WorldWideScience

Sample records for international endotoxin society

  1. International Transplant Nurses Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... The Mission of ITNS The International Transplant Nurses Society is committed to the promotion of excellence in ... 20-1589538 Copyright © 2006 - 2014 International Transplant Nurses Society (ITNS). No materials, including graphics, may be reused, ...

  2. Insoluble glycogen, a metabolizable internal adsorbent, decreases the lethality of endotoxin shock in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sipka

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Insoluble glycogen is an enzymatically modified form of naturally occurring soluble glycogen with a great adsorbing capacity. It can be metabolized by phagocytes to glucose. In this study we used insoluble glycogen intravenously in the experimental endotoxin shock of rats. Wistar male rats were sensitized to endotoxin by Pb acetate. The survival of rats were compared in groups of animals endotoxin shock treated and non-treated with insoluble glycogen. Furthermore, we have determined in vitro the binding capacity of insoluble glycogen for endotoxin, tumour necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1 and secretable phospholipase A2. Use of 10 mg/kg dose of insoluble glycogen could completely prevent the lethality of shock induced by LD50 quantity of endotoxin in rats. All animals treated survived. Insoluble glycogen is a form of ‘metabolizable internal adsorbents’. It can potentially be used for treatment of septic shock.

  3. International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooks, R G; Gelpi, E; Nibbering, N M

    2001-02-01

    This paper gives a brief description of the recently formalized International Mass Spectrometry Society (IMSS). It is presented here in order to increase awareness of the opportunities for collaboration in mass spectrometry in an international context. It also describes the recent 15th International Mass Spectrometry Conference, held August/September 2000, in Barcelona. Each of the authors is associated with the IMSS. The 15th Conference, which covers all of mass spectrometry on a triennial basis, was chaired by Professor Emilio Gelpi of the Instituto de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Barcelona. The outgoing and founding President of the IMSS is Professor Graham Cooks, Purdue University, and the incoming President is Professor Nico Nibbering, University of Amsterdam. Similar material has been provided to the Editors of other journals that cover mass spectrometry.

  4. Collaborative study for the establishment of the WHO 3(rd) International Standard for Endotoxin, the Ph. Eur. endotoxin biological reference preparation batch 5 and the USP Reference Standard for Endotoxin Lot H0K354.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Findlay, L; Desai, T; Heath, A; Poole, S; Crivellone, M; Hauck, W; Ambrose, M; Morris, T; Daas, A; Rautmann, G; Buchheit, K H; Spieser, J M; Terao, E

    2015-01-01

    An international collaborative study was organised jointly by the World Health Organization (WHO)/National Institute for Biological Standards and Control (NIBSC), the United States Pharmacopeia (USP) and the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines & HealthCare (EDQM/Council of Europe) for the establishment of harmonised replacement endotoxin standards for these 3 organisations. Thirty-five laboratories worldwide, including Official Medicines Control Laboratories (OMCLs) and manufacturers enrolled in the study. Three candidate preparations (10/178, 10/190 and 10/196) were produced with the same material and same formulation as the current reference standards with the objective of generating a new (3(rd)) International Standard (IS) with the same potency (10 000 IU/vial) as the current (2(nd)) IS, as well as new European Pharmacopoeia (Ph. Eur.). and USP standards. The suitability of the candidate preparations to act as the reference standard in assays for endotoxin performed according to compendial methods was evaluated. Their potency was calibrated against the WHO 2(nd) IS for Endotoxin (94/580). Gelation and photometric methods produced similar results for each of the candidate preparations. The overall potency estimates for the 3 batches were comparable. Given the intrinsic assay precision, the observed differences between the batches may be considered unimportant for the intended use of these materials. Overall, these results were in line with those generated for the establishment of the current preparations of reference standards. Accelerated degradation testing of vials stored at elevated temperatures supported the long-term stability of the 3 candidate preparations. It was agreed between the 3 organisations that batch 10/178 be shared between WHO and EDQM and that batches 10/190 and 10/196 be allocated to USP, with a common assigned value of 10 000 IU/vial. This value maintains the continuity of the global harmonisation of reference materials and

  5. Internal Conflicts in Muslim Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashiq Ali Shah

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of psychological theories and the social dynamics of the society help identify salient attributes and processes relevant to conflict among Muslims. The psychodynamic concept of personality and frustration-aggression hypothesis account for the socialization practices in the Muslim societies, emotional instability, unfavorable evaluation of those holding a different viewpoint and venting out one's aggression on the weaker. The tendency of the Muslims to praise their sect/tribe/religious group leads to a groupthink situation that polarizes intergroup relationships. The acts of categorization in group and out group, as postulated by the social identity theory, contribute towards the distorted perception of each other. The Islamic notions of brotherhood, unity and ethnic identity as means of personal identification and social interaction seems to have been forgotten by the Muslims. Though the Western social-psychological constructs are helpful in understanding the causes of conflict among Muslims, they are not germane to Muslim societies. The group belongingness and group favouritism is not necessarily a tool of discrimination and conflict but is an essential component of one's survival in a collectivist society. The Western theories also do not address the economic and political circumstances responsible for the multitude of conflicts among Muslims.

  6. International Society for Stem Cell Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and regenerative medicine community in the world. More stem cell research Take a closer look Recent Blogs View ... story independent nonprofit organization & the voice of the stem cell research community The International Society for Stem Cell ...

  7. Role of Scientific Societies in International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches. Understanding how deeply interrelated are Earth components and processes, population growth, increased needs of mineral and energy resources, global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as an interconnected system emphasizes the need of international cooperation. International research collaboration has an immense potential and is needed for further development of Earth science research and education. The Union Session is planned to provide a forum for analysis and discussion of the status of research and education of geosciences in developing countries, international collaboration programs and new initiatives for promoting and strengthening scientific cooperation. A theme of particular relevance in the analyses and discussions is the role of scientific societies in international collaboration. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities. They may further assist communities in developing countries in providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. What else can be done? This is a complex subject and scientific societies may not be seen independently from the many factors involved in research and education. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems, while urgently requiring improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources, and identification of major problems and needs. What are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? What and how should international collaboration do? What are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to

  8. The Concept of Law and International Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    Hedley Bull, one of the founders of the School of International Society (English School) relies heavily on H.L.A. Hart in his understanding of law, including international law. The contribution seeks to explore 1) how Bull has creatively made use of Hart's Concept of Law, 2) on which points Hart......'s theory has short comings, 3) on which additional points Bull's use of the concept of law has short comings, and 4) sketch of ideas how to improve the various short comings....

  9. The Concept of Law and International Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaumburg-Müller, Sten

    Hedley Bull, one of the founders of the School of International Society (English School) relies heavily on H.L.A. Hart in his understanding of law, including international law. The contribution seeks to explore 1) how Bull has creatively made use of Hart's Concept of Law, 2) on which points Hart......'s theory has short comings, 3) on which additional points Bull's use of the concept of law has short comings, and 4) sketch of ideas how to improve the various short comings....

  10. International Society and Normalization Efforts in Rwanda

    OpenAIRE

    Güzelipek, Yiğit Anıl

    2015-01-01

    In 1994, an African country of Rwanda experienced one of the most relentless genocide of the human history. Between 800.000 and 1.000.000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus are killed. Despite two decades after the genocide, the country is still very far from a functioning state system. What is more to the point, the social effects of the 1994 genocide are still prevalent over the Rwandan society. This study seeks to analyze the reconstruction process in Rwanda state in the respect of international co...

  11. Global Civil Society and International Summits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2011-01-01

    Research in the field of citizenship, civil society, and social movements in relation to larger democratic summits has either focused on radical confrontational elements of activism, broad public demonstrations, or the professional non-governmental organizations. In this article, I label the type...

  12. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R;

    2014-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretat...

  13. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: energy drinks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin; La Bounty, Paul; Taylor, Lem; Nelson, Mike T; Greenwood, Mike; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Lopez, Hector L; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Schmitz, Stephen; Collins, Rick; Kalman, Doug S; Antonio, Jose; Kreider, Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the safety and efficacy of the use of energy drinks (ED) or energy shots (ES...

  14. International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Federation of Red Cross Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)... Hurricane Matthew: International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent ... communities Port-au Prince, 3 November 2016 —Since Hurricane Matthew struck Haiti one month ago, the Haiti Re... ...

  15. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C H; Buckleton, J S;

    2006-01-01

    The DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) was convened at the 21st congress of the International Society for Forensic Genetics held between 13 and 17 September in the Azores, Portugal. The purpose of the group was to agree on guidelines to encourage best practice...... that can be universally applied to assist with mixture interpretation. In addition the commission was tasked to provide guidance on low copy number (LCN) reporting. Our discussions have highlighted a significant need for continuing education and research into this area. We have attempted to present...

  16. The Rise of the Welfare State in International Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schouenborg, Laust

    2015-01-01

    in international society such as diplomacy, war and trade. A key contribution of this approach is that it aspires not only to examine the evolution of one institution in isolation, as has often been attempted in English School scholarship, but to actively explore how institutions interact with each other....

  17. "Families" in International Context: Comparing Institutional Effects across Western Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Lynn Prince; Baxter, Janeen

    2010-01-01

    We review comparative evidence of institutional effects on families in Western societies. We focus on 2 key aspects of family life: gendered divisions of labor and people's transitions into, within, and out of relationships. Many individual-level models assume the effects are robust across countries. The international evidence over the past decade…

  18. International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Conference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, Maarten J

    2009-01-01

    In Orlando, the 14th International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) Conference was held at Sea World, FL, USA. Despite the temptations of the environment, delegates from industry, academia and health policy convened, engaged in lively discussion and presented new and fasci

  19. Symposium of the International Society of Dynamic Games

    CERN Document Server

    Haurie, Alain; Annals of the International Society of Dynamic Games

    1994-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed a surge of activity in the field of dynamic both theory and applications. Theoretical as well as practical games, in problems in zero-sum and nonzero-sum games, continuous time differential and discrete time multistage games, and deterministic and stochastic games games are currently being investigated by researchers in diverse disciplines, such as engineering, mathematics, biology, economics, management science, and political science. This surge of interest has led to the formation of the International Society of Dynamic Games (ISDG) in 1990, whose primary goal is to foster the development of advanced research and applications in the field of game theory. One important activity of the Society is to organize biannually an international symposium which aims at bringing together all those who contribute to the development of this active field of applied science. In 1992 the symposium was organized in Grimentz, Switzerland, under the supervision of an international scientific committe...

  20. Introducing a New International Society of Aeolian Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobeck, T. M.; Lee, J.; Lancaster, N.; Bullard, J. E.

    2008-12-01

    Aeolian research is a long-standing and rapidly growing area of geological study where scientists of many disciplines meet to investigate the effects of wind on the surface of the Earth and other planetary bodies such as Mars and Titan. Fields of study in aeolian research cover a broad spectrum ranging from developing a basic scientific understanding of the fundamental physical processes of grain motion to the effects of soil erosion on landscape health and environmental sustainability. Aeolian research also includes studies of the effects of aeolian particles on global climate, air quality, and human health, coastal sand transport processes, land degradation, dune migration, the formation of sand seas, and much more. A growing number of international conferences have been organized to focus specifically on aeolian phenomena and a vast number of scholarly publications have been produced to support the science. One popular bibliography includes over 30,000 citations and hundreds of peer-reviewed papers are published each year. Until very recently, no scientific society specifically dealing with aeolian research has been available. The new International Society of Aeolian Research (ISAR) that has been organized to bring together aeolian scientists from around the world. The new society was created to promote contacts among researchers in aeolian processes and related subjects for discussion and comparison of research, to initiate conferences (such as the International Conference on Aeolian Research), to organize excursions, and support the publication of a peer-reviewed scientific journal. The International Society of Aeolian Research sponsors the new Elsevier journal Aeolian Research in support of these activities. This paper will provide further details about the new society and the journal. Please see www.aeolianresearch.org for details.

  1. Abstracts from the 2016 Joint Meeting of the International Confocal Group (ICG), the International Dermoscopy Society (IDS), and the International Society for Digital Imaging of the Skin (ISDIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, DongKyun; Rocha, Lilian; Guitera, Pascale; Sierra, Heidy; Kose, Kivanc; Peterson, Gary; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Bozkurt, Alican; Ariafar, Setareh; Dy, Jennifer; Brooks, Dana; Dickensheets, David; Prow, Tarl W; Hoang, Van; Lin, Lynlee

    2016-01-01

    What follows are the abstracts presented at the Joint Meeting of the International Confocal Group (ICG), the International Dermoscopy Society (IDS), and the International Society for Digital Imaging of the Skin (ISDIS). The meeting was held on March 5, 2016, in Washington, DC, USA, in conjunction with the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology (Figure 1). The abstracts appear in the order in which they were presented.

  2. The Organization of Islamic Cooperation in contemporary international society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Víctor Luis Gutiérrez Castillo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC is an international organisation consisting of 57 member States of Muslim confession, also Palestina. This organisation is "the collective voice of the Muslim world" and works to "safeguard and protect the interests of the Muslim world in the spirit of promoting international peace and harmony". In 28 June 2011 during the 38th Council of Foreign Ministers meeting (CFM in Astana (Kazakhstan the organisation changed its name from Organisation of the Islamic Conference to its current name.The OIC also changed its logo at this time.The Organisation of Islamic Cooperation (OIC has a permanent delegation of the United Nations and it’s the second largest international organisation outside the United Nations. In recent years it has been increasing its importance in the international society and it has played an important role in regional conflicts

  3. Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Reu, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    This collection represents a single volume of technical papers presented at the Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference organized by the Society for Experimental Mechanics and Sandia National Laboratories and held in Philadelphia, PA, November 7-10, 2016. The volume presents early findings from experimental, standards development and various other investigations concerning digital image correlation - an important area within Experimental Mechanics. The area of Digital Image Correlation has been an integral track within the SEM Annual Conference spearheaded by Professor Michael Sutton from the University of South Carolina. In 2016, the SEM and Sandia joined their collaborative strengths to launch a standing fall meeting focusing specifically on developments in the area of Digital Image Correlation. The contributed papers within this volume span numerous technical aspects of DIC including standards development for the industry. .

  4. 2nd Conference of the International Society for Nonparametric Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Manteiga, Wenceslao; Romo, Juan

    2016-01-01

    This volume collects selected, peer-reviewed contributions from the 2nd Conference of the International Society for Nonparametric Statistics (ISNPS), held in Cádiz (Spain) between June 11–16 2014, and sponsored by the American Statistical Association, the Institute of Mathematical Statistics, the Bernoulli Society for Mathematical Statistics and Probability, the Journal of Nonparametric Statistics and Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. The 15 articles are a representative sample of the 336 contributed papers presented at the conference. They cover topics such as high-dimensional data modelling, inference for stochastic processes and for dependent data, nonparametric and goodness-of-fit testing, nonparametric curve estimation, object-oriented data analysis, and semiparametric inference. The aim of the ISNPS 2014 conference was to bring together recent advances and trends in several areas of nonparametric statistics in order to facilitate the exchange of research ideas, promote collaboration among researchers...

  5. International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies: A model for international collaboration to promote orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theodore Miclau

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In October 2013, the International Combined Orthopaedic Research Societies (ICORS; http://i-cors.org was founded with inaugural member organisations from the previous Combined Orthopaedic Research Society, which had sponsored combined meetings for more than 2 decades. The ICORS is dedicated to the stimulation of orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research in fields such as biomedical engineering, biology, chemistry, and veterinary and human clinical research. The ICORS seeks to facilitate communication with member organisations to enhance international research collaborations and to promote the development of new international orthopaedic and musculoskeletal research organisations. Through new categories of membership, the ICORS represents the broadest coalition of orthopaedic research organisations globally.

  6. The Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) and the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES): Leadership, Ambiguities and Synergies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzon, Maria; Bray, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) has, throughout its 50 years of existence, exercised leadership in the field of comparative education. It was one of the five societies that founded the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES) in 1970, an umbrella body that by 2006 brought together 35 national,…

  7. 15th Conference of the International Federation of Classification Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Montanari, Angela; Vichi, Maurizio

    2017-01-01

    This edited volume on the latest advances in data science covers a wide range of topics in the context of data analysis and classification. In particular, it includes contributions on classification methods for high-dimensional data, clustering methods, multivariate statistical methods, and various applications. The book gathers a selection of peer-reviewed contributions presented at the Fifteenth Conference of the International Federation of Classification Societies (IFCS2015), which was hosted by the Alma Mater Studiorum, University of Bologna, from July 5 to 8, 2015.

  8. Headache associated with dialysis: the International Headache Society criteria revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoniazzi, A L; Bigal, M E; Bordini, C A; Speciali, J G

    2003-03-01

    The International Headache Society (IHS) criteria for headache related to haemodialysis consider that the headaches must begin during haemodialysis and terminate within 24 h. Twenty-eight patients whose headaches started by the time they entered the dialysis programme were prospectively studied. We were not able to classify eight patients that presented the headaches between the sessions. Despite the small number of patients in our study being too low to provide a basis for change in the IHS classification, it serves as an observational report demonstrating possible varieties of headache related to haemodialysis.

  9. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: energy drinks

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell Bill; Wilborn Colin; La Bounty Paul; Taylor Lem; Nelson Mike T; Greenwood Mike; Ziegenfuss Tim N; Lopez Hector L; Hoffman Jay R; Stout Jeffrey R; Schmitz Stephen; Collins Rick; Kalman Doug S; Antonio Jose; Kreider Richard B

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the safety and efficacy of the use of energy drinks (ED) or energy shots (ES). The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. Although ED and ES contain a number of nutrients that are purported to affect mental and/or physical performance, the primary ergogenic nutrients in most ED and ES appear to be carbohydrate and/or caffeine. 2. The er...

  10. International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaffer, Ayal; Isometsä, Erkki T; Tondo, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    the framework of the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force on Suicide, a systematic review of articles published since 1980, characterized by the key terms bipolar disorder and 'suicide attempts' or 'suicide', was conducted, and data extracted for analysis from all eligible articles...... significantly associated with suicide attempts were: female gender, younger age at illness onset, depressive polarity of first illness episode, depressive polarity of current or most recent episode, comorbid anxiety disorder, any comorbid substance use disorder, alcohol use disorder, any illicit substance use...

  11. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coble, M. D.; Buckleton, J.; Butler, J M

    2016-01-01

    The use of biostatistical software programs to assist in data interpretation and calculate likelihood ratios is essential to forensic geneticists and part of the daily case work flow for both kinship and DNA identification laboratories. Previous recommendations issued by the DNA Commission...... of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) covered the application of bio-statistical evaluations for STR typing results in identification and kinship cases, and this is now being expanded to provide best practices regarding validation and verification of the software required for these calculations...... requirements to validate bio-statistical software to be used in forensic genetics. We distinguish between developmental validation and the responsibilities of the software developer or provider, and the internal validation studies to be performed by the end user. Recommendations for the software provider...

  12. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prinz, M; Carracedo, A; Mayr, W R

    2006-01-01

    with human identifications and causes many DNA laboratories to get involved in DVI tasks. The present recommendations are meant to educate more forensic geneticists about their potential involvement in mass fatality preparedness and possible DVI efforts, as well as to provide practical guidance for each...... of the laboratories' individual tasks. The idea to work on DNA-specific recommendations was born after a round table discussion dealing with the 2004 Tsunami disaster in south east Asia during the 21st congress of the International Society for Forensic Genetics on the Azores, Portugal, in September 2005. The ensuing...... discussion between scientists and pathologists that had been involved in the International Center in Khao Lak, Thailand, revealed the need for the scientific community to be better prepared to answer the local authorities' questions by formulating generally acceptable scientific standards for the most...

  13. History of the international societies in health technology assessment: International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care and Health Technology Assessment International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, David; Jonsson, Egon; Childs, Paul

    2009-07-01

    The International Society for Technology Assessment in Health Care (ISTAHC) was formed in 1985. It grew out of the increasing awareness of the international dimensions of health technology assessment (HTA) and the need for new communication methods at the international level. The main function of ISTAHC was to present an annual conference, which gradually grew in size, and also to generally improve in quality from to year. ISTAHC overextended itself financially early in the first decade of the 2000s and had to cease its existence. A new society, Health Technology Assessment international (HTAi), based on many of the same ideas and people, grew up beginning in the year 2003. The two societies have played a large role in making the field of HTA visible to people around the world and providing a forum for discussion on the methods and role of HTA.

  14. 78 FR 26375 - Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Co-Sponsorship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-06

    ...-sponsorship with the International Society of Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE), is announcing a conference... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Co-Sponsorship Educational Workshop: Redefining the `C' in CGMP (Current...

  15. 77 FR 26768 - Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Cosponsorship...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ... cosponsorship with the International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE), is planning a multiday... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering Cosponsorship Educational Workshop: Redefining the `C' in CGMP: Creating,...

  16. International Headache Society classification: new proposals about chronic headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, G C; Torelli, P

    2003-05-01

    In the International Headache Society (IHS) classification of 1988, chronic daily headache (CDH) forms are not exhaustively categorized. The forthcoming revision of the classification will include a number of CDH forms that had been reported prior to 1988 or have been identified after that date. In particular, chronic migraine will be added to the classification as a complication of migraine, provided that use of symptomatic drugs does not exceed 10 days per month. In addition to chronic cluster headache and chronic paroxysmal hemicrania, short-lasting unilateral neuralgiform headache with conjunctival injection and tearing (SUNCT) and hemicrania continua will be comprised among CDH forms with short-lived attacks. Hypnic headache will be included in Group 4 ("Other primary headaches"). No additions will be made to the new IHS classification for forms such as new daily persistent headache (NDPH) and cervicogenic headache as proposed by Sjaastad.

  17. 5th Conference of the International Federation of Classification Societies

    CERN Document Server

    Yajima, Keiji; Bock, Hans-Hermann; Ohsumi, Noboru; Tanaka, Yutaka; Baba, Yasumasa

    1998-01-01

    This volume, Data Science, Classification, and Related Methods, contains a selection of papers presented at the Fifth Conference of the International Federation of Oassification Societies (IFCS-96), which was held in Kobe, Japan, from March 27 to 30,1996. The volume covers a wide range of topics and perspectives in the growing field of data science, including theoretical and methodological advances in domains relating to data gathering, classification and clustering, exploratory and multivariate data analysis, and knowledge discovery and seeking. It gives a broad view of the state of the art and is intended for those in the scientific community who either develop new data analysis methods or gather data and use search tools for analyzing and interpreting large and complex data sets. Presenting a wide field of applications, this book is of interest not only to data analysts, mathematicians, and statisticians but also to scientists from many areas and disciplines concerned with complex data: medicine, biology, ...

  18. The International Liver Transplant Society Guideline on Living Liver Donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Charles M; Durand, Francois; Heimbach, Julie K; Kim-Schluger, Leona; Lee, Sung-Gyu; Lerut, Jan; Lo, Chung-Mau; Quintini, Cristiano; Pomfret, Elizabeth Anne

    2016-06-01

    The following guideline represents the position of the International Liver Transplantation Society (ILTS) on key preoperative, operative, and postoperative aspects surrounding living liver donation. These recommendations were developed from experts in the field from around the world. The authors conducted an analysis of the National Library of Medicine indexed literature on "living donor liver transplantation" [Medline search] using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Writing was guided by the ILTS Policy on the Development and Use of Practice Guidelines (www.ilts.org). ILTS members, and many more nonmembers, were invited to comment. Recommendations have been based on information available at the time of final submission (March 2016). The lack of randomized controlled trials in this field to date is acknowledged and is reflected in the grading of evidence. Intended for use by physicians, these recommendations support specific approaches to the diagnostic, therapeutic, and preventive aspects of care.

  19. The ContiNet of the International Continence Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, P H; Fonda, D

    1997-01-01

    This is an account of the International Continence Society's ContiNet--the web server linking up continence organisations worldwide with provision to upload or download vast data stores of information on continence via e-mail, FTP, mailing lists, and special tools to seek information using "search engines." Special communication devices using internet voice/phone mail and real-time "text" or "voice" chats permit conversation globally over normal phone lines linked to the Net at local telephone rates. Special features of ContiNet include announcements of upcoming conventions, information for professionals and laypeople, and the capability to conduct research via the net and conduct consultations and discussions via newsgroups. In-built devices requiring special IDs and passwords permit privacy and security for users. Simple instructions are provided on how to get your PC up and running and get connected to fellow members of ICS, link up with national continence societies, or simply surf for professional enrichment and leisure. With the advent of advanced multimedia capabilities, the current poor quality videoconferencing on the Net will be replaced by excellent videophones by 1998.

  20. A brief history of the International Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baber, R J; Wright, J

    2017-04-01

    Although some understanding of post-reproductive life dates back to Ancient Greece, the term 'menopause' was only introduced in the early 1800s by a French physician. Notwithstanding familiarity with the condition at that time, treatments were largely ineffective, often harmful and never evidence-based, and it was not until 100 years later with the identification and description of estrogen and progesterone that effective treatments became available. So efficacious were hormone therapies for menopausal symptoms that their prescription was often recommended for all postmenopausal women regardless of their needs, wishes or health status. For many there was benefit but for some there was harm. It was in this environment that a small group of clinicians determined to form an International Menopause Society (IMS) to conduct research into the appropriate use of hormone therapy in treating menopause symptoms, to hold regular congresses to educate colleagues and discuss research results and thus to improve the health and well-being of women in midlife and beyond. Formed in 1978, the IMS is now recognized as the global leader in its field, working towards these goals in collaboration with colleagues and other national and regional societies concerned with women's health. During that time, the IMS has been led by 13 Presidents and has conducted 15 World Congresses on the Menopause, all of which are reviewed in this paper.

  1. Dispatches from the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society meeting 2014. Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigman, Jonathan L; Young, Jared W; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Kent, Stephen

    2015-12-15

    The International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (IBNS) was founded in 1992 to fill the need for a focused meeting of the international research community to discuss issues important for the development and progress of this scientific discipline. In the 20 plus years since its founding, IBNS has become a hub for the dissemination of new research, development of important research collaborations, support and networking for young investigators, and for outreach and education to the community. This work is covered in part by offering special sessions during the meeting for late-breaking scientific discoveries from a range of disciplines as well as background and seniority level of the presenters. This special issue is a culmination of the late-breaking research presented at the IBNS 2014 meeting. The manuscripts of this Special Issue cover a variety of themes, including, stress, depression, the intersection of monoamine systems and behavior, substance use disorders, attentional processes, and awareness and acceptance of brain training. This wide range of topics and interest as well as range in seniority of presenters demonstrate the driving interest of IBNS in advancing knowledge in behavioral neuroscience as well as supporting scientists at every level.

  2. International Outreach: What Is the Responsibility of ASTRO and the Major International Radiation Oncology Societies?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mayr, Nina A., E-mail: ninamayr@uw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Hu, Kenneth S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Beth Israel Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Liao, Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Viswanathan, Akila N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wall, Terry J. [St. Luke' s Cancer Institute, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Amendola, Beatriz E. [Innovative Cancer Institute, Miami, Florida (United States); Calaguas, Miriam J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, St. Luke' s Medical Center, Quezon City (Philippines); Palta, Jatinder R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia (United States); Yue, Ning J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Rengan, Ramesh [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, Washington (United States); Williams, Timothy R. [Lynn Cancer Institute, Boca Raton Regional Hospital, Boca Raton, Florida (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In this era of globalization and rapid advances in radiation oncology worldwide, the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) is committed to help decrease profound regional disparities through the work of the International Education Subcommittee (IES). The IES has expanded its base, reach, and activities to foster educational advances through a variety of educational methods with broad scope, in addition to committing to the advancement of radiation oncology care for cancer patients around the world, through close collaboration with our sister radiation oncology societies and other educational, governmental, and organizational groups.

  3. 1st Conference of the International Society for Nonparametric Statistics

    CERN Document Server

    Lahiri, S; Politis, Dimitris

    2014-01-01

    This volume is composed of peer-reviewed papers that have developed from the First Conference of the International Society for NonParametric Statistics (ISNPS). This inaugural conference took place in Chalkidiki, Greece, June 15-19, 2012. It was organized with the co-sponsorship of the IMS, the ISI, and other organizations. M.G. Akritas, S.N. Lahiri, and D.N. Politis are the first executive committee members of ISNPS, and the editors of this volume. ISNPS has a distinguished Advisory Committee that includes Professors R.Beran, P.Bickel, R. Carroll, D. Cook, P. Hall, R. Johnson, B. Lindsay, E. Parzen, P. Robinson, M. Rosenblatt, G. Roussas, T. SubbaRao, and G. Wahba. The Charting Committee of ISNPS consists of more than 50 prominent researchers from all over the world.   The chapters in this volume bring forth recent advances and trends in several areas of nonparametric statistics. In this way, the volume facilitates the exchange of research ideas, promotes collaboration among researchers from all over the wo...

  4. Humane Society International's global campaign to end animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seidle, Troy

    2013-12-01

    The Research & Toxicology Department of Humane Society International (HSI) operates a multifaceted and science-driven global programme aimed at ending the use of animals in toxicity testing and research. The key strategic objectives include: a) ending cosmetics animal testing worldwide, via the multinational Be Cruelty-Free campaign; b) achieving near-term reductions in animal testing requirements through revision of product sector regulations; and c) advancing humane science by exposing failing animal models of human disease and shifting science funding toward human biology-based research and testing tools fit for the 21st century. HSI was instrumental in ensuring the implementation of the March 2013 European sales ban for newly animal-tested cosmetics, in achieving the June 2013 cosmetics animal testing ban in India as well as major cosmetics regulatory policy shifts in China and South Korea, and in securing precedent-setting reductions in in vivo data requirements for pesticides in the EU through the revision of biocides and plant protection product regulations, among others. HSI is currently working to export these life-saving measures to more than a dozen industrial and emerging economies. 2013 FRAME.

  5. Chronic daily headache and the revised international headache society classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Morris

    2004-02-01

    Chronic daily headache (CDH) is surprisingly common. It is best defined as a primary headache disorder with head pain on most days. There are a number of possible secondary causes of persistent headache, including traumatic, vascular, neoplastic, and infectious processes, all of which must be ruled out when the patient with frequent headache is evaluated. However, most patients with CDH seem to have a primary neurophysiologic disorder. This category of primary CDH does not seem to be a homogeneous disorder, but rather one with important subtypes. Several authors have proposed subdivisions of primary CDH such as chronic migraine, evolved migraine, transformed migraine, chronic tension-type headache, new daily persistent headache, and hemicrania continua. The International Headache Society (IHS) Classification published in 1988 did not address CDH other than to define a category "chronic tension-type headache." The revised IHS Classification (ICHD II) attempts to characterize CDH more thoroughly with the addition of chronic migraine and new daily persistent headache diagnoses, but this complex issue continues to defy easy categorization. This article provides a review of thinking about the nature of primary CDH and how ICHD II attempts to organize this category for much needed research purposes.

  6. History of International Society for Cerebral Blood Flow and Metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulson, Olaf B; Kanno, Iwao; Reivich, Martin

    2012-01-01

    grown within the society and is now an integrated part. The ISCBFM is a sound society, and support of young scientists is among its goals. Several awards have been established. Other activities including summer schools, courses, satellite meetings, and Gordon conferences have contributed to the success...

  7. International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for Use in the International Conference on Harmonisation Regions; Annex 14 on Bacterial Endotoxins Test General Chapter; availability. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled "Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for Use in the International Conference on Harmonisation Regions; Annex 14: Bacterial Endotoxins Test General Chapter.'' The guidance was prepared under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonisation of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The guidance provides the results of the ICH Q4B evaluation of the Bacterial Endotoxins Test General Chapter harmonized text from each of the three pharmacopoeias (United States, European, and Japanese) represented by the Pharmacopoeial Discussion Group (PDG). The guidance conveys recognition of the three pharmacopoeial methods by the three ICH regulatory regions and provides specific information regarding the recognition. The guidance is intended to recognize the interchangeability between the local regional pharmacopoeias, thus avoiding redundant testing in favor of a common testing strategy in each regulatory region. The guidance is in the form of an annex to the core guidance on the Q4B process entitled "Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmacopoeial Texts for Use in the ICH Regions (core ICH Q4B guidance).

  8. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: energy drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Bill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the safety and efficacy of the use of energy drinks (ED or energy shots (ES. The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. Although ED and ES contain a number of nutrients that are purported to affect mental and/or physical performance, the primary ergogenic nutrients in most ED and ES appear to be carbohydrate and/or caffeine. 2. The ergogenic value of caffeine on mental and physical performance has been well-established but the potential additive benefits of other nutrients contained in ED and ES remains to be determined. 3. Consuming ED 10-60 minutes before exercise can improve mental focus, alertness, anaerobic performance, and/or endurance performance. 4. Many ED and ES contain numerous ingredients; these products in particular merit further study to demonstrate their safety and potential effects on physical and mental performance. 5. There is some limited evidence that consumption of low-calorie ED during training and/or weight loss trials may provide ergogenic benefit and/or promote a small amount of additional fat loss. However, ingestion of higher calorie ED may promote weight gain if the energy intake from consumption of ED is not carefully considered as part of the total daily energy intake. 6. Athletes should consider the impact of ingesting high glycemic load carbohydrates on metabolic health, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as the effects of caffeine and other stimulants on motor skill performance. 7. Children and adolescents should only consider use of ED or ES with parental approval after consideration of the amount of carbohydrate, caffeine, and other nutrients contained in the ED or ES and a thorough understanding of the potential side effects. 8. Indiscriminant use of ED or ES, especially if more than one serving per day is consumed, may lead to adverse events and

  9. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: energy drinks

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the safety and efficacy of the use of energy drinks (ED) or energy shots (ES). The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. Although ED and ES contain a number of nutrients that are purported to affect mental and/or physical performance, the primary ergogenic nutrients in most ED and ES appear to be carbohydrate and/or caffeine. 2. The ergogenic value of caffeine on mental and physical performance has been well-established but the potential additive benefits of other nutrients contained in ED and ES remains to be determined. 3. Consuming ED 10-60 minutes before exercise can improve mental focus, alertness, anaerobic performance, and/or endurance performance. 4. Many ED and ES contain numerous ingredients; these products in particular merit further study to demonstrate their safety and potential effects on physical and mental performance. 5. There is some limited evidence that consumption of low-calorie ED during training and/or weight loss trials may provide ergogenic benefit and/or promote a small amount of additional fat loss. However, ingestion of higher calorie ED may promote weight gain if the energy intake from consumption of ED is not carefully considered as part of the total daily energy intake. 6. Athletes should consider the impact of ingesting high glycemic load carbohydrates on metabolic health, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as the effects of caffeine and other stimulants on motor skill performance. 7. Children and adolescents should only consider use of ED or ES with parental approval after consideration of the amount of carbohydrate, caffeine, and other nutrients contained in the ED or ES and a thorough understanding of the potential side effects. 8. Indiscriminant use of ED or ES, especially if more than one serving per day is consumed, may lead to adverse events and harmful side effects. 9

  10. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: energy drinks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin; La Bounty, Paul; Taylor, Lem; Nelson, Mike T; Greenwood, Mike; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Lopez, Hector L; Hoffman, Jay R; Stout, Jeffrey R; Schmitz, Stephen; Collins, Rick; Kalman, Doug S; Antonio, Jose; Kreider, Richard B

    2013-01-03

    Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the safety and efficacy of the use of energy drinks (ED) or energy shots (ES). The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. Although ED and ES contain a number of nutrients that are purported to affect mental and/or physical performance, the primary ergogenic nutrients in most ED and ES appear to be carbohydrate and/or caffeine. 2. The ergogenic value of caffeine on mental and physical performance has been well-established but the potential additive benefits of other nutrients contained in ED and ES remains to be determined. 3. Consuming ED 10-60 minutes before exercise can improve mental focus, alertness, anaerobic performance, and/or endurance performance. 4. Many ED and ES contain numerous ingredients; these products in particular merit further study to demonstrate their safety and potential effects on physical and mental performance. 5. There is some limited evidence that consumption of low-calorie ED during training and/or weight loss trials may provide ergogenic benefit and/or promote a small amount of additional fat loss. However, ingestion of higher calorie ED may promote weight gain if the energy intake from consumption of ED is not carefully considered as part of the total daily energy intake. 6. Athletes should consider the impact of ingesting high glycemic load carbohydrates on metabolic health, blood glucose and insulin levels, as well as the effects of caffeine and other stimulants on motor skill performance. 7. Children and adolescents should only consider use of ED or ES with parental approval after consideration of the amount of carbohydrate, caffeine, and other nutrients contained in the ED or ES and a thorough understanding of the potential side effects. 8. Indiscriminant use of ED or ES, especially if more than one serving per day is consumed, may lead to adverse events and harmful side effects. 9

  11. International Society of Urological Pathology grading and other prognostic factors for renal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2014-11-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology convened an international consensus conference in 2012 to review aspects relating to the prognostic assessment, classification, and diagnosis of adult renal malignancy. The detailed recommendations of the conference are reported.

  12. Methods of Endotoxin Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wenqiong; Ding, Xianting

    2015-08-01

    Endotoxin, present in the outer membrane of all gram-negative bacteria, can pose serious risks to human health, from irreversible shock to death. Therefore, it is essential to develop sensitive, accurate, and rapid methods for its detection. The rabbit pyrogen test is the first standard technique for endotoxin detection and, nowadays, has been replaced by the Limulus Amoebocyte Lysate test, which is the most popular detection technique for endotoxin. With in-depth understanding of endotoxin, biosensors based on endotoxin-sensing components are promising alternatives to pursue in developing low-cost, easy-operation, and fast-response endotoxin detection techniques. This article summarizes the recent advances of endotoxin detection methods with a particular emphasis on optical and electrochemical biosensors based on various sensing elements ranging from nature biomolecules to artificial materials. As the research and technological revolution continues, the highly integrated and miniaturized commercial devices for sensitively and reliably detecting endotoxin will provide a wide range of applications in people's daily life.

  13. [Some epistemological outlines throughout the publications of the International Society for the History of Pharmacy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ledermann, Franeois

    2014-10-01

    The International Society, created in 1926 in Innsbruck, was originally strongly influ- enced by the German world, although it included some members from other nations, such as Eugène Humbert Guitard from France, and was designated only as the Society for the History of Pharmacy. Its international aspect, with a new name, was finally recognized officially after the Second World War. Early on, the Society published several documents dedicated to various subjects related to the history of pharmacy without a clear editorial orientation. This was changed post-war, in 1951, with the launch of "Publications of the Society" and of a journal. During these years the society was, however, still very focused on Germany, Austria and Switzerland, and the vast majority of works were written in German. In 1999, following new statutes, it was decided that the national societies would be the collective members of the Society and, at the same time, a newsletter appeared as an official organ and link between the International Society and members of the national societies. These publications as a whole have been the subject of an analytical treatment to examine the major orientations of history of pharmacy during a century. What were the subjects preferred by the authors, and what approach did they take to pharmaceutical history? What is the place of the social history of pharmacy and of drugs research? This conference tries to answer these questions by the analysis of the large corpus of publications of the International Society for the History of Pharmacy.

  14. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: protein and exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Landis Jamie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement The following seven points related to the intake of protein for healthy, exercising individuals constitute the position stand of the Society. They have been approved by the Research Committee of the Society. 1 Vast research supports the contention that individuals engaged in regular exercise training require more dietary protein than sedentary individuals. 2 Protein intakes of 1.4 – 2.0 g/kg/day for physically active individuals is not only safe, but may improve the training adaptations to exercise training. 3 When part of a balanced, nutrient-dense diet, protein intakes at this level are not detrimental to kidney function or bone metabolism in healthy, active persons. 4 While it is possible for physically active individuals to obtain their daily protein requirements through a varied, regular diet, supplemental protein in various forms are a practical way of ensuring adequate and quality protein intake for athletes. 5 Different types and quality of protein can affect amino acid bioavailability following protein supplementation. The superiority of one protein type over another in terms of optimizing recovery and/or training adaptations remains to be convincingly demonstrated. 6 Appropriately timed protein intake is an important component of an overall exercise training program, essential for proper recovery, immune function, and the growth and maintenance of lean body mass. 7 Under certain circumstances, specific amino acid supplements, such as branched-chain amino acids (BCAA's, may improve exercise performance and recovery from exercise.

  15. The Integration of International Migrants into Western Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-31

    into migrant issues of interest to the health protection and security sectors. Key words: immigration, migrants, integration, health protection...subsequently provided data for the international 2010 MIPEX comparison in 2011. With the aim of generating background information for further health ...affect more recent migrants may not have been explored in this survey. The field requires more studies into the needs of newer migrants accessed through

  16. Between Nationalism and Internationalism: The German Chemical Society In Comparative Perspective, 1867-1945.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jeffrey Allan

    2017-09-04

    One-hundred fifty years ago, on the eve of German unification, about one-hundred people gathered in Berlin to found the German Chemical Society (DChG) under the charismatic leadership of August Wilhelm von Hofmann, who attracted a large international membership by promoting modern organic chemistry. By 1892, when Emil Fischer succeeded Hofmann, the DChG was the world's largest chemical society. Under Fischer the Society promoted international collaboration with foreign societies, and in 1900 it opened an impressive headquarters, the Hofmann House, where it centralized its greatly expanded literary activity including abstracts and reference publications. Yet a half-century later, after war and racial-national extremism, the house lay in ruins and the Society had ceased to exist. In remembering the Society, one may well ask why its auspicious beginning should have led to this ignominious end. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Proceedings from the 7th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Schmidt, Wolfgang A

    2015-01-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in clinical practice and research. Because the field of musculoskeletal (MSK...

  18. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Aysegul; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vazquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valenti, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Ozerdem, Aysegul; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations

  19. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; Gonzalez-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Aysegul; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vazquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valenti, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martinez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Ozerdem, Aysegul; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flavio; Vieta, Eduard

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations

  20. International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wilson, Jacob M; Fitschen, Peter J; Campbell, Bill; Wilson, Gabriel J; Zanchi, Nelo; Taylor, Lem; Wilborn, Colin; Kalman, Douglas S; Stout, Jeffrey R; Hoffman, Jay R; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Lopez, Hector L; Kreider, Richard B; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Antonio, Jose

    2013-01-01

    Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the use of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB...

  1. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildman Robert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1. Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (≥ 9 mg/kg. 2. Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3. It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4. Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5. Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6. The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7. The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance.

  2. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: Nutrient timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziegenfuss Tim

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The position of the Society regarding nutrient timing and the intake of carbohydrates, proteins, and fats in reference to healthy, exercising individuals is summarized by the following eight points: 1. Maximal endogenous glycogen stores are best promoted by following a high-glycemic, high-carbohydrate (CHO diet (600 – 1000 grams CHO or ~8 – 10 g CHO/kg/d, and ingestion of free amino acids and protein (PRO alone or in combination with CHO before resistance exercise can maximally stimulate protein synthesis. 2. During exercise, CHO should be consumed at a rate of 30 – 60 grams of CHO/hour in a 6 – 8% CHO solution (8 – 16 fluid ounces every 10 – 15 minutes. Adding PRO to create a CHO:PRO ratio of 3 – 4:1 may increase endurance performance and maximally promotes glycogen re-synthesis during acute and subsequent bouts of endurance exercise. 3. Ingesting CHO alone or in combination with PRO during resistance exercise increases muscle glycogen, offsets muscle damage, and facilitates greater training adaptations after either acute or prolonged periods of supplementation with resistance training. 4. Post-exercise (within 30 minutes consumption of CHO at high dosages (8 – 10 g CHO/kg/day have been shown to stimulate muscle glycogen re-synthesis, while adding PRO (0.2 g – 0.5 g PRO/kg/day to CHO at a ratio of 3 – 4:1 (CHO: PRO may further enhance glycogen re-synthesis. 5. Post-exercise ingestion (immediately to 3 h post of amino acids, primarily essential amino acids, has been shown to stimulate robust increases in muscle protein synthesis, while the addition of CHO may stimulate even greater levels of protein synthesis. Additionally, pre-exercise consumption of a CHO + PRO supplement may result in peak levels of protein synthesis. 6. During consistent, prolonged resistance training, post-exercise consumption of varying doses of CHO + PRO supplements in varying dosages have been shown to stimulate

  3. International comparisons of behavioral and emotional problems in preschool children: parents' reports from 24 societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Achenbach, Thomas M; Ivanova, Masha Y

    2011-01-01

    International comparisons were conducted of preschool children's behavioral and emotional problems as reported on the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1½-5 by parents in 24 societies (N = 19,850). Item ratings were aggregated into scores on syndromes; Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental...... Disorders-oriented scales; a Stress Problems scale; and Internalizing, Externalizing, and Total Problems scales. Effect sizes for scale score differences among the 24 societies ranged from small to medium (3-12%). Although societies differed greatly in language, culture, and other characteristics, Total...... Problems scores for 18 of the 24 societies were within 7.1 points of the omnicultural mean of 33.3 (on a scale of 0-198). Gender and age differences, as well as gender and age interactions with society, were all very small (effect sizes ...

