WorldWideScience

Sample records for international fusion superconducting magnet test facility

  1. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: Superconducting magnet system cost analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-07-01

    At the request of Victor Karpenko, Project manager for LLL`s Mirror Fusion Test Facility, EG&G has prepared this independent cost analysis for the proposed MFTF Superconducting Magnet System. The analysis has attempted to show sufficient detail to provide adequate definition for a basis of estimating costs.

  2. LLNL superconducting magnets test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manahan, R; Martovetsky, N; Moller, J; Zbasnik, J

    1999-09-16

    The FENIX facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was upgraded and refurbished in 1996-1998 for testing CICC superconducting magnets. The FENIX facility was used for superconducting high current, short sample tests for fusion programs in the late 1980s--early 1990s. The new facility includes a 4-m diameter vacuum vessel, two refrigerators, a 40 kA, 42 V computer controlled power supply, a new switchyard with a dump resistor, a new helium distribution valve box, several sets of power leads, data acquisition system and other auxiliary systems, which provide a lot of flexibility in testing of a wide variety of superconducting magnets in a wide range of parameters. The detailed parameters and capabilities of this test facility and its systems are described in the paper.

  3. Mechanical behavior of the mirror fusion test Facility superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    The mechanical response to winding and electromagnetic loads of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) superconducting coil pack is presented. The 375-ton (3300 N) MFTF Yin-Yang magnet, presently the world's largest superconducting magnet, is scheduled for acceptance cold-testing in May of 1981. The assembly is made up of two identical coils which together contain over 15 miles (24 km) of superconductor wound in 58 consecutive layers of 24 turns each. Topics associated with mechanical behavior include physical properties of the coil pack and its components, winding pre-load effects, finite element analysis, magnetic load redistribution, and the design impact of predicted conductor motion

  4. Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.; Kozman, T.A.; Bulmer, R.H.; Ng, D.S.

    1981-01-01

    In 1979, R.H. Bulmer of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) discussed a proposed tandem-mirror magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at the 8th symposium on Engineering Problems in Fusion Research. Since then, Congress has voted funds for expanding LLNL's MFTF to a tandem-mirror facility (designated MFTF-B). The new facility, scheduled for completion by 1985, will seek to achieve two goals: (1) Energy break-even capability (Q or the ratio of fusion energy to plasma heating energy = 1) of mirror fusion, (2) Engineering feasibility of reactor-scale machines. Briefly stated, 22 superconducting magnets contained in a 11-m-diam by 65-m-long vacuum vessel will confine a fusion plasma fueled by 80 axial streaming-plasma guns and over 40 radial neutral beams. We have already completed a preliminary design of this magnet system

  5. Design and fabrication of the superconducting-magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatro, R.E.; Wohlwend, J.W.; Kozman, T.A.

    1982-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) consists of 24 magnets; i.e. two pairs of C-shaped Yin-Yang coils, four C-shaped transition coils, four solenoidal axicell coils, and a 12-solenoid central cell. General Dynamics Convair Division has designed all the coils and is responsible for fabricating 20 coils. The two Yin-Yang pairs (four coils) are being fabricated by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Since MFTF-B is not a magnet development program, but rather a major physics experiment critical to the mirror fusion program, the basic philosophy has been to use proven materials and analytical techniques wherever possible. The transition and axicell coils are currently being analyzed and designed, while fabrication is under way on the solenoid magnets

  6. JSME construction standard for superconducting magnets of fusion facilities. Toward the construction of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasone, Yuji; Takahashi, Yukio; Sato, Kazuyoshi; Nishimura, Arata; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Irie, Hirosada; Nakahira, Masataka

    2009-01-01

    The present paper describes the general view of the construction standard, which the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) has recently set up and published, for superconducting magnet structures to be used in nuclear fusion facilities. The present target of the standard is tokamak-type fusion energy facilities, especially the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor called ITER for short. The standard contains rules for structural materials including cryogenic materials, structural design considering magnetic forces, manufacture including welding and installation, nondestructive testing, pressure proof tests and leak tests of toroidal field magnet structures. The standard covers requirements for structural integrity, deformation control, and leak tightness of all the components of the superconducting magnets and their supports except for superconducting strands and electrical insulators. The standard does not cover deterioration, which may occur in service as a result of corrosion, radiation effects, or instability of material. The standard consists of seven articles and twelve mandatory and non-mandatory appendices to the articles; i.e., (1) Scope, roles and responsibilities, (2) Materials, (3) Structural design, (4) Fabrication and installation, (5) Non-destructive examination, (6) Pressure and leak testing, and (7) Terms used in general requirements. (author)

  7. Construction and testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.; Shimer, D.; VanSant, J.; Zbasnik, J.

    1986-08-01

    This paper describes the construction and testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility superconducting magnet set. Construction of the first Yin Yang magnet was started in 1978. And although this particular magnet was later modified, the final construction of these magnets was not completed until 1985. When completed these 42 magnets weighed over 1200 tonnes and had a maximum stored energy of approximately 1200 MJ at full field. Together with power supplies, controls and liquid nitrogen radiation shields the cost of the fabrication of this system was over $100M. General Dynamics/Convair Division was responsible for the system design and the fabrication of 20 of the magnets. This contract was the largest single procurement action at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. During the PACE acceptance tests, the 26 major magnets were operated at full field for more than 24 hours while other MFTF subsystems were tested. From all of the data, the magnets operated to the performance specifications. For physics operation in the future, additional helium and nitrogen leak checking and repair will be necessary. In this report we will discuss the operation and testing of the MFTF Magnet System, the world's largest superconducting magnet set built to date. The topics covered include a schedule of the major events, summary of the fabrication work, summary of the installation work, summary of testing and test results, and lessons learned

  8. A facility to test short superconducting accelerator magnets at Fermilab

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamm, M.J.; Hess, C.; Lewis, D.; Jaffery, T.; Kinney, W.; Ozelis, J.P.; Strait, J.; Butteris, J.; McInturff, A.D.; Coulter, K.J.

    1992-10-01

    During the past four years the Superconducting Magnet R ampersand D facility at Fermilab (Lab 2) has successfully tested superconducting dipole, quadrupole, and correction coil magnets less than 2 meters in length for the SSC project and the Tevatron D0/B0 Low-β Insertion. During this time several improvements have been made to the facility that have greatly enhanced its magnet testing capabilities. Among the upgrades have been a new rotating coil and data acquisition system for measuring magnetic fields, a controlled flow liquid helium transfer line using an electronically actuated cryo valve, and stand-alone systems for measuring AC loss and training low current Tevatron correction coil packages. A description of the Lab 2 facilities is presented

  9. SSC string test facility for superconducting magnets: Testing capabilities and program for collider magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraushaar, P.; Burgett, W.; Dombeck, T.; McInturff, A.; Robinson, W.; Saladin, V.

    1993-05-01

    The Accelerator Systems String Test (ASST) R ampersand D Testing Facility has been established at the SSC Laboratory to test Collider and High Energy Booster (HEB) superconducting magnet strings. The facility is operational and has had two testing periods utilizing a half cell of collider prototypical magnets with the associated spool pieces and support systems. This paper presents a description of the testing capabilities of the facility with respect to components and supporting subsystems (cryogenic, power, quench protection, controls and instrumentation), the planned testing program for the collider magnets

  10. Stress analysis of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akin, J.E.; Gray, W.H.; Baudry, T.V.

    1980-01-01

    Superconducting devices involve several factors that normally are not encountered in the structural analysis of more common systems. Several of these factors ae noted and methods for including them in an analysis are cited. To illustrate the state of the analysis art for superconducting magnets, in magnetic fusion reactors, two specific projects are illustrated. They are the Large Coil Program (LCP) and the Engineering Test Facility

  11. Superconducting magnets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for fusion reactor applications are being developed in the U.S., Europe, Japan and the USSR. A substantial technological base already exists, but magnets for fusion face special problems and strong incentives for higher performance. In the U.S. high-field magnets for mirrors are being addressed by construction of the superconducting (NbTi) MFTF and by Nb 3 Sn conductor development. Large toroidal field magnets for tokamaks are being developed through the Large Coil Program, which involves design and construction of NbTi and Nb 3 Sn coils by six industrial teams, three in the U.S. and three in other countries

  12. Tandem mirror magnet system for the mirror fusion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulmer, R.H.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1980-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will be a large magnetic fusion experimental facility containing 22 supercounducting magnets including solenoids and C-coils. State-of-the-art technology will be used extensively to complete this facility before 1985. Niobium titanium superconductor and stainless steel structural cases will be the principle materials of construction. Cooling will be pool boiling and thermosiphon flow of 4.5 K liquid helium. Combined weight of the magnets will be over 1500 tonnes and the stored energy will be over 1600 MJ. Magnetic field strength in some coils will be more than 8 T. Detail design of the magnet system will begin early 1981. Basic requirements and conceptual design are disclosed in this paper

  13. Development work on superconducting coils for a large mirror fusion test facility (MFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.; Deis, D.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hirzel, D.G.; Johnston, J.E.; Leber, R.L.; Nelson, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    The geometry and size of the superconducting coils for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) proposed by Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) impose certain constraints on the Nb-Ti superconductor. The most promising fabrication process is a wrap-around technique in which a superconducting core is ''wrapped'' in stabilizing copper that contains built-in cooling channels. Insulation between pancake coils and turns is provided by perforated sheets and buttons of epoxy-impregnated fiberglass. Preliminary heat-transfer tests conducted on short samples of single conductor and on a nine-conductor bundle are reported and related to the heat generated in ''normal'' conductors. Investigation of joining techniques, necessary because of the length of conductor needed for the MFTF magnet (about 21 km per coil), show that cold-welded butt joints best meet all requirements. In a test coil now being built, approximately 2 km of prototype MFTF conductor will provide a self-field of about 4 T. Supplementary coils will boost the field to about 6.7 T. The test coils will be used to study cryostatic stability, the propagation and recovery of normal zones, and diagnostic techniques

  14. Superconducting magnets for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.

    1987-01-01

    Fusion magnet technology has made spectacular advances in the past decade; to wit, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility and the Large Coil Project. However, further advances are still required for advanced economical fusion reactors. Higher fields to 14 T and radiation-hardened superconductors and insulators will be necessary. Coupled with high rates of nuclear heating and pulsed losses, the next-generation magnets will need still higher current density, better stability and quench protection. Cable-in-conduit conductors coupled with polyimide insulations and better steels seem to be the appropriate path. Neutron fluences up to 10 19 neutrons/cm 2 in niobium tin are achievable. In the future, other amorphous superconductors could raise these limits further to extend reactor life or decrease the neutron shielding and corresponding reactor size

  15. Results of the international Large Coil Task: a milestone for superconducting magnets in fusion power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dresner, L.; Fietz, W.A.; Gauss, S.

    1989-01-01

    The aim of the Large Coil Task (LCT) was to demonstrate the reliable operation of large superconducting toroidal field coils and to prove the design principles and fabrication techniques to be applied for the magnets in a tokamak experimental power reactor. This has been achieved by an international development effort involving the US DOE, EURATOM, JAERI and the Swiss government. Six different D-shaped test coils were separately designed, developed and constructed by the LCT participants, then extensively tested together in a compact toroidal array. Detailed information on coil design and manufacture and all test data were shared among the LCT participants. The full six-coil array tests were carried out in a continuous period from the beginning of 1986 until September 1987. Beside the originally planned tests to reach an 8 T design point performance, the tests went well beyond this goal, reaching 9 T peak field in each coil. The experiments also delineated the limits of operability and demonstrated the coil safety under abnormal conditions. For fusion application the transient a.c. field behaviour in the coils was also of great interest. Three of the coils have been tested in this respect and showed excellent performance, with loss values in agreement with the theoretical predictions. (author)

  16. Superconducting magnet radiation effects in fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sawan, M.E.; Walstrom, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    Radiation effects in superconducting magnets of fusion reactors are analyzed and experimental data reviewed. The interaction between the different radiation effects and impact on reactor design is discussed. The need for experimental data with higher irradiation levels is assessed

  17. Cryogenic test facility instrumentation with fiber optic and fiber optic sensors for testing superconducting accelerator magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajas, H.; Bajko, M.; Castaldo, B.; Consales, M.; Cusano, A.; Giordano, M.; Giloux, C.; Perez, J. C.; Sansone, L.; Viret, P.

    2017-12-01

    The magnets for the next steps in accelerator physics, such as the High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC (HL- LHC) and the Future Circular Collider (FCC), require the development of new technologies for manufacturing and monitoring. To meet the HL-LHC new requirements, a large upgrade of the CERN SM18 cryogenic test facilities is ongoing with the implementation of new cryostats and cryogenic instrumentation. The paper deals with the advances in the development and the calibration of fiber optic sensors in the range 300 - 4 K using a dedicated closed-cycle refrigerator system composed of a pulse tube and a cryogen-free cryostat. The calibrated fiber optic sensors (FOS) have been installed in three vertical cryostats used for testing superconducting magnets down to 1.9 K or 4.2 K and in the variable temperature test bench (100 - 4.2 K). Some examples of FOS measurements of cryostat temperature evolution are presented as well as measurements of strain performed on a subscale of High Temperature Superconducting magnet during its powering tests.

  18. Mirror fusion test facility magnet system. Final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Hodges, A.J.; VanSant, J.H.; Dalder, E.N.; Hinkle, R.E.; Horvath, J.A.; Scanlan, R.M.; Shimer, D.W.; Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) magnet description, (2) superconducting manufacture, (3) mechanical behavior of conductor winding, (4) coil winding, (5) thermal analysis, (6) cryogenic system, (7) power supply system, (8) structural analysis, (9) structural finite element analysis refinement, (10) structural case fault analysis, and (11) structural metallurgy

  19. Mirror fusion test facility magnet system. Final design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henning, C.D.; Hodges, A.J.; VanSant, J.H.; Dalder, E.N.; Hinkle, R.E.; Horvath, J.A.; Scanlan, R.M.; Shimer, D.W.; Baldi, R.W.; Tatro, R.E.

    1980-09-03

    Information is given on each of the following topics: (1) magnet description, (2) superconducting manufacture, (3) mechanical behavior of conductor winding, (4) coil winding, (5) thermal analysis, (6) cryogenic system, (7) power supply system, (8) structural analysis, (9) structural finite element analysis refinement, (10) structural case fault analysis, and (11) structural metallurgy. (MOW)

  20. Development of a vacuum leak test method for large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Katsumi; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Kato, Takashi

    2006-01-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has developed leak detection technology for liquid helium temperature experiments in large-scale superconducting magnet test facilities. In JAEA, a cryosorption pump that uses an absorbent cooled by liquid nitrogen with a conventional helium leak detector, is used to detect helium gas that is leaking from pressurized welded joints of pipes and valves in a vacuum chamber. The cryosorption pump plays the role of decreasing aerial components, such as water, nitrogen and oxygen, to increase the sensitivity of helium leak detection. The established detection sensitivity for helium leak testing is 10 -10 to 10 -9 Pam 3 /s. A total of 850 welded and mechanical joints inside the cryogenic test facility for the ITER Central Solenoid Model Coil (CSMC) experiments have been tested. In the test facility, 73 units of glass fiber-reinforced plastic (GFRP) insulation break are used. The amount of helium permeation through the GFRP was recorded during helium leak testing. To distinguish helium leaks from insulation-break permeation, the helium permeation characteristic of the GFRP part was measured as a function of the time of helium charging. Helium permeation was absorbed at 6 h after helium charging, and the detected permeation is around 10 -7 Pam 3 /s. Using the helium leak test method developed, CSMC experiments have been successfully completed. (author)

  1. Radiation considerations for superconducting fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.

    1977-01-01

    Radiation environment for the magnets is characterized for various conditions expected for tokamak power reactor operation. The radiation levels are translated into radiation effects using available experimental data. The impact of the tradeoffs in radiation shielding and the change in the properties of the superconducting magnets on reactor performance and economics is examined. It is shown that (1) superconducting magnets in fusion reactors will operate at much higher radiation level than was previously anticipated; (2) additional data on radiation damage is required to better accuracy than is presently available in order to accurately quantify the change in properties in the superconducting magnet components; and (3) there is a substantial penalty for increasing (or overestimating) the shielding requirements. A perspective of future tokamak power reactors is presented and questions relating to desirable magnetic field strength and selection of materials for superconducting magnets are briefly examined

  2. Superconducting (radiation hardened) magnets for mirror fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Miller, J.R.; Perkins, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    Superconducting magnets for mirror fusion have evolved considerably since the Baseball II magnet in 1970. Recently, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) yin-yang has been tested to a full field of 7.7 T with radial dimensions representative of a full scale reactor. Now the emphasis has turned to the manufacture of very high field solenoids (choke coils) that are placed between the tandem mirror central cell and the yin-yang anchor-plug set. For MFTF-B the choke coil field reaches 12 T, while in future devices like the MFTF-Upgrade, Fusion Power Demonstration and Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) reactor the fields are doubled. Besides developing high fields, the magnets must be radiation hardened. Otherwise, thick neutron shields increase the magnet size to an unacceptable weight and cost. Neutron fluences in superconducting magnets must be increased by an order of magnitude or more. Insulators must withstand 10 10 to 10 11 rads, while magnet stability must be retained after the copper has been exposed to fluence above 10 19 neutrons/cm 2

  3. Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dixon, F.P.

    1977-01-01

    On October 1, 1977 work began at LLL on the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), an advanced experimental fusion device. Scheduled for operation in late 1981, MFTF is designed as an intermediate step between present mirror machines, such as 2XIIB, and an experimental fusion reactor. This design incorporates improved technology and a better theoretical understanding of how neutral beam injection, plasma guns, and gas injection into the plasma region compensate for cooling and particle losses. With the new facility, we expect to achieve a confinement factor (n tau) of 10 12 particles . sm/cm 3 --a tenfold increase over 2XIIB n tau values--and to increase plasma temperature to over 500 million K. The following article describes this new facility and reports on progress in some of the R and D projects that are providing the technological base for its construction

  4. Magnets for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility: testing of the first Yin-Yang and the design and development of other magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.; Wang, S.T.; Chang, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Completed in May 1981, the first Yin-Yang magnet for the tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was successfully tested in February 1982 to its full design field (7.68 T) and current (5775 A). Since that time, the entire magnet array has been reconfigured - from the original A-cell to an axicell design. The MFTF-B magnet array now contains a total of 26 large superconducting coils: 2 sets of yin-yang pairs, 2 sets of transition magnets (each containing two coils), 2 sets of axicell magnets (each containing three coils), and 12 central-cell solenoids. This paper chronicles recent magnet history - from te testing of the initial yin-yang set, through the design of the axicell configuration, to the planned development of the system

  5. Large superconducting conductors and joints for fusion magnets: From conceptual design to test at full size scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J.L.; Decool, P.; Libeyre, P.; Turck, B.

    2001-01-01

    A new kind of superconducting conductor, using the so-called cable-in-conduit concept, is emerging mainly involving fusion activity. It is to be noted that at present time no large Nb 3 Sn magnet in the world is operating using this concept. The difficulty of this technology which has now been studied for 20 years, is that it has to integrate major progresses in multiple interconnected new fields such as: large number (1000) of superconducting strands, high current conductors (50 kA), forced flow cryogenics, Nb 3 Sn technology, low loss conductors in pulsed operation, high current connections, high voltage insulation (10 kV), economical and industrial feasibility. CEA was very involved during these last 10 years in this development which took place in the frame of the NET and ITER technological programs. One major milestone was reached in 1998-1999 with the successful tests by our Association of three full size conductor and connection samples in the Sultan facility (Villigen, Switzerland). (author)

  6. Radiation Effects on Superconducting Fusion Magnet Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Harald W.

    Nuclear fusion devices based on the magnetic confinement principle heavily rely on the existence and performance of superconducting magnets and have always significantly contributed to advancing superconductor and magnet technology to their limits. In view of the presently ongoing construction of the tokamak device ITER and the stellerator device Wendelstein 7X and their record breaking parameters concerning size, complexity of design, stored energy, amperage, mechanical and magnetic forces, critical current densities and stability requirements, it is deemed timely to review another critical parameter that is practically unique to these devices, namely the radiation response of all magnet components to the lifetime fluence of fast neutrons and gamma rays produced by the fusion reactions of deuterium and tritium. I will review these radiation effects in turn for the currently employed standard "technical" low temperature superconductors NbTi and Nb3Sn, the stabilizing material (Cu) as well as the magnet insulation materials and conclude by discussing the potential of high temperature superconducting materials for future generations of fusion devices, such as DEMO.

  7. Status of superconducting RF test facility (STF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, Hitoshi

    2005-01-01

    A superconducting technology was recommended for the main linac design of the International Linear Collider (ILC) by the International Technology Recommendation Panel (ITRP). The basis for this design has been developed and tested at DESY, and R and D is progressing at many laboratories around the world including DESY, Orsay, KEK, FNAL, SLAC, Cornell, and JLAB. In order to promote Asian SC-technology for ILC, construction of a test facility in KEK was discussed and decided. The role and status of the superconducting RF test facility (STF) is reported in this paper. (author)

  8. Superconducting magnet development capability of the LLNL [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] High Field Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.R.; Shen, S.; Summers, L.T.

    1990-02-01

    This paper discusses the following topics: High-Field Test Facility Equipment at LLNL; FENIX Magnet Facility; High-Field Test Facility (HFTF) 2-m Solenoid; Cryogenic Mechanical Test Facility; Electro-Mechanical Conductor Test Apparatus; Electro-Mechanical Wire Test Apparatus; FENIX/HFTF Data System and Network Topology; Helium Gas Management System (HGMS); Airco Helium Liquefier/Refrigerator; CTI 2800 Helium Liquefier; and MFTF-B/ITER Magnet Test Facility

  9. Safety issues for superconducting fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, S.Y.; Reich, M.; Powell, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Safety issues for future superconducting fusion magnet systems are examined. It is found that safety and failure experience with existing superconducting magnets is not very applicable to predictions as to the safety and reliability of fusion magnets. Such predictions will have to depend on analysis and judgement for many years to come, rather than on accumulated experience. A number of generic potential structural, thermal-hydraulic, and electrical safety problems are identified and analyzed. Prevention of quenches and non-uniform temperature distributions, if quenches should occur, is of great importance, since such events can trigger processes which lead to magnet damage or failure. Engineered safety features will be necessary for fusion magnets. Two of these, an energy dispersion system and external coil containment, appear capable of reducing the probability of coil disruption to very low levels. However, they do not prevent loss of function accidents which are of economic concern. Elaborate detector, temperature equalization, and energy removal systems will be required to minimize the chances of loss of function accidents

  10. Development work on superconducting coils for a Large Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.; Deis, D.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hirzel, D.G.; Johnston, J.E.; Leber, R.L.; Nelson, R.L.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1977-01-01

    This article has summarized development work directed toward obtaining the data required to design and build the superconducting coils for MFTF. The methods for fabricating the conductor and joining lengths of the conductor are almost finalized, and the building of the test coil and associated equipment is now well under way

  11. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities.

  12. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-05-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in DOE-STD-6002-96, Safety of Magnetic Fusion Facilities: Requirements. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While the requirements in DOE-STD-6002-96 are generally applicable to a wide range of fusion facilities, this Standard, DOE-STD-6003-96, is concerned mainly with the implementation of those requirements in large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This Standard is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment as opposed to regulation by other regulatory agencies. As the need for guidance involving other types of fusion facilities or other regulatory environments emerges, additional guidance volumes should be prepared. The concepts, processes, and recommendations set forth here are for guidance only. They will contribute to safety at magnetic fusion facilities

  13. Upgrade of the cryogenic infrastructure of SM18, CERN main test facility for superconducting magnets and RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perin, A.; Dhalla, F.; Gayet, P.; Serio, L.

    2017-12-01

    SM18 is CERN main facility for testing superconducting accelerator magnets and superconducting RF cavities. Its cryogenic infrastructure will have to be significantly upgraded in the coming years, starting in 2019, to meet the testing requirements for the LHC High Luminosity project and for the R&D program for superconducting magnets and RF equipment until 2023 and beyond. This article presents the assessment of the cryogenic needs based on the foreseen test program and on past testing experience. The current configuration of the cryogenic infrastructure is presented and several possible upgrade scenarios are discussed. The chosen upgrade configuration is then described and the characteristics of the main newly required cryogenic equipment, in particular a new 35 g/s helium liquefier, are presented. The upgrade implementation strategy and plan to meet the required schedule are then described.

  14. Structural aspects of superconducting fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Lehner, J.; Powell, J.

    1977-01-01

    Some methods for studying various static, dynamic, elastic-plastic, and fracture mechanics problems of superconducting magnets are described. Sample solutions are given for the UWMAK-I magnet. Finite element calculations were used

  15. 6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

    CERN Multimedia

    Teams : M. Brice, JC Gadmer

    2010-01-01

    6th July 2010 - United Kingdom Science and Technology Facilities Council W. Whitehorn signing the guest book with Head of International relations F. Pauss, visiting the Computing Centre with Information Technology Department Head Deputy D. Foster, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department P. Strubin,the Centre Control Centre with Operation Group Leader M. Lamont and the CLIC/CTF3 facility with Project Leader J.-P. Delahaye.

  16. Superconducting magnetic energy storage for electric utilities and fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.; Hassenzahl, W.V.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory and the University of Wisconsin are developing superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is being developed. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch systems and 1-to-2-s slow energy transfer tokamak systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of a SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given of a reference design for a 10-GWh unit for load leveling, of a 30-MJ coil proposed for system stabilization, and of tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are presented. The common technology base for the various storage systems is discussed

  17. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemp, E.L.; Trego, A.L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility is being designed to be constructed at Hanford, Washington, The system is designed to produce about 10 15 n/cm-s in a volume of approx. 10 cc and 10 14 n/cm-s in a volume of 500 cc. The lithium and target systems are being developed and designed by HEDL while the 35-MeV, 100-mA cw accelerator is being designed by LASL. The accelerator components will be fabricated by US industry. The total estimated cost of the FMIT is $105 million. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in September 1984

  18. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-07-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment.

  19. Safety of magnetic fusion facilities: Volume 2, Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document provides guidance for the implementation of the requirements identified in Vol. 1 of this Standard. This guidance is intended for the managers, designers, operators, and other personnel with safety responsibilities for facilities designated as magnetic fusion facilities. While Vol. 1 is generally applicable in that requirements there apply to a wide range of fusion facilities, this volume is concerned mainly with large facilities such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Using a risk-based prioritization, the concepts presented here may also be applied to other magnetic fusion facilities. This volume is oriented toward regulation in the Department of Energy (DOE) environment

  20. Safety of superconducting fusion magnets: twelve problem areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L. R.

    1979-01-01

    Twelve problem areas of superconducting magnets for fusion reaction are described. These are: Quench Detection and Energy Dump, Stationary Normal Region of Conductor, Current Leads, Electrical Arcing, Electrical Shorts, Conductor Joints, Forces from Unequal Currents, Eddy Current Effects, Cryostat Rupture, Vacuum Failure, Fringing Field and Instrumentation for Safety. Priorities among these areas are suggested.

  1. Safety of superconducting fusion magnets: twelve problem areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, L.R.

    1979-05-01

    Twelve problem areas of superconducting magnets for fusion reaction are described. These are: Quench Detection and Energy Dump, Stationary Normal Region of Conductor, Current Leads, Electrical Arcing, Electrical Shorts, Conductor Joints, Forces from Unequal Currents, Eddy Current Effects, Cryostat Rupture, Vacuum Failure, Fringing Field and Instrumentation for Safety. Each is described under the five categories: Identification and Definition, Possible Safety Effects, Current Practice, Adequacy of Current Practice for Fusion Magnets and Areas Requiring Further Analytical and Experimental Study. Priorities among these areas are suggested; application is made to the Large Coil Project at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  2. Characteristics of a dc 75 kA power supply in the superconducting magnet test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, S.; Mito, T.; Tanahashi, S.; Takahata, K.; Yanagi, N.; Sakamoto, M.; Nishimura, A.; Motojima, O.; Yamamoto, J.; Kubo, H.; Yonenaga, Y.; Watanabe, R.

    1993-01-01

    To investigate properties of superconducting R and D conductors and coils for the Large Helical Device (LHD), a dc 75 kA power supply system which consists of three 25 kA unit banks has been designed and constructed. One unit bank has two double-star-rectifier connections with the inter-phase reactors. The algorithm of the digital feedback control system is installed in each unit bank. In this algorithm, each 6 phase is operated independently on the process of averaging, proportioning and integrating. The experiments of several short samples and one of the R and D coils have been done under the maximum ramp rate of the power supply, 999 A/s per unit. It is confirmed that the measured current stability is less than ±0.75%, and the deviation between a set value and an output value of the load current is less than ±1% under the short circuit test. (orig.)

  3. ac Modeling and impedance spectrum tests of the superconducting magnetic field coils for the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmler, Hartmut; Köppen, Matthias

    2007-10-01

    The impedance spectrum test was employed for detection of short circuits within Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) superconducting magnetic field coils. This test is based on measuring the complex impedance over several decades of frequency. The results are compared to predictions of appropriate electrical equivalent circuits of coils in different production states or during cold test. When the equivalent circuit is not too complicated the impedance can be represented by an analytic function. A more detailed analysis is performed with a network simulation code. The overall agreement of measured and calculated or simulated spectra is good. Two types of short circuits which appeared are presented and analyzed. The detection limit of the method is discussed. It is concluded that combined high-voltage ac and low-voltage impedance spectrum tests are ideal means to rule out short circuits in the W7-X coils.

  4. ac modeling and impedance spectrum tests of the superconducting magnetic field coils for the Wendelstein 7-X fusion experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmler, Hartmut; Köppen, Matthias

    2007-10-01

    The impedance spectrum test was employed for detection of short circuits within Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X) superconducting magnetic field coils. This test is based on measuring the complex impedance over several decades of frequency. The results are compared to predictions of appropriate electrical equivalent circuits of coils in different production states or during cold test. When the equivalent circuit is not too complicated the impedance can be represented by an analytic function. A more detailed analysis is performed with a network simulation code. The overall agreement of measured and calculated or simulated spectra is good. Two types of short circuits which appeared are presented and analyzed. The detection limit of the method is discussed. It is concluded that combined high-voltage ac and low-voltage impedance spectrum tests are ideal means to rule out short circuits in the W7-X coils.

  5. Superconducting dipole magnet for the UTSI MHD facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.; Turner, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory is designing and will build a large superconducting dipole magnet system for use in the Coal Fired Flow MHD Research Facility at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI). Presented in detail are the conceptual design of the magnet geometry, conductor design, cryostability evaluation, magnetic pressure computation, structural design, cryostat design, the cryogenics system design, and magnet instrumentations and control

  6. Program for development of high-field superconducting magnets for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Three superconducting magnet programs at LLL are outlined. The first program, the one considered in greatest detail, is a developmental program in which LLL will work closely with superconductor manufacturers to develop multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductor suitable for use in large CTR magnets. The result of this program will be the fabrication of a rather large magnet (but one that is much smaller than future CTR magnets) and the determination of its performance limitations. In the second program, the developed multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn superconductor will be used to construct the magnets for the Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF) machine. In this program, the bulk of the effort will be in magnet design and winding. The third program chronologically overlaps the first two programs. This program includes the fabrication and testing of the superconducting magnets for the MX machine although, as explained in the Technical Plan, only the cost of the development work is included in this document. At the present time, Nb--Ti superconductor is being considered. Apart from some initial conductor design work, the major effort will be in magnet design and winding

  7. Mirror fusion test facility plasma diagnostics system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Coffield, F.E.; Davis, G.E.; Felker, B.

    1979-01-01

    During the past 25 years, experiments with several magnetic mirror machines were performed as part of the Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) Program at LLL. The latest MFE experiment, the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), builds on the advances of earlier machines in initiating, stabilizing, heating, and sustaining plasmas formed with deuterium. The goals of this machine are to increase ion and electron temperatures and show a corresponding increase in containment time, to test theoretical scaling laws of plasma instabilities with increased physical dimensions, and to sustain high-beta plasmas for times that are long compared to the energy containment time. This paper describes the diagnostic system being developed to characterize these plasma parameters

  8. Magnet Design Considerations for Fusion Nuclear Science Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhai, Y. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kessel, C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); El-Guebaly, L. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States) Fusion Technology Institute; Titus, P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF) is a nuclear confinement facility that provides a fusion environment with components of the reactor integrated together to bridge the technical gaps of burning plasma and nuclear science between the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the demonstration power plant (DEMO). Compared with ITER, the FNSF is smaller in size but generates much higher magnetic field, i.e., 30 times higher neutron fluence with three orders of magnitude longer plasma operation at higher operating temperatures for structures surrounding the plasma. Input parameters to the magnet design from system code analysis include magnetic field of 7.5 T at the plasma center with a plasma major radius of 4.8 m and a minor radius of 1.2 m and a peak field of 15.5 T on the toroidal field (TF) coils for the FNSF. Both low-temperature superconductors (LTS) and high-temperature superconductors (HTS) are considered for the FNSF magnet design based on the state-of-the-art fusion magnet technology. The higher magnetic field can be achieved by using the high-performance ternary restacked-rod process Nb3Sn strands for TF magnets. The circular cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) design similar to ITER magnets and a high-aspect-ratio rectangular CICC design are evaluated for FNSF magnets, but low-activation-jacket materials may need to be selected. The conductor design concept and TF coil winding pack composition and dimension based on the horizontal maintenance schemes are discussed. Neutron radiation limits for the LTS and HTS superconductors and electrical insulation materials are also reviewed based on the available materials previously tested. The material radiation limits for FNSF magnets are defined as part of the conceptual design studies for FNSF magnets.

  9. Design of superconducting toroidal magnet coils and testing facility in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Haubenreich, P.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1977-01-01

    In the U.S. Large Coil Program, three industrial teams are presently designing test coils to general specifications prepared by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory with guidance from USERDA. Each test coil is approximately half the bore size of reactor coils, being oval or D-shaped, with a bore of 2.5 x 3.5 m. The dimensions and operating requirements of the coils are identical for all test coils. The coils are designed to produce a peak field of at least 8 tesla at the winding of a selected coil operated at its design current. This condition is met when the selected coil is operated in a compact toroidal array of 6 coils, with the other five coils being operated at 0.8 of their design current. The six coils are of three different designs. Both pool boiling and forced flow designs are included. The coils are housed in a single large vacuum chamber for economy and testing convenience. Auxiliary coils provide a pulse field over the test coil winding volume. This auxiliary system is designed to produce a pulse field which rises to a peak of 0.14 T in 1 sec. With the exception of material damage due to neutron irradiation, all reactor requirements and environments will be either duplicated, approximated, or simulated. The test facility is being designed to accept coils producing up to 12 tesla in later phases of the program

  10. DEALS: a maintainable superconducting magnet system for tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hseih, S.Y.; Danby, G.; Powell, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of demountable superconducting magnet systems has been examined in a design study of a DEALS [Demountable Externally Anchored Low Stress] TF magnet for an HFITR [High Field Ignition Test Reactor] Tokamak device. All parts of the system appear feasible, including the demountable superconducting joints. Measurements on small scale prototype joints indicate that movable pressure contact joints exhibit acceptable electrical, mechanical, and cryogenic performance. Such joints permit a relatively simple support structure and are readily demountable. Assembly and disassembly sequences are described whereby any failed portion of the magnet, or any part of the reactor inside the TF coils can be removed and replaced if necessary

  11. Cryogenic magnet test facility for fair

    CERN Document Server

    Schroeder, C; Marzouki, F; Stafiniac, A; Floch, E; Schnizer, P; Moritz, G; Xiang, Y; Kauschke, M; Meier, J; Hess, G ,

    2009-01-01

    For testing fast-pulsed superconducting model and pre-series magnets for FAIR (Facility of Antiproton and Ion Research), a cryogenic magnet test facility was built up at GSI. The facility is able to cool either cold masses in a universal cryostat or complete magnets in their own cryo-module. It is possible to operate bath cooled, 2 phase cooled, and supercritical cooled magnets with a maximum current up to 11 kA and a ramp rate up to 14 kA/s. Measurements of magnet heat loss, with calorimetric and a V-I methods, are available, as are quench and magnetic field measurements. Design and functionality of the test facility will be described. Results of measurements with a supercritical cooled magnet and with a 2 phase cooled SIS100 model magnet will be shown.

  12. Mirror Fusion Test Facility: an intermediate device to a mirror fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karpenko, V.N.

    1983-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) now under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory represents more than an order-of-magnitude step from earlier magnetic-mirror experiments toward a future mirror fusion reactor. In fact, when the device begins operating in 1986, the Lawson criteria of ntau = 10 14 cm -3 .s will almost be achieved for D-T equivalent operation, thus signifying scientific breakeven. Major steps have been taken to develop MFTF-B technologies for tandem mirrors. Steady-state, high-field, superconducting magnets at reactor-revelant scales are used in the machine. The 30-s beam pulses, ECRH, and ICRH will also introduce steady-state technologies in those systems

  13. CERN tests largest superconducting solenoid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "CERN's Compacts Muon Solenoid (CMS) - the world's largest superconducting solenoid magnet - has reached full field in testing. The instrument is part of the proton-proton Large Hadron Collider (LHC) project, located in a giant subterranean chamber at Cessy on the Franco-Swiss border." (1 page)

  14. Manufacturing and Testing of Accelerator Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting magnet for accelerators is a quite complex process that is not yet fully industrialized. In this paper, after a short history of the evolution of the magnet design and construction, we review the main characteristics of the accelerator magnets having an impact on the construction technology. We put in evidence how the design and component quality impact on construction and why the final product calls for a total-quality approach. LHC experience is widely discussed and main lessons are spelled out. Then the new Nb3Sn technology, under development for the next generation magnet construction, is outlined. Finally, we briefly review the testing procedure of accelerator superconducting magnets, underlining the close connection with the design validation and with the manufacturing process

  15. Manufacturing and Testing of Accelerator Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Rossi, L

    2014-01-01

    Manufacturing of superconducting magnet for accelerators is a quite complex process that is not yet fully industrialized. In this paper, after a short history of the evolution of the magnet design and construction, we review the main characteristics of the accelerator magnets having an impact on the construction technology. We put in evidence how the design and component quality impact on construction and why the final product calls for a total-quality approach. LHC experience is widely discussed and main lessons are spelled out. Then the new Nb3Sn technology, under development for the next generation magnet construction, is outlined. Finally, we briefly review the testing procedure of accelerator superconducting magnets, underlining the close connection with the design validation and with the manufacturing process.

  16. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  17. The international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shannon, T.E.; Cozzani, F.; Crandall, D.H.; Wiffen, F.W.; Katsuta, H.; Kondo, T.; Teplyakov, V.; Zavialsky, L.

    1994-01-01

    It is widely agreed that the development of materials for fusion systems requires a high flux, 14 MeV neutron source. The European Union, Japan, Russia and the US have initiated the conceptual design of such a facility. This activity, under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Fusion Materials Agreement, will develop the design for an accelerator-based D-Li system. The first organizational meeting was held in June 1994. This paper describes the system to be studied and the approach to be followed to complete the conceptual design by early 1997

  18. Load Excitation at the Superconducting Cable Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsyth, E. B.; McNerney, A. J.; Meth, M.

    1979-09-01

    The superconducting cable test facility was constructed to evaluate and demonstrate flexible superconducting power transmission cables under realistic conditions. Power supplies were installed to excite two superconducting cables either separately or simultaneously. The cables formed a straight run of 100 m with a pair of terminations rated for full current and voltage located at the east and west ends of the cable enclosure. The design and operation of the test facilities are discussed. (LCL)

  19. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  20. Assessment of some of the problems in the USA of superconducting magnets for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses some of the general difficulties and problems encountered during the development of the technology of superconductors and superconducting magnets for fusion and expresses some personal concerns

  1. International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) neutron source term simulation and neutronics analyses of the high flux test module

    CERN Document Server

    Simakov, S P; Heinzel, V; Moellendorff, U V

    2002-01-01

    The report describes the new results of the development work performed at Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe on the neutronics of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). An important step forward has been done in the simulation of neutron production of the deuteron-lithium source using the Li(d,xn) reaction cross sections from evaluated data files. The developed Monte Carlo routine and d-Li reaction data newly evaluated at INPE Obninsk have been verified against available experimental data on the differential neutron yield from deuteron-bombarded thick lithium targets. With the modified neutron source three-dimensional distributions of neutron and photon fluxes, displacement and gas production rates and nuclear heating inside the high flux test module (HFTM) were calculated. In order to estimate the uncertainty resulting from the evaluated data, two independent libraries, recently released by INPE and LANL, have been used in the transport calculations. The proposal to use a reflector around ...

  2. International program activities in magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-03-01

    The following areas of our international activities in magnetic fusion are briefly described: (1) policy; (2) background; (3) strategy; (4) strategic considerations and concerns; (5) domestic program inplications, and (6) implementation. The current US activities are reviewed. Some of our present program needs are outlined

  3. Pressurized helium II-cooled magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warren, R.P.; Lambertson, G.R.; Gilbert, W.S.; Meuser, R.B.; Caspi, S.; Schafer, R.V.

    1980-06-01

    A facility for testing superconducting magnets in a pressurized bath of helium II has been constructed and operated. The cryostat accepts magnets up to 0.32 m diameter and 1.32 m length with current to 3000 A. In initial tests, the volume of helium II surrounding the superconducting magnet was 90 liters. Minimum temperature reached was 1.7 K at which point the pumping system was throttled to maintain steady temperature. Helium II reservoir temperatures were easily controlled as long as the temperature upstream of the JT valve remained above T lambda; at lower temperatures control became difficult. Positive control of the temperature difference between the liquid and cold sink by means of an internal heat source appears necessary to avoid this problem. The epoxy-sealed vessel closures, with which we have had considerable experience with normal helium vacuum, also worked well in the helium II/vacuum environment

  4. Program for development of toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research, May 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, H.M.; Lubell, M.S.

    1975-11-01

    The objective of this program is a tested magnet design which demonstrates the suitability and reliability needed to qualify toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research devices in a time compatible with the D-T burning experiments time frame. The overall applied development program including tasks, manpower, and cost estimates is detailed here, but for the full toroidal system only the cost and time frame are outlined to show compatibility with the present program. The details of the full toroidal system fall under major device fabrication and will be included in a subsequent document

  5. 8 October 2012 - Taipei Cultural and Economic Delegation, Geneva Office Ambassador A. Tah-Ray Yui visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with International Relations Office Adviser R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    8 October 2012 - Taipei Cultural and Economic Delegation, Geneva Office Ambassador A. Tah-Ray Yui visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with International Relations Office Adviser R. Voss.

  6. 28 September 2011 - Canadian Intellectual Property Office Policy, International and Research Office Director K. Georgaras visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineer M. Bajko and Senior Scientists P. Jenni and R. Voss.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    28 September 2011 - Canadian Intellectual Property Office Policy, International and Research Office Director K. Georgaras visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineer M. Bajko and Senior Scientists P. Jenni and R. Voss.

  7. Radiological design criteria for fusion power test facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, M.S.; Campbell, G.W.

    1982-01-01

    The quest for fusion power and understanding of plasma physics has resulted in planning, design, and construction of several major fusion power test facilities, based largely on magnetic and inertial confinement concepts. We have considered radiological design aspects of the Joint European Torus (JET), Livermore Mirror and Inertial Fusion projects, and Princeton Tokamak. Our analyses on radiological design criteria cover acceptable exposure levels at the site boundary, man-rem doses for plant personnel and population at large, based upon experience gained for the fission reactors, and on considerations of cost-benefit analyses

  8. Structural analysis of the magnet system for Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF). Addendum I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss, K.R.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1979-09-01

    The stress analysis refinement of the MFTF magnet system using GDSAP (General Dynamics Structural Analysis Program) and NASTRAN finite element computer models has been completed. The objective of this analysis was to calculate a more refined case and jacket stress distribution. The GDSAP model was refined in the minor radius area to yield a more detailed prediction of the stress distributions in critical areas identified by the previous analysis. Modifications in the case plate thickness (from 3.0 inches to 3.2 inches) and in the conductor pack load distribution and stiffness were included. The GDSAP model was converted to an identical NASTRAN model to determine the influence on stress results using higher order elements

  9. FMIT - the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liska, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    A joint effort by the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) and Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) has produced a preliminary design for a Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) that uses a high-power linear accelerator to fire a deuteron beam into a high-speed jet of molten lithium. The result is a continuous energy spectrum of neutrons with a 14-MeV average energy which can irradiate material samples to projected end-of-life levels in about 3 years, with a total accumulated fluence of 10 21 to 10 22 n/cm 2

  10. Contribution to the study of superconducting magnetic systems in the frame of fusion projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Artiguelongue, H.; Bej, Z.; Ciazynski, D.; Cloez, H.; Decool, P.; Hertout, P.; Libeyre, P.; Martinez, A.; Nicollet, S.; Rubino, M.; Schild, T.; Verger, J.M. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA/Cadarache, Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee DRFC, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2000-02-01

    This report is a presentation of all the 55 publications made by the Magnet Group of the 'Departement de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee' during the 94-99 period. These publications have been made mainly in the frame of EURATOM contracts and task for ITER. This collection deals with most of the dimensioning aspects of large superconducting magnets and hence the field interest is wider than the restricted field of magnets for fusion by magnetic confinement. Whenever it is possible, simple expressions and criteria are given for dimensioning superconducting strands, assembling them to build cables and cooling them by an adapted forced flow cooling. This is hence a major for the understanding of the behaviour of large modern superconducting magnets and provides many tools for design and construction. (author)

  11. Contribution to the study of superconducting magnetic systems in the frame of fusion projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duchateau, J.L.; Artiguelongue, H.; Bej, Z.; Ciazynski, D.; Cloez, H.; Decool, P.; Hertout, P.; Libeyre, P.; Martinez, A.; Nicollet, S.; Rubino, M.; Schild, T.; Verger, J.M.

