reversible detection method for metal ions is significant to guard against the threat of metal-caused environmental pollution and organisms poisoning. Here a supramolecular host-guest system (WP5⊃G) based on water-soluble pillar[5]arene (WP5) and water-soluble quaternized perylene diimide derivative (G) was constructed. Morphological transformation was achieved during the process of adding WP5 into G aqueous solution, and a fluorescence "turn-off" phenomenon was observed which was caused by supramolecular photoinduced electron transfer (PET). Meanwhile, hydrophobic effect and electrostatic interaction played important roles in this supramolecular process, which was confirmed by isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC) and ζ potential experiments. Furthermore, the supramolecular host-guest system could be a "turn-on" fluorescent probe for Fe 3+ ion detection through the process of interdicting supramolecular PET. Moreover, the Fe 3+ ion detection showed specific, ratiometric, and reversible performances with a detection limit of 2.13 × 10 -7 M, which might have great potentials in biological and environmental monitoring.

  13. Investigation of the host-guest complexation between 4-sulfocalix[4]arene and nedaplatin for potential use in drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Sherif Ashraf; Ponte, Fortuna; Abd El-Rahman, Mohamed K.; Russo, Nino; Sicilia, Emilia; Shoeib, Tamer

    2018-03-01

    Macromolecules including macrocyclic species have been reported to have the potential to encapsulate biologically active compounds such as drugs through host-guest complexation to increase their solubility, stability and bioavailability. In this paper the first experimental and theoretical investigation of the complexation between nedaplatin, a second generation antineoplastic drug, and p-4-sulfocalix[4]arene, a macromolecule possessing a bipolar amphiphilic structure with good biocompatibility and relatively low haemolytic toxicity for potential use as a drug delivery system is presented. Data from 1H NMR, UV, Job's plot analysis, HPLC and DFT calculations are detailed and suggest the formation of a 1:1 complex. The stability constant of the complex was experimentally estimated to be 3.6 × 104 M- 1 and 2.1 × 104 M- 1 which correspond to values of - 6.2 and - 5.9 kcal mol- 1, respectively for the free energy of complexation while the interaction free energy is calculated to be - 4.9 kcal mol- 1. The formed species is shown to be stabilised in solution through hydrogen bonding between the host and the guest which may allow for this strategy to be effective for potential use in drug delivery.

  14. Through-Space Paramagnetic NMR Effects in Host-Guest Complexes: Potential Ruthenium(III) Metallodrugs with Macrocyclic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyba, Jan; Novák, Martin; Munzarová, Petra; Novotný, Jan; Marek, Radek

    2018-04-05

    The potential of paramagnetic ruthenium(III) compounds for use as anticancer metallodrugs has been investigated extensively during the past several decades. However, the means by which these ruthenium compounds are transported and distributed in living bodies remain relatively unexplored. In this work, we prepared several novel ruthenium(III) compounds with the general structure Na + [ trans-Ru III Cl 4 (DMSO)(L)] - (DMSO = dimethyl sulfoxide), where L stands for pyridine or imidazole linked with adamantane, a hydrophobic chemophore. The supramolecular interactions of these compounds with macrocyclic carriers of the cyclodextrin (CD) and cucurbit[ n]uril (CB) families were investigated by NMR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction analysis, isothermal titration calorimetry, and relativistic DFT methods. The long-range hyperfine NMR effects of the paramagnetic guest on the host macrocycle are related to the distance between them and their relative orientation in the host-guest complex. The CD and CB macrocyclic carriers being studied in this account can be attached to a vector that attracts the drug-carrier system to a specific biological target and our investigation thus introduces a new possibility in the field of targeted delivery of anticancer metallodrugs based on ruthenium(III) compounds.

  15. PREFACE 12th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Stephen; Sullivan, James; White, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    SLOPOS-12 included: Positron Interactions with Surfaces Positron Beam and Detector Technology Positron Interactions with Atoms and Molecules Positronium Science Defects and Vacancies in Materials Porosity and Open Volume in Materials Antimatter in Biomedical Science Anti-hydrogen Studies Positron Transport Annihilation On a sad note, delegates paid tribute to the contributions of one of our colleagues, Chris Beling, who tragically passed away shortly before the meeting. Chris' contributions to positron science and to the education of young scientists were noted in a number of the invited presentations. It is an honour for our community to begin these proceedings with a short tribute to Chris' life by Professor Paul Coleman. The Workshop could not have occurred without the generous support of our sponsors: The ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, The Australian National University, Flinders University, James Cook University, The Institute of Physics (UK) and the Australian Government's Department of Innovation, Industry, Science and Research. It would also not have been possible without the hard work of the Local and International Organising Committees and the friendly and efficient staff at the All Seasons Resort, Magnetic Island. We are most grateful for the on-site assistance of Gillian Drew, the CAMS student and postdoc team, the financial wizardry of Chris Kalos, and the post-Workshop editorial assistance of Julia Wee and Adam Edwards. Finally we would like to thank all of the attendees at SLOPOS12 for their scientific contributions to the Workshop, and for the warm spirit of engagement which characterised the scientific discussions and social occasions. SLOPOS13 will be held in Germany in 2013 and we all look forward to the occasion. Stephen Buckman, James Sullivan and Ronald White(Guest Editors) Local Organising CommitteeInternational Committee Stephen Buckman (Chair, ANU, Canberra)G Amarendra (India) James Sullivan (Secretary, ANU, Canberra)M-F Barthe (France

  16. Space Station - Opportunity for international cooperation and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, K. S.

    1984-01-01

    In connection with his announcement regarding the development of a permanently manned Space Station, President Reagan invited the United States' friends and allies to join in the Space Station program. The President's invitation was preceded by more than two years of interaction between NASA and some of its potential partners in Space Station planning activities. Attention is given to international participation in Space Station planning, international cooperation on the Space Station, the guidelines for international cooperation, and the key challenges. Questions regarding quid pro quos are considered along with aspects of technology transfer, commercial use, problems of management, and the next steps concerning the Space Station program.

  17. PREFACE: 16th International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron, and Ion Technologies (VEIT 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Wolfhard; Guerassimov, Nikolay; Ghelev, Chavdar

    2010-04-01

    peer reviewing. The school comprised nine oral and three poster sessions. Seventeen invited talks of general interest and six progress reports were presented orally. In total 63 contributed papers were presented during the poster sessions. There were several scientific highlights covering fundamentals of interaction of fast particles with solids and challenging practical applications ranging from novel techniques for creating hard coatings, optical/protective layers, biocompatible materials to nanosized structures produced by evaporation, sputtering or external irradiation. Latest results were presented on ion-beam synthesis and modification in both low-energy (deposition and film growth) and high-energy (sputtering, implantation) regimes, and processing of solid materials aiming at patterning the surface or to create nanophase systems towards for electronic or tribological/wear resistant applications. Despite the busy scientific program, the atmosphere was relaxed and informal. The early afternoons of most conference days were free to stimulate both scientific and social interaction between participants, which often took place on the beach. The social program included a welcome reception, a conference banquet, and an outing to historical landmarks in Bulgaria. VEIT 2009 owes its success to many people. The International Advisory Committee shaped the scientific program and ensured high-quality plenary presentations by careful selection of invited speakers. The Local Committee bore the brunt of the organization both at the conference site and in dealing with correspondence, abstracts, and manuscripts for these proceedings. We are grateful to our sponsors Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany and Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria for their generosity that enabled us to support the attendance of students and provided support to deal with mailing, printing, renting the conference site, etc. We would like to thank also all authors for their

  18. Alternative Forms of International Cooperation: Comparing Their Efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinbergen, Jan

    1978-01-01

    The author, an economist, discusses nine forms of international cooperation according to their strengths, and invites representatives of other disciplines to comment on international cooperation. Discusses relevant concepts and the estimation of optimal procedures for cooperation. Available from: Unipub, Box 433, Murray Hill Station, New York, New…

  19. IDRC Bulletin — International Women's Day 2018 | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    In this issue we celebrate women worldwide. Women wearing traditional Darfuri outfits participate at the parade. International Women's Day 2018. Empowering women. In recognition of International Women's Day, we invite you to celebrate women's accomplishments and to learn more about the challenges they face ...

  20. Transfer and control of molecular chirality in the 1 : 2 host-guest supramolecular complex consisting of Mg(II)bisporphyrin and chiral diols: the effect of H-bonding on the rationalization of chirality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikbal, Sk Asif; Brahma, Sanfaori; Rath, Sankar Prasad

    2014-11-21

    A clear rationalization of the origin of chirality transfer from an optically active diol guest to an achiral Mg(ii)bisporphyrin host in a series of 1 : 2 host-guest supramolecular complexes has been reported here that has so far remained the most outstanding issue for the chirogenic process.