  4. International AIDS Society global scientific strategy: towards an HIV cure 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Steven G; Lewin, Sharon R; Ross, Anna Laura; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Benkirane, Monsef; Cannon, Paula; Chomont, Nicolas; Douek, Daniel; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Lo, Ying-Ru; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Margolis, David; Mellors, John; Persaud, Deborah; Tucker, Joseph D; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise; Alter, Galit; Auerbach, Judith; Autran, Brigitte; Barouch, Dan H; Behrens, Georg; Cavazzana, Marina; Chen, Zhiwei; Cohen, Éric A; Corbelli, Giulio Maria; Eholié, Serge; Eyal, Nir; Fidler, Sarah; Garcia, Laurindo; Grossman, Cynthia; Henderson, Gail; Henrich, Timothy J; Jefferys, Richard; Kiem, Hans-Peter; McCune, Joseph; Moodley, Keymanthri; Newman, Peter A; Nijhuis, Monique; Nsubuga, Moses Supercharger; Ott, Melanie; Palmer, Sarah; Richman, Douglas; Saez-Cirion, Asier; Sharp, Matthew; Siliciano, Janet; Silvestri, Guido; Singh, Jerome; Spire, Bruno; Taylor, Jeffrey; Tolstrup, Martin; Valente, Susana; van Lunzen, Jan; Walensky, Rochelle; Wilson, Ira; Zack, Jerome

    2016-08-01

    Antiretroviral therapy is not curative. Given the challenges in providing lifelong therapy to a global population of more than 35 million people living with HIV, there is intense interest in developing a cure for HIV infection. The International AIDS Society convened a group of international experts to develop a scientific strategy for research towards an HIV cure. This Perspective summarizes the group's strategy.

  5. Methodological Studies on Plasma Endotoxin Level and Endotoxin Inactivation Capacity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚国相; 杨乃发; 薛新波; 赵玉沛; 蒋朱明

    2004-01-01

    To establish stable methods for detecting plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity in a normal population and general surgical patients and evaluate their perioperative changes, 50 healthy people and 50 patients receiving gastrointestinal operation were enrolled, their plasma endotoxin levels and plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity were assayed. Our results showed that plasma endotoxin levels were 0.044±0.009 EU/ml in the normal population and 0.044±0.023 EU/ml in the preoperative patients. Endotoxin level peaked 3 h after the operation (0.223±0.041 EU/ml), and then decreased rapidly on the first day after the operation (0.134±0.164EU/ml). Endotoxin inactivation capacity also had the same time course as endotoxin level. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome and infection induced another elevation in the time course. It is concluded that establishing the endotoxin standard curve by using pyrogenic free water is better than by using plasma. Plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity can be used as an indirect indicator of postoperative immune depression. Plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity peaked shortly after operation, indicating surgical stress is closely related with the changes.

  6. Eicosanoids, endotoxins and liver disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.T. Ouwendijk (Rob)

    1985-01-01

    textabstractEndotoxins are cell wall lipopolysacharides of gram negative bacteria. The gut contains large numbers of bacteria and is generally accepted to be a large reservoir of endotoxins. In the normal state absorbed endotoxins are rapidly removed from the portal blood by especially the

  7. Endotoxin dosage in sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo Rondinelli

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Endotoxin, a component of the cell wall of Gram-negative bacteria is a major contributor to the pathogenesis of septic shock and multiple organ failure (MOF. Its entry into the bloodstream stimulates monocytes/macrophages which once activated produce and release cytokines, nitric oxide and other mediators that induce systemic inflammation, endothelial damage, organ dysfunction, hypotension (shock and MOF.The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of a quantitative test for the dosage of endotoxin to determine the risk of severe Gram-negative sepsis. Materials and methods. In the period January 2009 - June 2011 we performed 897 tests for 765 patients, mostly coming from the emergency room and intensive care, of which 328 (43% women (mean age 53 and 437 (57% male (mean age 49. Fifty-nine patients, no statistically significant difference in sex, were monitored by an average of two determinations of EA.All patients had procalcitonin values significantly altered.The kit used was EAA (Endotoxin Activity Assay Estor Company, Milan, which has three ranges of endotoxin activity (EA: low risk of sepsis if <0.40 units, medium if between 0.40 and 0.59; high if 0.60. Results. 78 out of 765 patients (10% had a low risk, 447 (58% a medium risk and 240 (32% a high risk.The dosage of EA, combined with that of procalcitonin, has allowed a more targeted antibiotic therapy. Six patients in serious clinical conditions were treated by direct hemoperfusion with Toraymyxin, a device comprising a housing containing a fiber polypropylene and polystyrene with surface-bound polymyxin B, an antibiotic that removes bacterial endotoxins from the blood. Conclusions.The test is useful in risk stratification as well as Gram negative sepsis, to set and monitor targeted therapies, also based on the neutralization of endotoxin.

  8. International AIDS Society: Global Scientific Strategy Towards an HIV Cure 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Ross, Anna Laura; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Benkirane, Monsef; Cannon, Paula; Chomont, Nicolas; Douek, Daniel; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Lo, Ying-Ru; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Margolis, David; Mellors, John; Persaud, Deborah; Tucker, Joseph D.; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy is not curative. Given the challenges in providing life-long therapy to a global population of over 35 million people living with HIV, there is intense interest in developing a cure for HIV infection. The International AIDS Society convened a group of international experts to develop a scientific strategy for research towards an HIV cure. This Perspective summarizes the group's strategy. PMID:27400264

  9. Biosensor of endotoxin and sepsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Yang; Wang, Xiang; Wu, Xi; Gao, Wei; He, Qing-hua; Cai, Shaoxi

    2001-09-01

    To investigate the relation between biosensor of endotoxin and endotoxin of plasma in sepsis. Method: biosensor of endotoxin was designed with technology of quartz crystal microbalance bioaffinity sensor ligand of endotoxin were immobilized by protein A conjugate. When a sample soliton of plasma containing endotoxin 0.01, 0.03, 0.06, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0Eu, treated with perchloric acid and injected into slot of quartz crystal surface respectively, the ligand was released from the surface of quartz crystal to form a more stable complex with endotoxin in solution. The endotoxin concentration corresponded to the weight change on the crystal surface, and caused change of frequency that occurred when desorbed. The result was biosensor of endotoxin might detect endotoxin of plasma in sepsis, measurements range between 0.05Eu and 0.5Eu in the stop flow mode, measurement range between 0.1Eu and 1Eu in the flow mode. The sensor of endotoxin could detect the endotoxin of plasm rapidly, and use for detection sepsis in clinically.

  10. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Eble, J.N.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Grignon, D.; Hes, O.; Moch, H.; Montironi, R.; Tickoo, S.K.; Zhou, M.; Argani, P.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group p

  11. Proceedings from The 8th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Olech, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in both clinical practice and research. The field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging...

  12. Physical Activity and Psychological Benefits. International Society of Sport Psychology Position Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physician and Sportsmedicine, 1992

    1992-01-01

    International Society of Sport Psychology clarifies the psychological benefits of physical activity, noting the positive relationship between physical activity level and mental health. Exercise can reduce anxiety, decrease depression levels, reduce neuroticism and anxiety, reduce stress, and have beneficial emotional effects for both sexes across…

  13. Highlights from the Third European International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council Symposium 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Francescatto, M.; Hermans, S.M.A.; Babaei, S.; Vicedo, E.; Borrel, A.; Meysman, P.

    2015-01-01

    In this meeting report, we give an overview of the talks, presentations and posters presented at the third European Symposium of the International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB) Student Council. The event was organized as a satellite meeting of the 13th European Conference for Computationa

  14. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the

  15. Millon's Contributions to the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders (ISSPD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Kongerslev, Mickey

    2015-01-01

    In this article we highlight the pivotal role of Dr. Theodore Millon in the founding of the International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders (ISSPD). This historical outline of Millon's contribution to the ISSPD also contains previously unpublished transcripts of his talks at ISSPD...

  16. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L. G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the

  17. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Eble, J.N.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Grignon, D.; Hes, O.; Moch, H.; Montironi, R.; Tickoo, S.K.; Zhou, M.; Argani, P.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group p

  18. Statistical evaluation of the function of the 1992 International Continence Society scientific committee

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Mastrigt (Ron); J.W. Downie (J.)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractPapers submitted to the International Confidence Society arc read by the six members of the scientific committee, who assign three scores to each paper, one for its originality, one for its scientific value, and one for its academic or clinical interest. Following discussion at the scien

  19. Meeting International Society for Technology in Education Competencies with a Problem-Based Learning Video Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoretz, Yvonne M.; Cottle, Amy E.

    2011-01-01

    Meeting International Society for Technology in Education competencies creates a challenge for teachers. The authors provide a problem-based video framework that guides teachers in enhancing 21st century skills to meet those competencies. To keep the focus on the content, the authors suggest teaching the technology skills only at the point the…

  20. The natural immunity to evolutionary atavistic endotoxin for human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moncevičiūtė-Eringienė, Elena; Rotkevič, Kristina; Grikienis, Ruta Grikienyte

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new theory of the immunological control of cancer corresponding to the hypothesis that the specific natural immunity to evolutionary atavistic endotoxin has a potential role in human cancer prevention. The results of our studies have shown that IgMNAE, i.e. endogenous or spontaneous IgM class antibodies to enterobacterial lipopolysaccharide molecules (lipid A), control the immune mechanisms responsible for the internal medium stability not only against the damaging impact of the carcinogenic factors, but also against the malignant transformation of its own degenerated cells. Among people who in 1979 and 1982 had IgMNAE in their blood serum, after 15-30years fell ill with cancer 10%, versus 15% among people who had no IgMNAE (pimmunity to endotoxin it is possible to see the formation of the respective evolutionary protective reactions which protect the damaged cells from acquiring resistance to damaging factors and thus from becoming an independent new parasitic population. Thereby the presented theory of the immunological control of cancer has a causal connection with our evolutionary resistance theory of the origin of cancer. Collectively, these data suggest that activation of natural immunity to endotoxin and production of vaccines against evolutionary atavistic endotoxin or gram-negative bacterial endotoxin can be helpful when applied in cancer prophylaxis for persons with a low level of natural immunity to endotoxin and perhaps in creating immunotherapeutic methods for stopping the endogenous parasitism of tumour cells by binding IgMNAE to atavistic endotoxin in cancer patients.

  1. International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy of Cancer 2009 Annual Meeting held in Cork, Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinn, Barbara; Casey, Garrett; Möller, Mecker G; Kasahara, Noriyuki; O'Sullivan, Gerald C; Peng, Kah-Whye; Tangney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The International Society for Cell and Gene Therapy (ISCGT) of Cancer annual meeting was held from September 2 through September 4, 2009, in Cork, Ireland ( www.iscgt2009.com ). The conference was held in conjunction with the Irish Society for Gene and Cell Therapy third annual meeting, and brought together scientists and clinicians from around the world in a country developing its knowledge economy. Next year's ISCGT meeting will be held in Doha, the capital of Qatar ( www.iscgt.net ), from September 27 through September 29, 2010.

  2. Chapter 3: International non-governmental organizations in the emerging world society: the example of ISPRM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhardt, Jan D; von Groote, Per M; DeLisa, Joel A; Melvin, John L; Bickenbach, Jerome E; Li, Leonard S W; Stucki, Gerold

    2009-09-01

    Using the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM) as a case in point, the paper describes the complex world societal situation within which non-governmental organizations that address health issues have to operate.This paper describes the complex world societal situation within which non-governmental organizations (NGOs), that are addressing health issues have to operate. In particular, as an international organization in official relation with the World Health Organization (WHO), ISPRM is confronted with a variety of responsibilities and a true world health political mandate. The accompanying rights need to be played out in relation to its own internal member organization and external allies. The theory of the world society and the current situation are briefly reviewed. The role of international NGOs within the world health polity, rehabilitation and Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (PRM) is highlighted, whilst special emphasis is placed on NGOs in official relation with WHO. Functions, dysfunctions and challenges of international NGOs operating in the health sector are discussed. Against this background, key approaches to enhance ISPRM's political role are analysed. These include transparent and accountable development of the organization, the differentiation between internal and external policy relations, the harmonization of organizational structures and procedures, the consequential use of political structures available to influence WHO's agenda, and the identification of other policy players of major relevance to PRM in order to build strategic alliances with external partners and to enhance ISPRM's membership base.

  3. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, C; Pabinger, I; Bauer, K A; Laffan, M; Angchaisuksiri, P; Rezende, S M; Middeldorp, S; Ross, M

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional curricula. Core curriculum informs and links to a variety of ISTH educational materials. Background The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) identified the need for an international core curriculum on thrombosis and hemostasis for its society members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community. Aims The current research sought consensus on the core competencies required by medical doctors who are ready to practise as independent clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis with the aim of developing a core clinical curriculum for specialists in the field. Method A draft list of competencies was developed by the Working Group and formed the basis of an online survey. ISTH members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community were asked to rate the importance of each competency, on a Likert scale, for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis. Results There were a total of 644 responses to the online survey with broad geographical representation. There was general agreement on what level of competency would be required for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis at the specified level of training. Conclusions Using the survey to gain consensus on the level of competency required by clinical specialists in the field of thrombosis and hemostasis enabled the development of a core clinical curriculum that has been endorsed by the ISTH Council. The curriculum will offer a framework and international reference that will be used by the society, by national and regional organizations, and for further research. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  4. Membrane adsorber for endotoxin removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karina Moita de Almeida

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface of flat-sheet nylon membranes was modified using bisoxirane as the spacer and polyvinyl alcohol as the coating polymer. The amino acid histidine was explored as a ligand for endotoxins, aiming at its application for endotoxin removal from aqueous solutions. Characterization of the membrane adsorber, analysis of the depyrogenation procedures and the evaluation of endotoxin removal efficiency in static mode are discussed. Ligand density of the membranes was around 7 mg/g dry membrane, allowing removal of up to 65% of the endotoxins. The performance of the membrane adsorber prepared using nylon coated with polyvinyl alcohol and containing histidine as the ligand proved superior to other membrane adsorbers reported in the literature. The lack of endotoxin adsorption on nylon membranes without histidine confirmed that endotoxin removal was due to the presence of the ligand at the membrane surface. Modified membranes were highly stable, exhibiting a lifespan of approximately thirty months.

  5. Proceedings from the 7th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Schmidt, Wolfgang A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Gaylis, Norman; Arnold, William; Ben-Artzi, Ami; Ranganath, Veena; Seraphine, Judy L; Peterfy, Charles

    2015-08-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in clinical practice and research. Because the field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging is rapidly evolving, continuous education in the field is imperative. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts presented the newest information as it relates to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) at the 7th annual ISEMIR meeting which took place on April 12-14, 2014 in Santa Monica, California. Presentations from the meeting can be viewed at www.isemir.org.

  6. Proceedings from The 8th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troum, Orrin M; Pimienta, Olga L; Olech, Ewa; Østergaard, Mikkel; Thiele, Ralf; Seraphine, Judy L; Bruyn, George A W; Peterfy, Charles

    2016-06-01

    The International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology (ISEMIR) was founded in 2005 with the goal of discussing matters related to imaging in rheumatology, particularly, validation, education, and use in both clinical practice and research. The field of musculoskeletal (MSK) imaging is continuously evolving; therefore, education for healthcare providers in this field is of paramount importance. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts presented the newest information as it relates to the use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US) at the 8th annual ISEMIR meeting that took place on April 17-18 in Santa Monica, California. Presentations from the meeting can be viewed at www.isemir.org.

  7. Proceedings of the sixth annual conference of the International Nuclear Target Development Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steers, G. (comp.)

    1978-08-01

    The Sixth Annual Conference of the International Nuclear Target Development Society was held at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California, on October 19--21, 1977. The discussion covered nuclear target preparation by evaporation, reduction of oxides, electrodeposition, reactive sputtering, rolling, gas jets, and related techniques. Abstracts were prepared for eighteen of the papers presented at the conference and are included in the data base. (GHT)

  8. International Society for Disease Surveillance Conference 2011: Building the Future of Public Health Surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    supplement, Complete

    2011-01-01

    The International Society for Disease Surveillance (ISDS) celebrates its 10th annual meeting with the arrival of the 2011 ISDS Annual Conference, ‘Building the Future of Public Health Surveillance’. This milestone in the Society’s history is punctuated not only by the achievements of the disease surveillance community but also by the promise of what lies ahead. The Annual Conference brings together a community of researchers and practitioners focused on monitoring, understanding and improving...

  9. The First International Residency Program Accredited by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Qadheeb, Nada S.; Alissa, Dema A.; Al-Jedai, Ahmed; Ajlan, Aziza; Al-Jazairi, Abdulrazaq S.

    2012-01-01

    The processes by which the pharmacy residency program at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre-Riyadh, Saudi Arabia became the first American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) accredited program outside the United States is described. This article provides key points for a successful program for other pharmacy residency programs around the world. Additionally, it points out the need for establishing international standards for pharmacy residency programs.

  10. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compérat, Eva; Camparo, Philippe; Srigley, John; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens issued recommendations for standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The conference addressed specimen handling, T2 substaging, prostate cancer volume, extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion, seminal vesicle invasion, lymph node metastases and surgical margins. This review summarizes the conclusions and recommendations resulting from the consensus process. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trpkov, K.; Grignon, D.J.; Bonsib, S.M.; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Lopez-Beltran, A.; Samaratunga, H.; Tamboli, P.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and

  12. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trpkov, K.; Grignon, D.J.; Bonsib, S.M.; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Lopez-Beltran, A.; Samaratunga, H.; Tamboli, P.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and

  13. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society International Multidisciplinary Classification of Lung Adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D.; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Noguchi, Masayuki; Nicholson, Andrew G.; Geisinger, Kim R.; Yatabe, Yasushi; Beer, David G.; Powell, Charles A.; Riely, Gregory J.; Van Schil, Paul E.; Garg, Kavita; Austin, John H. M.; Asamura, Hisao; Rusch, Valerie W.; Hirsch, Fred R.; Scagliotti, Giorgio; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Huber, Rudolf M.; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Jett, James; Sanchez-Cespedes, Montserrat; Sculier, Jean-Paul; Takahashi, Takashi; Tsuboi, Masahiro; Vansteenkiste, Johan; Wistuba, Ignacio; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Aberle, Denise; Brambilla, Christian; Flieder, Douglas; Franklin, Wilbur; Gazdar, Adi; Gould, Michael; Hasleton, Philip; Henderson, Douglas; Johnson, Bruce; Johnson, David; Kerr, Keith; Kuriyama, Keiko; Lee, Jin Soo; Miller, Vincent A.; Petersen, Iver; Roggli, Victor; Rosell, Rafael; Saijo, Nagahiro; Thunnissen, Erik; Tsao, Ming; Yankelewitz, David

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Adenocarcinoma is the most common histologic type of lung cancer. To address advances in oncology, molecular biology, pathology, radiology, and surgery of lung adenocarcinoma, an international multidisciplinary classification was sponsored by the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society. This new adenocarcinoma classification is needed to provide uniform terminology and diagnostic criteria, especially for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC), the overall approach to small nonresection cancer specimens, and for multidisciplinary strategic management of tissue for molecular and immunohistochemical studies. Methods An international core panel of experts representing all three societies was formed with oncologists/pulmonologists, pathologists, radiologists, molecular biologists, and thoracic surgeons. A systematic review was performed under the guidance of the American Thoracic Society Documents Development and Implementation Committee. The search strategy identified 11,368 citations of which 312 articles met specified eligibility criteria and were retrieved for full text review. A series of meetings were held to discuss the development of the new classification, to develop the recommendations, and to write the current document. Recommendations for key questions were graded by strength and quality of the evidence according to the Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation approach. Results The classification addresses both resection specimens, and small biopsies and cytology. The terms BAC and mixed subtype adenocarcinoma are no longer used. For resection specimens, new concepts are introduced such as adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and minimally invasive adenocarcinoma (MIA) for small solitary adenocarcinomas with either pure lepidic growth (AIS) or predominant lepidic growth with ≤5 mm invasion (MIA) to define patients who, if they undergo complete resection

  14. Does the involvement of global civil society make international decision-making more democratic? The case of the International Criminal Court

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasius, M.

    2008-01-01

    The negotiation and contents of the Statute for an International Criminal Court (ICC) were strongly influenced by global civil society actors. After examining definitions of global civil society, this article will consider whether and why such involvement of non-governmental actors in international

  15. An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) / International Continence Society (ICS) Joint Report on the Terminology for Female Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haylen, Bernard T; Maher, Christopher F; Barber, Matthew D; Camargo, Sérgio; Dandolu, Vani; Digesu, Alex; Goldman, Howard B; Huser, Martin; Milani, Alfredo L; Moran, Paul A; Schaer, Gabriel N; Withagen, Mariëlla I J

    2016-02-01

    The terminology for female pelvic floor prolapse (POP) should be defined and organized in a clinically-based consensus Report. This Report combines the input of members of two International Organizations, the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) and the International Continence Society (ICS), assisted at intervals by external referees. Appropriate core clinical categories and a sub-classification were developed to give a coding to definitions. An extensive process of fourteen rounds of internal and external review was involved to exhaustively examine each definition, with decision-making by collective opinion (consensus). A Terminology Report for female POP, encompassing over 230 separate definitions, has been developed. It is clinically-based with the most common diagnoses defined. Clarity and user-friendliness have been key aims to make it interpretable by practitioners and trainees in all the different specialty groups involved in female pelvic floor dysfunction and POP. Female-specific imaging (ultrasound, radiology and MRI) and conservative and surgical managements are major additions and appropriate figures have been included to supplement and clarify the text. Emerging concepts and measurements, in use in the literature and offering further research potential, but requiring further validation, have been included as an appendix. Interval (5-10 year) review is anticipated to keep the document updated and as widely acceptable as possible. A consensus-based Terminology Report for female POP has been produced to aid clinical practice and research. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., and The International Urogynecological Association.

  16. Transitions of Care Consensus Policy Statement American College of Physicians-Society of General Internal Medicine-Society of Hospital Medicine-American Geriatrics Society-American College of Emergency Physicians-Society of Academic Emergency Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Vincenza; Beck, Dennis; Budnitz, Tina; Miller, Doriane C; Potter, Jane; Wears, Robert L; Weiss, Kevin B; Williams, Mark V

    2009-08-01

    The American College of Physicians (ACP), Society of Hospital Medicine (SHM), Society of General Internal Medicine (SGIM), American Geriatric Society (AGS), American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP) and the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) developed consensus standards to address the quality gaps in the transitions between inpatient and outpatient settings. The following summarized principles were established: 1.) Accountability; 2) Communication; 3.) Timely interchange of information; 4.) Involvement of the patient and family member; 5.) Respect the hub of coordination of care; 6.) All patients and their family/caregivers should have a medical home or coordinating clinician; 7.) At every point of transitions the patient and/or their family/caregivers need to know who is responsible for their care at that point; 9.) National standards; and 10.) Standardized metrics related to these standards in order to lead to quality improvement and accountability. Based on these principles, standards describing necessary components for implementation were developed: coordinating clinicians, care plans/transition record, communication infrastructure, standard communication formats, transition responsibility, timeliness, community standards, and measurement.

  17. International languages: a challenge to society in the context of globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Chudnovskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Integration processes in the context of globalization of society reveal new factors causing inequality in various spheres of social space. Since language is an inherent characteristic of ethnic, inequality concerning the language is regarded as social inequality. Status of society and the status of its language in specific socio-communicative domains are interrelated, ethnos fights for improving the status of its language, in turn, the language enhances the status of its ethnos. Role significance of language correlates with the amount of social-communicative domains served by the language. The paper considers the current situation of competition between international languages, occupying the highest step of the sociolinguistic hierarchy by volume of functions performed. Emphasis is placed on language struggle in the field of science, its convergent and divergent principles, as well as actors engaged in language policy in this sphere.

  18. Developments in the International Society of Biometeorology over the decade, 2007-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Marie R.

    2017-09-01

    Over the decade 2007-2016, the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB) has pursued its purpose of advancing the science of biometeorology through its Congresses and sponsoring conferences, meetings and workshops. In conjunction with Springer, ISB has introduced a new book series: Biometeorology, and published three volumes. ISB's journal, the International Journal of Biometeorology, has increased the number of issues to 12 per year and added the Fields of `Aerobiology', `Climate Change and Ecology' and `Climate Change and Public Health'. Within ISB, there are currently six Commissions, reflecting the interests of the members and the needs of society. The newest, Biophysics of Adaptation and Response Commission, formed in 2015. Another group which formed over the decade was the Students and New Professionals Group. The Universal Thermal Climate Index Commission was formally dissolved in 2014 having met its aim of developing an easily understood human thermal index. At the Executive Board level, geographical representation has increased, with Councillors now being elected to represent six regions: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Oceania and Northern America. The ISB has worked to better coordinate and communicate biometeorological research, collaborating strategically with international partners to achieve this objective.

  19. Developments in the International Society of Biometeorology over the decade, 2007-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, Marie R.

    2017-06-01

    Over the decade 2007-2016, the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB) has pursued its purpose of advancing the science of biometeorology through its Congresses and sponsoring conferences, meetings and workshops. In conjunction with Springer, ISB has introduced a new book series: Biometeorology, and published three volumes. ISB's journal, the International Journal of Biometeorology, has increased the number of issues to 12 per year and added the Fields of `Aerobiology', `Climate Change and Ecology' and `Climate Change and Public Health'. Within ISB, there are currently six Commissions, reflecting the interests of the members and the needs of society. The newest, Biophysics of Adaptation and Response Commission, formed in 2015. Another group which formed over the decade was the Students and New Professionals Group. The Universal Thermal Climate Index Commission was formally dissolved in 2014 having met its aim of developing an easily understood human thermal index. At the Executive Board level, geographical representation has increased, with Councillors now being elected to represent six regions: Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, Oceania and Northern America. The ISB has worked to better coordinate and communicate biometeorological research, collaborating strategically with international partners to achieve this objective.

  20. Executive summary of the 2013 International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference on Body Composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, John A; Baim, Sanford; Bilezikian, John P; Schousboe, John T

    2013-01-01

    There have been many scientific advances in measurement of fat and lean body mass as determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) convened a Position Development Conference (PDC) on the use of DXA for body composition measurement. Previously, no guidelines to the use of DXA for body composition existed. The recommendations pertain to clinically relevant issues regarding DXA indications of use, acquisition, analysis, quality control, interpretation, and reporting were addressed. The topics and questions for consideration were developed by the ISCD Board of Directors and the Scientific Advisory Committee and were designed to address the needs of clinical practitioners. Three Task Forces were created and assigned these questions and asked to conduct comprehensive literature reviews. The Task Forces included participants from 6 countries and a variety of interests including academic institutions, private clinics, and industry. Reports with proposed Position Statements were then presented to an international panel of experts with backgrounds in DXA and bone densitometry and a variety of fields that use body composition measures. The PDC was held in Tampa, FL, contemporaneously with the Annual Meeting of the ISCD, March 21 through March 23, 2013. This report describes the methodology of the 2013 ISCD Body Composition PDC and summarizes the results. Three separate articles in this issue will detail the rationale, discussion, and additional research topics for each question the Task Forces addressed. Copyright © 2013 The International Society for Clinical Densitometry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Endotoxin hitchhiking on polymer nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnell, Mason L.; Lyon, Andrew J.; Mormile, Melanie R.; Barua, Sutapa

    2016-07-01

    The control of microbial infections is critical for the preparation of biological media including water to prevent lethal septic shock. Sepsis is one of the leading causes of death in the United States. More than half a million patients suffer from sepsis every year. Both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria are responsible for septic infection by the most common organisms i.e., Escherichia coli and Pseuodomonas aeruginosa. The bacterial cell membrane releases negatively charged endotoxins upon death and enzymatic destruction, which stimulate antigenic response in humans to gram-negative infections. Several methods including distillation, ethylene oxide treatment, filtration and irradiation have been employed to remove endotoxins from contaminated samples, however, the reduction efficiency remains low, and presents a challenge. Polymer nanoparticles can be used to overcome the current inability to effectively sequester endotoxins from water. This process is termed endotoxin hitchhiking. The binding of endotoxin on polymer nanoparticles via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions offers efficient removal from water. However, the effect of polymer nanoparticles and its surface areas has not been investigated for removal of endotoxins. Poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) polymer was tested for its ability to effectively bind and remove endotoxins from water. By employing a simple one-step phase separation technique, we were able to synthesize PCL nanoparticles of 398.3 ± 95.13 nm size and a polydispersity index of 0.2. PCL nanoparticles showed ∼78.8% endotoxin removal efficiency, the equivalent of 3.9 × 105 endotoxin units (EU) per ml. This is 8.34-fold more effective than that reported for commercially available membranes. Transmission electron microscopic images confirmed binding of multiple endotoxins to the nanoparticle surface. The concept of using nanoparticles may be applicable not only to eliminate gram-negative bacteria, but also for any gram

  2. Executive summary of the 2013 International Society for Clinical Densitometry Position Development Conference on bone densitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schousboe, John T; Shepherd, John A; Bilezikian, John P; Baim, Sanford

    2013-01-01

    The International Society for Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) convenes a Position Development Conference (PDC) every 2-3 yr to make recommendations for guidelines and standards in the field of musculoskeletal measurement and assessment. The recommendations pertain to clinically relevant issues regarding the acquisition, quality control, interpretation, and reporting of various aspects of musculoskeletal health metrics. Topics for consideration are developed by the ISCD Board of Directors and the Scientific Advisory Committee. For the 2013 PDC, body composition analysis was a central topic area for the first time and considered timely because of the scientific advances in measurement of fat and lean body mass by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Indications for DXA and vertebral fracture assessment and use of reference data to calculate bone mineral density T-scores were also updated. Task Forces for each of these areas were assigned questions of relevance to a clinical audience and asked to conduct comprehensive literature reviews. Reports with proposed Position Statements were then presented to an international panel of experts. The Expert Panel included representatives of the International Osteoporosis Foundation, the American Society for Bone and Mineral Research, the National Osteoporosis Foundation, Osteoporosis Canada, and the North American Menopause Society. The PDC was held in Tampa, FL, contemporaneously with the Annual Meeting of the ISCD, March 21 through March 23, 2013. This report describes the methodology of the 2013 ISCD PDC and summarizes the results of the 2013 ISCD PDC for vertebral fracture assessment/DXA and National Health and Nutrition Survey (NHANES) Reference Database Task Forces. A separate article in this issue will summarize the results of the Body Composition Analysis Task Forces. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Meeting report: the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS) South America Conference (August 5-7, 2011).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massuda, Raffael; Chaves, Cristiano; Trzesniak, Clarissa; Machado-de-Sousa, Joao P; Zanetti, Marcus V; Murray, Robin M; Gattaz, Wagner F; Busatto, Geraldo F

    2012-05-01

    On August 5-7, 2011, São Paulo was home to the first regional meeting of the Schizophrenia International Research Society (SIRS). Over 400 people from many countries attended the activities and contributed with around 200 submissions for oral and poster presentations. This article summarizes the data presented during the meeting, with an emphasis on the plenary talks and sessions for short oral presentations. For information on the poster presentations, readers are referred to the special issue of Revista de Psiquiatria Clínica (Brazil) dedicated to the conference (available at: http://www.hcnet.usp.br/ipq/revista/vol38/s1/).

  4. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Mobile Learning (Lisbon, Portugal, March 14-16, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the International Conference on Mobile Learning 2013, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Lisbon, Portugal, March 14-16, 2013. The Mobile Learning 2013 International Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of…

  5. Symposium introduction: the first joint American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    The American Chemical Society (ACS) Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division (AGFD) and the ACS International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand (ICSCT) worked together to stage the “1st Joint ACS AGFD - ACS ICSCT Symposium on Agricultural and Food Chemistry,” which was held in Bangkok, Thailand ...

  6. Does Internalizing Society and Media Messages Cause Body Dissatisfaction, in Turn Causing Disordered Eating?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dye, Heather

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the predictive influence that internalization of society and media messages has on body dissatisfaction, as well as the prediction influence that body dissatisfaction has on disordered eating behaviors, such as preoccupation with weight, dieting, and eating restraint. A total of 324 participants completed the demographic questionnaire, the Multidimensional Body Self Relations Questionnaire (Cash, 2001 ), the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire (Heinberg, Thompson, & Stormer, 1995 ) for women, and the Sociocultural Attitudes Towards Appearance Questionnaire-Revised-Male-Version (Cusumano & Thompson, 1997 ) for men, and the locus of control (Rotter, 1966 ). The results of this study found that high internalization leads to body dissatisfaction, in turn, leading to disordered eating behaviors, such as preoccupation with weight, dieting, and eating restraint. This study proposes the implementation of media literacy and education programs that teach college women and men, girls and boys, to think more critically about the media.

  7. [Renal tumors: The International Society of Urologic Pathology (ISUP) 2012 consensus conference recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux-Leclercq, Nathalie; Ferran, Algaba; Mahul, Amin; Argani, Pedram; Billis, Athanase; Bonsib, Stephen; Cheng, Liang; Cheville, John; Eble, John; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Humphrey, Peter; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Martignoni, Guido; McKenney, Jesse; Merino, Maria; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Netto, George; Reuter, Viktor; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Shen, Steven; Srigley, John; Tamboli, Pheroze; Tan, Puay Hoon; Tickoo, Satish; Trpkov, Kiril; Zhou, Ming; Delahunt, Brett; Comperat, Eva

    2014-12-01

    During the last 30 years many advances have been made in kidney tumor pathology. In 1981, 9 entities were recognized in the WHO Classification. In the latest classification of 2004, 50 different types have been recognized. Additional tumor entities have been described since and a wide variety of prognostic parameters have been investigated with variable success; however, much attention has centered upon the importance of features relating to both stage and grade. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) recommends after consensus conferences the development of reporting guidelines, which have been adopted worldwide ISUP undertook to review all aspects of the pathology of adult renal malignancy through an international consensus conference to be held in 2012. As in the past, participation in this consensus conference was restricted to acknowledged experts in the field. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Report on the third International Martial Arts and Combat Sports Scientific Society (IMACSSS Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Brizin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report provides a brief account of the Conference “Man - Martial Arts - Humanism”, held by the International Martial Arts and Combat Sport Scientific Society (IMACSSS on October 15th - 17th, 2014 in Rzeszów, Poland. During this international conference, scientists from various universities presented their actual projects and results of their latest projects in the field of martial arts and combat sports (MA&CS. Subjects covered a wide range, starting with anthropology, sociology, history, philosophy, psychology, reaching up to pedagogy and didactic methodology, bio-technical approaches and theoretical structures in MA&CS. The conference drew more than 120 participants and contributed to the formation of a close network in the community of the scientists conducting research within the field of MA&CS.

  9. The diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema. Consensus document of the International Society of Lymphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-06-01

    This International Society of Lymphology (ISL) Consensus Document is the current revision of the 1995 Document for the evaluation and management of peripheral lymphedema. It is based upon modifications suggested and published following the 1997 XVI International Congress of Lymphology (ICL) in Madrid, Spain, discussed at the 1999 XVII ICL in Chennai, India, considered at the 2000 (ISL) Executive Committee meeting in Hinterzarten, Germany, and derived from integration of discussions and written comments obtained during and following the 2001 XVIII ICL in Genoa, Italy as modified at the 2003 ISL Executive Committee meeting in Cordoba, Argentina. The document attempts to amalgamate the broad spectrum of protocols advocated worldwide for the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema into a coordinated proclamation representing a "Consensus" of the international community. The document is not meant to override individual clinical considerations for problematic patients nor to stifle progress. It is also not meant to be a legal formulation from which variations define medical malpractice. The Society understands that in some clinics the method of treatment derives from national standards while in others access to medical equipment and supplies is limited and therefore the suggested treatments are impractical. We continue to struggle to keep the document concise while balancing the need for depth and details. With these considerations in mind, we believe that this version of the Consensus represents the best judgment of the ISL membership on how to approach patients with peripheral lymphedema as of 2003. We anticipate that the document will and should be challenged, debated in the pages of Lymphology (e.g., as Letters to the Editor), and ideally become a continued focal point for robust discussion at local, national and international conferences in lymphology and related disciplines. We further anticipate as experience evolves and new ideas and technologies emerge

  10. Survey of International Members of the American Thoracic Society on Climate Change and Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarfaty, Mona; Kreslake, Jennifer; Ewart, Gary; Guidotti, Tee L; Thurston, George D; Balmes, John R; Maibach, Edward W

    2016-10-01

    The American Thoracic Society (ATS), in collaboration with George Mason University, surveyed international members of the society to assess perceptions, clinical experiences, and preferred policy responses related to global climate change. A recruitment email was sent by the ATS President in October 2015 to 5,013 international members. Subsequently, four reminder emails were sent to nonrespondents. Responses were received from 489 members in 68 countries; the response rate was 9.8%. Half of respondents reported working in countries in Asia (25%) or Europe (25%), with the remainder in South America (18%), North America (Canada and Mexico) (18%), Australia or New Zealand (9%), and Africa (6%). Survey estimate confidence intervals were ± 5% or smaller. A high percentage of international ATS survey respondents judged that climate change is happening (96%), that it is driven by human activity (70%), and that it is relevant to patient care ("a great deal"/"a moderate amount") (80%). A majority of respondents also indicated they are already observing health impacts of climate change among their patients; most commonly as increases in chronic disease severity from air pollution (88%), allergic symptoms from exposure to plants or mold (72%), and severe weather injuries (69%). An even larger majority anticipated seeing these climate-related health impacts in the next two decades. Respondents further indicated that physicians and physician organizations should play an active role in educating patients, the public, and policy makers on the human health effects of climate change. International ATS respondents, like their counterparts in the U.S., observed that human health is already adversely affected by climate change, and support responses to address this situation.

  11. International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsky, Lora W; Black, Michele; Cochran, Matthew; Daniel, Benjamin J; Davies, Derek; DeLay, Monica; Gardner, Rui; Gregory, Michael; Kunkel, Desiree; Lannigan, Joanne; Marvin, James; Salomon, Robert; Torres, Carina; Walker, Rachael

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this document is to define minimal standards for a flow cytometry shared resource laboratory (SRL) and provide guidance for best practices in several important areas. This effort is driven by the desire of International Society for the Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) members in SRLs to define and maintain standards of excellence in flow cytometry, and act as a repository for key elements of this information (e.g. example SOPs/training material, etc.). These best practices are not intended to define specifically how to implement these recommendations, but rather to establish minimal goals for an SRL to address in order to achieve excellence. It is hoped that once these best practices are established and implemented they will serve as a template from which similar practices can be defined for other types of SRLs. Identification of the need for best practices first occurred through discussions at the CYTO 2013 SRL Forum, with the most important areas for which best practices should be defined identified through several surveys and SRL track workshops as part of CYTO 2014. © 2016 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  12. [International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia 2012].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hes, Ondřej

    2014-01-01

    Kidney tumours form a broad spectrum of distinguished histopathological and molecular genetic entities. The last WHO classification is dated to 2004. Current classification has been published in October 2013 by ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology). There were 5 new epithelials tumours: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo-)papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. Another 3 subtypes of RCC were added as "provisional" entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Modifications were performed in already existing entities: multicystic clear cell RCC (formerly multilocular cystic RCC) is newly included as a subcategory of clear cell RCC with low malignant potential. Oncocytic papillary RCC (PRCC) has not been recognized as a distinctive subcategory of PRCC yet. Hybrid oncocytic-chromophobe tumour was placed within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC were elucidated. Outside of the epithelial category, current approach to our understanding of angiomyolipoma, including the epithelioid variant and angiomyolipoma with epithelial cysts was clarified. Cystic nephroma and mixed epithelial and stromal tumour were considered as a spectrum of one entity. Synovial sarcoma was placed within the sarcoma group. The new classification is to be referred to as the International Society of Urological Pathology Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

  13. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinoma and other prognostic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahunt, B.; Cheville, J.C.; Martignoni, G.; Humphrey, P.A.; Magi-Galluzzi, C.; McKenney, J.; Egevad, L.; Algaba, F.; Moch, H.; Grignon, D.J.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. Issues relating to prognostic factors were coordinated by a workgroup who id

  14. Replenishment of the Reference Suwannee River Natural Organic Matter (NOM): Final Report on a Proposal to International Humic Substances Society

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report on International Humic Substances Society findings of natural organic matter content along the Suwannee River sill in Southeastern Georgia.

  15. Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) Facing the Twenty-First Century: Challenges and Contributions. Presidential Address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnove, Robert F.

    2001-01-01

    Examines challenges to comparative and international education in the areas of epistemological approaches, research methodology, philosophical considerations, and dissemination of findings; the field's contributions in questioning assumptions about school-society relationships, identifying the benefits and dangers of "borrowing" educational…

  16. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinoma and other prognostic parameters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delahunt, B.; Cheville, J.C.; Martignoni, G.; Humphrey, P.A.; Magi-Galluzzi, C.; McKenney, J.; Egevad, L.; Algaba, F.; Moch, H.; Grignon, D.J.; Montironi, R.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen-van de Kaa, C.A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. Issues relating to prognostic factors were coordinated by a workgroup who id

  17. Institutional Fragmentation and the Ontological 'Ethos' of International Law as a Legal System in a World Society

    OpenAIRE

    Zuo, A

    2015-01-01

    In the “institutional fragmentation of international IP law” debate, the analogy between international law and national legal systems, as the theoretical premise of the “institutional fragmentation” language, fails for the lack of “relevant similarity”. And secondly, the ontological “ethos” of international law, which are the inherent virtues of international law-making and implementation, regime evolution and interaction in this world society, could rectify the chaos of this rhetoric of “ins...

  18. The International Year of Planet Earth (2007-2009):Earth Sciences for Society

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eduardo F.J.de Mulder; Ted Nield; Edward Derbyshire

    2006-01-01

    Natural disasters like the 2004 tsunami bear graphic testimony to the Earth's incredible power. More effective use of geoscientific knowledge can save lives and protect property. Such knowledge also enables us to satisfy, in a sustainable manner,the growing need for Earth's resources by an expanding human population. Such knowledge is readily available in the practical experience and publications of some half a million Earth scientists all over the world, a professional community that is ready and willing to contribute to a safer, healthier and wealthier society if called upon by politicians and decision makers. Professional guidance by Earth scientists is available in many aspects of everyday life including, for example, identification of the best areas for urban expansion, sites to avoid for waste disposal, the location of new underground fresh water resources, and where certain toxic agents implicated in Earth-related diseases may be located, etc.The International Year of Planet Earth (2007-2009) aims to build on existing knowledge and make it more available for the improvement of everyday life, especially in the less developed countries, as expressed in the Year's subtitle: Earth sciences for Society. Ambitious outreach and science programmes constitute the backbone of the International Year, now politically endorsed by all 191 member states of the United Nations Organisation which has proclaimed 2008, the central year of the triennium, as the UN Year of Planet Earth. This paper describes who is behind the initiative,how it will work, and how the political process leading to United Nations proclamation proceeded. It also describes the financial and organisational aspects of the International Year, sets out the commitments necessary for the realization of the Year's ambitions by all nations, and explains how the raising of US$ 20 million will be approached.

  19. Clinical trial registration in physiotherapy journals: recommendations from the International Society of Physiotherapy Journal Editors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo O P; Lin, Chung-Wei Christine; Grossi, Debora Bevilaqua; Mancini, Marisa Cota; Swisher, Anne K; Cook, Chad E; Vaughn, Daniel W; Elkins, Mark R; Sheikh, Umer; Moore, Ann; Jull, Gwendolen A; Craik, Rebecca L; Maher, Christopher G; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus; Marques, Amélia Pasqual; Harms, Michele; Brooks, Dina; Simoneau, Guy G; Strupstad, John Henry

    2012-12-01

    Clinical trial registration involves placing the protocol for a clinical trial on a free, publicly available, and electronically searchable register. Registration is considered to be prospective if the protocol is registered before the trial commences (ie, before the first participant is enrolled). Prospective registration has several potential advantages. It could help avoid trials being duplicated unnecessarily and it could allow people with health problems to identify trials in which they might participate. Perhaps more importantly, however, it tackles 2 big problems in clinical research: selective reporting and publication bias. Prospective clinical trial registration is of great potential value to the clinicians, consumers, and researchers who rely on clinical trial data, and that is why the International Society of Physiotherapy Journal Editors (ISPJE) is recommending that members enact a policy for prospective trial registration.