    2000-02-01

    This report is a presentation of all the 55 publications made by the Magnet Group of the 'Departement de Recherche sur la Fusion Controlee' during the 94-99 period. These publications have been made mainly in the frame of EURATOM contracts and task for ITER. This collection deals with most of the dimensioning aspects of large superconducting magnets and hence the field interest is wider than the restricted field of magnets for fusion by magnetic confinement. Whenever it is possible, simple expressions and criteria are given for dimensioning superconducting strands, assembling them to build cables and cooling them by an adapted forced flow cooling. This is hence a major for the understanding of the behaviour of large modern superconducting magnets and provides many tools for design and construction. (author)

  12. First Cryogenic Testing of the ATLAS Superconducting Prototype Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Haug, F; Mayri, C; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroids and the barrel toroid made of eight coils (BT) symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. All these magnets will be individually tested in an experimental area prior to their final installation in the underground cavern of the LHC collider. A dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed and built for this purpose. It mainly consists of a 1'200 W at 4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit, a cryostat housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps, a distribution valve box and transfer lines. Prior to the start of the series tests of the BT magnets, two model coils are used at this facility. The first one, the so-called B00 of comparatively small size, contains the three different types of superconductors used for the ATLAS magnets which are wound on a cylindrical mandrel. The second magnet, the B0, is a reduced model of basically identical design concept as the...

  13. Program for development of toroidal superconducting magnets for fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, H.M.; Lubell, M.S.

    1976-04-01

    Research progress on the following subprograms is described/: (1) system design, (2) coil design, (3) conductor selection and test, (4) radiation effects on superconducting coils, (5) coil protection, eddy current shielding, and power supply, (6) structural analysis and materials investigation, (7) cryogenics and refrigeration, (8) subsize coil fabrication, (9) large coil project, (10) coil testing and evaluation, (11) administrative plan, and (12) quality assurance and reliability

  14. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: experimental capabilities and test matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Opperman, E.K.

    1982-01-01

    This report describes the experimental capabilities of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) and reference material specimen test matrices. The description of the experimental capabilities and the test matrices has been updated to match the current single test cell facility ad assessed experimenter needs. Sufficient detail has been provided so that the user can plan irradiation experiments and conceptual hardware. The types of experiments, irradiation environment and support services that will be available in FMIT are discussed

  15. PTF; a new facility for pulse field testing of large scale superconducting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, Bradford A.; Hale, J. Richard; Zhukovsky, Alex; Michael, Philip C.; Minervini, Joseph V.; Olmstead, Michael M.; Dekow, Gary L.; Rosati, James; Camille, Richard J.; Gung, Chen-yu; Gwinn, David; Silva, Frank; Fairfax, Stephen A.; Shen, Stewart; Knoopers, H.G.; Wessel, Wilhelm A.J.; Krooshoop, Hendrikus J.G.; Chevtchenko, O.A.; Godeke, A.; ten Kate, Herman H.J.

    1997-01-01

    A magnetic Pulse Test Facility (PTF), in which samples of CICC electrical joints from each ITER home team will be tested, has been fabricated at the MIT Plasma Fusion Center under an ITER task agreement. Construction of this facility has recently been completed, and an initial test phase on the

  16. Evolution and results of LCT, international collaboration of superconducting coil development for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimamoto, Susumu

    1987-01-01

    This international collaboration has been promoted centering around the International Energy Agency since ten years ago. This work is that of advancing joint experiments on the equal footing by several countries gathering with large hardwares. As the result, unlike the international collaboration carried out so far, much experiences have been brought in. Now this work is going to be successfully completed. At this time, the realities of the international collaboration experienced through this work are reported while referring to a part of the technical results. Superconductors were found at the end of 1950s, and the technical development of superconducting coils has been advanced mainly for the equipment of high energy physics in foreign countries, while in Japan, for MHD electricity generation and magnetic levitation train. The TFTR (USA), JET (Euratom) and JT-60 (Japan) aiming at the attainment of critical plasma use normal conduction coils, but the agreement on the LCT project was signed in the autumn of 1977, which aims at the development of the superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactors. The development of coil manufacture in respective countries and the experiments in Japan and Euratom, some episode in the negotiation, the experiment on six coils and the results are reported. (Kako, I.)

  17. Safety analysis of superconducting toroidal field magnet for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    Safety analysis of the superconducting toroidal field magnet for a Tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been carried out. Works were accident classification, FMEA and FTA analyses, coil stability and quench behavior calculations, failure detection and coil protection system designs, structure analysis, fracture and fatigue studies, and earthquake response analysis. Accident analysis of cryostat and refrigeration system was also performed. The objective of this work is to reveal technological problems of the toroidal field magnet by safety analysis. (author)

  18. The development of the high-tension wire for nuclear fusion superconductive magnet measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Morita, Yohsuke; Yamazaki, Takanori; Watanabe, Kiyoshi; Furusawa, Ken-ichi.

    1987-01-01

    Following on tokamak critical plasma testing device JT-60, experimental fusion reactor JT-100 is being developed. The 6 kV high-tension wire has been developed for use in JT-100 under ultra-low temperature and high radiation environment. Used for superconductive magnet measurement, the wire is inserted in the vacuum vessel, being immersed within the liquid helium. As the insulating material of this wire, polyetherimido was found to be most suitable in the respects of radiation resistance and voltage-withstand property. In an electric wire covered with polyetherimido, which was made in trial, its test in voltage-withstand and bending characteristics at ultra-low temperature showed the wire to be usable for the intended purpose. (Mori, K.)

  19. Soldered joints—an essential component of demountable high temperature superconducting fusion magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Yeekin; Surrey, Elizabeth; Hampshire, Damian

    2016-07-01

    Demountable superconducting magnet coils would offer significant benefits to commercial nuclear fusion power plants. Whether large pressed joints or large soldered joints provide the solution for demountable fusion magnets, a critical component or building block for both will be the many, smaller-scale joints that enable the supercurrent to leave the superconducting layer, cross the superconducting tape and pass into the solder that lies between the tape and the conductor that eventually provides one of the demountable surfaces. This paper considers the electrical and thermal properties of this essential component part of demountable high temperature superconducting (HTS) joints by considering the fabrication and properties of jointed HTSs consisting of a thin layer of solder (In52Sn48 or Pb38Sn62) sandwiched between two rare-earth-Ba2Cu3O7 (REBCO) second generation HTS coated conductors (CCs). The HTS joints are analysed using numerical modelling, critical current and resistivity measurements on the joints from 300 to 4.2 K in applied magnetic fields up to 12 T, as well as scanning electron microscopy studies. Our results show that the copper/silver layers significantly reduce the heating in the joints to less than a few hundred mK. When the REBCO alone is superconducting, the joint resistivity (R J) predominantly has two sources, the solder layer and an interfacial resistivity at the REBCO/silver interface (∼25 nΩ cm2) in the as-supplied CCs which together have a very weak magnetoresistance in fields up to 12 T. We achieved excellent reproducibility in the R J of the In52Sn48 soldered joints of better than 10% at temperatures below T c of the REBCO layer which can be compared to variations of more than two orders of magnitude in the literature. We also show that demountable joints in fusion energy magnets are viable and need only add a few percent to the total cryogenic cost for a fusion tokamak.

  20. A database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, P.D.; Goessel, A.; Gubarev, V.; Iversen, J.

    2006-01-01

    We look back on 10 years experience using a database for superconducting cavities for the TESLA Test Facility (TTF). The database was developed to collect data of every preparation step and measurement in order to optimize cavity production and preparation techniques to meet the ambitious goal of high accelerating gradients at high quality factors. Data from 110 superconducting 9-cell cavities, 50 single cell cavities, several 2- to 7-cell cavities and about 60 RF couplers were collected in the database. In addition, company measurements on sub-assemblies and parts forming the next 30 9-cell cavities were stored, thus establishing the database as part of a quality management system. This database is dynamically accessible via an extensive graphical web-interface based on ORACLE products, which enables the users to select and analyse the collected data easily from anywhere

  1. New cryogenic facilities for testing superconducting equipments for the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Barth, K; Delikaris, D; Delruelle, N; Ferlin, G; Passardi, Giorgio; Rieubland, Jean Michel

    1998-01-01

    CERN's major project, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), has moved to an implementation phase with machine construction to be completed by 2005. To achieve the design proton-proton centre of mass energy of 14 TeV in the given 27 km circumference LEP tunnel, the LHC will make an extensive use of high-field superconducting magnets using Nb-Ti filament operated at 1.9 K. In order to test, on the one han d, the superconducting cables of the magnets and, on the other hand, the expected performance of several of these magnets assembled in a string representing the lattice period of the machine (107 m lo ng), CERN has installed new cryogenic test facilities. The paper briefly describes these new facilities with all their associated equipments.

  2. Stability and disturbance of large dc superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.

    1981-01-01

    This paper addresses the stability aspects of several successful dc superconducting magnets such as large bubble chamber magnets, and magnets for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility and MHD Research Facility. Specifically, it will cover Argonne National Laboratory 12-Foot Bubble Chamber magnets, the 15-foot Bubble Chamber magnets at Fermi National Laboratory, the MFTF-B Magnet System at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the U-25B Bypass MHD Magnet, and the CFFF Superconducting MHD magnet built by Argonne National Laboratory. All of these magnets are cooled in pool-boiling mode. Magnet design is briefly reviewed. Discussed in detail are the adopted stability critera, analyses of stability and disturbance, stability simulation, and the final results of magnet performance and the observed coil disturbances

  3. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility: a facility for fusion-materials qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Hagan, J.W.; Opperman, E.K.; Burke, R.J.

    1983-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility will provide a unique testing environment for irradiation of structural and special purpose materials in support of fusion power systems. The neutron source will be produced by a deuteron-lithium stripping reaction to generate high energy neutrons to ensure damage similar to that of a deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum. The facility design is now ready for the start of construction and much of the supporting lithium system research has been completed. Major testing of key low energy end components of the accelerator is about to commence. The facility, its testing role, and the status and major aspects of its design and supporting system development are described

  4. International team successfully launches world's largest superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The world's largest superconducting magnet was successfully brought online recently as part of CERN's Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the new particle accelerator scheduled for full scale use in November 2007. The magnet charged and operated successfully on its first attempt. The magnet, called Barrel Toroid, provides the powerful magnetic fiedl for ATLAS, one of the major particle detectors for LHC." (2/3 page)

  5. Change in properties of superconducting magnet materials by fusion neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Arata; Nishijima, Shigehiro; Takeuchi, Takao; Nishitani, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    A fusion reactor will generate a lot of high energy neutron and much energy will be taken out of the neutrons by a blanket system. Since some neutrons will stream out of a plasma vacuum vessel through neutral beam injection ports and penetrate a blanket system, a superconducting magnet system, which provides high magnetic field to confirm high energy particles, will be irradiated by a certain amount of neutrons. By developing the new NBI system or by reducing the penetration, the neutron fluence to the superconducting magnet will be able to be reduced. However, it is not easy to achieve the lower streaming and penetration at the present. Therefore, investigations on irradiation behavior of superconducting magnet materials are desired and some novel researches have been performed from 1970s. In general, the critical current of the superconducting wire increases under fast neutron environment comparing with that of the non-irradiated wire, and then decreased to almost zero as an increase of neutron fluence. On the other hand, the critical temperature of the wire starts to get down around 10 22 n/m 2 of neutron fluence and the temperature margin will be decreased during the operation by the neutron irradiation. In this paper, some aspects of irradiated materials will be overviewed and general tendency will be discussed focussing on knock-on effect of fast neutron and long range ordering of A15 compounds

  6. Large superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Pérot, J

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the use of large superconducting magnets in the areas of particle physics, thermonuclear fusion, and magnetohydrodynamics. In addition to considering the physics of the superconducting state, the article considers machines such as BEBC (Big European Bubble Chamber) at CERN, the LINAC at SLAC and possible Tokamak applications. The future application of superconductors to high speed trains is discussed. (0 refs).

  7. ESCAR, tests of superconducting bending magnets at the accelerator site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, W.S.; Lambertson, G.R.; Meuser, R.B.; Rechen, J.B.

    1979-03-01

    ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerator Ring) was conceived as a project in accelerator technology development which would provide data and experience to insure that planning for larger superconducting synchrotrons would proceed in a knowledgeable and responsible manner. It was to consist of the fabrication and operation of a relatively small proton synchrotron and storage ring with superconducting magnet elements for all of the main ring. The project was funded and design work began in July 1974. During the next two years it became increasingly apparent that the funding rate was directly limiting the rate of completion of ESCAR and that an intermediate goal, a test of the unconventional aspects of the project, was desirable. To that end, twelve dipole bending magnets, one-half of those required for the total ring, were installed at the site along with the 1500 watt helium refrigerator, cryogenic distribution system, electrical power supplies, vacuum systems, and necessary instrumentation. This truncated system was put through an extended series of tests which were completed in June 1978 at which time the ESCAR Project was terminated. ESCAR, and the dipole magnets have been described previously. The results of the systems tests have also been reported. The tests involving the dipole magnets are described

  8. PREFACE: International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism-ICSM2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Ali; Grasso, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) was held at the congress centre of Ankara University in Side, Antalya, between 25-29 August 2008. The conference was the first conference on the combined fields of superconductivity and magnetism organized in Turkey at international level, and it had broad international participation from 42 countries, with registered delegates numbering over 400. A quarter of the attendees were research students. The conference attracted many of the best known leading scientists and experts in the field of superconductivity and magnetism from all over the world. The scientific program involved the presentation and discussion of 336 papers, classified as 65 invited, 81 oral and 190 posters. Submission of papers for the proceedings was on a volunteer basis and we therefore had nearly half of the presented papers, i.e. 30 submitted invited papers, peer-reviewed by Superconductor Science and Technology, and 85 submitted contributing papers, peer-reviewed by the organizers through processes administered by the Editorial Board and Scientific Committee. Reviews were conducted by expert referees at professional level and with the scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal issue published by IOP Publishing. The invited papers on superconductivity and magnetism with superconductivity were considered and processed for Superconductor Science and Technology by IOP itself. Although there are missing papers from some of the plenary speakers, we believe that this special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SUST) and the corresponding issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) reflect most of the booming research in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism. We are very pleased to have worked with IOP on the conference proceedings, with special thanks to Dr Tom Miller and Dr Graham Douglas. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, about 93 papers were

  9. Conceptual design of the superconducting magnet system for the helical fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagi, Nagato; Hamaguchi, Shinji; Takahata, Kazuya; Natsume, Kyohei

    2013-01-01

    Current status of conceptual design of superconducting magnet system and low temperature system for the helical fusion reactor are introduced. There are three kinds of candidates of superconducting magnets such as Cable-in-conduit (CIC), Low-Temperature Superconductor (LTS) and High-Temperature Superconductor (HTS). Their characteristic properties, coil designs and cooling systems are stated. The freezer and low temperature distribution system, bus line and current lead, and excitation power source for superconducting coil are reported. The various elements of superconducting magnet system of FFHR-d1, partial cross section of FFHR helical coil using CIC, conceptual diagram of helical coil winding method of FFHR using CIC, relation among mass flow of supercritical helium supplied into CIC conductor and temperature increasing and pressure loss, cross section structure of LTS indirect-cooling conductor at 100 kA, cross section of 100-kA HTS conductor, connection method of helical coil segment and YBCO conductor are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  10. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  11. Non-superconducting magnet structures for near-term, large fusion experimental devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    File, J.; Knutson, D.S.; Marino, R.E.; Rappe, G.H.

    1980-10-01

    This paper describes the magnet and structural design in the following American tokamak devices: the Princeton Large Torus (PLT), the Princeton Divertor Experiment (PDX), and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). The Joint European Torus (JET), also presented herein, has a magnet structure evolved from several European programs and, like TFTR, represents state of the art magnet and structure design

  12. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.; Boenig, H.J.

    1978-01-01

    Superconducting inductors provide a compact and efficient means of storing electrical energy without an intermediate conversion process. Energy storage inductors are under development for diurnal load leveling and transmission line stabilization in electric utility systems and for driving magnetic confinement and plasma heating coils in fusion energy systems. Fluctuating electric power demands force the electric utility industry to have more installed generating capacity than the average load requires. Energy storage can increase the utilization of base-load fossil and nuclear power plants for electric utilities. Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) systems, which will store and deliver electrical energy for load leveling, peak shaving, and the stabilization of electric utility networks are being developed. In the fusion area, inductive energy transfer and storage is also being developed by LASL. Both 1-ms fast-discharge theta-pinch and 1-to-2-s slow tokamak energy transfer systems have been demonstrated. The major components and the method of operation of an SMES unit are described, and potential applications of different size SMES systems in electric power grids are presented. Results are given for a 1-GWh reference design load-leveling unit, for a 30-MJ coil proposed stabilization unit, and for tests with a small-scale, 100-kJ magnetic energy storage system. The results of the fusion energy storage and transfer tests are also presented. The common technology base for the systems is discussed

  13. Neutron-irradiation facilities at the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source-I for fusion magnet materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, B.S.; Blewitt, T.H.

    1982-01-01

    The decommissioning of reactor-based neutron sources in the USA has led to the development of a new generation of neutron sources that employ high-energy accelerators. Among the accelerator-based neutron sources presently in operation, the highest-flux source is the Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), a user facility at Argonne National Laboratory. Neutrons in this source are produced by the interaction of 400 to 500 MeV protons with either of two 238 U target systems. In the Radiation Effects Facility (REF), the 238 U target is surrounded by Pb for neutron generatjion and reflection. The REF has three separate irradiation thimbles. Two thimbles provide irradiation temperatures between that of liquid He and several hundred degrees centigrade. The third thimble operates at ambient temperature. The large irradiation volume, the neutron spectrum and flux, the ability to transfer samples without warm up, and the dedication of the facilities during the irradiation make this ideally suited for radiation damage studies on components for superconducting fusion magnets. Possible experiments for fusion magnet materials are discussed on cyclic irradiation and annealing of stabilizers in a high magnetic field, mechanical tests on organic insulation irradiated at 4 K, and superconductors measured in high fields after irradiation

  14. Neutron irradiation effects on superconducting and stabilizing materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, W.

    1984-05-01

    Available low-temperature neutron irradiation data for the superconductors NbTi and Nb 3 Sn and the stabilization materials Cu and Al are collected and maximum tolerable doses for these materials are defined. A neutron flux in a reactor of about 10 9 n/cm 2 s at the magnet position is expected. However, in fusion experiments the flux can be higher by an order of magnitude or more. The energy spectrum is similar to a fission reactor. A fluence of about 10 18 n/cm 2 results during the lifetime of a fusion magnet (about 20 full power years). At this fluence and energy spectrum no severe degradation of the superconducting properties of NbTi and Nb 3 Sn will occur. But the radiation-induced resistivity is for Cu about a twentieth of the room temperature resistivity and a tenth for Al. (orig.) [de

  15. Hazard evaluation of The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burgazzi, Luciano

    2005-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is aimed to provide an intense neutron source by a high current deuteron linear accelerator and a high-speed lithium flow target, for testing candidate materials for fusion. Liquid lithium is being circulated through a loop and is kept at a temperature above its freezing point. In the frame of the design phase called Key Element technology Phase (KEP), jointly performed by an international team to verify the most important risk factors, safety assessment of the whole plant has been required in order to identify the hazards associated with the plant operation. This paper discusses the safety assessments that were performed and their outcome: Failure Mode and Effect Analysis (FMEA) approach has been adopted in order to accomplish the task. Main conclusions of the study is that, on account of the safety and preventive measures adopted, potential plant related hazards are confined within the IFMIF security boundaries and great care must be exercised to protect workers and site personnel from operating the plant. The analysis has provided as a result a set of Postulated Initiating Events (PIEs), that is off-normal events, that could result in hazardous consequences for the plant, together with the total frequency and the list of component failures which could induce the PIE: this assures the exhaustive list of major initiating events of accident sequences, helpful to the further accident sequence analysis phase. Finally, for each one of the individuated PIEs, the evaluation of the accident evolution, in terms of effects on the plant and relative countermeasures, has allowed to verify that adequate measures are being taken both to prevent the accident occurrence and to cope with the accident consequences, thus assuring the fulfilment of the safety requirements

  16. Stress relaxation technique of high magnetic field superconducting magnet for the nuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamimoto, Masayuki; Tateishi, Hiroshi; Agatsuma, Ko; Arai, Kazuaki; Umeda, Masaichi

    1999-01-01

    Here were attempted not only to prove effectiveness of a stress self-supporting type wire material for magnet constituting technique, but also to develop a fiber reinforcing type superconducting wire material used by materials with excellent strain resistance to expand usable range of the stress self-supporting type with material. In 1997 fiscal year, superconductive features of the wire material produced by using composite processing method were evaluated, actual applicability for superconducting wire material was inspected, and investigation on manufacturing parameter of NbN thin films on trial production at present apparatus was conducted. (G.K.)

  17. ASTROMAG: A superconducting particle astrophysics magnet facility for the space station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smoot, G.F.; Golden, R.L.

    1986-09-01

    This paper describes a superconducting magnet system which is the heart of a particle astrophysics facility to be mounted on a portion of the proposed NASA space station. This facility will complete the studies done by the electromagnetic observatories now under development and construction by NASA. The paper outlines the selection process of the type of magnet to be used to analyze the energy and momentum of charged particles from deep space. The ASTROMAG superconducting magnet must meet all the criteria for a shuttle launch and landing, and it must meet safety standards for use in or near a manned environment such as the space station. The magnet facility must have a particle gathering aperture of at least 1 square meter steradian and the facility should be capable of resolving heavy nuclei with a total energy of 10 Tev or more. 4 refs., 3 figs

  18. Final design of a superconducting MHD magnet for the Coal-Fired Flow Facility at the University of Tennessee Space Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Turner, L.R.; Genens, L.

    1980-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system (SCMS) consists of a superconducting magnet, magnet cryostat, a helium refrigerator/liquefier facility, a helium gas-handling system, apparatus for cryogenic transfer and storage, a magnet power supply, an integrated instrumentation and control system including a computer for magnet operation, data acquisition, system status and diagnosis, and magnet protection. The complete system will be tested at Argonne and installed at the Coal-Fired Flow Facility (CFFF) at the University of Tennessee Space Institute (UTSI) in 1981. The coil configurations, conductor design, coil structure, cryostatibility, electromagnetic forces and pressure, structural support and stress analysis, and power supply and magnet protection are described

  19. The superconducting magnet system for the WENDELSTEIN 7-X fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapper, J.

    1995-01-01

    In devices of the TOKAMAK type (JET/Culham, GB, and TFTR/Princeton Laboratory, U.S.A.), successful plasma ignition was achieved, and fusion-induced generation of electricity of some megawatts, for a period of seconds. Experiments of the next generation will tackle the problems of electricity generation sustained over longer periods, for which the STELLARATOR machines are the device of choice, as these, other than the TOKAMAKS, do not require generation of plasma ring currents between 10 and 20 MA. The magnet system in the STELLARATOR devices has to be a superconducting magnet system. At present, bench-scale LT superconductors are available made of materials on the basis of NbTi or Nb 3 Sn, which are applied according to system configuration ( induction at the conductor, current density, temperature, alternating magnetic field load). The paper explains the magnet system intended for use in the planned STELLARATOR WENDELSTEIN 7-X experiments at IPP, Garching. (orig./MM) [de

  20. Electromagnetic properties of REBaCuO superconducting tapes considered for magnets of fusion reactors.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jirsa, Miloš; Rameš, Michal; Ďuran, Ivan; Entler, Slavomír; Melíšek, T.; Kováč, P.; Viererbl, L.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 124, November (2017), s. 73-76 ISSN 0920-3796. [SOFT 2016: Symposium on Fusion Technology /29./. Prague, 05.09.2016-09.09.2016] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 633053 - EUROfusion Institutional support: RVO:61389021 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Superconducting REBaCuO tapes * Magnetic hysteresis loops * Transport currents * Engineering currents * Angular dependence * Neutron irradiation Subject RIV: JF - Nuclear Energetics; JF - Nuclear Energetics (FZU-D) OBOR OECD: Nuclear related engineering; Nuclear related engineering (FZU-D) Impact factor: 1.319, year: 2016 www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0920379617304829

  1. Design study of superconducting magnets for tokamak experimental fusion reactor, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-03-01

    Design study has been made of superconducting magnets for a Tokamak experimental fusion reactor: toroidal field magnet design, poloidal field magnet design, refrigeration system design, magnet safety analysis, and magnet assembling and disassembling system design. A maximum toroidal field in the coil is 11.0 T, providing 5.5 T at plasma center. Nb 3 Sn superconducting cable is used to attain the toroidal field of 11 T. The coil bore is 7.3 x 11.2 m, and the coil shape is deformed constant-tension D-shape. The magnetomotive force is 185.6 MAT, and the operational current is 25.9 kA. In poloidal field magnet design, the coil is pancake-wound Nb 3 Sn conductor. The conductor is enclosed in Ti-alloy sheath, which serves also as helium containment vessel. The conductor is cooled by forced flow supercritical helium of 7 atm and 4.6 K, and the operational current is 25 -- 27 kA. (author)

  2. Superconductivity and fusion energy—the inseparable companions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruzzone, Pierluigi

    2015-02-01

    Although superconductivity will never produce energy by itself, it plays an important role in energy-related applications both because of its saving potential (e.g., power transmission lines and generators), and its role as an enabling technology (e.g., for nuclear fusion energy). The superconducting magnet’s need for plasma confinement has been recognized since the early development of fusion devices. As long as the research and development of plasma burning was carried out on pulsed devices, the technology of superconducting fusion magnets was aimed at demonstrations of feasibility. In the latest generation of plasma devices, which are larger and have longer confinement times, the superconducting coils are a key enabling technology. The cost of a superconducting magnet system is a major portion of the overall cost of a fusion plant and deserves significant attention in the long-term planning of electricity supply; only cheap superconducting magnets will help fusion get to the energy market. In this paper, the technology challenges and design approaches for fusion magnets are briefly reviewed for past, present, and future projects, from the early superconducting tokamaks in the 1970s, to the current ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and W7-X projects and future DEMO (Demonstration Reactor) projects. The associated cryogenic technology is also reviewed: 4.2 K helium baths, superfluid baths, forced-flow supercritical helium, and helium-free designs. Open issues and risk mitigation are discussed in terms of reliability, technology, and cost.

  3. Quench propagation tests on the LHC superconducting magnet string

    CERN Document Server

    Coull, L; Krainz, G; Rodríguez-Mateos, F; Schmidt, R

    1996-01-01

    The installation and testing of a series connection of superconducting magnets (three 10 m long dipoles and one 3 m long quadrupole) has been a necessary step in the verification of the viability of the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In the LHC machine, if one of the lattice dipoles or quadrupoles quenches, the current will be by-passed through cold diodes and the whole magnet chain will be de-excited by opening dump switches. In such a scenario it is very important to know whether the quench propagates from the initially quenching magnet to adjacent ones. A series of experiments have been performed with the LHC Test String powered at different current levels and at different de-excitation rates in order to understand possible mechanisms for such a propagation, and the time delays involved. Results of the tests and implications regarding the LHC machine operation are described in this paper.

  4. A new cryogenic test facility for large superconducting devices at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Perin, A; Serio, L; Stewart, L; Benda, V; Bremer, J; Pirotte, O

    2015-01-01

    To expand CERN testing capability to superconducting devices that cannot be installed in existing test facilities because of their size and/or mass, CERN is building a new cryogenic test facility for large and heavy devices. The first devices to be tested in the facility will be the S-FRS superconducting magnets for the FAIR project that is currently under construction at the GSI Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany. The facility will include a renovated cold box with 1.2 kW at 4.5 K equivalent power with its compression system, two independent 15 kW liquid nitrogen precooling and warm-up units, as well as a dedicated cryogenic distribution system providing cooling power to three independent test benches. The article presents the main input parameters and constraints used to define the cryogenic system and its infrastructure. The chosen layout and configuration of the facility is presented and the characteristics of the main components are described.

  5. Finite element analysis of structural response of superconducting magnet for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Powell, J.; Bezler, P.; Chang, T.Y.; Prachuktam, S.

    1975-01-01

    In the proposal Tokamak fusion reactor, the superconducting unit consists of an assembly of D-shaped magnets standing vertically and arranged in a toroidal configuration. Each magnet is a composite structure comprised of Nb-22%Ti and Nb-48%Ti, and stabilizing metals such as copper and aluminum or stainless steel held together by reinforced epoxies which also serve as insulators and spacers. The magnets are quite large, typically 15-20 meters in diameter with rectangular cross sections around 0.93x2m. Under static loading condition, the magnet is subjected to dead weight and large magnetic field forces, which may induce high stresses in the structure. Furthermore, additional stresses due to earthquake must also be considered for the design of the component. Both static and dynamic analyses of a typical field magnet have been performed by use of the finite element method. The magnet was assumed to be linearly elastic with equivalent homogeneous material properties. Various finite element models have been considered in order to better represent the structure for a particular loading case. For earthquake analysis, the magnet was assumed to be subjected to 50% of the El Centro 1940 earthquake and the dynamic response was obtained by the displacement spectrum analysis procedure. In the paper, numerical results are presented and the structure behavior of the magnet under static and dynamic loading conditions is discussed

  6. Superconducting materials and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-04-01

    The Technical Committee Meeting on Superconducting Materials and Magnets was convened by the IAEA and held by invitation of the Japanese government on September 4-6, 1989 in Tokyo. The meeting was hosted by the National Research Institute for Metals. Topics of the conference related to superconducting magnets and technology with particular application to fusion and the superconducting supercollider. Technology using both high and low-temperature superconductors was discussed. This document is a compendium of the papers presented at the meeting. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Electrical energy and cost for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, G.A.

    1983-01-01

    An operational scenario has been developed for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) based on the System Requirements, our experience with existing systems, and discussions with the project engineers and designers who are responsible for the systems. This scenario was used to predict the amount of electrical energy needed for running the facility. A generic type listing is included for the equipment considered in each system

  8. Electrical energy and cost for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pence, G.A.

    1983-02-01

    An operational scenario for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility has been developed based on System Requirements, experience with existing systems, and discussions with project engineers and designers who are responsible for the systems. This scenario was used to project the electrical energy required for the facility. Each system is listed showing the equipment that has been considered, the amount of power requested, and in most cases, the power that it is now connected

  9. Cryogenic systems for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Nelson, R.L.; Chronis, W.C.

    1985-08-01

    This paper includes an in-depth discussion of the design, fabrication, and operation of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) cryogenic system located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Each subsystem discussed to present a basic composite of the entire facility. The following subsystems are included: 500kW nitrogen reliquefier, subcoolers, and distribution system; 15kW helium refrigerator/liquefier and distribution system; helium recovery and storage system; rough vacuum and high vacuum systems

  10. 2 March 2011 - Swedish State Secretary to the Minister for Enterprise and Energy C. Håkansson Boman signing the guest book wit Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; in the ATLAS visitor centre with P. Grafstrom; troughout accompanied by Deparment Head T. Pettersson.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2011-01-01

    She was welcomed to CERN by Felicitas Pauss, head of international relations. The visit included a presentation about the LHC Computing Grid project and a tour of the LHC superconducting magnet test hall and the ATLAS visitor centre.

  11. Proceedings of the IEA-technical workshop on the test cell system for an international fusion materials irradiation facility, Karlsruhe, Germany, July 3-6, 1995. IEA-implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Lindau, R.

    1995-09-01

    After a Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) study on an International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been launched under the auspices of the IEA, working groups and relevant tasks have been defined and agreed in an IEA-workshop that was held September 26-29 1994 at Karlsruhe. For the Test Cell System 11 tasks were identified which can be grouped into the three major fields neutronics, test matrix/users and test cell engineering. In order to discuss recently achieved results and to coordinate necessary activities for an effective design integration, a technical workshop on the Test Cell System was initiated. This workshop was organized on July 3-6 1995 by the Institute for Materials Research I at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe and attended by 20 specialists working in the fields neutronics, fusion materials R and D and test cell engineering in the European Union, Japan, and the United States of America. The presentations and discussions during this workshop have shown together with the elaborated lists of action items, that has been achieved in all three fields, and that from the future IFMIF experimental program for a number of materials a database covering widerspread loading conditions up to DEMO-reactor relevant end-of-life damage levels can be expected. (orig.)

  12. Fusion magnet safety studies program: superconducting magnet protection system and failure. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Danby, G.; Hsieh, S.Y.; Keane, J.; Powell, J.; Prodell, A.

    1975-11-01

    This report includes the first two quarters study of available information on schemes for protecting superconducting magnets. These schemes can be divided into two different categories. The first category deals with the detection of faulty regions (or normal regions) in the magnet. The second category relates to the protection of the magnet when a fault is detected, and the derived signal which can be used to activate a safety system (or energy removal system). The general detection and protection methods are first described briefly and then followed by a survey of the protection systems used by different laboratories for various magnets. A survey of the cause of the magnet difficulties or failures is also included. A preliminary discussion of these protection schemes and the experimental development of this program is given

  13. Fusion magnet safety studies program: superconducting magnet protection system and failure. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allinger, J.; Danby, G.; Hsieh, S.Y.; Keane, J.; Powell, J.; Prodell, A.

    1975-11-01

    This report includes the first two quarters study of available information on schemes for protecting superconducting magnets. These schemes can be divided into two different categories. The first category deals with the detection of faulty regions (or normal regions) in the magnet. The second category relates to the protection of the magnet when a fault is detected, and the derived signal which can be used to activate a safety system (or energy removal system). The general detection and protection methods are first described briefly and then followed by a survey of the protection systems used by different laboratories for various magnets. A survey of the cause of the magnet difficulties or failures is also included. A preliminary discussion of these protection schemes and the experimental development of this program is given.

  14. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki (eds.) [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2002-03-01

    Activities of International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) have been performed under an IEA collaboration since 1995. IFMIF is an accelerator-based deuteron (D{sup +})-lithium (Li) neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field (2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/year for Fe) in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} for testing candidate fusion materials. In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was started to reduce the key technology risk factors. This interim report summarizes the KEP activities until mid 2001 in the major project work-breakdown areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  15. Fusion materials irradiation test facility: description and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trego, A.L.; Parker, E.F.; Hagan, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility will generate a high-flux, high-energy neutron source that will provide a fusion-like radiation environment for fusion reactor materials development. The neutrons will be produced in a nuclear stripping reaction by impinging a 35 MeV beam of deuterons from an Alvarez-type linear accelerator on a flowing lithium target. The target will be located in a test cell which will provide an irradiation volume of over 750l within which 10 cm 3 will have an average neutron flux of greater than 1.4 x 10 15 n/cm 2 -s and 500 cm 3 an average flux of greater than 2.2 by 10 14 n/cm 2- s with an expected availability factor greater than 65%. The projected fluence within the 10 cm 3 high flux region of FMIT will effect damage upon the materials test specimens to 30 dpa (displacements per atom) for each 90 day irradiation period. This irradiation flux volume will be at least 500 times larger than that of any other facility with comparable neutron energy and will fully meet the fusion materials damage research objective of 100 dpa within three years for the first round of tests

  16. Design study of superconducting toroidal magnet for tokamak experimental fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Design study of the superconducting toroidal magnet for the Tokamak experimental fusion reactor has been carried out. Performed here were conductor design, magnetic field calculation, design of coil support, stress analysis, design of refrigeration system and safety analysis. The maximum toroidal field at the coil is 12.0 T, providing 6.0 T at the plasma center. The coil bore is 7.3 x 11.2 m, and the coil shape is deformed constant-tension D-shape. 16 coil design was chosen, considering the necessity for good access for the evacuation port or the support structure of blanket and shield. The maximum field ripple obtained in the plasma region is 0.47%. The operational current is 25,100 amperes, and the cryogenic stabilization is fulfilled. Nb 3 Sn superconductor was chosen in spite of its brittleness, to attain a toroidal field of 12 T which is higher than a practical limit for NbTi superconductor. The development of large Nb 3 Sn coil technology would be necessary to realize an economic fusion power reactor. (auth.)

  17. Role of the large coil program in the development of superconducting magnets for fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Luton, J.N.; Thompson, P.B.

    1978-01-01

    Three U.S. industrial teams are designing and will build one coil each to a common set of specifications. Coil specifications and test conditions were chosen to insure maximum relevance to fusion program needs. Each test coil will have a 2.5 x 3.5 m D-shape bore, will contain about 7 MA-turns, and must operate at a peak field of 8 T while subjected to pulsed fields up to 0.14 T in a test stand that can accommodate up to 6 coils in a compact toroidal array. Coils by General Dynamics/Convair and General Electric will use different NbTi conductors cooled by pool-boiling helium. The Westinghouse coil will use Nb 3 Sn cooled by a forced flow of supercritical helium. These coils will be delivered in 1980 and 1981 for testing in the Large Coil Test Facility at Oak Ridge in a compact toroidal array with three coils from outside the U.S. These will be produced by EURATOM, Japan, and Switzerland for testing under an International Energy Agency agreement

  18. Safety of superconducting magnets for fusion: thermal analysis of large cryostable magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, L.R.

    1980-01-01

    A thermal analysis program has been developed to study the response of a cryostable fusion magnet to abnormal conditions such as a localized heat input, overcurrent, or uncooled length of conductor. It performs a heat balance on each element. Variation of parameters with temperature, pressure, and magnetic field are incorporated. The program has been applied to a conductor with magnetic field variation along its length, carrying a high current as might occur in one toroidal field coil when a neighboring coil discharges rapidly. It is found that a stable normal region can develop, with possibly serious consequences

  19. Magnetized Inertial Fusion (MIF) Research at the Shiva Star Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degnan, James; Grabowski, C.; Domonkos, M.; Ruden, E. L.; Amdahl, D. J.; White, W. M.; Frese, M. H.; Frese, S. D.; Wurden, G. A.; Weber, T. E.

    2015-11-01

    The AFRL Shiva Star capacitor bank (1300 μF, up to 120 kV) used typically at 4 to 5 MJ stored energy, 10 to 15 MA current, 10 μs current rise time, has been used to drive metal shell (solid liner) implosions for compression of axial magnetic fields to multi-megagauss levels, suitable for compressing magnetized plasmas to MIF conditions. MIF approaches use magnetic field to reduce thermal conduction relative to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). MIF substantially reduces required implosion speed and convergence. Using profiled thickness liner enables large electrode apertures and field-reversed configuration (FRC) injection. Using a longer capture region, FRC trapped flux lifetime was made comparable to implosion time and an integrated compression test was conducted. The FRC was radially compressed a factor of ten, to 100x density >1018 cm-3 (a world FRC record), but temperatures were only 300-400 eV, compared to intended several keV. Compression to megabar pressures was inferred by the observed liner rebound, but the heating rate during the first half of the compression was less than the normal FRC decay rate. Principal diagnostics were soft x-ray imaging, soft x-ray diodes, and neutron measurements. This work has been supported by DOE-OFES.

  20. Remote-handling demonstration tests for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, E.J.; Hussey, M.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1982-01-01

    The mission of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is to create a fusion-like environment for fusion materials development. Crucial to the success of FMIT is the development and testing of remote handling systems required to handle materials specimens and maintenance of the facility. The use of full scale mock-ups for demonstration tests provides the means for proving these systems

  1. LLL magnetic fusion energy program: an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1976-01-01

    Over the last 12 months, significant progress has been made in the LLL magnetic fusion energy program. In the 2XIIB experiment, a tenfold improvement was achieved in the plasma confinement factor (the product of plasma density and confinement time), pushed plasma temperature and pressure to values never before reached in a magnetic fusion experiment, and demonstrated--for the first time--plasma startup by neutral beam injection. A new laser-pellet startup technique for Baseball IIT has been successfully tested and is now being incorporated in the experiment. Technological improvements have been realized, such as a breakthrough in fabricating niobium-tin conductors for superconducting magnets. These successes, together with complementary progress in theory and reactor design, have led to a proposal to build the MX facility, which could be on the threshold of a mirror fusion reactor

  2. Superconducting magnet development. Program annual report, July 1975--September 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deis, D.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Nelson, R.L.; Sackett, S.J.; Taylor, C.E.

    1977-01-01

    During FY76 Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) continued its development of niobium tin (Nb 3 Sn) conductors and its design support for the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF) superconducting magnet. Three highlights came from within the Laboratory. LLL completed its cryogenic tensile-test apparatus for NB 3 Sn strain measurements. Over at MFTF, engineers ordered 2100 m of prototype material for a 1-m test coil. People at the high-field test facility (HFTF) released some components for fabrication; delivery was scheduled for early FY77. Outside LLL several subcontractors advanced Nb 3 Sn manufacturing technology. One advance, in particular, improved conductor current densities at 12 T

  3. Cryomodule tests of four Tesla-like cavities in the Superconducting RF Test Facility at KEK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eiji Kako

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A 6-m cryomodule including four Tesla-like cavities was developed, and was tested in the Superconducting RF Test Facility phase-I at KEK. The performance as a total superconducting cavity system was checked in the cryomodule tests at 2 K with high rf power. One of the four cavities achieved a stable pulsed operation at 32  MV/m, which is higher than the operating accelerating gradient in the ILC. The maximum accelerating gradient (E_{acc,max⁡} obtained in the vertical cw tests was maintained or slightly improved in the cryomodule tests operating in a pulse mode. Compensation of the Lorentz force detuning at 31  MV/m was successfully demonstrated by a piezo tuner and predetuning.

  4. Fusion technology development: role of fusion facility upgrades and fission test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.; Deis, G.A.; Miller, L.G.; Longhurst, G.R.; Schmunk, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    The near term national fusion program is unlikely to follow the aggressive logic of the Fusion Engineering Act of 1980. Faced with level budgets, a large, new fusion facility with an engineering thrust is unlikely in the near future. Within the fusion community the idea of upgrading the existing machines (TFTR, MFTF-B) is being considered to partially mitigate the lack of a design data base to ready the nation to launch an aggressive, mission-oriented fusion program with the goal of power production. This paper examines the cost/benefit issues of using fusion upgrades to develop the technology data base which will be required to support the design and construction of the next generation of fusion machines. The extent of usefulness of the nation's fission test reactors will be examined vis-a-vis the mission of the fusion upgrades. We will show that while fission neutrons will provide a useful test environment in terms of bulk heating and tritium breeding on a submodule scale, they can play only a supporting role in designing the integrated whole modules and systems to be used in a nuclear fusion machine

  5. 19 September 2011 - Austrian State Secretary for European and International Affairs W. Waldner, signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting CMS service cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli and the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Zerlauth.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoît Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    Austrian state secretary for foreign affairs, Wolfgang Waldner, left, was welcomed to CERN by Felicitas Pauss, head of international relations at CERN, on 19 September. While at CERN, he toured the CMS control room and underground experimental service cavern, the LHC superconducting magnet test hall, and the Universe of Particles exhibition in the Globe of Science and Innovation.

  6. Testing of the MFTF magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.; Chang, Y.; Dalder, E.N.C.

    1982-01-01

    This paper describes the cooldown and testing of the first yin-yang magnet for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility. The introduction describes the superconducting magnet; the rest of the paper explains the tests prior to and including magnet cooldown and final acceptance testing. The MFTF (originally MX) was proposed in 1976 and the project was funded for construction start in October 1977. Construction of the first large superconducting magnet set was completed in May 1981 and testing started shortly thereafter. The acceptance test procedures were reviewed in May 1981 and the cooldown and final acceptance test were done by the end of February 1982. During this acceptance testing the magnet achieved its full design current and field

  7. Seismic analysis of the mirror fusion test facility shielding vault

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gabrielsen, B.L.; Tsai, K.

    1981-04-01

    This report presents a seismic analysis of the vault in Building 431 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory which houses the mirror Fusion Test Facility. The shielding vault structure is approximately 120 ft long by 80 ft wide and is constructed of concrete blocks approximately 7 x 7 x 7 ft. The north and south walls are approximately 53 ft high and the east wall is approximately 29 ft high. These walls are supported on a monolithic concrete foundation that surrounds a 21-ft deep open pit. Since the 53-ft walls appeared to present the greatest seismic problem they were the first investigated

  8. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  9. Suitability and feasibility of the international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) for fusion materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Ehrlich, K.; Shannon, T.E.; Rennich, M.J.; Jameson, R.A.; Kondo, T.; Katsuta, H.; Maekawa, H.; Martone, M.; Teplyakov, V.

    1999-01-01

    There is a global consensus among materials scientists and engineers that the qualification of materials in an appropriate test environment is inevitable for design, construction and safe operation of DEMOnstration fusion reactors as well as for calibration of data generated from fission reactor and accelerators irradiations. In an evaluation process based on a series of technical workshops it was concluded that an accelerator driven D-Li stripping source would be the best choice to fulfill the requirements within a realistic time frame. In response to this need, an international design team with members from Europe, Japan, USA and Russia has developed under the auspices of the IEA during a Conceptual Design Activity Phase (1994-96) a suitable and feasible concept for an accelerator driven D-Li stripping source. This IFMIF reference design is based on conservative linac technology and two parallel operating 125-mA, 40-MeV deuteron beams that are focused onto a common liquid lithium target with a beam footprint of 50 mm by 200 mm. The materials testing volume downstream the Li-target is subdivided into different flux regions: The high flux test region (0.5 liter, 20-55 dpa/full power year), the medium flux test region (6 liter, 1-20 dpa/fpy), and low flux test regions (>100 liter, < 1 dpa/fpy). The developed design was the basis fore the present Conceptual Design Evaluation Phase (1997-98) and for subsequent engineering oriented activities. Based on comprehensive neutron transport calculations, an evaluation of the irradiation parameters and the available test volumes has shown that the users requirements can be fulfilled. Major engineering efforts have been undertaken to establish an IFMIF design that is based on available and already proven technologies. The developed design includes extensive reliability, availability, maintainability as well as safety studies and is conceived for long-term operation with a total annual facility availability of at least 70

  10. Suitability and feasibility of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) for fusion materials studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeslang, A.; Ehrlich, K.; Shannon, T.E.; Rennich, M.T.; Jameson, R.A.; Kondo, T.; Katsuta, H.; Maekawa, H.; Martone, M.; Teplyakov, V.