  1. International Conference on Cosmic Rays

    CERN Multimedia

    W.O. LOCK

    1964-01-01

    Towards the end of last year the 8th International conference on cosmic rays, held under the auspices of the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics (I.U.P.A.P.) and the Department of Atomic Energy of the Government of India, was held at Jaipur, India. Among the participants was W.O. Lock, head of CERN's Emulsion Group, who gave an invited talk on recent work in the field of what is normally known as high-energy physics — though in the context of this conference such energies seem quite low. In this article, Dr. Lock gives a general review of the conference and of the subjects discussed.

  2. International conference on "Photosynthesis research for sustainability-2013: in honor of Jalal A. Aliyev", held during June 5-9, 2013, Baku, Azerbaijan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Huseynova, Irada M; Govindjee

    2013-12-01

    In this brief report, we provide a pictorial essay on an international conference "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2013 in honor of Jalal A. Aliyev" that was held in Baku, Azerbaijan, during June 5-9, 2013 ( http://photosynthesis2013.cellreg.org/ ). We begin this report with a brief note on Jalal Aliyev, the honored scientist, and on John Walker (1997 Nobel laureate in Chemistry) who was a distinguished guest and lecturer at the Conference. We briefly describe the Conference, and the program. In addition to the excellent scientific program, a special feature of the Conference was the presentation of awards to nine outstanding young investigators; they are recognized in this report. We have also included several photographs to show the pleasant ambience at this conference. (See http://photosynthesis2013.cellreg.org/Photo-Gallery.php ; https://www.dropbox.com/sh/qcr124dajwffwh6/TlcHBvFu4H?m ; and https://www.copy.com/s/UDlxb9fgFXG9/Baku for more photographs taken by the authors as well as by others.) We invite the readers to the next conferences on "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2014: in honor of Vladimir A. Shuvalov" to be held during June 2-7, 2014, in Pushchino, Russia. Detailed information for this will be posted at the Website: http://photosynthesis2014.cellreg.org/ , and for the subsequent conference on "Photosynthesis Research for Sustainability-2015" to be held in May or June 2015, in Baku, Azerbaijan, at http://photosynthesis2015.cellreg.org/ .

  3. 11th International Conference on Clustering Aspects of Nuclear Structure and Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Preface The 11 th edition of the International Conference on Clustering Aspects of Nuclear Structure and Dynamics (CLUSTER‘16) was held in Napoli, Italy, on May 23-27 2016. All the Conference Sessions took place in the magnificent Complesso Monumentale dei Ss. Marcellino e Festo , located in the Historical Centre of Naples. This is one of the most prestigious building complexes of the Federico II University of Naples, the main home institution of the organizers, together with the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (Naples division). This building is 500 years old; in the XVIII century, it was reshaped by Luigi Vanvitelli, a famous architect of the pre-Neoclassical period in Italy, designer of the prestigious Royal Palace in the near town of Caserta. The site of Plenary Sessions was the Church of Ss. Marcellino e Festo , where all the participants were surrounded by the Baroque frescoes by Belisario Corenzio and, among the others, the paintings of Battistello Caracciolo, Massimo Stanzione, Giuseppe Simonelli and Francesco De Mura, important artists of the late Baroque period in South Italy. The sites of Parallel Sessions were two halls in the arcade of the S. Marcellino cloister: this gave the opportunity to the participants to enjoy the beauty of the architecture of the cloister with its fountains, gardens, sculptures. As organizers of the Conference, our main aims were: (1) to provide an excellent programme, with the expectation to be a reference point for the Nuclear Cluster Physics in the next four years; (2) to assure a very relaxing stay to the participants, allowing them to explore the bounty of artistic, and also culinary, masterpieces that Naples offers to its guests. The first point was assured by all the conveners that, with their excellent talks, gave a very precise and complete overview of the most recent achievements on Nuclear Cluster Physics, both from the experimental and theoretical point of view. We are indebted with the International

  4. 14th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings arose from the 14th International Workshop on Slow Positron Beam Techniques (SLOPOS14), which was held at Kunibiki Messe, Matsue, Shimane prefecture, Japan, from the 22nd—27th May 2016. Meetings in the SLOPOS series are held every three years. The SLOPOS workshop series has traditionally been devoted to investigations on the production of positron and positronium beams, their fundamental physics and chemistry, and their applications to materials such as metals, semiconductors and soft matter. During the workshop numerous applications using positron and positronium beams were also presented, clearly demonstrating the usefulness of such beams to the determination of surface structure, defect characterization as well as to fundamental scientific studies. For SLOPOS14 the main subjects of the workshop included the following: • Positron transport and beam technology • Pulsed positron beams and positron traps • Defect profiling in bulk and layered structures • Nano structures, porous materials and thin films • Surface and interface analysis • Positronium formation, emission and beams • Positron and positronium interactions with atoms and molecules • Many positrons and anti-hydrogen • Improvement of experimental techniques 106 delegates from 14 countries participated in the SLOPOS14, including 31 student delegates, which was a most encouraging sign for the future. The scientific program comprised 5 plenary talks, 22 invited talks, 32 contributed talks and 46 posters presented during two poster sessions. Student prizes were awarded for the best presented scientific contributions by 4 students from University of College London, Universität der Bundeswehr München and The University of Tokyo. On a sad note, delegates paid tribute to the contributions of our recently deceased colleagues, Prof. A. Seeger, Prof. R.N. West, Prof. T.C. Griffith, and Prof. Z. Tang. Memorial talks were given and a one minute silence was observed before the

  5. Retrievability: An international overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    Using available information from the published literature and material obtained from a network of contacts, a short introductory overview of international developments in the field of retrievability of emplaced nuclear waste was produced for the Swedish National Siting Coordinator for Nuclear Waste Disposal. This examined the issue in terms of a number of basic questions: Definition, Need, Design Implications, Safeguards for Fissile Material, Public Acceptability and Safety Assessment. The report was submitted in February 1999, and acted as a catalyst for the organisation of an international seminar by KASAM, the Swedish National Council for Nuclear Waste (these proceedings). This paper describes the report contents, and points to the invited papers at the seminar which expand on and update the limited descriptions in the original report. (author)

  6. EDITORIAL: Invited papers from ISAMMA 2010 (Sendai, Japan, 12-16 July 2010) Invited papers from ISAMMA 2010 (Sendai, Japan, 12-16 July 2010)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, M.; Saito, H.

    2011-02-01

    This cluster issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains a collection of papers based on invited talks given at the 2nd International Symposium on Advanced Magnetic Materials and Applications 2010 (ISAMMA 2010) held from 12-16 July 2010 in Sendai, Japan. ISAMMA is the first consolidated symposium of three independent symposia held in the Asian region. ISPMM (International Symposium on Physics of Magnetic Materials) of Japan started in 1987 in Sendai, and was held six times: Beijing (1992), Seoul (1995), Sendai (1998), Taipei (2001) and Singapore (2005). ISAMT (International Symposium of Advanced Magnetic Technology) of Taiwan and SOMMA (International Symposium on Magnetic Materials and Applications) of Korea both began in 1999 and were each held five times up to 2005. ISAMMA was established as a new international symposium which will be held every three years in Asia. The concept of this unified international symposium was mainly led by Professor M Takahashi, Conference Chair of ISAMMA 2010. The first memorial symposium, ISAMMA 2007, was held in Jeju Island, Korea, during the period from 28 May to 1 June 2007. The main purpose and scope of ISAMMA is to provide an opportunity for scientists and engineers from all over the world to meet in Asia to discuss recent advances in the study of magnetic materials and their physics, spin-related phenomena and materials. The categories of ISAMMA 2010 were: fundamental properties of magnetic materials; hard/soft magnetic materials and applications; spintronics materials and devices; structured materials; multi functional magnetic materials; spin dynamics and micromagnetics; magnetic storage; materials for applications (sensors, high-frequency, power, and bio/medical devices); magnetic imaging and characterization. The scientific programme began on Tuesday 13 July 2010 with the opening remark by the Symposium Chairman. The conference was attended by 511 participants from 23 countries, with about 40 per cent from