  20. Annual International Conference of the German Operations Research Society (GOR) University of Augsburg

    CERN Document Server

    Borgwardt, Karl-Heinz; Klein, Robert; Tuma, Axel

    2009-01-01

    This book contains 93 selected papers from the symposium "Operations Research 2008" which was held from September 3-5, 2008 at the University of Augsburg, Germany. The international conference, which also serves as the annual meeting of the German Operations Research Society (GOR), attracted 580 participants from more than thirty countries. The general theme "Operations Research and Global Business" stresses the important role of Operations Research in improving decisions in the increasingly complex global business environment. Operations Research represents one of the most successful instruments for organizing business processes, as many applications in areas like supply chain management or financial management show. The book gives a broad overview of the various facets of Operations Research: mathematical methods such as optimization, forecasting, data analysis or game theory and their applications in business, economics and social life.

  1. Does International Student Exchange Contribute to Educating Teachers We Need in a Multicultural Society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Berg

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is to present a study of some student teachers’ outcome of their international exchange, focusing on multiculturalism and the students’ intercultural education. The article is based on a quantitative study over three academic years. The study is a survey of the students’ knowledge, thoughts, and feelings before and after their stay abroad. Most of the answers to the questions in the survey are consistent from one year to the next, and there is no significant difference from one country to another. Consequently, the results may apply to any teacher-training institution. According to the data from the study, the benefits derived from student exchange are numerous and contribute to forming the teachers we need in a multicultural society

  2. SIOG (International Society of Geriatric Oncology recommendations for anthracycline use in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Aapro

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A taskforce of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG has recently submitted recommendations on the use of anthracyclines in elderly patients. Despite the aging of the population and the high proportion of elderly individuals in the population of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, the development of specialist expertise in the treatment of elderly patients with cancer is relatively recent. Treatment of the elderly is complex because they are a highly heterogeneous population, with large variations in health status, comorbidities and life expectancy. In addition, these patients are generally more susceptible than young patients to the cardiotoxic effects of anthracyclines. Strategies for assessing elderly patients with cancer, reducing the risk of congestive heart failure, and assessing the cardiotoxic effects of treatments are discussed. In addition, a summary of the SIOG recommendations is presented.

  3. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Kasper D; Thomsen, Frederik B; Nerstrøm, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers previously graded...... as Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) are now considered as 7 (3 + 4). PATIENTS AND METHODS: A matched-pair analysis was conducted. In all, 215 patients with Gleason score 6 or 7 (3 + 4) prostate cancer on biopsy who underwent RP before 31 December 2005 (pre-ISUP group), were matched 1:1 by biopsy Gleason score......, clinical tumour category, PSA level, and margin status to patients undergoing RP between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011 (post-ISUP group). Patients were followed until BCR defined as a PSA level of ≥0.2 ng/mL. Risk of BCR was analysed in a competing-risk model. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 9...

  4. Implications of the International Society of Urological Pathology modified Gleason grading system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Mazzucchelli, Roberta; Montironi, Rodolfo

    2012-04-01

    Histologic grading is the clinically most useful tissue-based predictor of prognosis for prostate cancer. Over the years, there has been a gradual shift in how the Gleason grading is applied in practice, with a general trend toward upgrading. A consensus conference was organized in 2005 by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) for standardizing both the perception of histologic patterns and how the grade information is compiled and reported. To review the implications of the ISUP modified Gleason grading system. Personal experience and review of the current literature. The recommendations regarding pattern interpretation and reporting are summarized. The practical consequences of the ISUP modification of the Gleason grading are reported. The prognostic importance of the Gleason score, its reproducibility, and its preoperative assessment are discussed. Subsequent proposals for slight modifications to the ISUP grading system are described.

  5. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading of prostate cancer - An ISUP consensus on contemporary grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Samaratunga, Hemamali

    2016-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has issued guidelines for the grading of prostate cancer based on a consensus conference held in 2014. The recommendations resulting from the 2014 consensus conference were a further development of 2005 ISUP modified Gleason grading. In the 2014 system, morphological criteria are clarified, including updated definitions of Gleason pattern 4. In addition to the continued reporting of Gleason scores, we also recommend that Gleason scores ≤6, 3 + 4 = 7, 4 + 3 = 7, 8 and 9-10, respectively, be reported as five groups, i.e. ISUP grades 1-5. This new grading system has the dual benefit of predicting patient outcome as well as facilitating patient communication. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Abstract presentations: what do SGIM presenters prefer? Society of General Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulsky, A A; Kouides, R W

    1998-06-01

    We surveyed physicians presenting abstracts at the 1995 Society of General Internal Medicine annual meeting to determine whether the oral or poster format better achieved their presentation goals. Poster presentations better met respondents' objectives for feedback and criticism and for networking and developing collaborative projects, while oral presentations better met their objectives for national visibility and sharing knowledge within one's field. Sixty-nine percent of respondents preferred to present oral abstracts. The majority of these presenters preferred to present their research in an oral format although poster presentations still played an important role for them, particularly as a venue for feedback on their work. As meeting size increases, different presentation formats should be explored that best meet the needs of the academic community.

  7. International Society of Blood Transfusion Working Party on red cell immunogenetics and blood group terminology: Cancun report (2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storry, J R; Castilho, L; Daniels, G; Flegel, W A; Garratty, G; de Haas, M; Hyland, C; Lomas-Francis, C; Moulds, J M; Nogues, N; Olsson, M L; Poole, J; Reid, M E; Rouger, P; van der Schoot, E; Scott, M; Tani, Y; Yu, L-C; Wendel, S; Westhoff, C; Yahalom, V; Zelinski, T

    2014-07-01

    The International Society of Blood Transfusion Working Party on red cell immunogenetics and blood group terminology convened during the International congress in Cancun, July 2012. This report details the newly identified antigens in existing blood group systems and presents three new blood group systems.

  8. Soil! Get the Scoop - The Soil Science Society of America's International Year of Soils Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbo, David L.; Hopmans, Jan; Olson, Carolyn; Fisk, Susan; Chapman, Susan; van Es, Harold

    2015-04-01

    Soils are a finite natural resource and are nonrenewable on a human time scale. Soils are the foundation for food, animal feed, fuel and natural fiber production, the supply of clean water, nutrient cycling and a range of ecosystem functions. The area of fertile soils covering the world's surface is limited and increasingly subject to degradation, poor management and loss to urbanization. Increased awareness of the life-supporting functions of soil is called for if this trend is to be reversed and so enable the levels of food production necessary to meet the demands of population levels predicted for 2050. The Soil Science Society of America is coordinating with the Global Soil Partnership and other organizations around the world to celebrate the 2015 International Year of Soils and raise awareness and promote the sustainability of our limited soil resources. We all have a valuable role in communicating vital information on soils, a life sustaining natural resource. Therefore, we will provide resources to learn about soils and help us tell the story of soils. We will promote IYS on social media by sharing our posts from Facebook and Twitter. Additionally SSSA developed 12 monthly themes that reflect the diverse value of soils to our natural environment and society. Each month has information on the theme, a lesson plan, and other outreach activities. All information is available on a dedicated website www.soil.org/IYS. The site will be updated constantly throughout the year.

  9. International Society for Extracellular Vesicles: first annual meeting, April 17–21, 2012: ISEV-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araldi, Elisa; Krämer-Albers, Eva-Maria; Hoen, Esther Nolte-‘t; Peinado, Hector; Psonka-Antonczyk, Katarzyna Maria; Rao, Pooja; van Niel, Guillaume; Yáñez-Mó, María; Nazarenko, Irina

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular micro- and nano-scale membrane vesicles produced by different cells are recognised as an essential entity of physiological fluids in a variety of organisms and function as mediators of intercellular communication employed for the regulation of multiple systemic and local processes. In the last decade, an exponential amount of experimental work was dedicated to exploring the biogenesis and secretion mechanisms, physiological and pathological functions and potential applications of the extracellular vesicles (EVs). Noteworthy is the large heterogeneity of in vitro and in vivo models applied, technical approaches developed in these studies and the diversity of designations assigned to different or similar types of EVs. Hence, there is a clear necessity for a uniform nomenclature and standardisation of methods to isolate and characterise these vesicles. In April 2012, the first meeting of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) took place bringing together this exponentially grown scientific community. The University of Gothenburg (Krefting Research Centre) together with the Interim Board of the Society created in September 2011 (Jan Lötvall, Clotilde Théry, Xandra Breakefield, Marca Wauben, Yong Song Gho, Lawrence Rajendran, Graça Raposo, Douglas Taylor, Margareta Sjöstrand and Esbjörn Telemo) organised this fantastic event that counted 488 registered and contributing participants. This meeting report provides a retrospective summary of the broad spectrum of ISEV-2012 sessions. Again, we emphasise novel findings, discussions and decisions met by the community during the meeting. PMID:26082071

  10. International Society for Extracellular Vesicles: first annual meeting, April 17–21, 2012: ISEV-2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Araldi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular micro- and nano-scale membrane vesicles produced by different cells are recognised as an essential entity of physiological fluids in a variety of organisms and function as mediators of intercellular communication employed for the regulation of multiple systemic and local processes. In the last decade, an exponential amount of experimental work was dedicated to exploring the biogenesis and secretion mechanisms, physiological and pathological functions and potential applications of the extracellular vesicles (EVs. Noteworthy is the large heterogeneity of in vitro and in vivo models applied, technical approaches developed in these studies and the diversity of designations assigned to different or similar types of EVs. Hence, there is a clear necessity for a uniform nomenclature and standardisation of methods to isolate and characterise these vesicles. In April 2012, the first meeting of the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV took place bringing together this exponentially grown scientific community. The University of Gothenburg (Krefting Research Centre together with the Interim Board of the Society created in September 2011 (Jan Lötvall, Clotilde Théry, Xandra Breakefield, Marca Wauben, Yong Song Gho, Lawrence Rajendran, Graça Raposo, Douglas Taylor, Margareta Sjöstrand and Esbjörn Telemo organised this fantastic event that counted 488 registered and contributing participants. This meeting report provides a retrospective summary of the broad spectrum of ISEV-2012 sessions. Again, we emphasise novel findings, discussions and decisions met by the community during the meeting.

  11. Leakage of Microbial Endotoxin through the Implant-Abutment Interface in Oral Implants: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rhoodie Garrana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Endotoxin initiates osteoclastic activity resulting in bone loss. Endotoxin leakage through implant abutment connections negatively influences peri-implant bone levels. Objectives. (i To determine if endotoxin can traverse different implant-abutment connection (IAC designs; (ii to quantify the amount of endotoxins traversing the IAC; (iii to compare the in vitro comportments of different IACs. Materials and Methods. Twenty-seven IACs were inoculated with E. coli endotoxin. Six of the twenty-seven IACs were external connections from one system (Southern Implants and the remaining twenty-one IACs were made up of seven internal IAC types from four different implant companies (Straumann, Ankylos, and Neodent, Southern Implants. Results. Of the 27 IACs tested, all 6 external IACs leaked measurable amounts of endotoxin. Of the remaining 21 internal IACs, 9 IACs did not show measurable leakage whilst the remaining 12 IACs leaked varying amounts. The mean log endotoxin level was significantly higher for the external compared to internal types (p=0.015. Conclusion. Within the parameters of this study, we can conclude that endotoxin leakage is dependent on the design of the IAC. Straumann Synocta, Straumann Cross-fit, and Ankylos displayed the best performances of all IACs tested with undetectable leakage after 7 days. Each of these IACs incorporated a morse-like component in their design. Speculation still exists over the impact of IAC endotoxin leakage on peri-implant tissues in vivo; hence, further investigations are required to further explore this.

  12. Leakage of Microbial Endotoxin through the Implant-Abutment Interface in Oral Implants: An In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrana, Rhoodie; Mohangi, Govindrau; Malo, Paulo; Nobre, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Endotoxin initiates osteoclastic activity resulting in bone loss. Endotoxin leakage through implant abutment connections negatively influences peri-implant bone levels. Objectives. (i) To determine if endotoxin can traverse different implant-abutment connection (IAC) designs; (ii) to quantify the amount of endotoxins traversing the IAC; (iii) to compare the in vitro comportments of different IACs. Materials and Methods. Twenty-seven IACs were inoculated with E. coli endotoxin. Six of the twenty-seven IACs were external connections from one system (Southern Implants) and the remaining twenty-one IACs were made up of seven internal IAC types from four different implant companies (Straumann, Ankylos, and Neodent, Southern Implants). Results. Of the 27 IACs tested, all 6 external IACs leaked measurable amounts of endotoxin. Of the remaining 21 internal IACs, 9 IACs did not show measurable leakage whilst the remaining 12 IACs leaked varying amounts. The mean log endotoxin level was significantly higher for the external compared to internal types (p = 0.015). Conclusion. Within the parameters of this study, we can conclude that endotoxin leakage is dependent on the design of the IAC. Straumann Synocta, Straumann Cross-fit, and Ankylos displayed the best performances of all IACs tested with undetectable leakage after 7 days. Each of these IACs incorporated a morse-like component in their design. Speculation still exists over the impact of IAC endotoxin leakage on peri-implant tissues in vivo; hence, further investigations are required to further explore this.

  13. Core competencies for hair restoration surgeons recommended by the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puig, Carlos J; Beehner, Michael L; Cotterill, Paul C; Elliott, Vance W; Haber, Robert S; Harris, James A; Martinick, Jennifer H; Niedbalski, Robert P; Rose, Paul; Rousso, Daniel E; Shapiro, Ronald L

    2009-03-01

    Because hair restoration surgery has changed so significantly, the International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery (ISHRS) recently developed and published a Core Curriculum for Hair Restoration Surgery (CCHRS). The ISHRS organized a task force to develop training programs that would not only present the CCHRS but also provide the practical experience necessary to allow a physician to practice safe, aesthetically sound hair restoration surgery. The task force recognized early on that identification of core competencies for hair restoration surgeons was essential to guiding the development of these training experiences. This article presents the competencies that have been identified. The intent of the Core Competencies for Hair Restoration Surgery is to outline the knowledge and skills that are essential to accurately diagnose and treat hair loss, to ensure patient safety, and to optimize aesthetic results. The ISHRS hopes that all existing surgery and dermatology training programs teaching hair restoration surgery procedures will find the Core Competencies useful in developing their curriculums. The Core Competencies were developed through an organized review of the CCHRS by a team of experienced hair restoration surgeons and educators and reviewed and approved by the ISHRS Board of Governors. The diversity of these competencies demonstrate that contemporary hair restoration surgery is a specialty requiring knowledge of several medical disciplines, including genetics, endocrinology, dermatology, tissue preservation, and surgery. The International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery believes identification of these Core Competencies is an important contribution to physician education in hair restoration surgery, and physicians who demonstrate competency in these skills will satisfy patients with contemporary results in a safe environment.

  14. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Mobile Learning (11th, Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers and posters of the 11th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2015, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Madeira, Portugal, March 14-16, 2015. The Mobile Learning 2015 Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of…

  15. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on e-Learning (Madeira, Portugal, July 1-4, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Miguel Baptista, Ed.; McPherson, Maggie, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the International Conference e-Learning 2016, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, 1-3 July, 2016. This conference is part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems 2016, 1-4 July. The e-Learning (EL) 2016 conference aims…

  16. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on e-Learning (Prague, Czech Republic, July 23-26, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Miguel Baptista, Ed.; McPherson, Maggie, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the International Conference e-Learning 2013, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information Society and is part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (Prague, Czech Republic, July 23-26, 2013). The e-Learning 2013 conference aims to…

  17. Highlights from the 6th International Society for Computational Biology Student Council Symposium at the 18th Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijn, C.N.; Michaut, M.; Abeel, T.

    2010-01-01

    This meeting report gives an overview of the keynote lectures and a selection of the student oral and poster presentations at the 6th International Society for Computational Biology Student Council Symposium that was held as a precursor event to the annual international conference on Intelligent Sys

  18. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Mobile Learning (12th, Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, April 9-11, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Inmaculada Arnedillo, Ed.; Isaías, Pedro, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 12th International Conference on Mobile Learning 2016, which was organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society, in Vilamoura, Algarve, Portugal, April 9-11, 2016. The Mobile Learning 2016 Conference seeks to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of…

  19. Introduction to the special issue from the 2014 meeting of the International Behavioral Neuroscience Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jared W; Hall, F Scott; Pletnikov, Mikhail; Kent, Stephen

    2015-11-01

    In 2013, President Obama launched what has been optimistically described as the "decade of the brain". The launch of this effort comes on the back of widespread acknowledgement that more is required to aid those suffering from mental health disorders. Specifically, a greater understanding of the neural circuitry related to behaviors specific to mental health disorders is needed. The field of research that relates the circuitry of the brain to specific aspects of behavior is referred to as behavioral neuroscience. The International Behavioral Neuroscience Society (IBNS) was founded in 1992 specifically to meet on an annual basis and present the latest research findings in this field, and to gather together the international research community to discuss issues important for the development and progress of this scientific discipline. This special issue includes reviews of topics of emerging interest and advancing knowledge in behavioral neuroscience, based on symposia presented at the 2014 IBNS meeting. Topics discussed at the annual IBNS meeting ranged from investigations of the neural mechanisms underlying bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, depression, traumatic brain injury, and risk-taking behavior, to behavioral consequences of obesity and immune dysfunction. Novel treatment areas are covered such as the use of deep brain stimulation, as well as investigation of the behavioral impacts of nicotine withdrawal and how this research will influence the development of nicotine cessation treatments. Hence, this special issue covers a wide-range of topics in behavioral neuroscience offering an insight into the challenges faced by researchers in this decade of the brain.

  20. 2014 President's plenary international psycho-oncology society: moving toward cancer care for the whole patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D; Travado, Luzia; Jacobsen, Paul B; Turner, Jane; Borras, Josep M; Ullrich, Andreas W H

    2015-12-01

    The International Psycho-oncology Society (IPOS) has just celebrated its 30th anniversary. The growth of psychosocial oncology has been exponential, and this relatively new field is becoming a core service that focuses on prevention, reducing the burden of cancer, and enhancing the quality of life from time of diagnosis, through treatment, survivorship, and palliative care. Looking back over the past 30 years, we see that cancer care globally has evolved to a new and higher standard. Today, 'cancer care for the whole patient' is being accomplished with an evidence-based model that addresses psychosocial needs and integrates psycho-oncology into the treatment and care of patients. The President's Plenary Session in Lisbon, Portugal, highlighted the IPOS Mission of promoting global excellence in psychosocial care of people affected by cancer through our research, public policy, advocacy, and education. The internationally endorsed IPOS Standard of Quality Cancer Care, for example, clearly states the necessity of integrating the psychosocial domain into routine care, and that distress should be measured as the sixth vital sign after temperature, blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, and pain. The plenary paper also discussed the global progress being made in Europe, North America, and Australia in providing quality cancer care for the whole patient. Collaborative partnerships between IPOS and organizations such as the European Partnership Action Against Cancer and the World Health Organization are essential in building capacity for the delivery of high-quality psycho-oncology services in the future.

  1. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Polverino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host–pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM. The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress.

  2. The best of respiratory infections from the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polverino, Eva; Bothamley, Graham H; Goletti, Delia; Heyckendorf, Jan; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Aliberti, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    The breadth and quality of scientific presentations on clinical and translational research into respiratory infections at the 2015 European Respiratory Society (ERS) International Congress in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, establishes this area as one of the leadings fields in pulmonology. The host-pathogen relationship in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and the impact of comorbidities and chronic treatment on clinical outcomes in patients with pneumonia were studied. Various communications were dedicated to bronchiectasis and, in particular, to different prognostic and clinical aspects of this disease, including chronic infection with Pseudomonas and inhaled antibiotic therapy. Recent data from the World Health Organization showed that Europe has the highest number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis cases and the poorest countries have the least access to suitable treatments. Latent tuberculosis and different screening programmes were also discussed with particular attention to risk factors such as HIV infection and diabetes. Several biomarkers were proposed to distinguish between active tuberculosis and latent infection. Major treatment trials were discussed (REMOX, RIFQUIN and STREAM). The possibility of once-weekly treatment in the continuation phase (RIAQUIN) was especially exciting. The continuing rise of Mycobacterium abscessus as a significant pathogen was noted. This article reviews some of the best contributions from the Respiratory Infections Assembly to the 2015 ERS International Congress.

  3. Highlights from the Fourth International Society for Computational Biology Student Council Symposium at the Sixteenth Annual International Conference on Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gehlenborg Nils

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this meeting report we give an overview of the talks and presentations from the Fourth International Society for Computational Biology (ISCB Student Council Symposium held as part of the annual Intelligent Systems for Molecular Biology (ISMB conference in Toronto, Canada. Furthermore, we detail the role of the Student Council (SC as an international student body in organizing this symposium series in the context of large, international conferences.

  4. XI Congress of the International Headache Society. September 13-16, 2003, Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarchielli, Paola

    2004-04-01

    The XI Congress of the International Headache Society (IHC) provided useful feedback for a wide range of disciplines for all scientists involved in basic and applied research concerning headaches. The major topics of the Congress included comorbidity, paediatric headache, phenotypic markers, genetics, migraine therapy, trigeminal neuralgia and paroxysmal facial pain with autonomic signs. The most recent advances were presented and discussed and all efforts were made to transfer these new understandings of pathogenesis, clinical features and treatments, to clinical practice, in an attempt to gain a better understanding of patient problems and requests. The Presidential Symposium, which anticipated the scientific sessions, provided the most updated knowledge regarding neuroimaging, neurophysiological and potential clinical implications of the activation of brainstem structures as well as the dependency of cortical events on this activation during migraine attacks. The results of the strenuous work carried out from autumn 1999 to 2003 of an International Committee of headache experts, presided by J. Olesen, reached its peak with the presentation of the new International Headache Classification ICHD-II. There are many relevant changes in the new classification, even though the basic structure and the most important criteria, such as those for migraine without aura and tension-type headache, have been maintained. Several new entities have been added including chronic migraine for patients having migraine >or= 15 days/month. New rules separate primary and secondary headaches and a new chapter now presents headaches attributed to psychiatric disorders. Headaches due to disturbance of homeostasis has been brought together in a new chapter and the diagnostic criteria for secondary headaches are now more systematically constructed. All these changes will hopefully promote research, especially for the novel entities reported in the appendix, which have not been sufficiently

  5. SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES CHRONIC AIRWAY DISEASE IN ENDOTOXIN-SENSITIVE BUT NOT ENDOTOXIN-RESISTANT MICE

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUBCHRONIC ENDOTOXIN INHALATION CAUSES CHRONIC AIRWAY DISEASE IN ENDOTOXIN-SENSITIVE BUT NOT ENDOTOXIN-RESISTANT MICE. D. M. Brass, J. D. Savov, *S. H. Gavett, ?C. George, D. A. Schwartz. Duke Univ Medical Center Durham, NC, *U.S. E.P.A. Research Triangle Park, NC, ?Univ of Iowa,...

  6. The diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema: 2013 Consensus Document of the International Society of Lymphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    This International Society of Lymphology (ISL) Consensus Document is the current revision of the 1995 Document for the evaluation and management of peripheral lymphedema (1) for discussion at the XXIV International Congress of Lymphology. It is based upon modifications: [A] suggested and published following the 1997 XVI International Congress of Lymphology (ICL) in Madrid, Spain (2) discussed at the 1999 XVII ICL in Chennai, India (3) and considered/ confirmed at the 2000 (ISL) Executive Committee meeting in Hinterzarten, Germany (4); [B] derived from integration of discussions and written comments obtained during and following the 2001 XVIII ICL in Genoa, Italy as modified at the 2003 ISL Executive Committee meeting in Cordoba, Argentina (5); [C] suggested from comments, criticisms, and rebuttals as published in the December 2004 issue of Lymphology (6); [D] discussed in both the 2005 XX ICL in Salvador, Brazil and the 2007 XXI ICL in Shanghai, China and modified at the 2008 Executive Committee Meeting in Naples, Italy (7,8); and [E] modified from discussions and written comments from the 2009 XXII ICL in Sydney, Australia, the 2011 XXIII ICL in Malmo, Sweden and 2012 Executive Committee Meetings. The document attempts to amalgamate the broad spectrum of protocols advocated worldwide for the diagnosis and treatment of peripheral lymphedema into a coordinated proclamation representing a "Consensus" of the international community. The document is not meant to override individual clinical considerations for problematic patients nor to stifle progress. It is also not meant to be a legal formulation from which variations define medical malpractice. The Society understands that in some clinics the method of treatment derives from national standards while in others access to medical equipment and supplies is limited, and therefore the suggested treatments are impractical. Adaptability and inclusiveness does come at the price that members can rightly be critical of what

  7. Biological Activity of Masked Endotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, Harald; Gornicec, Jan; Neuper, Theresa; Parigiani, Maria Alejandra; Wallner, Michael; Duschl, Albert; Horejs-Hoeck, Jutta

    2017-01-01

    Low endotoxin recovery (LER) is a recently discovered phenomenon describing the inability of limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL)-based assays to detect lipopolysaccharide (LPS) because of a “masking effect” caused by chelators or detergents commonly used in buffer formulations for medical products and recombinant proteins. This study investigates the masking capacities of different buffer formulations and whether masked endotoxin is biologically active. We show that both naturally occurring endotoxin as well as control standard endotoxin can be affected by LER. Furthermore, whereas masked endotoxin cannot be detected in Factor C based assays, it is still detectable in a cell-based TLR4-NF-κB-luciferase reporter gene assay. Moreover, in primary human monocytes, masked LPS induces the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines and surface activation markers even at very low concentrations. We therefore conclude that masked LPS is a potent trigger of immune responses, which emphasizes the potential danger of masked LPS, as it may pose a health threat in pharmaceutical products or compromise experimental results. PMID:28317862

  8. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Vancouver Classification of Renal Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Eble, John N; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I; Grignon, David; Hes, Ondrej; Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Tickoo, Satish K; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram

    2013-10-01

    The classification working group of the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference on renal neoplasia was in charge of making recommendations regarding additions and changes to the current World Health Organization Classification of Renal Tumors (2004). Members of the group performed an exhaustive literature review, assessed the results of the preconference survey and participated in the consensus conference discussion and polling activities. On the basis of the above inputs, there was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as new distinct epithelial tumors within the classification system: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, the MiT family translocation RCCs (in particular t(6;11) RCC), and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, there are 3 rare carcinomas that were considered as emerging or provisional new entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC; succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC; and ALK translocation RCC. Further reports of these entities are required to better understand the nature and behavior of these highly unusual tumors. There were a number of new concepts and suggested modifications to the existing World Health Organization 2004 categories. Within the clear cell RCC group, it was agreed upon that multicystic clear cell RCC is best considered as a neoplasm of low malignant potential. There was agreement that subtyping of papillary RCC is of value and that the oncocytic variant of papillary RCC should not be considered as a distinct entity. The hybrid oncocytic chromophobe tumor, which is an indolent tumor that occurs in 3 settings, namely Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome, renal oncocytosis, and as a sporadic neoplasm, was placed, for the time being, within the chromophobe RCC category. Recent advances related to collecting duct carcinoma, renal medullary carcinoma, and mucinous spindle cell and tubular RCC

  9. Genitourinary syndrome of menopause: new terminology for vulvovaginal atrophy from the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health and the North American Menopause Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portman, David J; Gass, Margery L S

    2014-10-01

    In 2012, the Board of Directors of the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH) and the Board of Trustees of The North American Menopause Society (NAMS) acknowledged the need to review current terminology associated with genitourinary tract symptoms related to menopause. The 2 societies cosponsored a terminology consensus conference, which was held in May 2013. Members of the consensus conference agreed that the term genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM) is a medically more accurate, all-encompassing, and publicly acceptable term than vulvovaginal atrophy. GSM is defined as a collection of symptoms and signs associated with a decrease in estrogen and other sex steroids involving changes to the labia majora/minora, clitoris, vestibule/introitus, vagina, urethra and bladder. The syndrome may include but is not limited to genital symptoms of dryness, burning, and irritation; sexual symptoms of lack of lubrication, discomfort or pain, and impaired function; and urinary symptoms of urgency, dysuria and recurrent urinary tract infections. Women may present with some or all of the signs and symptoms, which must be bothersome and should not be better accounted for by another diagnosis. The term was presented and discussed at the annual meeting of each society. The respective Boards of NAMS and ISSWSH formally endorsed the new terminology--genitourinary syndrome of menopause (GSM)--in 2014.

  10. Review of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Practice guidelines for management of heart failure in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colan, Steven D

    2015-08-01

    In 2004, practice guidelines for the management of heart failure in children by Rosenthal and colleagues were published in conjunction with the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. These guidelines have not been updated or reviewed since that time. In general, there has been considerable controversy as to the utility and purpose of clinical practice guidelines, but there is general recognition that the relentless progress of medicine leads to the progressive irrelevance of clinical practice guidelines that do not undergo periodic review and updating. Paediatrics and paediatric cardiology, in particular, have had comparatively minimal participation in the clinical practice guidelines realm. As a result, most clinical practice guidelines either specifically exclude paediatrics from consideration, as has been the case for the guidelines related to cardiac failure in adults, or else involve clinical practice guidelines committees that include one or two paediatric cardiologists and produce guidelines that cannot reasonably be considered a consensus paediatric opinion. These circumstances raise a legitimate question as to whether the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation paediatric heart failure guidelines should be re-reviewed. The time, effort, and expense involved in producing clinical practice guidelines should be considered before recommending an update to the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Paediatric Heart Failure guidelines. There are specific areas of rapid change in the evaluation and management of heart failure in children that are undoubtedly worthy of updating. These domains include areas such as use of serum and imaging biomarkers, wearable and implantable monitoring devices, and acute heart failure management and mechanical circulatory support. At the time the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation guidelines were published, echocardiographic tissue Doppler, 3 dimensional

  11. Endotoxin: From database to measurement strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, S.; Schinkel, J.M.; Wouters, I.M.; Preller, E.A.; Tjoe Nij, E.I.M.; Heederik, D.; Tielemans, E.L.J.P.; Preller, L.

    2007-01-01

    Endotoxin is a well-known toxin which has been associated with several health effects. Many factors influence airborne endotoxin exposure and can cause high variability in exposure between and within workers. Additionally, since the source of endotoxin exposure - gram-negative bacteria - grow and am

  12. Endotoxin: From database to measurement strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, S.; Schinkel, J.M.; Wouters, I.M.; Preller, E.A.; Tjoe Nij, E.I.M.; Heederik, D.; Tielemans, E.L.J.P.; Preller, L.

    2007-01-01

    Endotoxin is a well-known toxin which has been associated with several health effects. Many factors influence airborne endotoxin exposure and can cause high variability in exposure between and within workers. Additionally, since the source of endotoxin exposure - gram-negative bacteria - grow and

  13. 21 CFR 866.3210 - Endotoxin assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Endotoxin assay. 866.3210 Section 866.3210 Food... DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Serological Reagents § 866.3210 Endotoxin assay. (a) Identification. An endotoxin assay is a device that uses serological techniques in whole blood. The device...

  14. Endotoxin Studies And Biosolids Stabilization Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation has three parts; a review of bench-scale endotoxin research, a review of observations from a field scale endotoxin release study, and discussion of biosolids stabilization and characterization by PLFA/FAME microbial community analysis. Endotoxins are part of th...

  15. [The Choosing Wisely Initiative of the German Society of Internal Medicine : Recommendations of the German Society for Endocrinology and the German Society for Geriatrics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldkamp, J; Schott, M; Gogol, M; Quinkler, M; Blüher, M; Diederich, S; Reincke, M

    2016-06-01

    A. After osteoporotic fractures in the elderly, as a rule specific antiosteoporotic therapy should be initiated. a. Osteoporosis as a disease of the elderly should be diagnosed and treated (recommendation of the German Society for Geriatrics). B. All patients with diabetes mellitus should complete a specific diabetes training program when antidiabetic drug medication is initiated. C. In Germany, all pregnant women should be advised to undertake iodine supplementation. D. Endocrine causes of hypertension should be ruled out in younger patients and in patients on multiple antihypertensive drugs. E. All unclear cases of hypercalcemia should be clarified. A. Testosterone substitution therapy should not be initiated on the basis of only one measurement of a reduced testosterone level without clinical signs and clarification of the underlying cause. B. Imaging procedures should only be used after the existence of hormonal disease has been confirmed. C. Sonographic screening for thyroid disease is not advised in the elderly. D. Long-term therapy with levothyroxine for nodular goiter should be avoided. E. In relevant stress situations hydrocortisone replacement therapy should not be continued without dose adjustment in patients with adrenal or pituitary insufficiency.

  16. An update from the Chair of the students and new professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanos, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is composed of approximately 68 members who are either within 5 years from completing graduate studies or under 35 years of age. The group is represented by 21 countries from around the world and a variety of disciplinary perspectives working within the area of biometeorology. Here, an update from the Chair of the Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is provided based on accomplishments and new progress from 2014 to 2017 in advance of the ISB's 60th Anniversary.

  17. Evaluation of quantification methods of occupational endotoxin exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebers, V; Raulf-Heimsoth, M; Linsel, G; Goldscheid, N; Düser, M; Stubel, H; Brüning, Th

    2007-11-01

    Endotoxin has been identified as important component of organic-dust exposure and is suspected as main cause of work-related adverse health effects in dusty areas. Although the determination of endotoxin levels by using the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay is internationally accepted, reliability and variation of values measured with this test remain a point of discussion. Therefore, the purpose of the study was to determine the influence of different parameters on endotoxin activity measured in airborne samples. This study thus analyzed: (a) dust filter extraction procedures, (b) storage of samples, (c) usage of different commercially available LAL assays, and (d) results of the whole blood assay (WBA) compared to the LAL test. Using a parallel sampler, 120 filters were loaded with dust at 4 different occupational settings and extracted in 2 labs using a standardized protocol. Parameters like Tween in the extraction medium, extraction volume, centrifugation speed, and material of tubes used for extraction were tested. The LAL test and the WBA were able to determine the differences in dust load of filters obtained from the settings investigated. In addition, results varied significantly with modifications in extraction procedures. Using Tween for filter extraction mainly influenced the resulting endotoxin activity. In addition, LAL test differences according to manufacturer of LAL test, extraction volume, and whether the samples are freshly processed or frozen also resulted in significant variations in the endotoxin levels. In conclusion, a reliable assessment of exposure to endotoxin activity is only possible if standard operation procedures (SOPs) for sampling and determination are established.

  18. Consensus Document of the Spanish Society of Cardiology and the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine on the diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manito, N; Cerqueiro, J M; Comín-Colet, J; García-Pinilla, J M; González-Franco, A; Grau-Amorós, J; Peraira, J R; Manzano, L

    Iron deficiency in patients with heart failure is a medical problem of recent particular interest. This interest has resulted from the publication of several clinical trials that demonstrated that the administration of intravenous iron to such patients improved their functional capacity and even reduced the number of hospitalisations for heart failure decompensation. However, applying the evidence from these studies in clinical practice is still controversial, both in terms of the diagnostic criteria for iron deficiency (absolute and functional) and the optimal method for iron replenishment. This article is a consensus document that integrates the recommendations of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and the Spanish Society of Cardiology. The article reviews the scientific evidence and proposes a diagnostic and therapeutic performance protocol for iron deficiency in heart failure.

  19. International Society of Nephrology-Hydration and Kidney Health Initiative - Expanding Research and Knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moist, Louise M; Clark, William F; Segantini, Luca; Damster, Sandrine; Le Bellego, Laurent; Wong, Germaine; Tonelli, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to describe a collaborative research initiative to explore the role of hydration in kidney health. Our understanding of the effects of hydration in health and disease is surprisingly limited, particularly when we consider the vital role of hydration in basic human physiology. Recent initiatives and research outcomes have challenged the global medical community to expand our knowledge about hydration, including the differences between water, sugared beverages and other consumables. Identification of the potential mechanisms contributing to the benefits of hydration has stimulated the global nephrology community to advance research regarding hydration for kidney health. Hydration and kidney health has been a focus of research for several research centers with a rapidly expanding world literature and knowledge. The International Society of Nephrology has collaborated with Danone Nutricia Research to promote development of kidney research initiatives, which focus on the role of hydration in kidney health and the global translation of this new information. This initiative supports the use of existing data in different regions and countries to expand dialogue among experts in the field of hydration and health, and to increase scientific interaction and productivity with the ultimate goal of improving kidney health. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. International Society of Geriatric Oncology Consensus on Geriatric Assessment in Older Patients With Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildiers, Hans; Heeren, Pieter; Puts, Martine; Topinkova, Eva; Janssen-Heijnen, Maryska L.G.; Extermann, Martine; Falandry, Claire; Artz, Andrew; Brain, Etienne; Colloca, Giuseppe; Flamaing, Johan; Karnakis, Theodora; Kenis, Cindy; Audisio, Riccardo A.; Mohile, Supriya; Repetto, Lazzaro; Van Leeuwen, Barbara; Milisen, Koen; Hurria, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To update the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) 2005 recommendations on geriatric assessment (GA) in older patients with cancer. Methods SIOG composed a panel with expertise in geriatric oncology to develop consensus statements after literature review of key evidence on the following topics: rationale for performing GA; findings from a GA performed in geriatric oncology patients; ability of GA to predict oncology treatment–related complications; association between GA findings and overall survival (OS); impact of GA findings on oncology treatment decisions; composition of a GA, including domains and tools; and methods for implementing GA in clinical care. Results GA can be valuable in oncology practice for following reasons: detection of impairment not identified in routine history or physical examination, ability to predict severe treatment-related toxicity, ability to predict OS in a variety of tumors and treatment settings, and ability to influence treatment choice and intensity. The panel recommended that the following domains be evaluated in a GA: functional status, comorbidity, cognition, mental health status, fatigue, social status and support, nutrition, and presence of geriatric syndromes. Although several combinations of tools and various models are available for implementation of GA in oncology practice, the expert panel could not endorse one over another. Conclusion There is mounting data regarding the utility of GA in oncology practice; however, additional research is needed to continue to strengthen the evidence base. PMID:25071125

  1. The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles launches the first massive open online course on extracellular vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Lässer

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV has organised its first educational online course for students and beginners in the field of extracellular vesicles (EVs. This course, “Basics of Extracellular Vesicles,” uses recorded lectures from experts in the field and will be open for an unlimited number of participants. The course is divided into 5 modules and can be accessed at www.coursera.org/learn/extracellular-vesicles. The first module is an introduction to the field covering the nomenclature and history of EVs. Module 2 focuses on the biogenesis and uptake mechanisms of EVs, as well as their RNA, protein and lipid cargo. Module 3 covers the collection and processing of cell culture media and body fluids such as blood, breast milk, cerebrospinal fluid and urine prior to isolation of EVs. Modules 4 and 5 present different isolation methods and characterisation techniques utilised in the EV field. Here, differential ultracentrifugation, size-exclusion chromatography, density gradient centrifugation, kit-based precipitation, electron microscopy, cryo-electron microscopy, flow cytometry, atomic-force microscopy and nanoparticle-tracking analysis are covered. This first massive open online course (MOOC on EVs was launched on 15 August 2016 at the platform “Coursera” and is free of charge.

  2. Changing Paradigms in Down Syndrome: The First International Conference of the Trisomy 21 Research Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabar, Jean-Maurice; Allinquant, Bernadette; Bianchi, Diana; Blumenthal, Tom; Dekker, Alain; Edgin, Jamie; O'Bryan, John; Dierssen, Mara; Potier, Marie-Claude; Wiseman, Frances; Guedj, Faycal; Créau, Nicole; Reeves, Roger; Gardiner, Katheleen; Busciglio, Jorge

    2016-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability (ID) in humans with an incidence of ∼1:1,000 live births worldwide. It is caused by the presence of an extra copy of all or a segment of the long arm of human chromosome 21 (trisomy 21). People with DS present with a constellation of phenotypic alterations involving most organs and organ systems. ID is present in all people with DS, albeit with variable severity. DS is also the most frequent genetic cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD), and ∼50% of those with DS will develop AD-related dementia. In the last few years, significant progress has been made in understanding the crucial genotype-phenotype relationships in DS, in identifying the alterations in molecular pathways leading to the various clinical conditions present in DS, and in preclinical evaluations of potential therapies to improve the overall health and well-being of individuals with DS. In June 2015, 230 scientists, advocates, patients, and family members met in Paris for the 1st International Conference of the Trisomy 21 Research Society. Here, we report some of the most relevant presentations that took place during the meeting.

  3. Nomenclature of genetic movement disorders: Recommendations of the international Parkinson and movement disorder society task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marras, Connie; Lang, Anthony; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Sue, Carolyn M; Tabrizi, Sarah J; Bertram, Lars; Mercimek-Mahmutoglu, Saadet; Ebrahimi-Fakhari, Darius; Warner, Thomas T; Durr, Alexandra; Assmann, Birgit; Lohmann, Katja; Kostic, Vladimir; Klein, Christine

    2016-04-01

    The system of assigning locus symbols to specify chromosomal regions that are associated with a familial disorder has a number of problems when used as a reference list of genetically determined disorders,including (I) erroneously assigned loci, (II) duplicated loci, (III) missing symbols or loci, (IV) unconfirmed loci and genes, (V) a combination of causative genes and risk factor genes in the same list, and (VI) discordance between phenotype and list assignment. In this article, we report on the recommendations of the International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society Task Force for Nomenclature of Genetic Movement Disorders and present a system for naming genetically determined movement disorders that addresses these problems. We demonstrate how the system would be applied to currently known genetically determined parkinsonism, dystonia, dominantly inherited ataxia, spastic paraparesis, chorea, paroxysmal movement disorders, neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation, and primary familial brain calcifications. This system provides a resource for clinicians and researchers that, unlike the previous system, can be considered an accurate and criterion-based list of confirmed genetically determined movement disorders at the time it was last updated.

  4. The International Society of Nephrology (ISN). Roles & challenges in Africa and other resource-limited communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feehally, John

    ISN (the International Society of Nephrology) is a global organization with more than 9,000 members in 130 countries. The ISN's mission is to "advance the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of kidney diseases in the developing and developed world". ISN delivers this mission in low-resource settings through its five education and training programs available exclusively to low- and middle-income countries. These programs are designed to enable sustainable growth in capacity in nephrology and related disciplines to provide the basis for the improvement of care for kidney patients worldwide. ISN also directs its efforts towards advocacy for kidney health and kidney care, seeking to increase understanding of kidney disease among the general population, health professionals, and health policy makers. Such advocacy is challenging because of the complexity of kidney health messages; there is a need to emphasize affordable healthcare solutions for prevention and treatment of acute kidney injury (AKI), as well as the prevention and management of chronic kidney disease (CKD), and the provision of renal replacement therapy (both chronic dialysis and kidney transplantation) that is both affordable and ethically acceptable.

  5. International Society Of Neuropathology--Haarlem consensus guidelines for nervous system tumor classification and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, David N; Perry, Arie; Burger, Peter; Ellison, David W; Reifenberger, Guido; von Deimling, Andreas; Aldape, Kenneth; Brat, Daniel; Collins, V Peter; Eberhart, Charles; Figarella-Branger, Dominique; Fuller, Gregory N; Giangaspero, Felice; Giannini, Caterina; Hawkins, Cynthia; Kleihues, Paul; Korshunov, Andrey; Kros, Johan M; Beatriz Lopes, M; Ng, Ho-Keung; Ohgaki, Hiroko; Paulus, Werner; Pietsch, Torsten; Rosenblum, Marc; Rushing, Elisabeth; Soylemezoglu, Figen; Wiestler, Otmar; Wesseling, Pieter

    2014-09-01

    Major discoveries in the biology of nervous system tumors have raised the question of how non-histological data such as molecular information can be incorporated into the next World Health Organization (WHO) classification of central nervous system tumors. To address this question, a meeting of neuropathologists with expertise in molecular diagnosis was held in Haarlem, the Netherlands, under the sponsorship of the International Society of Neuropathology (ISN). Prior to the meeting, participants solicited input from clinical colleagues in diverse neuro-oncological specialties. The present "white paper" catalogs the recommendations of the meeting, at which a consensus was reached that incorporation of molecular information into the next WHO classification should follow a set of provided "ISN-Haarlem" guidelines. Salient recommendations include that (i) diagnostic entities should be defined as narrowly as possible to optimize interobserver reproducibility, clinicopathological predictions and therapeutic planning; (ii) diagnoses should be "layered" with histologic classification, WHO grade and molecular information listed below an "integrated diagnosis"; (iii) determinations should be made for each tumor entity as to whether molecular information is required, suggested or not needed for its definition; (iv) some pediatric entities should be separated from their adult counterparts; (v) input for guiding decisions regarding tumor classification should be solicited from experts in complementary disciplines of neuro-oncology; and (iv) entity-specific molecular testing and reporting formats should be followed in diagnostic reports. It is hoped that these guidelines will facilitate the forthcoming update of the fourth edition of the WHO classification of central nervous system tumors.