    2001-01-01

    There is a global consensus among materials scientists and engineers that the qualification of materials in an appropriate test environment is inevitable for design, construction and safe operation of DEMOnstration fusion reactors as well as for calibration of data generated from fission reactor and accelerators irradiations. In an evaluation process based on a series of technical workshops it was concluded that an accelerator driven D-Li stripping source would be the best choice to fulfill the requirements within a realistic time frame. In response to this need, an international design team with members from Europe, Japan, USA and Russia has developed under the auspices of the IEA during a Conceptual Design Activity Phase (1994-96) a suitable and feasible concept for an accelerator driven D-Li stripping source. This IFMIF reference design is based on conservative linac technology and two parallel operating 125-mA, 40-MeV deuteron beams that are focused onto a common liquid lithium target with a beam footprint of 50 mm by 200 mm. The materials testing volume downstream the Li-target is subdivided into different flux regions: The high flux test region (0.5 liter, 20-55 dpa/full power year), the medium flux test region (6 liter, 1-20 dpa/fpy), and low flux test regions (> 100 liter, < 1 dpa/fpy). The developed design was the basis fore the present Conceptual Design Evaluation Phase (1997-98) and for subsequent engineering oriented activities. Based on comprehensive neutron transport calculations, an evaluation of the irradiation parameters and the available test volumes has shown that the users requirements can be fulfilled. Major engineering efforts have been undertaken to establish an IFMIF design that is based on available and already proven technologies. The developed design includes extensive reliability, availability, maintainability as well as safety studies and is conceived for long-term operation with a total annual facility availability of at least 70

  11. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m 2 , 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm 3 and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  12. IFMIF-KEP. International fusion materials irradiation facility key element technology phase report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-03-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source designed to produce an intense neutron field that will simulate the neutron environment of a D-T fusion reactor. IFMIF will provide a neutron flux equivalent to 2 MW/m{sup 2}, 20 dpa/y in Fe, in a volume of 500 cm{sup 3} and will be used in the development and qualification of materials for fusion systems. The design activities of IFMIF are performed under an IEA collaboration which began in 1995. In 2000, a three-year Key Element Technology Phase (KEP) of IFMIF was undertaken to reduce the key technology risk factors. This KEP report describes the results of the three-year KEP activities in the major project areas of accelerator, target, test facilities and design integration. (author)

  13. Neutronics analysis of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Japanese contributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyama, Yukio; Noda, Kenji; Kosako, Kazuaki.

    1997-10-01

    In fusion reactor development for demonstration reactor, i.e., DEMO, materials tolerable for D-T neutron irradiation are absolutely required for both mechanical and safety point of views. For this requirement, several kinds of low activation materials were proposed. However, experimental data by actual D-T fusion neutron irradiation have not existed so far because of lack of fusion neutron irradiation facility, except fundamental radiation damage studies at very low neutron fluence. Therefore such a facility has been strongly requested. According to agreement of need for such a facility among the international parties, a conceptual design activity (CDA) of International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been carried out under the frame work of the IEA-Implementing Agreement. In the activity, a neutronics analysis on irradiation field optimization in the IFMIF test cell was performed in three parties, Japan, US and EU. As the Japanese contribution, the present paper describes a neutron source term as well as incident deuteron beam angle optimization of two beam geometry, beam shape (foot print) optimization, and dpa, gas production and heating estimation inside various material loading Module, including a sensitivity analysis of source term uncertainty to the estimated irradiation parameters. (author)

  14. Superconducting magnet and conductor research activities in the US fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, P.C.; Schultz, J.H.; Antaya, T.A.; Ballinger, R.; Chiesa, L.; Feng, J.; Gung, C.-Y.; Harris, D.; Kim, J.-H.; Lee, P.; Martovetsky, N.; Minervini, J.V.; Radovinsky, A.; Salvetti, M.; Takayasu, M.; Titus, P.

    2006-01-01

    Fusion research in the United States is sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES). The OFES sponsors a wide range of programs to advance fusion science, fusion technology, and basic plasma science. Most experimental devices in the US fusion program are constructed using conventional technologies; however, a small portion of the fusion research program is directed towards large scale commercial power generation, which typically relies on superconductor technology to facilitate steady-state operation with high fusion power gain, Q. The superconductor portion of the US fusion research program is limited to a small number of laboratories including the Plasma Science and Fusion Center at MIT, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Applied Superconductivity Center at University of Wisconsin, Madison. Although Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) are primarily sponsored by the US's High Energy Physics program, both have made significant contributions to advance the superconductor technology needed for the US fusion program. This paper summarizes recent superconductor activities in the US fusion program

  15. Proposed rf system for the fusion materials irradiation test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Hoffert, W.J.; Boyd, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    Preliminary rf system design for the accelerator portion of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility is in progress. The 35-MeV, 100-mA, cw deuteron beam will require 6.3 MW rf power at 80 MHz. Initial testing indicates the EIMAC 8973 tetrode is the most suitable final amplifier tube for each of a series of 15 amplifier chains operating at 0.5-MW output. To satisfy the beam dynamics requirements for particle acceleration and to minimize beam spill, each amplifier output must be controlled to +-1 0 in phase and the field amplitude in the tanks must be held within a 1% tolerance. These tolerances put stringent demands on the rf phase and amplitude control system

  16. International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity. Present status and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Tatsuo; Noda, Kenji; Oyama, Yukio

    1998-01-01

    For developing the materials for nuclear fusion reactors, it is indispensable to study on the neutron irradiation behavior under fusion reactor conditions, but there is not any high energy neutron irradiation facility that can simulate fusion reactor conditions at present. Therefore, the investigation of the IFMIF was begun jointly by Japan, USA, Europe and Russia following the initiative of IEA. The conceptual design activities were completed in 1997. As to the background and the course, the present status of the research on heavy irradiation and the testing means for fusion materials, the requirement and the technical basis of high energy neutron irradiation, and the international joint design activities are reported. The materials for fusion reactors are exposed to the neutron irradiation with the energy spectra up to 14 MeV. The requirements from the users that the IFMIF should satisfy, the demand of the tests for the materials of prototype and demonstration fusion reactors and the evaluation of the neutron field characteristics of the IFMIF are discussed. As to the conceptual design of the IFMIF, the whole constitution, the operational mode, accelerator system and target system are described. (K.I.)

  17. Status and possible prospects of an international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzani, F.

    1999-01-01

    Structural materials for future DT fusion power reactors will have to operate under intense neutron fields with energies up to 14 MeV and fluences in the order of 2 MW/m 2 per year. As environmental acceptability, safety considerations and economic viability will be ultimately the keys to the widespread introduction of fusion power, the development of radiation-resistant and low activation materials would contribute significantly to fusion development. For this purpose, testing of materials under irradiation conditions close to those expected in a fusion power station would require the availability, in an appropriate time framework, of an intense, high-energy neutron source. Recent advances in linear accelerator technology, in small specimens testing technology, and in the comprehension of damage phenomena, lead to the conclusion that an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source, with beam energy variability, would provide the most realistic option for a fusion materials testing facility. Under the auspices of the IEA, an international effort (EU, Japan, US, RF) to carry out the conceptual design activities (CDA) of an international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF), based on the D-Li concept, have been carried out successfully. A final conceptual design report was produced at the end of 1996. A phase of conceptual design evaluation (CDE), presently underway, is extending and further refining some of the conceptual design details of IFMIF. The results indicate that an IFMIF-class installation would be technically feasible and could meet its mission objectives. However, a suitable phase of Engineering Validation, to carry out some complementary R and D and prototyping, would still be needed to resolve a few key technical uncertainties before the possibility to proceed toward detailed design and construction could be explored. (orig.)

  18. International Conference on Magnet Technology, 7th, MT-7, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komarek, P.; Maurer, W.; Seibt, E.W.

    1981-01-01

    Proceedings includes 191 papers dealing with a wide variety of magnet and supermagnet technology and materials. Topics considered include: nuclear reactors, high-energy physics, accelerators, conductors, solenoids, fusion magnets, irradiation effects, cryogenics, hybrid magnets, quench problems, energy storage, pulsed magnets, superconducting machines, test and laboratory magnets, losses, stability, field measurements, magnetic shielding, MHD, rotating machines, test facilities, research laboratories, structural materials, magnets for medical applications, biological effects, tokamak devices, particle spectrometers, superconducting cables and coils, magnetic levitation, plasmas, cryostats, magnetic separation, magnetic measurements and measuring instruments, and various alloys used for superconducting materials, particularly those containing niobium, tin, copper and titanium. All papers are abstracted separately. Technical and professional papers from this conference are indexed with the conference code no. 00687 in the Ei Engineering Meetings (TM) database produced by Engineering Information, Inc

  19. Seismic analysis of the mirror fusion test facility building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coats, D.W.

    1978-01-01

    This report describes a seismic analysis of the present Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) building at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. The analysis was conducted to evaluate how the structure would withstand the postulated design-basis earthquake (DBE). We discuss the methods of analysis used and results obtained. Also presented are a detailed description of the building, brief discussions of site geology, seismicity, and soil conditions, the approach used to postulate the DBE, and two methods for incorporating the effects of ductility. Floor spectra for the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th floors developed for preliminary equipment design are also included. The results of the analysis, based on best-estimate equipment loadings, indicate additional bracing and upgrading of connection details are required for the structure to survive the postulated design-basis earthquake. Specific recommendations are made

  20. Data triggered data processing at the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, R.J.; Balch, T.R.; Preckshot, G.G.

    1986-01-01

    A primary characteristic of most batch systems is that the input data files must exist before jobs are scheduled. On the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory the authors schedule jobs to process experimental data to be collected during a five minute shot cycle. The data driven processing system emulates a coarsely granular data flow architecture. Processing jobs are scheduled before the experimental data is collected. Processing jobs ''fire'', or execute, as input data becomes available. Similar to UNIX ''pipes'', data produced by upstream processing nodes may be used as inputs by following nodes. Users, working on the networked SUN workstations, specify data processing templates which define processes and their data dependencies. Data specifications indicate the source of data; actual associations with specific data instantiations are made when the jobs are scheduled. The authors report here on details of diagnostic data processing and their experiences

  1. Superconductors for fusion magnets tested under pulsed field in SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruzzone, P.; Bottura, L.; Katheder, H.; Blau, B.; Rohleder, I.; Vecsey, G.

    1995-01-01

    The SULTAN III test facility has been upgraded with a pair of pulsed field coils to carry out AC losses and stability experiments under full operating loads on large size, fusion conductors for ITER. A fast data aquisition system records the conductor behaviour under fast field transient. The commissioning results of the pulsed coils and instrumentation are critically discussed and the test capability of the set up is assessed. (orig.)

  2. A high field and cryogenic test facility for neutron irradiated superconducting wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, A.; Miyata, H.; Yoshida, M.; Iio, M.; Suzuki, K.; Nakamoto, T.; Yamazaki, M.; Toyama, T.

    2017-12-01

    A 15.5 T superconducting magnet and a variable temperature insert (VTI) system were installed at a radiation control area in Oarai center in Tohoku University to investigate the superconducting properties of activated superconducting materials by fast neutron. The superconductivity was measured at cryogenic temperature and high magnetic field. During these tests, some inconvenient problems were observed and the additional investigation was carried out. The variable temperature insert was designed and assembled to perform the superconducting property tests. without the liquid helium. To remove the heat induced by radiation and joule heating, high purity aluminum rod was used in VTI. The thermal contact was checked by FEM analysis and an additional support was added to confirm the decreasing the stress concentration and the good thermal contact. After the work for improvement, it was affirmed that the test system works well and all troubles were resolved. In this report, the improved technical solution is described and the first data set on the irradiation effect on Nb3Sn wire is presented.

  3. Superconducting focusing quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, G.L.; Faltens, A.; Leitner, M.; Lietzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Barnard, J.; Lund, S.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Radovinsky, A.; Schultz, J.; Meinke, R.

    2003-05-01

    The Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF) Program is developing superconducting focusing magnets for both near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. In particular, single bore quadrupoles have been fabricated and tested for use in the High Current Experiment (HCX) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The next steps involve the development of magnets for the planned Integrated Beam Experiment (IBX) and the fabrication of the first prototype multi-beam focusing arrays for fusion driver accelerators. The status of the magnet R&D program is reported, including experimental requirements, design issues and test results.

  4. Large superconductors and joints for fusion magnets: From conceptual design to testing at full scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciazynski, D.; Duchateau, J. L.; Decool, P.; Libeyre, P.; Turck, B.

    2001-02-01

    A new kind of superconductor, using the cable-in-conduit concept, is emerging, mainly in the context of fusion activity. At present no large Nb3Sn magnet in the world is operating using this concept. The difficulty of this technology, which has now been studied for 20 years, is that it requires major advances in several interconnected new fields, such as handling a large number (1000) of superconducting strands, high current conductors (50 kA), forced flow cryogenics, Nb3Sn technology, low loss conductors in pulsed operation, high current connections and high voltage insulation (10 kV), as well as demonstration of its economical and industrial feasibility. CEA has been very much involved, during the past ten years, in this development, which took place in the framework of the NET and ITER technological programmes. One major milestone was reached in 1998-1999 with the successful tests by Euratom-CEA of three full size conductor and connection samples in the SULTAN facility in Switzerland.

  5. Japanese magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Horton, C.W.; Rutherford, P.H.

    1990-01-01

    This report is the work of six US scientists who surveyed and assessed Japanese research and development in magnetic fusion. All of the panelists are very familiar with Japanese fusion research through their knowledge of the published scientific literature and through personal contacts with Japanese colleagues and with US colleagues who have visited Japanese research facilities. This report concentrates on the period from the early 1980s through June 1989. The technical accomplishments during this period are reviewed, and the Japanese capabilities and outlook for future contributions are assessed. Detailed evaluations are provided in the areas of basic and applied plasma physics, tokamak confinement, alternate confinement approaches, plasma technology, and fusion nuclear technology and materials. With a sustained national commitment, Japan will surpass US and West European capabilities in the early to middle 1990s in several important areas of fusion research and development. For example, it is expected that the planned upgrade of the Japanese JT-60 tokamak will surpass both the US Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) and the Joint European tours (JET) in the usual measures of plasma performance in the 1992 to 1993 timeframe, and will take a clear international lead in large-tokamak research by 1994 to 1995. The Japanese fusion program has the human and technological resources required to build and operate a fusion engineering test reactor without external participation. By the same measure, Japan would be a highly desirable partner in the bilateral undertaking of such a project

  6. A Conduction-Cooled Superconducting Magnet System-Design, Fabrication and Thermal Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Xiaowei (Andy); Holbøll, Joachim; Wang, Qiuliang

    2015-01-01

    A conduction-cooled superconducting magnet system with an operating current of 105.5 A was designed, fabricated and tested for material processing applications. The magnet consists of two coaxial NbTi solenoid coils with an identical vertical height of 300 mm and is installed in a high...

  7. 26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

  8. 19 September 2011 - Japan Science and Technology Agency President K. Kitazawa visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with engineer M. Bajko; the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist T. Kondo; signing the guest book with Adviser R.Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    19 September 2011 - Japan Science and Technology Agency President K. Kitazawa visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with engineer M. Bajko; the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni and Senior Scientist T. Kondo; signing the guest book with Adviser R.Voss and Head of International Relations F. Pauss.

  9. 5 December 2011 - Chilean President of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica J. M. Aguilera in the ATLAS visitor centre with Adviser J. Salicio Diez and ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry.

    CERN Multimedia

    VMO Team

    2011-01-01

    5 December 2011 - Chilean President of the Comision Nacional de Investigacion Cientifica y Tecnologica J. M. Aguilera in the ATLAS visitor centre with Adviser J. Salicio Diez and ATLAS Collaboration G. Mikenberg; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Department Head F. Bordry.

  10. 8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

  11. 1st September 2010 - British Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University Sir Newby and Lady Newby signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with P. Cruikshank; accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier and Liverpool University T. Bowcock and P. Allport.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    1st September 2010 - British Vice-Chancellor, Liverpool University Sir Newby and Lady Newby signing the Guest Book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with P. Cruikshank; accompanied by Beams Department Head P. Collier and Liverpool University T. Bowcock and P. Allport.

  12. Progress on axicell MFTF-B superconducting magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Kozman, T.A.; Hanson, C.L.; Shimer, D.W.; VanSant, J.H.; Zbasnik, J.

    1983-01-01

    Since the entire Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) Magnet System was reconfigured from the original A-cell to an axicell design, much progress has been made on the design, fabrication, and installation planning. The axicell MFTF-B magnet array consists of a total of 26 large superconducting main coils. This paper provides an engineering overview of the progress of these coils. Recent studies on the effects of field errors on the plasma at the recircularizing region (transition coils) show that small field errors will generate large displacements of the field lines. These field errors might enhance radial electron heat transport and deteriorate the plasma confinement. Therefore, 16 superconducting trim coils have been designed to correct the coil misalignments. Progress of the trim coils are reported also

  13. Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the beam requirements for accelerator magnets, we will outline the main issues and the physical limitations for producing strong and pure magnetic fields with superconductors. The seminar will mainly focus on the magnets for the accelerator, and give some hints on the magnets for the experiments. Prerequisite knowledge: Basic knowledge of Maxwell equations, and linear optics for particle accelerators (FODO cell, beta functions).

  14. How to improve the irradiation conditions for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Daum, E

    2000-01-01

    The accelerator-based intense D-Li neutron source International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) provides very suitable irradiation conditions for fusion materials development with the attractive option of accelerated irradiations. Investigations show that a neutron moderator made of tungsten and placed in the IFMIF test cell can further improve the irradiation conditions. The moderator softens the IFMIF neutron spectrum by enhancing the fraction of low energy neutrons. For displacement damage, the ratio of point defects to cascades is more DEMO relevant and for tritium production in Li-based breeding ceramic materials it leads to a preferred production via the sup 6 Li(n,t) sup 4 He channel as it occurs in a DEMO breeding blanket.

  15. Superconductivity basics and applications to magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Sharma, R G

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and applications of superconducting magnets. It explains the phenomenon of superconductivity, theories of superconductivity, type II superconductors and high-temperature cuprate superconductors. The main focus of the book is on the application to superconducting magnets to accelerators and fusion reactors and other applications of superconducting magnets. The thermal and electromagnetic stability criteria of the conductors and the present status of the fabrication techniques for future magnet applications are addressed. The book is based on the long experience of the author in studying superconducting materials, building magnets and numerous lectures delivered to scholars. A researcher and graduate student will enjoy reading the book to learn various aspects of magnet applications of superconductivity. The book provides the knowledge in the field of applied superconductivity in a comprehensive way.

  16. Prototype superconducting magnet for the FFAG accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obana, T.; Ogitsu, T.; Yamamoto, A.; Yoshimoto, M.; Mori, Y.; Fujii, T.; Iwasa, M.; Orikasa, T.

    2006-01-01

    A study of a superconducting magnet for the Fixed Field Alternating Gradient (FFAG) accelerator has been performed. The FFAG accelerator requires static magnetic field, and it is suitable for superconducting magnet applications, because problems associated with time varying magnetic field such as eddy current loss can be eliminated. The superconducting magnet, which can generate high magnetic field, is possible to realize a higher beam energy with a given accelerator size or the size to be smaller for a given beam energy. The FFAG accelerator magnet is demanded to have a complicated nonlinear magnetic field with high accuracy. As a first prototype superconducting coil, the coil configuration which consists of left-right asymmetric cross-section and large aperture has been designed. The prototype coil has been successfully developed by using a 6-axis Computer Numerical Control (CNC) winding machine. The magnetic field of the prototype coil has been demonstrated in warm measurement. As a consequence, the technical feasibility has been verified with the prototype coil development and the performance test. In addition, the technology components developed in the prototype coil have a possibility to transfer to a fusion magnet

  17. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Executive summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-01-01

    This report is a summary of the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member.

  18. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martone, M. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member.

  19. IFMIF : International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility Conceptual Design Activity: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martone, M.

    1997-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) on the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF), conducted during 1995 and 1996. The activity is under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement for a Programme of Research and Development on Fusion Materials. An IEA Fusion Materials Executive Subcommittee was charged with overseeing the IFMIF-CDA work. Participants in the CDA are the European Union, Japan, and the United States, with the Russian Federation as an associate member

  20. Cooling tests of the cryomodules at superconducting RF test facility (STF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchi, Norihito; Nakai, Hirotaka; Kojima, Yuuji

    2009-01-01

    KEK has been constructing the Superconducting RF Test Facility (STF) with aiming at a center of the ILC-R and D in Asia from 2005. In this project, KEK targets manufacturing and operational experiences of the RF cavity and cryomodule toward the ILC, and two cryomodules have been developed. These cryomodules are 6 meter long and have 4 nine-cell cavities in each cryostat. The designs of the cryomodules are based on the TESLA Type-3 (TTF-3) at DESY, however, each cryostat has the different type of cavities, TESLA-like type and Low-Loss type. The tests of the cryomodules were performed in two steps. In the first test, measurements of the cryogenic performances of these cryomodules were the main objective. One nine-cell cavity was assembled in each cryomodule and cool-down of the two cryomodules was performed, individually. In the second test, the four TESLA-like cavities were assembled in the cryomodule as complete integration. Cool-down of the cryomodule to 2 K was successfully completed, and thermal performances of the cryomodule and cooling capacity of the cryogenics system were studied in detail. In this paper, we will report the design of the cryomodules and the thermal performances at these cold tests. (author)

  1. Summary of the workshop on structural analysis needs for magnetic fusion energy superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Lehner, J.; Powell, J.

    1976-09-01

    The technical portions of the meeting were divided into three major sessions as follows: (1) Review of methods being presently used by the MFE community for structural evaluation of current designs. (2) Future structural analysis needs. (3) Open discussions dealing with adequacy of present methods, the improvements needed for MFE magnet structural analysis, and the establishment of an MFE magnet structural advisory group. Summaries of the individual talks presented on Wednesday and Thursday (i.e., items 1 and 2 above) are included following the workshop schedule given later in this synopsis

  2. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Design and analysis summary. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heathman, J.H.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the designs and analyses produced by General Dynamics Convair for the four Axicell magnets (A1 and A20, east and west), the four Transition magnets (T1 and T2, east and west), and the twelve Solenoid magnets (S1 through S6, east and west). Over four million drawings and specifications, in addition to detailed stress analysis, thermal analysis, electrical, instrumentation, and verification test reports were produced as part of the MFTF-B design effort. Significant aspects of the designs, as well as key analysis results, are summarized in this report. In addition, drawing trees and lists off detailed analysis and test reports included in this report define the locations of the detailed design and analysis data.

  3. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Design and analysis summary. Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heathman, J.H.; Wohlwend, J.W.

    1985-05-01

    This report summarizes the designs and analyses produced by General Dynamics Convair for the four Axicell magnets (A1 and A20, east and west), the four Transition magnets (T1 and T2, east and west), and the twelve Solenoid magnets (S1 through S6, east and west). Over four million drawings and specifications, in addition to detailed stress analysis, thermal analysis, electrical, instrumentation, and verification test reports were produced as part of the MFTF-B design effort. Significant aspects of the designs, as well as key analysis results, are summarized in this report. In addition, drawing trees and lists off detailed analysis and test reports included in this report define the locations of the detailed design and analysis data

  4. Development of a Plasma Streaming System for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holdsworth, T.; Clark, R.N.; McCotter, R.E.; Rossow, T.L.; Cruz, G.E.

    1979-01-01

    The Plasma Streaming System (PSS) is an essential portion of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), scheduled for completion in October 1981. The PSS will develop a plasma density of at least 2 x 10 12 particles/cm 3 at the MFTF magnet centerline by injecting particles along the field lines. The plasma will have a midplane plasma radius as large as 40 cm with variable plasma particle energy and beam geometry. Minimum amounts of impurities will be injected, with emphasis on minimizing high Z materials. Each of the 60 PSS units will consist of a gun magnet assembly (GMA) and a power supply. Each GMA consists of a plasma streaming gun, a pulse magnet that provides variable beam shaping, and a fast reaction pulse gas valve

  5. Conceptual design of a fission-based integrated test facility for fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watts, K.D.; Deis, G.A.; Hsu, P.Y.S.; Longhurst, G.R.; Masson, L.S.; Miller, L.G.

    1982-01-01

    The testing of fusion materials and components in fission reactors will become increasingly important because of lack of fusion engineering test devices in the immediate future and the increasing long-term demand for fusion testing when a fusion reactor test station becomes available. This paper presents the conceptual design of a fission-based Integrated Test Facility (ITF) developed by EG and G Idaho. This facility can accommodate entire first wall/blanket (FW/B) test modules such as those proposed for INTOR and can also accommodate smaller cylindrical modules similar to those designed by Oak Ridge National laboratory (ORNL) and Westinghouse. In addition, the facility can be used to test bulk breeder blanket materials, materials for tritium permeation, and components for performance in a nuclear environment. The ITF provides a cyclic neutron/gamma flux as well as the numerous module and experiment support functions required for truly integrated tests

  6. Design of the background gas pressure diagnostic for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R.; Stever, R.D.; Goerz, D.A.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Background Gas Pressure (BGP) diagnostic is a collection of pressure gauges inside the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) vacuum vessel to measure neutral gas density near the plasma region. These measurements will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from returning neutrals. The diagnostic consists of magnetron-type, cold-cathode gauges, each stripped of its permanent magnet, and utilizing the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 1 to 25 kG. As part of the design effort, tests were performed to characterize gauge operation in strong magnetic field strengths and to evaluate the parameters affecting performance. This paper describes the BGP diagnostic and presents the details of the mechanical and electrical design

  7. Measurement of internal forces in superconducting accelerator magnets with strain gauge transducers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodzeit, C.L.; Anerella, M.D.; Ganetis, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    An improved method has been developed for the measurement of internal forces in superconducting accelerator magnets, in particular the compressive stresses in coils and the end restraint forces on the coils. The transducers have been designed to provide improved sensitivity to purely mechanical strain by using bending mode deflections for sensing the applied loads. Strain gauge resistance measurements are made with a new system that eliminates sources of errors due to spurious resistance changes in interconnecting wiring and solder joints. The design of the transducers and their measurement system is presented along with a discussion of the method of compensation for thermal and magnetic effects, methods of calibration with typical calibration data, and measured effect in actual magnets of the thermal stress changes from cooldown and the Lorentz forces during magnet excitation. 13 figs., 1 tab

  8. Safety and reliability in superconducting MHD magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laverick, C.; Powell, J.; Hsieh, S.; Reich, M.; Botts, T.; Prodell, A.

    1979-07-01

    This compilation adapts studies on safety and reliability in fusion magnets to similar problems in superconducting MHD magnets. MHD base load magnet requirements have been identified from recent Francis Bitter National Laboratory reports and that of other contracts. Information relevant to this subject in recent base load magnet design reports for AVCO - Everett Research Laboratories and Magnetic Corporation of America is included together with some viewpoints from a BNL workshop on structural analysis needed for superconducting coils in magnetic fusion energy. A summary of design codes used in large bubble chamber magnet design is also included

  9. Super Conducting and Conventional Magnets Test & Mapping Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Vertical Magnet Test Facility: Accommodate a device up to 3.85 m long, 0.61 m diameter, and 14,400 lbs. Configured for 5 psig sub-cooled liquid helium bath cooling...

  10. International round robin test for mechanical properties of REBCO superconductive tapes at room temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osamura, K.; Shin, H.S.; Weiss, K.; Nyilas, A.; Nijhuis, Arend; Yamamoto, K.; Machiya, S.; Nishijima, G.

    2014-01-01

    An international round robin test was promoted to establish a test method for room temperature mechanical properties of commercial REBCO superconductive tapes. Seven laboratories practiced a tensile test under the direction of guideline REBCO13 for four different kinds of REBCO tape. From the stress

  11. Irradiation effect of the insulating materials for fusion superconducting magnets at cryogenic temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Koji; Akiyama, Yoko; Nishijima, Shigehiro

    2017-09-01

    In ITER, superconducting magnets should be used in such severe environment as high fluence of fast neutron, cryogenic temperature and large electromagnetic forces. Insulating material is one of the most sensitive component to radiation. So radiation resistance on mechanical properties at cryogenic temperature are required for insulating material. The purpose of this study is to evaluate irradiation effect of insulating material at cryogenic temperature by gamma-ray irradiation. Firstly, glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and hybrid composite were prepared. After irradiation at room temperature (RT) or liquid nitrogen temperature (LNT, 77 K), interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) and glass-transition temperature (Tg) measurement were conducted. It was shown that insulating materials irradiated at room temperature were much degraded than those at cryogenic temperature.

  12. Heat load tests of superconducting magnets vibrated electromagnetically for the Maglev train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmori, J.; Nakao, H.; Yamashita, T.; Sanada, Y.; Shudou, M.; Kawai, M.; Fujita, M.; Terai, M.; Miura, A.

    Superconducting magnets on Maglev trains vibrate due to harmonic ripples of electromagnetic flux generated by ground coils. Heat load caused by vibration in the magnet amounted to several tens of watts in the electromagnetic vibration test. This was mainly because a.c. loss was induced in the helium vessel housing the superconducting coil, due to relative vibration between the aluminium thermal shield and the coil. The heat load caused by vibration should be strictly restricted to less than 4W due to limited cryogenic refrigeration capacity. The heat load was tested using electromagnetic flux ripples for a superconducting magnet model of one coil which corresponds to 1/4 of an actual magnet. The flux ripples simulated the 6th harmonic of the actual ground levitation coil. Some ideas to reduce the heat load were tried for the magnet model, such as applying high resistance thermal radiation shielding, increasing rigidity of the vacuum vessel, and using high purity copper plating on the helium vessel. These ideas proved effective, and the maximum heat load due to vibration was held to less than 4 W per magnet for the one coil magnet model.

  13. Superconducting magnet development. Program annual report, July 1975--September 1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deis, D.W.; Cornish, D.N.; Zbasnik, J.P.; Nelson, R.L.; Sackett, S.J.; Taylor, C.E.

    1977-07-22

    During FY76 Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) continued its development of niobium tin (Nb/sub 3/Sn) conductors and its design support for the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF) superconducting magnet. Three highlights came from within the Laboratory. LLL completed its cryogenic tensile-test apparatus for NB/sub 3/Sn strain measurements. Over at MFTF, engineers ordered 2100 m of prototype material for a 1-m test coil. People at the high-field test facility (HFTF) released some components for fabrication; delivery was scheduled for early FY77. Outside LLL several subcontractors advanced Nb/sub 3/Sn manufacturing technology. One advance, in particular, improved conductor current densities at 12 T.

  14. International aspects of fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    International collaborative efforts in magnetic confinement fusion in which the USA is involved are reviewed. These efforts are carried under the auspices of international agencies and through bilateral agreements

  15. Comparison of different cryogenic control strategies via simulation applied to a superconducting magnet test bench at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arpaia, P.; Coppier, H.; De Paola, D.; di Bernardo, M.; Guarino, A.; Pedemonte, B. Luz; Pezzetti, M.

    2017-12-01

    Industrial process controllers for cryogenic systems used in test facilities for superconducting magnets are typically PIDs, tuned by operational expertise according to users’ requirements (covering cryogenic transients and associated thermo-mechanical constraints). In this paper, an alternative fully-automatic solution, equally based on PID controllers, is proposed. Following the comparison of the operational expertise and alternative fully-automatic approaches, a new process control configuration, based on an estimated multiple-input/multiple-output (MIMO) model is proposed. The new MIMO model-based approach fulfils the required operational constraints while improving performance compared to existing solutions. The analysis and design work is carried out using both theoretical and numerical tools and is validated on the case study of the High Field Magnet (HFM) cryogenic test bench running at the SM18 test facility located at CERN. The proposed solution have been validated by simulation using the CERN ECOSIMPRO software tools using the cryogenic library (CRYOLIB [1]) developed at CERN.

  16. Experience gained during Manufacture and Testing of the W7-X Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wanner, M.; Sborchia, C.; Risse, K.; Viebke, H.; Baldzuhn, J.

    2006-01-01

    The W7-X basic device is presently being assembled at the Greifswald branch of IPP. The specific field configurations of this helical advanced stellarator are realised by a symmetric arrangement of 50 non-planar and 20 planar superconducting coils. In order to sustain the large electromagnetic forces and moments, all coils are bolted to a massive coil support structure and supported against each other by inter-coil support elements. Cooling of superconductor and the casing is provided by supercritical helium. For all coils the same cable-in-conduit conductor is used. This conductor is formed by a NbTi cable which is co-extruded in an aluminium jacket. Low-resistive electrical joints connect the conductor layers within a winding package and potential break provide electrical insulation of the helium pipes. After insulation and vacuum pressure impregnation, the winding packages are embedded in stainless steel casings, which are then finish-machined and equipped with cooling pipes. During a rapid shut-down of the magnet system the windings may experience voltages up to several kilovolts. High voltage tests under degraded vacuum conditions (Paschen tests) provide a sensitive method to detect weak points in the electrical insulation. Manufacture of the magnets is in a well advanced stage. All winding packages are completed, many of them are integrated in the casings and several coils have already been delivered for cold testing. These tests are performed in a cryogenic test facility at CEA Saclay. Tests at nominal operating conditions and quench tests confirmed the electric layout and the specified margin. Design changes have been implemented during fabrication due to more detailed structural analyses. Some manufacturing processes had to be modified and re-qualified to allow repair of weaknesses defects found during tests. The presentation will give an overview of the production status of the superconducting coils, the experiences gained during fabrication of the

  17. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  18. Long-pulse beamlines for the mirror fusion test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, R.R.; Goldner, A.I.; Poulsen, P.

    1984-01-01

    We have recently obtained test results indicating that a beam of pure full-energy deuterium particles can be delivered to the plasma targets in MFTF-B. We used a close-coupled separator magnet with the ion source to separate the impurities from the full-energy deuterium particles. Our completed studies show that the usual iron-core sweep magnet and shielding used in neutral beamlines can be eliminated and the gas flow out of the beamline decreased. This design also reduces beam losses. We will use smooth-bore OFHC tube arrays brazed to manifolds for the active heat transfer surfaces. Tests indicate that both burnout and life requirements are met by this design. In this paper, we present test results and discuss the MFTF-B long-pulse beamline configuration

  19. Cryogenic structures of superconducting coils for fusion experimental reactor 'ITER'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakajima, Hideo; Iguchi, Masahide; Hamada, Kazuya; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Shimamoto, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes both structural materials and structural design of the Toroidal Field (TF) coil and Central Solenoid (CS) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). All the structural materials used in the superconducting coil system of the ITER are austenitic stainless steels. Although 316LN is used in the most parts of the superconducting coil system, the cryogenic stainless steels, JJ1 and JK2LB, which were newly developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) and Japanese steel companies, are used in the highest stress area of the TF coil case and the whole CS conductor jackets, respectively. These two materials became commercially available based on demonstration of productivity and weldability of materials, and evaluations of 4 K mechanical properties of trial products including welded parts. Structural materials are classified into five grades depending on stress distribution in the TF coil case. JAEA made an industrial specification for mass production based on the ITER requirements. In order to simplify quality control in mass production, JAEA has used materials specified in the material section of 'Codes for Fusion Facilities - Rules on Superconducting Magnet Structure (2008)' issued by the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME) in October 2008, which was established using an extrapolation method of 4 K material strengths from room temperature strength and chemical compositions developed by JAEA. It enables steel suppliers to easily control the quality of products at room temperature. JAEA has already started actual production with several manufacturing companies. The first JJ1 product to be used in the TF coil case and the first JK2LB jackets for CS were completed in October and September 2013, respectively. (author)

  20. Monitoring of static and variable electromagnetic fields in a large magnetic fusion plasma experimental facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, T.; Tanaka, M.; Kawano, T.; Kamimura, Y.; Wang, J.; Fujiwara, O.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Nuclear fusion research has been increased worldwide to develop new reliable energy source. In order to occur nuclear fusion reaction extremely high temperature plasma must be confined by magnet. Plasma confinement physics and technology has been studied by such as the large helical device LHD, which is using super conducting magnet system and plasma heating devices by electromagnetic waves. In the large magnetic fusion experimental facility, various electric power devices have potential to exposure workers by leakage of electromagnetic fields. Regarding the environmental safety static magnetic field and variable electromagnetic fields had been monitored around the LHD and related devices. Many kinds of electric power devices of which frequencies distribute from static magnetic field to high frequency of electromagnetic waves. The magnetic strength of LHD is about 3 T and workers are restricted to enter into the LHD hall, but there are many workers in the building. Environmental magnetic strength at the fixed point, where is 23 m far from the center of LHD, had been continuously measured with Gauss Meter 9900 (F.W. Bell) since the first plasma in 1998. After the plasma experiment background level was increased to about 0.06 m T, which is a double of terrestrial magnetic field. It was increased to 0.1-0.2 m T on the plasma experiment and in the case of the super conducting magnet was quickly decreased for protection of the coils system it was increased to 1 m T in short time. Extremely low frequency ELF of electromagnetic fields are caused mainly around the coil electric power supplies. The ELF magnetic strength was measured with ELT-400 (Narda). Near the supplies it was increased to higher than the occupational restriction level of the ICNIRP guide line. In order to heat ion plasma 38 MHz electromagnetic wave heating are used. Around the electromagnetic wave generators, electromagnetic fields have been continuously measured using EMC-300 EP (Narda) with

  1. Lateral buckling and vibrations of superconducting magnets for magnetic fusion reactors. Progress report, October 1976--May 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, F.C.

    1977-05-01

    The main results center around experimental buckling results obtained in a 16 coil superconducting torus. This device is a 1 / 75 th model of an early Argonne National Lab experimental power reactor design. The coils in the experimental torus were designed to buckle below the normal transition current level. Up to 130 KA-turns were placed in the torus during these tests. The test results are described

  2. Cryogenic equipment to test models of superconducting magnets for accelerating-storage unit (ASU)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, V.I.; Vasiliev, V.N.; Dinaburg, L.B.; Kalinin, V.V.; Katasonov, N.N.; Semenov, S.V.; Fokoeev, V.F.; Khrushchev, V.N.

    1986-01-01

    The paper describes the testing results of the cryogenic equipment to investigate 2-m models of ASU superconducting magnets in subcooled forces and pool-boiling cooling regimes. A special cryostat with radial helium bath supports is used for pool-boiling testing of 2-m models without magnetic screen. For forced flow testing of dipole models a cooling loop with a centrifugal helium pump is used providing the consumption up to 110 g/s and the head of 0.01 + 0.015 MPa with loop pressure 0.25 + 0.6 MPa and temperature 4.4 K

  3. Superconducting electronics testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moskowitz, P.A.; Guernsey, R.W.; Stasiak, J.W.; Flint, E.B.

    1983-01-01

    An I/O assembly has been designed and constructed to support the operation of superconducting circuitry. A system, previously described for chip testing, has been adapted for use with a Josephson technology system level experiment. The cryoinsert assembly, constructed of non-magnetic parts, provides 80 high frequency I/O lines between room temperature and 4.2 K. (author)

  4. Superconducting magnets 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics on Superconducting Magnets; SSC Magnet Industrialization; Collider Quadrupole Development; A Record-Setting Magnet; D20: The Push Beyond 10T; Nonaccelerator Applications; APC Materials Development; High-T c at Low Temperature; Cable and Cabling-Machine Development; and Analytical Magnet Design

  5. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices

  6. Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B (MFTF-B) axicell configuration: NbTi magnet system. Manufacturing/producibility final report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritschel, A.J.; White, W.L.

    1985-05-01

    This Final MFTF-B Manufacturing/Producibility Report covers facilities, tooling plan, manufacturing sequence, schedule and performance, producibility, and lessons learned for the solenoid, axicell, and transition coils, as well as a deactivation plan, conclusions, references, and appendices.

  7. A step towards controlled fusion reactors: Tore Supra tokamak with superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turck, B.

    1988-01-01

    Tore Supra technology has to solve all the problems related to the development and the installaion of superconducting coils and associated cryogenic devices. Tore Supra will allow to get a significative experience to prepare next machines. Specifications and needs of tokamaks concerning the superconducting coils of future machines are recalled [fr

  8. Superconducting magnet safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arendt, F.; Komarek, P.

    1983-01-01

    One of the major components in a fusion reactor for which a safety analysis must be carried out is the magnet system. Most of the possible disturbances influencing the operation of superconducting magnets lead only to a quench, defined as an ''abnormal operating condition'' which causes just a temporary shut down of the magnet system without damage, if the system is well designed. More unlikely are accidental events which are associated with the generation of high power arcs. In these cases, single current arcs, e.g. at broken current leads, will lead to moderate damage only, but with the necessity of a longer shut down period for repair or replacing. Severe damage can only occur if in a multiple current arcing, starting by broken conductors, a wide-spread rupture of the winding occurs and the final high power arc burns through the coil case damaging other coils and reactor components. In a very hypothetical event the simultaneous rupture of the complete winding at two locations at least 1 m apart leads to missile generation due to the electromagnetic forces in the background field. The kinetic energy which the flying piece can get will be less than the values assumed for airplane crashes with the containment of modern fission power plants. (author)

  9. Transient Behaviour of Superconducting Magnet Systems of Fusion Reactor ITER during Safety Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Miri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the transient behaviour of the toroidal and poloidal field coils magnet systems of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor during safety discharge, network models with lumped elements are established. Frequency-dependant values of the network elements, that is, inductances and resistances are calculated with the finite element method. That way, overvoltages can be determined. According to these overvoltages, the insulation coordination of coils has to be selected.

  10. Bulk-shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1982-07-01

    The accelerator-based Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility will provide a high-fluence, fusion-like radiation environment for the testing of materials. While the neutron spectrum produced in the forward direction by the 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a flowing lithium target is characterized by a broad peak around 14 MeV, a high energy tail extends up to about 50 MeV. Some shield design considerations are reviewed

  11. Field-reversal experiments in the mirror fusion test facility (MFTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, J.W.; Condit, W.C.

    1977-01-01

    Detailed consideration of several aspects of a field-reversal experiment was begun in the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF): Model calculations have provided some plausible parameters for a field-reversed deuterium plasma in the MFTF, and a buildup calculation indicates that the MFTF neutral-beam system is marginally sufficient to achieve field reversal by neutral injection alone. However, the many uncertainties indicate the need for further research and development on alternate buildup methods. A discussion of experimental objectives is presented and important diagnostics are listed. The range of parameter space accessible with the MFTF magnet design is explored, and we find that with proper aiming of the neutral beams, meaningful experiments can be performed to advance toward these objectives. Finally, it is pointed out that if we achieve enhanced n tau confinement by means of field reversal, then quasi-steady-state operation of MFTF is conceivable

  12. Magnetic and superconducting nanowires

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piraux, L.; Encinas, A.; Vila, L.

    2005-01-01

    magnetic and superconducting nanowires. Using different approaches entailing measurements on both single wires and arrays, numerous interesting physical properties have been identified in relation to the nanoscopic dimensions of these materials. Finally, various novel applications of the nanowires are also...

  13. The operator interface for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lang, N.C.

    1986-12-01

    The uncertain and most likely changing nature of a large experimental facility like MFTF, as well as its large number of control and monitor points, ruled against the traditional hardware approach involving walls of knobs, dials, oscilloscopes, and strip chart recorders. Rather, from the beginning, project management specified computer control of all systems, and operation of the complete MFTF under an integrated computer control system became a major engineering goal. The Integrated Controls and Diagnostics (ICADS) group was charged with the design and implementation of this control system. We designed a control system with an extremely flexible operator interface which uses computer generated CRT displays for output and pointing devices such as touch sensitive CRT overlays, mice, and joysticks for input. Construction of MFTF was completed at the end of 1985 within the project budget of $241.6M and was followed immediately by a 5 month long acceptance test. During this period (known as PACE test) operators, engineers, and physicists successfully used our computer control system daily to test MFTF. Much of their willingness to forsake the traditional hands-on hardware approach to testing was a result of the powerful and flexible operator interface to the MFTF control system. In this paper, we describe the operator interface with emphasis on the displays, the touch screens, and the mouse. We also report the experiences of users and, in particular, stress those aspects of the user interface they strongly liked and disliked

  14. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) key element technology phase task description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ida, M.; Nakamura, H.; Sugimoto, M.; Yutani, T.; Takeuchi, H.

    2000-08-01

    In 2000, a 3 year Key Element technology Phase (KEP) of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has been initiated to reduce the key technology risk factors needed to achieve continuous wave (CW) beam with the desired current and energy and to reach the corresponding power handling capabilities in the liquid lithium target system. In the KEP, the IFMIF team (EU, Japan, Russian Federation, US) will perform required tasks. The contents of the tasks are described in the task description sheet. As the KEP tasks, the IFMIF team have proposed 27 tasks for Test Facilities, 12 tasks for Target, 26 tasks for Accelerator and 18 tasks for Design Integration. The task description by RF is not yet available. The task items and task descriptions may be added or revised with the progress of KEP activities. These task description sheets have been compiled in this report. After 3 years KEP, the results of the KEP tasks will be reviewed. Following the KEP, 3 years Engineering Validation Phase (EVP) will continue for IFMIF construction. (author)

  15. Design, construction, and testing of the superconducting magnet AC4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coupland, J.H.

    1973-09-01

    After a shont introduction covering the purpose and general requirements for this prototype high field dipole magnet, the choice of design is discussed and described together with details of construction. The rest of the report is devoted to a comprehensive account of the extensive measurements taken under pulsed and d.c. operation. Although the thermal performance is largely as expected, the analysis of field integrals over the intended useful aperture shows that the uniformity is not yet sufficient for use in a super high energy proton synchrotron. However, despite iron saturation, the constancy in performance over the excitation range 0 to 5T is very encouraging. (Auth)

  16. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, E. I.; Storm, E.

    2013-11-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density science (HEDS), is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE). This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  17. The NIF: An international high energy density science and inertial fusion user facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses E.I.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The National Ignition Facility (NIF, a 1.8-MJ/500-TW Nd:Glass laser facility designed to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF and high-energy-density science (HEDS, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL. A primary goal of NIF is to create the conditions necessary to demonstrate laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and burn. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began late in FY2009 as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC, an international effort to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory. To date, all of the capabilities to conduct implosion experiments are in place with the goal of demonstrating ignition and developing a predictable fusion experimental platform in 2012. The results from experiments completed are encouraging for the near-term achievement of ignition. Capsule implosion experiments at energies up to 1.6 MJ have demonstrated laser energetics, radiation temperatures, and symmetry control that scale to ignition conditions. Of particular importance is the demonstration of peak hohlraum temperatures near 300 eV with overall backscatter less than 15%. Important national security and basic science experiments have also been conducted on NIF. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of laser-driven Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE. This paper will describe the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the beginning of fundamental science experiments and the plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to HEDS and fusion energy researchers around the world.