  7. International relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2009-01-01

    The French nuclear safety authority (A.S.N.) has participated at different meeting in European Union as nuclear decommissioning assistance programme(N.D.A.P.), Regulatory assistance management group (R.A.M.G.) and Instrument for nuclear safety cooperation (I.N.S.C.). The members of Western European nuclear regulator association (W.E.N.R.A.) met and discussed about the future of W.E.N.R.A. and its representativeness and its cooperation with European nuclear safety regulator group (E.N.S.R.E.G.) and head of European radiation control authorities (H.E.R.C.A.). About International relations it is to noticed a meeting at the invitation of IAEA to discuss about the possibility to resort to the Ines scale for medical events. An audit mission under the IAEA aegis stood at Fessenheim, O.S.A.R.T. for operational safety review team. Two years and a half passed by between the audit mission Integrated regulatory review service (I.R.S.S.) welcome by A.S.N. in november 2006 and the audit mission follow up in 2009, 12 experts from 11 different countries and coordinated by three representatives of IAEA worked, the conclusions were that 90% of recommendations made to A.S.N. in 2006 were treated in a satisfying way; the evaluation gives three new recommendations, 7 new suggestions and 11 new correct practices. A meeting of the commission on safety standards (C.S.S.) stood in april 2009. Some others meeting are to be noticed: nuclear safety and security group (N.S.S.G.), expert group on nuclear and radiation safety (E.G.N.R.S.) instituted by the council of the Baltic sea states (C.B.S.S.) treats data exchange on the national networks of dose rates and surveillance of radioactivity in air. International nuclear regulator association (I.N.R.A.) held its first meeting in april 2009 at Seoul (Korea). Bilateral relations with Poland, Italy, Ukraine and Germany planed cooperation or information exchange in the field of nuclear safety. Participation to conference in Usa, meetings with United

  8. Optimal topotactic conversion of layered octosilicate to RWR-type zeolite by separating the formation stages of interlayer condensation and elimination of organic guest molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asakura, Yusuke; Osada, Shimon; Hosaka, Nami; Terasawa, Taichi; Kuroda, Kazuyuki

    2014-07-21

    We demonstrate that the separation of two stages of interlayer condensation under refluxing and elimination of organic guests provides the optimal conditions for the formation of RWR-type zeolite from layered octosilicate. The obtained RWR-type zeolite has higher quality than any other RWR-type zeolite reported previously.

  9. Selectivity and stoichiometry boosting of beta-cyclodextrin in cationic/anionic surfactant systems: when host-guest equilibrium meets biased aggregation equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yu, Caifang; Deng, Manli; Jin, Changwen; Wang, Yilin; Yan, Yun; Huang, Jianbin

    2010-02-18

    Cationic surfactant/anionic surfactant/beta-CD ternary aqueous systems provide a platform for the coexistence of the host-guest (beta-CD/surfactant) equilibrium and the biased aggregation (monomeric/aggregated surfactants) equilibrium. We report here that the interplay between the two equilibria dominates the systems as follows. (1) The biased aggregation equilibrium imposes an apparent selectivity on the host-guest equilibrium, namely, beta-CD has to always selectively bind the major surfactant (molar fraction > 0.5) even if binding constants of beta-CD to the pair of surfactants are quite similar. (2) In return, the host-guest equilibrium amplifies the bias of the aggregation equilibrium, that is, the selective binding partly removes the major surfactant from the aggregates and leaves the aggregate composition approaching the electroneutral mixing stoichiometry. (3) This composition variation enhances electrostatic attractions between oppositely charged surfactant head groups, thus resulting in less-curved aggregates. In particular, the present apparent host-guest selectivity is of remarkably high values, and the selectivity stems from the bias of the aggregation equilibrium rather than the difference in binding constants. Moreover, beta-CD is defined as a "stoichiometry booster" for the whole class of cationic/anionic surfactant systems, which provides an additional degree of freedom to directly adjust aggregate compositions of the systems. The stoichiometry boosting of the compositions can in turn affect or even determine microstructures and macroproperties of the systems.

  10. Ab initio design of drug carriers for zoledronate guest molecule using phosphonated and sulfonated calix[4]arene and calix[4]resorcinarene host molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Yong-Man; Yu, Chol-Jun; Kim, Jin-Song; Kim, Song-Un

    2018-04-01

    Monomolecular drug carriers based on calix[n]-arenes and -resorcinarenes containing the interior cavity can enhance the affinity and specificity of the osteoporosis inhibitor drug zoledronate (ZOD). In this work we investigate the suitability of nine different calix[4]-arenes and -resorcinarenes based macrocycles as hosts for the ZOD guest molecule by conducting {\\it ab initio} density functional theory calculations for structures and energetics of eighteen different host-guest complexes. For the optimized molecular structures of the free, phosphonated, sulfonated calix[4]-arenes and -resorcinarenes, the geometric sizes of their interior cavities are measured and compared with those of the host-guest complexes in order to check the appropriateness for host-guest complex formation. Our calculations of binding energies indicate that in gaseous states some of the complexes might be unstable but in aqueous states almost all of the complexes can be formed spontaneously. Of the two different docking ways, the insertion of ZOD with the \\ce{P-C-P} branch into the cavity of host is easier than that with the nitrogen containing heterocycle of ZOD. The work will open a way for developing effective drug delivering systems for the ZOD drug and promote experimentalists to synthesize them.

  11. A Three - Dimensional Channel Supramolecular Architecture Based on 3-Amino-2-(4-dimethylaminophenyldiazenyl)-1-phenylbut-2en-1-one and Aromatic Guests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Macháček, V.; Bertolasi, V.; Šimůnek, P.; Svobodová, M.; Svoboda, Jan; Černošková, E.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 1 (2010), s. 85-91 ISSN 1528-7483 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : X-ray structure * host-guest inclusion * compounds Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.390, year: 2010

  12. Sales Education beyond the Classroom: Building Participative Learning Experiences in Sales Management through the CMGS Method (Case Method with Guest Speakers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruizalba Robledo, José Luis; Almenta López, Estefanía; Vallespín Arán, María

    2014-01-01

    The overarching goal of working through the CMGS Method (Case Method with Guest Speakers) in Sales Management courses is to provide Business and marketing learners with practical knowledge about how a sales manager can deal with a wide variety of possible professional scenarios. Even when the case method itself is an excellent way to equip…

  13. Deciphering the perturbation effect of urea on the supramolecular host-guest interaction of biologically active hydrophobic molecule inside the nanocavity of cyclodextrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maity, Banibrata; Chatterjee, Aninda; Ahmed, Sayeed Ashique; Seth, Debabrata, E-mail: debabrata@iitp.ac.in

    2017-03-15

    The present work articulates the supramolecular interaction and the formation of host-guest complex between the biologically active hydrophobic coumarin derivative and cyclodextrins by using several spectroscopic, calorimetric and microscopic techniques. All the studies clearly revealed that in presence of cyclodextrins (CDs), coumarin forms 1:1 stoichiometric complex. From all the study, we have found that with gradual increasing the cavity diameter of the hosts, the binding efficiency of the complexes gradually increases. The small population of the non emissive twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) state of coumarin molecule turns into highly emissive in presence of γ-CD owing to its greater cavity diameter. The emissive TICT band is not found in β-CD complex due to its comparative small hydrophilic exterior and less polar environment. The present finding also interpret the perturbation effect of urea on host-guest complexes. In the presence of urea, the TICT emissive band of γ-CD is completely diminished. From, {sup 1}H NMR study it was observed that –NEt{sub 2} moiety of 7-DCCAE molecule is deeply buried inside the hydrophobic cavity of the CDs and forms host-guest complexes. Isothermal titration calorimetry measurement also indicates the formation of 1:1 host-guest complexes.

  14. Education Matters: Continuity and Change in Attitudes to Education and Social Mobility among the Offspring of Turkish Guest Workers in the Netherlands and Austria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pásztor, Adél

    2014-01-01

    By comparing the educational situation of second-generation Turks in the Netherlands and Austria, the paper investigates the reasons behind the differential higher educational gains of the descendants of guest workers in the two countries. By relying on in-depth interviews with second-generation Turks, the paper illustrates how ethnic…

  15. International Seminar on Advanced Pulsed Neutron Sources PANS-II. Invited talks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepelyshev, Yu.N.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual design of creating intense pulsed neutron sources based on high-current accelerators and pulsed reactors for neutron scattering experiments is considered. The progress in high-efficiency moderator developments is shown. Results of diffraction studied are presented

  16. 77 FR 58204 - International Joint Commission Invites Public Comment on Upper Great Lakes Report via...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... to dial in 10 minutes before the 7 p.m. (EDT) start time: English speaking line: Telephone 877-413-4814, PIN 7297456 French speaking line: Telephone 877-413-4814, PIN 2641187 Written comments may also...