  6. Paternity Testing Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on genetic investigations in paternity cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morling, Niels; Allen, Robert W; Carracedo, Angel; Geada, Helena; Guidet, Francois; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Martin, Wolfgang; Mayr, Wolfgang R; Olaisen, Bjørnar; Pascali, Vince L; Schneider, Peter M

    2002-10-09

    The International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has established a Paternity Testing Commission (PTC) with the purpose of formulating international recommendations concerning genetic investigations in paternity testing. The PTC recommends that paternity testing be performed in accordance with the ISO 17025 standards. The ISO 17025 standards are general standards for testing laboratories and the PTC offers explanations and recommendations concerning selected areas of special importance to paternity testing.

  7. Paternity Testing Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on genetic investigations in paternity cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Allen, Robert W; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-01-01

    The International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has established a Paternity Testing Commission (PTC) with the purpose of formulating international recommendations concerning genetic investigations in paternity testing. The PTC recommends that paternity testing be performed in accordance wi...... with the ISO 17025 standards. The ISO 17025 standards are general standards for testing laboratories and the PTC offers explanations and recommendations concerning selected areas of special importance to paternity testing....

  8. Endotoxin Detection in Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices with Kinetic-QCL, a Kinetic-Quantitative Chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate Assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzofsky, Ronald N.

    1995-01-01

    The observation that endotoxin caused gelation in extracts of Limulus amebocytes has been expanded to the development of an in vitro kinetic, quantitative chromogenic LAL assay (Kinetic-QCL) for the detection of endotoxin in aqueous fluids. Within the last 15 years, the use of Limulus amebocyte lysate to detect and control the presence of pyrogenic substances in pharmaceuticals and medical devices has gained wide international acceptance. Both the United States and European Pharmacopoeias contain descriptions of and requirements for the LAL Bacterial Endotoxin Test. Both pharmacopoeias have begun to remove the rabbit pyrogen test requirement in a majority of drug monographs and have substituted endotoxin limits to be determined by LAL. The use of LAL has proved invaluable in controlling the level of endotoxin in finished product. The endotoxin contribution of raw materials and packaging material can be monitored as well. In-process testing at critical production steps can identify additional sources of endotoxin contamination, and depyrogenation processes can be validated by quantitating the degradation of endotoxin challenges. The speed, reproducibility, sensitivity, and economics of the Kinetic-QCL assay, in conjunction with the ppropriate equipment and software, over both the in vivo rabbit pyrogen test and the more traditional LAL gel-clot assay allow a more in-depth approach to the control of endotoxin in pharmaceuticals and medical devices.

  9. Abstracts and program proceedings of the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kercher, J.R.

    1994-06-01

    This document contains information about the 1994 meeting of the International Society for Ecological Modelling North American Chapter. The topics discussed include: extinction risk assessment modelling, ecological risk analysis of uranium mining, impacts of pesticides, demography, habitats, atmospheric deposition, and climate change.

  10. Beyond the first 25 years: The International AIDS Society and its role in the global response to AIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McClure Craig

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dr. Pedro Cahn, International AIDS Society (IAS President and Mr. Craig McClure, IAS Executive Director, provide their thoughts and analysis on the current and future role of the IAS as part of the global response to HIV/AIDS.

  11. Methodological recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder by the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Targeting Cognition Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K W; Burdick, K E; Martinez-Aran, A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To aid the development of treatment for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to create a consensus-based guidance paper for the methodology and design of cognition trials in bipolar disorder. METHODS...

  12. International Epidemiology of Child and Adolescent Psychopathology II: Integration and Applications of Dimensional Findings from 44 Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescorla, Leslie; Ivanova, Masha Y.; Achenbach, Thomas M.; Begovac, Ivan; Chahed, Myriam; Drugli, May Britt; Emerich, Deisy Ribas; Fung, Daniel S. S.; Haider, Mariam; Hansson, Kjell; Hewitt, Nohelia; Jaimes, Stefanny; Larsson, Bo; Maggiolini, Alfio; Markovic, Jasminka; Mitrovic, Dragan; Moreira, Paulo; Oliveira, Joao Tiago; Olsson, Martin; Ooi, Yoon Phaik; Petot, Djaouida; Pisa, Cecilia; Pomalima, Rolando; da Rocha; Marina Monzani; Rudan, Vlasta; Sekulic, Slobodan; Shahini, Mimoza; de Mattos Silvares, Edwiges Ferreira; Szirovicza, Lajos; Valverde, Jose; Vera, Luis Anderssen; Villa, Maria Clara; Viola, Laura; Woo, Bernadine S. C.; Zhang, Eugene Yuqing

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To build on Achenbach, Rescorla, and Ivanova (2012) by (a) reporting new international findings for parent, teacher, and self-ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist, Youth Self-Report, and Teacher's Report Form; (b) testing the fit of syndrome models to new data from 17 societies, including previously underrepresented regions; (c)…

  13. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and pa...

  14. International Society for the Social Studies Annual Conference Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, February 26-27, 2009). Volume 2009, Issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William Benedict, III, Ed.

    2009-01-01

    The "International Society for the Social Studies Annual Conference Proceedings" is a peer-reviewed professional publication published once a year following the annual conference. It contains the following papers: (1) Teacher Perceptions of Authentic Pedagogy: A Case Study of Professional Development in an African American High School's…

  15. The development of Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society classification criteria for axial spondyloarthritis (part II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudwaleit, M; van der Heijde, D; Landewé, R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To validate and refine two sets of candidate criteria for the classification/diagnosis of axial spondyloarthritis (SpA). METHODS: All Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) members were invited to include consecutively new patients with chronic (> or =3 months) back...

  16. A report on older-age bipolar disorder from the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sajatovic, Martha; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Gildengers, Ariel G

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In the coming generation, older adults with bipolar disorder (BD) will increase in absolute numbers as well as proportion of the general population. This is the first report of the International Society for Bipolar Disorder (ISBD) Task Force on Older-Age Bipolar Disorder (OABD). METHODS...

  17. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Shindel, Alan W; Adaikan, P Ganesan; Becher, Edgardo; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and partn

  18. Integrated diagnostics: Proceedings from the 9th biennial symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); N. Grenier (Nicolas); H. Hricak (Hedvig); V.P. Jackson (V.); P.L. Khong (P.); J.C. Miller (Janet); A. Muellner (Ada); M. Schwaiger (M.); J.H. Thrall (James)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThe International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology held its 9th biennial meeting in August 2011. The focus of the programme was integrated diagnostics and massive computing. Participants discussed the opportunities, challenges, and consequences for the discipline of radiology t

  19. Results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Here we present the results of the 2009 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and two alleged fathers. The laboratories were encouraged...

  20. Results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2008-01-01

    We present the results of the 2007 Paternity Testing Workshop of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics. The exercise included paternity testing of blood samples from a mother, a child and an alleged father. The laboratories were encouraged to answer...

  1. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  2. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, the DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  3. Advances in renal neoplasia: recommendations from the 2012 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Srigley, John R; Montironi, Rodolfo; Egevad, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding the classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. There was consensus that 5 entities should be recognized as novel tumors: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic disease-associated RCC, clear cell papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor-family translocation RCC [in particular t(6; 11) RCC], and hereditary leiomyomatosis RCC syndrome-associated RCC. In addition, 3 rare epithelial carcinomas were considered emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC, and anaplastic lymphoma kinase translocation RCC. There were also a number of suggested modifications to existing World Health Organization 2004 categories, with the new classification to be known as the ISUP Vancouver Classification. Tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, and tumor necrosis were identified as significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The ISUP Grading System was accepted with grades 1-3 of clear cell and papillary RCC being based on nucleolar prominence, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. Consensus guidelines were formulated for specimen handling, and it was agreed that renal sinus invasion is present when tumor is in direct contact with fat or loose connective tissue of the sinus or if there is involvement of endothelial-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. The role of biomarkers in the diagnosis and assessment of prognosis of renal tumors was considered, and panels of immunohistochemical markers were identified for use in specific differential diagnostic scenarios.

  4. International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the use of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB) as a nutritional supplement. The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. HMB can be used to enhance recovery by attenuating exercise induced skeletal muscle damage in trained and untrained populations. 2. If consuming HMB, an athlete will benefit from consuming the supplement in close proximity to their workout. 3. HMB appears to be most effective when consumed for 2 weeks prior to an exercise bout. 4. Thirty-eight mg·kg·BM-1 daily of HMB has been demonstrated to enhance skeletal muscle hypertrophy, strength, and power in untrained and trained populations when the appropriate exercise prescription is utilized. 5. Currently, two forms of HMB have been used: Calcium HMB (HMB-Ca) and a free acid form of HMB (HMB-FA). HMB-FA may increase plasma absorption and retention of HMB to a greater extent than HMB-CA. However, research with HMB-FA is in its infancy, and there is not enough research to support whether one form is superior. 6. HMB has been demonstrated to increase LBM and functionality in elderly, sedentary populations. 7. HMB ingestion in conjunction with a structured exercise program may result in greater declines in fat mass (FM). 8. HMB’s mechanisms of action include an inhibition and increase of proteolysis and protein synthesis, respectively. 9. Chronic consumption of HMB is safe in both young and old populations. PMID:23374455

  5. International Society of Sports Nutrition Position Stand: beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilson Jacob M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN bases the following position stand on a critical analysis of the literature on the use of beta-hydroxy-beta-methylbutyrate (HMB as a nutritional supplement. The ISSN has concluded the following. 1. HMB can be used to enhance recovery by attenuating exercise induced skeletal muscle damage in trained and untrained populations. 2. If consuming HMB, an athlete will benefit from consuming the supplement in close proximity to their workout. 3. HMB appears to be most effective when consumed for 2 weeks prior to an exercise bout. 4. Thirty-eight mg·kg·BM-1 daily of HMB has been demonstrated to enhance skeletal muscle hypertrophy, strength, and power in untrained and trained populations when the appropriate exercise prescription is utilized. 5. Currently, two forms of HMB have been used: Calcium HMB (HMB-Ca and a free acid form of HMB (HMB-FA. HMB-FA may increase plasma absorption and retention of HMB to a greater extent than HMB-CA. However, research with HMB-FA is in its infancy, and there is not enough research to support whether one form is superior. 6. HMB has been demonstrated to increase LBM and functionality in elderly, sedentary populations. 7. HMB ingestion in conjunction with a structured exercise program may result in greater declines in fat mass (FM. 8. HMB’s mechanisms of action include an inhibition and increase of proteolysis and protein synthesis, respectively. 9. Chronic consumption of HMB is safe in both young and old populations.

  6. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) Task Force Report on Antidepressant Use in Bipolar Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacchiarotti, Isabella; Bond, David J.; Baldessarini, Ross J.; Nolen, Willem A.; Grunze, Heinz; Licht, Rasmus W.; Post, Robert M.; Berk, Michael; Goodwin, Guy M.; Sachs, Gary S.; Tondo, Leonardo; Findling, Robert L.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Tohen, Mauricio; Undurraga, Juan; González-Pinto, Ana; Goldberg, Joseph F.; Yildiz, Ayşegül; Altshuler, Lori L.; Calabrese, Joseph R.; Mitchell, Philip B.; Thase, Michael E.; Koukopoulos, Athanasios; Colom, Francesc; Frye, Mark A.; Malhi, Gin S.; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N.; Vázquez, Gustavo; Perlis, Roy H.; Ketter, Terence A.; Cassidy, Frederick; Akiskal, Hagop; Azorin, Jean-Michel; Valentí, Marc; Mazzei, Diego Hidalgo; Lafer, Beny; Kato, Tadafumi; Mazzarini, Lorenzo; Martínez-Aran, Anabel; Parker, Gordon; Souery, Daniel; Özerdem, Ayşegül; McElroy, Susan L.; Girardi, Paolo; Bauer, Michael; Yatham, Lakshmi N.; Zarate, Carlos A.; Nierenberg, Andrew A.; Birmaher, Boris; Kanba, Shigenobu; El-Mallakh, Rif S.; Serretti, Alessandro; Rihmer, Zoltan; Young, Allan H.; Kotzalidis, Georgios D.; MacQueen, Glenda M.; Bowden, Charles L.; Ghaemi, S. Nassir; Lopez-Jaramillo, Carlos; Rybakowski, Janusz; Ha, Kyooseob; Perugi, Giulio; Kasper, Siegfried; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Hirschfeld, Robert M.; Kapczinski, Flávio; Vieta, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Objective The risk-benefit profile of antidepressant medications in bipolar disorder is controversial. When conclusive evidence is lacking, expert consensus can guide treatment decisions. The International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to seek consensus recommendations on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorders. Method An expert task force iteratively developed consensus through serial consensus-based revisions using the Delphi method. Initial survey items were based on systematic review of the literature. Subsequent surveys included new or reworded items and items that needed to be rerated. This process resulted in the final ISBD Task Force clinical recommendations on antidepressant use in bipolar disorder. Results There is striking incongruity between the wide use of and the weak evidence base for the efficacy and safety of antidepressant drugs in bipolar disorder. Few well-designed, long-term trials of prophylactic benefits have been conducted, and there is insufficient evidence for treatment benefits with antidepressants combined with mood stabilizers. A major concern is the risk for mood switch to hypomania, mania, and mixed states. Integrating the evidence and the experience of the task force members, a consensus was reached on 12 statements on the use of antidepressants in bipolar disorder. Conclusions Because of limited data, the task force could not make broad statements endorsing antidepressant use but acknowledged that individual bipolar patients may benefit from antidepressants. Regarding safety, serotonin reuptake inhibitors and bupropion may have lower rates of manic switch than tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and norepinephrine-serotonin reuptake inhibitors. The frequency and severity of antidepressant-associated mood elevations appear to be greater in bipolar I than bipolar II disorder. Hence, in bipolar I patients antidepressants should be prescribed only as an adjunct to mood-stabilizing medications

  7. ISVEE 14 Yucatan 2015 14th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Anda, Jorge Hernández

    2017-02-01

    The 14th Symposium of the International Society for Veterinary Epidemiology and Economics (ISVEE 14) was held in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico during 3-7 November. 2015. The purpose of ISVEE 14 Yucatan 2015 was to provide a global forum for graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, junior and senior investigators, as well as health policymakers to exchange information that can advance the fields of veterinary epidemiology and economics, and other disciplines in the health and social sciences. The main theme of ISVEE 14 was Planning Our Future. Human population growth is predicted to increase nearly 50% to 11 billion by 2050, and climate change and changing land use can have an impact on local and global food systems, interactions among humans, wildlife and domestic animals, as well as local, regional, and global public health alerts. How can we help our systems of education, research, and public policy adapt? Are new veterinary graduates and epidemiology practitioners prepared to become active protagonists in the solution of health issues that affect humans and animal populations in a changing environment? What innovative research is needed to understand and enhance the food systems of the future? What are the expected roles or contributions of veterinarians or epidemiology practitioners on future climate change, food systems, and health? Is our profession or discipline leading One Health initiatives? Are there current or new models that make national veterinary services more efficacious and efficient for disease control and eradication? To help us answer these questions, the organizing committee of ISVEE 14 invited five distinguished keynote speakers to share their vision and innovative ideas on education, technological developments, research, and public policy of our future with a concentration in the following five areas: (i) One Health (Jonna Mazet), (ii) climate change (Bernard Bett), (iii) animal health economics (Jonathan Rushton), (iv) national veterinary services

  8. From Gleason to International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading of prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Hemamali; Delahunt, Brett; Yaxley, John; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars

    2016-10-01

    Gleason grading of prostate cancer has gained worldwide acceptance since its introduction 50 years ago. This system has fulfilled the role of a powerful prognostic indicator for many years and this has influenced treatment. There have been numerous changes to the management and diagnosis of prostate cancer since 1966, including prostate-specific antigen screening, resulting in the early detection of prostate cancer, This has resulted in the evolution of Gleason grading with the informal adoption of a number of alterations. Significant changes to Gleason grading were made in 2005 through a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP). In more recent times, the necessity for further changes to prostate cancer grading has been apparent and a follow-up ISUP consensus conference was held in 2014. Changes resulting from this conference included the classifying of all cribriform cancer and glomeruloid patterns as Gleason grade 4, the grading of mucinous adenocarcinoma based on underlying architecture rather than uniformly considering these tumors as pattern 4, and the introduction of a Gleason score (GS)-based 5 grade system, which incorporated the 2014 modifications to the Gleason grading system. Designated ISUP grade, this system consists of five grades: grade 1 (GS ≤3 + 3), grade 2 (GS 3 + 4), grade 3 (GS 4 + 3), grade 4 (GS 4 + 4, 3 + 5, 5 + 3) and grade 5 (GS 9-10). With further advances recently reported in the literature, it is apparent that amendments to the current system are likely to be necessary in the future.

  9. The Antagonistic Action of Heat-Clearing and Detoxifying Chinese Drugs on Endotoxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张霞; 崔乃杰; 王家泰

    2001-01-01

    @@In the recent decade, interest in treatment and prevention of many critical, severe and acute diseases caused by bacterial endotoxins has been aroused along with the advance of the knowledge on the nature of the endotoxin and the conditions involved. In abroad, attention has been mainly payed to raising antisera and monocolonal antibodies against the endotoxin and the induced mediators. However, the allergic reactions and the cost are still the problems. Till now, there is no drug that can antagonize endotoxin with high effectiveness and low toxicity. Clinical treatments are still confined in inhibiting or killing the pathogen, and correcting the internal environmental disturbance. Being less toxic and rich in resources with low cost and less side-effects, screening of effective Chinese drugs for antagonizing endotoxin is of important and practical significance. Endotoxin belongs to the category of toxic evils, or more precisely, the heat toxin in TCM. Therefore the application of heat-clearing and detoxifying Chinese drugs to antagonizing endotoxins is consistent with the theory of TCM. Some achievements in this field are reported as follows.

  10. Oral endotoxin in healthy adults

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    vanSaene, JJM; vanSaene, HKF; Martin, MV; Leenstra, T.

    1996-01-01

    This article presents a study that measured oral endotoxin levels in healthy persons with the Limulus amoebocyte lysate microassay. Only young nonsmoking adults with a healthy dentition measured with the plaque index and a good level of oral hygiene based on a twice-daily (morning and evening)

  11. Reality Construction at the Family/Society Interface: The Internalization of Family Themes and Values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Dale H.

    1985-01-01

    Addresses issue of socialization of the young for participation in society by viewing the family as a micro-society. Congruence between family themes and societally shared meanings is considered, utilizing ideas from the social construction of reality theories of Berger and Luckmann (1966). Three ideal-types of family themes are developed relative…

  12. Vagus nerve stimulation attenuates the systemic inflammatory response to endotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Lyudmila V.; Ivanova, Svetlana; Zhang, Minghuang; Yang, Huan; Botchkina, Galina I.; Watkins, Linda R.; Wang, Haichao; Abumrad, Naji; Eaton, John W.; Tracey, Kevin J.

    2000-05-01

    Vertebrates achieve internal homeostasis during infection or injury by balancing the activities of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory pathways. Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide), produced by all gram-negative bacteria, activates macrophages to release cytokines that are potentially lethal. The central nervous system regulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin through humoral mechanisms. Activation of afferent vagus nerve fibres by endotoxin or cytokines stimulates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal anti-inflammatory responses. However, comparatively little is known about the role of efferent vagus nerve signalling in modulating inflammation. Here, we describe a previously unrecognized, parasympathetic anti-inflammatory pathway by which the brain modulates systemic inflammatory responses to endotoxin. Acetylcholine, the principle vagal neurotransmitter, significantly attenuated the release of cytokines (tumour necrosis factor (TNF), interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and IL-18), but not the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human macrophage cultures. Direct electrical stimulation of the peripheral vagus nerve in vivo during lethal endotoxaemia in rats inhibited TNF synthesis in liver, attenuated peak serum TNF amounts, and prevented the development of shock.

  13. A mission in evolution: the International Society of Nephrology in the past 10 years--2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2011-05-01

    The International Society of Nephrology is now 50 years old! It has dedicated the year 2010 to celebrate its Gold Anniversary in many ways, including documentation of its progress during the past decade, following an earlier article addressing the period 1960-2000. The present article describes the changing mission of the Society in the direction of achieving its ultimate vision of "global elimination of kidney disease." While maintaining its leadership in the promotion of science, it became the prime driving force in capacity building for the diagnosis, prevention and management of kidney disease in the developing world. The society has recently modified its directive from addressing only the physicians providing renal care to supporting other health care providers, and sharing in community education on how to avoid kidney disease. This required the acquisition of new skills in publishing, marketing, politics and fund-raising, which could only be handled by professional management, which the Society has utilized since 2003. It also necessitated enlargement of the leadership circle to include members from all over the world, for which reason the constitution had to be amended twice during the past decade, and the bylaws re-written in 2007. The pride that International Society of Nephrology takes from its scientific and outreach achievements is the fuel that drives its machinery to endless horizons in the humanitarian arena.

  14. Report on the 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeul Hong; Yang, Han-Kwang; Kim, Tae Won; Lee, Jung Shin; Seong, Jinsil; Lee, Woo Yong; Ahn, Yong Chan; Lim, Ho Yeong; Won, Jong-Ho; Park, Kyong Hwa; Cho, Kyung Sam

    2013-04-01

    The 10th International Conference of the Asian Clinical Oncology Society (ACOS 2012) in conjunction with the 38th Annual Meeting of the Korean Cancer Association, was held on June 13 to 15 (3 days) 2012 at COEX Convention and Exhibition Center in Seoul, Korea. ACOS has a 20-year history starting from the first conference in Osaka, Japan, which was chaired by Prof. Tetsuo Taguchi and the ACOS conferences have since been conducted in Asian countries every 2 years. Under the theme of "Work Together to Make a Difference for Cancer Therapy in Asia", the 10th ACOS was prepared to discuss various subjects through a high-quality academic program, exhibition, and social events. The ACOS 2012 Committee was composed of the ACOS Organizing Committee, Honorary Advisors, Local Advisors, and ACOS 2012 Organizing Committee. The comprehensive academic program had a total of 92 sessions (3 Plenary Lectures, 1 Award Lectures, 1 Memorial Lectures, 9 Special Lectures, 15 Symposia, 1 Debate & Summary Sessions, 1 Case Conferences, 19 Educational Lectures, 1 Research & Development Session, 18 Satellite Symposia, 9 Meet the Professors, 14 Oral Presentations) and a total 292 presentations were delivered throughout the entire program. Amongst Free Papers, 462 research papers (110 oral presentations and 352 poster presentations) were selected to be presented. This conference was the largest of all ACOS conferences in its scale with around 1,500 participants from 30 countries. Furthermore, despite strict new financial policies and requirements governing fundraising alongside global economic stagnation, a total of 14 companies participated as sponsors and an additional 35 companies purchased 76 exhibition booths. Lastly, the conference social events provided attendees with a variety of opportunities to experience and enjoy Korea's rich culture and traditions during the Opening Ceremony, Welcome Reception, Invitee Dinner, Banquet, and Closing Ceremony. Overall, ACOS 2012 reinforced and promoted

  15. The international law of statehood: craftsmanship for the elucidation and regulation of birth and death in the international society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    d' Aspremont, J.; d' Argent, P.; Bonafé, B.; Combacau, J.

    2014-01-01

    This article argues the law of statehood is best construed as a delicate elixir which allows international lawyers, not only to make state creation a legal phenomenon worthy of legal investigation, but also to claim control of the volatile phenomenon of births and deaths in the international

  16. An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) / International Continence Society (ICS) Joint Report on the Terminology for Female Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haylen, Bernard T; Maher, Christopher F; Barber, Matthew D; Camargo, Sérgio; Dandolu, Vani; Digesu, Alex; Goldman, Howard B; Huser, Martin; Milani, Alfredo L; Moran, Paul A; Schaer, Gabriel N; Withagen, Mariëlla I J

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The terminology for female pelvic floor prolapse (POP) should be defined and organized in a clinically-based consensus Report. METHODS: This Report combines the input of members of two International Organizations, the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) and the Internatio

  17. [Internet-based Continuing Medical Education. Presentation of the first experience of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San José, A; Formiga, F; López Soto, A; Ortiz, J; Tiberio, G; Ollero, M; Valero, J; Ballarín, M

    2010-12-01

    This paper presents the first experience of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine in the development of an Internet-based Continuing Medical Education program for Society members, accredited by the Health Ministry and the Autonomous University of Barcelona, and funded by the Menarini Group SA. Academic performance and satisfaction of participants in this course have been very satisfactory, both with respect to scientific content and the virtual learning environment. This experience shows that Internet-based continuing medical education is a field with a great future that is well accepted by participating physicians, and that the scientific societies, with the collaboration of other institutions and companies, can lead Internet-based Continuing Medical Education programs especially designed and tailored to their members.

  18. Recent advances in biosensor based endotoxin detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, A P; Kumar, P S; Swain, S

    2014-01-15

    Endotoxins also referred to as pyrogens are chemically lipopolysaccharides habitually found in food, environment and clinical products of bacterial origin and are unavoidable ubiquitous microbiological contaminants. Pernicious issues of its contamination result in high mortality and severe morbidities. Standard traditional techniques are slow and cumbersome, highlighting the pressing need for evoking agile endotoxin detection system. The early and prompt detection of endotoxin assumes prime importance in health care, pharmacological and biomedical sectors. The unparalleled recognition abilities of LAL biosensors perched with remarkable sensitivity, high stability and reproducibility have bestowed it with persistent reliability and their possible fabrication for commercial applicability. This review paper entails an overview of various trends in current techniques available and other possible alternatives in biosensor based endotoxin detection together with its classification, epidemiological aspects, thrust areas demanding endotoxin control, commercially available detection sensors and a revolutionary unprecedented approach narrating the influence of omics for endotoxin detection.

  19. The contribution of Japanese Soil Science Societies to scientific knowledge, education and sustainability: Good practices in the International Year of Soils 2015 towards the International Decade of Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Takashi; Matoh, Toru; Inubushi, Kazuyuki; Sakurai, Katsutoshi

    2017-04-01

    The soil science community in Japan includes ca. 15,000 individuals from a variety of sectors, i.e. research, education, extension, business, national and local government, practitioners, non-governmental or non-profit organizations, etc., who have mostly (multi-)membership(s) in some of the academic societies. Among those societies, the Japanese Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, the Japanese Society of Soil Microbiology and the Japanese Society of Pedology played a leading role in the promotion of the International Year of Soils 2015. The activities, many of which were jointly organized and executed by the above three, can be summarized as follows; Scientific symposiums/workshops not only within the societies but together with other disciplines such as geosciences, quaternary research, biogeochemistry, ecology, biosciences, geotechnology, etc. in national as well as international gatherings, Symposiums, (mobile) exhibitions, photo contests, science cafes, talk shows, field days, agricultural fairs, edutainment programs for school children, etc. for promoting the public awareness of soil and soil science, Publication of the books and booklets on the topics of soils, soil science, soil and environment (and/or food, life, human security, etc.), targeting the moderately educated public, Articles in selected newspapers, Distribution or sale of the novelty/memorial goods and items, e.g. soil globe, logo stickers, specially brewed Sake wines, etc. Translation of "Vienna Soil Declaration" of the IUSS into Japanese language and its distribution to the public, and Scientific and action proposal and its international dispatch of "The need to reinforce soil science research and the information basis to respond to both gradual and sudden changes in our environment" together with the Science Council of Japan. Scientific forums and gatherings as symposiums and workshops with other disciplines were successful and satisfied by most of the participants. Those for the

  20. ADSORBENTS USED IN THE CLEARANCE OF ENDOTOXIN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Mei; LIU Tao; Hou Guanghui; YUAN Zhi

    2003-01-01

    A series of modified poly (methyl methacrylate, PMMA) resins were prepared and compared their adsorption abilities to endotoxin. The results showed that adsorbents, which were grafted with tertiary amine and long spacing arms, had the best adsorption capacities and good blood compatibility, It is hopeful to be used as adsorbent in hemoperfusion for clinical clearance of endotoxin. The influence of original concentration of endotoxin on adsorption and the adsorption mechanism were also investigated.

  1. Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases: an update on the Classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed eAl-Herz

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiency diseases, compiled by the ad-hoc Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies (IUIS. As compared to the previous edition, more than 15 novel disease entities have been added in the updated version. For each disorders, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This updated classification is meant to help in the diagnostic approach to patients with these diseases.

  2. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.;

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  3. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Japan, International Society of Electrochemistry Meeting (40th) Held in Kyoto on 17-22 Sep 89

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Selected "extended abstracts" presented at the 40th International Society of Electrochemistry Meeting held 17-22 Sep 89 in Kyoto, sponsored by the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC) and the Commemorative Association for the Japan World Exposition, and Organized by the Science Council of Japan and the Electrochemical Society of Japan.

  4. Catheter venography for the assessment of internal jugular veins and azygous vein: position statement by expert panel of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simka, Marian; Hubbard, David; Siddiqui, Adnan H; Dake, Michael D; Sclafani, Salvatore J A; Al-Omari, Mamoon; Eisele, Carlos G; Haskal, Ziv J; Ludyga, Tomasz; Miloševič, Zoran V; Sievert, Horst; Stehling, Michael K; Zapf, Stefan; Zorc, Marjeta

    2013-05-01

    This document by an expert panel of the International Society for Neurovascular Disease is aimed at presenting current technique and interpretation of catheter venography of the internal jugular veins, azygous vein and other veins draining the central nervous system. Although interventionalists agree on general rules, significant differences exist in terms of details of venographic technique and interpretations of angiographic pictures. It is also suggested that debatable findings should be investigated using multimodal diagnostics. Finally, the authors recommend that any publication on chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency should include detailed description of venographic technique used, to facilitate a comparison of published results in this area.

  5. Selected Abstracts presented at the 18th International Congress of the International Society of Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy (ISCP), Rome, Italy, 28--30 June 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Cheung, CL; Lam, KSL.; Cheung, BMY; Ivan, V.; Turcan, M.; Tudoran, M.; Apostol, A.; Komiyama, M.K.; Wada, H.W.; Asahara, N.A.; Koyama, H.K.; Kono, K.K.; Takahashi, Y.T.; Shimada, SS.; Nagaoka, NN.

    2013-01-01

    ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOTHERAPY (ISCP) ROME, 28–30 JUNE 2013 The following scientific abstracts were presented at the latest Annual Scientific Meeting of ISCP this year in Rome. They summarise the work of young investigators from different geographical regions worldwide. ISCP supports the scientific work of researchers round the Globe and offers a forum where the results of their investigations can be presented and discussed in the cont...

  6. Program on ecosystem change and society: An international research strategy for integrated social-ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpenter, S.R.; Folke, C.; Norström, A.V.; Olsson, O.; Schultz, L.; Agarwal, B.; Balvanera, P.; Campbell, B.; Castilla, J.C.; Cramer, W.; DeFries, R.; Eyzaguirre, P.; Hughes, T.P.; Polasky, S.; Sanusi, Z.A.; Scholes, R.J.; Spierenburg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Program on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS), a new initiative within the ICSU global change programs, aims to integrate research on the stewardship of social-ecological systems, the services they generate, and the relationships among natural capital, human wellbeing, livelihoods, inequality

  7. Program on ecosystem change and society: An international research strategy for integrated social-ecological systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carpenter, S.R.; Folke, C.; Norström, A.V.; Olsson, O.; Schultz, L.; Agarwal, B.; Balvanera, P.; Campbell, B.; Castilla, J.C.; Cramer, W.; DeFries, R.; Eyzaguirre, P.; Hughes, T.P.; Polasky, S.; Sanusi, Z.A.; Scholes, R.J.; Spierenburg, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The Program on Ecosystem Change and Society (PECS), a new initiative within the ICSU global change programs, aims to integrate research on the stewardship of social-ecological systems, the services they generate, and the relationships among natural capital, human wellbeing, livelihoods, inequality a

  8. Proceedings of the frst joint american chemical society agricultural and food chemistry division – american chemical society international chemical sciences chapter in Thailand symposium on agricultural and food chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Proceedings is a compilation of papers from contributed oral and poster presentations presented at the first joint symposium organized by the American Chemical Society Agricultural and Food Chemistry Division and the American Chemical Society International Chemical Sciences Chapter in Thailand ...

  9. An official American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society statement: Update of the international multidisciplinary classification of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, William D; Costabel, Ulrich; Hansell, David M; King, Talmadge E; Lynch, David A; Nicholson, Andrew G; Ryerson, Christopher J; Ryu, Jay H; Selman, Moisés; Wells, Athol U; Behr, Jurgen; Bouros, Demosthenes; Brown, Kevin K; Colby, Thomas V; Collard, Harold R; Cordeiro, Carlos Robalo; Cottin, Vincent; Crestani, Bruno; Drent, Marjolein; Dudden, Rosalind F; Egan, Jim; Flaherty, Kevin; Hogaboam, Cory; Inoue, Yoshikazu; Johkoh, Takeshi; Kim, Dong Soon; Kitaichi, Masanori; Loyd, James; Martinez, Fernando J; Myers, Jeffrey; Protzko, Shandra; Raghu, Ganesh; Richeldi, Luca; Sverzellati, Nicola; Swigris, Jeffrey; Valeyre, Dominique

    2013-09-15

    In 2002 the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) classification of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) defined seven specific entities, and provided standardized terminology and diagnostic criteria. In addition, the historical "gold standard" of histologic diagnosis was replaced by a multidisciplinary approach. Since 2002 many publications have provided new information about IIPs. The objective of this statement is to update the 2002 ATS/ERS classification of IIPs. An international multidisciplinary panel was formed and developed key questions that were addressed through a review of the literature published between 2000 and 2011. Substantial progress has been made in IIPs since the previous classification. Nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is now better defined. Respiratory bronchiolitis-interstitial lung disease is now commonly diagnosed without surgical biopsy. The clinical course of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia is recognized to be heterogeneous. Acute exacerbation of IIPs is now well defined. A substantial percentage of patients with IIP are difficult to classify, often due to mixed patterns of lung injury. A classification based on observed disease behavior is proposed for patients who are difficult to classify or for entities with heterogeneity in clinical course. A group of rare entities, including pleuroparenchymal fibroelastosis and rare histologic patterns, is introduced. The rapidly evolving field of molecular markers is reviewed with the intent of promoting additional investigations that may help in determining diagnosis, and potentially prognosis and treatment. This update is a supplement to the previous 2002 IIP classification document. It outlines advances in the past decade and potential areas for future investigation.

  10. Internalizing Null Extraterrestrial "Signals": An Astrobiological App for a Technological Society

    CERN Document Server

    Chaisson, Eric J

    2014-01-01

    One of the beneficial outcomes of searching for life in the Universe is that it grants greater awareness of our own problems here on Earth. Lack of contact with alien beings to date might actually comprise a null "signal" pointing humankind toward a viable future. Astrobiology has surprising practical applications to human society; within the larger cosmological context of cosmic evolution, astrobiology clarifies the energetic essence of complex systems throughout the Universe, including technological intelligence that is intimately dependent on energy and likely will be for as long as it endures. The "message" contained within the "signal" with which today's society needs to cope is reasonably this: Only solar energy can power our civilization going forward without soiling the environment with increased heat yet robustly driving the economy with increased per capita energy usage. The null "signals" from extraterrestrials also offer a rational solution to the Fermi paradox as a principle of cosmic selection l...

  11. Are the review criteria for automated complete blood counts of the International Society of Laboratory Hematology suitable for all hematology laboratories?

    OpenAIRE

    Samuel Ricardo Comar; Mariester Malvezzi; Ricardo Pasquini

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to verify whether the review criteria for automated blood counts suggested by the International Consensus Group for Hematology Review of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology are suitable for the Hematology Laboratory of Hospital de Clinicas, Universidade Federal do Paraná.METHODS: initially, the review criteria of the International Society for Laboratory Hematology were adapted due to limitations in the Institution's electronic hospital records and interfacing system...

  12. Rethinking the international anti-corruption agenda: civil society, human rights and democracy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ackerman, John M

    2014-01-01

    ... and society in general and in the functioning of democracy in particular. The objective of this article is to insert the discussion of anti- corruption policies within broader debates on accountability, democracy, and human rights. In Part II, this article begins by offering a new, expansive definition of accountability, which breaks with minimalist, bureaucratic versions of the concept. It also address the failings of elections as pro-accountability mechanisms and derives from this discussion the n...

  13. Reflections between CSR and international human rights in EU initiatives for a competitive inclusive society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    : The paper aims to contribute to our understanding of whether a shift is taking place in societal attitudes towards a perception that corporations have duties based on international law. This is assessed on the basis of EU initiatives on inclusiveness and responsible competitiveness, particularly...... the EU Multistakeholder Forum and the Lisbon Strategy, with a particular focus on goals or views related to the human rights of non-discrimination and rights to work, education and vocational training, and network governance in (soft) law creation. It is found that despite obvious links, international...... law does not serve as a clear source of inclusiveness or responsible competitiveness. It is also found that the initiatives assessed do not indicate a shift at EU institutional level towards a perception that business holds duties under international law. International law seems at the most to be seen...

  14. Reflections between CSR and international human rights in EU initiatives for a competitive inclusive society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhmann, Karin

    : The paper aims to contribute to our understanding of whether a shift is taking place in societal attitudes towards a perception that corporations have duties based on international law. This is assessed on the basis of EU initiatives on inclusiveness and responsible competitiveness, particularly...... the EU Multistakeholder Forum and the Lisbon Strategy, with a particular focus on goals or views related to the human rights of non-discrimination and rights to work, education and vocational training, and network governance in (soft) law creation. It is found that despite obvious links, international...... law does not serve as a clear source of inclusiveness or responsible competitiveness. It is also found that the initiatives assessed do not indicate a shift at EU institutional level towards a perception that business holds duties under international law. International law seems at the most to be seen...

  15. Modeling human health risks of airborne endotoxin in homes during the winter and summer seasons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan, E-mail: vivianliao@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chio, Chia-Pin; Chou, Wei-Chun; Ju, Yun-Ru; Liao, Chung-Min [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2010-03-01

    Endotoxin, a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, is a pro-inflammatory agent that induces local and systemic inflammatory responses in normal subjects which can contribute to the risk of developing asthma and chronic obstructive lung diseases. A probabilistic approach linking models of exposure, internal dosimetry, and health effects was carried out to quantitatively assess the potential inhalation risk of airborne endotoxin in homes during the winter and summer seasons. Combining empirical data and modeling results, we show that the half-maximum effect of the endotoxin dose (ED50) was estimated to be 707.9 (95% confidence interval (CI): 308.8-1287.0) endotoxin units (EU) for body temperature change, 481.8 (95% CI: 333.2-630.3) EU for elevation of neutrophils, and 1174.5 (95% CI: 816.0-1532.9) EU for elevation of the cytokine, interleukin-6. Our study also suggests that airborne endotoxin in homes may pose potential risks, and a higher risk for elevation of neutrophils and cytokine interleukin-6 appeared in winter season than in summer. Our study offers a risk-management framework for discussion of future studies of human respiratory exposure to airborne endotoxin.

  16. Health and Safety Advisory Committee (HASAC) of the International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) has managed critical challenges for two decades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibier, M; Stringfellow, D A

    2003-02-01

    The International Embryo Transfer Society (IETS) was founded in 1974. Early members used the society as a forum for the exchange of scientific and technical information relevant to a newly emerging embryo transfer industry. The impact that embryo transfer could have on the international trade of livestock genetics was clear by 1982, so the IETS commissioned the Import/Export Committee. The initial challenge for this Committee was to deal with concerns about disease transmission via embryo transfer. Many of the early concerns have been dispelled, but at the time they threatened the continued development of a fledgling industry. Over the past two decades, many new critical challenges have been met and managed by this Committee, which was recently renamed the Health and Safety Advisory Committee (HASAC). Assessing risks of animal disease transmission via reproductive technologies and establishing protocols for managing these risks are still major issues for HASAC. However, additional concerns have developed as views of the society changed and as novel applications of biotechnology in farm animals were identified. This paper is intended to chronicle some of the major changes and challenges that were managed by members of the HASAC and its Subcommittees from the early years of embryo transfer to the current millennium with technological advances in molecular biology.

  17. Rethinking international education through the concept of capabilities: a bridge to development in Asia's emergent knowledge societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lien Pham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper calls for rethinking international education towards a transformative agenda to engender international students’ self-determination, self-reflection, agency and citizenship that would enable them to make valuable personal and social change for them and their communities when they return to their homeland. It argues for a reconceptualisation of the vision of international education to include both the instrumental objectives of skills development and jobs procurement, as well as the intrinsic value of creating substantive opportunities for people to live the lives they value. It further argues that there is a need to move research from institutional perspectives of international education providers to those of international students and graduates focussing on their personal and civic commitment within their home communities. In the context of this paper, the terms "West" and "Western" generally refer to countries in the geographical regions of Europe including the United Kingdom, North America, and Australia and New Zealand in the Pacific region. The terms "Anglo-West" and "Euro-America" are also used interchangeably with the same meaning. The terms "Asia" and "Asian" generally refer to countries in the geographical regions of East and South East Asia, and South Asia. This paper has four parts. The first part sketches the current discourses on international education in the emerging knowledge societies of Asia. It critiques the parochial Anglo-Western values in international education discourses and calls for contending viewpoints that consider diversity of students' cultural and social values. The second part presents Amartya Sen's Capability Approach (CA as an alternative framework for viewing and evaluating international education. The third part discusses the operationalising aspects of the CA in the practical contexts of its philosophical status and considers the potential of its epistemological benefits. The last part concludes

  18. Paediatric radiation oncology in the care of childhood cancer: A position paper by the International Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortmann, Rolf-Dieter; Freeman, Carolyn; Marcus, Karen; Claude, Line; Dieckmann, Karin; Halperin, Edward; Esiashvili, Natia; Paulino, Arnold; Mahajan, Anita; Seiersen, Klaus; Ahern, Verity; Ricardi, Umberto; Carrie, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Paediatric malignancies are a challenge for the radiation oncologist due to their rarity, the great variety of histological types, and the complexity of treatment concepts that evolve over time. The Paediatric Radiation Oncology Society (PROS) is the only internationally operating society for paediatric radiation oncology. The objectives of PROS are to set a world-wide standard of excellence with respect to radiation oncology aspects in curing children and adolescents with cancer, to provide a forum for communication between radiation oncologists, and to exchange information with all professionals involved in the management of paediatric and adolescent cancer. Challenges include the need to promote education and support practice in low and middle income countries (LMIC) as well as the cost and availability of modern treatment technologies for all but most especially these countries. Collaborations with other societies that include for example the education programmes provided jointly with ESTRO, and the upgraded technical platform of the PROS web site offer new possibilities to enhance the efficacy of PROS in education and support of paediatric radiation oncology practice world-wide. PROS has made an important contribution to the management of childhood malignancies over the past decade and new and developing collaborations between PROS and other societies or organizations will ultimately lead to a reduction in world-wide health care inequalities.

  19. Institutional profile. The International Society for Cellular Therapy: evolving to meet the demands of the regenerative medicine industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maziarz, Richard T; Arthurs, Jane; Horwitz, Edwin

    2011-03-01

    The International Society for Cellular Therapy is a global association driving the translation of scientific research to deliver innovative cellular therapies to patients. Established in 1992, its membership and leadership comprises world-class scientists, clinicians, technologists, biotech/pharma and regulatory professionals from 40 countries focused on preclinical and translational aspects of developing cell therapy products. The International Society for Cellular Therapy has evolved in alignment with the maturation of the field of cell therapy and regenerative medicine to create forums for discussion of shared concerns for commercialization of cell therapies and of development of consensus standards, recognizing that true commercialization depends upon the translational scientific community, the regional regulatory and policy institutions, and the technology support and capital investment from industry. It exists to facilitate the international work of many, to spawn new initiatives, and to synergize with other stakeholders to create the best outcome for the many patients across the world depending on the answers and improved health that cellular therapeutics will provide them.

  20. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  1. At the European Physical Society (EPS) 1979 International Conference on High Energy Physics

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    To mark CERN's 25th Anniversary this year conference was held in Geneva from 27 June to 4 July, at the International Conference Centre. Here is Abdus Salam addressing theorists (on the first raw from left, Viki Weisskopf, Leon Van Hove, Giuliano Preparata).

  2. Proceedings from the 5th annual international society for musculoskeletal imaging in rheumatology annual conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Østergaard, Mikkel; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta;

    2013-01-01

    Since its inception, ISEMIR has held an annual education meeting highlighting the changes in the utilization of imaging tools for the management of rheumatic diseases. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts have discussed these topics at a very high scientific level. The evolut...

  3. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis score for overt disseminated intravascular coagulation predicts organ dysfunction and fatality in sepsis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voves, Claudia; Wuillemin, Walter A; Zeerleder, Sacha

    2006-09-01

    We evaluated the score for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) recently published by the International Society for Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) in a well-defined series of sepsis patients. Thirty-two patients suffering from severe sepsis and eight patients with septic shock were evaluated following the ISTH DIC score. Fibrin monomer and D-dimer were chosen as fibrin-related markers (FRM), respectively. DIC scores for nonsurvivors (n = 13) as well as for septic shock patients were higher (P coagulation activation, predicting fatality and disease severity. It mainly depends on the prolongation of the prothrombin time and platelet counts.