  18. Superconductivity Engineering and Its Application for Fusion 3.Superconducting Technology as a Gateway to Future Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asano, Katsuhiko

    Hopes for achieving a new source of energy through nuclear fusion rest on the development of superconducting technology that is needed to make future equipments more energy efficient as well as increase their performance. Superconducting technology has made progress in a wide variety of fields, such as energy, life science, electronics, industrial use and environmental improvement. It enables the actualization of equipment that was unachievable with conventional technology, and will sustain future “IT-Based Quality Life Style”, “Sustainable Environmental” and “Advanced Healthcare” society. Besides coil technology with high magnetic field performance, superconducting electoronics or device technology, such as SQUID and SFQ-circuit, high temperature superconducting material and advanced cryogenics technology might be great significance in the history of nuclear fusion which requires so many wide, high and ultra technology. Superconducting technology seems to be the catalyst for a changing future society with nuclear fusion. As society changes, so will superconducting technology.

  19. Inductive voltage compensation in superconducting magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yeh, H.T.; Goddard, J.S.; Shen, S.S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper details several techniques of inductive voltage compensation developed for quench detection in superconducting magnet systems with multiple coils and power supplies, with particular application for the Large Coil Test Facility (LCTF). Sources of noise, their magnitudes, and the sensitivity required for normal zone detection to avoid damage to the magnets are discussed. Two passive compensation schemes (second difference and central difference) are introduced and illustrated by parameters of LCTF; these take advantage of coil symmetries and other system characteristics. An active compensation scheme based on current rate input fom pickup coils and utilizing theory on ac loss voltage for calibration was tested, and the experimental setup and test results are discussed

  20. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purcell, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Several significant superconducting beam line magnet systems are being constructed in the U. S. These will demonstrate the practicability of superconductors in beam lines. It is now time to consider some of the more subtle engineering problems associated with these magnets in order to assure a ''next generation'' of highly usable magnets. This paper presents some engineering approaches to better magnets for the future. (U.S.)

  1. Superconducting magnetic energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Fusion power production requires energy storage and transfer on short time scales to create confining magnetic fields and for heating plasmas. The theta-pinch Scyllac Fusion Test Reactor (SFTR) requires 480 MJ of energy to drive the 5-T compression field with a 0.7-ms rise time. Tokamak Experimental Power Reactors (EPR) require 1 to 2 GJ of energy with a 1 to 2-s rise time for plasma ohmic heating. The design, development, and testing of four 300-kJ energy storage coils to satisfy the SFTR needs are described. Potential rotating machinery and homopolar energy systems for both the Reference Theta-Pinch Reactor (RTPR) and tokamak ohmic-heating are presented

  2. Test results from two 5m two-in-one superconducting magnets for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottingham, J.G.; Dahl, P.F.; Fernow, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    Two 5m long superconducting dipole magnets with specifications similar to the reference design for the proposed Superconducting Super Collider have been successfully tested. The cos theta coils of the magnets were made from two layers of standard CBA/Tevatron NbTi superconductor, keystoned to an angle of 2.8 degrees. The inner diameter of the inner layer was 3.2 cm. The ends of the coils were flared to increase the minimum bending radius so that future magnets can be wound from prereacted Nb 3 Sn. The windings of the two-aperture magnets were clamped in a two-in-one iron yoke with a tensioned stainless steel shell. The fields of the two apertures were closely coupled, since the flux in one aperture returned through the other. The inner and outer layers of the coil were powered separately so that their short-sample limits would be reached simultaneously. With minimal training the magnets reached a central field of 6 T, the short sample limit of the conductor at the 4.5 K temperature of the liquid helium bath. At 2.6 K, a central field in excess of 7 T was reached, again with minimal training. The measured values of the allowed sextupole and decapole harmonics are within 10% of the calculated values and the non-allowed harmonics are all small or zero, as predicted. 3 references, 6 figures

  3. Checking BEBC superconducting magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1974-01-01

    The superconducting coils of the magnet for the 3.7 m Big European Bubble Chamber (BEBC) had to be checked, see Annual Report 1974, p. 60. The photo shows a dismantled pancake. By December 1974 the magnet reached again the field design value of 3.5 T.

  4. New Superconducting Toroidal Magnet System for IAXO, the International AXion Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    Axions are hypothetical particles that were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. The new International AXion Observatory (IAXO) will incorporate the most promising solar axions detector to date, which is designed to enhance the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling by one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current state-of-the-art detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions into X-ray photons. Inspired by the successful realization of the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a very large superconducting toroid is currently designed at CERN to provide the required magnetic field. This toroid will comprise eight, one meter wide and twenty one meter long, racetrack coils. The system is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length. Its peak magnetic field is 5.4 T with a stored e...

  5. Manufacturing cost study on the ion sources for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    A study of the cost of manufacturing 48 ion sources for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility is described. The estimate is built up from individual part costs and assembly operation times for the 80 kV prototype source constructed by LLL and described by LLL drawings furnished during December 1978. Recommendations for cost reduction are made.

  6. Reactor structure and superconducting magnet system of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tada, Eisuke; Yoshida, Kiyoshi; Shibanuma, Kiyoshi; Okuno, Kiyoshi; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Shimamoto, Susumu

    1993-01-01

    Fusion Experimental Reactors are one of the major steps toward realization of the fusion energy and the key objective are to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility prior to the Demo Fusion Reactor. ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) is one of experimental reactors and the conceptual design has been completed by the united efforts of USA, USSR, EC and Japan. In parallel with the conceptual design, key technology development in various areas has being conducted. This paper describes the overall design concepts and the latest technological achievements of the ITER reactor structure and superconducting magnet system. (author)

  7. Magnetic systems for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.

    1985-02-01

    Mirror experiments have led the way in applying superconductivity to fusion research because of unique requirements for high and steady magnetic fields. The first significant applications were Baseball II at LLNL and IMP at ORNL. More recently, the MFTF-B yin-yang coil was successfully tested and the entire tandem configuration is nearing completion. Tokamak magnets have also enjoyed recent success with the large coil project tests at ORNL, preceded by single coil tests in Japan and Germany. In the USSR, the T-7 Tokamak has been operational for many years and the T-15 Tokamak is under construction, with the TF coils nearing completion. Also the Tore Supra is being built in France

  8. Reduced cost design of liquid lithium target for international fusion material irradiation facility (IFMIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroo; Ida, Mizuho; Sugimoto, Masayoshi; Takeuchi, Hiroshi; Yutani, Toshiaki

    2001-01-01

    The International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) is being jointly planned to provide an accelerator-based D-Li neutron source to produce intense high energy neutrons (2 MW/m 2 ) up to 200 dpa and a sufficient irradiation volume (500 cm 3 ) for testing the candidate materials and components up to about a full lifetime of their anticipated use in ITER and DEMO. To realize such a condition, 40 MeV deuteron beam with a current of 250 mA is injected into high speed liquid lithium flow with a speed of 20 m/s. Following Conceptual Design Activity (1995-1998), a design study with focus on cost reduction without changing its original mission has been done in 1999. The following major changes to the CAD target design have been considered in the study and included in the new design: i) number of the Li target has been changed from 2 to 1, ii) spare of impurity traps of the Li loop was removed although the spare will be stored in a laboratory for quick exchange, iii) building volume was reduced via design changes in lithium loop length. This paper describes the reduced cost design of the lithium target system and recent status of Key Element Technology activities. (author)

  9. Cryogenic testing of the TPC superconducting solenoid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    This report describes the results of a series of tests on the TPC superconducting magnet cryogenic system which occurred during the winter and spring of 1983. The tests occurred at interaction region 2 of the PEP colliding beam facility at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The TPC Magnet Cryogenic System which was tested includes the following major components: a remote helium compressor with a full flow liquid nitrogen purification station, 400 meters of high pressure supply and low pressure return lines; and locally a CTi Model 2800 refrigerator with two Sulzer gas bearing turbines, the TPC magnet control dewar, 70 meters of transfer lines, and the TPC thin superconducting solenoid magnet. In addition, there is a conditioner (liquid nitrogen heat exchangers and gas heaters) system for cooldown and warmup of the magnet. This report describes the local cryogenic system and describes the various steps in the cooldown and operation of the TPC magnet. The tests were successful in that they showed that the TPC magnet could be cooled down in 24 hours and the magnet could be operated on the refrigerator or a helium pump with adequate cooling margin. The tests identified problems with the cryogenic system and the 2800 refrigerator. Procedures for successful operation and quenching of the superconducting magnet were developed. 19 references

  10. Facilities, testing program and modeling needs for studying liquid metal magnetohydrodynamic flows in fusion blankets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bühler, L., E-mail: leo.buehler@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Mistrangelo, C.; Konys, J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Bhattacharyay, R. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Huang, Q. [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology (INEST), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) (China); Obukhov, D. [D.V. Efremov Scientific Research Institute of Electrophysical Apparatus (NIIEFA) (Russian Federation); Smolentsev, S. [University of California Los Angeles (UCLA) (United States); Utili, M. [ENEA C.R. Brasimone, Camugnano 40032 (Italy)

    2015-11-15

    Since many years, liquid metal flows for applications in fusion blankets have been investigated worldwide. A review is given about modeling requirements and existing experimental facilities for investigations of liquid metal related issues in blankets with the focus on magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Most of the performed theoretical and experimental works were dedicated to fundamental aspects of MHD flows under very strong magnetic fields as they may occur in generic elements of fusion blankets like pipes, ducts, bends, expansions and contractions. Those experiments are required to progressively validate numerical tools with the purpose of obtaining codes capable to predict MHD flows at fusion relevant parameters in complex blanket geometries, taking into account electrical and thermal coupling between fluid and structural materials. Scaled mock-up experiments support the theoretical activities and help deriving engineering correlations for cases which cannot be calculated with required accuracy up to now.

  11. Structural safety features for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehner, J.; Reich, M.; Powell, J.; Bezler, P.; Gardner, D.; Yu, W.; Chang, T.Y.

    1975-01-01

    A survey has been carried out for various potential structural safety problems of superconducting fusion magnets. These areas include: (1) Stresses due to inhomogeneous temperature distributions in magnets where normal regions have been initiated. (2) Stress distributions and yield forces due to cracks and failed regions. (3) Superconducting magnet response due to seismic excitation. These analyses have been carried out using a variety of large capacity finite element computer codes that allow for the evaluation of stresses in elastic or elastic-plastic zones and around singularities in the magnet structure. Thus far, these analyses have been carried out on UWMAK-I type magnet systems

  12. Operation of the cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chronis, W.C.; Slack, D.S.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was designed to cool the entire MFTF-B system from ambient to operating temperature in less than 10 days. The system was successfully operated in the recent plant and capital equipment (PACE) acceptance tests, and results from these tests helped us correct problem areas and improve the system

  13. Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Mess, K H; Wolff, S

    1996-01-01

    The main topic of the book are the superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets needed in high-energy accelerators and storage rings for protons, antiprotons or heavy ions. The basic principles of low-temperature superconductivity are outlined with special emphasis on the effects which are relevant for accelerator magnets. Properties and fabrication methods of practical superconductors are described. Analytical methods for field calculation and multipole expansion are presented for coils without and with iron yoke. The effect of yoke saturation and geometric distortions on field quality is studied. Persistent magnetization currents in the superconductor and eddy currents the copper part of the cable are analyzed in detail and their influence on field quality and magnet performance is investigated. Superconductor stability, quench origins and propagation and magnet protection are addressed. Some important concepts of accelerator physics are introduced which are needed to appreciate the demanding requirements ...

  14. Superconductors for superconducting magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larbalestier, David

    2011-03-01

    Even in 1913 Kamerlingh Onnes envisioned the use of superconductors to create powerful magnetic fields well beyond the capability provided by cooling normal metals with liquid helium. Only some ``bad places'' in his Hg and Pb wires seemed to impede his first attempts at this dream, one that he imagined would be resolved in a few weeks of effort. In fact, of course, resolution required another 50 years and development of both a true understanding of the difference between type I and type II superconductors and the discovery of compounds such as Nb 3 Sn that could remain superconducting to fields as high as 30 T. And then indeed, starting in the 1960s, Onnes's dreams were comfortably surpassed. In the last 45 years virtually all superconducting magnets have been made from just two Nb-base materials, Nb-Ti and Nb 3 Sn. Now it seems that a new generation of magnets based on cuprate high temperature superconductors with fields well above 30 T are possible using Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and the RE-Ba-Cu-O compounds. We hope that a first demonstration of this possibility will be an all-superconducting 32 T magnet with RE-Ba-Cu-O insert that we are building for NHMFL users. The magnet application potential of this new generation of superconducting conductors will be discussed.

  15. Using computer graphics to analyze the placement of neutral-beam injectors for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.A.

    1977-01-01

    To optimize the neutral-beam current incident on the fusion plasma and limit the heat load on exposed surfaces of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility magnet coils, impingement of the neutral beams on the magnet structure must be minimized. Also, placement of the neutral-beam injectors must comply with specifications for neutral-current heating of the plasma and should allow maximum flexibility to accommodate alternative beam aiming patterns without significant hardware replacement or experiment down-time. Injector placements and aimings are analyzed by means of the Structural Analysis Movie Post Processor (SAMPP), a general-purpose graphics code for the display of three-dimensional finite-element models. SAMPP is used to visually assemble, disassemble, or cut away sections of the complex three-dimensional apparatus, which is represented by an assemblage of 8-node solid finite elements. The resulting picture is used to detect and quantify interactions between the structure and the neutral-particle beams

  16. Electromagnetic analysis of a superconducting transformer for high current characterization of cable in conduit conductors in background magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiangyang; Tan, Yunfei; Fang, Zhen; Jiang, Donghui; Chen, Zhiyou; Chen, Wenge; Kuang, Guangli

    2017-10-01

    A large cable-in-conduit-conductor (CICC) test facility has been designed and fabricated at the High Magnetic Field Laboratory of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CHMFL) in order to meet the test requirement of the conductors which are applied to the future fusion reactor. The critical component of the test facility is an 80 kA superconducting transformer which consists of a multi-turn primary coil and a minor-turn secondary coil. As the current source of the conductor samples, the electromagnetic performance of the superconducting transformer determines the stability and safety of the test facility. In this paper, the key factors and parameters, which have much impact on the performance of the transformer, are analyzed in detail. The conceptual design and optimizing principles of the transformer are discussed. An Electromagnetic-Circuit coupled model built in ANSYS Multiphysics is successfully used to investigate the electromagnetic characterization of the transformer under the dynamic operation condition.

  17. Superconductivity : Controlling magnetism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Golubov, Alexandre Avraamovitch; Kupriyanov, Mikhail Yu.

    Manipulation of the magnetic state in spin valve structures by superconductivity has now been achieved, opening a new route for the development of ultra-fast cryogenic memories. Spintronics is a rapidly developing field that allows insight into fundamental spin-dependent physical properties and the

  18. X-ray generation by inverse Compton scattering at the superconducting RF test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Hirotaka, E-mail: hirotaka@post.kek.jp [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); Akemoto, Mitsuo; Arai, Yasuo; Araki, Sakae; Aryshev, Alexander; Fukuda, Masafumi; Fukuda, Shigeki; Haba, Junji; Hara, Kazufumi; Hayano, Hitoshi; Higashi, Yasuo; Honda, Yosuke; Honma, Teruya; Kako, Eiji; Kojima, Yuji; Kondo, Yoshinari; Lekomtsev, Konstantin; Matsumoto, Toshihiro; Michizono, Shinichiro; Miyoshi, Toshinobu [KEK, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba 305-0801, Ibaraki (Japan); and others

    2015-02-01

    Quasi-monochromatic X-rays with high brightness have a broad range of applications in fields such as life sciences, bio-, medical applications, and microlithography. One method for generating such X-rays is via inverse Compton scattering (ICS). X-ray generation experiments using ICS were carried out at the superconducting RF test facility (STF) accelerator at KEK. A new beam line, newly developed four-mirror optical cavity system, and new X-ray detector system were prepared for experiments downstream section of the STF electron accelerator. Amplified pulsed photons were accumulated into a four-mirror optical cavity and collided with an incoming 40 MeV electron beam. The generated X-rays were detected using a microchannel plate (MCP) detector for X-ray yield measurements and a new silicon-on-insulator (SOI) detector system for energy measurements. The detected X-ray yield by the MCP detector was 1756.8±272.2 photons/(244 electron bunches). To extrapolate this result to 1 ms train length under 5 Hz operations, 4.60×10{sup 5} photons/1%-bandwidth were obtained. The peak X-ray energy, which was confirmed by the SOI detector, was 29 keV, and this is consistent with ICS X-rays.

  19. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H.

    1995-01-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During '' time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems

  20. The operation of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Tritium Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C.A.; LaMarche, P.H. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Anderson, J.L. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-07-01

    The TFTR tritium operations staff has successfully received, stored, handled, and processed over five hundred thousand curies of tritium for the purpose of supporting D-T (Deuterium-Tritium) operations at TFTR. Tritium operations personnel nominally provide continuous round the clock coverage (24 hours/day, 7 days/week) in shift complements consisting of I supervisor and 3 operators. Tritium Shift Supervisors and operators are required to have 5 years of operational experience in either the nuclear or chemical industry and to become certified for their positions. The certification program provides formal instruction, as well as on the job training. The certification process requires 4 to 6 months to complete, which includes an oral board lasting up to 4 hours at which time the candidate is tested on their knowledge of Tritium Technology and TFTR Tritium systems. Once an operator is certified, the training process continues with scheduled training weeks occurring once every 5 weeks. During D-T operations at TFTR the operators must evacuate the tritium area due to direct radiation from TFTR D-T pulses. During `` time operators maintain cognizance over tritium systems via a real time TV camera system. Operators are able to gain access to the Tritium area between TFTR D-T pulses, but have been excluded from die tritium area during D-T pulsing for periods up to 30 minutes. Tritium operators are responsible for delivering tritium gas to TFRR as well as processing plasma exhaust gases which lead to the deposition of tritium oxide on disposable molecular sieve beds (DMSB). Once a DMSB is loaded, the operations staff remove the expended DMSB, and replace it with a new DMSB container. The TFIR tritium system is operated via detailed procedures which require operator sign off for system manipulation. There are >300 procedures controlling the operation of the tritium systems.

  1. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  2. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  3. Superconducting magnetic quadrupole

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.W.; Shepard, K.W.; Nolen, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A design was developed for a 350 T/m, 2.6-cm clear aperture superconducting quadrupole focussing element for use in a very low q/m superconducting linac as discussed below. The quadrupole incorporates holmium pole tips, and a rectangular-section winding using standard commercially-available Nb-Ti wire. The magnet was modeled numerically using both 2D and 3D codes, as a basis for numerical ray tracing using the quadrupole as a linac element. Components for a prototype singlet are being procured during FY 1995.

  4. Test Station for Magnetization Measurements on Large Quantities of Superconducting Strands

    CERN Document Server

    Le Naour, S; Billan, J; Genest, J

    2001-01-01

    In the superconducting main magnets of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), persistent currents in the superconductor determine the field quality at injection field. For this reason it is necessary to check the magnetization of the cable strands during their production. During four years, this requires measurements of the width of the strand magnetization hysteresis loop at 0.5 T, 1.9 K, at a rate of up to eight samples per day. This paper describes the design, construction and the first results of a magnetization test station built for this purpose. The samples are cooled in a cryostat, with a 2-m long elliptic tail. This tail is inserted in a normal conducting dipole magnet with a field between ± 1.5 T. Racetrack pick-up coils, integrated in the cryostat, detect the voltage due to flux change, which is then integrated numerically. The sample holder can contain eight strand samples, each 20 cm long. The test station operates in two modes: either the sample is fixed while the external field is changed, or the sa...

  5. Fusion technology development: first wall/blanket system and component testing in existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P.Y.S.; Bohn, T.S.; Deis, G.A.; Judd, J.L.; Longhurst, G.R.; Miller, L.G.; Millsap, D.A.; Scott, A.J.; Wessol, D.E.

    1980-12-01

    A novel concept to produce a reasonable simulation of a fusion first wall/blanket test environment employing an existing nuclear facility, the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, is presented. Preliminary results show that an asymmetric, nuclear test environment with surface and volumetric heating rates similar to those expected in a fusion first wall/blanket or divertor chamber surface appears feasible. The proposed concept takes advantage of nuclear reactions within the annulus of an existing test space (15 cm in diameter and approximately 100 cm high) to provide an energy flux to the surface of a test module. The principal reaction considered involves 3 He in the annulus as follows: n + 3 He → p + t + 0.75 MeV. Bulk heating in the test module is accomplished by neutron thermalization, gamma heating, and absorption reactions involving 6 Li in the blanket breeding region. The concept can be extended to modified core configurations that will accommodate test modules of different sizes and types. It makes possible development testing of first wall/blanket systems and other fusion components on a scale and in ways not otherwise available until actual high-power fusion reactors are built

  6. Superconducting pulsed magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2006-01-01

    Lecture 1. Introduction to Superconducting Materials Type 1,2 and high temperature superconductors; their critical temperature, field & current density. Persistent screening currents and the critical state model. Lecture 2. Magnetization and AC Loss How screening currents cause irreversible magnetization and hysteresis loops. Field errors caused by screening currents. Flux jumping. The general formulation of ac loss in terms of magnetization. AC losses caused by screening currents. Lecture 3. Twisted Wires and Cables Filamentary composite wires and the losses caused by coupling currents between filaments, the need for twisting. Why we need cables and how the coupling currents in cables contribute more ac loss. Field errors caused by coupling currents. Lecture 4. AC Losses in Magnets, Cooling and Measurement Summary of all loss mechanisms and calculation of total losses in the magnet. The need for cooling to minimize temperature rise in a magnet. Measuring ac losses in wires and in magnets. Lecture 5. Stab...

  7. Software architecture for the ORNL large-coil test facility data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, E.T.; Baylor, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The VAX-based data-acquisition system for the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second-generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60-based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX-based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, decoupling end-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring, and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software. This paper describes the software architecture and the functionality incorporated into the various layers of the data system

  8. Software architecture for the ORNL large coil test facility data system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blair, E.T.; Baylor, L.R.

    1986-01-01

    The VAX-based data acquisition system for the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a second-generation system that evolved from a PDP-11/60-based system used during the initial phase of facility testing. The VAX-based software represents a layered implementation that provides integrated access to all of the data sources within the system, deoupling end-user data retrieval from various front-end data sources through a combination of software architecture and instrumentation data bases. Independent VAX processes manage the various front-end data sources, each being responsible for controlling, monitoring, acquiring and disposing data and control parameters for access from the data retrieval software. This paper describes the software architecture and the functionality incorporated into the various layers of the data system

  9. Fracture mechanics behavior of a Ni-Fe superalloy sheath for superconducting fusion magnets. Pt. 2. Magnet life analysis model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    For pt.1 see ibid., p.251-67,(1997). From previous results of fatigue crack growth and fracture toughness measurements for a Ni-Fe base superalloy, a primary candidate for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) central solenoid (CS) conduit, we derive an improved magnet life analysis model from the framework of Newman and Raju. For the superalloy conduit with an initial semielliptical surface crack in its thickness direction, the model predicts the evolution of crack aspect ratio for a wide range of initial crack geometries under pure tension and bending fatigue. The prediction of final fracture due to fatigue crack growth using the linear elastic fracture mechanics approach is shown to be underconservative. An alternative model based on Newman's elastic-plastic fracture toughness parameter is derived for the base metal with nearly semicircular cracks. The improved life analysis model taking into account the fatigue and fracture behavior is applied to the ITER CS magnet and the results are compared with those from earlier models. Accounting for the crack shape evolution leads to significantly longer life compared to assuming a constant aspect ratio. For the superalloy base metal we find that the expected fatigue life of engineering design activity design of the CS magnet is about eight times the design requirement. Even the conceptual design activity design with a free-standing CS meets the life requirement when analyzed by the improved model. (orig.)

  10. IFMIF (International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility) conceptual design activity reduced cost report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-02-01

    This report describes the results of a preliminary reevaluation of the design and cost of the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) Project in response to the request from the 28th FPCC meeting in January 1999. Two major ideas have been considered: 1) reduction of the total construction cost through elimination of the previously planned facility upgrade and 2) a facility deployment in 3 stages with capabilities for limited experiments in the first stage. As a result, the size and complexity of the facility could be significantly reduced, leading to substantial cost savings. In addition to these two ideas, this study also included a critical review of the original CDA specification with the objective of elimination of nonessential items. For example, the number of lithium targets was reduced from two to one. As a result of these changes in addition to the elimination of the upgrade, the total cost estimate was very substantially reduced from 797.2 MICF to 487.8 MICF, where 1 MICF = 1 Million of the IFMIF Conversion Units (approximately $1M US January, 1996). (author)

  11. Gettering high energy plasma in the end loss region of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldner, A.I.; Margolies, D.S.

    1979-01-01

    The ions escaping from the end loss fan of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) neutralize when they hit the surface of the end dome. If the neutrals then bounce back into the oncoming plasma, they are likely to reionize, drawing power from the center of the plasma and reducing the overall electron temperature. In this paper we describe two methods for reducing the reionization rate and a computer code for estimating their effectiveness

  12. Fiber Bragg Grating Cryo-Sensors for Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Perez, J; Bajas, H; Consales, M; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Cusano, A

    2014-01-01

    The design, fabrication and tests of the new generation of superconducting magnets for the High Luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider (HL - LHC) require the support of an adequate sensing technology able to assure the integrity of the strain sensitive and brittle superconducting cables through the whole service life of the magnet: assembly up to 150 MPa, cool down to 1.9 K and powering up to about 16 kA. A precise temperature monitoring is also needed in order to guarantee the safe working condition of the superconducting cables in the power transmission lines (SC - Link) designed to feed the magnet over long distance. Temperature and strain FBGs based monitoring systems have been implemented in the first SC-Link prototype and in two subscale dipole magnets and tested in the cryogenic test facility at CERN at 30 K, 77 K and 1.9 K.

  13. Development of superconducting magnet systems for HIFExperiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabbi, Gian Luca; Faltens, A.; Leitzke, A.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Martovets ky, N.; Chiesa, L.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Goodzeit, C.; Hwang, P.; Hinson, W.; Meinke, R.

    2004-07-27

    The U.S. Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing superconducting focusing quadrupoles for near-term experiments and future driver accelerators. Following the fabrication and testing of several models, a baseline quadrupole design was selected and further optimized. The first prototype of the optimized design achieved a conductor-limited gradient of 132 T/m in a 70 mm bore, with measured field harmonics within 10 parts in 10{sup 4}. In parallel, a compact focusing doublet was fabricated and tested using two of the first-generation quadrupoles. After assembly in the cryostat, both magnets reached their conductor-limited quench current. Further optimization steps are currently underway to improve the performance of the magnet system and reduce its cost. They include the fabrication and testing of a new prototype quadrupole with reduced field errors as well as improvements of the cryostat design for the focusing doublet. The prototype units will be installed in the HCX beamline at LBNL, to perform accelerator physics experiments and gain operational experience. Successful results in the present phase will make superconducting magnets a viable option for the next generation of integrated beam experiments.

  14. Proposal for an Accelerator R&D User Facility at Fermilab's Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, M. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Edwards, H. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Harms, E. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Henderson, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Holmes, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Lumpkin, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Kephart, R. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Levedev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Leibfritz, J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Nagaitsev, S. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Piot, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Prokop, C. [Northern Illinois Univ., DeKalb, IL (United States); Shiltsev, V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Sun, Y. E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Valishev, A. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Fermilab is the nation’s particle physics laboratory, supported by the DOE Office of High Energy Physics (OHEP). Fermilab is a world leader in accelerators, with a demonstrated track-record— spanning four decades—of excellence in accelerator science and technology. We describe the significant opportunity to complete, in a highly leveraged manner, a unique accelerator research facility that supports the broad strategic goals in accelerator science and technology within the OHEP. While the US accelerator-based HEP program is oriented toward the Intensity Frontier, which requires modern superconducting linear accelerators and advanced highintensity storage rings, there are no accelerator test facilities that support the accelerator science of the Intensity Frontier. Further, nearly all proposed future accelerators for Discovery Science will rely on superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) acceleration, yet there are no dedicated test facilities to study SRF capabilities for beam acceleration and manipulation in prototypic conditions. Finally, there are a wide range of experiments and research programs beyond particle physics that require the unique beam parameters that will only be available at Fermilab’s Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA). To address these needs we submit this proposal for an Accelerator R&D User Facility at ASTA. The ASTA program is based on the capability provided by an SRF linac (which provides electron beams from 50 MeV to nearly 1 GeV) and a small storage ring (with the ability to store either electrons or protons) to enable a broad range of beam-based experiments to study fundamental limitations to beam intensity and to develop transformative approaches to particle-beam generation, acceleration and manipulation which cannot be done elsewhere. It will also establish a unique resource for R&D towards Energy Frontier facilities and a test-bed for SRF accelerators and high brightness beam applications in support of the OHEP

  15. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  16. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  17. Progress in the development of superconducting quadrupoles for heavy ion fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, B.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-05-24

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  18. Progress in the Development of Superconducting Quadrupoles forHeavy-ion Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faltens, A.; Lietzke, A.; Sabbi, G.; Seidl, P.; Lund, S.; Manahan, R.; Martovetsky, N.; Gung, C.; Minervini, J.; Schultz, J.; Myatt, L.; Meinke, R.

    2002-08-19

    The Heavy Ion Fusion program is developing single aperture superconducting quadrupoles based on NbTi conductor, for use in the High Current Experiment at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Following the fabrication and testing of prototypes using two different approaches, a baseline design has been selected and further optimized. A prototype cryostat for a quadrupole doublet, with features to accommodate induction acceleration modules, is being fabricated. The single aperture magnet was derived from a conceptual design of a quadrupole array magnet for multi-beam transport. Progress on the development of superconducting quadrupole arrays for future experiments is also reported.

  19. Magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project

  20. FERMILAB: protons through doubler sector (energy doubler for proton beam); test of superconducting magnets; bubble chamber ups and downs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1979-01-01

    A recent test of the first stage of the proton beam energy doubler at Fermilab is described. The new beam transport system, particularly the performance of the superconducting magnets, is also described. Initial performance and subsequent difficulties in the operation of the 15 foot bubble chamber are summarised. (W.D.L.).

  1. Safety assessment for the rf Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, A.; Beane, F.

    1984-08-01

    The Radio Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) is a part of the Magnetic Fusion Program's rf Heating Experiments. The goal of the Magnetic Fusion Program (MFP) is to develop and demonstrate the practical application of fusion. RFTF is an experimental device which will provide an essential link in the research effort aiming at the realization of fusion power. This report was compiled as a summary of the analysis done to ensure the safe operation of RFTF

  2. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennich, M.J. [comp.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities.

  3. IFMIF, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility conceptual design activity cost report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the cost estimate for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) at the completion of the Conceptual Design Activity (CDA). The estimate corresponds to the design documented in the Final IFMIF CDA Report. In order to effectively involve all the collaborating parties in the development of the estimate, a preparatory meeting was held at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in March 1996 to jointly establish guidelines to insure that the estimate was uniformly prepared while still permitting each country to use customary costing techniques. These guidelines are described in Section 4. A preliminary cost estimate was issued in July 1996 based on the results of the Second Design Integration Meeting, May 20--27, 1996 at JAERI, Tokai, Japan. This document served as the basis for the final costing and review efforts culminating in a final review during the Third IFMIF Design Integration Meeting, October 14--25, 1996, ENEA, Frascati, Italy. The present estimate is a baseline cost estimate which does not apply to a specific site. A revised cost estimate will be prepared following the assignment of both the site and all the facility responsibilities

  4. A spallation-based irradiation test facility for fusion and future fission materials

    CERN Document Server

    Samec, K; Kadi, Y; Luis, R; Romanets, Y; Behzad, M; Aleksan, R; Bousson, S

    2014-01-01

    The EU’s FP7 TIARA program for developing accelerator-based facilities has recently demonstrated the unique capabilities of a compact and powerful spallation source for irradiating advanced nuclear materials. The spectrum and intensity of the neutron flux produced in the proposed facility fulfils the requirements of the DEMO fusion reactor for ITER, ADS reactors and also Gen III / IV reactors. Test conditions can be modulated, covering temperature from 400 to 550°C, liquid metal corrosion, cyclical or static stress up to 500 MPa and neutron/proton irradiation damage of up to 25 DPA per annum. The entire “TMIF” facility fits inside a cube 2 metres on a side, and is dimensioned for an accelerator beam power of 100 kW, thus reducing costs and offering great versatility and flexibility.

  5. Integral Effect Tests in the PKL Facility with International Participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umminger, Klaus; Mull, Thomas; Brand, Bernhard [AREVA NP, Erlangen (Georgia)

    2009-08-15

    For over 30 years, investigations of the thermohydraulic behavior of pressurized-water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a of pressurized water reactor at a height scale of 1:1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1:145. The experimental facility consists of four primary loops with circulation pumps and steam generators (SGs) arranged symmetrically around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The investigations carried out encompass a very broad spectrum from accident scenario simulations with large, medium, and small breaks, over the investigation of shutdown procedures after a wide variety of accidents, to the systematic investigation of complex thermohydraulic phenomena. The PKL tests began in the mid 1970s with the support of the German Research Ministry. Since the mid 1980s, the project has also been significantly supported by the German PWR operators. Since 2001, 25 partner organizations from 15 countries have taken part in the PKL investigations with the support and mediation of the OECD/NEA (Nuclear Energy Agency). After an overview of PKL history and a short description of the facility, this paper focuses on the investigations carried out since the beginning of the international cooperation, and shows, by means of some examples, what insights can be derived from the tests

  6. Design of a 28 MW pulse facility for testing superconducting coils to several hundred megajoules capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, H.F.

    1980-01-01

    Railway traction motors are available in unit sizes convenient for installation and series-parallel grouping. They are rugged. Industry builds and refurbishes them with good economy and in quantities replenishing the rolling stock. We find them well suited for reversing the current in a superconducting winding. We focus on a pulsed energy of 20 to 100 MJ, discussing our analysis and facility planning. Limitations are imposed by the following maximum numbers tolerated by the motor - pulsed current of 3.0 to 3.5 kA, current change of 40 kA/s, and pulsed voltage of 1.8 kV. Hence, the number of machines needed in parallel follows from the coil current and its rate of change. The number in series is determined by the voltage. The power transfer is limited by the torsional strength of the motor shaft to a value affected by the flywheel mass

  7. 6 February 2012 - Supreme Audit Institutions from Norway, Poland, Spain and Switzerland visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5, CMS underground experimental area, CERN Control Centre and LHC superconducting magnet test hall. Delegations are throughout accompanied by Swiss P. Jenni, Polish T. Kurtyka, Spanish J. Salicio, Norwegian S. Stapnes and International Relations Adviser R. Voss. (Riksrevisjonen, Oslo; Tribunal de Cuentas , Madrid; the Court of Audit of Switzerland and Najwyzsza Izba Kontroli, Varsaw)

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2012-01-01

    6 February 2012 - Supreme Audit Institutions from Norway, Poland, Spain and Switzerland visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5, CMS underground experimental area, CERN Control Centre and LHC superconducting magnet test hall. Delegations are throughout accompanied by Swiss P. Jenni, Polish T. Kurtyka, Spanish J. Salicio, Norwegian S. Stapnes and International Relations Adviser R. Voss. (Riksrevisjonen, Oslo; Tribunal de Cuentas , Madrid; the Court of Audit of Switzerland and Najwyzsza Izba Kontroli, Varsaw)

  8. 21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

  9. Study for cryogenic testing the Super-FRS magnets of FAIR in a new test facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Derking, J H; Benda, V; Pirotte, O

    2015-01-01

    The Super-FRS magnets of the international Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) being built at GSI in Germany will be tested at a new cryogenic test facility currently under construction at CERN. During nominal operation the magnets will be cooled with liquid helium to 4.5 K. Over a period of three years in total 57 magnets will be tested of three different types. A study is performed to determine the cryogenic requirements for testing the Super-FRS magnets. The required operational parameters for the cool down, magnet test and warm up phases are determined and the results are discussed in this paper. For pre-cooling the magnets to 90 K with a rate of 1 Kcenterdoth-1, a maximum cooling power of 5.6 kW is required. Cooling down the magnets further to 4.5 K and filling will be performed with LHe within 24 h. For warming up the magnets a maximum heater power of 14 kW is needed. It is concluded that the planned test facility currently under construction at CERN fulfills the cryogenic requirements for t...

  10. Cryogenic instrumentation of an SSC (superconducting super collider) magnet test stand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGuire, K.; Strait, J.; Kuchnir, M.; McInturff, A.

    1987-09-01

    This paper describes the system used to acquire cryogenic data for the testing of SSC magnets at the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. An array of pressure transducers, resistance thermometers, vapor pressure thermometers, and signal conditioning circuits are used. Readings with time resolution appropriate for quench recording are obtained with a waveform digitizer and steady-state measurements are obtained with higher accuracy using a digital voltmeter. The waveform digitizer is clocked at a 400 Hz sampling rate and these readings are stored in local ring buffers. The system is modular and can be expanded to add more channels. The software for the acquisition, control, logging, and display of cryogenic data consist of two programs which run as separate tasks. These programs (as well as a third program which acquires quench and magnetic data) communicate and pass data using shared global resources. The acquired data are available for analysis via a nationwide DECnet network.

  11. Proceedings of the workshop on structural analysis needs for magnetic fusion energy superconducting magnets: a technical assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, M.; Lehner, J.; Powell, J.; Bezler, P.

    1976-01-01

    The technical portions of the meeting were divided into three major sessions as follows: (1) Review of methods being presently used by the MFE community for structural evaluation of current designs. (2) Future structural analysis needs. (3) Open discussions dealing with adequacy of present methods, the improvements needed for MFE magnet structural analysis, and the establishment of an MFE magnet structural advisory group. Summaries of the individual talks are presented.

  12. Proceedings of the workshop on structural analysis needs for magnetic fusion energy superconducting magnets: a technical assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reich, M.; Lehner, J.; Powell, J.; Bezler, P.

    1976-01-01

    The technical portions of the meeting were divided into three major sessions as follows: (1) Review of methods being presently used by the MFE community for structural evaluation of current designs. (2) Future structural analysis needs. (3) Open discussions dealing with adequacy of present methods, the improvements needed for MFE magnet structural analysis, and the establishment of an MFE magnet structural advisory group. Summaries of the individual talks are presented

  13. Development of Experimental Superconducting Magnet for the Collector Ring of FAIR Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yinfeng; Wu Weiyue; Wu Songtao; Liu Changle; Xu Houchang

    2010-01-01

    A pool cooled experimental magnet based on the copper stabilized NbTi superconducting wire was designed, fabricated and tested, in order to evaluate the engineering design of the dipole superconducting magnet for the collector ring (CR) of the facility for antiproton and ion research (FAIR) project. In this paper, the experimental setup including quench protection system was presented. Performance of the liquid helium pool cooled test was introduced. All of the results indicate both the performance of conductor and the experimental superconducting magnet under low temperature is stable, which suggests the engineering design are feasible for the formal magnet in CR of the FAIR project.

  14. Superconducting Cable Development for Future High Energy Physics Detector Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvath, I. L.

    1995-11-01

    Under the leadership of the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETHZ) an international ad hoc collaboration for superconducting cables developed an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable for future detector magnets. With the financial support of the Swiss government, this R&D work was carried out for the European Organisation for Nuclear Research (CERN). In this report the manufacturing process is described and results of the quality control measurements are summarised. These tests showed that the industrial manufacturing of an aluminium stabilised superconducting cable is feasible.

  15. International fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pease, R.S.

    1983-01-01

    Nuclear energy of the light elements deuterium and lithium can be released if the 100 MK degree temperature required for deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fusion reactions can be achieved together with sufficient thermal insulation for a net energy yield. Progress of world-wide research shows good prospect for these physical conditions being achieved by the use of magnetic field confinement and of rapidly developing heating methods. Tokamak systems, alternative magnetic systems and inertial confinement progress are described. International co-operation features a number of bilateral agreements between countries: the Euratom collaboration which includes the Joint European Torus, a joint undertaking of eleven Western European nations of Euratom, established to build and operate a major confinement experiment; the development of co-operative projects within the OECD/IEA framework; the INTOR workshop, a world-wide study under IAEA auspices of the next major step in fusion research which might be built co-operatively; and assessments of the potential of nuclear fusion by the IAEA and the International Fusion Research Council. The INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) studies have outlined a major plant of the tokamak type to study the engineering and technology of fusion reactor systems, which might be constructed on a world-wide basis to tackle and share the investment risks of the developments which lie ahead. This paper summarizes the recent progress of research on controlled nuclear fusion, featuring those areas where international co-operation has played an important part, and describes the various arrangements by which this international co-operation is facilitated. (author)

  16. A coil test facility for the cryogenic tests of the JT-60SA TF coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chantant, M.; Genini, L.; Bayetti, P.; Millet, F.; Wanner, M.; Massaut, V.; Corte, A. Della; Ardelier-Desage, F.; Catherine-Dumont, V.; Dael, A.; Decool, P.; Donati, A.; Duchateau, J.L.; Garibaldi, P.; Girard, S.; Hatchressian, J.C.; Fejoz, P.; Jamotton, P.; Jourdheuil, L.; Juster, F.P.

    2011-01-01

    In the framework of the Broader Approach Activities, the EU will deliver to Japan the 18 superconducting coils, which constitute the JT-60SA Toroidal field magnet. These 18 coils, manufactured by France and Italy, will be cold tested before shipping to Japan. For this purpose, the European Joint Undertaking for ITER, the Development of Fusion Energy ('Fusion for Energy', F4E) and the European Voluntary Contributors are collaborating to design and set-up a coil test facility (CTF) and to perform the acceptance test of the 18 JT-60SA Toroidal Field (TF) coils. The test facility is designed to test one coil at a time at nominal current and cryogenic temperature. The test of the first coil of each manufacturer includes a quench triggered by increasing the temperature. The project is presently in the detailed design phase.

  17. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won; Cho, Seungyon

    2014-01-01

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity

  18. Performance Test of Korea Heat Load Test Facility (KoHLT-EB) for the Plasma Facing Components of Fusion Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Suk-Kwon; Jin, Hyung Gon; Lee, Eo Hwak; Yoon, Jae-Sung; Lee, Dong Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The main components of the plasma facing components (PFCs) in the tokamak are the blanket first wall and divertor, which include the armour materials, the heat sink with the cooling mechanism, and the diagnostics devices for the temperature measurement. The Korea Heat Load Test facility by using electron beam (KoHLT-EB) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering. This electron beam facility was constructed using a 300 kW electron gun and a cylindrical vacuum chamber. Performance tests were carried out for the calorimetric calibrations with Cu dummy mockup and for the heat load test of large Cu module. For the simulation of the heat load test of each mockup, the preliminary thermal-hydraulic analyses with ANSYS-CFX were performed. For the development of the plasma facing components in the fusion reactors, test mockups were fabricated and tested in the high heat flux test facility. To perform a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test, the Korean high-heat flux test facility using an electron beam system was constructed. In this facility, a cyclic heat flux test will be performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile, and cooling capacity.

  19. Quench protection in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shajii, A.; Freidberg, J.P.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this obviously non-plasma physics research is to demonstrate that many of the powerful and sophisticated theoretical techniques widely used by the plasma physics community can be applied to engineering problems of direct interest to the magnetic fusion program. Quench protection is such a problem. If a sudden pulse of energy is delivered (usually by accident) to a small section of a superconducting magnet, it may go normal. Under such conditions, the magnet current flows in the surrounding copper matrix, which is essentially in parallel with the superconductor. Although the copper is a good conductor, it still dissipates ohmic power, further adding to the energy input. It is important to detect the quench as early as possible in order to shut off the current, thereby preventing irreversible damage to the conductor. This a non-trivial problem since the cables comprising a coil can be as long as one kilometer. The theory presented here starts with a set of multi-dimensional Navier-Stokes and heat transport equations for the coupled system of helium coolant, superconducting/copper cable, and surrounding jacket. A combination of multiple time scale expansions and asymptotic analysis reduces the problem to a nonlinear fourth order system of 1-D plus time equations. A code has been written whose numerical results are in excellent agreement with more complex engineering codes. There is at least an order of magnitude savings in CPU over the existing codes where a typical run requires one hour Cray CPU. By investigating a number of different cases the authors have been able to introduce further analytic approximations which reduce the problem to quasi-analytic form, a set of three ODE's in time. The results here too are in excellent agreement with the engineering code and requires only several seconds of CPU time. More important, the critical dimensionless parameters have been identified, as well as practical scaling information for the magnet design

  20. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Wilson, J.H.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1980-01-01

    In late August 1978, a fixed price procurement contract for $25,000,000 was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, California, for the design, manufacture, installation and acceptance testing of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) Sustaining Neutral Beam Power Supply System (SNBPSS). This system of 24 power supply sets will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each set will provide the accel potential the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module. The design and development of the SNBPSS has progressed through the final design phase and is now in production. Testing of the major sub-assembly power supply is proceeding at Aydin and the final acceptance testing of the first two power supplies at LLNL is expected to be completed this year

  1. Supervisory control and diagnostics system for the mirror fusion test facility: overview and status 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGoldrick, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a complex facility requiring a highly-computerized Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) to monitor and provide control over ten subsystems; three of which require true process control. SCDS will provide physicists with a method of studying machine and plasma behavior by acquiring and processing up to four megabytes of plasma diagnostic information every five minutes. A high degree of availability and throughput is provided by a distributed computer system (nine 32-bit minicomputers on shared memory). Data, distributed across SCDS, is managed by a high-bandwidth Distributed Database Management System. The MFTF operators' control room consoles use color television monitors with touch sensitive screens; this is a totally new approach. The method of handling deviations to normal machine operation and how the operator should be notified and assisted in the resolution of problems has been studied and a system designed

  2. Magnetic fusion technology

    CERN Document Server

    Dolan, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic Fusion Technology describes the technologies that are required for successful development of nuclear fusion power plants using strong magnetic fields. These technologies include: ? magnet systems, ? plasma heating systems, ? control systems, ? energy conversion systems, ? advanced materials development, ? vacuum systems, ? cryogenic systems, ? plasma diagnostics, ? safety systems, and ? power plant design studies. Magnetic Fusion Technology will be useful to students and to specialists working in energy research.