  17. Host-Guest Engineering of Layered Double Hydroxides towards Efficient Oxygen Evolution Reaction: Recent Advances and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianming Li

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical water splitting has great potential in the storage of intermittent energy from the sun, wind, or other renewable sources for sustainable clean energy applications. However, the anodic oxygen evolution reaction (OER usually determines the efficiency of practical water electrolysis due to its sluggish four-electron process. Layered double hydroxides (LDHs have attracted increasing attention as one of the ideal and promising electrocatalysts for water oxidation due to their excellent activity, high stability in basic conditions, as well as their earth-abundant compositions. In this review, we discuss the recent progress on LDH-based OER electrocatalysts in terms of active sites, host-guest engineering, and catalytic performances. Moreover, further developments and challenges in developing promising electrocatalysts based on LDHs are discussed from the viewpoint of molecular design and engineering.

  18. Multicolor Fluorescence Writing Based on Host-Guest Interactions and Force-Induced Fluorescence-Color Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Yuki; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2015-06-26

    A new strategy is reported for multicolor fluorescence writing on thin solid films with mechanical forces. This concept is illustrated by the use of a green-fluorescent pentiptycene derivative 1, which forms variably colored fluorescent exciplexes: a change from yellow to red was observed with anilines, and fluorescence quenching (a change to black) occurred in the presence of benzoquinone. Mechanical forces, such as grinding and shearing, induced a crystalline-to-amorphous phase transition in both the pristine and guest-adsorbed solids that led to a change in the fluorescence color (mechanofluorochromism) and a memory of the resulting color. Fluorescence drawings of five or more colors were created on glass or paper and could be readily erased by exposure to air and dichloromethane fumes. The structural and mechanistic aspects of the observations are also discussed. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Self-assembly behavior of a linear-star supramolecular amphiphile based on host-guest complexation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Xing; Yang, Fei; Shen, Hong; You, Yezi; Wu, Decheng

    2014-11-04

    A star polymer, β-cyclodextrin-poly(l-lactide) (β-CD-PLLA), and a linear polymer, azobenzene-poly(ethylene glycol) (Azo-PEG), could self-assemble into a supramolecular amphiphilic copolymer (β-CD-PLLA@Azo-PEG) based on the host-guest interaction between β-CD and azobenzene moieties. This linear-star supramolecular amphiphilic copolymer further self-assembled into a variety of morphologies, including sphere-like micelle, carambola-like micelle, naan-like micelle, shuttle-like lamellae, tube-like fiber, and random curled-up lamellae, by tuning the length of hydrophilic or hydrophobic chains. The variation of morphology was closely related to the topological structure and block ratio of the supramolecular amphiphiles. These self-assembly structures could disassemble upon an ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation.

  20. Organic light-emitting diodes for lighting: High color quality by controlling energy transfer processes in host-guest-systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weichsel, Caroline; Reineke, Sebastian; Furno, Mauro; Lüssem, Björn; Leo, Karl

    2012-02-01

    Exciton generation and transfer processes in a multilayer organic light-emitting diode (OLED) are studied in order to realize OLEDs with warm white color coordinates and high color-rendering index (CRI). We investigate a host-guest-system containing four phosphorescent emitters and two matrix materials with different transport properties. We show, by time-resolved spectroscopy, that an energy back-transfer from the blue emitter to the matrix materials occurs, which can be used to transport excitons to the other emitter molecules. Furthermore, we investigate the excitonic and electronic transfer processes by designing suitable emission layer stacks. As a result, we obtain an OLED with Commission Internationale de lÉclairage (CIE) coordinates of (0.444;0.409), a CRI of 82, and a spectrum independent of the applied current. The OLED shows an external quantum efficiency of 10% and a luminous efficacy of 17.4 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2.

  1. International Trade. International Business

    OpenAIRE

    Мохнюк, А. М.; Mokhniuk, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Work programme of the study course “International Trade. International Business” was prepared in accordance with educational and vocational training program for bachelors of training direction 6.030601 “Management”.

  2. Lipid-Mediated Clusters of Guest Molecules in Model Membranes and Their Dissolving in the Presence of Lipid Rafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kardash, Maria E; Dzuba, Sergei A

    2017-05-25

    The clustering of molecules is an important feature of plasma membrane organization. It is challenging to develop methods for quantifying membrane heterogeneities because of their transient nature and small size. Here, we obtained evidence that transient membrane heterogeneities can be frozen at cryogenic temperatures which allows the application of solid-state experimental techniques sensitive to the nanoscale distance range. We employed the pulsed version of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy, the electron spin echo (ESE) technique, for spin-labeled molecules in multilamellar lipid bilayers. ESE decays were refined for pure contribution of spin-spin magnetic dipole-dipolar interaction between the labels; these interactions manifest themselves at a nanometer distance range. The bilayers were prepared from different types of saturated and unsaturated lipids and cholesterol (Chol); in all cases, a small amount of guest spin-labeled substances 5-doxyl-stearic-acid (5-DSA) or 3β-doxyl-5α-cholestane (DChl) was added. The local concentration found of 5-DSA and DChl molecules was remarkably higher than the mean concentration in the bilayer, evidencing the formation of lipid-mediated clusters of these molecules. To our knowledge, formation of nanoscale clusters of guest amphiphilic molecules in biological membranes is a new phenomenon suggested only recently. Two-dimensional 5-DSA molecular clusters were found, whereas flat DChl molecules were found to be clustered into stacked one-dimensional structures. These clusters disappear when the Chol content is varied between the boundaries known for lipid raft formation at room temperatures. The room temperature EPR evidenced entrapping of DChl molecules in the rafts.

  3. Effects of cyclopentane on CO2 hydrate formation and dissociation as a co-guest molecule for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Jia-nan; Yang, Ming-jun; Liu, Yu; Wang, Da-yong; Song, Yong-chen

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • CP decreases CO 2 hydrate phase equilibrium pressure by forming CO 2 -CP hydrates. • The increase of CP can’t decrease hydrates phase equilibrium pressure unlimitedly. • Higher CP concentration lowers CO 2 hydrate gas uptake. • The optimal CP molar ratio is 0.01 based on hydrate phase equilibrium and gas uptake. - Abstract: Cyclopentane (CP) is considered to be a potential co-guest molecule in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) hydrate-based desalination. The experimental thermodynamic data of CO 2 -CP hydrates were measured for a salt solution, where CP was chosen as a hydrate promoter. Seven experimental cases (62 cycles) were studied with different molar ratios of CP/water (0, 0.0025, 0.005, 0.0075, 0.01, 0.02, and 0.03). Hydrate phase equilibrium data were generated using an isochoric method, and the hydrate saturations were calculated based on gas uptake. The results indicated that the increase in CP concentration significantly decreased the CO 2 hydrate equilibrium pressure to a certain limit; the hydrate saturation also decreased during this process. Also, it was determined that CP encouraged the formation of s-II double CO 2 -CP hydrates, which are different from s-I simple CO 2 hydrate. The CO 2 -CP guest provides a strengthened stability and moderate hydrate phase equilibrium conditions for hydrate-based desalination. The recommended optimal molar ratio of CP is 0.01 when the increase in equilibrium was more than 10 K, and the decrease in hydrate saturation was less than 2%.

  4. 14 CFR 11.85 - Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for exemption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Does FAA invite public comment on petitions... Rulemaking and for Exemption § 11.85 Does FAA invite public comment on petitions for exemption? Yes, FAA... the reasons for requesting it; and (e) A request for comments to assist FAA in evaluating the petition. ...

  5. Do invitations for cervical screening provide sufficient information to enable informed choice?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolthoff, Sie Karen; Hestbech, Mie Sara; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl

    2016-01-01

    or unmentioned. The same applied to other important harms, such as false-positive results and the psychological consequences from an abnormal test result. The majority of invitations took a paternalistic approach. While only two invitations (17%) included a pre-assigned appointment date, eight (70...

  6. 48 CFR 14.203-2 - Dissemination of information concerning invitations for bids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 14.203-2 Dissemination of information concerning invitations for bids. Procedures concerning display... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dissemination of information concerning invitations for bids. 14.203-2 Section 14.203-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System...

  7. 76 FR 53693 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application COC-74911, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-29

    ...] Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application COC-74911, Colorado AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920... America in lands located in Delta County, Colorado. DATES: This notice of invitation was published in the...