  4. Primary immunodeficiency diseases: an update on the classification from the International Union of Immunological Societies Expert Committee for Primary Immunodeficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleed eAl-Herz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We report the updated classification of primary immunodeficiencies compiled by the Expert Committee of the International Union of Immunological Societies. In comparison to the previous version, more than 30 new gene defects are reported in this updated version. In addition we have added a table of acquired defects that are phenocopies of primary immunodeficiencies. For each disorder, the key clinical and laboratory features are provided. This classification is the most up to date catalogue of all known primary immunodeficiencies and acts as a current reference of the knowledge of these conditions and is an important aid for the molecular diagnosis of patients with these rare diseases.

  5. 9. international congress of the Mexican Hydrogen Society (MHS); 9. congreso Internacional de la Sociedad Mexicana del Hidrogeno (SMH)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-09-15

    The Mexican Hydrogen Society (MHS) and Cinvestav, Saltillo Unit, organized the IX International Congress of the MHS, held in Saltillo, Coahuila, Mexico from September 21 to 25, 2009. Important topics were discussed related to hydrogen technologies, the environment and global climate change during the congress [Spanish] La Sociedad Mexicana del Hidrogeno (SMH) y el Cinvestav, Unidad Saltillo, organizaron el IX Congreso Internacional de la SMH, que se llevo a cabo en la ciudad de Saltillo, Coahuila del 21 al 25 de septiembre de 2009. Durante el desarrollo del Congreso se cubrieron importantes topicos relacionados con las tecnologias del hidrogeno, el medio ambiente y el cambio climatico global.

  6. Current trends in endotoxin detection and analysis of endotoxin-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dullah, Elvina Clarie; Ongkudon, Clarence M

    2017-03-01

    Endotoxin is a type of pyrogen that can be found in Gram-negative bacteria. Endotoxin can form a stable interaction with other biomolecules thus making its removal difficult especially during the production of biopharmaceutical drugs. The prevention of endotoxins from contaminating biopharmaceutical products is paramount as endotoxin contamination, even in small quantities, can result in fever, inflammation, sepsis, tissue damage and even lead to death. Highly sensitive and accurate detection of endotoxins are keys in the development of biopharmaceutical products derived from Gram-negative bacteria. It will facilitate the study of the intermolecular interaction of an endotoxin with other biomolecules, hence the selection of appropriate endotoxin removal strategies. Currently, most researchers rely on the conventional LAL-based endotoxin detection method. However, new methods have been and are being developed to overcome the problems associated with the LAL-based method. This review paper highlights the current research trends in endotoxin detection from conventional methods to newly developed biosensors. Additionally, it also provides an overview of the use of electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and docking programs in the endotoxin-protein analysis.

  7. Dialysate bacterial endotoxin as a prognostic indicator of peritoneal dialysis related peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeto, Cheuk-Chun; Lai, Ka-Bik; Chow, Kai-Ming; Kwan, Bonnie Ching-Ha; Law, Man-Ching; Pang, Wing-Fai; Ma, Terry King-Wing; Leung, Chi-Bon; Li, Philip Kam-Tao

    2016-12-01

    Peritonitis is the major complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of our present study is to explore the prognostic value of endotoxin level in PD effluent for the prediction of treatment failure in PD-related peritonitis. We studied 325 peritonitis episodes in 223 patients. PD effluent (PDE) was collected every 5 days for endotoxin level and leukocyte count. Patients were followed for relapsing or recurrent peritonitis. We found 20 episodes (6.2%) had primary treatment failure; 41 (12.6%) developed relapsing, 19 (5.8%) had recurrent, and 22 (6.8%) had repeat episodes. Endotoxin was detectable in the PDE of 19 episodes (24.4%) caused by Gram negative organisms, 4 episodes (6.8%) of mixed bacterial growth, and none of the culture negative episodes or those by Gram positive organisms. For episodes caused by Gram negative bacteria, a detectable endotoxin level in PDE on day 5 had a sensitivity and specificity of 66.7% and 83.3%, respectively, for predicting primary treatment failure. In contrast, PDE leukocyte count > 1000 per mm3 on day 5 had a sensitivity and specificity of 88.9% and 89.1%, respectively; the addition of PDE endotoxin assay did not improve the sensitivity or specificity. We conclude that detectable endotoxin in PDE 5 days after antibiotic therapy might predict primary treatment failure in peritonitis episodes caused by Gram negative organisms. However, the sensitivity and specificity of PDE endotoxin assay was inferior to PDE leukocyte count. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  8. Establishing a South African Honour Society of Nursing under auspices of Sigma Theta Tau International (Inc.)

    OpenAIRE

    van der Wal, D.

    1998-01-01

    The information on Sigma Theta Tau International (Inc.) which follows is reproduced from official STTI documentation with permission from the STTI Chapter Manager. This section should thus be read with the United States context in mind as certain words and concepts have different meanings in the US and SA contexts, eg under graduate, graduate, college and the like. In addition, certain words are also spelled differently in American English and standard English.

  9. Identity negotiation : rethinking the affects of International study in a global society

    OpenAIRE

    Fiske, Mandie Marie

    2006-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of research that sought to undercover evidence to determine if identity negotiation and reinterpretation takes place when students study abroad. The findings were derived from a self-completion survey administered to university students that had studied internationally in 2005. It was determined that the severity of culture clashes endured abroad determined the potency of the experience. However, specifically where the students studied and how their program wa...

  10. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    Contaminants remaining on implantable medical devices, even following sterilization, include dangerous fever-causing residues of the outer lipopolysaccharide-rich membranes of Gram-negative bacteria such as the common gut microorganism E. coli. The conventional method for endotoxin removal is by Food & Drug Administration (FDA)-recommended dry-heat depyrogenation at 250°C for at least 45 minutes, an excessively time-consuming high-temperature technique not suitable for low-melting or heat-distortable biomaterials. This investigation evaluated the mechanism by which E. coli endotoxin contamination can be eliminated from surfaces during ambient temperature single 3-minute to cumulative 15-minute exposures to radio-frequency glow discharge (RFGD)-generated residual room air plasmas activated at 0.1-0.2 torr in a 35MHz electrodeless chamber. The main analytical technique for retained pyrogenic bio-activity was the Kinetic Chromogenic Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) Assay, sufficiently sensitive to document compliance with FDA-required Endotoxin Unit (EU) titers less than 20 EU per medical device by optical detection of enzymatic color development corresponding to water extracts of each device. The main analytical technique for identification of chemical compositions, amounts, and changes during sequential reference Endotoxin additions and subsequent RFGD-treatment removals from infrared (IR)-transparent germanium (Ge) prisms was Multiple Attenuated Internal Reflection (MAIR) infrared spectroscopy sensitive to even monolayer amounts of retained bio-contaminant. KimaxRTM 60 mm x 15 mm and 50mm x 15mm laboratory glass dishes and germanium internal reflection prisms were inoculated with E. coli bacterial endotoxin water suspensions at increments of 0.005, 0.05, 0.5, and 5 EU, and characterized by MAIR-IR spectroscopy of the dried residues on the Ge prisms and LAL Assay of sterile water extracts from both glass and Ge specimens. The Ge prism MAIR-IR measurements were

  11. Conference program and abstracts. International Biogeography Society 6th Biennial Meeting – 9-13 January 2013, Miami, Florida, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquín Hortal

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Proceedings of the Sixth biennial conference of the International Biogeography Society, an international and interdisciplinary society contributing to the advancement of all studies of the geography of nature. Held at Miami, Florida, USA, 9 – 13 January 2013.Abstracts include:(i the Opening, MacArthur & Wilson Award and Alfred Russel Award Plenary Lectures;(ii four symposia entitled "Island Biogeography: New Syntheses", "Beyond Bergmann: New perspectives on the biogeography of traits", "The Convergence of Conservation Paleontology and Biogeography" and "Predicting species and biodiversity in a warmer world: are we doing a good job?";(iii oral presentations from contributed papers on Phylogeography, Marine Biogeography, Biogeography of the Anthropocene, Hot Topics in biogeography, Island Biogeography, Neotropical Biogeography, Global Change Biogeography, Historical and Paleo-biogeography, Conservation Biogeography and Global-Scale Biogeography; and(iv contributions presented as posters on Phylogeography, Geospatial techniques and land cover, Biodiversity gradients and macroecology, Biogeography of traits, Island Biogeography, Neotropical Biogeography, Conservation Biogeography, Disturbance and Disease Biogeography, Climate Change Biogeography and Historical and Paleo-Biogeography.

  12. Management of high blood pressure in Blacks: an update of the International Society on Hypertension in Blacks consensus statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flack, John M; Sica, Domenic A; Bakris, George; Brown, Angela L; Ferdinand, Keith C; Grimm, Richard H; Hall, W Dallas; Jones, Wendell E; Kountz, David S; Lea, Janice P; Nasser, Samar; Nesbitt, Shawna D; Saunders, Elijah; Scisney-Matlock, Margaret; Jamerson, Kenneth A

    2010-11-01

    Since the first International Society on Hypertension in Blacks consensus statement on the "Management of High Blood Pressure in African American" in 2003, data from additional clinical trials have become available. We reviewed hypertension and cardiovascular disease prevention and treatment guidelines, pharmacological hypertension clinical end point trials, and blood pressure-lowering trials in blacks. Selected trials without significant black representation were considered. In this update, blacks with hypertension are divided into 2 risk strata, primary prevention, where elevated blood pressure without target organ damage, preclinical cardiovascular disease, or overt cardiovascular disease for whom blood pressure consistently blood pressure with target organ damage, preclinical cardiovascular disease, and/or a history of cardiovascular disease, for whom blood pressure consistently blood pressure is ≤10 mm Hg above target levels, monotherapy with a diuretic or calcium channel blocker is preferred. When blood pressure is >15/10 mm Hg above target, 2-drug therapy is recommended, with either a calcium channel blocker plus a renin-angiotensin system blocker or, alternatively, in edematous and/or volume-overload states, with a thiazide diuretic plus a renin-angiotensin system blocker. Effective multidrug therapeutic combinations through 4 drugs are described. Comprehensive lifestyle modifications should be initiated in blacks when blood pressure is ≥115/75 mm Hg. The updated International Society on Hypertension in Blacks consensus statement on hypertension management in blacks lowers the minimum target blood pressure level for the lowest-risk blacks, emphasizes effective multidrug regimens, and de-emphasizes monotherapy.

  13. International Society for Wildlife Endocrinology: the future of endocrine measures for reproductive science, animal welfare and conservation biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganswindt, André; Brown, Janine L; Freeman, Elizabeth W; Kouba, Andrew J; Penfold, Linda M; Santymire, Rachel M; Vick, Mandi M; Wielebnowski, Nadja; Willis, Erin L; Milnes, Matthew R

    2012-10-23

    Hormone analysis is a precise and widely accepted tool for monitoring reproductive function and responses to stressors. Although hormones are present and can be measured in various biological matrices, non-invasive methods have gained popularity over the past 30 years as a more practical approach for assessing ovarian, testicular and, more recently, adrenocortical activity in intractable wildlife species. Non-invasive hormone monitoring also has been key to understanding biological mechanisms related to observed behaviours of captive and free-ranging animals. Despite the increasing popularity of this research field, wildlife endocrinologists have not had a specific forum for sharing and discussing their latest findings, technical developments and common challenges. To provide such a communication platform, the International Society for Wildlife Endocrinology (ISWE) was established in 2010, followed by an international meeting held on 3-4 November 2011 at the Toronto Zoo, Canada. Over several sessions, keynote speakers and participants discussed recent developments of new and innovative methods for hormone monitoring, as well as the latest advances in basic endocrinology as applied to adrenal function, reproductive physiology, animal health, ecology and evolution. Here, we introduce ISWE to the scientific community and discuss how this new society will serve as a resource for wildlife endocrinologists worldwide.

  14. Reporting and Staging of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Testicular Cancer Consultation Conference Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrill, Clare; Yilmaz, Asli; Srigley, John R; Amin, Mahul B; Compérat, Eva; Egevad, Lars; Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Berney, Daniel M; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology held a conference devoted to issues in testicular and penile pathology in Boston in March 2015, which included a presentation and discussion led by the testis microscopic features working group. This conference focused on controversies related to staging and reporting of testicular tumors and was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urological Pathology members. The survey results were used to initiate discussions, but decisions were made by expert consensus rather than voting. A number of recommendations emerged from the conference, including that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) should always be reported and no distinction need be made between lymphatic or blood invasion. If LVI is equivocal, then it should be regarded as negative to avoid triggering unnecessary therapy. LVI in the spermatic cord is considered as category pT2, not pT3, unless future studies provide contrary evidence. At the time of gross dissection, a block should be taken just superior to the epididymis to define the base of the spermatic cord, and direct invasion of tumor in this block indicates a category of pT3. Pagetoid involvement of the rete testis epithelium must be distinguished from rete testis stromal invasion, with only the latter being prognostically useful. Percentages of different tumor elements in mixed germ cell tumors should be reported. Although consensus was reached on many issues, there are still areas of practice that need further evidence on which to base firm recommendations.

  15. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Evans, A.J.; Delahunt, B.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.L.; Humphrey, P.A.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a

  16. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, D.M.; Wheeler, T.M.; Grignon, D.J.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Montironi, R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coo

  17. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samaratunga, H.; Montironi, R.; True, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by wo

  18. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, P.H.; Cheng, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed

  19. Invasively estimated international continence society obstruction classification versus noninvasively assessed bladder outlet obstruction probability in treatment recommendation for LOTS suggestive of BPH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boormans, Joost L.; van Venrooij, Ger E. P. M.; Boon, Tom A.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To investigate the contribution of urodynamically proven presence or absence (International Continence Society classification) of bladder outlet obstruction (BOO) to treatment recommendations for lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia, and to invest

  20. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tan, P.H.; Cheng, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed

  1. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berney, D.M.; Wheeler, T.M.; Grignon, D.J.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Montironi, R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Srigley, J.R.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coo

  2. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magi-Galluzzi, C.; Evans, A.J.; Delahunt, B.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Kwast, T.H. van der; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.L.; Humphrey, P.A.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a

  3. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Samaratunga, H.; Montironi, R.; True, L.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.F.; Humphrey, P.A.; Kwast, T. van der; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Delahunt, B.; Egevad, L.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by wo

  4. Proceedings from the 5th Annual International Society for Musculoskeletal Imaging in Rheumatology Annual Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaghan, Philip G; Ostergaard, Mikkel; D'Agostino, Maria Antonietta; Gaylis, Norman; Arnold, William; Olech, Ewa; Wells, Alvin; Peterfy, Charles; Seraphine, Judy L; Troum, Orrin

    2013-02-01

    Since its inception, ISEMIR has held an annual education meeting highlighting the changes in the utilization of imaging tools for the management of rheumatic diseases. ISEMIR's international faculty and world-renowned experts have discussed these topics at a very high scientific level. The evolution of the content demonstrates the rapidly changing environment in the field of rheumatology. Advances in treatment have led to the increased use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasound (US). This publication is based upon the proceedings from the 2012 ISEMIR educational meeting that took place on April 26th in Chicago, Illinois. Presentations from the live proceedings can be viewed at www.isemir.org.

  5. Electronic cigarettes. A position statement of the forum of international respiratory societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraufnagel, Dean E; Blasi, Francesco; Drummond, M Bradley; Lam, David C L; Latif, Ehsan; Rosen, Mark J; Sansores, Raul; Van Zyl-Smit, Richard

    2014-09-15

    Awareness and usage of electronic cigarettes has exponentially increased during the last few years, especially among young people and women in some countries. The rapid acceptance of electronic cigarettes may be attributed in part to the perception created by marketing and the popular press that they are safer than combustible cigarettes. To alert and advise policy makers about electronic cigarettes and their potential hazards. Using The Union's position paper on electronic cigarettes as the starting template, the document was written using an iterative process. Portions of the manuscript have been taken directly from the position papers of participating societies. Because electronic cigarettes generate less tar and carcinogens than combustible cigarettes, use of electronic cigarettes may reduce disease caused by those components. However, the health risks of electronic cigarettes have not been adequately studied. Studies looking at whether electronic cigarettes can aid smoking cessation have had inconsistent results. Moreover, the availability of electronic cigarettes may have an overall adverse health impact by increasing initiation and reducing cessation of combustible nicotine delivery products. The health and safety claims regarding electronic nicotine delivery devices should be subject to evidentiary review. The potential benefits of electronic cigarettes to an individual smoker should be weighed against potential harm to the population of increased social acceptability of smoking and use of nicotine, the latter of which has addictive power and untoward effects. As a precaution, electronic nicotine delivery devices should be restricted or banned until more information about their safety is available. If they are allowed, they should be closely regulated as medicines or tobacco products.

  6. Endotoxin levels and contribution factors of endotoxins in resident, school, and office environments - A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salonen, Heidi; Duchaine, Caroline; Létourneau, Valérie; Mazaheri, Mandana; Laitinen, Sirpa; Clifford, Sam; Mikkola, Raimo; Lappalainen, Sanna; Reijula, Kari; Morawska, Lidia

    2016-10-01

    As endotoxin exposure has known effects on human health, it is important to know the generally existing levels of endotoxins as well as their contributing factors. This work reviews current knowledge on the endotoxin loads in settled floor dust, concentrations of endotoxins in indoor air, and different environmental factors potentially affecting endotoxin levels. The literature review consists of peer-reviewed manuscripts located using Google and PubMed, with search terms based on individual words and combinations. References from relevant articles have also been searched. Analysis of the data showed that in residential, school, and office environments, the mean endotoxin loads in settled floor dust varied between 660 and 107,000 EU/m2, 2180 and 48,000 EU/m2, and 2700 and 12,890 EU/m2, respectively. Correspondingly, the mean endotoxin concentrations in indoor air varied between 0.04 and 1610 EU/m3 in residences, and 0.07 and 9.30 EU/m3 in schools and offices. There is strong scientific evidence indicating that age of houses (or housing unit year category), cleaning, farm or rural living, flooring materials (the presence of carpets), number of occupants, the presence of dogs or cats indoors, and relative humidity affect endotoxin loads in settled floor dust. The presence of pets (especially dogs) was extremely strongly associated with endotoxin concentrations in indoor air. However, as reviewed articles show inconsistency, additional studies on these and other possible predicting factors are needed.

  7. Endotoxin contamination delays the foreign body reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Putten, Sander M.; Wubben, Maike; Plantinga, Josee A.; Hennink, Wim E.; van Luyn, Marja J. A.; Harmsen, Martin C.

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials are at continuous risk of bacterial contamination during production and application. In vivo, bacterial contamination of biomaterials delays the foreign body reaction (FBR). Endotoxins such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS), major constituents of the bacterial cell wall, are potent stimulato

  8. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients before elective, noncardiothoracic surgery : Joint recommendation of the German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, the German Society of Surgery, and the German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwissler, B

    2017-06-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e. g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest x‑ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or is controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, noncardiothoracic surgery, which were initially published in 2010. These recommendations have now been updated based on the current literature and existing international guidelines. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and

  9. Why combine diet and physical activity in the same international research society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baranowski Tom

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Research in diet and physical activity in the U.S. started in very different traditions, with behavioral science input being uneven in their development. Investigators and policy makers in Europe have recognized the complementarity of diet and physical activity and incorporated them both under the label Public Health Nutrition. Joining these disciplines internationally offers the opportunity to benefit all, since the problems addressed are human, not specific to any one country. In regard to why combine diet and physical activity, at the biological level, there is reason to believe that diet and physical activity working in concert can remodel physiological structures and processes toward healthful ends. The diet and physical activity behaviors themselves vary in characteristics and are similar in others. The behavioral science components of these two disciplines face similar problems, and can learn from the advances made by the other, in the areas of measurement, correlates and intervention. By working together, knowledge will be enhanced from uncovering complementary and interactive relationships between diet and physical activity, and in relation to disease risks, that may result in designing more effective and efficient interventions and policies. Since the behavioral sciences are at a disadvantage in comparison to the biological sciences in terms of scientific advances and thereby capturing the popular imagination for solutions to health problems, we must redouble our efforts to enhance funding for behavioral research in regard to diet and physical activity and to make the research advances necessary to prevent the medicalizing of essentially social and behavioral problems. Nutrition and physical activity should most effectively do this together.

  10. Clinical decisions in patients with diabetes and other cardiovascular risk factors. A statement of the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Huelgas, R; Pérez-Jiménez, F; Serrano-Ríos, M; González-Santos, P; Román, P; Camafort, M; Conthe, P; García-Alegría, J; Guijarro, R; López-Miranda, J; Tirado-Miranda, R; Valdivielso, P

    2014-05-01

    Although the mortality associated to cardiovascular diseases (CVD) has been reduced in the last decades, CVD remains the main cause of mortality in Spain and they are associated with an important morbidity and a huge economic burden. The increasing prevalence of obesity and diabetes could be slowing down the mortality reduction in Spain. Clinicians have often difficulty making clinical decisions due to the multiple clinical guidelines available. Moreover, in the current context of economic crisis it is critical to promote an efficient use of diagnostic and therapeutic proceedings to ensure the viability of public health care systems. The Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI) has coordinated a consensus document to answer questions of daily practice with the aim of facilitating physicians' decision-making in the management of diabetes and cardiovascular risk factors from a cost-efficiency point of view. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Adaptation of water resources systems to changing society and environment: a statement by the International Association of Hydrological Sciences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ceola, Serena; Montanari, Alberto; Krueger, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    to develop effective solutions to support water resources systems adaptation. Finally, we call the scientific community to a renewed and unified effort to deliver an innovative message to stakeholders. Water science is essential to resolve the water crisis, but the effectiveness of solutions depends, inter......We explore how to address the challenges of adaptation of water resources systems under changing conditions by supporting flexible, resilient and low-regret solutions, coupled with on-going monitoring and evaluation. This will require improved understanding of the linkages between biophysical...... and social aspects in order to better anticipate the possible future co-evolution of water systems and society. We also present a call to enhance the dialogue and foster the actions of governments, the international scientific community, research funding agencies and additional stakeholders in order...

  12. THE 3rd SCHIZOPHRENIA INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SOCIETY CONFERENCE, 14-18 APRIL 2012, FLORENCE, ITALY: SUMMARIES OF ORAL SESSIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbs, Brandon; Achalia, Rashmin M; Adelufosi, Adegoke O; Aktener, Ahmet Yiğit; Beveridge, Natalie J; Bhakta, Savita G; Blackman, Rachael K; Bora, Emre; Byun, MS; Cabanis, Maurice; Carrion, Ricardo; Castellani, Christina A; Chow, Tze Jen; Dmitrzak-Weglarz, M; Gayer-Anderson, Charlotte; Gomes, Felipe V; Haut, Kristen; Hori, Hiroaki; Kantrowitz, Joshua T; Kishimoto, Taishiro; Lee, Frankie HF; Lin, Ashleigh; Palaniyappan, Lena; Quan, Meina; Rubio, Maria D; Ruiz de Azúa, Sonia; Sahoo, Saddichha; Strauss, Gregory P; Szczepankiewicz, Aleksandra; Thompson, Andrew D; Trotta, Antonella; Tully, Laura M; Uchida, Hiroyuki; Velthorst, Eva; Young, Jared W; O’Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2013-01-01

    The 3rd Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference was held in Florence, Italy, April 14-18, 2012.and this year had as its emphasis, “The Globalization of Research”. Student travel awardees served as rapporteurs for each oral session and focused their summaries on the most significant findings that emerged and the discussions that followed. The following report is a composite of these summaries. We hope that it will provide an overview for those who were present, but could not participate in all sessions, and those who did not have the opportunity to attend, but who would be interested in an update on current investigations ongoing in the field of schizophrenia research. PMID:22910407

  13. High quality care and ethical pay-for-performance: a Society of General Internal Medicine policy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharam, J Frank; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K; Farber, Neil J; Sinsky, Christine; Rucker, Lisa; Rask, Kimberly J; Figaro, M Kathleen; Braddock, Clarence; Barry, Michael J; Sulmasy, Daniel P

    2009-07-01

    Pay-for-performance is proliferating, yet its impact on key stakeholders remains uncertain. The Society of General Internal Medicine systematically evaluated ethical issues raised by performance-based physician compensation. We conclude that current arrangements are based on fundamentally acceptable ethical principles, but are guided by an incomplete understanding of health-care quality. Furthermore, their implementation without evidence of safety and efficacy is ethically precarious because of potential risks to stakeholders, especially vulnerable patients. We propose four major strategies to transition from risky pay-for-performance systems to ethical performance-based physician compensation and high quality care. These include implementing safeguards within current pay-for-performance systems, reaching consensus regarding the obligations of key stakeholders in improving health-care quality, developing valid and comprehensive measures of health-care quality, and utilizing a cautious evaluative approach in creating the next generation of compensation systems that reward genuine quality.

  14. An Update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation (PE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley E. Althof, PhD

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Development of guidelines is an evolutionary process that continually reviews data and incorporates the best new research. We expect that ongoing research will lead to a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology as well as new efficacious and safe treatments for this sexual dysfunction. We again recommend that these guidelines be reevaluated and updated by the ISSM in 4 years. Althof SE, McMahon CG, Waldinger MD, Serefoglu EC, Shindel AW, Adaikan PG, Becher E, Dean J, Giuliano F, Hellstrom WJG, Giraldi A, Glina S, Incrocci L, Jannini E, McCabe M, Parish S, Rowland D, Segraves RT, Sharlip I, and Torres LO. An update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of premature ejaculation (PE. Sex Med 2014;2:60–90.

  15. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus conference on handling and staging of radical prostatectomy specimens: rationale and organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. The activities of the conference were coordinated through five workgroups. The results are presented in five separate reports covering (1) specimen handling, (2) T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume, (3) extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease, (4) seminal vesicles and lymph node metastases and (5) surgical margins. In this introductory article we describe some novel features of the organization of the consensus process. Following the completion of a pre-meeting survey conference, participants discussed and voted on 43 specific issues of contention relating to the pathological reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Consensus, defined as agreement by at least 65% of participants present, was achieved for 30 questions.

  16. Highlights of the 11th Congress of the International Headache Society, held September 13-16, 2003, in Rome, Italy. Updating the headache classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Larry

    2003-12-01

    The International Headache Society held their 11th biennial congress in Rome, Italy, on September 13-16, 2003. The meeting featured the introduction of the second edition to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, the first update to the document since its presentation in 1988. This report discusses some of the different classifications of headache and their treatments as discussed at the congress.

  17. A probabilistic approach to quantitatively assess the inhalation risk for airborne endotoxin in cotton textile workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, Vivian Hsiu-Chuan, E-mail: vivianliao@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chou, Wei-Chun; Chio, Chia-Pin; Ju, Yun-Ru; Liao, Chung-Min [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, 1 Roosevelt Road, Sec. 4, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    Endotoxin, a component of gram-negative bacterial cell walls, is a proinflammatory agent that induces local and systemic inflammatory responses in normal subjects which can contribute to the risk of developing asthma and chronic obstructive lung diseases. A probabilistic approach linking models of exposure, internal dosimetry, and health effects were carried out to quantitatively assess the potential inhalation risk of airborne endotoxin for workers in cotton textile plants. Combining empirical data and modeling results, we show that the half-maximum effects of the endotoxin dose (ED50) were estimated to be 3.3 x 10{sup 5} (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.9-14.7 x 10{sup 5}) endotoxin units (EU) for the blood C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, 1.1 x 10{sup 5} (95% CI: 0.6-1.7 x 10{sup 5}) EU for the blood polymorphonuclear neutrophil (PMN) count, and 1.5 x 10{sup 5} (95% CI: 0.4-2.5 x 10{sup 5}) EU for the sputum PMN count. Our study offers a risk-management framework for discussing future establishment of limits for respiratory exposure to airborne endotoxin for workers in cotton textile plants.

  18. Comparison of the Treatment Implications of American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 and Eighth Joint National Committee Guidelines: an analysis of National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Venkatesh L; Shah, Ravi V; Rubenfire, Melvyn; Brook, Robert D

    2014-08-01

    Multiple guidelines and statements related to hypertension have recently been published. Much discord has arisen from discrepant treatment and target systolic blood pressure thresholds for individuals aged 60 to 79 years of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013. We sought to evaluate the public health implications of these differences using data from the 2005 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) cycles. NHANES is an ongoing survey designed to allow characterization of the US population and subpopulations. We found that only .2.4% (95% confidence interval, 1.5.3.2%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years had indications for antihypertensive treatment under the more stringent American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 guideline but not under Eighth Joint National Committee. About 65.7% (95% confidence interval, 62.4.69.0%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years had indications for treatment under both guidelines. Furthermore, those with indications for treatment under American Society of Hypertension and International Society of Hypertension 2013 but not under Eighth Joint National Committee generally had higher systolic blood pressure and less favorable lipid profiles compared with those with indications for treatment under both guidelines. Importantly, a larger group, comprising 21.0% (95% confidence interval, 18.7.23.2%) of adults aged 60 to 79 years, had either untreated or inadequately treated hypertension and represents an important group for continued efforts.

  19. Axial Globe Position Measurement: A Prospective Multicenter Study by the International Thyroid Eye Disease Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Chad M; Sivak-Callcott, Jennifer A; Gurka, Matthew J; Nguyen, John; Hogg, Jeffery P; Feldon, Steve E; Fay, Aaron; Seah, Lay-Leng; Strianese, Diego; Durairaj, Vikram D; Uddin, Jimmy; Devoto, Martin H; Harris, Matheson; Saunders, Justin; Osaki, Tammy H; Looi, Audrey; Teo, Livia; Davies, Brett W; Elefante, Andrea; Shen, Sunny; Realini, Tony; Fischer, William; Kazim, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Identify a reproducible measure of axial globe position (AGP) for multicenter studies on patients with thyroid eye disease (TED). This is a prospective, international, multicenter, observational study in which 3 types of AGP evaluation were examined: radiologic, clinical, and photographic. In this study, CT was the modality to which all other methods were compared. CT AGP was measured from an orthogonal line between the anterior lateral orbital rims to the cornea. All CT measurements were made at a single institution by 3 individual clinicians. Clinical evaluation was performed with exophthalmometry. Three clinicians from each clinical site assessed AGP with 3 different exophthalmometers and horizontal palpebral width using a ruler. Each physician made 3 separate measurements with each type of exophthalmometer not in succession. All photographic measurements were made at a single institution. AGP was measured from lateral photographs in which a standard marker was placed at the anterior lateral orbital rim. Horizontal and vertical palpebral fissure were measured from frontal photographs. Three trained readers measured 3 separate times not in succession. Exophthalmometry and photography method validity was assessed by agreement with CT (mean differences calculation, intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs], Bland-Altman figures). Correlation between palpebral fissure and CT AGP was assessed with Pearson correlation. Intraclinician and interclinician reliability was evaluated using ICCs. Sixty-eight patients from 7 centers participated. CT mean AGP was 21.37 mm (15.96-28.90 mm) right and 21.22 mm (15.87-28.70 mm) left (ICC 0.996 and 0.995). Exophthalmometry AGP fell between 18 mm and 25 mm. Intraclinician agreement across exophthalmometers was ideal (ICC 0.948-0.983). Agreement between clinicians was greater than 0.85 for all upright exophthalmometry measurements. Photographic mean AGP was 20.47 mm (10.92-30.88 mm) right and 20.30 mm (8.61-28.72

  20. Selected Abstracts presented at the 18th International Congress of the International Society of Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy (ISCP, Rome, Italy, 28--30 June 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available ANNUAL SCIENTIFIC MEETING OF THE INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY OF CARDIOVASCULAR PHARMACOTHERAPY (ISCP ROME, 28--30 JUNE 2013 The following scientific abstracts were presented at the latest Annual Scientific Meeting of ISCP this year in Rome. They summarise the work of young investigators from different geographical regions worldwide. ISCP supports the scientific work of researchers round the Globe and offers a forum where the results of their investigations can be presented and discussed in the context of the annual meetings and other regional activities. This activity represents not only a possibility for young investigators to showcase their work but also an opportunity to have their results assessed and discussed by world experts in the field. ISCP sees this as a useful contribution to the development of young scientists working in the field of cardiovascular pharmacotherapy.

  1. American Headache Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Applications are now being accepted for the 2017 International headache Society scheduled for January 20 - 22, 2017 at the ... READ MORE Sep 7 18th Congress of the International Headache Society Vancouver, BC Canada , Vancouver Convention Centre READ MORE ...

  2. Brief migraine episodes in children and adolescents-a modification to International Headache Society pediatric migraine (without aura) diagnostic criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Muttamthottil Varghese

    2013-12-01

    The international Headache Society (I H S) diagnostic criteria (International classification of headache disorders edition 2- ICHD 2) for headache in children and adults improved the accuracy of migraine diagnoses. However many short duration headaches in children, receive an atypical migraine diagnosis. This study is to diagnose children and adolescents who presented with such atypical migraines of less than one hour duration. 1402 children and adolescents aged 5 to 15 years who presented with recurrent brief activity affected head pain, were studied. Known and common migraine triggers and family history of migraine were recorded in all. All the children studied had moderate to severe headache lasting 5 to 45 minutes which forced them motionless during the attacks (thus fulfilling 2 diagnostic pain features). At least one of the ICHD2 pediatric migraine diagnostic symptoms (nausea / vomiting / photophobia / phonophobia) were present in all. Two additional features were diagnostic of brief migraines in all of them- one of the parents or siblings was a migrainer and one of the common migraine triggers as a precipitating factor. This study concludes that if duration of head pain is less than one hour ,two additional features to be included to diagnose definitive migraine in children and adolescents - one migraine parent or sibling and one of the migraine triggers precipitating the head pain.

  3. The Migration, Mental Stress, and Tobacco use of Internal Migrants in China: The Moderating Effect of the Social Context of the Host Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Shenghua

    2017-07-13

    Previous studies on the relationship between mental stress and the tobacco use of internal migrants have not fully considered the social context of the host society. This study aims to examine how mental stress influences cigarette smoking in internal migrants in China by considering the social context of the host society. We used the RUMiC data that were collected in 15 cities distributed throughout 9 provinces of China. A total of 8,446 and 5,426 migrant workers were interviewed in 2008 and 2009, respectively. We selected individuals based on the criteria of age, salary, and hukou status. A total of 8,880 observations are valid for this study. This research used the logistic regression method to test the association between mental stress and the tobacco use of internal migrants. The results show that mental stress is not necessarily associated with the tobacco use of internal migrants. However, the effects of mental stress on tobacco use are moderated by the social context of the host society. This article calls for more attention to be paid to the moderate effect of social context in the host society on the association between mental stress and cigarette smoking of internal migrants. Moreover, this article underscores the importance of factors related to local societies in making and enacting tobacco control policies for migrants in developing countries.

  4. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus guidelines on Gleason grading - a matched-pair analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Kasper D; Thomsen, Frederik B; Nerstrøm, Camilla; Røder, Martin A; Iversen, Peter; Toft, Birgitte G; Vainer, Ben; Brasso, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    To investigate whether the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2005 revision of the Gleason grading system has influenced the risk of biochemical recurrence (BCR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), as the new guideline implies that some prostate cancers previously graded as Gleason score 6 (3 + 3) are now considered as 7 (3 + 4). A matched-pair analysis was conducted. In all, 215 patients with Gleason score 6 or 7 (3 + 4) prostate cancer on biopsy who underwent RP before 31 December 2005 (pre-ISUP group), were matched 1:1 by biopsy Gleason score, clinical tumour category, PSA level, and margin status to patients undergoing RP between 1 January 2008 and 31 December 2011 (post-ISUP group). Patients were followed until BCR defined as a PSA level of ≥0.2 ng/mL. Risk of BCR was analysed in a competing-risk model. The median follow-up was 9.5 years in the pre-ISUP group and 4.8 years in the post-ISUP group. The 5-year cumulative incidences of BCR were 34.0% and 13.9% in the pre-ISUP and post-ISUP groups, respectively (P ISUP Gleason score 6 and post-ISUP Gleason score 7 (3 + 4) (P = 0.34). In a multiple Cox-proportional hazard regression model, ISUP 2005 grading was a strong prognostic factor for BCR within 5 years of RP (hazard ratio 0.34; 95% confidence interval 0.22-0.54; P < 0.001). The revision of the Gleason grading system has reduced the risk of BCR after RP in patients with biopsy Gleason score 6 and 7 (3 + 4). This may have consequences when comparing outcomes across studies and historical periods and may affect future treatment recommendations. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery: joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  6. [Preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac surgery. Joint recommendations of German Society of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, German Society of Surgery and German Society of Internal Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Evaluation of the patient's medical history and a physical examination are the cornerstones of risk assessment prior to elective surgery and may help to optimize the patient's preoperative medical condition and to guide perioperative management. Whether the performance of additional technical tests (e.g. blood chemistry, ECG, spirometry, chest-x-ray) can contribute to a reduction of perioperative risk is often not very well known or controversial. Similarly, there is considerable uncertainty among anesthesiologists, internists and surgeons with respect to the perioperative management of the patient's long-term medication. Therefore, the German Scientific Societies of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine (DGAI), Internal Medicine (DGIM) and Surgery (DGCH) have joined to elaborate and publish recommendations on the preoperative evaluation of adult patients prior to elective, non-cardiac and non-lung resection surgery. In the first part the general principles of preoperative evaluation are described (part A). The current concepts for extended evaluation of patients with known or suspected major cardiovascular disease are presented in part B. Finally, the perioperative management of patients' long-term medication is discussed (part C). The concepts proposed in these interdisciplinary recommendations endorsed by the DGAI, DGIM and DGCH provide a common basis for a structured preoperative risk assessment and management. These recommendations aim to ensure that surgical patients undergo a rational preoperative assessment and at the same time to avoid unnecessary, costly and potentially dangerous testing. The joint recommendations reflect the current state-of-the-art knowledge as well as expert opinions because scientific-based evidence is not always available. These recommendations will be subject to regular re-evaluation and updating when new validated evidence becomes available.

  7. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffee Elizabeth M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN. In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy.

  8. 2015 President's Plenary International Psycho-oncology Society: psychosocial care as a human rights issue-challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travado, Luzia; Breitbart, William; Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Patenaude, Andrea; Baider, Lea; Connor, Stephen; Fingeret, Michelle

    2017-04-01

    The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support, for the relevance of psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue. In 2014 the "Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Universal Human Right" was fully endorsed by IPOS. Subsequently, the IPOS Standard on Quality Cancer Care, endorsed by 75 cancer organizations worldwide, has been updated and now includes 3 core principles: Psychosocial cancer care should be recognised as a universal human right; Quality cancer care must integrate the psychosocial domain into routine care; Distress should be measured as the 6th vital sign. The President's plenary held at the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology in Washington DC was devoted to discussing psychosocial care as a human rights issue. Many challenges and opportunities are illustrated in different continents and contexts: from Africa where resources for basic cancer treatment are scarce and children and their parents face significant difficulties with hospital detention practices; to Europe where for many countries psychosocial care is still seen as a luxury; and the Middle East where Muslim women face stigma and a culture of silence over cancer. We further discuss how to move the Lisbon Declaration forward towards its implementation into clinical practice globally, using the successful example of the World Health Assembly resolution supporting palliative care as a human right which has achieved widespread approval, and identifying the vital role the IPOS Federation of National Psychoncology Societies plays worldwide to move this agenda forward. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. 2015 President's Plenary International Psycho-oncology Society: psychosocial care as a human rights issue–challenges and opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travado, Luzia; Breitbart, William; Grassi, Luigi; Fujisawa, Daisuke; Patenaude, Andrea; Baider, Lea; Connor, Stephen; Fingeret, Michelle

    2017-01-01

    The International Psycho-Oncology Society (IPOS) Human Rights Task Force has been working since 2008 to raise awareness and support, for the relevance of psychosocial cancer care as a human rights issue. In 2014 the “Lisbon Declaration: Psychosocial Cancer Care as a Universal Human Right” was fully endorsed by IPOS. Subsequently, the IPOS Standard on Quality Cancer Care, endorsed by 75 cancer organizations worldwide, has been updated and now includes 3 core principles: Psychosocial cancer care should be recognised as a universal human right; Quality cancer care must integrate the psychosocial domain into routine care; Distress should be measured as the 6th vital sign. The President's plenary held at the 2015 World Congress of Psycho-Oncology in Washington DC was devoted to discussing psychosocial care as a human rights issue. Many challenges and opportunities are illustrated in different continents and contexts: from Africa where resources for basic cancer treatment are scarce and children and their parents face significant difficulties with hospital detention practices; to Europe where for many countries psychosocial care is still seen as a luxury; and the Middle East where Muslim women face stigma and a culture of silence over cancer. We further discuss how to move the Lisbon Declaration forward towards its implementation into clinical practice globally, using the successful example of the World Health Assembly resolution supporting palliative care as a human right which has achieved widespread approval, and identifying the vital role the IPOS Federation of National Psychoncology Societies plays worldwide to move this agenda forward. PMID:27530206

  10. Indian Psychiatric Society-World Psychiatric Association - World Health Organization survey on usefulness of International Classification of Diseases-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avasthi, Ajit; Grover, Sandeep; Maj, Mario; Reed, Geoffrey; Thirunavukarasu, M.; Garg, Uttam Chand

    2014-01-01

    Background: World Health Organization (WHO) is in the process of revising the International Classification of Diseases 10 (ICD-10). For increasing the acceptability of the ICD-11, WHO along with World Psychiatric Association (WPA), conducted a survey of psychiatrists around the world, in which 386 psychiatrists from India participated. Aim: To present the findings of “WPA-WHO Global Survey of Psychiatrists’ Attitudes toward Mental Disorders Classification” for Indian psychiatrists who participated in the survey as members of Indian Psychiatric Society. Methodology: The online survey was sent to qualified psychiatrists who are members of Indian Psychiatric Society and are residing in India. Results: Of the 1702 members who were urged to participate in the survey, 386 (22.7%) participated. Most(79%) of the psychiatrists opined that they use formal classificatory systems in their day-to-day clinical practice. ICD-10 was the most commonly (71%) followed classificatory system. Nearly half (48%) felt the need for only 10–30 categories for use in clinical settings and another 44% opined that 31-100 categories are required for use. Most of the participants (85%) suggested that a modified/simpler classificatory system should be designed for primary care practitioners. Similarly, the same number of participants (89%) argued that for maximum utility of a nosological system diagnostic criteria should provide flexible guidance that allows cultural variation and clinical judgement. About 75% opined that the diagnostic system they were using was difficult to apply across cultures. Conclusion: Findings of the survey suggest that classificatory systems are routinely used in day-to-day practice by most of the participating psychiatrists in India and most expect that future classificatory system should provide flexible guidance that allows cultural variation and clinical judgement. PMID:25568475

  11. Mr. Robert Aymar Director General of CERN speaking to international delegates meeting in Tunis for the second World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Webcast Service Archives ITU and UN

    2005-01-01

    "CERN's community of 6500 researchers of 85 nationalities has benefited from the global Information Society for many years," said Robert Aymar. "Through the WSIS process, the scientific community, at CERN and elsewhere, is sharing its experience to help bring the benefits of ICT to society as a whole. We urge all nations to support the connection of all universities around the world to the international networks for open exchange and collaboration between scientists everywhere."