  3. Safety and stability in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herring, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing size and field of superconducting magnets required for new applications result in significant stored energy and magnetic forces. The use of superconducting magnets near humans has resulted in standards for limiting occupational exposures to magnetic field. While these standards are unofficial, they have been widely adopted. In addition, development of large magnet sets for the fusion program and for the MHD program has led to experiments on the behavior of shorted and arcing coils under transient conditions. In combination with various code development efforts, these experiments, in the US and Europe, are resulting in criteria for the design of stable coils which can safely discharge their stored energy. 22 refs., 6 tabs

  4. Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmierer, Eric N [Los Alamos, NM; Prenger, F Coyne [Los Alamos, NM; Hill, Dallas D [Los Alamos, NM

    2010-01-12

    A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

  5. Design and Test Results of Superconducting Magnet for Heavy-Ion Rotating Gantry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, S.; Koyanagi, K.; Miyazaki, H.; Takami, S.; Orikasa, T.; Ishii, Y.; Kurusu, T.; Iwata, Y.; Noda, K.; Obana, T.; Suzuki, K.; Ogitsu, T.; Amemiya, N.

    2017-07-01

    Heavy-ion radiotherapy has a high curative effect in cancer treatment and also can reduce the burden on patients. These advantages have been generally recognized. Furthermore, a rotating gantry can irradiate a tumor with ions from any direction without changing the position of the patient. This can reduce the physical dose on normal cells, and is thus commonly used in proton radiotherapy. However, because of the high magnetic rigidity of carbon ions, the weight of the rotating gantry for heavy-ion therapy is about three-times heavier than those used for proton cancer therapy, according to our estimation. To overcome this issue, we developed a small and lightweight rotating gantry in collaboration with the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS). The compact rotating gantry was composed of ten low-temperature superconducting (LTS) magnets that were designed from the viewpoint of beam optics. These LTS magnets have a surface-winding coil-structure and provide both dipole and quadrupole fields. The maximum dipole and quadrupole magnetic field of the magnets were 2.88 T and 9.3 T/m, respectively. The rotating gantry was installed at NIRS, and beam commissioning is in progress to achieve the required beam quality. In the three years since 2013, in a project supported by the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI) and the Japan Agency for Medical Research and Development (AMED), we have been developing high-temperature superconducting (HTS) magnets with the aim of a further size reduction of the rotating gantry. To develop fundamental technologies for designing and fabricating HTS magnets, a model magnet was manufactured. The model magnet was composed of 24 saddle-shaped HTS coils and generated a magnetic field of 1.2 T. In the presentation, recent progress in this research will be reported.

  6. PREFACE: The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) (Side, Turkey, 25-29 August 2008) The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) (Side, Turkey, 25-29 August 2008)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencer, Ali; Grasso, Gianni

    2009-03-01

    The International Conference on Superconductivity and Magnetism (ICSM2008) was held at the congress centre of Ankara University in Side, Antalya, between 25-29 August 2008. The conference was the first conference on the combined fields of superconductivity and magnetism organized in Turkey at international level, and it had broad international participation from 42 countries, with registered delegates numbering over 400. A quarter of the attendees were research students. The conference attracted many of the best known leading scientists and experts in the field of superconductivity and magnetism from all over the world. The scientific program involved the presentation and discussion of 336 papers, classified as 65 invited, 81 oral and 190 posters. Submission of papers for the proceedings was on a volunteer basis and we therefore had nearly half of the presented papers, i.e. 30 submitted invited papers, peer-reviewed by Superconductor Science and Technology, and 85 submitted contributing papers, peer-reviewed by the organizers through processes administered by the Editorial Board and Scientific Committee. Reviews were conducted by expert referees at professional level and with the scientific standards expected of a proceedings journal issue published by IOP Publishing. The invited papers on superconductivity and magnetism with superconductivity were considered and processed for Superconductor Science and Technology by IOP itself. Although there are missing papers from some of the plenary speakers, we believe that this special issue of Superconductor Science and Technology (SUST) and the corresponding issue of Journal of Physics: Conference Series (JPCS) reflect most of the booming research in the fields of superconductivity and magnetism. We are very pleased to have worked with IOP on the conference proceedings, with special thanks to Dr Tom Miller and Dr Graham Douglas. Based on a refereed evaluation of all the papers and posters submitted, about 93 papers were

  7. Magnetic fusion energy and computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups

  8. The Mirror Fusion Test Facility cryogenic system: Performance, management approach, and present equipment status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.

    1987-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a 14-kW, 4.35-K helium refrigeration system that proved to be highly successful and cost-effective. All operating objectives were met, while remaining within a few percent of initial cost and schedule plans. The management approach used in MFTF allowed decisions to be made quickly and effectively, and it helped keep costs down. Manpower levels, extent and type of industrial participation, key aspects of subcontractor specifications, and subcontractor interactions are reviewed, as well as highlights of the system tests, operation, and present equipment status. Organizations planning large, high-technology systems may benefit from this experience with the MFTF cryogenic system

  9. Program user's manual: cryogen system for the analysis for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-04-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility being designed and constructed at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory requires a liquid helium liquefaction, storage, distribution, and recovery system and a liquid nitrogen storage and distribution system. To provide a powerful analytical tool to aid in the design evolution of this system through hardware, a thermodynamic fluid flow model was developed. This model allows the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory to verify that the design meets desired goals and to play what if games during the design evolution. For example, what if the helium flow rate is changed in the magnet liquid helium flow loop; how does this affect the temperature, fluid quality, and pressure. This manual provides all the information required to run all or portions of this program as desired. In addition, the program is constructed in a modular fashion so changes or modifications can be made easily to keep up with the evolving design.

  10. Testing electrical insulation of LCT coils and instrumentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luton, J.N.; Ulbricht, A.R.; Ellis, J.F.; Shen, S.S.; Wilson, C.T.; Okuno, K.; Siewerdt, L.O.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

    1986-09-01

    Three of the superconducting test coils in the Large Coil Task (LCT) use conductors cooled internally by forced flow of helium. In the other three coils, the conductors are cooled externally by a bath of helium. The coils and facility are designed for rapid discharges (dumps) at voltages up to 2.5 kV, depending on coil design. Many coil sensors are connected electrically to the conductors. These sensor leads and signal conditioning equipment also experience high voltage. High-potential tests of ground insulation were performed on all components of the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Coil insulation was also tested by ring-down tests that produced voltage distributions within the coils like those occurring during rapid discharge. Methods were developed to localize problem areas and to eliminate them. The effect on breakdown voltage near the Paschen minimum of magnetic fields up to 2 T was investigated

  11. Large coil test structural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clinard, J.A.; Hammonds, C.J.

    1986-01-01

    The International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is being utilized for testing of 2.5 x 3.5-m bore superconducting 8-T magnets produced by four international agencies (U.S., Euratom, Japan, and Switzerland). The definitive tests in the design configuration, six coils arranged in a compact torus, will begin in late 1985. Partial-array tests involving one US coil and the Japanese coil were completed in the fall of 1984. This presentation describes structural analysis using NASTRAN, with symmetry and superelement techniques, to predict the IFSMTF test stand and coil responses to various combinations of in-plane and out-of-plane loading conditions for both the partial-array and six-coil test configurations. Comparison to partial-array displacement and strain measurements are presented and discussed. Six-coil results and their utilization for determining safe levels of operation of the system are likewise discussed

  12. 28 May 2010 - Japanese Ambassador H. Ueda visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with CERN Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    CERN-HI-1005088 02 Japanese Ambassador H. Ueda (right) visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Deputy Department Head L. Rossi(left). H. Ueda is accompanied by KEK and ATLAS Collaboration T. Kondo (centre).

  13. Superconductivity and magnetism: Materials properties and developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, N.H.; Bay, N.; Grivel, J.C. (eds.) [and others

    2003-07-01

    The 24th Risoe International Symposium on Materials Science focuses on development of new materials, devices and applications, as well as experimental and theoretical studies of novel and unexplained phenomena in superconductivity and magnetism, e.g. within high.T{sub c} superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB{sub 2}, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin-tronics. The aim is to stimulate exchange of ideas and establish new collaborations between leading Danish and international scientists. The topics are addressed by presentations from 24 invited speakers and by 41 contributed papers. (ln)

  14. Superconductivity and magnetism: Materials properties and developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersen, N.H.; Bay, N.; Grivel, J.C.

    2003-01-01

    The 24th Risoe International Symposium on Materials Science focuses on development of new materials, devices and applications, as well as experimental and theoretical studies of novel and unexplained phenomena in superconductivity and magnetism, e.g. within high.T c superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB 2 , CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin-tronics. The aim is to stimulate exchange of ideas and establish new collaborations between leading Danish and international scientists. The topics are addressed by presentations from 24 invited speakers and by 41 contributed papers. (ln)

  15. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system: a design and development status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brackenbury, P.J.; Bazinet, G.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system is outlined. This unique liquid lithium recirculating system, the largest of its kind in the world, is described with emphasis on the liquid lithium target assembly and other important components necessary to provide lithium flow to the target. The operational status and role of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) in the design of the FMIT lithium system are discussed. Safety aspects of operating the FMIT lithium system in a highly radioactive condition are described. Potential spillage of the lithium is controlled by cell liners, by argon flood systems and by remote maintenance features. Lithium chemistry is monitored and controlled by a side-stream loop, where impurities measured by instruments are collected by hot and cold traps

  16. Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility lithium system: a design and development status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brackenbury, P.J.; Bazinet, G.D.; Miller, W.C.

    1983-01-01

    The design and development of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) Facility lithium system is outlined. This unique liquid lithium recirculating system, the largest of its kind in the world, is described with emphasis on the liquid lithium target assembly and other important components necessary to provide lithium flow to the target. The operational status and role of the Experimental Lithium System (ELS) in the design of the FMIT lithium system are discussed. Safety aspects of operating the FMIT lithium system in a highly radioactive condition are described. Potential spillage of the lithium is controlled by cell liners, by argon flood systems and by remote maintenance features. Lithium chemistry is monitored and controlled by a side-stream loop, where impurities measured by instruments are collected by hot and cold traps.

  17. Generic magnetic fusion reactor cost assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Fusion Energy Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory discusses ''generic'' magnetic fusion reactors. The author comments on DT burning magnetic fusion reactor models being possibly operational in the 21st century. Representative parameters from D-T reactor studies are given, as well as a shematic diagram of a generic fusion reactor. Values are given for winding pack current density for existing and future superconducting coils. Topics included are the variation of the cost of electricity (COE), the dependence of the COE on the net electric power of the reactor, and COE formula definitions

  18. Fabrication and properties of conductors for fusion magnets. Annual report, October 1, 1976--September 30, 1977. [Nb/sub 3/ Sn conductor testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-06-01

    The objectives of this project are to develop suitable and economical conductors for fusion magnets, in particular, to develop methods for improving the mechanical properties of Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors. This includes the measurement and study of degradation mechanisms of Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors under mechanical strain. The investigation of degradation in the superconducting properties of Nb/sub 3/Sn conductors under mechanical stresses for FY 1977 can be divided into the following areas: (1) monofilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn wires, (2) multifilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn wires and conductors, (3) effects of additives to Nb/sub 3/Sn, (4) mechanism for degradation, and (5) construction of high field test facilities. Our effort in FY 1977 has been concentrated in the investigation of T/sub c/, J/sub c/ and H/sub c2/ variations in monofilamentary Nb/sub 3/Sn wires. The most important finding in this study is that a Nb/sub 3/Sn wire can sustain mechanical strain well beyond 1% if a proper ratio of the matrix to the Nb core was chosen.

  19. Productive international collaboration in the large coil task

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haubenreich, P.N.; Komarek, P.; Shimamoto, S.; Vecsey, G.

    1987-01-01

    The Large Coil Task (LCT), initiated in 1977, has been very productive of useful technical information about superconducting toroidal field (TF) coil design and manufacture. Moreover, it has demonstrated close international collaboration in fusion technology development, including integration of large components built in four different countries. Each of six 40-t test coils was designed and produced by a major industrial team, with government laboratory guidance, to a common set of specifications. The six were assembled into a toroidal array for testing in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF) at Oak Ridge. Testing was done by a team of representatives of EURATOM, Japan, Switzerland, and the United States, with each participant having full access to all data. Coils were thoroughly instrumented, enabling penetrating analysis of behavior

  20. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics: proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahl, P.F.

    1986-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 70 papers in these workshop proceeedings. Topics covered include: superconducting accelerator magnet research and development; superconductor development; electrical measurements; magnet design and construction methods; field correction methods; power schemes and quench protection; cryogenic systems; and magnet measurements

  1. Durability Evaluation of Superconducting Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Akihiko; Ogata, Masafumi; Nakauchi, Masahiko; Asahara, Tetsuo; Herai, Toshiki; Nishikawa, Yoichi

    2006-01-01

    It is one of the most essential things to verify the durability of devices and components of JR-Maglev system to realize the system into the future inauguration. Since the load requirements were insufficient in terms of the durability under vibrations under mere running tests carried out on Yamanashi Maglev Test Line hereinafter referred to YMTL, we have developed supplemental method with bench tests. Superconducting magnets hereinafter referred to SCM as used in the experimental running for the last seven years on the YMTL were brought to Kunitachi Technical Research Institute; we conducted tests to evaluate the durability of SCM up to a period of the service life in commercial use. The test results have indicated that no irregularity in each part of SCM proving that SCM are sufficiently durable for the practical application

  2. Liquid helium cooling of the MFTF superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1986-09-01

    During acceptance testing of the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF), we measured these tests: liquid helium heat loads and flow rates in selected magnets. We used the data from these tests to estimate helium vapor quality in the magnets so that we could determine if adequate conductor cooling conditions had occurred. We compared the measured quality and flow with estimates from a theoretical model developed for the MFTF magnets. The comparison is reasonably good, considering influences that can greatly affect these values. This paper describes the methods employed in making the measurements and developing the theoretical estimates. It also describes the helium system that maintained the magnets at required operating conditions

  3. Magnetic-fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-08-01

    In February 1980, the Director of Energy Research requested that the Energy Research Advisory Board (ERAB) review the Department of Energy (DOE) Magnetic Fusion Program. Of particular concern to the DOE was the judicious choice of the next major steps toward demonstration of economic power production from fusion. Of equal concern was the overall soundness of the DOE Magnetic Fusion Program: its pace, scope, and funding profiles. Their finding and recommendations are included

  4. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  5. Optimization of the testing volumes with respect to neutron flux levels in the two-target high flux D-Li neutron source for the international fusion materials irradiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelleher, W.P.; Varsamis, G.L.

    1989-01-01

    An economic and fusion-relevant source of high-energy neutrons is an essential element in the fusion nuclear technology and development program. This source can be generated by directing a high energy deuteron beam onto a flowing liquid lithium target, producing neutrons via the D-Lithium stripping reaction. Previous work on this type of source concentrated on a design employing one deuteron beam of modest amperage. This design was shown to have a relatively small testing volume with high flux gradients and was therefor considered somewhat unattractive from a materials testing standpoint. A design using two lithium targets and two high-amperage beams has recently been proposed. This two beam design has been examined in an effort to maximize the test volume while minimizing the flux gradients and minimizing the effect of radiation damage on one target due to the other. A spatial, energy and angle dependent neutron source modeling the D-Lithium source was developed. Using this source, a 3-dimensional map of uncollided flux within the test volume was calculated. The results showed that the target separation has little effect on the available experimental volume and that a testing volume of ∼35 liters is available with a volume averaged flux above 10 14 n/cm 2 /s. The collided flux within the test volume was then determined by coupling the source model with a Monte Carlo code. The spectral effects of the high-energy tail in the flux were examined and evaluated as to possible effects on materials response. Calculations comparing the radiation damage to materials from the D-Lithium source to that cause by a standard DT fusion first-wall neutron flux spectrum showed that the number of appm and dpa, as well as the ratio appm/dpa and dpa/MW/m 2 are within 30% for the two sources. 8 refs., 8 figs

  6. A commercial tokamak reactor using super high field superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.; Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    This paper explores the range of possibilities for producing super high fields with advanced superconducting magnets. Obtaining magnetic fields greater than about 18 T at the coil in a large superconducting magnet system will require advances in many areas of magnet technology. These needs are discussed and potential solutions (advanced superconductors, structural materials and design methods) evaluated. A point design for a commercial reactor with magnetic field at the coil of 24 T and fusion power of 1800 MW is presented. Critical issues and parameters for magnet design are identified. 20 refs., 9 figs., 4 tabs

  7. The superconducting bending magnets 'CESAR'

    CERN Document Server

    Pérot, J

    1978-01-01

    In 1975, CERN decided to build two high precision superconducting dipoles for a beam line in the SPS north experimental area. The aim was to determine whether superconducting magnets of the required accuracy and reliability can be built and what their economies and performances in operation will be. Collaboration between CERN and CAE /SACLAY was established in order to make use of the knowledge and experience already acquired in the two laboratories. (0 refs).

  8. Superconducting magnets. B. Superconducting magnet systems in EPR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1978-01-01

    Tokamak experiments have reached a stage where large scale application of superconductors can be envisaged for machines becoming operational within the next decade. Existing designs for future devices already indicate some of the tasks and problems associated with large superconducting magnet systems. Using this information the coming magnet system requirements are summarized, some design considerations given and in conclusion a brief survey describes already existing Tokamak magnet development programs

  9. Structure design of the Westinghouse superconducting magnet for the Large Coil Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domeisen, F.N.; Hackworth, D.T.; Stuebinger, L.R.

    1978-01-01

    In the on-going development of superconducting toroidal field coils for tokamak reactors, the Large Coil Program (LCP) managed by Union Carbide Corporation will include the design, fabrication, and testing of large superconducting coils to determine their feasibility for use in the magnetic fusion energy effort. Structural analysis of the large coil is essential to ensure adequate safety in the test coil design and confidence in the scalability of the design. This paper will discuss the action of tensile and shear loads on the various materials used in the coil. These loads are of magnetic and thermal origin

  10. Numerical and experimental investigations of coupled electromagnetic and thermal fields in superconducting accelerator magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mierau, Anna

    2013-01-01

    The new international facility for antiproton and ion research FAIR will be built in Darmstadt (Germany). The existing accelerator facility of GSI Helmholtzzentrum for Heavy Ion Research will serve as a pre-accelerator for the new facility. FAIR will provide high-energy antiproton and ion beams with unprecedented intensity and quality for fundamental research of states of matter and the evolution of the universe. The central component of FAIR's accelerator and storage rings complex is a double-ring accelerator consisting of two heavy ion synchrotrons SIS100 and SIS300. The SIS100 is the primary accelerator of FAIR. The desired beam properties of SIS100 require a design of the machine much more challenging than the conventional design of existing proton and ion synchrotrons. The key technical components of each synchrotron are the special electromagnets, which allow guiding the charged particles on their orbits in the synchrotron during the acceleration processes. For a stable operation of the SIS100's the magnets have to produce extremely homogeneous magnetic fields. Furthermore, the SIS100 high-intensity ion beam modes, for example with U 28+ ions, require an ultra-high vacuum in the beam pipe of the synchrotron, which can be generated effectively only at low temperatures below 15 K. Due to the field quality requirements for the magnets, the properties of the dynamic vacuum in the beam pipe but also in order to minimise future operating costs, fast ramped superconducting magnets will be used to guide the beam in SIS100. These magnets have been developed at GSI within the framework of the FAIR project. Developing a balanced design of a superconducting accelerator magnet requires a sound understanding of the interaction between its thermal and electromagnetic fields. Of special importance in this case are the magnetic field properties such as the homogeneity of the static magnetic field in the aperture of the magnet, and the dynamic heat losses of the whole magnet

  11. Superconducting hexapole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, J.H.; Stovold, R.V.

    1977-08-01

    This metre long magnet, intended for polarising and focusing a beam of cold neutrons, has been tested to 1.1 x 10 4 T m -2 , or 90% of the design value. It showed considerable training to this level with every indication that it would have continued further upwards had more liquid helium been available. Field measurements indicate an eighteen pole harmonic of 1.2% at the full bore radius of 25 mm. (author)

  12. Superconducting hexapole magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupland, J.H.; Stovold, R.V.

    1978-01-01

    One metre long magnet, intended for polarising and focusing a beam of cold neutrons, has been tested to 1.1x10 4 T.m -2 , or 90% of the design value. It showed considerable training to this level with every indication that it would have continued further upwards had more liquid helium been available. Field measurements indicate an eighteen pole harmonic of 1.2% at the full bore radius of 25 mm. (author)

  13. Magnetic-confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ongena, J.; Koch, R.; Wolf, R.; Zohm, H.

    2016-05-01

    Our modern society requires environmentally friendly solutions for energy production. Energy can be released not only from the fission of heavy nuclei but also from the fusion of light nuclei. Nuclear fusion is an important option for a clean and safe solution for our long-term energy needs. The extremely high temperatures required for the fusion reaction are routinely realized in several magnetic-fusion machines. Since the early 1990s, up to 16 MW of fusion power has been released in pulses of a few seconds, corresponding to a power multiplication close to break-even. Our understanding of the very complex behaviour of a magnetized plasma at temperatures between 150 and 200 million °C surrounded by cold walls has also advanced substantially. This steady progress has resulted in the construction of ITER, a fusion device with a planned fusion power output of 500 MW in pulses of 400 s. ITER should provide answers to remaining important questions on the integration of physics and technology, through a full-size demonstration of a tenfold power multiplication, and on nuclear safety aspects. Here we review the basic physics underlying magnetic fusion: past achievements, present efforts and the prospects for future production of electrical energy. We also discuss questions related to the safety, waste management and decommissioning of a future fusion power plant.

  14. Test Results of a 1.2 kg/s Centrifugal Liquid Helium Pump for the ATLAS Superconducting Toroid Magnet System

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The toroid superconducting magnet of ATLAS-LHC experiment at CERN will be indirectly cooled by means of forced flow of liquid helium at about 4.5 K. A centrifugal pump will be used, providing a mass flow of 1.2 kg/s and a differential pressure of 40 kPa (ca. 400 mbar) at about 4300 rpm. Two pumps are foreseen, one for redundancy, in order to feed in parallel the cooling circuits of the Barrel and the two End-Caps toroid magnets. The paper describes the tests carried out at CERN to measure the characteristic curves, i.e. the head versus the mass flow at different rotational speeds, as well as the pump total efficiency. The pump is of the "fullemission" type, i.e. with curved blades and it is equipped with an exchangeable inducer. A dedicated pump test facility has been constructed at CERN, which includes a Coriolis-type liquid helium mass flow meter. This facility is connected to the helium refrigerator used for the tests at CERN of the racetrack magnets of the Barrel and of the End-Cap toroids.

  15. Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sen, Abhijit

    2013-01-01

    The magnetic fusion energy program of India started in the early eighties with the construction of an indigenous tokamak device ADITYA at the Institute for Plasma Research in Gandhinagar. The initial thrust was on fundamental studies related to plasma instabilities and turbulence phenomena but there was also a significant emphasis on technology development in the areas of magnetics, high vacuum, radio-frequency heating and neutral beam technology. The program took a major leap forward in the late nineties with the decision to build a state-of-the-art superconducting tokamak (SST-1) that catapulted India into the mainstream of the international tokamak research effort. The SST experience and the associated technological and human resource development has now earned the country a place in the ITER collaboration as an equal partner with other major nations. Keeping in mind the rapidly growing and enormous energy needs of the future the program has also identified and launched key development projects that can lead us to a DEMO reactor and eventually a Fusion Power Plant in a systematic manner. I will give a brief overview of the early origins, the present status and some of the highlights of the future road map of the Indian Fusion Program. (author)

  16. Ten years of cryo-magnetic W7-X test facility construction and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renard, B.; Dispau, G.; Donati, A.; Genini, L.; Gournay, J.F.; Kuster, O.; Molinie, F.; Schild, T.; Touzery, R.; Vieillard, L.; Walter, C.

    2011-01-01

    The construction, commissioning, and operation phases of the W7-X cryo-magnetic test facility in CEA Saclay lasted ten years. The large diversity of equipments called, specialties involved and problems solved attest the expertise that was required to operate the test facility and test the coils. Nearly one hundred cryogenic tests were performed on the seventy W7-X coils, at a rate always increasing, using two cryostats each holding two coils. This paper presents the test facility and its operation first, the cryogenic difficulties that were confronted with their solutions, the electro-magnetic difficulties encountered along with corrective actions, and finally the instrumentation and data acquisition aspects. (authors)

  17. Development of superconducting magnets for magnetically levitated trains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohno, E.; Iwamoto, M.; Ogino, O.; Kawamura, T.

    1974-01-01

    Superconducting magnets will play a vital role in magnetically levitated trains, producing lift, guidance and propulsion forces. The main problems in the design are the current density of coils and the cryogenic thermal insulation. This paper describes the development of full-scale levitation magnets with length of 1.55m and width of 0.3 or 0.5m. Dynamic levitation tests using small model magnets are also presented. (author)

  18. Analysis of the tritium-water (T-H2O) system for a fusion material test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassanein, A.; Smith, D.L.; Sze, D.K.; Reed, C.B.

    1992-04-01

    The need for a high flux, high energy neutron test facility to evaluate performance of fusion reactor materials is urgent. An accelerator based D-Li source is generally accepted as the most reasonable approach to a high flux neutron source in the near future. The idea is to bombard a high energy (35 MeV) deuteron beam into a lithium target to produce high energy neutrons to simulate the fusion environment. More recently it was proposed to use a 21 MeV triton beam incident on a water jet target to produce the required neutron source for testing and simulating fusion material environments. The advantages of such a system are discussed. Major concerns regarding the feasibility of this system are also highlighted

  19. Superconducting Coils for Small Nuclear Fusion Rocket Engines, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal focuses on the superconducting coils subsystem, a critical subsystem for the PFRC reactor and Direct Fusion Drive and other fusion and electric...

  20. Calculations of alpha particle loss for reversed magnetic shear in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redi, M.H.; White, R.B.; Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M.; McCune, D.C.

    1997-03-01

    Hamiltonian coordinate, guiding center code calculations of the toroidal field ripple loss of alpha particles from a reversed shear plasma predict both total alpha losses and ripple diffusion losses to be greater than those from a comparable non-reversed magnetic shear plasma in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) [Fusion Technol. 21, 1324 (1992)]. High central q is found to increase alpha ripple losses as well as first orbit losses of alphas in the reversed shear simulations. A simple ripple loss model, benchmarked against the guiding center code, is found to work satisfactorily in transport analysis modelling of reversed and monotonic shear scenarios. Alpha ripple transport on TFTR affects ions within r/a=0.5, not at the plasma edge. The entire plasma is above threshold for stochastic ripple loss of alpha particles at birth energy in the reversed shear case simulated, so that all trapped 3.5 MeV alphas are lost stochastically or through prompt losses. The 40% alpha particle loss predictions for TFTR suggest that reduction of toroidal field ripple will be a critical issue in the design of a reversed shear fusion reactor.

  1. Magnetic fusion reactor economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    An almost primordial trend in the conversion and use of energy is an increased complexity and cost of conversion systems designed to utilize cheaper and more-abundant fuels; this trend is exemplified by the progression fossil fission → fusion. The present projections of the latter indicate that capital costs of the fusion ''burner'' far exceed any commensurate savings associated with the cheapest and most-abundant of fuels. These projections suggest competitive fusion power only if internal costs associate with the use of fossil or fission fuels emerge to make them either uneconomic, unacceptable, or both with respect to expensive fusion systems. This ''implementation-by-default'' plan for fusion is re-examined by identifying in general terms fusion power-plant embodiments that might compete favorably under conditions where internal costs (both economic and environmental) of fossil and/or fission are not as great as is needed to justify the contemporary vision for fusion power. Competitive fusion power in this context will require a significant broadening of an overly focused program to explore the physics and simbiotic technologies leading to more compact, simplified, and efficient plasma-confinement configurations that reside at the heart of an attractive fusion power plant

  2. Superconductivity from magnetic elements under high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Katsuya [KYOKUGEN, Research Center for Materials Science at Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)]. E-mail: shimizu@rcem.osaka-u.ac.jp; Amaya, Kiichi [Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Aichi 480-1192 (Japan); Suzuki, Naoshi [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Onuki, Yoshichika [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043 (Japan)

    2006-05-01

    Can we expect the appearance of superconductivity from magnetic elements? In general, superconductivity occurs in nonmagnetic metal at low temperature and magnetic impurities destroy superconductivity; magnetism and superconductivity are as incompatible as oil and water. Here, we present our experimental example of superconducting elements, iron and oxygen. They are magnetic at ambient pressure, however, they become nonmagnetic under high pressure, then superconductor at low temperature. What is the driving force of the superconductivity? Our understanding in the early stages was a simple scenario that the superconductive state was obtained as a consequence of an emergence of the nonmagnetic states. In both cases, we may consider another scenario for the appearance of superconductivity; the magnetic fluctuation mechanism in the same way as unconventional superconductors.

  3. Superconductivity from magnetic elements under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Katsuya; Amaya, Kiichi; Suzuki, Naoshi; Onuki, Yoshichika

    2006-01-01

    Can we expect the appearance of superconductivity from magnetic elements? In general, superconductivity occurs in nonmagnetic metal at low temperature and magnetic impurities destroy superconductivity; magnetism and superconductivity are as incompatible as oil and water. Here, we present our experimental example of superconducting elements, iron and oxygen. They are magnetic at ambient pressure, however, they become nonmagnetic under high pressure, then superconductor at low temperature. What is the driving force of the superconductivity? Our understanding in the early stages was a simple scenario that the superconductive state was obtained as a consequence of an emergence of the nonmagnetic states. In both cases, we may consider another scenario for the appearance of superconductivity; the magnetic fluctuation mechanism in the same way as unconventional superconductors

  4. High temperature superconductivity and cold fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabinowitz, M.

    1990-01-01

    There are numerous historical and scientific parallels between high temperature superconductivity (HTSC) and the newly emerging field of cold fusion (CF). Just as the charge carrier effective mass plays an important role in SC, the deuteron effective mass may play a vital role in CF. A new theory including effects of proximity, electron shielding, and decreased effective mass of the fusing nuclei can account for the reported CF results. A quantum-gas model that covers the range from low temperature to superhigh temperature SC indicates an increased T c with reduced dimensionality. A reduced dimensionality effect may also enhance CF. A relation is shown between CF and the significant cluster-impact fusion experiments

  5. Superconducting bulk magnets for magnetic levitation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, H.; Kamijo, H.

    2000-06-01

    The major applications of high-temperature superconductors have mostly been confined to products in the form of wires and thin films. However, recent developments show that rare-earth REBa 2Cu 3O 7- x and light rare-earth LREBa 2Cu 3O 7- x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical-current density at 77 K and high magnetic fields. These superconductors will promote the application of bulk high-temperature superconductors in high magnetic fields; the superconducting bulk magnet for the Maglev train is one possible application. We investigated the possibility of using bulk magnets in the Maglev system, and examined flux-trapping characteristics of multi-superconducting bulks arranged in array.

  6. Fusion facility siting considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bussell, G.T.

    1985-01-01

    Inherent in the fusion program's transition from hydrogen devices to commercial power machines is a general increase in the size and scope of succeeding projects. This growth will lead to increased emphasis on safety, environmental impact, and the external effects of fusion in general, and of each new device in particular. A critically important consideration in this regard is site selection. The purpose of this paper is to examine major siting issues that may affect the economics, safety, and environmental impact of fusion

  7. Bipolar programmable current supply for superconducting nuclear magnetic resonance magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivuniemi, Jaakko; Luusalo, Reeta; Hakonen, Pertti

    1998-09-01

    In high resolution continuous-wave nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) work well-reproducible, linear sweeps of current are needed. We have developed a microcontroller based programmable current supply, tested with superconducting magnets with inductance of 10 mH and 10 H. We achieved a resolution and noise of 4 ppm. The supply has an internal sweep with programmable ramping rate and a possibility for remote operation from a computer with either GPIB or RS232 interface. It is based on an 18-bit D/A converter. The maximum output current is ±10 A, the sweep rate can be set between 1 μA/s-140 mA/s, and the maximum output voltage is ±2.5 V. In work at ultralow temperatures, especially in superconducting quantum interference device NMR, all rf interference to the experiment should be avoided. One of the sources of this kind of unwanted input is the digital switching noise of fast logic devices. We discuss this problem in the context of our design.

  8. Test Bed for Superconducting Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Nantista, C D; Dolgashev, Valery A; Siemann, Robert; Tantawi, Sami G; Weisend, John

    2005-01-01

    Superconducting rf cavities are increasingly used in accelerators. Gradient is a parameter of particular importance for the ILC. Much progress in gradient has been made over the past decade, overcoming problems of multipacting, field emission, and breakdown triggered by surface impurities. However, the quenching limit of the surface magnetic field for niobium remains a hard limitation on cavity fields sustainable with this technology. Further exploration of materials and preparation may offer a path to surpassing the current limit. For this purpose, we have designed a resonant test cavity. One wall of the cavity is formed by a flat sample of superconducting material; the rest of the cavity is copper or niobium. The H field on the sample wall is 74% higher than on any other surface. Multipacting is avoided by use of a mode with no surface electric field. The cavity will be resonated through a coupling iris with high-power rf at superconducting temperature until the sample wall quenches, as detected by a change...

  9. Magnetic fusion 1985: what next

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1985-03-01

    Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion.

  10. Magnetic fusion 1985: what next

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowler, T.K.

    1985-03-01

    Recent budget reductions for magnetic fusion have led to a re-examination of program schedules and objectives. Faced with delays and postponement of major facilities as previously planned, some have called for a near-term focus on science, others have stressed technology. This talk will suggest a different focus as the keynote for this conference, namely, the applications of fusion. There is no doubt that plasma science is by now mature and fusion technology is at the forefront. This has and will continue to benefit many fields of endeavor, both in actual new discoveries and techniques and in attracting and training scientists and engineers who move on to make significant contributions in science, defense and industry. Nonetheless, however superb the science or how challenging the technology, these are means, not ends. To maintain its support, the magnetic fusion program must also offer the promise of power reactors that could be competitive in the future. At this conference, several new reactor designs will be described that claim to be smaller and economically competitive with fission reactors while retaining the environmental and safety characteristics that are the hallmark of fusion. The American Nuclear Society is an appropriate forum in which to examine these new designs critically, and to stimulate better ideas and improvements. As a preview, this talk will include brief discussions of new tokamak, tandem mirror and reversed field pinch reactor designs to be presented in later sessions. Finally, as a preview of the session on fusion breeders, the talk will explore once again the economic implications of a new nuclear age, beginning with improved fission reactors fueled by fusion breeders, then ultimately evolving to reactors based solely on fusion

  11. Improvement of a high current DC power supply system for testing the large scaled superconducting cables and magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Chikaraishi, Hirotaka; Tanahashi, Shugo; Mito, Toshiyuki; Takahata, Kazuya; Yanagi, Nagato; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Nishimura, Arata; Motojima, Osamu; Yamamoto, Junya

    1994-07-01

    A dc 75 kA power supply system was constructed to test the SC (superconducting) R&D (research and development) cables and magnets for the Large Helical Device (LHD). It consists of three 25 kA unit banks. A unit bank has two double-star-rectifier connections with the inter-phase reactors. A digital feedback control method is applied to the automatic current regulation (ACR) in each unit bank. For shortening the dead time of the feedback process, a new algorithm of a digital phase controller for the ACR is investigated. A Bode diagram of the feedback process is directly measured. It is confirmed that the dead time of the feedback process is reduced to one sixth, and that the feedback gain of PID (proportional, integral and differential) compensation is improved by a factor of two from the original method.

  12. Improvement of a high current DC power supply system for testing the large scaled superconducting cables and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Chikaraishi, Hirotaka; Tanahashi, Shugo

    1993-11-01

    A dc 75 kA power supply system was constructed to test the superconducting (SC) R and D cables and magnets for the Large Helical Device. It consists of three 25 kA unit banks. A unit bank has two double-star-rectifier connections with the inter-phase reactors. A digital feedback control method is applied to the automatic current regulation (ACR) in each unit bank. For shortening the dead time of the feedback process, a new algorithm of a digital phase controller for the ACR is investigated. A Bode diagram of the feedback process is directly measured. It is confirmed that the dead time of the feedback process is reduced to one sixth, and that the feedback gain of PID compensation is improved by a factor of two from the original method. (author)

  13. Improvement of a high current dc power supply system for testing the large scaled superconducting cables and magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Shuichi; Chikaraishi, Hirotaka; Tanahashi, Shugo

    1994-01-01

    A dc 75 kA power supply system was constructed to test the SC (superconducting) R and D (research and development) cables and magnets for the Large Helical Device (LHD). It consists of three 25 kA unit banks. A unit bank has two double-star-rectifier connections with the inter-phase reactors. A digital feedback control method is applied to the automatic current regulation (ACR) in each unit bank. For shortening the dead time of the feedback process, a new algorithm of a digital phase controller for the ACR is investigated. A Bode diagram of the feedback process is directly measured. It is confirmed that the dead time of the feedback process is reduced to one sixth, and that the feedback gain of PID (proportional, integral and differential) compensation is improved by a factor of two from the original method

  14. Magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNamara, B.

    1977-01-01

    A brief review of fusion research during the last 20 years is given. Some highlights of theoretical plasma physics are presented. The role that computational plasma physics is playing in analyzing and understanding the experiments of today is discussed. The magnetic mirror program is reviewed

  15. Straight ends for superconducting dipole magnet using constant perimeter geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Royet, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ends of the SSC Dipole magnets are a very critical aspect of the superconducting cable windings needed for this large project. The internal coils, where the radius at the pole is as small as 3/10 of an inch for the first turn, are difficult to form with the very stiff cable, and a high tension is needed. The curing operation on the coils is performed in a heated forming press which applies an important additional stress on the superconducting wire and insulation. A new design of this sensitive region of the magnets was performed at LBL, and several prototypes were built and tested. In this paper the construction method used to solve some of the most critical problems is exposed along with a description of the experimental work in progress. 3 refs., 2 figs

  16. Proposed experimental test of the theory of hole superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    The theory of hole superconductivity predicts that in the reversible transition between normal and superconducting phases in the presence of a magnetic field there is charge flow in direction perpendicular to the normal-superconductor phase boundary. In contrast, the conventional BCS-London theory of superconductivity predicts no such charge flow. Here we discuss an experiment to test these predictions.

  17. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  18. Special-purpose materials for magnetically confined fusion reactors. Third annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    The scope of Special Purpose Materials covers fusion reactor materials problems other than the first-wall and blanket structural materials, which are under the purview of the ADIP, DAFS, and PMI task groups. Components that are considered as special purpose materials include breeding materials, coolants, neutron multipliers, barriers for tritium control, materials for compression and OH coils and waveguides, graphite and SiC, heat-sink materials, ceramics, and materials for high-field (>10-T) superconducting magnets. It is recognized that there will be numerous materials problems that will arise during the design and construction of large magnetic-fusion energy devices such as the Engineering Test Facility (ETF) and Demonstration Reactor (DEMO). Most of these problems will be specific to a particular design or project and are the responsibility of the project, not the Materials and Radiation Effects Branch. Consequently, the Task Group on Special Purpose Materials has limited its concern to crucial and generic materials problems that must be resolved if magnetic-fusion devices are to succeed. Important areas specifically excluded include low-field (8-T) superconductors, fuels for hybrids, and materials for inertial-confinement devices. These areas may be added in the future when funding permits

  19. Evaluation of the Netherlands' International Test Facility for Smart Grids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmintier, Bryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pratt, Annabelle [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-06-01

    The Netherlands Enterprise Agency (Rijksdienst voor Ondernemend Nederland, or RVO) engaged the U.S. National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for two primary purposes: to evaluate the International Test Facility for Smart Grids (ITF) sponsored by RVO and to learn best practices for integrated test facilities from NREL's Energy Systems Integration Facility (ESIF). This report covers the ITF evaluation and is largely based on a one-week visit to the Netherlands in November 2014.

  20. Magnetic fusion and project ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, H.K.

    1992-01-01

    It has already been demonstrated that our economics and international relationship are impacted by an energy crisis. For the continuing prosperity of the human race, a new and viable energy source must be developed within the next century. It is evident that the cost will be high and will require a long term commitment to achieve this goal due to a high degree of technological and scientific knowledge. Energy from the controlled nuclear fusion is a safe, competitive, and environmentally attractive but has not yet been completely conquered. Magnetic fusion is one of the most difficult technological challenges. In modem magnetic fusion devices, temperatures that are significantly higher than the temperatures of the sun have been achieved routinely and the successful generation of tens of million watts as a result of scientific break-even is expected from the deuterium and tritium experiment within the next few years. For the practical future fusion reactor, we need to develop reactor relevant materials and technologies. The international project called ''International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER)'' will fulfill this need and the success of this project will provide the most attractive long-term energy source for mankind

  1. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  2. Manufacturing the MFTF magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Hinkle, R.E.; Hodges, A.J.

    1980-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a large mirror program experiment for magnetic fusion energy. It will combine and extend the near-classical plasma confinement achieved in 2XIIB with advanced neutral-beam and magnet technologies. The product of ion density and confinement time will be improved more than an order of magnitude, while the superconducting magnet weight will be extrapolated from 15 tons in Baseball II to 375 tons in MFTF. Recent reactor studies show that the MFTF will traverse much of the distance in magnet technology towards the reactor regime

  3. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

  4. Superconducting magnet development program progress report, July 1974--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, D.N.; Harvey, A.R.; Nelson, R.L.; Taylor, C.E.; Zbasnik, J.P.

    1975-01-01

    During FY 1975, the superconducting magnet development program at the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory was primarily directed toward the development of multifilamentary Nb 3 Sn conductor for large CTR machines. It was secondarily concerned with preliminary work for the MX experiment and with the acquisition of additional testing facilities. Among the significant achievements was the construction and operation of a 27-cm-bore coil to its short-sample limit of 7-T at the windings. The coil was wound with a 100-m length of 67,507-filament Nb 3 Sn conductor

  5. Superconducting magnet coils protection schemes and apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuchinski, V.; Bulgakov, S.; Larionov, B.; Mikhailov, N.; Silin, V.

    1995-01-01

    The circuitry of the superconducting coils protection system of the large fusion installations is analyzed. The requirements to the switches and several options of the circuit breakers and making switches with the data of their experimental study are discussed. (orig.)

  6. Nuclear data for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF). Summary report of technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forrest, R.; Mengoni, A.

    2005-10-01

    Experts on reaction cross-section databases participated in a Technical Meeting organized at the Forschungszentrum Zentrum (FZK), Karlsruhe, Germany on 4-6 October 2005. The overall objective of the meeting was to explore the possibilities for improving the status of the nuclear database for the assessment of radiation damage to structural components of large fusion devices. The discussions and recommendations of the meeting are briefly described in this report. (author)

  7. Remote handling features of the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klos, D.B.; Wierman, R.W.; Kelly, V.P.; Yount, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Initial design of the experimental system provided two modes of access to the test cells. The horizontal mode was the predominant one. However, as the design progressed unacceptable risks were identified that increased personnel exposure to radiation and decreased testing availability of the facility. Consequently, vertical-only access was adopted. Remote handling features of both design concepts are described including the technical basis for the transition from the first to the second concept

  8. Integrated operations plan for the MFTF-B Mirror Fusion Test Facility. Volume II. Integrated operations plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-12-01

    This document defines an integrated plan for the operation of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B). The plan fulfills and further delineates LLNL policies and provides for accomplishing the functions required by the program. This plan specifies the management, operations, maintenance, and engineering support responsibilities. It covers phasing into sustained operations as well as the sustained operations themselves. Administrative and Plant Engineering support, which are now being performed satisfactorily, are not part of this plan unless there are unique needs

  9. Fatigue effects in insulation materials for fusion magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenkranz, P.

    2000-12-01

    The mechanical properties of insulation materials for the superconducting magnets of ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) and future fusion plants, i.e. woven fiber reinforced composites, have been identified as an area of concern for the long-term operation of such magnets. The magnets will be subjected to fast neutron and γ-radiation over their lifetime, which influence the mechanical properties of the insulation materials. The ultimate tensile strength and, above all, the interlaminar shear strength and their performance under dynamic load, corresponding to the pulsed operation of a TOKAMAK-confinement system, are sensitive indicators of material failure in fiber-reinforced laminates especially at cryogenic temperatures. To simulate these conditions, low frequency fatigue measurements at 10 Hz were made at 77 K up to one million cycles. Tension-tension fatigue tests were performed according to ASTM D3479. However, due to the space limitations in all irradiation facilities, the tests have to be done on samples, which are considerably smaller than those required for standard test conditions. The influence of the specimen geometry on the ultimate tensile strength under static and dynamic load conditions was, therefore, investigated on fiber-reinforced plastics. They did not show any systematic trends as long as the sample thickness does not exceed the thickness recommended in ASTM D3479. The double lap shear test method was chosen for the shear experiments because of the symmetry of the specimen geometry under tensile load and the suitability for fatigue tests. Like almost every existing test procedure for the interlaminar shear strength, this test method does not provide for a completely uniform interlaminar shear stress distribution over a sizable region in the test section of the specimen. A scaling program combined with FE-simulations was, therefore, initiated to assess the influence of the length of the test section and of the sample

  10. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly.