  8. Invitations and excuses that are not invitations and excuses: Gossip in Luke 14:18–20

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest van Eck

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In modern Western culture, gossip is seen as a malicious activity that should be avoided. In ancient oral-cultures, gossip as a cultural form did not have this negative connotation. Gossip was a necessary social game that enabled the flow of information. This information was used in the gossip network of communities to clarify, maintain and enforce group values, facilitate group formation and boundary maintenance and assess the morality of individuals. Gossip was a natural and spontaneous recurring form of social organisation. This understanding of gossip is used to interpret the two invitations and three excuses in the parable of the Feast (Lk 14:16a–23. The conclusion reached is that gossip, when understood as a social game, can be a useful tool to curb anachronistic and ethnocentristic readings of texts produced by cultures different from that of modern interpreters analysing these texts.

  9. 18th International Workshop on Radiation Imaging Detectors

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    The International Workshops on Radiation Imaging Detectors are held yearly and provide an international forum for discussing current research and developments in the area of position sensitive detectors for radiation imaging, including semiconductor detectors, gas and scintillator-based detectors. Topics include processing and characterization of detector materials, hybridization and interconnect technologies, design of counting or integrating electronics, readout and data acquisition systems, and applications in various scientific and industrial fields. The workshop will have plenary sessions with invited and contributed papers presented orally and in poster sessions. The invited talks will be chosen to review recent advances in different areas covered in the workshop.

  10. Unwanted Guests: The Impact of Iraqi Refugees on Jordan’s Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-13

    The International Crisis Group, a non-governmental organization, interviewed Iraqi refugees in 2007 and reported a number of instances of harassment ...process: Before they can be legally employed, Iraqi refugees must obtain a work permit from the Ministry of Labour . To be eligible for a work permit...Minister of the Interior and the Minister of Labour , respectively. Jordanian law also requires potential employers to provide a litany of documents and

  11. PREFACE: 13th International Conference on Liquid and Amorphous Metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popel, Pjotr; Gelchinskii, Boris; Sidorov, Valeriy; Son, Leonid; Sabirzjanov, Alexandre

    2007-06-01

    The state of the art in the field of liquid and amorphous metals and alloys is regularly updated through two series of complementary international conferences, the LAM (Liquid and Amorphous Metals) and the RQ (Rapidly Quenched Materials). The first series of the conferences started as LM-1 in 1966 at Brookhaven for the basic understanding of liquid metals. The subsequent LM conferences were held in Tokyo (1972) and Bristol (1976). The conference was renewed in Grenoble (1980) as a LAM conference including amorphous metals and continued in Los Angeles (1983), Garmisch-Partenkirchen (1986), Kyoto (1989), Vienna (1992), Chicago (1995), Dortmund (1998), Yokohama (2001) and Metz (2004). The conferences are mainly devoted to liquid and amorphous metals and alloys. However, communications on some non-metallic systems such as semi conductors, quasicrystals etc, were accepted as well. The conference tradition strongly encourages the participation of junior researchers and graduate students. The 13th conference of the LAM series was organized in Ekaterinburg, Russia, by the Institute of Metallurgy of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (IMet UB RAS) and Ural State Pedagogical University (USPU) and held on 8-13 July 2007 under the chairmanship of Professors Pjotr Popel (USPU) and Boris Gelchinskii (IMet UB RAS). There were 242 active and about 60 guest participants from 20 countries who attended the conference. There were no parallel sessions and all oral reports were separated into three groups: invited talks (40 min), full-scale (25 min) and brief (15 min) oral reports. The program included 10 sessions, ranging from purely theoretical subjects to technological application of molten and amorphous alloys. The following sessions took place: A) Electronic structure and transport, magnetic properties; B) Phase transitions; C) Structure; D) Atomic dynamics and transport; E) Thermodynamics; F) Modelling, simulation; G) Surface and interface; H) Mechanical properties

  12. PREFACE: Proceedings of the 7th International LISA Symposium, Barcelona, Spain, 16-20 June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Alberto; Sopuerta, Carlos F.

    2009-07-01

    In June 2006 the LISA International Science Team (LIST) accepted the bid presented by the Institut d'Estudis Espacials de Catalunya (IEEC) to host the 7th International LISA Symposium. This was during its 11th meeting at the University of Maryland, just before the 6th edition of the Symposium started in NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. The 7th International LISA Symposium took place at the city of Barcelona, Spain, from 16-20 June 2008, in the premises of CosmoCaixa, a modern Science Museum located in the hills near Tibidabo. Almost 240 delegates registered for the event, a record breaking figure compared to previous editions of the Symposium. Many of the most renowned world experts in LISA, Gravitational Wave Science, and Astronomy, as well as Engineers, attended LISA 7 and produced state-of-the-art presentations, while everybody benefited from the opportunity to have live discussions during the week in a friendly environment. The programme included 31 invited plenary lectures in the mornings, and 8 parallel sessions in the afternoons. These were classified into 7 major areas of research: LISA Technology, LISA PathFinder, LISA PathFinder Data Analysis, LISA Data Analysis, Gravitational Wave sources, Cosmology and Fundamental Physics with LISA and Other Gravitational Wave Detectors. 138 abstracts for communications were received, of which a selection was made by the session convenors which would fit time constraints. Up to 63 posters completed the scientific programme. More details on the programme, including some of the talks, can be found at the Symposium website: http://www.ice.cat/research/LISA_Symposium. There was however a remarkable add-on: Professor Clifford Will delivered a startling presentation to the general public, who completely filled the Auditori—the main Conference Room, 320 seats—and were invited to ask questions to the speaker who had boldly guided them through the daunting world of Black Holes, Waves of Gravity, and other Warped Ideas of

  13. GUEST EDITOR'S INTRODUCTION: Guest Editor's introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysanthis, Panos K.

    1996-12-01

    Computer Science Department, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260, USA This special issue focuses on current efforts to represent and support workflows that integrate information systems and human resources within a business or manufacturing enterprise. Workflows may also be viewed as an emerging computational paradigm for effective structuring of cooperative applications involving human users and access to diverse data types not necessarily maintained by traditional database management systems. A workflow is an automated organizational process (also called business process) which consists of a set of activities or tasks that need to be executed in a particular controlled order over a combination of heterogeneous database systems and legacy systems. Within workflows, tasks are performed cooperatively by either human or computational agents in accordance with their roles in the organizational hierarchy. The challenge in facilitating the implementation of workflows lies in developing efficient workflow management systems. A workflow management system (also called workflow server, workflow engine or workflow enactment system) provides the necessary interfaces for coordination and communication among human and computational agents to execute the tasks involved in a workflow and controls the execution orderings of tasks as well as the flow of data that these tasks manipulate. That is, the workflow management system is responsible for correctly and reliably supporting the specification, execution, and monitoring of workflows. The six papers selected (out of the twenty-seven submitted for this special issue of Distributed Systems Engineering) address different aspects of these three functional components of a workflow management system. In the first paper, `Correctness issues in workflow management', Kamath and Ramamritham discuss the important issue of correctness in workflow management that constitutes a prerequisite for the use of workflows in the automation of the critical organizational/business processes. In particular, this paper examines the issues of execution atomicity and failure atomicity, differentiating between correctness requirements of system failures and logical failures, and surveys techniques that can be used to ensure data consistency in workflow management systems. While the first paper is concerned with correctness assuming transactional workflows in which selective transactional properties are associated with individual tasks or the entire workflow, the second paper, `Scheduling workflows by enforcing intertask dependencies' by Attie et al, assumes that the tasks can be either transactions or other activities involving legacy systems. This second paper describes the modelling and specification of conditions involving events and dependencies among tasks within a workflow using temporal logic and finite state automata. It also presents a scheduling algorithm that enforces all stated dependencies by executing at any given time only those events that are allowed by all the dependency automata and in an order as specified by the dependencies. In any system with decentralized control, there is a need to effectively cope with the tension that exists between autonomy and consistency requirements. In `A three-level atomicity model for decentralized workflow management systems', Ben-Shaul and Heineman focus on the specific requirement of enforcing failure atomicity in decentralized, autonomous and interacting workflow management systems. Their paper describes a model in which each workflow manager must be able to specify the sequence of tasks that comprise an atomic unit for the purposes of correctness, and the degrees of local and global atomicity for the purpose of cooperation with other workflow managers. The paper also discusses a realization of this model in which treaties and summits provide an agreement mechanism, while underlying transaction managers are responsible for maintaining failure atomicity. The fourth and fifth papers are experience papers describing a workflow management system and a large scale workflow application, respectively. Schill and Mittasch, in `Workflow management systems on top of OSF DCE and OMG CORBA', describe a decentralized workflow management system and discuss its implementation using two standardized middleware platforms, namely, OSF DCE and OMG CORBA. The system supports a new approach to workflow management, introducing several new concepts such as data type management for integrating various types of data and quality of service for various services provided by servers. A problem common to both database applications and workflows is the handling of missing and incomplete information. This is particularly pervasive in an `electronic market' with a huge number of retail outlets producing and exchanging volumes of data, the application discussed in `Information flow in the DAMA project beyond database managers: information flow managers'. Motivated by the need for a method that allows a task to proceed in a timely manner if not all data produced by other tasks are available by its deadline, Russell et al propose an architectural framework and a language that can be used to detect, approximate and, later on, to adjust missing data if necessary. The final paper, `The evolution towards flexible workflow systems' by Nutt, is complementary to the other papers and is a survey of issues and of work related to both workflow and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) areas. In particular, the paper provides a model and a categorization of the dimensions which workflow management and CSCW systems share. Besides summarizing the recent advancements towards efficient workflow management, the papers in this special issue suggest areas open to investigation and it is our hope that they will also provide the stimulus for further research and development in the area of workflow management systems.