  12. Outcomes of adolescent recipients after lung transplantation: An analysis of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paraskeva, Miranda A; Edwards, Leah B; Levvey, Bronwyn; Stehlik, Josef; Goldfarb, Samuel; Yusen, Roger D; Westall, Glen P; Snell, Greg I

    2017-02-17

    Recipient adolescent age for non-lung solid-organ transplantation is associated with higher rates of rejection, graft loss and mortality. Although there have been no studies specifically examining adolescent outcomes after lung transplantation (LTx), limited data from the International Society of Heart and Lung Transplantation (ISHLT) Registry suggest that a similar association may exist. Recently, adolescence has been defined as 10 to 24 years of age, taking into account the biologic and sociologic transitions that occur during this age interval. The ISHLT Registry was used to examine the survival outcomes of LTx recipients 10 to 24 years of age between 2005 and 2013. Given the developmental changes that occur in adolescence, survival outcomes for the tertiles of adolescence (10 to 14, 15 to 19 and 20 to 24 years old) were also examined. Adolescents made up 9% (n = 2,319) of the 24,730 LTxs undertaken during the study period. Kaplan-Meier survival estimates at 3 years showed lower adolescent survival (65%) when compared with younger children (73%, p = 0.006) and adults 25 to 34 (75%, p < 0.00001) and 35 to 49 (71%, p < 0.00001) years of age, without a significant survival difference compared with those 50 to 65 years old. Critically, 15- to 19-year-old recipients had the poorest outcomes, with reduced 1-year survival (82%) compared with those 10 to 14 years old (88%, p = 0.02), and reduced 3-year survival (59%) compared with those 10 to 14 (73%, p < 0.00001) and 20 to 24 (66%, p < 0.0001) years old. Adolescent LTx recipients have poorer overall survival when compared with younger children and adults, with those 15 to 19 years old having the highest risk of death. This survival disparity among age groups likely reflects the difficult period of adolescence and its biologic and social transitions, which may influence both immunologic function and adherence. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  13. An Update of the International Society of Sexual Medicine's Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Premature Ejaculation (PE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Althof, Stanley E; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Serefoglu, Ege Can; Shindel, Alan W; Adaikan, P Ganesan; Becher, Edgardo; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne JG; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In 2009, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) convened a select panel of experts to develop an evidence-based set of guidelines for patients suffering from lifelong premature ejaculation (PE). That document reviewed definitions, etiology, impact on the patient and partner, assessment, and pharmacological, psychological, and combined treatments. It concluded by recognizing the continually evolving nature of clinical research and recommended a subsequent guideline review and revision every fourth year. Consistent with that recommendation, the ISSM organized a second multidisciplinary panel of experts in April 2013, which met for 2 days in Bangalore, India. This manuscript updates the previous guidelines and reports on the recommendations of the panel of experts. Aim The aim of this study was to develop clearly worded, practical, evidenced-based recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of PE for family practice clinicians as well as sexual medicine experts. Method A comprehensive literature review was performed. Results This article contains the report of the second ISSM PE Guidelines Committee. It offers a new unified definition of PE and updates the previous treatment recommendations. Brief assessment procedures are delineated, and validated diagnostic and treatment questionnaires are reviewed. Finally, the best practices treatment recommendations are presented to guide clinicians, both familiar and unfamiliar with PE, in facilitating treatment of their patients. Conclusion Development of guidelines is an evolutionary process that continually reviews data and incorporates the best new research. We expect that ongoing research will lead to a more complete understanding of the pathophysiology as well as new efficacious and safe treatments for this sexual dysfunction. We again recommend that these guidelines be reevaluated and updated by the ISSM in 4 years. Althof SE, McMahon CG, Waldinger MD, Serefoglu EC, Shindel AW, Adaikan PG

  14. Handling and staging of renal cell carcinoma: the International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus (ISUP) conference recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trpkov, Kiril; Grignon, David J; Bonsib, Stephen M; Amin, Mahul B; Billis, Athanase; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Samaratunga, Hemamali; Tamboli, Pheroze; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Srigley, John R

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urologic Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference on renal cancer, through working group 3, focused on the issues of staging and specimen handling of renal tumors. The conference was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urologic Pathology members, and the results of this were used to inform the focus of conference discussion. On formal voting a ≥65% majority was considered a consensus agreement. For specimen handling it was agreed that with radical nephrectomy specimens the initial cut should be made along the long axis and that both radical and partial nephrectomy specimens should be inked. It was recommended that sampling of renal tumors should follow a general guideline of sampling 1 block/cm with a minimum of 3 blocks (subject to modification as needed in individual cases). When measuring a renal tumor, the length of a renal vein/caval thrombus should not be part of the measurement of the main tumor mass. In cases with multiple tumors, sampling should include at a minimum the 5 largest tumors. There was a consensus that perinephric fat invasion should be determined by examining multiple perpendicular sections of the tumor/perinephric fat interface and by sampling areas suspicious for invasion. Perinephric fat invasion was defined as either the tumor touching the fat or extending as irregular tongues into the perinephric tissue, with or without desmoplasia. It was agreed upon that renal sinus invasion is present when the tumor is in direct contact with the sinus fat or the loose connective tissue of the sinus, clearly beyond the renal parenchyma, or if there is involvement of any endothelium-lined spaces within the renal sinus, regardless of the size. When invasion of the renal sinus is uncertain, it was recommended that at least 3 blocks of the tumor-renal sinus interface should be submitted. If invasion is grossly evident, or obviously not present (small peripheral tumor), it was agreed that only 1 block was

  15. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-03-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers - the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production.

  16. Phospholipid imprinted polymers as selective endotoxin scavengers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulc, Robert; Szekely, Gyorgy; Shinde, Sudhirkumar; Wierzbicka, Celina; Vilela, Filipe; Bauer, David; Sellergren, Börje

    2017-01-01

    Herein we explore phospholipid imprinting as a means to design receptors for complex glycolipids comprising the toxic lipopolysaccharide endotoxin. A series of polymerizable bis-imidazolium and urea hosts were evaluated as cationic and neutral hosts for phosphates and phosphonates, the latter used as mimics of the phospholipid head groups. The bis-imidazolium hosts interacted with the guests in a cooperative manner leading to the presence of tight and well defined 1:2 ternary complexes. Optimized monomer combinations were subsequently used for imprinting of phosphatidic acid as an endotoxin dummy template. Presence of the aforementioned ternary complexes during polymerization resulted in imprinting of lipid dimers – the latter believed to crudely mimic the endotoxin Lipid A motif. The polymers were characterized with respect to template rebinding, binding affinity, capacity and common structural properties, leading to the identification of polymers which were thereafter subjected to an industrially validated endotoxin removal test. Two of the polymers were capable of removing endotoxin down to levels well below the accepted threshold (0.005 EU/mg API) in pharmaceutical production. PMID:28303896

  17. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (Fort Worth, Texas, October 22-24, 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2013-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the IADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2013), October 22-24, 2013, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), co-organized by The University of North Texas (UNT), sponsored by the…

  18. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on e-Learning (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, July 21-24, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Miguel Baptista, Ed.; McPherson, Maggie, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the International Conference e-Learning 2015, which was organised by the International Association for Development of the Information and Society and is part of the Multi Conference on Computer Science and Information Systems (Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain, July 21-24, 2015). The e-Learning 2015…

  19. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (13th, Mannheim, Germany, October 28-30, 2016)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2016-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 13th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2016), October 28-30, 2016, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), co-organized by the University of Mannheim, Germany, and endorsed by the…

  20. Proceedings of the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS) International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA) (12th, Maynooth, Greater Dublin, Ireland, October 24-26, 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Demetrios G., Ed.; Spector, J. Michael, Ed.; Ifenthaler, Dirk, Ed.; Isaias, Pedro, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    These proceedings contain the papers of the 12th International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA 2015), October 24-26, 2015, which has been organized by the International Association for Development of the Information Society (IADIS), co-organized by Maynooth University, Ireland, and endorsed by the…

  1. Government control over health-related not-for-profit organisations: Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Tim; Donohoo, Angus M; Faunce, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between government and the not-for-profit (NFP) sector has important implications for society, especially in relation to the delivery of public health measures and the protection of the environment. In key health-related areas such as provision of medical services, welfare, foreign aid and education, governments have traditionally preferred for the NFP sector to act as service partners, with the relationship mediated through grants or funding agreements. This service delivery arrangement is intended to provide a diversity of voices, and encourage volunteerism and altruism, in conjunction with the purposes and objectives of the relevant NGO. Under the pretence of "accountability", however, governments increasingly are seeking to impose intrusive conditions on grantees, which limit their ability to fulfil their mission and advocate on behalf of their constituents. This column examines the United States Supreme Court decision, Agency for International Development v Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013), and compares it to the removal of gag clauses in Australian federal funding rules. Recent national changes to the health-related NFP sector in Australia are then discussed, such as those found in the Charities Act 2013 (Cth) and the Not-for-Profit Sector Freedom to Advocate Act 2013 (Cth). These respectively include the establishment of the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profit Commission, the modernising of the definition of "charity" and statutory blocks on "gag" clauses. This analysis concludes with a survey of recent moves by Australian States to impose new restrictions on the ability of health-related NFPs to lobby against harmful government policy Among the responses considered is the protection afforded by s 51l(xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution. This constitutional guarantee appears to have been focused historically on preventing medical and dental practitioners and related small businesses being practically coerced

  2. A report of the 2000 and 2001 paternity testing workshops of the English speaking working group of the international society for forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallenberg, Charlotte; Morling, Niels

    2002-01-01

    During the last 10 years, the English Speaking Working Group (ESWG) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has once a year arranged a Paternity Testing Workshop in which blood samples as well as a questionnaire concerning laboratory strategies were distributed to the participat......During the last 10 years, the English Speaking Working Group (ESWG) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has once a year arranged a Paternity Testing Workshop in which blood samples as well as a questionnaire concerning laboratory strategies were distributed...

  3. Methodological recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder by the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Targeting Cognition Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, K W; Burdick, K E; Martinez-Aran, A; Bonnin, C M; Bowie, C R; Carvalho, A F; Gallagher, P; Lafer, B; López-Jaramillo, C; Sumiyoshi, T; McIntyre, R S; Schaffer, A; Porter, R J; Torres, I J; Yatham, L N; Young, A H; Kessing, L V; Vieta, E

    2017-09-12

    To aid the development of treatment for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to create a consensus-based guidance paper for the methodology and design of cognition trials in bipolar disorder. The task force was launched in September 2016, consisting of 18 international experts from nine countries. A series of methodological issues were identified based on literature review and expert opinion. The issues were discussed and expanded upon in an initial face-to-face meeting, telephone conference call and email exchanges. Based upon these exchanges, recommendations were achieved. Key methodological challenges are: lack of consensus on how to screen for entry into cognitive treatment trials, define cognitive impairment, track efficacy, assess functional implications, and manage mood symptoms and concomitant medication. Task force recommendations are to: (i) enrich trials with objectively measured cognitively impaired patients; (ii) generally select a broad cognitive composite score as the primary outcome and a functional measure as a key secondary outcome; and (iii) include remitted or partly remitted patients. It is strongly encouraged that trials exclude patients with current substance or alcohol use disorders, neurological disease or unstable medical illness, and keep non-study medications stable. Additional methodological considerations include neuroimaging assessments, targeting of treatments to illness stage and using a multimodal approach. This ISBD task force guidance paper provides the first consensus-based recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder. Adherence to these recommendations will likely improve the sensitivity in detecting treatment efficacy in future trials and increase comparability between studies. © 2017 The Authors Bipolar Disorders Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-12-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (LPS) were compared in both isolated rat Kupffer cells and elicited rat peritoneal cells. Both types of cells were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats fed a semisynthetic AIN-76 5% saturated-fat diet either by peritoneal lavage for peritoneal cells or by collagenase perfusion followed by purification on a 17.5% metrizamide gradient for Kupffer cells. Hot phenol water-extracted S. minnesota LPS was labeled with iodine by the chloramine-T method following a reaction with methyl-p-hydroxybenzimidate. The in vitro uptake of [125I]LPS by Kupffer cells was unsaturable up to concentrations of 33.33 micrograms/ml, while peritoneal cells became saturated at between 16.67 and 25 micrograms of LPS per ml. Uptake by both types of cells could be inhibited by a 10-fold excess of unlabeled LPS. Kinetic experiments demonstrated that Kupffer cells were unsaturable after 60 min of incubation, while peritoneal cells were saturable after 40 min of incubation. Pretreatment with 75 mM colchicine inhibited uptake by peritoneal cells but not Kupffer cells, while pretreatment with 12 mM 2-deoxyglucose inhibited uptake by Kupffer cells but not peritoneal cells. These results are consistent with a process of receptor-mediated endocytosis for peritoneal cells, while Kupffer cells may internalize endotoxins by absorptive pinocytosis. These results suggest that studies of peritoneal cell-endotoxin interactions do not accurately describe the physiologic process within the liver, the major site for the

  5. Evaluation of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis and institutional diagnostic criteria of disseminated intravascular coagulation in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundar, Esther P; Jariwala, Purviben; Nguyen, Trung C; Eldin, Karen W; Teruya, Jun

    2013-06-01

    Globally, adult intensive care units routinely use the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) scoring system for identifying overt disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). However, in our pediatric intensive care unit, a modified diagnostic criterion (Texas Children's Hospital [TCH] criteria) that requires serial monitoring of the coagulation variables is employed. A retrospective analysis of 2,136 DIC panels from 130 patients who had at least 4 DIC panels during 1 admission to a pediatric intensive care unit was done to compare the diagnostic utility of the TCH criteria with the ISTH scoring method in children. Both scoring systems were evaluated against the gold standard diagnostic method of autopsy confirmation of DIC in the subset of children who died. Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates that TCH diagnostic criteria are comparable to the ISTH scoring method (area under the curve of 0.878 for TCH and 0.950 for ISTH). On the contrary, TCH diagnostic criteria perform better, with a sensitivity significantly higher than the ISTH scoring method when tested against the gold standard (P coagulation parameters is recommended for improved sensitivity when applying ISTH criteria to pediatric populations.

  6. Heart rate turbulence: standards of measurement, physiological interpretation, and clinical use: International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrophysiology Consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Axel; Malik, Marek; Schmidt, Georg; Barthel, Petra; Bonnemeier, Hendrik; Cygankiewicz, Iwona; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Lombardi, Federico; Müller, Alexander; Oto, Ali; Schneider, Raphael; Watanabe, Mari; Wichterle, Dan; Zareba, Wojciech

    2008-10-21

    This consensus statement has been compiled on behalf of the International Society for Holter and Noninvasive Electrophysiology. It reviews the topic of heart rate turbulence (HRT) and concentrates on technologies for measurement, physiologic background and interpretation, and clinical use of HRT. It also lists suggestions for future research. The phenomenon of HRT refers to sinus rhythm cycle-length perturbations after isolated premature ventricular complexes. The physiologic pattern of HRT consists of brief heart rate acceleration (quantified by the so-called turbulence onset) followed by more gradual heart rate deceleration (quantified by the so-called turbulence slope) before the rate returns to a pre-ectopic level. Available physiologic investigations confirm that the initial heart rate acceleration is triggered by transient vagal inhibition in response to the missed baroreflex afferent input caused by hemodynamically inefficient ventricular contraction. A sympathetically mediated overshoot of arterial pressure is responsible for the subsequent heart rate deceleration through vagal recruitment. Hence, the HRT pattern is blunted in patients with reduced baroreflex. The HRT pattern is influenced by a number of factors, provocations, treatments, and pathologies reviewed in this consensus. As HRT measurement provides an indirect assessment of baroreflex, it is useful in those clinical situations that benefit from baroreflex evaluation. The HRT evaluation has thus been found appropriate in risk stratification after acute myocardial infarction, risk prediction, and monitoring of disease progression in heart failure, as well as in several other pathologies.

  7. Guidelines for the recording and evaluation of pharmaco-sleep studies in man: the International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Marc; Wilson, Frederick J; Roth, Thomas; Ruigt, Gé S F; Anderer, Peter; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M; Bes, Frederik W; Brunovsky, Martin; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Freeman, Jon; van Gerven, Joop M A; Gruber, Georg; Kemp, Bob; Klösch, Gerhard; Ma, Junshui; Penzel, Thomas; Peterson, Barry T; Schulz, Hartmut; Staner, Luc; Saletu, Bernd; Svetnik, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    The International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG) presents guidelines summarising the requirements for the recording and computerised evaluation of pharmaco-sleep data in man. Over the past years, technical and data-processing methods have advanced steadily, thus enhancing data quality and expanding the palette of sleep assessment tools that can be used to investigate the activity of drugs on the central nervous system (CNS), determine the time course of effects and pharmacodynamic properties of novel therapeutics, hence enabling the study of the pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic relationship, and evaluate the CNS penetration or toxicity of compounds. However, despite the presence of robust guidelines on the scoring of polysomnography -recordings, a review of the literature reveals inconsistent -aspects in the operating procedures from one study to another. While this fact does not invalidate results, the lack of standardisation constitutes a regrettable shortcoming, especially in the context of drug development programmes. The present guidelines are intended to assist investigators, who are using pharmaco-sleep measures in clinical research, in an effort to provide clear and concise recommendations and thereby to standardise methodology and facilitate comparability of data across laboratories. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Guidelines for the recording and evaluation of pharmaco-EEG data in man: the International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobert, Marc; Wilson, Frederick J; Ruigt, Gé S F; Brunovsky, Martin; Prichep, Leslie S; Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M

    2012-01-01

    The International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG) presents updated guidelines summarising the requirements for the recording and computerised evaluation of pharmaco-EEG data in man. Since the publication of the first pharmaco-EEG guidelines in 1982, technical and data processing methods have advanced steadily, thus enhancing data quality and expanding the palette of tools available to investigate the action of drugs on the central nervous system (CNS), determine the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of novel therapeutics and evaluate the CNS penetration or toxicity of compounds. However, a review of the literature reveals inconsistent operating procedures from one study to another. While this fact does not invalidate results per se, the lack of standardisation constitutes a regrettable shortcoming, especially in the context of drug development programmes. Moreover, this shortcoming hampers reliable comparisons between outcomes of studies from different laboratories and hence also prevents pooling of data which is a requirement for sufficiently powering the validation of novel analytical algorithms and EEG-based biomarkers. The present updated guidelines reflect the consensus of a global panel of EEG experts and are intended to assist investigators using pharmaco-EEG in clinical research, by providing clear and concise recommendations and thereby enabling standardisation of methodology and facilitating comparability of data across laboratories. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for renal cell carcinoma and other prognostic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, Brett; Cheville, John C; Martignoni, Guido; Humphrey, Peter A; Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; McKenney, Jesse; Egevad, Lars; Algaba, Ferran; Moch, Holger; Grignon, David J; Montironi, Rodolfo; Srigley, John R

    2013-10-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology 2012 Consensus Conference made recommendations regarding classification, prognostic factors, staging, and immunohistochemical and molecular assessment of adult renal tumors. Issues relating to prognostic factors were coordinated by a workgroup who identified tumor morphotype, sarcomatoid/rhabdoid differentiation, tumor necrosis, grading, and microvascular invasion as potential prognostic parameters. There was consensus that the main morphotypes of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) were of prognostic significance, that subtyping of papillary RCC (types 1 and 2) provided additional prognostic information, and that clear cell tubulopapillary RCC was associated with a more favorable outcome. For tumors showing sarcomatoid or rhabdoid differentiation, there was consensus that a minimum proportion of tumor was not required for diagnostic purposes. It was also agreed upon that the underlying subtype of carcinoma should be reported. For sarcomatoid carcinoma, it was further agreed upon that if the underlying carcinoma subtype was absent the tumor should be classified as a grade 4 unclassified carcinoma with a sarcomatoid component. Tumor necrosis was considered to have prognostic significance, with assessment based on macroscopic and microscopic examination of the tumor. It was recommended that for clear cell RCC the amount of necrosis should be quantified. There was consensus that nucleolar prominence defined grades 1 to 3 of clear cell and papillary RCCs, whereas extreme nuclear pleomorphism or sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation defined grade 4 tumors. It was agreed upon that chromophobe RCC should not be graded. There was consensus that microvascular invasion should not be included as a staging criterion for RCC.

  10. The impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) consensus on Gleason grading in contemporary practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zareba, Piotr; Zhang, Jianguo; Yilmaz, Asli; Trpkov, Kiril

    2009-10-01

    To investigate the impact of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Gleason grading consensus in contemporary practice. The Gleason scores (GS) were compared in two consecutive patient cohorts with matched biopsies and prostatectomies: (i) 908 patients evaluated before the ISUP consensus (July 2000-June 2004) and (ii) 423 patients evaluated after the ISUP consensus (October 2005-June 2007). All biopsies and prostatectomies were performed and scored in one institution and were sampled and processed identically. There was a higher percentage of biopsy and prostatectomy specimens with GS > or = 7 after the ISUP consensus (GS > or = 7 on biopsy in 32% before ISUP versus 46% after ISUP; GS > or = 7 on prostatectomy in 53% before ISUP versus 68% after ISUP; P ISUP consensus. There was a trend towards better complete agreement for GS > or = 7 after the ISUP consensus. There was a shift towards higher GS on biopsy and prostatectomy in our practice after the ISUP consensus, although - there was no significant impact on the biopsy-prostatectomy Gleason agreement. The significance of this shift for patient management and prognosis is uncertain.

  11. The prognostic significance of the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading system for prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Hemamali; Delahunt, Brett; Gianduzzo, Troy; Coughlin, Geoff; Duffy, David; LeFevre, Ian; Johannsen, Shulammite; Egevad, Lars; Yaxley, John

    2015-10-01

    The 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) modified Gleason grading system was further amended in 2014 with the establishment of grade groupings (ISUP grading). This study examined the predictive value of ISUP grading, comparing results with recognised prognostic parameters.Of 3700 men undergoing radical prostatectomy (RP) reported at Aquesta Pathology between 2008 and 2013, 2079 also had a positive needle biopsy available for review. We examined the association between needle biopsy 2014 ISUP grade and 2005 modified Gleason score, tumour volume, pathological stage of the subsequent RP tumour, as well as biochemical recurrence-free survival (BRFS). The median age was 62 (range 32-79 years). Median serum prostate specific antigen was 5.9 (range 0.4-69 ng/mL). For needle biopsies, 280 (13.5%), 1031 (49.6%), 366 (17.6%), 77 (3.7%) and 325 (15.6%) were 2014 ISUP grades 1-5, respectively. Needle biopsy 2014 ISUP grade showed a significant association with RP tumour volume (p ISUP grade >2 to be significantly associated with BRFS.This study provides evidence of the prognostic significance of ISUP grading for thin core needle biopsy of prostate.

  12. The 2015 International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD) Terminology of Vulvar Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Jacob; Bogliatto, Fabrizio; Haefner, Hope K; Stockdale, Colleen K; Preti, Mario; Bohl, Tanja G; Reutter, Jason

    2016-01-01

    The impact of terminology for vulvar intraepithelial lesions has been significant over the years, because it has affected diagnosis, treatment, and research. The introduction of the Lower Anogenital Squamous Terminology (LAST) in 2012 raised 2 concerns in relation to vulvar lesions: firstly, the absence of reference to "differentiated vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia" (differentiated VIN) could lead to its being overlooked by health care providers, despite its malignant potential. Secondly, including the term "low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion" (LSIL) in LAST recreated the potential for overdiagnosis and overtreatment for benign, self-limiting lesions. The International Society for the Study of Vulvovaginal Disease (ISSVD) assigned the terminology committee the task of developing a terminology to take these issues into consideration. The committee reviewed the development of terminology for vulvar SILs with the previous 2 concerns in mind and reviewed several new terminology options. The final version accepted by the ISSVD contains the following:•Low-grade SIL of the vulva or vulvar LSIL, encompassing flat condyloma or human papillomavirus effect.•High-grade SIL or vulvar HSIL (which was termed "vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia usual type" in the 2004 ISSVD terminology).•Vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia, differentiated type. The advantage of the new terminology is that it includes all types of vulvar SILs, it provides a solution to the concerns in relation to the application of LAST to vulvar lesion, and it is in accordance with the World Health Organization classification as well as the LAST, creating unity among clinicians and pathologists.

  13. Endotoxins in surgical instruments of hip arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vania Regina Goveia

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract OBJECTIVE To investigate endotoxins in sterilized surgical instruments used in hip arthroplasties. METHOD A descriptive exploratory study conducted in a public teaching hospital. Six types of surgical instruments were selected, namely: acetabulum rasp, femoral rasp, femoral head remover, chisel box, flexible bone reamer and femoral head test. The selection was based on the analysis of the difficulty in removing bone and blood residues during cleaning. The sample was made up of 60 surgical instruments, which were tested for endotoxins in three different stages. The EndosafeTM Gel-Clot LAL (Limulus Amebocyte Lysate method was used. RESULT There was consistent gel formation with positive analysis in eight instruments, corresponding to 13.3%, being four femoral rasps and four bone reamers. CONCLUSION Endotoxins in quantity ≥0.125 UE/mL were detected in 13.3% of the instruments tested.

  14. Face validity and reliability of the first digital assessment scheme of pelvic floor muscle function conform the new standardized terminology of the International Continence Society.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slieker-ten Hove, M.C.; Pool-Goudzwaard, A.; Eijkemans, M.J.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Burger, C.W.; Vierhout, M.E.

    2009-01-01

    AIMS: To test the face validity and reliability of a new digital pelvic floor muscle function (PFMF) assessment scheme that was designed on the basis of the recently standardized terminology of the International Continence Society. METHODS: Study participants comprised 41 women, age 18-85 years. Dat

  15. The Five E's: Ethnicity, Education, Economy, Equity, and Environment. Proceedings [of the] Annual Conference of the Global Awareness Society International (Chicago, Illinois, June 1994).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, James H., Ed.; And Others

    The 23 conference papers in this proceedings include: (1) "Global Awareness Society International: Retrospectives and Prospectives" (Chang Shub Roh); (2) "Technology Transfer in Developing Countries: The Case of Turkey (1989-1994)" (Huseyin Ates; Asim Sen); (3) "Indigenous People, Environmental Protection and Globalization" (Edward D. Barker); (4)…

  16. A report with consensus statements of the International Society of Nephrology 2004 Consensus Workshop on Prevention of Progression of Renal Disease, Hong Kong, June 29, 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirks, J; Lui, SL; Szeto, CC; Tang, S; Atkins, RC; Mitch, WE; Chow, KM; D'Amico, G; Freedman, BI; Harris, DC; Hooi, LS; de Jong, PE; Kincaid-Smith, P; Lai, KN; Lee, E; Li, FK; Lin, SY; Lo, WK; Mani, MK; Mathew, T; Murakami, M; Qian, JQ; Ramirez, S; Reiser, T; Tomino, Y; Tong, MK; Tsang, WK; Tungsanga, K; Wang, HY; Wong, AK; Wong, KM; Yang, WC; de Zeeuw, D; Yu, AW; Remuzzi, G; Weening, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes the discussions of the International Society of Nephrology (ISN) 2004 Consensus Workshop on Prevention of Progression of Renal Disease, which was held in Hong Kong on June 29, 2004. Three key areas were discussed during the workshop: (1) screening for chronic kidney disease; (

  17. Impact of the International Continence Society (ICS) report on the standardisation of terminology in nocturia on the quality of reports on nocturia and nocturnal polyuria : a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmeester, Ilse; Kollen, Boudewijn J.; Steffens, Martijn G.; Bosch, J. L. H. Ruud; Drake, Marcus J.; Weiss, Jeffrey P.; Blanker, Marco H.

    Objective To systematically review and evaluate the impact of the International Continence Society (ICS)-2002 report on standardisation of terminology in nocturia, on publications reporting on nocturia and nocturnal polyuria (NP). In 2002, the ICS defined NP as a Nocturnal Polyuria Index (nocturnal

  18. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, T.H. van der; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.; Delahunt, B.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporti

  19. The 34th Annual Fall Meeting of the American Physiological Society and the International Conference on Hydrogen Ion Transport in Epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Physiologist, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provided are abstracts of papers presented at the annual American Physiological Society meeting and International Conference on Hydrogen Ion Transport in Epithelia. Papers are grouped by such topic areas as lung fluid balance, renal cardiovascular integration, smooth muscle physiology, neuroendocrines (pituitary), exercise physiology, mechanics of…

  20. ISMIR 2010 Proceedings of the 11th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, August 9-13, 2010 Utrecht, Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Downie, J. Stephen; Veltkamp, Remco C.

    2010-01-01

    Welcome to the 11th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR 2010). ISMIR 2010 will be convened in Utrecht, Netherlands, 9-13 August 2010 and is jointly organised by Utrecht University, the Utrecht School of the Arts, the Meertens Institute and Philips Research. The

  1. The International Society for the Social Studies Annual Conference Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, February 26-27, 2015) Volume 2015, Issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William Benedict, III, Ed.

    2015-01-01

    The "International Society for the Social Studies (ISSS) Annual Conference Proceedings" is a peer-reviewed professional publication published once a year following the annual conference. The following papers are included in the 2015 proceedings: (1) Local History and Local Culture at the Core of Elementary Social Studies Curriculum (C.…

  2. The International Society for the Social Studies Annual Conference Proceedings (Orlando, Florida, February 27-28, 2014). Volume 2014, Issue 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, William Benedict, III, Ed.

    2014-01-01

    The "International Society for the Social Studies (ISSS) Annual Conference Proceedings" is a peer-reviewed professional publication published once a year following the annual conference. The following papers are included in the 2014 proceedings: (1) Legal Profession in the Technological Era with Special Reference to Women Lawyers in…

  3. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG): an update of the recommendations on the use of Y-STRs in forensic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusmão, L; Butler, J M; Carracedo, A

    2006-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y-chromosome po...

  4. Urotherapy in children: quantitative measurements of daytime urinary incontinence before and after treatment according to the new definitions of the International Children's Continence Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulders, M.M.; Cobussen-Boekhorst, H.; Gier, R.P. de; Feitz, W.F.J.; Kortmann, B.B.M.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the effectiveness of urotherapy in children with lower urinary tract dysfunction, according to the new definitions of the International Children's Continence Society. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of 122 children (aged 8.8 +/- 2.0 years) treated in an

  5. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwast, T.H. van der; Amin, M.B.; Billis, A.; Epstein, J.I.; Griffiths, D.; Humphrey, P.A.; Montironi, R.; Wheeler, T.M.; Srigley, J.R.; Egevad, L.; Delahunt, B.; Hulsbergen- van de Kaa, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporti

  6. Revisioning Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICT4D) at the Comparative & International Education Society (CIES): A Five-Year Account (2009-2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Haijun

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an account of how Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has evolved as a key topic and research area at the Comparative and International Education Society (CIES) conference. The past five years' CIES conference papers with an ICT component are reviewed for common development trends, opportunities,…

  7. ISMIR 2010 Proceedings of the 11th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference, August 9-13, 2010 Utrecht, Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Downie, J. Stephen; Veltkamp, Remco C.

    2010-01-01

    Welcome to the 11th International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR 2010). ISMIR 2010 will be convened in Utrecht, Netherlands, 9-13 August 2010 and is jointly organised by Utrecht University, the Utrecht School of the Arts, the Meertens Institute and Philips Research. The or

  8. Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health (ISSWSH) Expert Consensus Panel Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Irwin; Kim, Noel N; Clayton, Anita H; DeRogatis, Leonard R; Giraldi, Annamaria; Parish, Sharon J; Pfaus, James; Simon, James A; Kingsberg, Sheryl A; Meston, Cindy; Stahl, Stephen M; Wallen, Kim; Worsley, Roisin

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the International Society for the Study of Women's Sexual Health expert consensus panel was to develop a concise, clinically relevant, evidence-based review of the epidemiology, physiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD), a sexual dysfunction affecting approximately 10% of adult women. Etiologic factors include conditions or drugs that decrease brain dopamine, melanocortin, oxytocin, and norepinephrine levels and augment brain serotonin, endocannabinoid, prolactin, and opioid levels. Symptoms include lack or loss of motivation to participate in sexual activity due to absent or decreased spontaneous desire, sexual desire in response to erotic cues or stimulation, or ability to maintain desire or interest through sexual activity for at least 6 months, with accompanying distress. Treatment follows a biopsychosocial model and is guided by history and assessment of symptoms. Sex therapy has been the standard treatment, although there is a paucity of studies assessing efficacy, except for mindfulness-based cognitive behavior therapy. Bupropion and buspirone may be considered off-label treatments for HSDD, despite limited safety and efficacy data. Menopausal women with HSDD may benefit from off-label testosterone treatment, as evidenced by multiple clinical trials reporting some efficacy and short-term safety. Currently, flibanserin is the only Food and Drug Administration-approved medication to treat premenopausal women with generalized acquired HSDD. Based on existing data, we hypothesize that all these therapies alter central inhibitory and excitatory pathways. In conclusion, HSDD significantly affects quality of life in women and can effectively be managed by health care providers with appropriate assessments and individualized treatments.

  9. External Factors That Influence the Practice of Radiology: Proceedings of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Geoffrey D; McNeil, Barbara J; Palkó, András; Thrall, James H; Krestin, Gabriel P; Muellner, Ada; Kressel, Herbert Y

    2017-06-01

    In both the United States and Europe, efforts to reduce soaring health care costs have led to intense scrutiny of both standard and innovative uses of imaging. Given that the United States spends a larger share of its gross domestic product on health care than any other nation and also has the most varied health care financing and delivery systems in the world, it has become an especially fertile environment for developing and testing approaches to controlling health care costs and value. This report focuses on recent reforms that have had a dampening effect on imaging use in the United States and provides a glimpse of obstacles that imaging practices may soon face or are already facing in other countries. On the basis of material presented at the 2015 meeting of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology, this report outlines the effects of reforms aimed at (a) controlling imaging use, (b) controlling payer expense through changes in benefit design, and (c) controlling both costs and quality through "value-based" payment schemes. Reasons are considered for radiology practices on both sides of the Atlantic about why the emphasis needs to shift from providing a large volume of imaging services to increasing the value of imaging as manifested in clinical outcomes, patient satisfaction, and overall system savings. Options for facilitating the shift from volume to value are discussed, from the use of advanced management strategies that improve workflow to the creation of programs for patient engagement, the development of new clinical decision-making support tools, and the validation of clinically relevant imaging biomarkers. Radiologists in collaboration with industry must enhance their efforts to expand the performance of comparative effectiveness research to establish the value of these initiatives, while being mindful of the importance of minimizing conflicts of interest. (©) RSNA, 2017.

  10. International Society of Sports Nutrition position stand: safety and efficacy of creatine supplementation in exercise, sport, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Richard B; Kalman, Douglas S; Antonio, Jose; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Wildman, Robert; Collins, Rick; Candow, Darren G; Kleiner, Susan M; Almada, Anthony L; Lopez, Hector L

    2017-01-01

    Creatine is one of the most popular nutritional ergogenic aids for athletes. Studies have consistently shown that creatine supplementation increases intramuscular creatine concentrations which may help explain the observed improvements in high intensity exercise performance leading to greater training adaptations. In addition to athletic and exercise improvement, research has shown that creatine supplementation may enhance post-exercise recovery, injury prevention, thermoregulation, rehabilitation, and concussion and/or spinal cord neuroprotection. Additionally, a number of clinical applications of creatine supplementation have been studied involving neurodegenerative diseases (e.g., muscular dystrophy, Parkinson's, Huntington's disease), diabetes, osteoarthritis, fibromyalgia, aging, brain and heart ischemia, adolescent depression, and pregnancy. These studies provide a large body of evidence that creatine can not only improve exercise performance, but can play a role in preventing and/or reducing the severity of injury, enhancing rehabilitation from injuries, and helping athletes tolerate heavy training loads. Additionally, researchers have identified a number of potentially beneficial clinical uses of creatine supplementation. These studies show that short and long-term supplementation (up to 30 g/day for 5 years) is safe and well-tolerated in healthy individuals and in a number of patient populations ranging from infants to the elderly. Moreover, significant health benefits may be provided by ensuring habitual low dietary creatine ingestion (e.g., 3 g/day) throughout the lifespan. The purpose of this review is to provide an update to the current literature regarding the role and safety of creatine supplementation in exercise, sport, and medicine and to update the position stand of International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN).

  11. Hearts transplanted after circulatory death in children: Analysis of the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinmahon, Jake A; Patel, Sonali S; Auerbach, Scott R; Rossano, Joseph; Everitt, Melanie D

    2017-09-21

    We aimed to describe worldwide DCD HT experience in children using the International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation Registry. The Registry was queried for primary HT performed in children (2005-2014). Kaplan-Meier analysis was used to assess survival for recipients grouped by DCD or DBD hearts. Recipient characteristics were compared between DCD and DBD and between survivors and non-survivors of DCD HT. Among 3877 pediatric HT performed, 21 (0.5%) were DCD. DCD 1-year survival was 61% vs 91% DBD, P < .01. DCD recipients were more often supported by ECMO pre-HT (24% vs 6%, P < .001) and more often receiving inhaled nitric oxide (10% vs 0.6%, P < .001) compared to DBD. Older DCD recipients had significantly lower 1-year survival of 57% vs 93% for DBD, P < .01. Survival for infant DCD recipients was not statistically different to DBD recipients (survival 62% at 1 year and 62% at 5 years for DCD vs 85% at 1 year and 77% at 5 years for DBD, P = .15). Recipients of DCD HT who died were more often supported by ECMO pre-HT (56% non-survivors vs 0% survivors, P = .004) and receiving mechanical ventilation (44% vs 0%, P = .012). DCD HT is uncommon in children. DCD-independent factors in recipients may have contributed to worse survival as DCD recipients who died were more often supported by ECMO and mechanical ventilation. More research is needed to identify donor factors and recipient factors that contribute to mortality after DCD HT. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [Vancouver classification of renal tumors: Recommendations of the 2012 consensus conference of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, G; Delahunt, B; Srigley, J R; Lüders, C; Lunkenheimer, J-M; Gevensleben, H; Thiesler, T; Montironi, R; Egevad, L

    2015-05-01

    The 2012 consensus conference of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) has formulated recommendations on classification, prognostic factors and staging as well as immunohistochemistry and molecular pathology of renal tumors. Agreement was reached on the recognition of five new tumor entities: tubulocystic renal cell carcinoma (RCC), acquired cystic kidney disease-associated RCC, clear cell (tubulo) papillary RCC, microphthalmia transcription factor family RCC, in particular t(6;11) RCC and hereditary leiomyomatosis-associated RCC. In addition three rare forms of carcinoma were considered as emerging or provisional entities: thyroid-like follicular RCC, succinate dehydrogenase B deficiency-associated RCC and anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) translocation RCC. In the new ISUP Vancouver classification, modifications to the existing 2004 World Health Organization (WHO) specifications are also suggested. Tumor morphology, a differentiation between sarcomatoid and rhabdoid and tumor necrosis were emphasized as being significant prognostic parameters for RCC. The consensus ISUP grading system assigns clear cell and papillary RCCs to grades 1-3 due to nucleolar prominence and grade 4 is reserved for cases with extreme nuclear pleomorphism, sarcomatoid and/or rhabdoid differentiation. Furthermore, consensus guidelines were established for the preparation of samples. For example, agreement was also reached that renal sinus invasion is diagnosed when the tumor is in direct contact with the fatty tissue or loose connective tissue of the sinus (intrarenal peripelvic fat) or when endothelialized cavities within the renal sinus are invaded by the tumor, independent of the size. The importance of biomarkers for the diagnostics or prognosis of renal tumors was also emphasized and marker profiles were formulated for use in specific differential diagnostics.

  13. The International Society of Hypertension and World Hypertension League call on governments, nongovernmental organizations and the food industry to work to reduce dietary sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norman R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Chockalingam, Arun; Lisheng, Liu; Harrap, Stephen B; Touyz, Rhian M; Burrell, Louise M; Ramírez, Agustín J; Schmieder, Roland E; Schutte, Aletta E; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    The International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League have developed a policy statement calling for reducing dietary salt. The policy supports the WHO and the United Nations recommendations, which are based on a comprehensive and up-to-date review of relevant research. The policy statement calls for broad societal action to reduce dietary salt, thus reducing blood pressure and preventing hypertension and its related burden of cardiovascular disease. The hypertension organizations and experts need to become more engaged in the efforts to prevent hypertension and to advocate strongly to have dietary salt reduction policies implemented. The statement is being circulated to national hypertension organizations and to international nongovernmental health organizations for consideration of endorsement. Member organizations of the International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League are urged to support this effort.

  14. International Migration, US Immigration Law and Civil Society: From the Pre-Colonial Era to the 113th Congress (Edited by Leonir Mario Chiarello and Donald Kerwin, Scalabrini International Migration Network, 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breana George

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available International Migration, US Immigration Law and Civil Society: From the Pre-Colonial Era to the 113th Congress, published by the Scalabrini International Migration Network in collaboration with the Center for Migration Studies of New York, offers an overview of immigration law and policy that contextualizes the present challenges in reaching policy consensus in the immigration debate. This book review highlights the debate on executive action in relation to a chapter on the evolution of US immigration laws by Charles Wheeler and a chapter on the role of civil society in immigration policymaking by Sara Campos. 

  15. Detecting endotoxin with a flow cytometry-based magnetic aptasensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Ming-Yan; Chen, Li-Juan; Jiang, Hao; Tan, Lin; Luo, Zhao-Feng; Wang, Yan-Mei

    2014-12-01

    Endotoxin, which is also known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), is a marker for intruding gram-negative pathogens. It is essential to detect endotoxin quickly and sensitively in a complex milieu. A new flow cytometry (FCM)-based magnetic aptasensor assay that employs two endotoxin-binding aptamers and magnetic beads has been developed to detect endotoxin. The endotoxin-conjugated sandwich complex on magnetic beads was observed by scanning confocal laser microscopy. The resulting magnetic aptasensor rapidly detected (endotoxin within a broad dynamic detection range of 10(-8) to 10(0)mg/ml in the presence of bovine serum albumin (BSA), RNA, sucrose, and glucose, which are most likely to coexist with endotoxin in the majority of biological liquids. Only 2 μl of magnetic aptasensor was required to quantify the endotoxin solution. Furthermore, the magnetic aptasensor could be regenerated seven times and still presented an outstanding response to the endotoxin solution. Therefore, the magnetic aptasensor exhibited high sensitivity, selectivity, and reproducibility, thereby serving as a powerful tool for the quality control and high-throughput detection of endotoxin in the food and pharmaceutical industries.

  16. Airborne endotoxin in fine particulate matter in Beijing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Tianjia; Yao, Maosheng; Wang, Junxia; Fang, Yanhua; Hu, Songhe; Wang, Yan; Dutta, Anindita; Yang, Junnan; Wu, Yusheng; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong

    2014-11-01

    Endotoxin is an important biological component of particulate matter (PM) which, upon inhalation, can induce adverse health effects, and also possibly complicate the diseases in combination with other pollutants. From 1 March 2012 to 27 February 2013 we collected air samples using quartz filters daily for the quantification of airborne endotoxin and also fine PM (PM2.5) in Beijing, China. The geometric means for endotoxin concentration and the fraction of endotoxin in PM were 0.65 EU/m3 (range: 0.10-75.02) and 10.25 EU/mg PM2.5 (range: 0.38-1627.29), respectively. The endotoxin concentrations were shown to vary greatly with seasons, typically with high values in the spring and winter seasons. Temperature and relative humidity, as well as concentrations of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides were found to be significantly correlated with airborne endotoxin concentrations (p endotoxin concentrations and natural sources of Na+, K+, Mg2+, and F-, while negative correlations were observed between endotoxin concentrations and anthropogenic sources of P, Co, Zn, As, and Tl. Oxidative potential analysis revealed that endotoxin concentrations were positively correlated with reactive oxygen species (ROS), but not dithiothreitol (DTT) of PM. This study provided the first continuous time series of airborne endotoxin concentrations in Beijing, and identifies its potential associations with atmospheric factors. The information developed here can assist in the assessment of health effects of air pollution in Beijing.

  17. Prospective Evaluation of PI-RADS™ Version 2 Using the International Society of Urological Pathology Prostate Cancer Grade Group System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehralivand, Sherif; Bednarova, Sandra; Shih, Joanna H; Mertan, Francesca V; Gaur, Sonia; Merino, Maria J; Wood, Bradford J; Pinto, Peter A; Choyke, Peter L; Turkbey, Baris

    2017-09-01

    The PI-RADS™ (Prostate Imaging Reporting and Data System), version 2 scoring system, introduced in 2015, is based on expert consensus. In the same time frame ISUP (International Society of Urological Pathology) introduced a new pathological scoring system for prostate cancer. Our goal was to prospectively evaluate the cancer detection rates for each PI-RADS, version 2 category and compare them to ISUP group scores in patients undergoing systematic biopsy and magnetic resonance imaging-transrectal ultrasound fusion guided biopsy. A total of 339 treatment naïve patients prospectively underwent multiparametric magnetic resonance imaging evaluated with PI-RADS, version 2 with subsequent systematic and fusion guided biopsy from May 2015 to May 2016. ISUP scores were applied to pathological specimens. An ISUP score of 2 or greater (ie Gleason 3 + 4 or greater) was defined as clinically significant prostate cancer. Cancer detection rates were determined for each PI-RADS, version 2 category as well as for the T2 weighted PI-RADS, version 2 categories in the peripheral zone. The cancer detection rate for PI-RADS, version 2 categories 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 was 25%, 20.2%, 24.8%, 39.1% and 86.9% for all prostate cancer, and 0%, 9.6%, 12%, 22.1% and 72.4% for clinically significant prostate cancer, respectively. On T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging the cancer detection rate in the peripheral zone was significantly higher for PI-RADS, version 2 category 4 than for overall PI-RADS, version 2 category 4 in the peripheral zone (all prostate cancer 36.6% vs 48.1%, p = 0.001, and clinically significant prostate cancer 22.9% vs 32.6%, p = 0.002). The cancer detection rate increases with higher PI-RADS, version 2 categories. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplant, European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network and International Myeloma Working Group Consensus Conference on Salvage Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Relapsed Multiple

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giralt, S; Garderet, L; Durie, B

    2015-01-01

    not been extensively studied in MM patients relapsing after primary therapy. The International Myeloma Working Group together with the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network, the American Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation...... convened a meeting of MM experts to: (1) summarize current knowledge regarding the role of autologous or allogeneic HCT in MM patients progressing after primary therapy, (2) propose guidelines for the use of salvage HCT in MM, (3) identify knowledge gaps, (4) propose a research agenda, and (5) develop...... autologous HCT in patients with MM relapsing after primary therapy comparing it to "best non-HCT" therapy. The expert committee also underscored the importance of collecting enough hematopoietic stem cells to perform 2 transplantations early in the course of the disease. Regarding allogeneic HCT, the expert...