  11. Structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, C.J.

    1976-12-01

    The selection of structural materials for large superconducting magnets for tokamak-type fusion reactors is considered. The important criteria are working stress, radiation resistance, electromagnetic interaction, and general feasibility. The most advantageous materials appear to be face-centered-cubic alloys in the Fe-Ni-Cr system, but high-modulus composites may be necessary where severe pulsed magnetic fields are present. Special-purpose structural materials are considered briefly

  12. SSC [Superconducting Super Collider] magnet technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, C.

    1987-09-01

    To minimize cost of the SSC facility, small-bore high field dipole magnets have been developed;some of the new technology that has been developed at several U.S. national laboratories and in industry is summarized. Superconducting wire with high J/sub c/ and filaments as small as 5μm diameter is not produced iwht mechanical properties suitable for reliable cable production. A variety of collar designs of both aluminum and stainless steel have been used in model magnets. A low-heat leak post-type cryostat support system is used and a system for accurate alignment of coil-collar-yoke in the cryostat has been developed. Model magnets of 1-m, 1.8 m, 4.5 m, and 17 m lengths have been build during the past two years. 23 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  13. CLIQ – Coupling-Loss Induced Quench System for Protecting Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    Ravaioli, E; Kirby, G; ten Kate, H H J; Verweij, A P

    2014-01-01

    The recently developed Coupling-Loss-Induced Quench (CLIQ) protection system is a new method for initiating a fast and voluminous transition to the normal state for protecting high energy density superconducting magnets. Upon quench detection, CLIQ is triggered to generate an oscillating current in the magnet coil by means of a capacitive discharge. This in turn introduces a high coupling loss in the superconductor which provokes a quick transition to the normal state of the coil windings. The system is now implemented for the protection of a two meter long superconducting quadrupole magnet and characterized in the CERN magnet test facility. Various CLIQ configurations with different current injection points are tested and the results compared to similar transients lately measured with a not optimized configuration. Test results convincingly show that the newly tested design allows for a more global quench initiation and thus a faster discharge of the magnet energy. Moreover, the performance of CLIQ for reduc...

  14. Comparing superconducting and permanent magnets for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein; Bahl, C. R. H.

    2016-01-01

    We compare the cost of a high temperature superconducting (SC) tape-based solenoidwith a permanent magnet (PM) Halbach cylinder for magnetic refrigeration.Assuming a five liter active magnetic regenerator volume, the price of each type ofmagnet is determined as a function of aspect ratio...... of the regenerator and desiredinternal magnetic field. It is shown that to produce a 1 T internal field in theregenerator a permanent magnet of hundreds of kilograms is needed or an area ofsuperconducting tape of tens of square meters. The cost of cooling the SC solenoidis shown to be a small fraction of the cost...... of the SC tape. Assuming a cost ofthe SC tape of 6000 $/m2 and a price of the permanent magnet of 100 $/kg, thesuperconducting solenoid is shown to be a factor of 0.3-3 times more expensive thanthe permanent magnet, for a desired field from 0.5-1.75 T and the geometrical aspectratio of the regenerator...

  15. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. Photos 01, 02: Felix Rodriguez Mateos (right) explains some of a cryomagnet's myriad connections to the Minister.

  16. Magnetic fusion; La fusion magnetique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This document is a detailed lecture on thermonuclear fusion. The basic physics principles are recalled and the technological choices that have led to tokamaks or stellarators are exposed. Different aspects concerning thermonuclear reactors such as safety, economy and feasibility are discussed. Tore-supra is described in details as well as the ITER project.

  17. Search for superconductivity of magnetic metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya, K [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Furomoto, S [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Kimura, T [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Shimizu, K [Graduate School of Engineering Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan); Onuki, Y [Graduate School of Science, Osaka University, Toyonaka, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2002-11-11

    A search for superconductivity of magnetic elemental metals is performed. A successful discovery of the onset of superconductivity is reported in the case of iron under pressure. By electrical resistance measurement, a maximum value of the superconducting transition temperature T{sub c} of 2 K and the upper critical magnetic field H{sub c} of 0.2 T are observed under pressure of 20 GPa where iron is in the crystallographic hcp phase and non-magnetic. Further confirmation of the superconducting transition of hcp iron was obtained by the detection of the diamagnetic signal due to the Meissner effect in accordance with the results of the electrical resistance measurements.

  18. Search for superconductivity of magnetic metals

    CERN Document Server

    Amaya, K; Kimura, T; Shimizu, K; Onuki, Y

    2002-01-01

    A search for superconductivity of magnetic elemental metals is performed. A successful discovery of the onset of superconductivity is reported in the case of iron under pressure. By electrical resistance measurement, a maximum value of the superconducting transition temperature T sub c of 2 K and the upper critical magnetic field H sub c of 0.2 T are observed under pressure of 20 GPa where iron is in the crystallographic hcp phase and non-magnetic. Further confirmation of the superconducting transition of hcp iron was obtained by the detection of the diamagnetic signal due to the Meissner effect in accordance with the results of the electrical resistance measurements.

  19. Superconducting magnets for high energy storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sampson, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting dipole and quadrupole magnets were developed for the proton-proton intersecting storage accelerator ISABELLE. Full size prototypes of both kinds of magnets were constructed and successfully tested. The coils are fabricated from a single layer of wide braided superconductor and employ a low temperature iron core. This method of construction leads to two significant performance advantages; little or no training, and the ability of the coil to absorb its total magnetic stored energy without damage. A high pressure (15 atm) helium gas system is used for cooling. Measurements of the random field errors are compared with the expected field distribution. Three magnets (two dipoles and one quadrupole) were assembled into a segment of the accelerator ring structure (half cell). The performance of this magnet array, which is coupled in series both electrically and cryogenically, is also summarized

  20. Fabrication and Test of a 60-kA HTS Current Lead for Fusion Magnet System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, T.; Isono, T.; Kawano, K.; Hamada, K.; Matsui, K.; Nunoya, Y.; Hara, E.; Kato, T.; Okuno, K.; Bono, T.; Tomioka, A.; Sanuki, Y.; Ito, I.; Sakaki, K.; Konno, M.; Uede, T.

    2004-06-01

    A 60-kA HTS current lead was fabricated and tested in the frame of the R&D work for large fusion magnets such as the ITER magnet. The design of the current lead was characterized by its safe thermal protection for the current decay of about ten seconds after quench as well as lower electrical power consumption for its cryogenic equipment. The 60-kA current lead is composed of a lower temperature HTS part using HTS and a high temperature copper part using a conventional copper cable. The HTS part consists of 48 HTS units installed in the cylindrical array into the grooves provided on the outer surface of a stainless steel cylinder with a diameter of 146 mm. The unit was composed of six Bi2223/Ag-10at%Au tapes and its cross-sectional dimension is 6.5 mm × 2.7 mm. The stainless steel cylinder and Ag alloy sheath have a share in thermal protection for quench. The current lead was tested under the cooling condition that the bottom of the HTS part was immersed into 4.2 K liquid helium, and the bottom of the copper part was forced cooled with a helium gas of 3.2 g/s at 20 K. The lead was successfully operated at 60 kA without quench. Heat load to liquid helium was 4.8 W. The total electrical power consumption for the cryogenic equipment was estimated as 37 % of that of conventional copper current lead.

  1. Utilization of a Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2011–2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-12-01

    The IAEA actively promotes the development of controlled fusion as a source of energy. Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA helps Member States to exchange and establish scientific and technical knowledge required for the design, construction and operation of a fusion reactor. Due to their compactness, flexibility and low operation costs, small fusion devices are a great resource for supporting and accelerating the development of mainstream fusion research on large fusion devices such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. They play an important role in investigating the physics of controlled fusion, developing innovative technologies and diagnostics, testing new materials, training highly qualified personnel for larger fusion facilities, and supporting educational programmes for young scientists. This publication reports on the research work accomplished within the framework of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Utilization of the Network of Small Magnetic Confinement Fusion Devices for Mainstream Fusion Research, organized and conducted by the IAEA in 2011–2016. The CRP has contributed to the coordination of a network of research institutions, thereby enhancing international collaboration through scientific visits, joint experiments and the exchange of information and equipment. A total of 16 institutions and 14 devices from 13 Member States participated in this CRP (Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, China, Costa Rica, the Czech Republic, the Islamic Republic of Iran, Kazakhstan, Pakistan, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the United Kingdom).

  2. Superconducting magnets for energy buncher at FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhandari, R.K.; Ahammed, M.; Bhattacharya, P.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Bhattacharya, T.K.; Bhunia, U.; Chaudhuri, J.; Dey, M.K.; Dutta, A.; DuttaGupta, A.; Mallik, C.; Mandal, B.; Manna, B.; Nandi, C.; Pal, G.; Roy, S.; Saha, S.; Sarma, P.R.

    2011-01-01

    A set of large superconducting magnets have been designed for the Low Energy Buncher (LEB) of the Superconducting Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) for FAIR. The set of magnets will include dipoles and multipoles (sextupole and quadrupole) of stringent quality criteria. Details of design and expected performance have been discussed. (author)

  3. Electrical insulation for large multiaxis superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harvey, A.R.; Rinde, J.A.

    1975-01-01

    The selection of interturn and interlayer insulation for superconducting magnets is discussed. The magnet problems of the Baseball II device are described. Manufacture of the insulation and radiation damage are mentioned. A planned experimental program is outlined

  4. Superconducting magnets in high energy physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodell, A.G.

    1978-01-01

    The applications of superconducting magnets in high energy physics in the last ten years have made feasible developments which are vital to high energy research. These developments include high magnetic field, large volume detectors, such as bubble chambers, required for effective resolution of high energy particle trajectories, particle beam transport magnets, and superconducting focusing and bending magnets for the very high energy accelerators and storage rings needed to pursue the study of interactions between elementary particles. The acceptance of superconductivity as a proven technology in high energy physics was reinforced by the recognition that the existing large accelerators using copper-iron magnets had reached practical limits in terms of magnetic field intensity, cost, space, and energy usage, and that large-volume, high-field, copper-iron magnets were not economically feasible. Some of the superconducting magnets and associated systems being used in and being developed for high energy physics are described

  5. Overview of international fusion technology programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coffman, F.E.; Baublitz, J.E.; Beard, D.S.; Cohen, M.M.; Dalder, E.N.C.; Finfgeld, C.R.; Haas, G.M.; Head, C.R.; Murphy, M.R.; Nardella, G.R.

    1979-01-01

    World fusion technology programs, as well as current progress and future plans for the U.S., are discussed. Regarding conceptual design, the international INTOR tokamak study, the Garching Ignition Test Reactor Study, the U.S. Engineering Test Facility conceptual design, the Argonne National Laboratory Commercial Tokamak Study, mirror conceptual designs, and alternate concepts and applications studies are summarized. With regard to magnetics, progress to date in the large coil program and pulsed coil program is summarized. In the area of plasma heating and fueling and exhaust, work on a new positive ion source research and development program at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory is described, as is negative ion work. Tradeoff considerations for radio-frequency heating alternatives are made, and a new 60-100 GHz electron cyclotron heating research and development program is discussed. Progress and plans for solid hydrogen pellet injector development are analyzed, as are plans for a divertor technology initiative. A brief review of the U.S. alternate applications and environment and safety program is included

  6. Feeding helium to superconducting magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1979-01-01

    The photo shows two of the 3 superconducting magnets (two MBS dipoles (CESAR) of 150 mm bore and 4.5 T, and one quadrupole (CASTOR) of 90 mm bore and 54 T/m) which were installed in the hall EHN1 (Annual Report 1978 p. 134) and ran until 1985. They formed a section of the beam H6 travelling from target T4 (down the bottom of the photo) towards the NA30 setup followed by the NA11 setup. The two big transversal pipelines are the quench lines of the two magnets (on the right, one quadrupole and one dipole, the other dipole lays down the photo and is not visible). The Jura side of the hall is on the right.

  7. Prospects for the use of high-Tc superconductors in fusion magnets and options for their test in SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesche, Rainer; Bruzzone, Pierluigi; March, Stephen; Marinucci, Claudio; Stepanov, Boris; Uglietti, Davide

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► RE-123 tapes j c ≥ 500 A/cm (77 K) would enable fusion magnets operating above 20 K. ► Quench studies indicate that the protection of RE-123 fusion magnets is a challenge. ► Possibilities to test 50 kA class HTS conductors in SULTAN have been identified. ► HTS bus bar of large thermal resistance needed to connect sample and NbTi flux pump. ► Tests in the 20–50 K range require additional changes in the SULTAN cryogenics. -- Abstract: In the last few years, the critical current densities of long commercially available REBa 2 Cu 3 O 7−x (RE-123, where RE represents Y or a rare earth element) coated conductors have reached values of 250 A/cm-width at 77 K and zero applied field. Even higher values of 600 A/cm-w (77 K, B = 0) have been demonstrated in shorter lengths. The attractive features of the use of these high-T c superconductors (HTS) are operation temperatures above 20 K and/or magnetic fields higher than those envisaged for the ITER TF coils. Possible operation conditions for HTS fusion magnets have been studied taking into consideration the possible further improvements of RE-123 coated conductors. Investigations of stability and quench behavior indicate that stability is not a problem, whereas quench detection and protection need attention. Because of the high currents necessary for fusion magnets, many tapes need to be assembled into a transposed conductor. The qualification of HTS conductors for fusion magnets would require their test at magnetic fields of 11 T and currents well above 10 kA. The possibilities to test straight HTS conductor samples in SULTAN have been considered. For a test at 4.5 K, only the development of a low resistance joint between the HTS conductor under test and the NbTi transformer of SULTAN would be necessary. Tests up to 20 K would require that the HTS sample is connected with the NbTi transformer by a conduction-cooled HTS bus bar of large thermal resistance similar to the HTS module of a current

  8. Magnetic-fusion energy and computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Killeen, J.

    1982-01-01

    The application of computers to magnetic fusion energy research is essential. In the last several years the use of computers in the numerical modeling of fusion systems has increased substantially. There are several categories of computer models used to study the physics of magnetically confined plasmas. A comparable number of types of models for engineering studies are also in use. To meet the needs of the fusion program, the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center has been established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A large central computing facility is linked to smaller computer centers at each of the major MFE laboratories by a communication network. In addition to providing cost effective computing services, the NMFECC environment stimulates collaboration and the sharing of computer codes among the various fusion research groups

  9. Magnetic fusion energy research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-02-01

    This report on the Department of Energy's Magnetic Fusion Program was requested by the Secretary of Energy. The Panel finds that substantial progress has been made in the three years since the previous ERAB review, although budget constraints have precluded the engineering initiatives recommended in that review and authorized in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Engineering Act of 1980 (the Act). Recognizing that the goals of the Act cannot now be met, the Panel recommends that the engineering phase be further postponed in favor of a strong base program in physics and technology, including immediate commitment to a major new tokamak-based device for the investigation of an ignited long-pulse plasma designated in this report as the Burning Core Experiment or BCX. Resources to design such a device could be obtained from within the existing program by redirecting work toward to BCX. At this time it is not possible to assess accurately the potential economic viability of fusion power in the future. The Panel strongly recommends expansion of international collaboration, particularly the joint construction and operation of major new unique facilities, such as the proposed BCX

  10. A novel superconducting toroidal field magnetic concept using advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwartz, J.

    1991-01-01

    The plasma physics database indicates that two distinct approaches to tokamak design may lead to commercial fusion reactors: Low Aspect ratio, high plasma current, relatively low magnetic field devices, and high Aspect ratio, high field devices. The former requires significant enhancements in plasma performance, while the latter depends primarily upon technology development. The key technology for the commercialization of the high-field approach is large, high magnetic field superconducting magnets. In this paper, the physics motivation for the high field approach and key superconducting magnet (SCM) development issues are reviewed. Improved SCM performance may be obtained from improved materials and/or improved engineering. Superconducting materials ranging from NbTi to high-T c oxides are reviewed, demonstrating the broad range of potential superconducting materials. Structural material options are discussed, including cryogenic steel alloys and fiber-reinforced composite materials. The potential for improved magnet engineering is quantified in terms of the Virial Theorem Limit, and two examples of approaches to highly optimized magnet configurations are discussed. The force-reduced concept, which is a finite application of the force-free solutions to Ampere's Law, appear promising for large SCMs but may be limited by the electromagnetics of a fusion plasma. The Solid Superconducting Cylinder (SSC) concept is proposed. This concept combines the unique properties of high-T c superconductors within a low-T c SCM to obtain (1) significant reductions in the structural material volume, (2) a decoupling of the tri-axial (compressive and tensile) stress rate, and (3) a demountable TF magnet system. The advantages of this approach are quantified in terms of a 24 T commercial reactor TF magnet system. Significant reductions in the mechanical stress and the TF radial build are demonstrated. 54 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs

  11. Superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    During 2007, a large amount of the work was centred on the ITER project and related tasks. The activities based on low-temperature superconducting (LTS) materials included the manufacture and qualification of ITER full-size conductors under relevant operating conditions, the design of conductors and magnets for the JT-60SA tokamak and the manufacture of the conductors for the European dipole facility. A preliminary study was also performed to develop a new test facility at ENEA in order to test long-length ITER or DEMO full-size conductors. Several studies on different superconducting materials were also started to create a more complete database of superconductor properties, and also for use in magnet design. In this context, an extensive measurement campaign on transport and magnetic properties was carried out on commercially available NbTi strands. Work was started on characterising MgB 2 wire and bulk samples to optimise their performance. In addition, an intense experimental study was started to clarify the effect of mechanical loads on the transport properties of multi-filamentary Nb 3 Sn strands with twisted or untwisted superconducting filaments. The experimental activity on high-temperature superconducting (HTS) materials was mainly focussed on the development and characterisation of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-X (YBCO) based coated conductors. Several characteristics regarding YBCO deposition, current transport performance and tape manufacture were investigated. In the framework of chemical approaches for YBCO film growth, a new method, developed in collaboration with the Technical University of Cluj-Napoca (TUCN), Romania, was studied to obtain YBCO film via chemical solution deposition, which modifies the well-assessed metallic organic deposition trifluoroacetate (MOD-TFA) approach. The results are promising in terms of critical current and film thickness values. YBCO properties in films with artificially added pinning sites were characterised in collaboration with

  12. Technology spin-offs from the magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    A description is given of 138 possible spin-offs from the magnetic fusion program. The spin-offs cover the following areas: (1) superconducting magnets, (2) materials technology, (3) vacuum systems, (4) high frequency and high power rf, (5) electronics, (6) plasma diagnostics, (7) computers, and (8) particle beams

  13. Mechanical Design of Superconducting Accelerator Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Toral, Fernando

    2014-07-17

    This paper is about the mechanical design of superconducting accelerator magnets. First, we give a brief review of the basic concepts and terms. In the following sections, we describe the particularities of the mechanical design of different types of superconducting accelerator magnets: solenoids, costheta, superferric, and toroids. Special attention is given to the pre-stress principle, which aims to avoid the appearance of tensile stresses in the superconducting coils. A case study on a compact superconducting cyclotron summarizes the main steps and the guidelines that should be followed for a proper mechanical design. Finally, we present some remarks on the measurement techniques.

  14. Developments on the RF system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazio, M.V.; Johnson, H.P.; Riggin, D.M.

    1979-01-01

    The rf system for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) accelerator is currently in the design phase at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL). The 35-MeV, 100-mA deuteron beam will require approximately 6 MW of rf power at 80 MHz. The EIMAC 8973 power tetrode, capable of a 600-kW cw output, has been chosen as the final amplifier tube for each of 15 amplifier chains. The final power stage of each chain is designed to perform as a linear Class B amplifier. Each low-power rf system (less than or equal to 100W) is to be phase, amplitude, and frequency controlled to provide a drive signal for each high-power amplifier. Beam dynamics for particle acceleration and for minimal beam spill require each rf amplifier output to be phase controlled to +-1 0 . The amplitude of the accelerating field must be held to +-1%. A varactor-tuned electronic phase shifter and a linear phase detector are under development for use in this system. To complement hardware development, analog computer simulations are being performed to optimize the closed-loop control characteristics of the system

  15. West European magnetic confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenney, B.L.; McGrain, M.; Hogan, J.T.; Porkolab, M.; Thomassen, K.I.

    1990-01-01

    This report presents a technical assessment and review of the West European program in magnetic confinement fusion by a panel of US scientists and engineers active in fusion research. Findings are based on the scientific and technical literature, on laboratory reports and preprints, and on the personal experiences and collaborations of the panel members. Concerned primarily with developments during the past 10 years, from 1979 to 1989, the report assesses West European fusion research in seven technical areas: tokamak experiments; magnetic confinement technology and engineering; fusion nuclear technology; alternate concepts; theory; fusion computations; and program organization. The main conclusion emerging from the analysis is that West European fusion research has attained a position of leadership in the international fusion program. This distinction reflects in large measure the remarkable achievements of the Joint European Torus (JET). However, West European fusion prominence extends beyond tokamak experimental physics: the program has demonstrated a breadth of skill in fusion science and technology that is not excelled in the international effort. It is expected that the West European primacy in central areas of confinement physics will be maintained or even increased during the early 1990s. The program's maturity and commitment kindle expectations of dramatic West European advances toward the fusion energy goal. For example, achievement of fusion breakeven is expected first in JET, before 1995

  16. Development of large bore superconducting magnet for wastewater treatment application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Hui Ming; Xu, Dong; Shen, Fuzhi; Zhang, Hengcheng; Li, Lafeng [State Key Laboratory of Technologies in Space Cryogenic Propellants, Technical Institute of Physics and Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-03-15

    Water issue, especially water pollution, is a serious issue of 21st century. Being an significant technique for securing water resources, superconducting magnetic separation wastewater system was indispensable. A large bore conduction-cooled magnet was custom-tailored for wastewater treatment. The superconducting magnet has been designed, fabricated and tested. The superconducting magnet was composed of NbTi solenoid coils with an effective horizontal warm bore of 400 mm and a maximum central field of 2.56T. The superconducting magnet system was cooled by a two-stage 1.5W 4K GM cryocooler. The NbTi solenoid coils were wound around an aluminum former that is thermally connected to the second stage cold head of the cryocooler through a conductive copper link. The temperature distribution along the conductive link was measured during the cool-down process as well as at steady state. The magnet was cooled down to 4.8K in approximately 65 hours. The test of the magnetic field and quench analysis has been performed to verify the safe operation for the magnet system. Experimental results show that the superconducting magnet reached the designed magnetic performance.

  17. Superconducting materials suitable for magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb$_{3}$Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti, Nb$_{3}$Sn, MgB2, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox - in the context of those aspects of their science, properties and fabrication properties, which circumscribe their ap...

  18. Superconducting materials suitable for magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva. Audiovisual Unit

    2002-01-01

    The range of materials available for superconducting magnets is steadily expanding, even as the choice of material becomes potentially more complex. When virtually all magnets were cooled by helium at ~2-5 K it was easy to separate the domain of Nb-Ti from those of Nb3Sn applications and very little surprise that more than 90% of all magnets are still made from Nb-Ti. But the development of useful conductors of the Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox high temperature superconductors, coupled to the recent discovery of the 39 K superconductor MgB2 and the developing availability of cryocoolers suggests that new classes of higher temperature, medium field magnets based on other than Nb-based conductors could become available in the next 5-10 years. My talks will discuss the essential physics and materials science of these 5 classes of material - Nb-Ti, Nb3Sn, MgB2, Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O and YBa2Cu3Ox - in the context of those aspects of their science, properties and fabrication properties, which circumscribe their applications...

  19. Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology. Report of a Coordinated Research Project 2007-2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-04-01

    Through its coordinated research activities, the IAEA promotes the development and application of nuclear technologies in Member States. The scientific and technical knowledge required for the construction and operation of large nuclear fusion research facilities, including ITER and the Laser Megajoule in France, and the Z machine and the National Ignition Facility in the United States of America, necessitates several accompanying research and development programmes in physics and technology. This is particularly true in the areas of materials science and fusion technology. Hence, the long standing IAEA effort to conduct coordinated research projects (CRPs) in these areas is aimed at: (i) the development of appropriate technical tools to investigate the issue of materials damage and degradation in a fusion plasma environment; and (ii) the emergence of a knowledge based understanding of the various processes underlying materials damage and degradation, thereby leading to the identification of suitable candidate materials fulfilling the stringent requirements of a fusion environment in any next step facility. Dense magnetized plasma (DMP) devices serve as a first test bench for testing of fusion relevant plasma facing materials, diagnostic development and calibration, technologies and scaling to conceptual principles of larger devices while sophisticated testing facilities such as the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) are being designed. The CRP on Integrated Approach to Dense Magnetized Plasmas Applications in Nuclear Fusion Technology described herein was initiated in 2007 with the participation of 12 research institutions in 8 Member States and was concluded in 2011. It was designed with specific research objectives falling into two main categories: support to mainstream fusion research and development of DMP technology. This publication is a compilation of the individual reports submitted by the 12 CRP participants. These reports discuss

  20. Experience with the Fabrication and Testing of the Sextupole Superconducting Corrector Magnets for the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Salminen, J; Ang, Z; Billan, J; Walckiers, L; Bapna, S; Karmarkar, M; Puntambekar, A; Thipsay, A; García-Tabarés, L

    1999-01-01

    The LHC main dipoles will be equipped with sextupole corrector magnets with a field strength of 1700 x2 (T,m) and a magnetic length of 110 mm to correct sextupole field errors. Within the LHC magnet programme CERN has developed in collaboration with CAT a cosine-q type of design where much emphasis has been put on the cost reduction. The magnet features a two-layer racetrack coil, without end spacers, wound from a rectangular NbTi-wire. The two layers are wound simultaneously turning in opposite directions. The yoke is made of a scissor-type of lamination, which allows bringing the iron close to the coil for field enhancement. In this paper we review the manufacturing experiences with the first 12 prototypes built at CERN and CAT. The results of the training at 4.2 K and 1.9 K are presented along with the magnetic field quality measured at room temperature and at 1.9 K.

  1. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, A., E-mail: rpp@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, UC3M, Avda de la Universidad 30, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Hernandez, M.T. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Jimenez-Rey, D. [CMAM, UAM, C/Faraday 3, 28049, Madrid (Spain); Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Perlado, M. [IFN, ETSII, UPM, C/Jose Gutierrez Abascal, 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ibarra, A. [LNF-CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense, 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  2. The materials production and processing facility at the Spanish National Centre for fusion technologies (TechnoFusion)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Hernandez, M.T.; Jimenez-Rey, D.; Roman, R.; Gonzalez, M.; Garcia-Cortes, I.; Perlado, M.; Ibarra, A.

    2011-01-01

    In response to the urgent request from the EU Fusion Program, a new facility (TechnoFusion) for research and development of fusion materials has been planned with support from the Regional Government of Madrid and the Ministry of Science and Innovation of Spain. TechnoFusion, the National Centre for Fusion Technologies, aims screening different technologies relevant for ITER and DEMO environments while promoting the contribution of international companies and research groups into the Fusion Programme. For this purpose, the centre will be provided with a large number of unique facilities for the manufacture, testing (a triple-beam multi-ion irradiation, a plasma-wall interaction device, a remote handling for under ionizing radiation testing) and analysis of critical fusion materials. Particularly, the objectives, semi-industrial scale capabilities and present status of the TechnoFusion Materials Production and Processing (MPP) facility are presented. Previous studies revealed that the MPP facility will be a very promising infrastructure for the development of new materials and prototypes demanded by the fusion technology and therefore some of them will be here briefly summarized.

  3. Model of an LHC superconducting quadrupole magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    2000-01-01

    Model of a superconducting quadrupole magnet for the LHC project. These magnets are used to focus the beam by squeezing it into a smaller cross-section, a similar effect to a lens focusing light. However, each magnet only focuses the beam in one direction so alternating magnet arrangements are required to produce a fully focused beam.

  4. Fabrication experiences and operative characteristics of the U.S. SCMC superconducting dipole magnet for MHD research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.T.; Niemann, R.C.; Kustom, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The U.S. SCMS superconducting dipole magnet system consists of the superconducting magnet and its cryostat, a helium liquifier and refrigerator/liquifier facility, helium storage dewars, the transfer line, power supply, and a complete system for magnet instrumentations and control. The magnet system has been designed and built by Argonne National Laboratory. The entire magnet system was successfully tested to full design field in May 1977. It was then safely delivered to Moscow in June 1977, and the first energization of the magnet system is expected in early August 1977. The magnet design and the coil cryostability are reviewed; and the experiences of coil fabrication and coil assembly, magnet instrumentation and control, and results of magnet performance tests are described in detail

  5. 10th December 2010 - German Delegation from the Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department S. Russenschuck and accompanied by Adviser for Life Sciences M. Dosanjh.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    10th December 2010 - German Delegation from the Novartis Foundation for Sustainable Development visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department S. Russenschuck and accompanied by Adviser for Life Sciences M. Dosanjh.

  6. 12 April 2013 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

    CERN Multimedia

    Jean-Claude Gadmer

    2013-01-01

    12 April 2013 - The British Royal Academy of Engineering visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with R. Veness and the ATLAS experimental cavern with Collaboration Spokesperson D. Charlton.

  7. Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design, testing and prototyping of superconducting elements for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project and for the production of spare quadrupole magnets for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    Proposal to negotiate a collaboration agreement for the design, testing and prototyping of superconducting elements for the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) project and for the production of spare quadrupole magnets for LHC

  8. 9 July 2012 - Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM), Chairman, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Discipline Group M. Yahaya FASc and his delegation visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department G. De Rijk.

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2012-01-01

    9 July 2012 - Academy of Sciences Malaysia (ASM), Chairman, Mathematical and Physical Sciences Discipline Group M. Yahaya FASc and his delegation visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department G. De Rijk.

  9. 4 August 2011 - Austrian Head of Protocol, Directorate General III, Federal Ministry of Science and Research I. Friedrich (3rd from left) in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Benedkit, C. Wulz and C. Fabjan.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    4 August 2011 - Austrian Head of Protocol, Directorate General III, Federal Ministry of Science and Research I. Friedrich (3rd from left) in the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with M. Benedkit, C. Wulz and C. Fabjan.

  10. 23rd August 2011 - Turkish Representatives of the Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges, E. Uluatam and S. Kologlu, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Jeannet

    2011-01-01

    23rd August 2011 - Turkish Representatives of the Union of Chambers and Commodity Exchanges, E. Uluatam and S. Kologlu, visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Engineering Department Head R. Saban.

  11. Radiation hardness of superconducting magnet insulation materials for FAIR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidl, Tim

    2013-03-01

    This thesis focuses on radiation degradation studies of polyimide, polyepoxy/glass-fiber composites and other technical components used, for example, in the superconducting magnets of new ion accelerators such as the planned International Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR) at the GSI Helmholtz Center of Heavy Ion Research (GSI) in Darmstadt. As accelerators are becoming more powerful, i.e., providing larger energies and beam intensities, the potential risk of radiation damage to the components increases. Reliable data of the radiation hardness of accelerator materials and components concerning electrical, thermal and other technical relevant properties are of great interest also for other facilities such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) of CERN. Dependent on the position of the different components, induced radiation due to beam losses consists of a cocktail of gammas, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles. Although the number of heavy fragments of the initial projectiles is small compared to neutrons, protons, or light fragments (e.g. ? particles), their large energy deposition can induce extensive damage at rather low fluences (dose calculations show that the contribution of heavy ions to the total accumulated dose can reach 80 %). For this reason, defined radiation experiments were conducted using different energetic ion beams (from protons to uranium) and gamma radiation from a Co-60 source. The induced changes were analyzed by means of in-situ and ex-situ analytical methods, e.g. ultraviolet-visible and infrared spectroscopy, residual gas analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, dielectric strength measurements, measurements of low temperature thermal properties, and performance tests. In all cases, the radiation induces a change in molecular structure as well as loss of functional material properties. The amount of radiation damage is found to be sensitive to the used type of ionizing radiation and the long term stability of the materials is

  12. High-Field Superconducting Magnets Supporting PTOLEMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Ann; Luo, Audrey; Osherson, Benjamin; Gentile, Charles; Tully, Chris; Cohen, Adam

    2013-10-01

    The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) is an experiment planned to collect data on Big Bang relic neutrinos, which are predicted to be amongst the oldest and smallest particles in the universe. Currently, a proof-of-principle prototype is being developed at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory to test key technologies associated with the experiment. A prominent technology in the experiment is the Magnetic Adiabatic Collimation with an Electrostatic Filter (MAC-E filter), which guides tritium betas along magnetic field lines generated by superconducting magnets while deflecting those of lower energies. B field mapping is performed to ensure the magnets produce a minimum field at the midpoint of the configuration of the magnets and to verify accuracy of existing models. Preliminary tests indicate the required rapid decrease in B field strength from the bore of the more powerful 3.35 T magnet, with the field dropping to 0.18 T approximately 0.5 feet from the outermost surface of the magnet.

  13. Thermal performance of the MFTF magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSant, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    A yin-yang pair of liquid-helium (LHe) cooled, superconducting magnets were tested last year at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as part of a series of tests with the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF). These tests were performed to determine the success of engineering design used in major systems of the MFTF and to provide a technical base for rescoping from a single-mirror facility to the large tandem-mirror configuration (MFTF-B) now under construction. The magnets were cooled, operated at their design current and magnetic field, and warmed to atmospheric temperature. In this report, we describe their thermal behavior during these tests

  14. A Concept for a Low Pressure Noble Gas Fill Intervention in the IFE Fusion Test Facility (FTF) Target Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gentile, C. A.; Blanchard, W. R.; Kozub, T. A.; Aristova, M.; McGahan, C.; Natta, S.; Pagdon, K.; Zelenty, J.

    2010-01-14

    An engineering evaluation has been initiated to investigate conceptual engineering methods for implementing a viable gas shield strategy in the Fusion Test Facility (FTF) target chamber. The employment of a low pressure noble gas in the target chamber to thermalize energetic helium ions prior to interaction with the wall could dramatically increase the useful life of the first wall in the FTF reactor1. For the purpose of providing flexibility, two target chamber configurations are addressed: a five meter radius sphere and a ten meter radius sphere. Experimental studies at Nike have indicated that a low pressure, ambient gas resident in the target chamber during laser pulsing does not appear to impair the ability of laser light from illuminating targets2. In addition, current investigations into delivering, maintaining, and processing low pressure gas appear to be viable with slight modification to current pumping and plasma exhaust processing technologies3,4. Employment of a gas fill solution for protecting the dry wall target chamber in the FTF may reduce, or possibly eliminate the need for other attenuating technologies designed for keeping He ions from implanting in first wall structures and components. The gas fill concept appears to provide an effective means of extending the life of the first wall while employing mostly commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies. Although a gas fill configuration may provide a methodology for attenuating damage inflicted on chamber surfaces, issues associated with target injection need to be further analyzed to ensure that the gas fill concept is viable in the integrated FTF design5. In the proposed system, the ambient noble gas is heated via the energetic helium ions produced by target detonation. The gas is subsequently cooled by the chamber wall to approximately 800oC, removed from the chamber, and processed by the chamber gas processing system (CGPS). In an optimized scenario of the above stated concept, the chamber

  15. Design study of an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Jensen, E; Brüning, O; Calaga, R; Catalan-Lasheras, N; Goddard, B; Klein, M; Torres-Sanchez, R; Valloni, A

    2014-01-01

    The modern concept of an Energy Recovery Linac allows providing large electron currents at large beam energy with low power consumption. This concept is used in FEL’s, electron-ion colliders and electron coolers. CERN has started a Design Study of an ERL Test Facility with the purpose of 1) studying the ERL principle, its specific beam dynamics and operational issues, as relevant for LHeC, 2) providing a test bed for superconducting cavity modules, cryogenics and integration, 3) studying beam induced quenches in superconducting magnets and protection methods, 4) providing test beams for detector R&D and other applications. It will be complementary to existing or planned facilities and is fostering international collaboration. The operating frequency of 802 MHz was chosen for performance and for optimum synergy with SPS and LHC; the design of the cryomodule has started. The ERL Test Facility can be constructed in stages from initially 150 MeV to ultimately 1 GeV in 3 passes, with beam currents of up to 8...

  16. Improved cable insulation for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anerella, M.; Ghosh, A.K.; Kelly, E.; Schmalzle, J.; Willen, E.; Fraivillig, J.; Ochsner, J.; Parish, D.J.

    1993-01-01

    Several years ago, Brookhaven joined with DuPont in a cooperative effort to develop improved cable insulation for SSC superconducting dipole magnets. The effort was supported by the SSC Central Design Group and later the SSC Laboratory. It was undertaken because turn-to-turn and midplane shorts were routinely being experienced during the assembly of magnets with coils made of the existing Kapton/Fiberglass (K/FG) system of Kapton film overwrapped with epoxy-impregnated fiberglass tape. Dissection of failed magnets showed that insulation disruption and punch-through was occurring near the inner edges of turns close to the magnet midplane. Coil pressures of greater than 17 kpsi were sufficient to disrupt the insulation at local high spots where wires in neighboring turns crossed one another and where the cable had been strongly compacted in the keystoning operation during cable manufacture. In the joint development program, numerous combinations of polyimide films manufactured by DuPont with varying configurations and properties (including thickness) were subjected to tests at Brookhaven. Early tests were bench trials using wrapped cable samples. The most promising candidates were used in coils and many of these assembled and tested as magnets in both the SSC and RHIC magnet programs currently underway. The Kapton CI (CI) system that has been adopted represents a suitable compromise of numerous competing factors. It exhibits improved performance in the critical parameter of compressive punch-through resistance as well as other advantages over the K/FG system

  17. Superconducting cyclotron magnet coil short

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallory, M.L.; Blosser, H.G.; Clark, D.J.; Launer, H.; Lawton, D.; Miller, P.; Resmini, F.

    1982-01-01

    In February 1981, a short circuit appeared in the superconducting coil of the K500 cyclotron. The short is resistive in character and therefore has no effect on steady state operation of the magnet. The resistance of the short varies, sometimes being below threshold of detection as a heat load on the cooling system and sometimes being significant. The resistance under certain conditions shows approximately cyclic phenomena with time constants in the range of seconds and other approximately cyclic phenomena which correlate with gross operating parameters of the magnet (shifting current from one coil to another at high field and lowering and raising the liquid helium level). A number of diagnostic studies of the short have been made, using 1) an array of flux sensing loops to sense the magnetic effect of the short, 2) voltage comparisons between upper and lower sections of the coil, 3) comparisons of forces in the nine member coil support system and 4) the effect of the short on the thermal charactersitics of the coil. Insulation failure or a metal chip shorting out turns have been explored in some detail but a convincing determination of the exact cause of the short may never be available, (even the extreme step of unwinding the coil having a significant probability that an imperfection with the observed characteristics would pass unnoticed). Analysis of the characteristics of the short indicated that the most serious consequence would be failure of the coils mechanical support system in the event that the magnet was quickly discharged, as in a dump or quench. To deal with this hazard, the support system has been modified by installing solid supports which prevent the coil from moving by an amount sufficient to damage the support system. We have also reexamined the data and calculations used in the original coil design and have made some additional measurements of the properties of the materials (yield strength, friction coefficient, Young's modulus) used in the

  18. SCMS-1, Superconducting Magnet System for an MHD generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenkevich, V.B.; Kirenin, I.A.; Tovma, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    The research and development effort connected with the building of the superconducting magnet systems for MHD generators at the Institute for High Temperatures of the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences included the designing, fabrication and testing of the superconducting magnet system for an MHD generator (SCMS-1), producing a magnetic field up to 4 Tesla in a warm bore tube 300 mm in diameter and 1000 mm long (the nonuniformity of the magnetic field in the warm bore did not exceed +-5%. The superconducting magnet system is described. The design selected consisted of a dipole, saddle-form coil, wound around a tube. The cooling of the coils is of the external type with helium access to each layer of the winding. For winding of the superconducting magnet system a 49-strand cable was used consisting of 42 composition conductors, having a diameter of 0.3 mm each, containing six superconducting strands with a niobium-titanium alloy base (the superconducting strands were 70 microns in diameter), and seven copper conductors of the same diameter as the composite conductors. The cable is made monolithic with high purity indium and insulated with lavsan fiber. The cable diameter with insulation is 3.5 mm

  19. Magnetic fluctuations and heavy electron superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, M.R.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetic fluctuation self-energy based on neutron scattering data is used to calculate mass renormalizations, and superconducting critical temperatures and order parameters, for various heavy electron metals

  20. 10th International Symposium on Superconductivity

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Izumi

    1998-01-01

    The International Symposium on Superconductivity, which has been held annu­ ally since 1988, is a forum for presenting the most up-to-date information about a broad range of research and development in superconductivity, from funda­ mental aspects to applications. More than 10 years have passed since the discovery of oxide superconductors and since various developments of applications began. It may be said that the prospects for application of oxide superconductors recently have opened up. Great progress has been made toward practical use, for example, of the flywheel, which uses bulk materials, and the high-performance cryo-cooled magnet made of bismuth wire. These were the results of persistent efforts to develop materials from the viewpoint of materials science and engineering. Also important is the progress in comprehensive understanding of high­ temperature superconductivity. Unique electronic properties of cuprates such as the non-Fermi liquid normal state, spin-charge separation, spin gap, and d-wav...

  1. Impact of high magnetic fields on fusion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    High field concepts can provide significant advantages for the size and performance of tokamak fusion reactors. These devices would make use of advanced superconductors and structural materials. Use of high plasma aspect ratios, super high field operation, and strong ohmic heating are promising new directions. The tokamak device has been demonstrated to be the most effective magnetic confinement machine for obtaining the burning plasma conditions required for a fusion reactor. Analysis of present experimental results together with basic theoretical considerations indicates that high magnetic fields can have a large beneficial impact on reactor performance and cost. At the same time superconducting magnet technology has been steadily advancing. Concepts that maximize the beneficial impacts of high fields and make use of advanced superconducting magnet technology could thus have a profound impact on the development of fusion systems. In this paper the authors discuss this approach and describe some promising directions

  2. Cryocooled superconducting magnets for high magnetic fields at the HFLSM and future collaboration with the TML

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, K; Nishijima, G; Awaji, S; Koyama, K; Takahashi, K; Kobayashi, N; Kiyoshi, T

    2006-01-01

    A hybrid magnet needs a large amount of liquid helium for operation. In order to make an easy-to-operate hybrid magnet system, we constructed a cryocooled 28 T hybrid magnet, consisting of an outer cryocooled 10 T superconducting magnet and an inner traditional water-cooled 19 T resistive magnet. As a performance test, the cryocooled hybrid magnet generated 27.5 T in a 32 mm room temperature experimental bore. As long as Nb3Sn superconducting wires are employed, the expected maximum high field generation in the cryocooled superconducting magnet will be 17 T at 5 K. We adopted the high temperature superconducting insert coil, employing Ag-sheathed Bi 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O 10 superconducting tape. In combination with the low temperature 16.5 T back-up coil with a 174 mm cold bore, the cryocooled high temperature superconducting magnet successfully generated the total central field of 18.1 T in a 52 mm room temperature bore. As a next step, we start the collaboration with the National Institute for Materials Science for the new developmental works of a 30 T high temperature superconducting magnet and a 50 T-class hybrid magnet

  3. Magnetized Target Fusion: Prospects for Low-Cost Fusion Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemon, Richard E.; Turchi, Peter J.; Barnes, Daniel C.; Degnan, James; Parks, Paul; Ryutov, Dmitri D.; Thio, Y. C. Francis; Schafer, Charles (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) has attracted renewed interest in recent years because it has the potential to resolve one of the major problems with conventional fusion energy research - the high cost of facilities to do experiments and in general develop practical fusion energy. The requirement for costly facilities can be traced to fundamental constraints. The Lawson condition implies large system size in the case of conventional magnetic confinement, or large heating power in the case of conventional inertial confinement. The MTF approach is to use much higher fuel density than with conventional magnetic confinement (corresponding to megabar pressures), which results in a much-reduced system size to achieve Lawson conditions. Intrinsically the system must be pulsed because the pressures exceed the strength of any known material. To facilitate heating the fuel (or "target") to thermonuclear conditions with a high-power high-intensity source of energy, magnetic fields are used to insulate the high-pressure fuel from material surroundings (thus "magnetized target"). Because of magnetic insulation, the required heating power intensity is reduced by many orders of magnitude compared to conventional inertial fusion, even with relatively poor energy confinement in the magnetic field, such as that characterized by Bohm diffusion. In this paper we show semi-quantitatively why MTF-should allow fusion energy production without costly facilities within the same generally accepted physical constraints used for conventional magnetic and inertial fusion. We also briefly discuss potential applications of this technology ranging from nuclear rockets for space propulsion to a practical commercial energy system. Finally, we report on the exploratory research underway, and the interesting physics issues that arise in the MTF regime of parameters. Experiments at Los Alamos are focused on formation of a suitable plasma target for compression, utilizing the knowledge base for compact

  4. Development of magnetic order in superconducting systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moncton, D.E.; Shirane, G.; Thomlinson, W.

    1979-08-01

    Two different classes of rare-earth (RE) ternary superconductors (RERh 4 B 4 and REMo 6 S 8 , X=S, Se) have provided the first instances in which chemically ordered sublattices of magnetic ions exist in superconductors. Neutron scattering studies show that simple, conventional antiferromagnetism coexists with superconductivity in a number of systems, while destruction of superconductivity occurs with the onset of ferromagnetism. The magnetic structural details are summarized for the coexistent antiferromagnets, and review measurements on the superconducting → ferromagnetic transition in ErRh 4 B 4

  5. Electric vehicles, magnetic levitation and superconductive levitation in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wyczalek, F.A.

    1988-01-01

    This is a technological assessment of electric automotive vehicles, high speed magnetic levitation trains and hyperspeed superconductive magnetic levitation trains in Japan. It includes conventional battery electric vehicles for the automotive application, conventional magnetic levitation trains with peak speeds of 300 km/h and superconductive levitation trains capable of speeds over 500 km/h in transcontinental service. These electric vehicles have been under development since 1971 and are now considered ready for introduction into intercity commercial service. Conventional magnetic levitation trains are targeted to connect New Chitose International Airport with Sapporo and shorter connections in LasVegas, Philadelphia and Miami. The first superconductive train is planned for the Osaka to Tokyo link by the year 2000, a distance of 515 km. The initial step has been taken with approval of funding for the first five year phase of construction beginning with the Kansai project near Osaka

  6. Research Needs for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neilson, Hutch

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear fusion — the process that powers the sun — offers an environmentally benign, intrinsically safe energy source with an abundant supply of low-cost fuel. It is the focus of an international research program, including the ITER fusion collaboration, which involves seven parties representing half the world’s population. The realization of fusion power would change the economics and ecology of energy production as profoundly as petroleum exploitation did two centuries ago. The 21st century finds fusion research in a transformed landscape. The worldwide fusion community broadly agrees that the science has advanced to the point where an aggressive action plan, aimed at the remaining barriers to practical fusion energy, is warranted. At the same time, and largely because of its scientific advance, the program faces new challenges; above all it is challenged to demonstrate the timeliness of its promised benefits. In response to this changed landscape, the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) in the US Department of Energy commissioned a number of community-based studies of the key scientific and technical foci of magnetic fusion research. The Research Needs Workshop (ReNeW) for Magnetic Fusion Energy Sciences is a capstone to these studies. In the context of magnetic fusion energy, ReNeW surveyed the issues identified in previous studies, and used them as a starting point to define and characterize the research activities that the advance of fusion as a practical energy source will require. Thus, ReNeW’s task was to identify (1) the scientific and technological research frontiers of the fusion program, and, especially, (2) a set of activities that will most effectively advance those frontiers. (Note that ReNeW was not charged with developing a strategic plan or timeline for the implementation of fusion power.)