  14. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Guest Editors' introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, Geoff; de Meer, Jan B.

    1997-03-01

    Quality of Service (QoS) has emerged in the last few years as a topical and challenging research area in distributed systems. For a broad definition of QoS we refer to the ISO's Reference Model for Open Distributed Processing (ISO/IEC IS 10746-2): `The notion of QoS is a system or object property, and consists of a set of quality requirements on the collective behaviour of one or more objects . . .'. In the context of this special issue, QoS is primarily associated with systems such as distributed multimedia application platforms or distributed simulations. The QoS requirements of such systems typically relate to measures of rate and latency of information transfer, probability of a communication being disrupted, probability of system failure, probability of storage failure, etc. The role of QoS management is thus to ensure that applications are able to specify and obtain the quality of service that they require for their correct execution. In general, the functions of QoS management may be subsumed under the following headings: (i) QoS specification and mapping, (ii) QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control and (iii) QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation. QoS specification defines the QoS required by an application in terms of both timeliness constraints and guarantees. QoS mapping then translates between QoS representations at different system levels, relieving the user of the necessity of thinking in terms of low-level QoS representations. For example, a user may express a jitter requirement by manipulating a slider in a GUI, and this could be mapped at the lower layers into a requirement for an absolute bound on ATM cell jitter and a jitter smoothing buffer of a certain size. QoS negotiation, resource allocation and admission control are collectively responsible for configuring a system in preparation for the execution of a QoS requiring application. QoS negotiation provides a framework in which the QoS levels supported by individual system components (e.g. file server, operating system and network) are composed to build the required end-to-end service. Providing such a service may well require explicit resource allocation (e.g. of network bandwidth or CPU cycles); admission control may also be required to ensure that requested QoS levels can be met. QoS monitoring, adaptation and renegotiation are concerned with supporting QoS during the run time of an application. QoS monitoring and QoS adaptation are conceptually related in a feedback loop in which current QoS levels are observed and fine grained reconfiguration is triggered as necessary to ensure that the required levels are maintained. An example of such a loop is to be found in Internet tools such as vic or vat which monitor network delay and adapt by adjusting the size of an elastic playout buffer. QoS renegotiation is a coarser grained adaptation, often explicitly initiated by the user, in which required QoS levels are revised at run time. An example could be a user scaling a video display from colour to monochrome so that sufficient resources can be freed to support an additional connection. The papers in this special issue were selected from the fourth QoS Workshop held in Paris in March 1996. To understand the overall evolution of QoS research it is useful to know some background on the series of workshops of which the Paris workshop was a part. The first workshop to be dedicated exclusively to QoS issues was organized in Canada by the European RACE project R2088 (TOPIC) in cooperation with the University of Montreal in June 1994. A European counterpart of this initiating event occurred in the same year in September 1994 in Aachen, Germany. This latter event was held in cooperation with the European Conference on Intelligence in Broadband Services and Networks (IS&N94). A third workshop was then held in conjunction with the IFIP conference on Open Distributed Processing (ICODP95) in Brisbane, Australia in March 1995. By 1996 more independence, and also more recognition of QoS as an independent research area, was achieved in the above mentioned Paris workshop. This workshop was aligned with the IFIP conference on Formal Methods for Open Object-based Distributed Systems (FMOODS96), but was also independently recognised by IFIP. A fifth workshop is due to take place in May 1997 in New York. This event will be the first not to be organized under the umbrella of another big event. This is indicative of the fact that the community interested in QoS issues has now become large enough to maintain its own independent forum of discussion and exchange of expertise. The five papers in this special issue cover a wide range of QoS research issues and fall broadly into three categories. First we have a paper that addresses a very specific but nevertheless crucial aspect of QoS provision: supporting the QoS of variable bit rate (VBR) traffic in networks with deterministic guarantees. `On the effects of smoothing for deterministic QoS' by Edward Knightly and Paola Rossaro examines the impact of rate smoothing of VBR sources such as MPEG video. The impact of such smoothing on both the QoS as perceived by the user and on resource utilization in the network are considered. Experimental evidence is presented which shows quantitatively how reducing burstiness through source smoothing techniques can significantly reduce the resource utilization of VBR streams while maintaining deterministic QoS for the user (at the cost of some increase in the end-to-end delay bound). It is also shown that a richer traffic characterisation model (D-BIND) can produce better network utilization and user QoS than the usual models based only on peak rate, average rate and burst length. Next we have two papers concerned with broader issues of QoS management. These papers explore approaches to QoS monitoring and adaptation which are intended to be generic and applicable in a range of implementation environments. `Some principles for quality of service management' by Gregor v Bochmann and Abdelhakim Hafid offers lessons in QoS management learned during the implementation of a prototype News-on-Demand application. Some general principles are extracted from this experience. In particular, a novel QoS adaptation technique is highlighted: transparent automatic reconfiguration of the components involved in a communication (e.g. choice of an alternative network or server at run time). An algorithm which attempts to choose optimal configurations is discussed. `Quality of service management using generic modelling and monitoring techniques', by Leonard Franken and Boudewijn Haverkort investigates the use of Petri nets as the basis of generic QoS monitoring of distributed applications. A distributed application is exploded into finegrained component parts and interactions between these parts are instrumented. The paper offers a case study of the instrumentation of a videophone application using this technique. Simulation is used to evaluate the scheme. The final two papers in the special issue are more focused and pragmatic in nature. These papers explore QoS provision in particular environments (the World Wide Web and ATM networks respectively) through reported implementation experience. `QoS management in a World Wide Web environment which supports continuous media' by Michael Fry, Aruna Seneviratne, Andreas Vogel and Varuni Witana looks at the practical provision of end to end QoS management in the World Wide Web. The paper looks beyond currently available tools such as RealAudio and StreamWorks and presents a QoS managed RTP based solution featuring an adjunct QoS management protocol. This work offers QoS management functions (e.g. QoS negotiation, adaptation and control of QoS degradation paths) directly to the user via the usual Web GUI. `A QoS adaptive multimedia transport system: design, implementation and experiences' by Andrew Campbell and Geoff Coulson offers further practical experience of QoS management. Their scheme is embedded in an experimental ATM network with the potential for guaranteed QoS. The system features QoS support mechanisms in both the network and the end systems. Of particular interest is reported experience with a dynamic QoS adaptation protocol implemented in the network and based on video scaling techniques and filtering. In summary, this special issue provides an up to date review of approaches to QoS management and their practical realization. Of course, no claim is made as to comprehensiveness, but the chosen papers do serve as a highly representative sample of current directions in QoS research. The editors are very much obliged to all authors, reviewers and publishers. Without their excellent work, and the contribution of their valuable time this special issue would not have been possible.