  19. Applicability of bacterial endotoxins test to various blood products by the use of endotoxin-specific lysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochiai, Masaki; Yamamoto, Akihiko; Naito, Seishiro; Maeyama, Jun-Ichi; Masumi, Atsuko; Hamaguchi, Isao; Horiuchi, Yoshinobu; Yamaguchi, Kazunari

    2010-11-01

    Endotoxin contamination is a serious threat to the safety of parenteral drugs, and the rabbit pyrogen test has played a crucial role in controlling this contamination. Although the highly sensitive endotoxin test has replaced the pyrogen test for various pharmaceuticals, the pyrogen test is still implemented as the control test for most blood products in Japan. We examined the applicability of the endotoxin test to blood products for reliable detection and quantification of endotoxin. Nineteen types of blood products were tested for interfering factors based on spike/recovery of endotoxin by using 2 types of endotoxin-specific lysate reagents for photometric techniques. Interfering effects on the endotoxin test by the products could be eliminated by diluting from 1/2 to 1/16, with the exception of antithrombin III. However, conventional lysate reagents that also react with non-pyrogenic substances, such as (1-3)-β-D-glucan, produced results that were not relevant to endotoxin content or pyrogenicity. Our results showed that the endotoxin test would be applicable to most blood products if used with appropriate endotoxin-specific lysate reagents.

  20. Geographical variation and the determinants of domestic endotoxin levels in mattress dust in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.M.; Thiering, E.; Doekes, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070079803; Zock, J.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/095184309; Bakolis, I.; Norbäck, D.; Sunyer, J.; Villani, S.; Verlato, G.; Täubel, M.; Jarvis, D.

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxin exposures have manifold effects on human health. The geographical variation and determinants of domestic endotoxin levels in Europe have not yet been extensively described. To investigate the geographical variation and determinants of domestic endotoxin concentrations in mattress dust in

  1. Surface endotoxin contamination and hemocompatibility evaluation of materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Manfred F; Teichmann, Juliane; Sperling, Claudia; Werner, Carsten

    2009-07-01

    To evaluate the blood compatibility of new materials, a clear distinction between properties of the materials and effects due to surface contamination by adsorbed endotoxins is essential. This study compares direct contact approaches and elution methods with water, organic solvents, nonionic, and zwitterionic detergents for determination of surface-adsorbed endotoxin by the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test and determines the blood compatibility of various surfaces with controlled endotoxin contamination in vitro. The LAL test in direct contact with an endotoxin-contaminated surface was concluded to be not practicable for most devices and its sensitivity showed a high dependence on surface characteristics. Among the elution methods, 0.2% Tween-20 showed most stable elution characteristics and appears therefore preferable. Biological reactions at in vitro blood exposure were found to be only minimally influenced by adsorbed endotoxin during the time window of 2 h, allowing for a straightforward discrimination between materials and endotoxin-dependent reactions.

  2. ROLE OF ENDOGENOUS CARBON MONOXIDE IN ENDOTOXIN SHOCK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To study the role of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in endotoxin shock. Methods. The changes of CO levels and the effects of zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP),an inhibitor of heme-oxygenase (HO), in endotoxin shock and the efficacy of hemin,an inducer of HO were investigated.Results. The plasma CO levels were found to be significantly increased during the course of endotoxin shock. Injection of ZnPP was shown to abrogate the endotoxin-induced hypotension and metabolic derangements markedly. Administration of hemin to healthy rabbits revealed the hypotension and metabolic derangements similar to the animals given endotoxin.Conclusion.CO is a newly found endogenously produced mediator which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of endotoxin shock.

  3. ROLE OF ENDOGENOUS CARBON MONOXIDE IN ENDOTOXIN SHOCK

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史源; 李华强; 潘捷; 覃世文; 潘凤; 蒋东波; 沈际皋

    2000-01-01

    Objective. To study the role of endogenous carbon monoxide (CO) in endotoxin shock. Methods. The changes of CO levels and the effects of zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an inhibitor of hemeoxygenase (HO), in endotoxin shock and the efficacy of heroin, an inducer of HO were investigated. Results. The plasma CO levels were found to be significantly increased during the comse of endotoxin shock. Injection of ZnPP was shown to abrogate the endotoxin-induced hypotension and metabolic derangements markedly. Administration of hemin to healthy rabbits revealed the hypotension and metabolic derangements similar to the animsls given endotoxin. Conclusion. CO is a newly found endogenously produced mediator which may play an important role in the pathogenesis of endotoxin shock.

  4. Partnership of the Sociedade Brasileira de Oncologia Pediátrica and International Society of Pediatric Oncology to improve nutritional care for children with cancer in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viani, Karina; Filho, Vicente Odone; Ferman, Sima; Fonseca, Teresa Cristina Cardoso; Oliveira, Vanessa da Cunha; Lemos, Priscila Dos Santos Maia; Barr, Ronald D; Ladas, Elena J

    The authors present a proposal of a partnership between the Sociedade Brasileira de Oncologia Pediátrica (SOBOPE) and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) to promote the standardization and improvement of nutritional care of kids under cancer treatment in Brazil. The results of the first meeting in Brazil as well as plans for future meetings are described. Copyright © 2017 Associação Brasileira de Hematologia, Hemoterapia e Terapia Celular. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Patients with sudden onset headache not meeting the criteria of the International Headache Society for new daily persistent headache. How to classify them?

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Hélio Monzillo; Patrícia Homsi Nemoto

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of the records of 1348 patients regularly treated at the headache clinic of Department of Neurology of Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil. Sixty-two patients reported history of daily and persistent headache. From the 62 patients selected, only 21 (group 1) could be diagnosed with new daily-persistent headache (NDPH) according to the International Headache Society (HIS) 2004 criteria. The 41 remaining patients (group 2) could not be diagnosed with NDPH accor...

  6. Renewal through Participation in Global Food Security Governance: Implementing the International Food Security and Nutrition Civil Society Mechanism to the Committee on World Food Security

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    The food commodity price rises from 2006 to 2008 engendered a period of political renewal and reform in the governance of global food security. The Committee on World Food Security (CFS) was designated as the main international forum dealing with food security and nutrition in 2009 as part of this reform. Through the CFS reform process, civil society organizations secured the right to co-ordinate autonomously their engagement in the Committee as official participants and are doing so through ...

  7. Are Cockroaches an Important Source of Indoor Endotoxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ka Man

    2017-01-18

    Endotoxins are common indoor biocontaminants. Their levels have been shown to link to many sources and factors. One of them is cockroach infestation but the role of cockroaches and contamination mechanisms are unclear. We hypothesized that not only is cockroach infestation a sign of poor hygiene, but it also contributes to indoor endotoxins via fecal contamination. In this study, different cockroach species were caught in homes. The endotoxin and allergen levels and their ratios in cockroach feces were determined. To estimate the amount of indoor endotoxins that originated from cockroaches, a new approach of using these new cockroach endotoxin and allergen ratios to compare with environmental data was employed. We found that Supella (S.) longipalpa, Periplaneta (P.) australasiae, and Blattella (B.) germanica were dominant in homes. On average, P. australasiae feces had a higher level but greater variation of endotoxins. B. germanica feces had the highest levels of allergens measured. Depending on environmental bacterial load and the type of cockroaches present, cockroach endotoxins in the environment may vary greatly. Cockroaches directly contribute to indoor endotoxins rather than just being a sign of poor hygiene. The type and extent of cockroach infestation should be taken into consideration when assessing and remediating indoor endotoxin contamination.

  8. Endotoxin and cytokines in patients with gastrointestinal tract perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Endo

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available Plasma levels of endotoxin and various cytokines were assessed in 70 patients with gastrointestinal tract perforation. Sepsis developed in 29 of them, and eight of these (27.6% had on admission endotoxin levels higher than 9.8 pg ml-1. The clinical outcome correlated with the level of tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα, rather than with the endotoxin level. The high interleukin 6 (IL-6 level was shown in septic patients and no correlation was observed between the IL-6 level and the clinical outcome. Plasma TNFα levels tended to change independently from endotoxin levels, suggesting that TNFα may have been locally produced in inflammatory lesions.

  9. Fluorescent nanodiamonds as highly stable biomarker for endotoxin verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Thorsten; Burg, Jan Michael; Lilholt, Maria; Maeder, Ulf; Beer, Sebastian; Salzig, Denise; Ebrahimi, Mehrdad; Czermak, Peter; Fiebich, Martin

    2012-03-01

    Fluorescent nanodiamonds (ND) provide advantageous properties as a fluorescent biomarker for in vitro and in vivo studies. The maximum fluorescence occurs around 700 nm, they do not show photobleaching or blinking and seem to be nontoxic. After a pretreatment with strong acid fluorescent ND can be functionalized and coupled to endotoxin. Endotoxin is a decay product of bacteria and causes strong immune reactions. Therefore endotoxin has to be removed for most applications. An effective removal procedure is membrane filtration. The endotoxin, coupled to fluorescent ND can be visualized by using confocal microscopy which allows the investigation of the separation mechanisms of the filtration process within the membranes.

  10. Endotoxin and cancer chemo-prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrangelo, Giuseppe; Fadda, Emanuela; Cegolon, Luca

    2013-10-01

    Reduced rates of lung cancer have been observed in several occupational groups exposed to high levels of organic dusts contaminated by endotoxin. The underlying anti-neoplastic mechanism of endotoxin may be an increased secretion of endogenous anti-neoplastic mediators and activation of the toll-like receptors (TLR). A detoxified endotoxin derivative, Monophosphoryl Lipid A (MPL(®)) is marketed in Europe since 1999 as part of the adjuvant systems in allergy vaccines for treatment of allergic rhino-conjunctivitis and allergic asthma. Over 200,000 patients have used them to date (nearly 70% in Germany). Since detailed exposure (MPL(®) dose and timing of administration) and individual data are potentially available, an observational follow-up study could be conducted in Germany to investigate the protective effect of MPL(®) against cancer, comparing cancer incidence in two groups of patients with allergic rhinitis: those treated with allergoids plus MPL(®) and those treated with a vaccine including the same allergoids but not MPL(®). The protective effect of MPL(®) could be quantified in ever and never smokers. If this proposed observational study provides evidence of protective effects, MPL(®) could be immediately used as a chemo-preventive agent since it is already in use as adjuvant in human vaccines against cancer.

  11. Acculturation, quality of life and work environment of international nurses in a multi-cultural society: A cross-sectional, correlational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Yong-Shian; Lopez, Violeta

    2016-05-01

    The aim is to examine the acculturation level of international nurses working in a multi-cultural society. The relationship between acculturation, working environment and quality of life of international nurses was also explored. A cross-sectional, correlational study using self-report questionnaire was conducted on 814 international nurses using stratified random sampling based on the nationality distribution of international nurses registered with the Singapore Nursing Board. Outcome measures included World Health Organisation Quality of Life-BREF (WHOQOL_BREF) and Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index-Revised (PES-NWI-R). Data were collected from June to December 2012. There were variations in the acculturation level among different nationality groups of international nurses. Acculturation levels were the lowest among Mainland Chinese international nurses (M=27.47, SD 5.23). A positive correlation was found between acculturation and quality of life whereas a lower perception of work environment was associated with lower acculturation level. Data obtained from this study can be utilized to develop interventions targeted at the unique needs of the international nurses as they migrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: An international Delphi consensus process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagnon, A.J.; DeBruyn, R.; Essén, B.; Gissler, M.; Heaman, M.; Jeambey, Z.; Korfker, D.; McCourt, C.; Roth, C.; Zeitlin, J.; Small, R.; Alexander, S.; Racapé, J.; Arntzen, A.; Barros, H.; Blondel, B.; Merry, L.; Glazier, R.; Kirby, R.; Mohangoo, A.; Macfarlane, A.; Dattani, N.; Nybo Andersen, A.M.; Mortensen, L.; Villadsen, S.; Davey, M.A.; Sievers, E.; Stray-Pedersen, B.; Urquia, M.; Janevic, T.; Guendelman, S.; Bolumar, F.; Río Sánchez, M.I.; Hjern, A.; Vangen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital

  13. 20th International Symposium on Shiftwork and Working Time: Biological Mechanisms, Recovery, and Risk Management in the 24-h Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kecklund, L.G.; Milia, L. Di; Axelsson, J.; Lowden, A.; Äkerstedt, T.

    2012-01-01

    This dedicated issue of Chronobiology International is devoted to the selected proceedings of the 20th International Symposium on Shift Work and Working Time held in Stockholm, Sweden, 28 June to 1 July 2011. It constitutes the fifth such issue of the journal since 2004 dedicated to the selected pro

  14. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: An international Delphi consensus process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gagnon, A.J.; DeBruyn, R.; Essén, B.; Gissler, M.; Heaman, M.; Jeambey, Z.; Korfker, D.; McCourt, C.; Roth, C.; Zeitlin, J.; Small, R.; Alexander, S.; Racapé, J.; Arntzen, A.; Barros, H.; Blondel, B.; Merry, L.; Glazier, R.; Kirby, R.; Mohangoo, A.; Macfarlane, A.; Dattani, N.; Nybo Andersen, A.M.; Mortensen, L.; Villadsen, S.; Davey, M.A.; Sievers, E.; Stray-Pedersen, B.; Urquia, M.; Janevic, T.; Guendelman, S.; Bolumar, F.; Río Sánchez, M.I.; Hjern, A.; Vangen, S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, 'Health of Migrants', the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital

  15. Erratum to: An International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) / International Continence Society (ICS) joint report on the terminology for female pelvic organ prolapse (POP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haylen, Bernard T.; Maher, Christopher F.; Barber, Matthew D.; Camargo, Sérgio; Dandolu, Vani; Digesu, Alex; Goldman, Howard B.; Huser, Martin; Milani, Alfredo L.; Moran, Paul A.; Schaer, Gabriel N.; Withagen, Mariëlla I J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The terminology for female pelvic floor prolapse (POP) should be defined and organized in a clinically-based consensus Report. Methods: This Report combines the input of members of two International Organizations, the International Urogynecological Association (IUGA) and the Internatio

  16. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  17. American Society of Neuroradiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ASNR American Society of Neuroradiology Forgot username or password ? .: International Day Of Radiology :. Tues, Nov 8 is International Day of Radiology. ... you celebrate, #neurorad? #IDoR2016 Once again, the European Society of Radiology has created a wonderful ... Tues, Nov ...

  18. World Congresses of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine 2013-2015: the way forward - from Beijing to Berlin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutenbrunner, Christoph; Fialka-Moser, Veronika; Li, Leonard S W; Paternostro-Sluga, Tatjana; Stucki, Gerold; Nugraha, Boya; Guzman, Juan Manuel; Imamura, Marta; Battistella, Linamara Rizzo; Li, Jianan

    2014-09-01

    Scientific congresses are an important tool to support communication among scientists, enabling exchange of knowledge and discussion of research results. They can also provide specialist education and allow a forum in which to develop the goals and policies of scientific societies. The World Congresses of the International Society of Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine (ISPRM) aims at continuous improvement of congress quality. The programme development aims are: to operate at the highest possible scientific level; to guarantee continuous communication within the main areas of science in the field; and to invite experts to present topics of recent interest. The first section, the basic programme, largely comprises original papers selected from submitted abstracts. The second section covers topics of recent interest in more depth. Other sessions include recent topics arising from the ISPRM-World Health Organization (ISPRM-WHO) liaison, collaborative sessions with other societies, including national societies special interest sessions and ISPRM partners, and sessions organized by young scientists and students. These aims and programme guide the organizers of the 9th World Congress, which will be held on 19-23 June 2015 in Berlin. The concepts described here will be developed further for use in future ISPRM World Congresses.

  19. Detection of Bacteroides fragilis endotoxin in amniotic fluid by counterimmunoelectrophoresis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Beckmann (Ilse); K. de Graaff (K.); F. Meisel-Mikolajczyk; H.C.S. Wallenburg (Henk)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe ability of counter immunoelectrophoresis (CIE) to detectBacteroides fragilis endotoxin in amniotic fluid in small concentrations was evaluated. A method was developed which, in combination with ultrafiltration, permits detection ofB. fragilis endotoxin in amniotic fluid in a concentr

  20. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...

  1. EFFECTS OF LIME (CAO) ON THE ENDOTOXIN LEVELS OF BIOSOLIDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lime addition is a common practice for treating biosolids in order to meet EPA 503 requirements for land application. Since this treatment kills the majority of microorganisms, will it increase the level of endotoxins present in biosolids? And, if endotoxin levels are increased, ...

  2. STS-Astro: Astronomy in focus of science, technology and society and analysis about the International Year of Astronomy 2009-Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Orlando Rodrigues; Voelzke, Marcos Rincon

    2012-10-01

    This paper focuses on Science, Technology and Society around Astronomy an approach which authors call STS-Astro. It is considered that Astronomy is beyond the limits of Science itself, since it forwards to profound reflections on the own existence, predicated on the philosophical foundation of the Universe which is based on the anthropic principle. Subsequently, it discuss about the International Year of Astronomy 2009 in Brazil and their results. In 2003, Brazil, Italy and France sent a petition to the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization-UNESCO to consider 2009 as the International Year of Astronomy, on the occasion of 400 years of the first telescopic observations made in 1609 by Galileo Galilei (1568-1742). The International Year of Astronomy 2009 involved more than 148 countries and 815 million people, causing an unprecedented integration in the History between areas scientific, technological and humanities. Brazil had an outstanding performance, but even after a few years, numerous data in the country are still subject to studies and analyzes. The positive impacts on various sectors of the society have become permanent and aggregate actions in many institutions as schools, Universities, Observatories, Planetariums, Science Museums and the Astronomy Club, among others.

  3. Bedside ultrasonography (US), Echoscopy and US point of care as a new kind of stethoscope for Internal Medicine Departments: the training program of the Italian Internal Medicine Society (SIMI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arienti, Vincenzo; Di Giulio, Rosella; Cogliati, Chiara; Accogli, Esterita; Aluigi, Leonardo; Corazza, Gino Roberto

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, thanks to the development of miniaturized ultrasound devices, comparable to personal computers, tablets and even to smart phones, we have seen an increasing use of bedside ultrasound in internal medicine departments as a novel kind of ultrasound stethoscope. The clinical ultrasound-assisted approach has proved to be particularly useful in assessing patients with nodules of the neck, dyspnoea, abdominal pain, and with limb edema. In several cases, it has allowed a simple, rapid and precise diagnosis. Since 2005, the Italian Society of Internal Medicine and its Ultrasound Study Group has been holding a Summer School and training courses in ultrasound for residents in internal medicine. A national network of schools in bedside ultrasound was then organized for internal medicine specialists who want to learn this technique. Because bedside ultrasound is a user-dependent diagnostic method, it is important to define the limits and advantages of different new ultrasound devices, to classify them (i.e. Echoscopy and Point of Care Ultrasound), to establish appropriate different levels of competence and to ensure their specific training. In this review, we describe the point of view of the Italian Internal Medicine Society on these topics.

  4. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...... were isolated, labelled with Indium and reinjected intravenously. Eight rabbits received an infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 while eight received isotonic saline. The redistribution of granulocytes was imaged with a gamma camera and calculated with a connected computer before and 2 and 6...... hours after infusion of endotoxin or saline. Serum cortisol and interleukin-1 beta were measured. In another seven rabbits, respiratory burst activity and degranulation of granulocytes were measured prior to and from 5 min to 6 hours after infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 BW. Following...

  5. Removal of viable bacteria and endotoxins by Electro Deionization (EDI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Norimitsu; Otomo, Teruo; Watabe, Tomoichi; Ase, Tomonobu; Takemura, Takuto; Sato, Toshio

    2011-09-01

    Viable bacteria and endotoxins in water sometimes cause problems for human health. Endotoxins are major components of the outer cell wall of gram-negative bacteria (lipopolysaccharides). In medical procedures, especially haemodialysis (HD) and related therapies (haemodiafiltration (HDF), haemofiltration (HF)), endotoxins in the water for haemodialysis can permeate through the haemodialysis membrane and cause microinflammation or various haemodialysis-related illnesses. To decrease such a biological risk, RO and UF membranes are generally used. Also, hot water disinfection or the chemical disinfection is regularly executed to kill bacteria which produce endotoxins. However, simple treatment methods and equipment may be able to decrease the biological risk more efficiently. In our experiments, we confirmed that viable bacteria and endotoxins were removed by Electro Deionization (EDI) technology and also clarified the desorption mechanisms.

  6. Endotoxins in the prostatic secretions of chronic prostatitis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-Ping Dai; Xiang-Zhou Sun; Ke-Li Zheng

    2005-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the clinical significance of the quantitative determinations of endotoxins in the expressed prostatic secretions (EPS) of chronic prostatitis (CP) patients. Methods: The EPS of 45 patients with CP and 15 normal volunteers were obtained for microscopic examination, bacterial culture and endotoxin determination. The level of endotoxins was determined by the Limulus-amebocyte-lysate test with chromogenic substrate. Results: Patients (P>0.05), type Ⅱ/type Ⅲa vs. Normal controls P < 0.05)]. Conclusion: CP patients have elevated levels of endotoxins in the EPS, which suggests that inflammation is a feature of this disease. EPS endotoxin determination is not only helpful in diagnostic confirmation, but also in evaluating the response to treatment in CP patients.

  7. The redistribution of granulocytes following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, P; Lillevang, S T; Tønnesen, Else Kirstine

    1994-01-01

    Infusion of endotoxin elicits granulocytopenia followed by increased numbers of granulocytes in peripheral blood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the redistribution and sequestration of granulocytes in the tissues following E. coli endotoxin induced sepsis. From 16 rabbits granulocytes...... were isolated, labelled with Indium and reinjected intravenously. Eight rabbits received an infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 while eight received isotonic saline. The redistribution of granulocytes was imaged with a gamma camera and calculated with a connected computer before and 2 and 6...... hours after infusion of endotoxin or saline. Serum cortisol and interleukin-1 beta were measured. In another seven rabbits, respiratory burst activity and degranulation of granulocytes were measured prior to and from 5 min to 6 hours after infusion of E. coli endotoxin 2 micrograms kg-1 BW. Following...

  8. A report of the 1995 and 1996 Paternity Testing Workshops of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Haemogenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerre, A; Syndercombe-Court, Denise; Lincoln, P

    1997-01-01

    We report the results of the 1995 and 1996 Paternity Testing Workshops of the English Speaking Working Group of the International Society for Forensic Haemogenetics. In 1995, 18 laboratories participated and in 1996, 21 laboratories participated. Each year, blood samples from three persons (child...... for investigations in crime cases by the European DNA Profiling Group. In 1996, eight laboratories reported the results of PCR based typing of the short tandem repeat (STR) locus HumTH01, six laboratories reported results of HumVWA31A typing, and five laboratories reported the results of typing of the STR locus Hum...

  9. [Diagnosis and treatment of imported eosinophilia in travellers and immigrants: Recommendations of the Spanish Society of Tropical Medicine and International Health (SEMTSI)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salas-Coronas, J; Ramírez-Olivencia, G; Pérez-Arellano, J L; Belhassen-García, M; Carranza-Rodríguez, C; García-Rodríguez, M; Villar-Garcia, J; Treviño-Maruri, B; Serre-Delcor, N; López-Vélez, R; Norman, F; Gómez-Junyent, J; Soriano-Pérez, M J; Rojo-Marcos, G; Rodríguez de Las Parras, E; Lago-Núñez, M M; Muro, A; Muñoz, J

    2017-02-01

    According to published data, prevalence of imported eosinophilia among travellers and immigrants is set between 8% and 28.5%. Etiological diagnosis is often troublesome, and depending on the depth of the study and on the population analyzed, a parasitic cause is identified in 17% to 75.9% of the individuals. Among the difficulties encountered to compare studies are the heterogeneity of the studied populations, the type of data collection (prospective/retrospective) and different diagnostic protocols. In this document the recommendations of the expert group of the Spanish Society of Tropical Medicine and International Health (SEMTSI) for the diagnosis and treatment of imported eosinophilia are detailed.

  10. Minimal experimental requirements for definition of extracellular vesicles and their functions: a position statement from the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andrew F.; Hochberg, Fred; Buzás, Edit I.; Di Vizio, Dolores; Gardiner, Christopher; Gho, Yong Song; Kurochkin, Igor V.; Mathivanan, Suresh; Quesenberry, Peter; Sahoo, Susmita; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Wauben, Marca H.; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Théry, Clotilde

    2014-01-01

    Secreted membrane-enclosed vesicles, collectively called extracellular vesicles (EVs), which include exosomes, ectosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, apoptotic bodies and other EV subsets, encompass a very rapidly growing scientific field in biology and medicine. Importantly, it is currently technically challenging to obtain a totally pure EV fraction free from non-vesicular components for functional studies, and therefore there is a need to establish guidelines for analyses of these vesicles and reporting of scientific studies on EV biology. Here, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV) provides researchers with a minimal set of biochemical, biophysical and functional standards that should be used to attribute any specific biological cargo or functions to EVs. PMID:25536934

  11. The collapse of the two-kingdom system, the rise of protistology and the founding of the International Society for Evolutionary Protistology (ISEP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, F J R Max

    2003-11-01

    This paper provides a brief summary of the rise and acceptance of protistology as a modern, realistic approach to the evolutionary relationships and classification of unicellular eukaryotic organisms as well as the origins of the multicellular groups. The apparent reasons for the renaissance of this 19th-century concept in the 1970s are reviewed, with electron microscopy considered to be the key factor, strongly reinforced by molecular phylogenetic studies in the 1980s and 1990s. The foundation of the International Society for Evolutionary Protistology in 1975 accompanied this major alteration in the view of biological diversity. The current status of protistology relative to protozoology and phycology is discussed.

  12. Occupational exposure to endotoxins and lung cancer risk: results of the ICARE Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Khedher, Soumaya; Neri, Monica; Guida, Florence; Matrat, Mireille; Cenée, Sylvie; Sanchez, Marie; Menvielle, Gwenn; Molinié, Florence; Luce, Danièle; Stücker, Isabelle

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the role of occupational exposure to endotoxins in lung cancer in a French population-based case-control study (ICARE (Investigation of occupational and environmental causes of respiratory cancers)). Detailed information was collected on the occupational history and smoking habits from 2926 patients with histologically confirmed lung cancer and 3555 matched controls. We evaluated each subject's endotoxin exposure after cross referencing International Standard Classification of Occupations (ISCO) codes (for job tasks) and Nomenclature d'Activités Françaises (NAF) codes (for activity sectors). Endotoxin exposure levels were attributed to each work environment based on literature reports. ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using unconditional logistic regression models and controlled for main confounding factors. An inverse association between exposure to endotoxins and lung cancer was found (OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.66 to 0.95). Negative trends were shown with duration and cumulative exposure, and the risk was decreased decades after exposure cessation (all statistically significant). Lung cancer risk was particularly reduced among workers highly exposed (eg, in dairy, cattle, poultry, pig farms), but also in those weakly exposed (eg, in waste treatment). Statistically significant interactions were shown with smoking, and never/light smokers were more sensitive to an endotoxin effect than heavy smokers (eg, OR=0.14, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.32 and OR=0.80, 95% CI 0.45 to 1.40, respectively, for the quartiles with the highest cumulative exposure, compared with those never exposed). Pronounced inverse associations were shown with adenocarcinoma histological subtype (OR=0.37, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.55 in the highly exposed). Our findings suggest that exposure to endotoxins, even at a low level, reduces the risk of lung cancer. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is

  13. Endotoxin and CD14 in the progression of biliary atresia

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    Chen Ching-Mei

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biliary atresia (BA is a typical cholestatic neonatal disease, characterized by obliteration of intra- and/or extra-hepatic bile ducts. However, the mechanisms contributing to the pathogenesis of BA remain uncertain. Because of decreased bile flow, infectious complications and damaging endotoxemia occur frequently in patients with BA. The aim of this study was to investigate endotoxin levels in patients with BA and the relation of these levels with the expression of the endotoxin receptor, CD14. Methods The plasma levels of endotoxin and soluble CD14 were measured with a pyrochrome Limulus amebocyte lysate assay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in patients with early-stage BA when they received the Kasai procedure (KP, in patients who were jaundice-free post-KP and followed-up at the outpatient department, in patients with late-stage BA when they received liver transplantation, and in patients with choledochal cysts. The correlation of CD14 expression with endotoxin levels in rats following common bile duct ligation was investigated. Results The results demonstrated a significantly higher hepatic CD14 mRNA and soluble CD14 plasma levels in patients with early-stage BA relative to those with late-stage BA. However, plasma endotoxin levels were significantly higher in both the early and late stages of BA relative to controls. In rat model, the results demonstrated that both endotoxin and CD14 levels were significantly increased in liver tissues of rats following bile duct ligation. Conclusions The significant increase in plasma endotoxin and soluble CD14 levels during BA implies a possible involvement of endotoxin stimulated CD14 production by hepatocytes in the early stage of BA for removal of endotoxin; whereas, endotoxin signaling likely induced liver injury and impaired soluble CD14 synthesis in the late stages of BA.

  14. An evidence-based definition of lifelong premature ejaculation: Report of the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McMahon, C.G.; Althof, S.E.; Waldinger, M.D.

    2008-01-01

    authority based rather than evidence based, and have no support from controlled clinical and/or epidemiological studies. Aim. The aim of this article is to develop a contemporary, evidence-based definition of PE. Methods. In August 2007, the International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) appointed several...... international experts in PE to an Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation. The committee met in Amsterdam in October 2007 to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of current definitions of PE, to critique the evidence in support of the constructs of ejaculatory latency, ejaculatory control...... and encourage ongoing research into the true prevalence of this disorder and the efficacy of new pharmacological and psychological treatments Udgivelsesdato: 2008...

  15. Discovery of hantaviruses and of the Hantavirus genus: personal and historical perspectives of the Presidents of the International Society of Hantaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ho Wang; Vaheri, Antti; Schmaljohn, Connie S

    2014-07-17

    We three authors, the two past presidents (HWL and AV) and the current president (CSS) of the International Society for Hantaviruses (ISH) have attended most of the nine International Conferences on HFRS, HPS and Hantaviruses (Table 1). These conferences have provided a forum for a synergistic group of clinicians, basic researchers, mammalogists, epidemiologists and ecologists to share their expertise and interests in all aspects of hantavirus research. Much of what is now hantavirus dogma was only conjecture when HWL organized the first conference in Seoul, Korea in 1989. Herein, we provide our reflections on key events in hantavirus research. As we come from distinct areas of the world and have had individual historical experiences, we certainly have our own geocentric opinions about the key events. Nevertheless, we agree that the discovery of hantaviruses has taken an interesting and unpredictable track to where we are today.

  16. Report on the first International Martial Arts and Combat Sports Scientific Society (IMACSSS Conference - “Game, Drama, Ritual in Martial Arts and Combat Sports”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jikkemien Vertonghen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The present report provides a brief account of the first conference of the International Martial Arts and Combat Sports Scientific Society (IMACSSS, held in Genova (Italy on June 8th-10th, 2012. There were 43 oral presentations and 15 posters divided into five themes: (1 Psychological dimensions of martial arts and combat sports (MA&CS; (2 Sociological and historical aspects of MA&CS; (3 Bio physical, bio technical and bio tactical issues in MA&CS; (4 Pedagogy and didactic methodologies in MA&CS; (5 Philosophical aspects, anthropological conceptions and taxonomy in MA&CS. The conference was a well-organised and unique meeting of MA&CS researchers with a wide variety of topics, international presence and expertise. It provided a good opportunity to consolidate and broaden scientific knowledge and research in MA&CS and contributed to the integration of the scientific community involved in their study.

  17. Guidelines for the diagnosis and antimicrobial therapy of canine superficial bacterial folliculitis (Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillier, Andrew; Lloyd, David H.; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Superficial bacterial folliculitis (SBF) is usually caused by Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and routinely treated with systemic antimicrobial agents. Infection is a consequence of reduced immunity associated with alterations of the skin barrier and underlying diseases that may be di...... will improve antimicrobial use and reduce selection of MRSP and other multidrug-resistant bacteria affecting animal and human health....... of an internationally available resource guiding practitioners in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of SBF. DEVELOPMENT OF THE GUIDELINES: The guidelines were developed by the Antimicrobial Guidelines Working Group of the International Society for Companion Animal Infectious Diseases, with consultation and advice...... on infection control. Guidance is given for topical and systemic modalities, including approaches suitable for MRSP. Systemic drugs are classified in three tiers. Tier one drugs are used when diagnosis is clear cut and risk factors for antimicrobial drug resistance are not present. Otherwise, tier two drugs...

  18. International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Calcified Tissue Society Working Group. Recommendations for the screening of adherence to oral bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Naylor, K E; Abrahamsen, B

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to oral bisphosphonates is low. A screening strategy is proposed based on the response of biochemical markers of bone turnover after 3 months of therapy. If no change is observed, the clinician should reassess the adherence to the treatment and also other potential issues with the drug...... Tissue Society have convened a working group to propose a screening strategy to detect a lack of adherence to these drugs. The question to answer was whether the bone turnover markers (BTMs) PINP and CTX can be used to identify low adherence in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis initiating oral...... bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. The findings of the TRIO study specifically address this question and were used as the basis for testing the hypothesis. RESULTS: Based on the findings of the TRIO study, specifically addressing this question, the working group recommends measuring PINP and CTX at baseline and 3...

  19. International Workshop on the Future of Physics and Society, Debrecen, Hungary, 4-6 March 1999, Workshop Summary

    CERN Document Server

    MacIntosh, R S

    1999-01-01

    The Debrecen workshop was one of a number held in preparation for the UNESCO-ICSU World Conference on Science, which will be held in Budapest, June 1999. A report representing the views of the workshop, prepared for that conference and containing a number of recommended actions, is included with this summary. The workshop affirmed the ongoing importance of physics for its own sake and as part of our culture, as a key element in our increasingly unified science and as an essential contributor to the solution of environmental and energy problems. The problems faced by physics as an activity and as an educational subject were discussed and actions for both society as a whole and the physics community itself were put forward.

  20. Intercultural education for citizenship in complex societies. Summary of the International Conference on Intercultural Education for citizenship.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Guidetti

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Summary of the International Conference held on 15 and May 16, 2009 in Verona. An event planned at the end of a Research Project of National Interest (PRIN designed to detect and promote the practices of education for democratic citizenship in Italian schools, following the guidelines of the Council of Europe on Education for Democratic Citizenship (EDC and using the methodologies proposed in the "Tool for Quality Assurance of EDC in schools".

  1. Ciclos longos e cenários contemporâneos da sociedade internacional Long cycles of the international society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullo Vigevani

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A despeito da anarquia que resulta da ausência uma autoridade legítima comum, as relações internacionais pós-Westphalia têm elementos de ordem que são suficientes para caracterizá-las como uma forma de "associação prática". Esses elementos são a (igual soberania nacional, a diplomacia, o direito internacional e o equilíbrio de poder. Discute-se, neste artigo, em que medida esses pilares da ordem mundial pós-Westphalia ainda se prestam para pensar as relações internacionais no pós-Guerra Fria. Trata-se de saber em que medida essas relações hoje se afastam do modelo de "associação prática" em direção a um modelo, normativamente mais exigente, de "associação de objetivos".Despite the lack of a common legitimate authority the international relations after Westphalia share enough elements of order for being characterized as a form of "practical association": (equal national sovereignty, diplomacy, international law and the balance of power. The fit-ness of those pilars of the post-Westphalian world order for thinking the international relations after the Cold War is discussed. It is asked how far those relations are leaving the model of a practical association towards another normatively more demanding model, of "goals association".

  2. Validation of Omron RS8, RS6, and RS3 home blood pressure monitoring devices, in accordance with the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010

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    Takahashi H

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Hakuo Takahashi, Masamichi Yoshika, Toyohiko YokoiDepartment of Clinical Sciences and Laboratory Medicine, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, JapanBackground: Allowing patients to measure their blood pressure at home is recognized as being of clinical value. However, it is not known how often these measurements are taken correctly. Blood pressure monitors for home use fall into two types based on the position of the cuff, ie, at the upper arm or the wrist. The latter is particularly convenient, as measurements can be taken fully clothed. This study aimed to evaluate the performance of the wrist-type blood pressure monitors Omron RS8 (HEM-6310F-E, Omron RS6 (HEM-6221-E, and Omron RS3 (HEM-6130-E.Methods: A team of three trained doctors validated the performance of these devices by comparing the measurements obtained from these devices with those taken using a standard mercury sphygmomanometer. All the devices met the validation requirements of the European Society of Hypertension International Protocol revision 2010.Results: The difference in blood pressure readings between the tested device and the standard mercury sphygmomanometer was within 3 mmHg, which is acceptable according to the European Society of Hypertension guidelines.Conclusion: All the home devices tested were found to be suitable for measuring blood pressure at home because their performance fulfilled the requirement of the guidelines.Keywords: blood pressure, device, European Society of Hypertension, guideline, measurement, validation

  3. International Youth Justice Systems: Promoting Youth Development and Alternative Approaches: A Position Paper of the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    Youth incarceration is an international public health concern among developed and developing countries. Worldwide, youth are held in incarceration, detention, and other secure settings that are inappropriate for their age and developmental stages, jeopardizing their prosocial development, and reintegration into society. Youth incarceration lacks evidence and cost-effectiveness. The well-being of youth is a key indicator of the welfare of families, communities, and society at large; therefore, the Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine (SAHM) supports a paradigm shift in the role of the justice system as it relates to treatment of youth. SAHM recommends justice systems focus greater attention and resources on identifying and reducing the antecedents of high-risk and criminal behaviors, recognizing the rights and freedom of young persons, and prioritizing the well-being of youth over punitive measures that may harm and disrupt healthy adolescent development. SAHM supports the following positions: (1) incarceration is a last option for selected offenders who have committed the most serious violent crimes and are unable to remain safely in the community; (2) youth justice policies, programs, and practices affecting youth be evidence based and trauma informed; (3) youth justice policies, programs, and practices must incorporate research and ongoing program evaluation; (4) youth justice policies shall protect the privacy and dignity of children younger than 18 years; and (5) health care professionals and media will promote positive portrayals of youth in healthy relationships within their communities and reduce representations and images of youth that are negative, violent, deviant, and threatening.

  4. An evidence-based unified definition of lifelong and acquired premature ejaculation : report of the second international society for sexual medicine ad hoc committee for the definition of premature ejaculation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Serefoglu, Ege Can; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Althof, Stanley E; Shindel, Alan; Adaikan, Ganesh; Becher, Edgardo F; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne Jg; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation developed the first evidence-based definition for lifelong premature ejaculation (PE...

  5. Intestinal radiation syndrome: sepsis and endotoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geraci, J.P.; Jackson, K.L.; Mariano, M.S.

    1985-03-01

    Rats were whole-body irradiated with 8-MeV cyclotron-produced neutrons and /sup 137/Cs ..gamma.. rays to study the role of enteric bacteria and endotoxin in the intestinal radiation syndrome. Decrease in intestinal weight was used as an index of radiation-induced breakdown of the mucosa. Neutron and ..gamma..-ray doses that were sublethal for intestinal death resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in intestinal weight, reaching minimal values 2 to 3 days after exposure, followed by recovery within 5 days after irradiation. Neutron and photon doses that caused intestinal death resulted in greater mucosal breakdown with little or no evidence of mucosal recovery. The presence of fluid in the intestine and diarrhea, but not bacteremia or endotoxemia, were related to mucosal breakdown and recovery. Neither sepsis nor endotoxin could be detected in liver samples taken at autopsy from animals which died a short time earlier from intestinal injury. These results suggest that overt sepsis and endotoxemia do not play a significant role in the intestinal radiation syndrome.

  6. Contamination of nanoparticles by endotoxin: evaluation of different test methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smulders Stijn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanomaterials can be contaminated with endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS during production or handling. In this study, we searched for a convenient in vitro method to evaluate endotoxin contamination in nanoparticle samples. We assessed the reliability of the commonly used limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL assay and an alternative method based on toll-like receptor (TLR 4 reporter cells when applied with particles (TiO2, Ag, CaCO3 and SiO2, or after extraction of the endotoxin as described in the ISO norm 29701. Results Our results indicate that the gel clot LAL assay is easily disturbed in the presence of nanoparticles; and that the endotoxin extraction protocol is not suitable at high particle concentrations. The chromogenic-based LAL endotoxin detection systems (chromogenic LAL assay and Endosafe-PTS, and the TLR4 reporter cells were not significantly perturbed. Conclusion We demonstrated that nanoparticles can interfere with endotoxin detection systems indicating that a convenient test method must be chosen before assessing endotoxin contamination in nanoparticle samples.

  7. International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer/American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society classification predicts occult lymph node metastasis in clinically mediastinal node-negative lung adenocarcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yi-Chen; Kadota, Kyuichi; Nitadori, Jun-ichi; Sima, Camelia S.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Jones, David R.; Travis, William D.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We investigated the role of the 2011 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) classification in predicting occult lymph node metastasis in clinically mediastinal node-negative lung adenocarcinoma. METHODS We reviewed lung adenocarcinoma patients who had clinically N2-negative status, were evaluated by preoperative positron emission tomography combined with computed tomography (PET/CT) and had undergone lobectomy or pneumonectomy at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (n = 297). Tumours were classified according to the 2011 IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. The associations between occult lymph node metastasis and clinicopathological variables were analysed using Fisher's exact test and logistic regression analysis. RESULTS Thirty-two (11%) cN0-1 patients had occult mediastinal lymph node metastasis (pN2) whereas 25% of cN1 patients had pN2 disease. Increased micropapillary pattern was associated with increased risk of pN2 disease (P = 0.001). On univariate analysis, high maximum standard uptake value of the primary tumour on PET/CT (P = 0.019) and the presence of micropapillary (P = 0.014) and solid pattern (P = 0.014) were associated with occult pN2 disease. On multivariable analysis, micropapillary pattern was positively associated with risk of pN2 disease (odds ratio = 3.41; 95% confidence intervals = 1.42–8.19; P = 0.006). CONCLUSIONS The presence of micropapillary pattern is an independent predictor of occult mediastinal lymph node metastasis. Our observations have potential therapeutic implications for management of early-stage lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26377636

  8. Endotoxin Elimination in Patients with Septic Shock: An Observation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamik, Barbara; Zielinski, Stanislaw; Smiechowicz, Jakub; Kübler, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of endotoxin elimination with an adsorption column in patients with septic shock and endotoxemia. The elimination therapy was guided by a new bedside method of measuring endotoxin activity (EA). Intensive care unit (ICU) patients with septic shock and suspected Gram-negative infection were consecutively added to the study group within the first 24 h. Endotoxin elimination was performed using hemoperfusion with the Alteco LPS Adsorber. The primary endpoint was improvement in organ function within the first 24 h of treatment. A secondary objective was to assess the usefulness of a new method of measuring EA to help guide endotoxin elimination therapy. Out of 64 patients 18 had a high baseline EA [0.70 EA units (0.66-0.77)]. Those patients had endotoxin elimination treatment in addition to conventional medical therapy. At 24 h after endotoxin elimination, the EA had decreased to 0.56 EA units (0.43-0.77), (p = 0.005); MAP increased from 69 (62-80) to 80 mm Hg (68-88), (p = 0.002), and noradrenaline use decreased from 0.28 (0.15-0.80) to 0.1 μg/kg/min (0.00-0.70) at the same time (p = 0.04). The SOFA score had decreased from 11 (9-15) to 9 (7-14) points 24 h after endotoxin elimination (p = 0.01) with a median delta SOFA -2 points. Endotoxin elimination did not have a significant effect on the ICU length of stay or ICU mortality. Effective endotoxin elimination resulted in a significant improvement in hemodynamic parameters and of organ function. The application of the EA assay was useful for the bedside monitoring of endotoxemia in critically ill ICU patients.