  7. Concepts for the magnetic design of the MITICA neutral beam test facility ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitarin, G; Agostinetti, P; Marconato, N; Marcuzzi, D; Sartori, E; Serianni, G; Sonato, P

    2012-02-01

    The megavolt ITER injector concept advancement neutral injector test facility will be constituted by a RF-driven negative ion source and by an electrostatic Accelerator, designed to produce a negative Ion with a specific energy up to 1 MeV. The beam is then neutralized in order to obtain a focused 17 MW neutral beam. The magnetic configuration inside the accelerator is of crucial importance for the achievement of a good beam efficiency, with the early deflection of the co-extracted and stripped electrons, and also of the required beam optic quality, with the correction of undesired ion beamlet deflections. Several alternative magnetic design concepts have been considered, comparing in detail the magnetic and beam optics simulation results, evidencing the advantages and drawbacks of each solution both from the physics and engineering point of view.

  8. Conceptual design of a mirror reactor for a fusion engineering research facility (FERF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Burleigh, R.C.; Carlson, G.A.; Dexter, W.L.; Hamilton, G.W.; Harvey, A.R.; Hickman, R.G.; Hoffman, M.A.; Hooper, E.B. Jr.; Moir, R.W.; Nelson, R.L.; Pittenger, L.C.; Smith, B.H.; Taylor, C.E.; Werner, R.W.; Wilcox, T.P.

    1975-01-01

    A conceptual design is presented for a small mirror fusion reactor for a Fusion Engineering Research Facility (FERF). The reactor produces 3.4 MW of fusion power and a useful neutron flux of about 10 14 n.cm -2 .s -1 . Superconducting ''yin-yang'' coils are used, and the plasma is sustained by injection of energetic neutral D 0 and T 0 . Conceptual layouts are given for the reactor, its major components, and supporting facilities. (author)

  9. Cryogenic magnet tests for the LHC process operation using web-based tools and facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Hemelsoet, G H; Chohan, V; Veyrunes, E

    2005-01-01

    For the Large Hadron Collider under construction at CERN, an essential requirement is the acceptance test of its 1706 Cryo-magnets in cryogenic conditions in a purpose-built facility at CERN. Several teams ensure the proper operation of the infrastructure on a round the clock basis. The cold test part is one of the key elements amongst many other essential activities requiring magnet transport and connections/disconnections, cryogenic preparation and pumping, cooling down to 1.9 K as well warm up before disconnection & removal. All these operations involve multi-tasking and usage of 12 test benches with nominal turn-round time per dipole magnet of 120 hours. It also involves multiple teams of industrial contractors, a support contract for cryogenics operation, CERN staff in magnet testing Operation, aided by a large external collaboration of visiting staff for round the clock operation. This paper gives a flavour of the operation and exposes the software tools that were necessary, designed and developed t...

  10. Radiation damage of organic composite material for fusion magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishijima, S.; Okada, T.

    1991-01-01

    Fusion superconducting magnets are 'series machines' in the sense that the complete magnet may decrease in overall performance when even one component does not deliver the expected performance. Such magnets are often operated under severe conditions, such as radiation environments and those materials which are most prone to damage under such radiation environments demand particular attention. The component most sensitive to radiation damage in the fusion magnet is the organic composite material used for insulation, usually glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP). Radiation resistant GFRPs have been developed and these will be discussed in this work, together with other aspects of radiation damage of organic composite materials. (author)

  11. ITER: a technology test bed for a fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huguet, M.; Green, B.J.

    1996-01-01

    The ITER Project aims to establish nuclear fusion as an energy source that has potential safety and environmental advantages, and to develop the technologies required for a fusion reactor. ITER is a collaborative project between the European Union, Japan, the Russian Federation and the United States of America. During the current phase of the Project, an R and D programme of about 850 million dollars is underway to develop the technologies required for ITER. This technological effort should culminate in the construction of the components and systems of the ITER machine and its auxiliaries. The main areas of technological development include the first wall and divertor technology, the blanket technology and tritium breeding, superconducting magnet technology, pulsed power technology and remote handling. ITER is a test bed and an essential step to establish the technology of future fusion reactors. Many of the ITER technologies are of potential interest to other fields and their development is expected to benefit the industries involved. (author)

  12. Computer control and data acquisition system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating System (ICRH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheshire, D.L.; Thomas, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) large Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) will employ an Ion Cyclotron Resonant Heating (ICRH) system for plasma startup. As the MFTF-B Industrial Participant, TRW has responsibility for the ICRH system, including development of the data acquisition and control system. During the MFTF-B Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS). For subsystem development and checkout at TRW, and for verification and acceptance testing at LLNL, the system will be run from a stand-alone computer system designed to simulate the functions of SCDS. The ''SCDS Simulator'' was developed originally for the MFTF-B ECRH System; descriptions of the hardware and software are updated in this paper. The computer control and data acquisition functions implemented for ICRH are described, including development status, and test schedule at TRW and at LLNL. The application software is written for the SCDS Simulator, but it is programmed in PASCAL and designed to facilitate conversion for use on the SCDS computers

  13. Development of portable superconducting bulk magnet system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saho, N.; Nishijima, N.; Tanaka, H.; Sasaki, A.

    2009-01-01

    Recently a magnetic drug delivery system (MDDS) has been developing to navigate magnetic seeded drugs around diseased parts of the human body. To improve the magnetic drug delivery performance, a portable high temperature superconducting (HTS) bulk magnet system with high magnetic fields has been developed. This magnet system mainly consists of small bulk high temperature superconductors and a compact cryocooler. The materials of the high temperature superconductor are rare earth 123 single domain compounds (Gd-Ba-Cu-O). The bulk magnet was activated successfully using field-cooling magnetization under the superconducting solenoid magnet. The magnetic flux densities at the surface of the vacuum chambers that contain bulk magnets reached 5.07 T and 6.76 T using the static magnetic fields of 6 T and 10 T superconducting solenoid magnets, respectively. A cryocooler cooled them to 38.1 K and 39.1 K. It was clarified that the magnetic gradient was approximately 10 T/m at a position located 50 mm from the surface of the vacuum chambers.

  14. LHC Report: superconducting circuit powering tests

    CERN Multimedia

    Mirko Pojer

    2015-01-01

    After the long maintenance and consolidation campaign carried out during LS1, the machine is getting ready to start operation with beam at 6.5 TeV… the physics community can’t wait! Prior to this, all hardware and software systems have to be tested to assess their correct and safe operation.   Most of the cold circuits (those with high current/stored energy) possess a sophisticated magnet protection system that is crucial to detect a transition of the coil from the superconducting to the normal state (a quench) and safely extract the energy stored in the circuits (about 1 GJ per dipole circuit at nominal current). LHC operation relies on 1232 superconducting dipoles with a field of up to 8.33 T operating in superfluid helium at 1.9 K, along with more than 500 superconducting quadrupoles operating at 4.2 or 1.9 K. Besides, many other superconducting and normal resistive magnets are used to guarantee the possibility of correcting all beam parameters, for a total of mo...

  15. Design, Fabrication, Installation and Commissioning of the Helium Refrigeration system Supporting Superconducting Radio Frequency Testing at Facility for Rare Isotope Beams at Michigan State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, F.; Fila, A.; Nguyen, C.; Tatsumoto, H.

    2017-12-01

    The Facility for Rare Isotope Beams (FRIB) will be a scientific user facility for the Office of Nuclear Physics in the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC). The FRIB linear accelerator (LINAC) will be comprised of cryomodules each with multiple Superconducting Radio Frequency (SRF) cavities operating at 2 K. A helium refrigeration system was designed, fabricated, installed and commissioned in the SRF high bay building to test and certify these cavities and cryomodules before installation in the FRIB LINAC tunnel. The helium refrigeration system includes a helium refrigerator which has nominal capacity of 900 W at 4 K, 5000 L liquid helium storage Dewar, helium gas storage, two room temperature vacuum pumps capable of 2.5 g/s each for 2 K testing, purifier, purifier recovery compressor, and the distribution system for liquid nitrogen and helium. The helium refrigeration system is now operational supporting three below grade cavity testing Dewars and one cryomodule testing bunker meeting the required throughput of 1 cavity per day.

  16. Superconducting magnets. Volume 2. September 1976 -- September 1977 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for Sep 76 -- Sep 77

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reimherr, G.W.

    1977-10-01

    The cited reports discuss research on materials studies, theory, design, and applications of superconducting magnets. Examples of applications include particle accelerators, MHD power generation, superconducting generators, nuclear fusion research devices, energy storage systems, and magnetic levitation. The updated bibliography contains 122 abstracts, all of which are new entries to the previous edition

  17. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, F.

    2013-06-01

    Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — tokamaks and stellarators — will be introduced and described. The first fusion reactor, ITER, and the most modern stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, are under construction. Their basic features and objectives will be presented.

  18. Physics of magnetic confinement fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusion is the energy source of the universe. The local conditions in the core of the Sun allow the transfer of mass into energy, which is finally released in the form of radiation. Technical fusion melts deuterons and tritons to helium releasing large amounts of energy per fusion process. Because of the conditions for fusion, which will be deduced, the fusion fuel is in the plasma state. Here we report on the confinement of fusion plasmas by magnetic fields. Different confinement concepts — tokamaks and stellarators — will be introduced and described. The first fusion reactor, ITER, and the most modern stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X, are under construction. Their basic features and objectives will be presented.

  19. Magnetic and inertial fusion status and development plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correll, D.; Storm, E.

    1987-01-01

    Controlled fusion, pursued by investigators in both the magnetic and inertial confinement research programs, continues to be a strong candidate as an intrinsically safe and virtually inexhaustible long-term energy source. We describe the status of magnetic and inertial confinement fusion in terms of the accomplishments made by the research programs for each concept. The improvement in plasma parameters (most frequently discussed in terms of the Tn tau product of ion temperature, T, density, n, and confinement time, tau) can be linked with the construction and operation of experimental facilities. The scientific progress exhibited by larger scale fusion experiments within the US, such as Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory's Fusion Test Reactor for magnetic studies and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's Nova laser for inertial studies, has been optimized by the theoretical advances in plasma and computational physics. Both TFTR and Nova have exhibited ion temperatures in excess of 10 keV at confinement parameters of n tau near 10 13 cm -3 . sec. At slightly lower temperatures (near a few keV), the value of n tau has exceeded 10 14 cm -3 . sec in both devices. Near-term development plans in fusion research include experiments within the US, Europe, and Japan to improve the plasma performance to reach conditions where the rate of fusion energy production equals or exceeds the heating power incident upon the plasma. 9 refs., 7 figs

  20. CLIQ. A new quench protection technology for superconducting magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Ravaioli, Emmanuele; ten Kate, H H J

    CLIQ, the Coupling-Loss Induced Quench system, is a new method for protecting superconducting magnets after a sudden transition to the normal state. It offers significant advantages over the conventional technology due to its effective mechanism for heating the superconductor relying on coupling loss and its robust electrical design, which makes it more reliable and less interfering with the coil winding process. The analysis of the electro-magnetic and thermal transients during and after a CLIQ discharge allows identifying the system parameters that affect the system performance and defining guidelines for implementing this technology on coils of various characteristics. Most existing superconducting magnets can be protected by CLIQ as convincingly shown by test results performed on magnets of different sizes, superconductor types, geometries, cables and strand parameters. Experimental results are successfully reproduced by means of a novel technique for modeling non-linear dynamic effects in superconducting...

  1. Rotational decay torques of superconducting magnetic bearing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahata, R.; Yotsuya, T.

    1991-01-01

    This paper proposes a superconducting magnetic bearing as one of application of a high critical temperature (Tc) oxide superconducting material. The authors have assembled new models of bearing with free rotation axis. In these models, superconductor, YBa 2 Cu 3 O X , prepared by the quench and melt growth (QMG) method was applied to the bearing section and a permanent magnet was used for a rotor. This development originated from the knowledge that YBa 2 Cu 3 O X prepared by QMG method had a stronger pinning force of magnetic flux than that of conventional superconductors

  2. Investigation of wire motion in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogitsu, T.; Tsuchiya, K.; Devred, A.

    1990-09-01

    The large Lorentz forces occuring during the excitation of superconducting magnets can provoke sudden motions of wire, which eventually release enough energy to trigger a quench. These wire motions are accompanied by two electromagnetic effects: an induced emf along the moved wire, and a local change in flux caused by the minute dislocation of current. Both effects cause spikes in the coil voltage. Voltage data recorded during the excitation of a superconducting quadrupole magnet which early exhibit such events are here reported. Interpretations of the voltage spikes in terms of energy release are also presented, leading to insights on the spectrum of the disturbances which occur in real magnets. 15 refs

  3. First-wall, blanket, and shield engineering test program for magnetically confined fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maroni, V.A.

    1980-01-01

    The key engineering areas identified for early study relate to FW/B/S system thermal-hydraulics, thermomechnics, nucleonics, electromagnetics, assembly, maintenance, and repair. Programmatic guidance derived frm planning exercises involving over thirty organizations (laboratories, industries, and universities) has indicated (1) that meaningful near term engineering testing should be feasible within the bounds of a modest funding base, (2) that there are existing facilities and expertise which can be profitably utilized in this testing, and (3) that near term efforts should focus on the measurement of engineering data and the verification/calibration of predictive methods for anticipated normal operational and transient FW/B/S conditions. The remainder of this paper discusses in more detail the planning strategies, proposed approach to near term testing, and longer range needs for integrated FW/B/S test facilities

  4. Summary Report of the 1. Research Coordination Meeting on Testing and Improving the International Reactor Dosimetry and Fusion File (IRDFF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trkov, A.; Greenwood, L.R.; Simakov, S.P.

    2013-09-01

    In accordance with the recommendations of the International Nuclear Data Committee in May 2012, the Nuclear Data Section of IAEA has initiated a new Coordinated Research Project (CRP number F41031) with the main goal to test, validate and improve the international dosimetry library for fission and fusion (IRDFF). The output of this CRP will be a reference dosimetry database of cross sections and decay data with corresponding documentation. It will serve to the needs of fission, fusion and accelerator applications. The first Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) was held 1 to 5 July 2013 in IAEA. At this meeting, the attendees discussed the objectives of the whole CRP, presented their contributions and elaborated on consolidated recommendations and actions for implementation over the next 1.5 year period. This Summary Report documents the individual contributions and joint decisions made during this meeting. (author)

  5. Superconducting magnetic energy storage, possibilities and limitations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bace, M.; Knapp, V.

    1981-01-01

    Energy storage is of great importance for the exploitation of new energy sources as well as for the better utilisation of conventional ones. Several proposals in recent years have suggested that superconducting magnets could be used as energy storage in large electricity networks. It is a purpose of this note to point out that the requirements which have to be met by energy storage in a large electricity network place serious limitation on the possible use of superconducting energy storage. (author)

  6. PIREX II, a new irradiation facility for testing fusion first wall materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmy, P.; Daum, M.; Gavillet, D.; Green, S.; Green, W.V.; Hegedues, F.; Pronnecke, S.; Rohrer, U.; Stiefel, U.; Victoria, M.

    1988-12-01

    A new irradiation facility, PIREX II, became operational in March 1987. It is located on a dedicated beam line split from the main beam of the 590 MeV proton accelerator at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). Irradiation with protons of this energy introduces simultaneously displacement damage, helium and other impurities. Because of the penetration range of 590 MeV protons, both damage and impurities are homogeneously distributed in the target. The installation has its own beam line optics that can support a proton current of up to 50 μA. At a typical beam density of 4 μA/mm 2 , the damage rate in steels is 0.7 x 10 -5 dpa/sec (dpa: displacements per atom) and the helium production rate is 170 appm He/dpa. Both flat tensile specimens of up to 0.4 mm thickness and tubular fatigue samples of 3 mm diameter can be irradiated. Cooling of the temperatures can be controlled between 100 o and 800 o C. Installation of an in situ low cycle fatigue device is foreseen. Beams of up to 20 μA have been obtained, the beam having approximately a gaussian distribution of elliptical cross section with 4 σ between 0.8 and 3 mm by 10 mm. Irradiations for a dosimetry program have been completed on samples of Al, Cu, Fe, Ni, Au, W, and the 1.4914 ferritic steel. The evaluation of results allows the correct choice of reactions to be used for determining total dose, from the standpoint of half life and gamma energy. A program of irradiations on candidate materials for the Next European Torus (NET) design (Cu and Cu alloys, the 1.4914 ferritic martensitic steel, W and W-Re alloys and Mo alloys), where the above mentioned characteristics of this type of irradiation can be used advantageously, is now under way. (author) 11 figs., 4 tabs., 20 refs

  7. Magnetic and Superconducting Materials at High Pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struzhkin, Viktor V. [Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Washington, DC (United States)

    2015-03-24

    The work concentrates on few important tasks in enabling techniques for search of superconducting compressed hydrogen compounds and pure hydrogen, investigation of mechanisms of high-Tc superconductivity, and exploring new superconducting materials. Along that route we performed several challenging tasks, including discovery of new forms of polyhydrides of alkali metal Na at very high pressures. These experiments help us to establish the experimental environment that will provide important information on the high-pressure properties of hydrogen-rich compounds. Our recent progress in RIXS measurements opens a whole field of strongly correlated 3d materials. We have developed a systematic approach to measure major electronic parameters, like Hubbard energy U, and charge transfer energy Δ, as function of pressure. This technique will enable also RIXS studies of magnetic excitations in iridates and other 5d materials at the L edge, which attract a lot of interest recently. We have developed new magnetic sensing technique based on optically detected magnetic resonance from NV centers in diamond. The technique can be applied to study superconductivity in high-TC materials, to search for magnetic transitions in strongly correlated and itinerant magnetic materials under pressure. Summary of Project Activities; development of high-pressure experimentation platform for exploration of new potential superconductors, metal polyhydrides (including newly discovered alkali metal polyhydrides), and already known superconductors at the limit of static high-pressure techniques; investigation of special classes of superconducting compounds (high-Tc superconductors, new superconducting materials), that may provide new fundamental knowledge and may prove important for application as high-temperature/high-critical parameter superconductors; investigation of the pressure dependence of superconductivity and magnetic/phase transformations in 3d transition metal compounds, including

  8. Mirror fusion test facility cryogenic system - performance, management approach, and present equipment status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slack, D.S.; Chronis, W.C.

    1988-01-01

    The cryogenic system for the MFTF is a helium refrigeration system that proved to be successful and cost effective. All operating objectives were met while remaining within a few percent of the initial cost and schedule plans. The management approach used at MFTF is assessed. Manpower levels, extent and type of industrial participation, and subcontractor specifications and interactions are reviewed along with highlights of system testing, documentation, and operation

  9. Magnetic Fusion Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-02-01

    This Plan reflects the present conditions of the energy situation and is consistent with national priorities for the support of basic and applied research. It is realistic in taking advantage of the technical position that the United States has already established in fusion research to make cost-effective progress toward the development of fusion power as a future energy option

  10. Sustaining neutral beam power supply system for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eckard, R.D.; Van Ness, H.W.

    1979-01-01

    A fixed-price procurement contract for $24.9 million was awarded to Aydin Energy Division, Palo Alto, CA, for the design, manufacture, installation, and acceptance testing of the sustaining neutral beam power supply system (SNBPSS). This system is scheduled for completion in early 1981 and will provide the conditioned power for the 24 neutral beam source modules. Each of the 24 power supply sets will provide the accel potential of 80 kV at 88 A, the arc power, the filament power, and the suppressor power for its associated neutral beam source module

  11. Superconducting magnets. A. Some fundamentals and their state of the art

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinz, W.; Karlsruhe Univ.

    1978-01-01

    An introduction to the basis of superconductivity is given. Materials suitable for use in superconducting magnets and their essential properties are presented followed by a discussion on the status of conductor development. A survey of stabilization methods, behavior of the superconductor under normal operating conditions and special requirements of superconductors for fusions magnets are given. Magnet technology and its status is briefly discussed. Existing magnet systems are introduced. Finally some of the most important problems encountered in developing big toroidal magnet systems are mentioned

  12. Superconducting magnet systems in EPR designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knobloch, A.F.

    1976-10-01

    Tokamak experiments have reached a stage where large scale application of superconductors can be envisaged for machines becoming operational within the next decade. Existing designs for future devices already indicate some of the tasks and problems associated with large superconducting magnet systems. Using this information the coming magnet system requirements are summarized, some design considerations given and in conclusion a brief survey describes already existing Tokamak magnet development programs. (orig.) [de

  13. Material testing facilities and programs for plasma-facing component testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linsmeier, Ch.; Unterberg, B.; Coenen, J. W.; Doerner, R. P.; Greuner, H.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Maier, H.

    2017-09-01

    Component development for operation in a large-scale fusion device requires thorough testing and qualification for the intended operational conditions. In particular environments are necessary which are comparable to the real operation conditions, allowing at the same time for in situ/in vacuo diagnostics and flexible operation, even beyond design limits during the testing. Various electron and neutral particle devices provide the capabilities for high heat load tests, suited for material samples and components from lab-scale dimensions up to full-size parts, containing toxic materials like beryllium, and being activated by neutron irradiation. To simulate the conditions specific to a fusion plasma both at the first wall and in the divertor of fusion devices, linear plasma devices allow for a test of erosion and hydrogen isotope recycling behavior under well-defined and controlled conditions. Finally, the complex conditions in a fusion device (including the effects caused by magnetic fields) are exploited for component and material tests by exposing test mock-ups or material samples to a fusion plasma by manipulator systems. They allow for easy exchange of test pieces in a tokamak or stellarator device, without opening the vessel. Such a chain of test devices and qualification procedures is required for the development of plasma-facing components which then can be successfully operated in future fusion power devices. The various available as well as newly planned devices and test stands, together with their specific capabilities, are presented in this manuscript. Results from experimental programs on test facilities illustrate their significance for the qualification of plasma-facing materials and components. An extended set of references provides access to the current status of material and component testing capabilities in the international fusion programs.

  14. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Post, R.F.

    1980-02-11

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed.

  15. Magnetic mirror fusion: status and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post, R.F.

    1980-01-01

    Two improved mirror systems, the tandem mirror (TM) and the field-reversed mirror (FRM) are being intensively studied. The twin practical aims of these studies: to improve the economic prospects for mirror fusion power plants and to reduce the size and/or complexity of such plants relative to earlier approaches to magnetic fusion. While at the present time the program emphasis is still strongly oriented toward answering scientific questions, the emphasis is shifting as the data accumulates and as larger facilities - ones with a heavy technological and engineering orientation - are being prepared. The experimental and theoretical progress that led to the new look in mirror fusion research is briefly reviewed, the new TM and the FRM ideas are outlined, and the projected future course of mirror fusion research is discussed

  16. submitter Thermal, Hydraulic, and Electromagnetic Modeling of Superconducting Magnet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bottura, L

    2016-01-01

    Modeling techniques and tailored computational tools are becoming increasingly relevant to the design and analysis of large-scale superconducting magnet systems. Efficient and reliable tools are useful to provide an optimal forecast of the envelope of operating conditions and margins, which are difficult to test even when a prototype is available. This knowledge can be used to considerably reduce the design margins of the system, and thus the overall cost, or increase reliability during operation. An integrated analysis of a superconducting magnet system is, however, a complex matter, governed by very diverse physics. This paper reviews the wide spectrum of phenomena and provides an estimate of the time scales of thermal, hydraulic, and electromagnetic mechanisms affecting the performance of superconducting magnet systems. The analysis is useful to provide guidelines on how to divide the complex problem into building blocks that can be integrated in a design and analysis framework for a consistent multiphysic...

  17. A motor with superconducting magnetic bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladun, A.; Stoye, P.; Verges, P.; Gawalek, W.; Habisreuther, T.; Goernert, P.

    1993-01-01

    Superconducting bearings may be one of the most promising near term applications of HTSC. For use at liquid nitrogen temperature and below, they offer the advantage of lower energy consumption and higher reliability. Different bearing configurations have been proposed. But in order to substitute for conventional bearings a further increase in the critical current density of the superconductor and improved bearing concepts are necessary. For this it is necessary to take into account the peculiarities of the interaction between permanent magnets and bulk superconductors. As a contribution to this programme we present the model of a motor with superconducting magnetic bearings. (orig.)

  18. Linear magnetic fusion: summary of Seattle workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-12-01

    The linear-geometry magnetic confinement concept is among the oldest used in the study of high-temperature plasmas. However, it has generally been discounted as a suitable approach for demonstrating controlled thermonuclear fusion because rapid losses from the plasma column ends necessitate very long devices. Further, the losses and how to overcome them have not yet received parametric experimental study, nor do facilities exist with which such definitive experiments could be performed. Nonetheless, the important positive attribute, simplicity, together with the appearance of several ideas for reducing end losses have provided motivation for continued research on linear magnetic fusion (LMF). These motivations led to the LMF workshop, held in Seattle, March 9--11, 1977, which explored the potential of LMF as an alternate approach to fusion. A broad range of LMF aspects were addressed, including radial and axial losses, stability and equilibrium, heating, technology, and reactor considerations. The conclusions drawn at the workshop are summarized.

  19. Linear magnetic fusion: summary of Seattle workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The linear-geometry magnetic confinement concept is among the oldest used in the study of high-temperature plasmas. However, it has generally been discounted as a suitable approach for demonstrating controlled thermonuclear fusion because rapid losses from the plasma column ends necessitate very long devices. Further, the losses and how to overcome them have not yet received parametric experimental study, nor do facilities exist with which such definitive experiments could be performed. Nonetheless, the important positive attribute, simplicity, together with the appearance of several ideas for reducing end losses have provided motivation for continued research on linear magnetic fusion (LMF). These motivations led to the LMF workshop, held in Seattle, March 9--11, 1977, which explored the potential of LMF as an alternate approach to fusion. A broad range of LMF aspects were addressed, including radial and axial losses, stability and equilibrium, heating, technology, and reactor considerations. The conclusions drawn at the workshop are summarized

  20. Guide to making time-lapse graphics using the facilities of the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munro, J.K. Jr.

    1980-05-01

    The advent of large, fast computers has opened the way to modeling more complex physical processes and to handling very large quantities of experimental data. The amount of information that can be processed in a short period of time is so great that use of graphical displays assumes greater importance as a means of displaying this information. Information from dynamical processes can be displayed conveniently by use of animated graphics. This guide presents the basic techniques for generating black and white animated graphics, with consideration of aesthetic, mechanical, and computational problems. The guide is intended for use by someone who wants to make movies on the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computing Center (NMFECC) CDC-7600. Problems encountered by a geographically remote user are given particular attention. Detailed information is given that will allow a remote user to do some file checking and diagnosis before giving graphics files to the system for processing into film in order to spot problems without having to wait for film to be delivered. Source listings of some useful software are given in appendices along with descriptions of how to use it. 3 figures, 5 tables

  1. Progress in fusion technology in the U.S. magnetic fusion program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dowling, R.J.; Beard, D.S.; Haas, G.M.; Stone, P.M.; George, T.V.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors discuss the major technological achievements that have taken place during the past few years in the U.S. magnetic fusion program which have contributed to the global efforts. The goal has been to establish the scientific and technological base required for fusion energy. To reach this goal the fusion RandD program is focused on four key technical issues: determine the optimum configuration of magnetic confinement systems; determine the properties of burning plasmas; develop materials for fusion systems; and establish the nuclear technology of fusion systems. The objective of the fusion technology efforts has been to develop advanced technologies and provide the necessary support for research of these four issues. This support is provided in a variety of areas such as: high vacuum technology, large magnetic field generation by superconducting and copper coils, high voltage and high current power supplies, electromagnetic wave and particle beam heating systems, plasma fueling, tritium breeding and handling, remote maintenance, energy recovery. The U.S. Fusion Technology Program provides major support or has the primary responsibility in each of the four key technical issues of fusion, as described in the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan of February 1985. This paper has summarized the Technology Program in terms of its activities and progress since the Proceedings of the SOFT Conference in 1984

  2. Automated installations for reeling up of superconducting magnet windings of the accelerating-storage complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolzhenkov, V.I.; Elistratov, V.V.; Kuznetsov, Yu.V.; Petrov, V.B.; Popov, V.V.; Savel'ev, A.V.; Sokolov, B.V.; Sytnik, V.V.; Tarakanov, N.M.; Ustinov, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    An automated facility for reeling up the windings of model and full-scale superconducting magnets of the accelerating-storage complex is described. The control system monitors superconducting cable tension, transport carriage linear velocity and some other parameters. Maximum length of the winded coils is 6 m. Cable tension stability - 5%

  3. Axisymmetric Magnetic Mirror Fusion-Fission Hybrid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moir, R. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Martovetsky, N. N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Molvik, A. W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Ryutov, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Simonen, T. C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-05-13

    The achieved performance of the gas dynamic trap version of magnetic mirrors and today’s technology we believe are sufficient with modest further efforts for a neutron source for material testing (Q=Pfusion/Pinput~0.1). The performance needed for commercial power production requires considerable further advances to achieve the necessary high Q>>10. An early application of the mirror, requiring intermediate performance and intermediate values of Q~1 are the hybrid applications. The Axisymmetric Mirror has a number of attractive features as a driver for a fusion-fission hybrid system: geometrical simplicity, inherently steady-state operation, and the presence of the natural divertors in the form of end tanks. This level of physics performance has the virtue of low risk and only modest R&D needed and its simplicity promises economy advantages. Operation at Q~1 allows for relatively low electron temperatures, in the range of 4 keV, for the DT injection energy ~ 80 keV. A simple mirror with the plasma diameter of 1 m and mirror-to-mirror length of 35 m is discussed. Simple circular superconducting coils are based on today’s technology. The positive ion neutral beams are similar to existing units but designed for steady state. A brief qualitative discussion of three groups of physics issues is presented: axial heat loss, MHD stability in the axisymmetric geometry, microstability of sloshing ions. Burning fission reactor wastes by fissioning actinides (transuranics: Pu, Np, Am, Cm, .. or just minor actinides: Np, Am, Cm, …) in the hybrid will multiply fusion’s energy by a factor of ~10 or more and diminish the Q needed to less than 1 to overcome the cost of recirculating power for good economics. The economic value of destroying actinides by fissioning is rather low based on either the cost of long-term storage or even deep geologic disposal so most of the revenues of hybrids will come from electrical power. Hybrids that obtain revenues from

  4. The Quest for Fusion at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartouni, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Arthur Eddington speculated in 1920 on the internal constitution of stars and described the possibility of nuclear fusion based on the then new results from special relativity and measurements of light nuclei masses. By 1929 Atkinson and Houtermans worked out the calculations for nuclear fusion in stars and initiating nuclear astrophysics. All of these sciences were pressed into service during the World War II, and the applications developed, particularly under the auspices of the Manhattan Project provided both weapons with which to wage and win that conflict, but also the possibilities to harness these applications of the nuclear processes of fission and fusion for peaceful purposes. 32 years after Eddington's speculation the United States demonstrated the application of fusion in a famous nuclear weapons test. In the following years many ideas for producing ``controlled'' fusion through inertial confinement were pursued. The invention of the laser opened up new avenues which have culminated in the National Ignition Facility, NIF. I will attempt to cover the ground between Eddington, through the Manhattan Project and provide a current status of this quest at NIF. LLNL-ABS-704367-DRAFT. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Magnet Coil Test Facility for Researching Magnetic Activity of Pico/Nano/Micro Satellites (PNMSats)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-16

    communication capability of PNMSats and translate to increasing the technology readiness level (TRL) of these subsystems, thereby broadening the scope of...year, successfully motivating even two students to take up careers in Space is noteworthy. Apart from inspiring students to take up careers in...research and development. Impact on Physical Resources The MCTF academic facility is unique and probably the only one of its kind in the state of

  6. Advanced materials: The key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural material for the first wail and blanket (FWB), (2) plasma-facing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications

  7. Advanced materials - the key to attractive magnetic fusion power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloom, E.E.

    1992-01-01

    Fusion is one of the most attractive central station power sources from the viewpoint of potential safety and environmental impact characteristics. Studies also indicate that fusion can be economically competitive with other options such as fission reactors and fossil-fired power stations. However, to achieve this triad of characteristics we must develop advanced materials with properties tailored for performance in the various fusion reactor systems. This paper discusses the desired characteristics of materials and the status of materials technology in four critical areas: (1) structural materials for the first wall and blanket (FWB), (2) plasmafacing materials, (3) materials for superconducting magnets, and (4) ceramics for electrical and structural applications. (author)

  8. Analysis of the superconducting wiggler magnets for the ATF Harmonic Generation FEL experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, X.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Ingold, G.; Krinsky, S.; Yu, L.H.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the superconducting wiggler magnet under construction for the High Gain Harmonic Generation experiment (HGHG) at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at BNL. This wiggler consists of an energy modulation section, a dispersion magnet and a radiator section. We present an analysis of the dispersion magnet and the end effects in the other wiggler sections. The purpose of the dispersion magnet is to convert energy modulation of the electron beam into spatial bunching. For the dispersion magnet, we discuss the physical requirements, analyze the magnetic design, determine the focusing properties, and consider the effect of departures from ideal behavior on the FEL gain. In the modulator and radiator wigglers we analyze the effects due to the ends of the wiggler and discuss their correction. In addition, the localized field produced by a trim coil for horizontal beam steering is investigated

  9. Laser-driven magnetized liner inertial fusion on OMEGA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnak, D. H.; Davies, J. R.; Betti, R.; Bonino, M. J.; Campbell, E. M.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sefkow, A. B.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Peterson, K. J.; Sinars, D. B.; Slutz, S. A.; Weis, M. R.; Chang, P.-Y.

    2017-05-01

    Magneto-inertial fusion (MIF) combines the compression of fusion fuel, a hallmark of inertial confinement fusion (ICF), with strongly magnetized plasmas that suppress electron heat losses, a hallmark of magnetic fusion. It can reduce the traditional velocity, pressure, and convergence ratio requirements of ICF. The magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) concept being studied at the Z Pulsed-Power Facility is a key target concept in the U.S. ICF Program. Laser-driven MagLIF is being developed on OMEGA to test the scaling of MagLIF over a range of absorbed energy of the order of 1 kJ on OMEGA to 500 kJ on Z. It is also valuable as a platform for studying the key physics of MIF. An energy-scaled point design has been developed for OMEGA that is roughly 10 × smaller in linear dimensions than Z MagLIF targets. A 0.6-mm-outer-diameter plastic cylinder filled with 2.4 mg/cm3 of D2 is placed in a ˜10-T axial magnetic field, generated by a Magneto-inertial fusion electrical discharge system, the cylinder is compressed by 40 OMEGA beams, and the gas fill is preheated by a single OMEGA beam propagating along the axis. Preheating to >100 eV and axially uniform compression over 0.7 mm have been demonstrated, separately, in a series of preparatory experiments that meet our initial expectations. The preliminary results from the first integrated experiments combining magnetization, compression, and preheat demonstrating a roughly 2 x increase in the neutron yield will be reported here for the first time.

  10. Stability and fast heat removal with He-II cooling for pulsed superconductive magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desportes, H.

    1979-01-01

    The use of pressurized superfluid helium between 1.6 K and 1.8 K is being considered for a number of superconducting magnet applications. This type of cooling is particularly interesting in the case of pulsed field magnets where large heat fluxes need to be evacuated in a short time. This paper reviews a few recent experiments on heat transport properties and stability in He-II, which contribute to evaluating its potential use for such an application. Present technology is illustrated by the description of a large test facility recently operated at Saclay

  11. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister for Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. Photos 01, 02: (left to right) M. Cerrada, CERN; Francisco Giménez-Reyna, Spanish delegate to the CERN Finance Committee; G. Léon; Juan Antonio Rubio, leader of the Education and Technology Transfer division at CERN; M. Aguilar-Benitez, Spanish delegate to CERN Council; (behind) H.E. Mr Joaquin Pérez-Villanueva y Tovar, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Spain to the United Nations in Geneva; the Minister; Manuel Delfino, leader of the Information Technology division at CERN; bodyguard; Matteo Cavalli-Sforza, ATLAS national contact physicist for Spain; Felix Rodriguez Mateos, CERN; G. Babé. Visible in the left background is one of the test benches where magnets are prepared for installation in String 2: the full-scale model of an LHC cell of the regular part of the arc. The extremity of String 2, which measures 120 m and runs the ...

  12. Safety aspects of superconducting magnets for Super-FRS

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The Super Fragment Separator (Super FRS) is a two-stage in flight separator to be built next to the site of GSI, Darmstadt, Germany as part of FAIR (Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research). Its purpose is to create and separate rare isotope beams and to enable the mass measurement also for very short lived nuclei. A superferric design with superconducting coils and standard iron yoke shaping the magnetic field was chosen for the magnets. The cooling will be by a liquid Helium bath. For the main dipoles only the coil is at cold for the multiplets (asemblies of quadrupoles and hgher order correctors) also the iron yoke will be in the bath. From a safety point of view the large He-volumes of more than 1000 l of the multiplets, the high design pressure of 20 bar, as well as the high inductances of the magnets up to 30 H are challenges to be considered in the design and definition of the testing procedures.

  13. Leak testing and repair of fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozman, T.A.

    1983-01-01

    The leak testing, reporting and vacuum leak repair techniques of the MFTF yin-yang number one magnet system, the world's largest superconducting magnet system, are discussed. Based on this experience, techniques will be developed for testing and repairing leaks on the 42 MFTF-B magnets. The leak-hunting techniques for the yin-yang magnet systems were applied to two helium circuits (the coil bundle and guard vacuum; both require helium flow for magnet cooldown), their associated piping, liquid nitrogen radiation shields, and piping. Additionally, during MFTF-B operation there will be warm water plasma shields and piping that require leak checking

  14. Development of partially-stabilized pulsed superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tateishi, Hiroshi; Onishi, Toshitada; Komuro, Kazuo; Koyama, Kenichi

    1987-01-01

    Two types of pulsed superconducting cables and four pulsed superconducting magnets have been developed in order to investigate basic problems in constructing ohmic heating coils of a tokamak-type fusion reactor. We found that a compacted cable is superior in mechanical rigidity and a braided cable is superior in cooling capacity as a conductor of a pulsed magnet. Stored energy and a maximum field of the magnets are 78 kJ and 6 T, 68 kJ and 4 T, 375 kJ and 6 T, and 363 kJ and 3 T, respectively. Some of these magnets quenched in pulsive operations due to excessive ac losses or macroscopic wire motions. Therefore, main conditions for operating pulsed magnets without quenching are (1) to make ac losses low enough to be cooled with liquid helium existing near at the conductor surface by reducing filament diameter to the order of 10 μm and utilizing CuNi as matrix effectively, and (2) to prevent macroscopic wire motions by partial solderfilling of a cable or winding a magnet with strong tension. (author)

  15. Calculation of Persistent Currents in Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Völlinger, Christine; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2000-01-01

    The paper describes a semi-analytical hysteresis model for hard superconductors. The model is based on the critical state model considering the dependency of the critical current density on the varying local field in the superconducting filaments. By combining this hysteresis model with numerical field computation methods, it is possible to calculate the persistent current multipole errors in the magnet taking local saturation effects in the magnetic iron parts into consideration. As an application of the method, the use of soft magnetic iron sheets (coil protection sheets mounted between the coils and the collars) for the part compensation of the multipole errors during the ramping of the magnets is investigated.

  16. Partial-array test results in IFSMTF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lue, J.W.; Dresner, L.; Koizumi, K.; Lubell, M.S.; Luton, J.N.; Shen, S.S.; Zahn, G.R.; Zichy, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    Preliminary performance tests of two large superconducting magnets have been carried out in the International Fusion Superconducting Magnet Test Facility (IFSMTF). Each of the Japanese (JA) and General Dynamics/Convair (GD) coils was operated up to its full design current of 10.2 kA with the other serving as an adjacent background coil at 40% of design current. Cryostatic stability was demonstrated for both coils by noting recovery from a full half-turn (5 m) driven normal. A new pick-up coil compensation scheme was successfully used for the quench detection system. Each coil remained superconducting when the other was dumped. Unique instrumentation was used to measure changes in bore dimensions and displacement of the winding from the coil case. Agreement between structural analysis and measurement of bore dimension changes resulting from magnetic loads is good. The Swiss (CH) coil underwent only a cryogenic test. The forced cooling worked well and an inlet temperature of 3.8 K was demonstrated

  17. Fusion Development Facility Machine Design Aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. P.; Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.; Wong, C. P. C.

    2008-11-01

    To fill the gap prior to building a fusion demonstration power plant (DEMO), a Fusion Development Facility (FDF) is proposed. As currently configured, FDF is a copper, water-cooled coil machine capable of running continuously for several weeks with the goal to test several blanket configurations in its lifetime. To accommodate multiple changes in blankets, a machine configuration must be chosen that allows for the efficient remote exchange. The TF coil configuration drives the primary maintenance approach decision. A TF coil with joints similar to DIII-D and Alcator C-Mod, allows for one maintenance approach while a continuously wound TF coil drives a different approach. The base machine design parameters are described. The different machine configuration options are presented which consider the design aspects for the machine including alignment of the first wall and divertor, coolant access, and exchange of the blanket.

  18. Stability of high field superconducting dipole magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allinger, J.; Danby, G.; Foelsche, H.; Jackson, J.; Prodell, A.; Stevens, A.

    1977-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets of the window-frame type were constructed and operated successfully at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Examples of this type of magnet are the 6 T ''Model T'' magnet, and the 4 T 8 0 superconducting bending magnet. The latter magnet operated reliably since October 1973 as part of the proton beam transport to the north experimental area at the BNL AGS with intensities of typically 8 x 10 12 protons at 28.5 GeV/c passing through the magnet in a curved trajectory with the proton beam center only 2.0 cm from the beam pipe at both ends and the middle of each of the two units comprising the magnet. The energy in the beam is approximately 40 kJ per 3 μsec pulse. Targets were inserted in the beam at locations 2 m and 5.6 m upstream of the first magnet unit to observe the effects of radiation heating. The 8 0 magnet demonstrated ultrastability, surviving 3 μsec thermal pulses delivering up to 1 kJ into the cold magnet at repetition periods as short as 1.3 sec

  19. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Confinement Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, PE; Wootton, A.; Gorini, G.; Sindoni, E.; Batani, D.

    2003-02-01

    This book is a collection of papers, written by specialists in the field, on advanced topics of nuclear fusion diagnostics. The 78 contributions were originally presented at the International Conference on Advanced Diagnostics for Magnetic and Inertial Fusion held at Villa Monastero, Italy in September 2001. Both magnetically confined and inertial fusion programmes are quite extensively covered, with more emphasis given to the former scheme. In the case of magnetic confinement, since the present international programme is strongly focused on next-step devices, particular attention is devoted to techniques and technologies viable in an environment with strong neutron fluxes. Indeed, in the first section, the various methods are considered in the perspective of performing the measurements of the relevant parameters in conditions approaching a burning plasma, mainly in the Tokamak configuration. The most demanding requirements, like the implications of the use of tritium and radiation resistance, are reviewed and the most challenging open issues, which require further research and development, are also clearly mentioned. The following three sections are devoted to some of the most recent developments in plasma diagnostics, which are grouped according to the following classification: `Neutron and particle diagnostics', `Optical and x-ray diagnostics' and `Interferometry, Polarimetry and Thomson Scattering'. In these chapters, several of the most recent results are given, covering measurements taken on the most advanced experiments around the world. Here the developments described deal more with the requirements imposed by the physical issues to be studied. They are therefore more focused on the approaches adopted to increase the spatial and time resolution of the diagnostics, on some methods to improve the characterisation of the turbulence and on fast particles. Good coverage is given to neutron diagnostics, which are assuming increasing relevance as the plasma

  20. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report.

  1. Fusion Energy Division annual progress report, period ending December 31, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Baker, C.C.; Saltmarsh, M.J.

    1991-07-01

    The Fusion Program of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) carries out research in most areas of magnetic confinement fusion. The program is directed toward the development of fusion as an energy source and is a strong and vital component of both the US fusion program and the international fusion community. Issued as the annual progress report of the ORNL Fusion Energy Division, this report also contains information from components of the Fusion Program that are carried out by other ORNL organizations (about 15% of the program effort). The areas addressed by the Fusion Program and discussed in this report include the following: Experimental and theoretical research on magnetic confinement concepts, engineering and physics of existing and planned devices, including remote handling, development and testing of diagnostic tools and techniques in support of experiments, assembly and distribution to the fusion community of databases on atomic physics and radiation effects, development and testing of technologies for heating and fueling fusion plasmas, development and testing of superconducting magnets for containing fusion plasmas, development and testing of materials for fusion devices, and exploration of opportunities to apply the unique skills, technology, and techniques developed in the course of this work to other areas. Highlights from program activities are included in this report

  2. Cryogen free superconducting splittable quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashikhin, V.S.; Andreev, N.; Kerby, J.; Orlov, Y.; Solyak, N.; Tartaglia, M.; Velev, G.; /Fermilab

    2011-09-01

    A new superconducting quadrupole magnet for linear accelerators was fabricated at Fermilab. The magnet is designed to work inside a cryomodule in the space between SCRF cavities. SCRF cavities must be installed inside a very clean room adding issues to the magnet design, and fabrication. The designed magnet has a splittable along the vertical plane configuration and could be installed outside of the clean room around the beam pipe previously connected to neighboring cavities. For more convenient assembly and replacement a 'superferric' magnet configuration with four racetrack type coils was chosen. The magnet does not have a helium vessel and is conductively cooled from the cryomodule LHe supply pipe and a helium gas return pipe. The quadrupole generates 36 T integrated magnetic field gradient, has 600 mm effective length, and the peak gradient is 54 T/m. In this paper the quadrupole magnetic, mechanical, and thermal designs are presented, along with the magnet fabrication overview and first test results.