  15. Basic investigation project for energy consumption efficiency improvement in developing countries. Invitation of engineers from developing countries (Vietnam, Philippines, and India); Hatten tojokoku energy shohi koritsuka kiso chosa nado jigyo. Hatten tojokoku gijutsusha shohei jigyo (Betonamu, Philippines, Indo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The International Center of Environmental Technology Transfer has invited seven engineers from Vietnam, eight from Philippines and two from India for human resource education project for environmental preservation in developing countries. Those who were invited are administrative officials and engineers who work at administrative agents, research institutes and corporations related to energy conservation and environment preservation. In this invitation program, lecturers were invited from governmental offices, universities and corporations according to their expertise fields to carry out lectures and site training. With respect to energy conservation, lectures were given on a `summary of energy saving methods` by a lecturer invited from the Chubu Governmental Department of Trade and Industry, and on an `introduction to new energies` by Prof. Shimizu at the Engineering Faculty of the Mie University. Both lecturers emphasized the necessity of energy conservation, and importance of new energies as clean energies. The trainees showed strong interest when they visited a `cement factory` and a `coal burning thermal power plant` as the key industries. Their experience would be reflected strongly on guiding operations of factories in their own countries. 56 figs., 15 tabs.

  16. First international conference on nonlinear problems in aviation and aerospace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivasundaram, S.

    1994-01-01

    The International Conference on Nonlinear Problems in Aviation and Aerospace was held at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida on May 9-11, 1996. This conference was sponsored by the International Federation of Nonlinear Analysts, International Federation of Information Processing, and Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University. Over one hundred engineers, scientists, and mathematicians from seventeen countries attended. These proceedings include keynote addresses, invited lectures, and contributed papers presented during the conference

  17. EDITORIAL: International Workshop on Current Topics in Monte Carlo Treatment Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhaegen, Frank; Seuntjens, Jan

    2005-03-01

    The use of Monte Carlo particle transport simulations in radiotherapy was pioneered in the early nineteen-seventies, but it was not until the eighties that they gained recognition as an essential research tool for radiation dosimetry, health physics and later on for radiation therapy treatment planning. Since the mid-nineties, there has been a boom in the number of workers using MC techniques in radiotherapy, and the quantity of papers published on the subject. Research and applications of MC techniques in radiotherapy span a very wide range from fundamental studies of cross sections and development of particle transport algorithms, to clinical evaluation of treatment plans for a variety of radiotherapy modalities. The International Workshop on Current Topics in Monte Carlo Treatment Planning took place at Montreal General Hospital, which is part of McGill University, halfway up Mount Royal on Montreal Island. It was held from 3-5 May, 2004, right after the freezing winter has lost its grip on Canada. About 120 workers attended the Workshop, representing 18 countries. Most of the pioneers in the field were present but also a large group of young scientists. In a very full programme, 41 long papers were presented (of which 12 were invited) and 20 posters were on display during the whole meeting. The topics covered included the latest developments in MC algorithms, statistical issues, source modelling and MC treatment planning for photon, electron and proton treatments. The final day was entirely devoted to clinical implementation issues. Monte Carlo radiotherapy treatment planning has only now made a slow entrée in the clinical environment, taking considerably longer than envisaged ten years ago. Of the twenty-five papers in this dedicated special issue, about a quarter deal with this topic, with probably many more studies to follow in the near future. If anything, we hope the Workshop served as an accelerator for more clinical evaluation of MC applications. The

  18. Inviting parents to take part in paediatric palliative care research: A mixed-methods examination of selection bias

    OpenAIRE

    Crocker, Joanna C; Beecham, Emma; Kelly, Paula; Dinsdale, Andrew P; Hemsley, June; Jones, Louise; Bluebond-Langner, Myra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recruitment to paediatric palliative care research is challenging, with high rates of non-invitation of eligible families by clinicians. The impact on sample characteristics is unknown. Aim: To investigate, using mixed methods, non-invitation of eligible families and ensuing selection bias in an interview study about parents? experiences of advance care planning (ACP). Design: We examined differences between eligible families invited and not invited to participate by clinicians us...

  19. PREFACE: Fifteenth International Summer School on Vacuum, Electron and Ion Technologies (VEIT 2007)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerassimov, Nikolay; Möller, Wolfhard; Ghelev, Chavdar

    2008-03-01

    . The early afternoons of most conference days were free to stimulate both scientific and social interaction between participants, which often took place on the beach. The social program included a welcome reception, a conference banquet, and an outing to historical landmarks in the vicinity of Sozopol. VEIT 2007 owes its success to many people. The International Advisory Committee shaped the scientific program and ensured high-quality plenary presentations by careful selection of invited speakers. The Local Committee bore the brunt of the organization both at the conference site and in dealing with correspondence, abstracts, and manuscripts for these proceedings. We are grateful to our sponsors Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Dresden, Germany, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia, Bulgaria, Hauser Techno Coating Ltd, Venlo, The Netherlands, and Evrika Foundation, Sofia, Bulgaria for their generosity that enabled us to support the attendance of students and provided support to deal with mailing, printing, renting the conference site, etc. We would like to also thank all authors for their valuable contributions to this proceeding and to the school, as well as all reviewers for their important work. The next conference in the series will be held in September 2009. Nikolay Guerassimov, Wolfhard Möller, Chavdar Ghelev Guest Editors

  20. CERN at the International Inventions Fair

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    CERN is the guest of honour at the 35th International Inventions Fair, which will take place from 18th to 22nd April at Palexpo, in Geneva. CERN has been chosen as the guest of honour for its ability to develop new technologies and translate them for the benefit of society. For the Fair, CERN has teamed up with ten companies that have made use of technologies and ideas from the Laboratory. The CERN stand at the exhibition will be dedicated to a presentation of the Laboratory and the LHC. Each of the technologies featured will be highlighted on the stand, along with the companies that have put them into more general use. This will allow visitors to trace the path from basic research to practical application from start to finish. One example is Medipix, a particle detection technology that has found applications in medical imaging. Visitors to the Fair will be able to see a Medipix detector in action on the CERN stand, and use it to view the particles emitted by everyday objects.

  1. An Advanced Private Social Activity Invitation Framework with Friendship Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weitian Tong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the popularity of social networks and human-carried/human-affiliated devices with sensing abilities, like smartphones and smart wearable devices, a novel application was necessitated recently to organize group activities by learning historical data gathered from smart devices and choosing invitees carefully based on their personal interests. We proposed a private and efficient social activity invitation framework. Our main contributions are (1 defining a novel friendship to reduce the communication/update cost within the social network and enhance the privacy guarantee at the same time; (2 designing a strong privacy-preserving algorithm for graph publication, which addresses an open concern proposed recently; (3 presenting an efficient invitee-selection algorithm, which outperforms the existing ones. Our simulation results show that the proposed framework has good performance. In our framework, the server is assumed to be untrustworthy but can nonetheless help users organize group activities intelligently and efficiently. Moreover, the new definition of the friendship allows the social network to be described by a directed graph. To the best of our knowledge, it is the first work to publish a directed graph in a differentially private manner with an untrustworthy server.

  2. CERN is celebrating its anniversary - invite your neighbours!

    CERN Document Server

    Corinne Pralavorio

    2014-01-01

    On 24 and 25 May 2014, CERN will be organising a weekend of discovery to celebrate its 60th anniversary with its (our) neighbours. Come and help us to welcome them as a volunteer!   CERN is celebrating 60 years since its establishment - 60 years during which the region and the Laboratory have developed strong links. To celebrate this collaboration, two days of visits and activities for everyone living in the region are being organised. Underground visits to the CMS detector in Cessy, the LHCb detector in Ferney-Voltaire and the LHC machine in Échenevex will be held throughout the weekend. Some 6,000 visitors are expected to make the most of one of the last chances to visit the underground installations before the LHC is restarted next year. These visits are open only to people aged 12 years and over and are by reservation only. Members of the public are also invited to take part in fun activities at the site of the CMS experiment in Cessy. The programme includes demonstrations an...

  3. Invitational Rhetoric and the Case for Service Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina L. Hicks-Goldston

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This research argues for repositioning Service Learning as a necessary part of public education, with the transformative goal of empowered communities operating in a social-collaborative framework from communities dependent on overburdened state and local government programs and services. Such repositioning depends on recognition of Service Learning as a means of providing that preparation. To “mainstream” Service Learning, this research proposes two initiatives: (a Foster the idea of the Service Learning experience as citizenship/community building by associating the experience with embedded cultural values and (b apply Invitational Rhetoric in persuading students and parents to view Service Learning as something other than imposed servitude or social consciousness for a grade. Service Learning has proven to be successful in changing students’ attitudes about their place in society. If Service Learning were a part of the common educational core, the potential for repositioning its value to citizenry would be highly expanded. Because many communities lack access to education and training for the citizenry, Service Learning could supply that link to empowerment.