  3. Magnet system for a laser heated solenoid fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, P.G.; Nolan, J.J.; Averill, R.J.

    1976-01-01

    A hybrid magnet system is proposed that consists of a 2 m inside diameter 20 T continuous superconducting magnet surrounding a number of 4 cm bore, 20 T pulsed magnets. Each pulsed magnet encloses a plasma tube for the laser heated fusion reaction. A tritium breeder, heat exchanger, and neutron shield are located in the annular region between the pulsed magnets and the superconducting magnet. The overall length of the system is 1 kilometer. The pulsed magnets are operated in a reverse-forward current sequence so that the magnetic field in the plasma is first reduced to zero and then raised to 40 T. Novel design features are included in the pulsed magnets, pulsing circuits and the superconducting magnet. Of particular interest is the structural design which maintains practical stress levels for readily available materials in both magnets and enables operation of the superconductors in a strain-free condition. Estimated costs and comment on the advantages of the pressure support system are presented

  4. Superconducting vortex pinning with artificial magnetic nanostructures.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velez, M.; Martin, J. I.; Villegas, J. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Gonzalez, E. M.; Vicent, J. L.; Schuller, I. K.; Univ. de Oviedo-CINN; Unite Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales; Univ. Paris-Sud; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Univ. California at San Diego

    2008-11-01

    This review is dedicated to summarizing the recent research on vortex dynamics and pinning effects in superconducting films with artificial magnetic structures. The fabrication of hybrid superconducting/magnetic systems is presented together with the wide variety of properties that arise from the interaction between the superconducting vortex lattice and the artificial magnetic nanostructures. Specifically, we review the role that the most important parameters in the vortex dynamics of films with regular array of dots play. In particular, we discuss the phenomena that appear when the symmetry of a regular dot array is distorted from regularity towards complete disorder including rectangular, asymmetric, and aperiodic arrays. The interesting phenomena that appear include vortex-lattice reconfigurations, anisotropic dynamics, channeling, and guided motion as well as ratchet effects. The different regimes are summarized in a phase diagram indicating the transitions that take place as the characteristic distances of the array are modified respect to the superconducting coherence length. Future directions are sketched out indicating the vast open area of research in this field.

  5. Radiation effects limits on copper in superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guinan, M.W.

    1984-01-01

    The determination of the response of copper stabilizers to neutron irradiation in fusion reactor superconducting magnets requires information in four areas. (1) Neutron flux and spectrum determination are a major factor in the accuracy with which stabilizer response can be predicted. Since magnet stability depends on the weakest link, calculations must be made in sufficient detail to fully account for steep flux gradients and local pertubations from penetrations. (2) Resistivity changes at zero field in magnet spectra are generally calculated from the damage energy cross-section or the equivalent displacement (dpa) rate. (3) Resistivity changes at field for conceptual designs are generally determined from the changes predicted at zero field by the use of a Kohler plot. The cyclic irradiation and annealing, expected to be characteristic of fusion reactor magnet operation, is presently the largest source of uncertainty in determining the limits of neutron exposure for copper stabilizers. Applications of our current understanding of the limits of copper stabilizers in fusion reactor designs are explored in two examples. Recommendations for future additions to the data base are discussed

  6. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation

  7. Status report on the 12T split coil test facility SULTAN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blau, B.; Aebli, E.; Jakob, B.; Pasztor, G.; Vecsey, G.; della Corte, A.; Pasotti, G.; Sacchetti, N.; Spadoni, M.

    1992-01-01

    The third phase of upgrading of the superconductor test facility SULTAN into a split coil system (SULTAN III) is in progress. SULTAN III a join project of ENEA (Italy) and PSI (Switzerland) consists of two coil packages, each containing three concentrically mounted superconducting solenoids. Together they will produce a field of nearly 12T between the two coil packages, inside a solenoid bore of 58 cm. The outermost 6T coils have NbTi conductors, whereas the inner 9T and 12T coils are made of A-15 cables. All Nb 3 Sn coils are manufactured by the react-and-wind technique. The split coil arrangement, in connection with a sophisticated sample insert containing a 50 kA superconducting transformer, will allow testing of short samples of high current carrying superconductors, e.g. for fusion applications. The sample insert was designed to allow changing the samples within a few hours without warming up the whole magnet system. This paper deals with the present status and potential of the Split Coil Test Facility SULTAN III

  8. Technical issues of a high-Tc superconducting bulk magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki

    2000-06-01

    Superconducting magnets made of high-Tc superconductors are promising for industrial applications. It is well known that REBa2Cu3O7-x superconductors prepared by melt processes have a high critical current density, Jc, at 77 K and high magnetic fields. The materials are very promising for high magnetic field applications as a superconducting permanent/bulk magnet with liquid-nitrogen refrigeration. Light rare-earth (LRE) BaCuO bulks, compared with REBaCuO bulks, exhibit a larger Jc in high magnetic fields and a much improved irreversibility field, Hirr, at 77 K. In this study, we discuss technical issues of a high-Tc superconducting bulk magnet, namely the aspects of the melt processing for bulk superconductors, their characteristic superconducting properties and mechanical properties, and trapped field properties of a superconducting bulk magnet. One of the possible applications is a superconducting bulk magnet for the magnetically levitated (Maglev) train in the future.

  9. A monitoring of superconducting magnets by acoustic emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nomura, Harehiko; Tateishi, Hiroshi; Onishi, Toshitada

    1990-01-01

    Since superconducting magnets (SCM) are going to be indispensable to magnetic levitated train, nuclear fusion, magnetic resonating imaging, rotational machines, etc., they must be placed great reliance on its repetitional operations. But without appropriate evaluating methods, these promising techniques must remain still in science levels and hard to be transferable to real human technologies. SCM, being used under dynamical operation with linking other electro-magnetic systems as said above, induce high voltage from which monitoring superconducting to normal transitional voltage is difficult to distinguish. To solve this problem, monitoring SCM by Acoustic Emission (AE) from themselves, have been found effective, in particular, during the dynamical energizing of them. As for a demonstration, this paper will report mainly how to monitor 3 MJ-SCM and a few results of the experiments aquired both by counting and locational mode of AE in pulsed and repeated operations of the magnet. Some discussions on the AE monitorings are also made along the main issues to be solved in future. (author)

  10. Superconducting magnets for isochronous cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, E.R.

    1979-01-01

    Different approaches using superconductivity for isochronous cyclotrons and examination of advantages and disadvantages of each of them are considered. The discussion is focused on isochronous cyclotrons designed for heavy particle acceleration up to kinetic energies of approximately 0.5 times the rest energy of the accelerated ion. A quantitative solution for the influence of the field edges and for the various values of the valley fields are given. The Indiana University cyclotron is considered where both the coil and the associated pole tip material operate at a cryogenic temperature. Offered are advantages for the design which provide reduction in size and impivement in terms of beam dynamics

  11. Design of MgB{sub 2} superconducting dipole magnet for particle beam transport in accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahamsen, A.B.; Givel, J.C.; Andersen, N.H. [Risoe National Lab., Materials Research Dept., Roskilde (Denmark); Zangenberg, N.; Baurichter, A. [Danfysik A/S, Jyllinge (Denmark)

    2006-11-15

    A comprehensive analysis of the innovation potential of superconductivity at Risoe was performed in February 2004 by the main author of this report. Several suggestions for new products and new markets were formulated by the superconductivity group and examined by the innovation staff at Risoe. The existing markets of superconducting technology is within highly specialized scientific areas such as magnetic confinement in fusion energy, sample environment in neutron scattering and large scale accelerators such as the Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at Cern, or in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) community using MR-imaging scanners in medicine and phase identification in organic chemistry. Only the NMR applications can be categorized as a highly profitable and commercial market today. The superconductivity group of Risoe formulated and presented the gearless superconducting wind turbine multipole generator as the most promising new concept, but further initiatives were stopped due to unclear patent possibilities. The experience of the innovation review was used in the STVF framework program 'New superconductors: mechanisms, processes and products' to identify potential new product for the collaborating company Danfysik A/S, which has a strong tradition in building resistive magnets for particle accelerators. A technology transfer project was formulated at the end of 2005 with the purpose to collect the knowledge about the MgB2 superconductor gained in the STVF program and in the European Framework Program 6 project HIPERMAG. It was presented at the Risoe innovation seminar January 2006, and recently a collaboration between Risoe and Danfysik A/S was initialized. The present report aims to outline a potential superconducting product within the STVF program. The use of the MgB{sub 2} superconductors in a dipole magnet for guiding particle beams in a small scale accelerator is examined with the purpose to build lighter and smaller than the present resistive

  12. Design, modification and test of the conduction cooled high-current current leads for the superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Quanling; Cheng, Da; Xu, Fengyu; Yang, Xiangchen; Wang, Ting; Wei, Xiaotao

    2017-09-01

    Conduction cooled current leads, which bring the current from the room temperature terminal down to the cryogenic environment, were used in common recently in large scale superconducting accelerators for its low cost, sample design and low heat load. In practice, the current lead is designed contained in a stainless steel tube. The heat load can be incepted in steps by thermal anchors, where one end is attached to the stainless steel tube, while the other end is connected with the cold shield of the cryomodule. Since the limitation of the welding technique, a thicker stainless steel tube needs to be used, and hence the thermal anchors cannot provide enough pressure to deform the tube enough to be in direct contact with the current lead, which may lead to temperature instability and bring extra heat load to the cryogenic system. An excellent option of epoxy filled current lead can realize the fully contact and reduce the heat load effectively. This paper will present the process of the current lead design, optimization, numerical simulation and cryogenic test, the test results show that the current lead can keep in a stable operation and low heat load.

  13. Status of tritium technology development for magnetic-fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    The development of tritium technology for the magnetic fusion energy program has progressed at a rapid rate over the past two years. The focal points for this development in the United States have been the Tritium Systems Test Assembly at Los Alamos and the FED/INTOR studies supported by the Fusion Engineering Design Center at Oak Ridge. In Canada the Canadian Fusion Fuel Technology Project has been initiated and promises to make significant contributions to the tritium technology program in the next few years. The Japanese government has now approved funding for the Tritium Processing Laboratory at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute's Tokai Research Establishment. Construction on this new facility is scheduled to begin in April 1983. This facility will be the center for fusion tritium technology development in Japan. The European Community is currently working on the design of the tritium facility for the Joint European Torus. There is considerable interaction between all of these programs, thus accelerating the overall development of this crucial technology

  14. Design of MgB2 superconducting dipole magnet for particle beam transport in accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, A.B.; Zangenberg, N.; Baurichter, A.; Grivel, Jean-Claude; Andersen, Niels Hessel

    2006-01-01

    A comprehensive analysis of the innovation potential of superconductivity at Risø was performed in February 2004 by the main author of this report [1]. Several suggestions for new products and new markets were formulated by the superconductivity group andexamined by the innovation staff at Risø. The existing markets of superconducting technology is within highly specialized scientific areas such as magnetic confinement in fusion energy, sample environment in neutron scattering and large scale...

  15. Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee report on recommended fusion program priorities and strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-09-01

    The Magnetic Fusion Advisory Committee recommends a new program strategy with the following principal features: (1) Initiation in FY86 of the Tokamak Fusion Core Experiment (TFCX), a moderate-cost tokamak reactor device (less than $1 B PACE) designed to achieve ignition and long-pulse equilibrium burn. Careful trade-off studies are needed before making key design choices in interrelated technology areas. Cost reductions relative to earlier plans can be realized by exploiting new plasma technology, by locating the TFCX at the TFTR site, and by assigning responsibility for complementary reactor engineering tasks to other sectors of the fusion program. (2) Potential utilization of the MFTF Upgrade to provide a cost-effective means for quasi-steady-state testing of blanket and power-system components, complementary to TFCX. This will depend on future assessments of the data base for tandem mirrors. (3) Vigorous pursuit of the broad US base program in magnetic confinement, including new machine starts, where appropriate, at approximately the present total level of support. (4) Utilization of Development and Technology programs in plasma and magnet technology in support of specific hardware requirements of the TFCX and of other major fusion facilities, so as to minimize overall program cost

  16. Two phase cooling for superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhard, P.H.; Gibson, G.A.; Green, M.A.; Ross, R.R.; Smits, R.G.; Taylor, J.D.; Watt, R.D.

    1986-01-01

    Comments on the use of two phase helium in a closed circuit tubular cooling system and some results obtained with the TPC superconducting magnet are given. Theoretical arguments and experimental evidence are given against a previously suggested method to determine helium two phase flow regimes. Two methods to reduce pressure in the magnet cooling tubes during quenches are discussed; (1) lowering the density of helium in the magnet cooling tubes and (2) proper location of pressure relief valves. Some techniques used to protect the refrigerator from too much cold return gas are also mentioned. 10 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs

  17. Preliminary study of superconducting bulk magnets for Maglev

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Kamijo, Hiroki

    Recent development shows that melt-processed YBaCuO (Y123) or Rare Earth (RE)123 superconductors have a high Jc at 77 K and high magnetic field, leading to high field application as a superconducting quasi-permanent bulk magnet with the liquid nitrogen refrigeration. One of the promising applications is a superconducting magnet for the magnetically levitated (Maglev) train. We discuss a superconducting bulk magnet for the Maglev train in the aspect of a preliminary design of the bulk magnet and also processing for (L)REBaCuO bulk superconductors and their characteristic superconducting properties.

  18. International fusion og spaltning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lone L.

    Bogen analyserer de nye muligheder fra 2007 i europæisk ret med hensyn til fusion eller spaltning mellem aktieselskaber og anpartsselskaber med hjemsted i forskellige europæiske lande. Bogen gennemgår de nye muligheder for strukturændringer, der herved er opstået mulighed for, og den sætter fokus...

  19. Design of a signal conditioner for the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giannelli, Pietro [Turin Polytechnic

    2012-01-01

    This thesis describes the design of a remotely-programmable signal conditioner for the harmonic measurement of accelerator magnets. A 10-channel signal conditioning circuit featuring bucking capabilities was designed from scratch and implemented to the level of the printed circuit board layout. Other system components were chosen from those available on the market. Software design was started with the definition of routine procedures. This thesis is part of an upgrade project for replacing obsolescent automated test equipment belonging to the Fermilab Magnet Test Facility. The design started with a given set of requirements. Using a top-down approach, all the circuits were designed and their expected performances were theoretically predicted and simulated. A limited prototyping phase followed. The printed circuit boards were laid out and routed using a CAD software and focusing the design on maximum electromagnetic interference immunity. An embedded board was selected for controlling and interfacing the signal conditioning circuitry with the instrumentation network. Basic low level routines for hardware access were defined. This work covered the entire design process of the signal conditioner, resulting in a project ready for manufacturing. The expected performances are in line with the requirements and, in the cases where this was not possible, approval of trade-offs was sought and received from the end users. Part I deals with the global structure of the signal conditioner and the subdivision in functional macro-blocks. Part II treats the hardware design phase in detail, covering the analog and digital circuits, the printed circuit layouts, the embedded controller and the power supply selection. Part III deals with the basic hardware-related routines to be implemented in the final software.

  20. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, John R.; Uherka, Kenneth L.; Abdoud, Robert G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing.

  1. Permanent magnet design for high-speed superconducting bearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.; Abdoud, R.G.

    1996-01-01

    A high temperature superconducting bearing including a permanent magnet rotor levitated by a high temperature superconducting structure is disclosed. The rotor preferably includes one or more concentric permanent magnet rings coupled to permanent magnet ring structures having substantially triangular and quadrangular cross-sections. Both alternating and single direction polarity magnet structures can be used in the bearing. 9 figs

  2. Decontamination and Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perry, E.; Chrzanowski, J.; Rule, K.; Viola, M.; Williams, M.; Strykowsky, R.

    1999-01-01

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) is a one-of-a-kind, tritium-fueled fusion research reactor that ceased operation in April 1997. The Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) of the TFTR is scheduled to occur over a period of three years beginning in October 1999. This is not a typical Department of Energy D and D Project where a facility is isolated and cleaned up by ''bulldozing'' all facility and hardware systems to a greenfield condition. The mission of TFTR D and D is to: (a) surgically remove items which can be re-used within the DOE complex, (b) remove tritium contaminated and activated systems for disposal, (c) clear the test cell of hardware for future reuse, (d) reclassify the D-site complex as a non-nuclear facility as defined in DOE Order 420.1 (Facility Safety) and (e) provide data on the D and D of a large magnetic fusion facility. The 100 cubic meter volume of the donut-shaped reactor makes it the second largest fusion reactor in the world. The record-breaking deuterium-tritium experiments performed on TFTR resulted in contaminating the vacuum vessel with tritium and activating the materials with 14 Mev neutrons. The total tritium content within the vessel is in excess of 7,000 Curies while dose rates approach 75 mRem/hr. These radiological hazards along with the size and shape of the Tokamak present a unique and challenging task for dismantling

  3. An FPGA-based quench detection and protection system for superconducting accelerator magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carcagno, R.H.; Feher, S.; Lamm, M.; Makulski, A.; Nehring, R.; Orris, D.F.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Tartaglia, M.; /Fermilab

    2005-05-01

    A new quench detection and protection system for superconducting accelerator magnets was developed for the Fermilab's Magnet Test Facility (MTF). This system is based on a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) module, and it is made of mostly commercially available, integrated hardware and software components. It provides all the functions of our existing VME-based quench detection and protection system, but in addition the new system is easily scalable to protect multiple magnets powered independently and a more powerful user interface and analysis tools. The new system has been used successfully for testing LHC Interaction Region Quadrupoles correctors and High Field Magnet HFDM04. In this paper we describe the system and present results.

  4. Spanish Minister of Science and Technology visits the LHC magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2002-01-01

    H.E. Mr Josep Piqué i Camps, Minister of Science and Technology, Spain, toured the test facility for LHC magnets in building SM18 during his visit to CERN in November. In this series of photos Felix Rodriguez Mateo explains the operation of the test facilty to the ministerial party. Photo 01: (left to right) Felix Rodriguez Mateo; the Minister; Francisco Giménez-Reyna, Spanish delegate to the CERN Finance Committee; M. Aguilar Benitez, Spanish delegate to the CERN Council; G. Babé and G. Léon. Photo 02: (left to right) Felix Rodriguez Mateos; César Dopazo, Director-General of CIEMAT (Spanish Research Centre for Energy, Environment and Technology); the Minister; G. Babé; M. Aguilar Benitez; and G. Léon. Photo 03: Francisco Giménez-Reyna; Felix Rodriguez Mateos; César Dopazo; the Minister; Juan Antonio Rubio, leader of the Education and Technology Transfer division at CERN; G. Babé behind M. Aguilar Benitez. Photo 04: Francisco Giménez-Reyna, partially hidden behind Felix Rodriguez Mateos; César Dop...

  5. Liquid Hydrogen Recirculation System for Forced Flow Cooling Test of Superconducting Conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirai, Y.; Kainuma, T.; Shigeta, H.; Shiotsu, M.; Tatsumoto, H.; Naruo, Y.; Kobayashi, H.; Nonaka, S.; Inatani, Y.; Yoshinaga, S.

    2017-12-01

    The knowledge of forced flow heat transfer characteristics of liquid hydrogen (LH2) is important and necessary for design and cooling analysis of high critical temperature superconducting devices. However, there are few test facilities available for LH2 forced flow cooling for superconductors. A test system to provide a LH2 forced flow (∼10 m/s) of a short period (less than 100 s) has been developed. The test system was composed of two LH2 tanks connected by a transfer line with a controllable valve, in which the forced flow rate and its period were limited by the storage capacity of tanks. In this paper, a liquid hydrogen recirculation system, which was designed and fabricated in order to study characteristics of superconducting cables in a stable forced flow of liquid hydrogen for longer period, was described. This LH2 loop system consists of a centrifugal pump with dynamic gas bearings, a heat exchanger which is immersed in a liquid hydrogen tank, and a buffer tank where a test section (superconducting wires or cables) is set. The buffer tank has LHe cooled superconducting magnet which can produce an external magnetic field (up to 7T) at the test section. A performance test was conducted. The maximum flow rate was 43.7 g/s. The lowest temperature was 22.5 K. It was confirmed that the liquid hydrogen can stably circulate for 7 hours.

  6. Performance Evaluation of the International Space Station Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Mohammad; Balasubramaniam, R.; Nahra, Henry; Mackey, Jeff; Hall, Nancy; Frankenfield, Bruce; Harpster, George; May, Rochelle; Mudawar, Issam; Kharangate, Chirag R.; hide

    2016-01-01

    A ground-based experimental facility to perform flow boiling and condensation experiments is built in support of the development of the long duration Flow Boiling and Condensation Experiment (FBCE) destined for operation on board of the International Space Station (ISS) Fluid Integrated Rack (FIR). We performed tests with the condensation test module oriented horizontally and vertically. Using FC-72 as the test fluid and water as the cooling fluid, we evaluated the operational characteristics of the condensation module and generated ground based data encompassing the range of parameters of interest to the condensation experiment to be performed on the ISS. During this testing, we also evaluated the pressure drop profile across different components of the fluid subsystem, heater performance, on-orbit degassing subsystem, and the heat loss from different components. In this presentation, we discuss representative results of performance testing of the FBCE flow loop. These results will be used in the refinement of the flight system design and build-up of the FBCE which is scheduled for flight in 2019.

  7. Progress on the superconducting magnet for the time projection chamber experiment (TPC) at PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; Eberhard, P.H.; Burns, W.A.

    1980-01-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber) experiment at PEP will have a two meter inside diameter superconducting magnet which creatests a 1.5 T uniform solenoidal field for the TPC. The superconducting magnet coil, cryostat, cooling system, and the TPC gas pressure vessel (which operatests at 11 atm) were designed to be about two thirds of a radiation length thick. As a result, a high current density coil design was chosen. The magnet is cooled by forced flow two phase helium. The TPC magnet is the largest adiabatically stable superconducting magnet built to date. The paper presents the parameters of the TPC thin solenoid and its subsystems. Tests results from the Spring 1980 cryogenic tes are presented. The topics to be dealt with in the paper are cryogenic services and the tests of magnet subsystems such as the folded current leads. Large thin superconducting magnet technology will be important to large detectors to be used on LEP

  8. Application of the microcapsule fabrication technology to magnetic particle testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Fuyumi; Nishimura, Akihiko; Norimatsu, Takayoshi; Nagai, Keiji

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the research is to apply the micro capsule technology to the facility maintenance. The micro capsule technology for laser fusion target was developed at the Institute of Laser Engineering Osaka University. We have a plan to apply the fabrication technology of polystyrene micro capsules to the facility maintenance where the magnetic particle testing for complex piping system is investigated. (author)

  9. Magnetic system of a superconducting separated-sector cyclotron for hadron therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V. L.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.

    2017-07-01

    The development of a cyclotron magnetic system based on superconducting sector magnets is discussed. The cyclotron is conceived as a booster accelerator of a source of 12C6+ ions with energy of 400MeV/nucleon for the purposes of hadron therapy. The results of preliminary investigations aimed at developing such a facility have been reported in our previous papers. In this paper, we consider various configurations of the booster's magnetic system for various field levels. We also analyze the effects of the positions and shapes of superconducting coils on the magnetic field and select the optimum configuration for the cyclotron's magnetic system.

  10. Demountable toroidal fusion core facility for physics optimization and fusion engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bogart, S.L.; Wagner, C.E.; Krall, N.A.; Dalessandro, J.A.; Weggel, C.F.; Lund, K.O.; Sedehi, S.

    1986-01-01

    Following a successful compact ignition tokamak (CIT) experiment, a fusion facility will be required for physics optimization (POF) and fusion engineering research (FERF). The POF will address issues such as high-beta operation, current drive, impurity control, and will test geometric and configurational variations such as the spherical torus or the reversed-field pinch (RFP). The FERF will be designed to accumulate rapidly a large neutron dose in prototypical fusion subsystems exposed to radiation. Both facilities will require low-cost replacement cores and rapid replacement times. The Demountable Toroidal Fusion Core (DTFC) facility is designed to fulfill these requirements. It would be a cost-effective stepping stone between the CIT and a demonstration fusion reactor

  11. Potential applications of NbN composites in fusion reactor magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capone, D.W. II; Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Ho, H.L.

    1986-02-01

    Recent projected requirements for large scale fusion reactor magnets call for the development of advanced superconducting materials capable of producing peak magnetic fields in excess of 15 T with current densities in the windings in excess of 2 x 10 3 A/cm 2 . These materials will be exposed to large stresses (up to 500 MPa) and neutron fluences as high as 10 22 n/cm 2 over the lifetime of the conductor. The demonstrated strain and radiation tolerance of NbN together with excellent superconducting properties make it a promising candidate to be used in a superconducting composite capable of satisfying these requirements. Our program at Argonne is directed towards demonstrating a method of fabrication which is capable of achieving these goals. Tests will be conducted on moderate lengths of NbN superconducting composites to verify the ability to achieve large overall current densities in magnetic fields up to 20 T. High field applications of NbN are also being investigated by groups in Japan and Germany

  12. Fiber Optic Cryogenic Sensors for Superconducting Magnets and Superconducting Power Transmission lines at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Chiuchiolo, A; Cusano, A; Bajko, M; Perez, J C; Bajas, H; Giordano, M; Breglio, G; Palmieri, L

    2014-01-01

    The design, fabrication and tests of a new generation of superconducting magnets for the upgrade of the LHC require the support of an adequate, robust and reliable sensing technology. The use of Fiber Optic Sensors is becoming particularly challenging for applications in extreme harsh environments such as ultra-low temperatures, high electromagnetic fields and strong mechanical stresses offering perspectives for the development of technological innovations in several applied disciplines.

  13. Fiber optic cryogenic sensors for superconducting magnets and superconducting power transmission lines at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiuchiolo, A.; Bajko, M.; Perez, J. C.; Bajas, H.; Consales, M.; Giordano, M.; Breglio, G.; Palmieri, L.; Cusano, A.

    2014-08-01

    The design, fabrication and tests of a new generation of superconducting magnets for the upgrade of the LHC require the support of an adequate, robust and reliable sensing technology. The use of Fiber Optic Sensors is becoming particularly challenging for applications in extreme harsh environments such as ultra-low temperatures, high electromagnetic fields and strong mechanical stresses offering perspectives for the development of technological innovations in several applied disciplines.

  14. Superconducting niobium in high rf magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, G.

    1988-01-01

    The benefit of superconducting cavities for accelerator applications depends on the field and Q/sub 0/ levels which can be achieved reliably in mass producible multicell accelerating structures. The presently observed field and Q/sub 0/ limitations are caused by anomalous loss mechanisms which are not correlated with the intrinsic properties of the pure superconductor but rather due to defects or contaminants on the superconducting surface. The ultimate performance levels of clean superconducting cavities built from pure Nb will be given by the rf critical field and the surface resistance of the superconductor. In the first part of this paper a short survey is given of the maximum surface magnetic fields achieved in single-cell cavities. The results of model calculations for the thermal breakdown induced by very small defects and for the transition to the defect free case is discussed in part 2. In the last chapter, a discussion is given for the rf critical field of Nb on the basis of the Ginzburg-Landau Theory. It is shown that not only purity but also the homogeneity of the material should become important for the performance of superconducting Nb cavities at field levels beyond 100mT. Measurement results of the upper critical field for different grades of commercially available Nb sheet materials are given. 58 references, 20 figures, 1 table

  15. History and status of magnetic fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jacquinot, J.

    2008-01-01

    Ever since the understanding of the basic process which powers the stars has been elucidated, humanity has been dreaming to master controlled fusion for peaceful purposes. Controlled fusion in a steady state regime must use magnetic confinement of a gas (plasma) heated up to 150 millions degrees. Physics and technology involved in such a state are extremely complex and went through many up and down phases. Nevertheless, the overall progress has been spectacular and a significant amount of energy could be produced in a well controlled manner. On this basis, an international organisation of unprecedented magnitude involving 34 countries has started working in Cadarache for the construction of the ITER project. It aims at the scientific demonstration of controlled fusion at the level of 500 MW and a power gain of 10. (author)

  16. SMES: Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    power to magnetically levitated trains . A very small size SMES can poten- tially be part of a hybrid propul- sion system on large transit buses...potentially lead to the increased use of urban transit, maglev and electric vehicles, thereby re- ducing air pollution. Illustration courtesy of

  17. Superconducting dipole magnet for the CBM experiment at FAIR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurilkin P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific goal of the CBM (Compressed Baryonic Matter experiment at FAIR (Darmstadt is to explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at highest baryon densities. The physics program of the CBM experiment is complimentary to the programs to be realized at MPD and BMN facilities at NICA and will start with beam derived by the SIS100 synchrotron. The 5.15 MJ superconducting dipole magnet will be used in the silicon tracking system of the CBM detector. The magnet will provide a magnetic field integral of 1 Tm which is required to obtain a momentum resolution of 1% for the track reconstruction. The results of the development of dipole magnet of the CBM experiment are presented.

  18. Alternate concepts for magnetic fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, D.B.

    Concepts for magnetic confinement are reviewed for desirability as fusion reactors. Physics and technology advantages, uncertainties, and problems are discussed. Alternate fuel cycles, including D-D, D-He 3 , and p-Li 6 , are considered for possible advantages over D-T. Concepts currently under investigation which offer potential improvement over tokamaks include tandem mirrors. Elmo Bumpy Torus, compact tori encompassing reversed field mirrors, reversed field theta pinches and spheromak, stellarators, multipoles, and reversed field Z pinches

  19. Magnetized Target Fusion At General Fusion: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laberge, Michel; O'Shea, Peter; Donaldson, Mike; Delage, Michael; Fusion Team, General

    2017-10-01

    Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) involves compressing an initial magnetically confined plasma on a timescale faster than the thermal confinement time of the plasma. If near adiabatic compression is achieved, volumetric compression of 350X or more of a 500 eV target plasma would achieve a final plasma temperature exceeding 10 keV. Interesting fusion gains could be achieved provided the compressed plasma has sufficient density and dwell time. General Fusion (GF) is developing a compression system using pneumatic pistons to collapse a cavity formed in liquid metal containing a magnetized plasma target. Low cost driver, straightforward heat extraction, good tritium breeding ratio and excellent neutron protection could lead to a practical power plant. GF (65 employees) has an active plasma R&D program including both full scale and reduced scale plasma experiments and simulation of both. Although pneumatic driven compression of full scale plasmas is the end goal, present compression studies use reduced scale plasmas and chemically accelerated aluminum liners. We will review results from our plasma target development, motivate and review the results of dynamic compression field tests and briefly describe the work to date on the pneumatic driver front.

  20. Proceedings of the IEA-technical workshop for an international fusion materials irradiation facility. IEA-implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrlich, K.; Lindau, R.

    1995-07-01

    The workshop was initiated to deal with the following objectives: (1) Critical review of the requirements for IFMIF from the user's point of view; (2) Definition of a baseline concept for the CDA-study; (3) Formation of working groups for main fields of activities; (4) Identification of tasks and critical issues for main components; (5) Development of a working break-down structure, distribution of work and milestones for CDA-activities; (6) Documentation of main results. According to the enclosed agenda the mission for a Conceptual Design Study, the requirements for an intense neutron source from the user's point of view and the baseline concept for an accelerator-driven D-Li neutron source were discussed in several plenary sessions. In three subgroups (SG 1 Accelerators, SG2 Lithium Target and SG3 Users and Test Cell) technical concepts for the different components and facilities were discussed in detail, critical issues and tasks for the concept study were identified. Finally, the sharing of tasks to the different national parties, questions of organisation of the work, flow of information and definition of milestones was agreed upon. The detailled summary reports of the subgroups and the contributions of the plenary sessions are presented in the proceedings. (orig./HP)

  1. Superconducting Sphere in an External Magnetic Field Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonov, Sergey N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to give the intelligible procedure for undergraduate students to grasp proof of the fact that the magnetic field outside the hollow superconducting sphere (superconducting shell) coincides with the field of a point magnetic dipole both when an uniform external magnetic field is applied as when a ferromagnetic sphere…

  2. Criteria of the efficiency for radiation protection of tokamak reactor superconducting magnet coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimin, S.A.

    1988-01-01

    Factors determining serviceability of the main elements (superconductor, stabilizing conductor, insulation) of superconducting magnet coils for tokamak reactors are discussed. It is suggested that the limiting values of total and specific energy release in the material of superconducting coils, increase in electric resistance of the stabilizing conductor, decrease in the superconductor critical current and damage of the superconducting magnet insulation should be used as criteria of the reactor internal radiation protection efficiency. The conclusion is made that neutron fluence in the magnet coil components considered can be used as a generalized criterion of the first approximation for the evaluation of the protection efficiency

  3. Stored energy in fusion magnet materials irradiated at low temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaplin, R.L.; Kerchner, H.R.; Klabunde, C.E.; Coltman, R.R.

    1989-08-01

    During the power cycle of a fusion reactor, the radiation reaching the superconducting magnet system will produce an accumulation of immobile defects in the magnet materials. During a subsequent warm-up cycle of the magnet system, the defects will become mobile and interact to produce new defect configurations as well as some mutual defect annihilations which generate heat-the release of stored energy. This report presents a brief qualitative discussion of the mechanisms for the production and release of stored energy in irradiated materials, a theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials, theoretical analysis of the thermal response of irradiated materials during warm-up, and a discussion of the possible impact of stored energy release on fusion magnet operation 20 refs

  4. Radiation Shielding Utilizing A High Temperature Superconducting Magnet

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Project objective is to evaluate human radiation protection and architecture utilizing existing superconducting magnet technology while attempting to significantly...

  5. 1400 Liter 1.8K Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, T.J.; Rabehl, R.J.; Sylvester, C.D.

    1997-08-01

    A double bath superfluid helium dewar has been constructed and operated at Fermilab's Magnet Test Facility. The 1.8 K portion of the dewar is sized to contain a superconducting magnet up to 0.5 meters in diameter and 4 meters long in a vertical orientation in 0.12 MPa pressurized superfluid. The dewar can also provide a subcooled Helium I environment for tests; the entire temperature range from 4.4 K to 1. 8 K at 0.12 MPa is available. This paper describes the system design, lambda plate, heat exchanger, and performance

  6. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  7. Structural design of superconducting magnets for the large coil program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, W.H.; Long, C.J.; Stoddart, W.C.T.

    1979-09-01

    The Large Coil Program (LCP) is a research, development, and demonstration effort specifically for the advancement of the technologies involved in the production of large superconducting magnets. This paper presents a review of the status of the structural designs, analysis methods, and verification tests being performed by the participating LCP design teams in the USA, Switzerland, Japan, and the Federal Republic of Germany. The significant structural mechanics concerns that are being investigated with the LCP are presented

  8. Magnetic Parameters Of A NB3SN Superconducting Magnet For A 56 HGz ECR Ion Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferracin, P.; Caspi, S.; Felice, H.; Leitner, D.; Lyneis, C.M.; Prestemon, S.; Sabbi, G.L.; Todd, D.S.

    2009-01-01

    Third generation Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion sources operate at microwave frequencies between 20 and 30 GHz and employ NbTi superconducting magnets with a conductor peak field of 6-7 T. A significant gain in performance can be achieved by replacing NbTi with Nb 3 Sn, allowing solenoids and sextupole coils to reach a field of 15 T in the windings. In this paper we describe the design of a Nb 3 Sn superconducting magnet for a fourth generation ECR source operating at a microwave frequency of 56 GHz. The magnet design features a configuration with an internal sextupole magnet surrounded by three solenoids. A finite element magnetic model has been used to investigate conductor peak fields and the operational margins. Results of the numerical analysis are presented and discussed.

  9. Conduction cooled high temperature superconducting dipole magnet for accelerator applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zangenberg, N.; Nielsen, G.; Hauge, N.

    2012-01-01

    A 3T proof-of-principle dipole magnet for accelerator applications, based on 2nd generation high temperature superconducting tape was designed, built, and tested by a consortium under the lead of Danfysik. The magnet was designed to have a straight, circular bore with a good field region of radius...... = 25 mm, and a magnetic length of 250 mm. A total length of 2.5 km YBCO-based copper stabilized conductor supplied by SuperPower Inc., NY, USA, was isolated with 0.025 mm of epoxy and subsequently wound into 14 saddle coils and 4 racetrack coils with a cosine theta like configuration. The coils were......-liquid free operation of an HTS accelerator magnet was demonstrated. The cold mass support design permits magnet orientation under arbitrary angles. Careful choice of materials in terms of magnetic, heat conducting and mechanical properties resulted in a robust and compact solution which opens up...

  10. Ruthenocuprats: Playground for superconductivity and magnetism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Khajehnezhad

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available  We have compared the structural, electrical, and magnetic properties of Ru(Gd1.5-xPrxCe0.5Sr2Cu2O10-δ (Pr/Gd samples with x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.033, 0.035, 0.04, 0.05, 0.06, 0.1 and RuGd1.5(Ce0.5-xPrxSr2Cu2O10-δ (Pr/Ce samples with x = 0.0, 0.01, 0.03, 0.05, 0.08, 0.1, 0.15, 0.2 prepared by the standard solid-state reaction technique with RuGd1.5(GdxCe0.5-x Sr2Cu2O10-δ (Gd/Ce samples with x= 0.0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3. We obtained the XRD patterns for different samples with various x. The lattice parameters versus x for different substitutions have been obtained from the Rietveld analysis. To determine how the magnetic and superconducting properties of these layered cuprate systems can be affected by Pr substitution, the resistivity and magnetoresistivity, with Hext varying from 0.0 to 15 kOe, have been measured at various temperatures. Superconducting transition temperature Tc and magnetic transition Tirr have been obtained through resistivity and ac susceptibility measurements. The Tc suppression due to Gd/Ce, Pr/Gd and Pr/Ce substitutions show competition between pair breaking by magnetic impurity, hole doping due to different ionic valences, difference in ionic radii, and oxygen stoichiometry. Pr/Gd substitution suppresses superconductivity more rapidly than for Pr/Ce or Gd/Ce, showing that the effect of hole doping and pair breaking by magnetic impurity is stronger than the difference in ionic radii. In Pr/Gd substitution, the small difference between the ionic radii of Pr and Gd, and absorption of more oxygen due to higher valence of Pr with respect to Gd, decrease the mean Ru-Ru distance, and as a result, the magnetic exchange interaction becomes stronger with the increase of x. But, Pr/Ce and Gd/Ce substitutions have a reverse effect. The magnetic properties such as Hc, obtained through magnetization measurements versus applied magnetic field isoterm at 77K and room temperatures, become stronger with x in Pr/Gd and weaker with x in Pr

  11. Superconducting magnets and cryogenics for the steady state superconducting tokamak SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saxena, Y.C.

    2000-01-01

    SST-1 is a steady state superconducting tokamak for studying the physics of the plasma processes in tokamak under steady state conditions and to learn technologies related to the steady state operation of the tokamak. SST-1 will have superconducting magnets made from NbTi based conductors operating at 4.5 K temperature. The design of the superconducting magnets and the cryogenic system of SST-1 tokamak are described. (author)

  12. The investigation of the superconducting NMR-imaging main magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Han, S.; Feng, Z.X.

    1989-01-01

    The design principles of MRI main magnets and the problems in the design process have been analyzed. A computer program in which the critical characteristics of superconductor, the uniformity of the magnetic field, the economization of magnet and the selection of magnet constructions are considered has been established. The program can also be used to design high uniformity superconducting magnet in some other uses. In designing MRI superconducting main magnet, five different magnet constructions have been analyzed. Using this computer program the authors made a series of designs of MRI superconducting main magnets with different construction, different central magnetic field, and different bore diameters. By analyzing the computing results some conclusions useful for the practical design of the MRI superconducting main magnets are obtained

  13. The Toulouse pulsed magnet facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The 'Laboratoire National des Champs Magnetiques Pulses' (LNCMP) is an international user facility providing access to pulsed magnetic fields up to and beyond 60 T. The laboratory disposes of 10 magnet stations equipped with long-pulse magnets operating in the 35-60 T range and a short-pulse system reaching magnetic fields in excess of 70 T. The experimental infrastructure includes various high and low-temperature systems ranging from ordinary flow-type cryostats to dilution refrigerators reaching 50 mK, as well as different types of high-pressure cells. Experimental techniques include magnetization, transport, luminescence, IR-spectroscopy and polarimetry. The LNCMP pursues an extensive in-house research program focussing on all technological and scientific aspects of pulsed magnetic fields. Recent technical developments include the implementation of 60 T rapid-cooling coils, an 80 T prototype, a pulsed dipole magnet for optical investigations of dilute matter and a transportable horizontal access magnet for small angle x-ray scattering experiments. Scientific activities cover a variety of domains, including correlated electron systems, magnetism, semiconductors and nanoscience

  14. Transportation of tritiated waste from fusion facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gruetzmacher, K.M.; Carlson, R.V.; Stencel, J.R.; Sissingh, R.A.P.

    1988-03-01

    This paper examines methods of handling tritiated waste from a fusion facility, concentrating on handling requirements specific to tritium. Gaseous effluent from a fusion reactor can currently be transported from a fusion facility in two forms /endash/ as a gas or solidified on uranium beds. Tritiated water can be transported if it is solidified by absorption onto molecular sieve beds or on clay or cement. Solid waste being shipped for disposal can be transported in low specific activity (LSA, less than 0.3 mCig[1.1 /times/ 10 7 Bqg]), type A (less than or equal to 1000 CI[3.7 /times/ 10 13 Bq]) or type B (greater than 1000 CI[3.7 /times/ 10 13 Bq]) standard containers. The method chosen for transport depends on the amount and level of activity of the tritiated material and whether or not it will be reprocessed at another facility. 4 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs

  15. SUPERCONDUCTING HELICAL SNAKE MAGNETS: CONSTRUCTION AND MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackay, W.W.; Anerella, M.; Courant, E.

    1999-01-01

    In order to collide polarized protons, the RHIC project will have two snakes in each ring and four rotators around each of two interaction regions. Two snakes on opposite sides of each ring can minimize depolarization during acceleration by keeping the spin tune at a half. Since the spin direction is normally along the vertical direction in a flat ring, spin rotators must be used around an interaction point to have longitudinal polarization in a collider experiment. Each snake or rotator will be composed of four helical dipoles to provide the required rotation of spin with minimal transverse orbit excursions in a compact length of 10m. The basic helical dipole is a superconducting magnet producing a transverse dipole field which is twisted about the magnet axis through 360 o in a length of 2.4 m. The design and construction of the magnets is described in this paper

  16. HFR irradiation testing of fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conrad, R.; von der Hardt, P.; Loelgen, R.; Scheurer, H.; Zeisser, P.

    1984-01-01

    The present and future role of the High Flux Reactor Petten for fusion materials testing has been assessed. For practical purposes the Tokamak-based fusion reactor is chosen as a point of departure to identify material problems and materials data needs. The identification is largely based on the INTOR and NET design studies, the reported programme strategies of Japan, the U.S.A. and the European Communities for technical development of thermonuclear fusion reactors and on interviews with several experts. Existing and planned irradiation facilities, their capabilities and limitations concerning materials testing have been surveyed and discussed. It is concluded that fission reactors can supply important contributions for fusion materials testing. From the point of view of future availability of fission testing reactors and their performance it appears that the HFR is a useful tool for materials testing for a large variety of materials. Prospects and recommendations for future developments are given

  17. Mirror fusion vacuum technology developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batzer, T.H.; Call, W.R.

    1983-01-01

    Magnetic Mirror Fusion experiments, such as MFTF-B+T (Mirror Fusion Test Facility-B, Tritium Upgrade) and foreseeable follow-on devices, have operational and maintenance requirements that have not yet been fully demonstrated. Among those associated with vacuum technology are the very-high continuous-pumping speeds, 10 7 to 10 8 l/s for D 2 , T 2 and, to a lesser extent, He; the early detection of water leaks from the very-high heat-flux neutral-beam dumps and the detection and location of leaks in the superconducting magnets not protected by guard vacuums. Possible solutions to these problems have been identified and considerable progress has been made toward successfully demonstrating their feasibility

  18. Fusion power by magnetic confinement - program plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dean, S.O.

    1978-01-01

    This Fusion Power Program Plan treats the technical, schedular and budgetary projections for the development of fusion power using magnetic confinement. It was prepared on the basis of current technical status and program perspective. A broad overview of the probable facilities requirements and optional possible technical paths to a demonstration reactor is presented, as well as a more detailed plan for the R and D program for the next five years. The 'plan' is not a roadmap to be followed blindly to the end goal. Rather it is a tool of management, a dynamic and living document which will change and evolve as scientific, engineering/technology and commercial/economic/environmental analyses and progress proceeds. The use of plans such as this one in technically complex development programs requires judgment and flexibility as new insights into the nature of the task evolve. The presently-established program goal of the fusion program is to develop and demonstrate pure fusion central electric power stations for commercial applications

  19. Design and control of a superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Y; Pei, R; Hong, Z; Song, J; Fang, F; Coombs, T A

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives a detailed description of the design of a superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor. The parameters of the motor have been identified, and the torque equation has been stated. A direct torque control algorithm is introduced and applied to a traditional permanent magnet synchronous motor and the superconducting permanent magnet synchronous motor described in this paper. The motor performance shows that the direct torque control algorithm provides excellent control to the superconducting motor, and guarantees that the magnitude of the operational armature currents is smaller than the value of the critical current of the superconducting tape used for stator winding

  20. Peking university superconducting accelerator facility for free electron laser

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Kui; Hao Jian Kui; Huang Sen Lin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan Sheng Wen; Wang Li; Xiang Rong; Zhang Bao Cheng; Zhu Feng; Zhuang Jie Ji

    2002-01-01

    Peking University Superconducting Accelerator Facility (PKU-SCAF) is to generate high-quality electron beams with high average current. It is mainly composed of a DC-SC photocathode injector and a superconducting accelerator. It will operate in CW mode. The energy of the electrons is 20-35 MeV and the emittance is <15 pi mm mrad. PKU-SCAF will be used for Free Electron Lasers.