  4. Microwave Interferometric Radiometry in Remote Sensing: an Invited Historical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Neira, M.; LeVine, D. M.; Kerr, Y.; Skou, N.; Peichl, M.; Camps, A.; Corbella, I.; Hallikainen, M.; Font, J.; Wu, J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    The launch of the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission on 2 November 2009 marked a milestone in remote sensing for it was the first time a radiometer capable of acquiring wide field of view images at every single snapshot, a unique feature of the synthetic aperture technique, made it to space. The technology behind such an achievement was developed, thanks to the effort of a community of researchers and engineers in different groups around the world. It was only because of their joint work that SMOS finally became a reality. The fact that the European Space Agency, together with CNES (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and CDTI (Centro para el Desarrollo Tecnológico e Industrial), managed to get the project through should be considered a merit and a reward for that entire community. This paper is an invited historical review that, within a very limited number of pages, tries to provide insight into some of the developments which, one way or another, are imprinted in the name of SMOS.

  5. Development of a unique product: Perception of guests in Tourism in vineyard cottages on the local environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le- Marija Colarič-Jakše

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and Originality: Tourism in vineyard cottages is new, authentic, unique tourism product, which involves the area of wine-growing land Posavje, with districts of Dolenjska (Lower Carniola Region, Bela Krajina and Obsotelje-Kozjansko, where are the wine-growing areas with vineyards and vineyard cottages. Tourists in vineyard cottages bring economic benefits to the local community. Method: With the research we gained the information, where local residents can see positive and where negative impacts of guests who come to the vineyard cottages. As the part of descriptive approach in our research we used a method of a description about the opinion of local residents on impact of arriving tourists in tourist vineyard cottages on the local environment and the method of a compilation discoveries, observations and results. In the activities of analytical approach we are going on the base about the results of questioning individual cases and conclusion about opinion of local inhabitants in the area of marketing the tourism product Tourism in vineyard cottages. Results: Considering the results of the research, individual interviews with guests in the area of product Tourism in vineyard cottages and responses in the local environment, we evaluate, that the product has unique, authentic, original and attractive approach with all the possibilities, that it becomes one of the most recognizable, wanted and paraded integral product of Slovenian tourism. Society: New, innovative, attractive, unique and authentic product Tourism in vineyard cottages, which is developed in the wine-growing region Posavje, it has an extremely great potential, because it is one of the most recognizable forms of tourism in the countryside areas, and it has extra perspective with the creating local stories and connecting into the integral tourism products. Limitations / further research: It is necessary, that also other owners of the vineyard cottages, who are not included into

  6. Islamophobia and Crime – Anti-Muslim Demonising and Racialised Targeting: Guest Editor’s Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Poynting

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This special issue deals with anti-Muslim racism, crime, criminalisation and attacks – both ideological and material – on Muslims and their communities in countries like Britain, Canada and Australia. A new spectre is haunting these places: an imagined ‘other’ is seen to be subversively spreading Muslim ‘extremism’ and exhorting anti-Western violence from within these societies, supporting global terrorism abroad and at home, and espousing hyperpatriarchal, homophobic and sexually exploitative culture. The ‘Muslim other’ has become the folk demon of our time in a racialising ideology that circulates internationally and has strikingly similar effects in quite different local contextsTo find out more about this special edition, download the PDF file from this page.  

  7. International Conference Approximation Theory XIV

    CERN Document Server

    Schumaker, Larry

    2014-01-01

    This volume developed from papers presented at the international conference Approximation Theory XIV,  held April 7–10, 2013 in San Antonio, Texas. The proceedings contains surveys by invited speakers, covering topics such as splines on non-tensor-product meshes, Wachspress and mean value coordinates, curvelets and shearlets, barycentric interpolation, and polynomial approximation on spheres and balls. Other contributed papers address a variety of current topics in approximation theory, including eigenvalue sequences of positive integral operators, image registration, and support vector machines. This book will be of interest to mathematicians, engineers, and computer scientists working in approximation theory, computer-aided geometric design, numerical analysis, and related approximation areas.

  8. Second international conference on isotopes. Conference proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, C J [ed.

    1997-10-01

    The Second International Conference on Isotopes (2ICI) was hosted by the Australian Nuclear Association in Sydney, NSW, Australia. The Theme of the Second Conference: Isotopes for Industry, Health and a Better Environment recognizes that isotopes have been used in these fields successfully for many years and offer prospects for increasing use in the future. The worldwide interest in the use of research reactors and accelerators and in applications of stable and radioactive isotopes, isotopic techniques and radiation in industry, agriculture, medicine, environmental studies and research in general, was considered. Other radiation issues including radiation protection and safety were also addressed. International and national overviews and subject reviews invited from leading experts were included to introduce the program of technical sessions. The invited papers were supported by contributions accepted from participants for oral and poster presentation. A Technical Exhibition was held in association with the Conference. This volume contains the full text or extended abstracts of papers number 61- to number 114

  9. 15th International Symposium of Robotic Research

    CERN Document Server

    Khatib, Oussama

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents a collection of papers presented at the 15th International Symposium of Robotic Research (ISRR). ISRR is the biennial meeting of the International Foundation of Robotic Research (IFRR) and its 15th edition took place in Flagstaff, Arizona on December 9 to December 12, 2011. As for the previous symposia, ISRR 2011 followed up on the successful concept of a mixture of invited contributions and open submissions. Therefore approximately half of the 37 contributions were invited contributions from outstanding researchers selected by the IFRR officers and the program committee, and the other half were chosen among the open submissions after peer review. This selection process resulted in a truly excellent technical program which featured some of the very best of robotic research. The program was organized around oral presentation in a single-track format and included for the first time a small number of interactive presentations. The symposium contributions contained in this volume report on a ...

  10. 1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    1 March 2012 - British University of Oxford Head of the Mathematical, Physical & Life Sciences Division A. N. Halliday FRS signing the guest book with Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci.

  11. 4 July 2013- European Commission DG CONNECT Director-General R. Madelin, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2013-01-01

    4 July 2013- European Commission DG CONNECT Director-General R. Madelin, signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting CMS experimental area with Collaboration Deputy Spokesperson J. Varela.

  12. 29 August 2013 - Director Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, India D. Srivastava signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Coordinator of India-ALICE Collaboration T. Nayak present throughout.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    29 August 2013 - Director Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, India D. Srivastava signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer. Coordinator of India-ALICE Collaboration T. Nayak present throughout.

  13. Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa exchanging gifts at luncheon and signing the Guest Book on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Commission of Science Technology and Industry for National Defense Senior Vice Minister CHEN Qiufa exchanging gifts at luncheon and signing the Guest Book on 1st November 2007 with CERN Director-General R. Aymar.

  14. 20 Novemnber 2013 - Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Switzerland B. Twaalfhoven in the LHC tunnel with CERN scientists G. De Rijk and H. Ten Kate; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    20 Novemnber 2013 - Ambassador of the Kingdom of the Netherlands to Switzerland B. Twaalfhoven in the LHC tunnel with CERN scientists G. De Rijk and H. Ten Kate; signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  15. State Councillor of the Republic and Canton of Geneva in charge of the Department of Security, Police and Environment I Rochat signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer on 25th January 2010.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice; Glass Box

    2010-01-01

    State Councillor of the Republic and Canton of Geneva in charge of the Department of Security, Police and Environment I Rochat signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer on 25th January 2010.

  16. 22 February 2011 - German Ambassador to Switzerland A. Berg signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    22 February 2011 - German Ambassador to Switzerland A. Berg signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry.

  17. 1st October 2010 - Chinese Vice President of the Academy of Sciences signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, witnessed by Adviser R. Voss

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    1st October 2010 - Chinese Vice President of the Academy of Sciences signing the guest book and exchanging gifts with CERN Director for Research and Scientific Computing S. Bertolucci, witnessed by Adviser R. Voss

  18. 11th October 2011 - Chinese University of Science and Technology President J. Hou signing the guest book with Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Members of the ATLAS Chinese Collaboration.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    11th October 2011 - Chinese University of Science and Technology President J. Hou signing the guest book with Adviser R. Voss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Former Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni and Members of the ATLAS Chinese Collaboration.

  19. 21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar and CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and signing the electronic guest book with T. Pettersson.

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Photo Service

    2008-01-01

    21 October 2008 - LHC Inauguration - Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research L. Leijonborg welcomed by CERN Director-General R. Aymar and CERN Chief Scientific Officer J. Engelen and signing the electronic guest book with T. Pettersson.

  20. 4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

    CERN Multimedia

    Anna Pantelia

    2013-01-01

    4 April 2013 - Spanish State Secretary of Science, Development and Innovation C. Vela Olmo in the LHC tunnel with Technology Department Head F. Bordry and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.