  9. Adherent endotoxin on dental implant surfaces: a reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morra, Marco; Cassinelli, Clara; Bollati, Daniele; Cascardo, Giovanna; Bellanda, Marco

    2015-02-01

    Osteoimmunology is the crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems, suggesting a role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the stimulation of osteoclast activity. Endotoxin or bacterial challenges to inflammatory cells are directly relevant to dental implant pathologies involving bone resorption, such as osseointegration failure and peri-implantitis. While the endotoxin amount on implant devices is regulated by standards, it is unknown whether commercially available dental implants elicit different levels of adherent-endotoxin stimulated cytokines. The objective of this work is to develop a model system and evaluate endotoxin-induced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine genes relevant to osteoclast activation on commercially available dental implants. Murine J774-A1 macrophages were cultured on Ti disks with different level of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contamination to define the time-course of the inflammatory response to endotoxin, as evaluated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. The developed protocol was then used to measure adherent endotoxin on commercially available packaged and sterile dental implants in the "as-implanted" condition. Results show that tested dental implants induce variable expression of endotoxin-stimulated genes, sometimes above the level expected to promote bone resorption in vivo. Results are unaffected by the specific surface treatment; rather, they likely reflect care in cleaning and packaging protocols. In conclusion, expression of genes that enhance osteoclast activity through endotoxin stimulation of inflammatory cells is widely different on commercially available dental implants. A reappraisal of the clinical impact of adherent endotoxins on dental (and bone) implant devices is required in light of increasing knowledge on crosstalk between cells from the immune and skeletal systems.

  10. Elevated endotoxin levels in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Sudhesh

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emerging data indicate that gut-derived endotoxin may contribute to low-grade systemic inflammation in insulin resistant states. This study aimed to examine the importance of serum endotoxin and inflammatory markers in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD patients, with and without type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, and to explore the effect of treatment with a lipase inhibitor, Orlistat, on their inflammatory status. Methods Fasted serum from 155 patients with biopsy proven NAFLD and 23 control subjects were analysed for endotoxin, soluble CD14 (sCD14, soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor II (sTNFRII and various metabolic parameters. A subgroup of NAFLD patients were re-assessed 6 and 12 months after treatment with diet alone (n = 6 or diet plus Orlistat (n = 8. Results Endotoxin levels were significantly higher in patients with NAFLD compared with controls (NAFLD: 10.6(7.8, 14.8 EU/mL; controls: 3.9(3.2, 5.2 EU/mL, p Sub-cohort treatment with Orlistat in patients with NAFLD showed significant decreases in ALT (p = 0.006, weight (p = 0.005 and endotoxin (p = 0.004 compared with the NAFLD, non-Orlistat treated control cohort at 6 and 12 months post therapy, respectively. Conclusions Endotoxin levels were considerably increased in NAFLD patients, with marked increases noted in early stage fibrosis compared with controls. These results suggest elevated endotoxin may serve as an early indicator of potential liver damage, perhaps negating the need for invasive liver biopsy. As endotoxin may promote insulin resistance and inflammation, interventions aimed at reducing endotoxin levels in NAFLD patients may prove beneficial in reducing inflammatory burden.

  11. Urinary F2 -Isoprostanes in Cats with International Renal Interest Society Stage 1-4 Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, W; Quimby, J; Wan, S; Monaghan, K; Robbins, R; Trepanier, L A

    2017-03-01

    F2 -isoprostanes, a biomarker of oxidant injury, increase with advancing chronic kidney disease (CKD) in humans. In cats, the relationship between CKD and oxidative stress is poorly understood. To determine whether cats with advancing CKD have increasing urinary F2 -isoprostanes. Control cats without evidence of CKD (≥6 years old; n = 11), and cats with IRIS stage 1 (n = 8), 2 (n = 38), 3 (n = 21), and 4 (n = 10) CKD. This was a prospective observational study. Urinary F2 -isoprostanes (specifically free 15-F2t -isoprostanes) normalized to urine creatinine (IsoPs) were compared among groups and tested for correlations with blood pressure, proteinuria, serum creatinine concentration, and urine specific gravity. The IsoPs also were compared between cats with and without hypertension or proteinuria, and in cats fed predominantly standard versus renal diets. Urinary IsoPs were increased, but not significantly, in cats with stage 1 CKD (median 263 pg/mg creatinine; range, 211-380) compared to controls (182 pg/mg; range, 80-348) and decreased significantly from stage 1 through advancing CKD (stage 2, 144 pg/mg; range, 49-608; stage 3, 102 pg/mg; range, 25-158; stage 4, 67 pg/mg; range, 26-117; P cats with more advanced CKD. Additional studies are warranted to characterize oxidative stress in cats with stage 1 CKD and determine whether early antioxidant treatments have a protective effect on CKD progression. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Bacterial endotoxins and liver haemorrhage in the oestrogenised chicken.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, M J; Pearson, A W; Butler, E J

    1980-11-01

    Hepatic steatosis and haemorrhage in oestrogenised chickens were not associated with any increase in the endotoxin content of the plasma. The haemorrhage was not ameliorated by suppressing enteric bacteria with neomycin or exacerbated by the repeated injection of Escherichia coli O111 endotoxin and there were no relevant changes in plasma enzyme activities that are indicators of liver damage. These results therefore do not support the hypothesis that, as in the choline deficient rat, hepatic steatosis impairs the ability of the oestrogenised chicken to dispose of bacterial endotoxins and that these then damage the liver.

  13. Redesigning the practice model for general internal medicine. A proposal for coordinated care: a policy monograph of the Society of General Internal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    General Internal Medicine (GIM) faces a burgeoning crisis in the United States, while patients with chronic illness confront a disintegrating health care system. Reimbursement that rewards using procedures and devices rather than thoughtful examination and management, plus onerous administrative burdens, are prompting physicians to pursue specialties other than GIM. This monograph promotes 9 principles supporting the concept of Coordinated Care--a strategy to sustain quality and enhance the attractiveness and viability of care delivered by highly trained General Internists who specialize in the longitudinal care of adult patients with acute and chronic illness. This approach supplements and extends the concept of the Advanced Medical Home set forth by the American College of Physicians. Specific components of Coordinated Care include clinical support, information management, and access and scheduling. Success of the model will require changes in the payment system that fairly reimburse physicians who provide leadership to teams that deliver high quality, coordinated care.

  14. Climate change and biometeorology, the International Society of Biometeorology and its journal: a perspective on the past and a framework for the future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Paul John

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is inherently a biometeorological issue. As such, it would be reasonably expected that the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB) and its journal, International Journal of Biometeorology ( IJB), would have had climate change feature prominently in their activities, articles etc., and to therefore have made a substantial and valuable contribution to the science of the issue. This article presents an analysis of climate change science in ISB and IJB. The analysis focusses on climate-change-related publications by ISB Presidents found through searches of Thomson Reuters Web of Science; contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) Working Group II (WGII) by ISB Presidents; and climate change-related publications in IJB found through searches of Thomson Reuters Web of Science. The results demonstrate that the ISB, as represented by its recent, current, and future Presidents, is actively engaged in climate change research and the production of scholarly climate change publications. For example, ISB Presidents have contributed as authors to all four IPCC WGII Assessment Reports, with some Presidents having contributed to more than one Assessment Report or several chapters of the one report. Similarly, it is evident that the IJB is increasingly attracting and publishing climate-change-related articles, with such articles generally having greater impact (as indicated by citations) than other IJB articles. Opportunities for the ISB to provide an internal framework for, and showcase, its climate change work are described. Such opportunities, if enacted, would complement the recent creation of two IJB climate change Field Editor positions.

  15. Climate change and biometeorology, the International Society of Biometeorology and its journal: a perspective on the past and a framework for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beggs, Paul John

    2014-01-01

    Anthropogenic climate change is inherently a biometeorological issue. As such, it would be reasonably expected that the International Society of Biometeorology (ISB) and its journal, International Journal of Biometeorology (IJB), would have had climate change feature prominently in their activities, articles etc., and to therefore have made a substantial and valuable contribution to the science of the issue. This article presents an analysis of climate change science in ISB and IJB. The analysis focusses on climate-change-related publications by ISB Presidents found through searches of Thomson Reuters Web of Science; contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC's) Working Group II (WGII) by ISB Presidents; and climate change-related publications in IJB found through searches of Thomson Reuters Web of Science. The results demonstrate that the ISB, as represented by its recent, current, and future Presidents, is actively engaged in climate change research and the production of scholarly climate change publications. For example, ISB Presidents have contributed as authors to all four IPCC WGII Assessment Reports, with some Presidents having contributed to more than one Assessment Report or several chapters of the one report. Similarly, it is evident that the IJB is increasingly attracting and publishing climate-change-related articles, with such articles generally having greater impact (as indicated by citations) than other IJB articles. Opportunities for the ISB to provide an internal framework for, and showcase, its climate change work are described. Such opportunities, if enacted, would complement the recent creation of two IJB climate change Field Editor positions.

  16. Cerebellum: from Fundamentals to Translational Approaches. The Seventh International Symposium of the Society for Research on the Cerebellum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manto, Mario; Mariën, Peter

    2016-02-01

    In terms of cerebellar research and ataxiology, a most fascinating period is currently going on. Numerous academic groups are now focusing their innovative research on the so-called little brain, hidden at the bottom of our brain. Indeed, its unique anatomical features make the cerebellum a wonderful window to address major questions about the central nervous system. The seventh international symposium of the SRC was held in Brussels at the Palace of Academies from May 8 to 10, 2015. The main goal of this dense symposium was to gather in a 2-day meeting senior researchers of exceptional scientific quality and talented junior scientists from all over the world working in the multidisciplinary field of cerebellar research. Fundamental and clinical researchers shared the latest knowledge and developments in this rapidly growing field. New ideas, addressed in a variety of inspiring talks, provoked a vivid debate. Advances in genetics, development, electrophysiology, neuroimaging, neurocognition and affect, as well as in the cerebellar ataxias and the controversies on the roles and functions of the cerebellum were presented. The Ferdinando Rossi lecture and the key-note lecture were delivered by Jan Voogd and Chris De Zeeuw, respectively. Contacts between researchers of different neuroscientific disciplines established a robust basis for novel trends and promising new cooperations between researchers and their centers spread all over the world.

  17. Endotoxins in surgical instruments of hip arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goveia, Vania Regina; Mendoza, Isabel Yovana Quispe; Guimarães, Gilberto Lima; Ercole, Flavia Falci; Couto, Bráulio Roberto Gonçalves Marinho; Leite, Edna Marilea Meireles; Stoianoff, Maria Aparecida Resende; Ferreira, José Antonio Guimarães

    2016-01-01

    To investigate endotoxins in sterilized surgical instruments used in hip arthroplasties. A descriptive exploratory study conducted in a public teaching hospital. Six types of surgical instruments were selected, namely: acetabulum rasp, femoral rasp, femoral head remover, chisel box, flexible bone reamer and femoral head test. The selection was based on the analysis of the difficulty in removing bone and blood residues during cleaning. The sample was made up of 60 surgical instruments, which were tested for endotoxins in three different stages. The EndosafeTM Gel-Clot LAL (Limulus Amebocyte Lysate method) was used. There was consistent gel formation with positive analysis in eight instruments, corresponding to 13.3%, being four femoral rasps and four bone reamers. Endotoxins in quantity ≥0.125 UE/mL were detected in 13.3% of the instruments tested. Investigar endotoxinas em instrumentais cirúrgicos esterilizados empregados em artroplastias do quadril. Estudo exploratório, descritivo, desenvolvido em um hospital público de ensino. Foram selecionados seis tipos de instrumentais, a saber: raspa acetabular, raspa femural, saca-cabeça de fêmur, formão box, fresa de fêmur e cabeça de prova de fêmur. A seleção foi feita a partir da análise da dificuldade para a remoção de resíduos de sangue e osso durante a limpeza. A amostra foi constituída por 60 instrumentais cirúrgicos, que foram testados para endotoxinas em três momentos distintos. Foi utilizado o método de gel-clot pelo Limulus Amebócito Lisado (LAL) Endosafe(tm). Houve formação de gel consistente com análise positiva em oito instrumentais, o que corresponde a 13,3%, sendo quatro raspas de fêmur e quatro fresas de fêmur. Foram detectadas endotoxinas em quantidade ≥0,125 UE/mL em 13,3% dos instrumentais testados.

  18. Microbiological assessment of house and imported bottled water by comparison of bacterial endotoxin concentration, heterotrophic plate count, and fecal coliform count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Mayra I; Pérez, Cynthia M; Negrón, Edna L

    2008-03-01

    Consumers increasingly use bottled water and home water treatment systems to avoid direct tap water. According to the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA), an industry trade group, 5 billion gallons of bottled water were consumed by North Americans in 2001. The principal aim of this study was to assess the microbial quality of in-house and imported bottled water for human consumption, by measurement and comparison of the concentration of bacterial endotoxin and standard cultivable methods of indicator microorganisms, specifically, heterotrophic and fecal coliform plate counts. A total of 21 brands of commercial bottled water, consisting of 10 imported and 11 in-house brands, selected at random from 96 brands that are consumed in Puerto Rico, were tested at three different time intervals. The Standard Limulus Amebocyte Lysate test, gel clot method, was used to measure the endotoxin concentrations. The minimum endotoxin concentration in 63 water samples was less than 0.0625 EU/mL, while the maximum was 32 EU/mL. The minimum bacterial count showed no growth, while the maximum was 7,500 CFU/mL. Bacterial isolates like P. fluorescens, Corynebacterium sp. J-K, S. paucimobilis, P. versicularis, A. baumannii, P. chlororaphis, F. indologenes, A. faecalis and P. cepacia were identified. Repeated measures analysis of variance demonstrated that endotoxin concentration did not change over time, while there was a statistically significant (p count over time. In addition, multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that a unit change in the concentration of endotoxin across time was associated with a significant (p count. This analysis evidenced a significant time effect in the average log bacteriological cell count. Although bacterial growth was not detected in some water samples, endotoxin was present. Measurement of Gram-negative bacterial endotoxins is one of the methods that have been suggested as a rapid way of determining bacteriological water quality.

  19. Transitional society, health status and international migration of Muslim villagers in the lower part of southern Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chongsuvivatwong, V; Mo-Suwan, L; Mahahing, P

    1990-09-01

    A survey was carried out in a Malay-speaking Muslim community in southern Thailand to obtain baseline data for planning of long term multidisciplinary research and development. By using a 30-cluster sampling technique, 210 households of 1,308 subjects were studied in the post-Ramadan period. It was found that the community was in a social transition. The crude birth rate was 4% and 37.6% of the households had at least one migrant. About half of these migrants had been to Malaysia and mainly worked in rubber plantations. Ninety-five per cent of the households had electricity whereas only 23.8% had a latrine. Boiled or rain water was regularly drunk in only 13.3 per cent of the households. Home-grown agricultural products were not sufficient to provide adequate food. Twenty-six per cent of the adults were unemployed and 24.6% were illiterate. Of the pregnancies 26.7% had no antenatal care and complete tetanus toxoid was given to only 27.8%. Traditional birth attendants conducted 81.1% of the deliveries and only 28.9 and 24.4% of the umbilical cords were correctly cut and correctly dressed, respectively. Breast feeding was still a common (87.8%) practice. However, complete immunization was given to only 10.8%, and 37.8% of the infants had at least one diarrheal episode in the previous month. It was concluded that high birth rate, high migration, low education, low income and bad health of infants are major problems. These problems were interlinked and needed a special multidisciplinary approach. In addition to common obstacles for routine health delivery, migration may create international complications, particularly related to maternal and child care.

  20. TRANSLOCATION OF BACTERIA AND ENDOTOXIN IN ORGAN DONORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Goor, Harry; Rosman, C; Kooi, K; Wubbels, GH; Bleichrodt, RP

    1994-01-01

    Objective: To determine if bacterial translocation and endotoxin absorption occur in organ donors with an anatomically intact gastrointestinal tract. Design: Case series. Setting: Intensive care units in general and university hospitals. Patients: Twenty-one (multiple) organ donors. Intervention: No

  1. Variability in endotoxin exposure levels and consequences for exposure assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spaan, S.; Schinkel, J.; Wouters, I.M.; Preller, L.; Tielemans, E.; Nij, E.T.; Heederik, D.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Workers in many industries are exposed to endotoxins, which may cause adverse health effects. In exposure assessment, information about exposure variability is essential. However, variability in exposure has rarely been investigated for biological agents and more specifically for

  2. Endotoxin-Induced Structural Transformations in Liquid Crystalline Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, I.-Hsin; Miller, Daniel S.; Bertics, Paul J.; Murphy, Christopher J.; de Pablo, Juan J.; Abbott, Nicholas L.

    2011-06-01

    The ordering of liquid crystals (LCs) is known to be influenced by surfaces and contaminants. Here, we report that picogram per milliliter concentrations of endotoxin in water trigger ordering transitions in micrometer-size LC droplets. The ordering transitions, which occur at surface concentrations of endotoxin that are less than 10-5 Langmuir, are not due to adsorbate-induced changes in the interfacial energy of the LC. The sensitivity of the LC to endotoxin was measured to change by six orders of magnitude with the geometry of the LC (droplet versus slab), supporting the hypothesis that interactions of endotoxin with topological defects in the LC mediate the response of the droplets. The LC ordering transitions depend strongly on glycophospholipid structure and provide new designs for responsive soft matter.

  3. The interaction of the international society concerning kidney transplants--a consideration of diseased kidney transplants in Japan and transplant tourism over the world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokubo, Asako

    2009-04-01

    In November 2006 in Japan, it was detected that there were 41 cases that diseased kidneys were harvested from patients and then were transplanted to other renal failure patients. This "Diseased kidney transplant" was prohibited in Japan since 2007 because of a lot of problems. On the other hand, in Japan, although there are about 12,000 patients on a waiting list for a transplant, only 10% of those get a transplant. Recently it appears that some patients have gone overseas for kidney transplants (transplant tourism). Concerning the background of transplant tourism, the issues are three points following. First, globalization caused recipients to go abroad easier and faster. Second, transnational law is difficult to institutionalize. Third, there is economical gap in not only international but also domestic. We should discuss again diseased kidney transplant in not only professionals but also in Japanese civilized society.

  4. A report of the 2002-2008 paternity testing workshops of the English speaking working group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Anni Rønfeldt; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo Thisted

    2009-01-01

    The English Speaking Working Group (ESWG) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) offers an annual Paternity Testing Workshop open to all members of the group. Blood samples, a questionnaire and a paper challenge are sent to the participants. Here, we present the results...... increased from 46 in 2002 to 68 in 2008. The results showed an increasing degree of concordance concerning methods and DNA systems used and a high degree of uniformity in typing results with discrepancies in 0.1 and 0.3 % of all submitted PCR-based results. The paper challenges showed uniformity...... in the calculation of the weight of evidence for simple cases with straight-forward genetic constellations. However, a high degree of variation existed in complex scenarios with rare genetic constellations such as genetic inconsistencies/possible silent alleles, rare alleles and haplotypes....

  5. Minimal experimental requirements for definition of extracellular vesicles and their functions: a position statement from the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Lötvall

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Secreted membrane-enclosed vesicles, collectively called extracellular vesicles (EVs, which include exosomes, ectosomes, microvesicles, microparticles, apoptotic bodies and other EV subsets, encompass a very rapidly growing scientific field in biology and medicine. Importantly, it is currently technically challenging to obtain a totally pure EV fraction free from non-vesicular components for functional studies, and therefore there is a need to establish guidelines for analyses of these vesicles and reporting of scientific studies on EV biology. Here, the International Society for Extracellular Vesicles (ISEV provides researchers with a minimal set of biochemical, biophysical and functional standards that should be used to attribute any specific biological cargo or functions to EVs.

  6. THE 4th SCHIZOPHRENIA INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SOCIETY CONFERENCE, 5–9 APRIL 2014, FLORENCE, ITALY: A summary of topics and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abayomi, Olukayode; Amato, Davide; Bailey, Candace; Bitanihirwe, Byron; Bowen, Lynneice; Burshtein, Shimon; Cullen, Alexis; Fusté, Montserrat; Herrmann, Ana P; Khodaie, Babak; Kilian, Sanja; Lang, Qortni A; Manning, Elizabeth E; Massuda, Raffael; Nurjono, Milawaty; Sadiq, Sarosh; Sanchez-Gutierrez, Teresa; Sheinbaum, Tamara; Shivakumar, Venkataram; Simon, Nicholas; Spiteri-Staines, Anneliese; Sirijit, Suttajit; Toftdahl, Nanna Gilliam; Wadehra, Sunali; Wang, Yi; Wigton, Rebekah; Wright, Susan; Yagoda, Sergey; Zaytseva, Yuliya; O’Shea, Anne; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2015-01-01

    The 4th Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference was held in Florence, Italy, April 5–9, 2014.and this year had as its emphasis, “Fostering Collaboration in Schizophrenia Research”. Student travel awardees served as rapporteurs for each oral session, summarized the important contributions of each session and then each report was integrated into a final summary of data discussed at the entire conference by topic. It is hoped that by combining data from different presentations, patterns of interest will emerge and thus lead to new progress for the future. In addition, the following report provides an overview of the conference for those who were present, but could not participate in all sessions, and those who did not have the opportunity to attend, but who would be interested in an update on current investigations ongoing in the field of schizophrenia research. PMID:25306204

  7. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in urologic pathology: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ulbright, Thomas M; Humphrey, Peter A; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Grignon, David; Trpkov, Kiril; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram; Delahunt, Brett; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-08-01

    Members of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) participated in a half-day consensus conference to discuss guidelines and recommendations regarding best practice approaches to use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differential diagnostic situations in urologic pathology, including bladder, prostate, testis and, kidney lesions. Four working groups, selected by the ISUP leadership, identified several high-interest topics based on common or relevant challenging diagnostic situations and proposed best practice recommendations, which were discussed by the membership. The overall summary of the discussions and the consensus opinion forms the basis of a series of articles, one for each organ site. This Special Article summarizes the overall recommendations made by the four working groups. It is anticipated that this ISUP effort will be valuable to the entire practicing community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic urologic pathology.

  8. Platinum-Induced Ototoxicity in Children: A Consensus Review on Mechanisms, Predisposition, and Protection, Including a New International Society of Pediatric Oncology Boston Ototoxicity Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Penelope R.; Knight, Kristin R.; Freyer, David R.; Campbell, Kathleen C.M.; Steyger, Peter S.; Blakley, Brian W.; Rassekh, Shahrad R.; Chang, Kay W.; Fligor, Brian J.; Rajput, Kaukab; Sullivan, Michael; Neuwelt, Edward A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The platinum chemotherapy agents cisplatin and carboplatin are widely used in the treatment of adult and pediatric cancers. Cisplatin causes hearing loss in at least 60% of pediatric patients. Reducing cisplatin and high-dose carboplatin ototoxicity without reducing efficacy is important. Patients and Methods This review summarizes recommendations made at the 42nd Congress of the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) in Boston, October 21-24, 2010, reflecting input from international basic scientists, pediatric oncologists, otolaryngologists, oncology nurses, audiologists, and neurosurgeons to develop and advance research and clinical trials for otoprotection. Results Platinum initially impairs hearing in the high frequencies and progresses to lower frequencies with increasing cumulative dose. Genes involved in drug transport, metabolism, and DNA repair regulate platinum toxicities. Otoprotection can be achieved by acting on several these pathways and generally involves antioxidant thiol agents. Otoprotection is a strategy being explored to decrease hearing loss while maintaining dose intensity or allowing dose escalation, but it has the potential to interfere with tumoricidal effects. Route of administration and optimal timing relative to platinum therapy are critical issues. In addition, international standards for grading and comparing ototoxicity are essential to the success of prospective pediatric trials aimed at reducing platinum-induced hearing loss. Conclusion Collaborative prospective basic and clinical trial research is needed to reduce the incidence of irreversible platinum-induced hearing loss, and optimize cancer control. Wide use of the new internationally agreed-on SIOP Boston ototoxicity scale in current and future otoprotection trials should help facilitate this goal. PMID:22547603

  9. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: Recommendations on the validation of software programs performing biostatistical calculations for forensic genetics applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, M D; Buckleton, J; Butler, J M; Egeland, T; Fimmers, R; Gill, P; Gusmão, L; Guttman, B; Krawczak, M; Morling, N; Parson, W; Pinto, N; Schneider, P M; Sherry, S T; Willuweit, S; Prinz, M

    2016-11-01

    The use of biostatistical software programs to assist in data interpretation and calculate likelihood ratios is essential to forensic geneticists and part of the daily case work flow for both kinship and DNA identification laboratories. Previous recommendations issued by the DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) covered the application of bio-statistical evaluations for STR typing results in identification and kinship cases, and this is now being expanded to provide best practices regarding validation and verification of the software required for these calculations. With larger multiplexes, more complex mixtures, and increasing requests for extended family testing, laboratories are relying more than ever on specific software solutions and sufficient validation, training and extensive documentation are of upmost importance. Here, we present recommendations for the minimum requirements to validate bio-statistical software to be used in forensic genetics. We distinguish between developmental validation and the responsibilities of the software developer or provider, and the internal validation studies to be performed by the end user. Recommendations for the software provider address, for example, the documentation of the underlying models used by the software, validation data expectations, version control, implementation and training support, as well as continuity and user notifications. For the internal validations the recommendations include: creating a validation plan, requirements for the range of samples to be tested, Standard Operating Procedure development, and internal laboratory training and education. To ensure that all laboratories have access to a wide range of samples for validation and training purposes the ISFG DNA commission encourages collaborative studies and public repositories of STR typing results. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  10. Axial Globe Position Measurement: A Prospective Multi-center Study by the International Thyroid Eye Disease Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Chad M.; Sivak-Callcott, Jennifer A.; Gurka, Matthew J.; Nguyen, John; Hogg, Jeffery P.; Feldon, Steve E.; Fay, Aaron; Seah, Lay-Leng; Strianese, Diego; Durairaj, Vikram D.; Uddin, Jimmy; Devoto, Martin H.; Harris, Matheson; Saunders, Justin; Osaki, Tammy H.; Looi, Audrey; Teo, Livia; Davies, Brett W.; Elefante, Andrea; Shen, Sunny; Realini, Tony; Fischer, William; Kazim, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Identify a reproducible measure of axial globe position (AGP) for multicenter studies of patients with thyroid eye disease (TED). Methods This is a prospective, international, multicenter, observational study in which 3 types of AGP evaluation were examined: radiologic, clinical, and photographic. In this study, computed tomography (CT) was the modality to which all other methods were compared. CT AGP was measured from an orthogonal line between the anterior lateral orbital rims to the cornea. All CT measurements were made at a single institution by 3 individual clinicians. Clinical evaluation was performed with exophthalmometry. Three clinicians from each clinical site assessed AGP with 3 different exophthalmometers and horizontal palpebral width using a ruler. Each physician made 3 separate measurements with each type of exophthalmometer, not in succession. All photographic measurements were made at a single institution. AGP was measured from lateral photographs in which a standard marker was placed at the anterior lateral orbital rim. Horizontal and vertical palpebral fissure were measured from frontal photographs. Three trained readers measured 3 separate times, not in succession. Exophthalmometry and photography method validity was assessed by agreement with CT (mean differences calculation, ICC’s, Bland-Altman figures). Correlation between palpebral fissure and CT AGP was assessed with Pearson correlation. Intraclinician and interclinician reliability was evaluated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC). Results Sixty-eight patients from 7 centers participated. CT mean AGP was 21.37mm (15.96 – 28.90mm) right, 21.22mm (15.87 – 28.70mm) left (ICC 0.996 and 0.995). Exophthalmometry AGP fell between 18mm and 25mm. Intraclinician agreement across exophthalmometers was ideal (ICC 0.948 – 0.983). Agreement between clinicians was greater than 0.85 for all upright exophthalmometry measurements. Photographic mean AGP was 20.47mm (10.92 – 30

  11. Pavlovian conditioning of endotoxin-tolerance in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberbeck, Reiner; Kromm, Alexander; Exton, Michael S; Schade, Ullrich; Schedlowski, Manfred

    2003-02-01

    The most fascinating example of the bi-directional interaction between the central nervous system (CNS) and immune system is the behavioral conditioning of immune functions. We therefore investigated the behavioral conditioning of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxin tolerance using the taste aversion paradigm. The conditioned stimulus (CS) saccharin was paired with the unconditioned stimulus (UCS) LPS over a five (CONDl) or four (COND2) days learning trial. Controls received drinking water with (SHAM) or without (UNT) LPS. Endotoxin tolerance was tested by determination of LPS-induced tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha release. After the avoidance of the induced endotoxin-tolerance the CS saccharin was re-presented in all experimental groups. A the end of the re-exposure period a complete endotoxin tolerance was noticed in the CONDl- and COND2-group. In contrast, no effect of saccharin administration was observed in the SHAM- or UNT-group. Our data demonstrate for the first time the behavioral conditioning of endotoxin tolerance. Furthermore, these results contribute new aspects to the mechanisms underlying the development and modulation of endotoxin tolerance.

  12. An official American Thoracic Society/International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation/Society of Critical Care Medicine/Association of Organ and Procurement Organizations/United Network of Organ Sharing Statement: ethical and policy considerations in organ donation after circulatory determination of death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gries, Cynthia J; White, Douglas B; Truog, Robert D; Dubois, James; Cosio, Carmen C; Dhanani, Sonny; Chan, Kevin M; Corris, Paul; Dark, John; Fulda, Gerald; Glazier, Alexandra K; Higgins, Robert; Love, Robert; Mason, David P; Nakagawa, Thomas A; Shapiro, Ron; Shemie, Sam; Tracy, Mary Fran; Travaline, John M; Valapour, Maryam; West, Lori; Zaas, David; Halpern, Scott D

    2013-07-01

    Donation after circulatory determination of death (DCDD) has the potential to increase the number of organs available for transplantation. Because consent and management of potential donors must occur before death, DCDD raises unique ethical and policy issues. To develop an ethics and health policy statement on adult and pediatric DCDD relevant to critical care and transplantation stakeholders. A multidisciplinary panel of stakeholders was convened to develop an ethics and health policy statement. The panel consisted of representatives from the American Thoracic Society, Society of Critical Care Medicine, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation, Association of Organ Procurement Organizations, and the United Network of Organ Sharing. The panel reviewed the literature, discussed important ethics and health policy considerations, and developed a guiding framework for decision making by stakeholders. A framework to guide ethics and health policy statement was established, which addressed the consent process, pre- and post mortem interventions, the determination of death, provisions of end-of-life care, and pediatric DCDD. The information presented in this Statement is based on the current evidence, experience, and clinical rationale. New clinical research and the development and dissemination of new technologies will eventually necessitate an update of this Statement.

  13. ISBNPA 2007: Marketing, serious games and nanny states. Observations from the sixth annual meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, Oslo 2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brug Johannes

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This commentary paper provides a selective overview of topics addressed at the sixth annual meeting of the International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity (ISBNPA. With 31 symposiums, 42 free paper sessions and 236 poster presentations ISBNPA 2007 provided a comprehensive overview of the state of the art and of new avenues for behavioral nutrition and physical activity research. Research presented at the conference helps to identify and specify important nutrition and physical activity behaviors for health promotion, as well as the correlates, predictors and determinants of these behaviors, and to build and test intervention strategies that go beyond traditional health education. ISBNPA 2007 also indicates that ISBNPA should strive to become more international by inclusion of more scientists from countries outside North America, Western Europe and Australia. ISBNPA should maintain its encouragement of research that is firmly rooted in behavioral theory and research that goes beyond applying cross-sectional research designs, and that addresses the most important public health issues associated with behavioral nutrition and physical activity.

  14. International outreach for promoting open geoscience content in Finnish university libraries - libraries as the advocates of citizen science awareness on emerging open geospatial data repositories in Finnish society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousi, A. M.; Branch, B. D.; Kong, N.; Fosmire, M.

    2013-12-01

    In their Finnish National Spatial Strategy 2010-2015 the Finland's Ministry of Agriculture and Forestry delineated e.g. that spatial data skills should support citizens everyday activities and facilitate decision-making and participation of citizens. Studies also predict that open data, particularly open spatial data, would create, when fully realizing their potential, a 15% increase into the turnovers of Finnish private sector companies. Finnish libraries have a long tradition of serving at the heart of Finnish information society. However, with the emerging possibilities of educating their users on open spatial data a very few initiatives have been made. The National Survey of Finland opened its data in 2012. Finnish technology university libraries, such as Aalto University Library, are open environments for all citizens, and seem suitable of being the first thriving entities in educating citizens on open geospatial data. There are however many obstacles to overcome, such as lack of knowledge about policies, lack of understanding of geospatial data services and insufficient know-how of GIS software among the personnel. This framework examines the benefits derived from an international collaboration between Purdue University Libraries and Aalto University Library to create local strategies in implementing open spatial data education initiatives in Aalto University Library's context. The results of this international collaboration are explicated for the benefit of the field as a whole.

  15. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... En Español Register today for the 49th Annual Autism Society National Conference Please plan on joining us ... Today Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  16. Predictive value of the 2014 International Society of Urological Pathology grading system for prostate cancer in patients undergoing radical prostatectomy with long-term follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grogan, Judith; Gupta, Ruta; Mahon, Kate L; Stricker, Phillip D; Haynes, Anne-Maree; Delprado, Warick; Turner, Jennifer; Horvath, Lisa G; Kench, James G

    2017-03-28

    To assess the relationship between the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) 2014 grading system, biochemical recurrence (BCR) and clinical recurrence (CLR) after radical prostatectomy (RP), to determine whether the 2014 ISUP grading system is a better predictor of survival compared with the previous Gleason scoring systems, and to investigate whether incorporation of the tertiary pattern/grade into the ISUP scoring system significantly improves its efficacy. A total of 635 RP cases (1991-1999) were identified from a database at a single institution. A histopathology review was performed to re-grade the cases as per the ISUP 2014 grading system. All relevant clinicopathological data and clinical follow-up (median [range] 15.25 [0.3-26] years) were obtained. Log-rank, Kaplan-Meier, Cox regression and Harrell's concordance c-indices analyses were performed. At a median follow-up of 15 years, 276 patients (44%) had BCR and 41 (7%) had CLR. Grade Groups 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 were seen in 112 (18%), 307 (48%), 129 (20%), 33 (5%) and 54 patients (9%), respectively: 337 (53%) were upgraded, while 70 (11%) were downgraded compared with the 1992 Gleason system. Grade Group (hazard ratio [HR] 4.9; P ISUP grading system was a significantly better predictor of BCR and CLR as well as prostate cancer-specific death, compared with the 2005 ISUP modified Gleason system. The replacement of the secondary pattern by the tertiary pattern did not alter the prognostic efficacy of the ISUP 2014 grading system. The ISUP 2014 grading system is a significant independent predictor of both BCR and CLR, outperforming the 2005 ISUP modified Gleason system. This classification system has the potential to influence clinical decision-making after RP. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Endotoxin contamination of apolipoprotein A-I: effect on macrophage proliferation--a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xueting; Xu, Qing; Champion, Keith; Kruth, Howard S

    2015-05-01

    This technical report addresses the problem of endotoxin contamination of apolipoprotein reagents. Using a bromodeoxyuridine incorporation cell proliferation assay, we observed that human plasma ApoA-I as low as 1 μg/ml resulted in a >90% inhibition in macrophage proliferation. However, not all ApoA-I from different sources showed this effect. We considered the possibility that endotoxin contamination of the apolipoproteins contributed to the differential inhibition of macrophage cell proliferation. Endotoxin alone very potently inhibited macrophage proliferation (0.1 ng/ml inhibited macrophage proliferation>90%). Measurement of endotoxin levels in the apolipoprotein products, including an analysis of free versus total endotoxin, the latter which included endotoxin that was masked due to binding to protein, suggested that free endotoxin mediated inhibition of macrophage proliferation. Despite the use of an advanced endotoxin removal procedure and agents commonly used to inhibit endotoxin action, the potency of endotoxin precluded successful elimination of endotoxin effect. Our findings show that endotoxin contamination can significantly influence apparent apolipoprotein-mediated cell effects (or effects of any other biological products), especially when these products are tested on highly endotoxin-sensitive cells, such as macrophages.

  18. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  19. Report from the international society for nomenclature of paediatric and congenital heart disease: creation of a visual encyclopedia illustrating the terms and definitions of the international pediatric and congenital cardiac code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giroud, Jorge M; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Spicer, Diane; Backer, Carl; Martin, Gerard R; Franklin, Rodney C G; Béland, Marie J; Krogmann, Otto N; Aiello, Vera D; Colan, Steven D; Everett, Allen D; William Gaynor, J; Kurosawa, Hiromi; Maruszewski, Bohdan; Stellin, Giovanni; Tchervenkov, Christo I; Walters, Henry L; Weinberg, Paul; Anderson, Robert H; Elliott, Martin J

    2010-10-01

    Tremendous progress has been made in the field of pediatric heart disease over the past 30 years. Although survival after heart surgery in children has improved dramatically, complications still occur, and optimization of outcomes for all patients remains a challenge. To improve outcomes, collaborative efforts are required and ultimately depend on the possibility of using a common language when discussing pediatric and congenital heart disease. Such a universal language has been developed and named the International Pediatric and Congenital Cardiac Code (IPCCC). To make the IPCCC more universally understood, efforts are under way to link the IPCCC to pictures and videos. The Archiving Working Group is an organization composed of leaders within the international pediatric cardiac medical community and part of the International Society for Nomenclature of Paediatric and Congenital Heart Disease (www.ipccc.net). Its purpose is to illustrate, with representative images of all types and formats, the pertinent aspects of cardiac diseases that affect neonates, infants, children, and adults with congenital heart disease, using the codes and definitions associated with the IPCCC as the organizational backbone. The Archiving Working Group certifies and links images and videos to the appropriate term and definition in the IPCCC. These images and videos are then displayed in an electronic format on the Internet. The purpose of this publication is to report the recent progress made by the Archiving Working Group in establishing an Internet-based, image encyclopedia that is based on the standards of the IPCCC.

  20. Level of clinical evidence presented at the International Society for Hip Arthroscopy Annual Scientific Meeting over 5 years (2010–2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Jeffrey; de SA, Darren; Shallow, Scott; Simunovic, Nicole; Safran, Marc R.; Philippon, Marc J.; Ayeni, Olufemi R.

    2015-01-01

    The International Society for Hip Arthroscopy (ISHA) Annual Scientific Meeting is at the forefront of informing today’s orthopaedic surgeons and society of the rapid advances in the exponentially growing field of hip arthroscopy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate and observe any trends in the level of clinical evidence in the papers and posters presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meeting from 2010 to 2014. The online abstracts of the paper and poster presentations presented at the ISHA Annual Scientific Meetings were independently evaluated by two reviewers (582 total resulting presentations). Two reviewers screened these results for clinical studies and graded the quality of evidence from level I (i.e. randomized trials) to IV (i.e. case series) based on the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons classification system. Four hundred and twenty-eight presentations met the inclusion criteria and were evaluated. Overall, 10.1% of the presentations were level I, 12.8% were level II, 30.1% were level III and 47.0% were level IV evidence. Over time, from 2010 to 2014, we observed an increase in the percentage of level II paper presentations, an increase in the proportion of level III poster presentations, and a decrease in the proportion of both level IV paper and poster presentations. Significant non-random improvement in the level of evidence presented was noted for the poster presentations (P = 0.012) but not for the paper presentations (P = 0.61) over the study period. Statistical trends demonstrate ISHA’s increased awareness and commitment to presenting higher quality evidence as the availability of this evidence increases. PMID:27011857

  1. Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular protein permeability in the dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welsh, C.H.; Dauber, I.M.; Weil, J.V.

    1986-10-01

    Endotoxin increases pulmonary vascular permeability consistently in some species but fails to reliably cause injury in the dog. We wondered whether this phenomenon depended on the method of injury assessment, as others have relied on edema measurement; we quantified injury by monitoring the rate of extravascular protein accumulation. /sup 113m/In-labeled protein and /sup 99m/Tc-labeled erythrocytes were injected into anesthetized dogs and monitored by an externally placed lung probe. A protein leak index, the rate of extravascular protein accumulation, was derived from the rate of increase in lung protein counts corrected for changes in intravascular protein activity. After administration of Salmonella enteriditis endotoxin (4 micrograms/kg), the protein leak index was elevated 2.5-fold (41.1 +/- 4.6 X 10(-4) min-1) compared with control (16.0 +/- 2.8 X 10(-4) min-1). In contrast, wet-to-dry weight ratios failed to increase after endotoxin (4.6 +/- 0.8 vs. control values of 4.2 +/- 0.5 g/g dry bloodless lung). However, we observed that endotoxin increased lung dry weight (per unit body weight), which may have attenuated the change in wet-to-dry weight ratios. To determine whether low microvascular pressures following endotoxin attenuated edema formation, we increased pulmonary arterial wedge pressures in five dogs by saline infusion, which caused an increase in wet-to-dry weight ratios following endotoxin but no change in the five controls. We conclude that low dose endotoxin causes pulmonary vascular protein leak in the dog while edema formation is minimal or absent.

  2. Duration of in vivo endotoxin tolerance in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcombe, Susan J; Jacobs, Carrie C; Cook, Vanessa L; Gandy, Jeffery C; Hauptman, Joseph G; Sordillo, Lorraine M

    2016-05-01

    Endotoxemia models are used to study mechanisms and treatments of early sepsis. Repeated endotoxin exposures induce periods of endotoxin tolerance, characterized by diminished proinflammatory responses to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and modulated production of proinflammatory cytokines. Repeated measure designs using equine endotoxemia models are rarely performed, despite the advantages associated with reduced variability, because the altered responsiveness would confound study results and because the duration of equine endotoxin tolerance is unknown. We determined the interval of endotoxin tolerance, in vivo, in horses based on physical, clinicopathologic, and proinflammatory gene expression responses to repeated endotoxin exposures. Six horses received 30 ng/kg LPS in saline infused over 30 min. Behavior pain scores, physical examination parameters, and blood for complete blood count and proinflammatory gene expression were obtained at predetermined intervals for 24h. Horses received a total of 3 endotoxin exposures. The first exposure was LPS 1, followed 7 days later by LPS 7 or 14-21 days later by LPS 14-21. Lipopolysaccharide exposures were allocated in a randomized, crossover design. Lipopolysaccharide produced clinical and clinicopathologic signs of endotoxemia and increased expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8, Pendotoxin tolerance following LPS 7 but not following LPS 14-21. Horses had significantly lower pain scores, heart rates, respiratory rates and duration of fever, after LPS 7 compared to LPS 1 and LPS 14-21, Pendotoxin tolerance had subsided. A minimum of 3 weeks between experiments is warranted if repeated measures designs are used to assess in vivo response to endotoxin in horses.

  3. 2012 best practices for repositories collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of biological materials for research international society for biological and environmental repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Third Edition [Formula: see text] [Box: see text] Printed with permission from the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) © 2011 ISBER All Rights Reserved Editor-in-Chief Lori D. Campbell, PhD Associate Editors Fay Betsou, PhD Debra Leiolani Garcia, MPA Judith G. Giri, PhD Karen E. Pitt, PhD Rebecca S. Pugh, MS Katherine C. Sexton, MBA Amy P.N. Skubitz, PhD Stella B. Somiari, PhD Individual Contributors to the Third Edition Jonas Astrin, Susan Baker, Thomas J. Barr, Erica Benson, Mark Cada, Lori Campbell, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques Campos, David Carpentieri, Omoshile Clement, Domenico Coppola, Yvonne De Souza, Paul Fearn, Kelly Feil, Debra Garcia, Judith Giri, William E. Grizzle, Kathleen Groover, Keith Harding, Edward Kaercher, Joseph Kessler, Sarah Loud, Hannah Maynor, Kevin McCluskey, Kevin Meagher, Cheryl Michels, Lisa Miranda, Judy Muller-Cohn, Rolf Muller, James O'Sullivan, Karen Pitt, Rebecca Pugh, Rivka Ravid, Katherine Sexton, Ricardo Luis A. Silva, Frank Simione, Amy Skubitz, Stella Somiari, Frans van der Horst, Gavin Welch, Andy Zaayenga 2012 Best Practices for Repositories: Collection, Storage, Retrieval and Distribution of Biological Materials for Research INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPOSITORIES (ISBER) INTRODUCTION T he availability of high quality biological and environmental specimens for research purposes requires the development of standardized methods for collection, long-term storage, retrieval and distribution of specimens that will enable their future use. Sharing successful strategies for accomplishing this goal is one of the driving forces for the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER). For more information about ISBER see www.isber.org . ISBER's Best Practices for Repositories (Best Practices) reflect the collective experience of its members and has received broad input from other repository professionals. Throughout this document

  4. PREFACE: International Symposium on Materials Science and Innovation for Sustainable Society - Eco-Materials and Eco-Innovation for Global Sustainability - The 21st Iketani Conference 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Yasuo

    2012-08-01

    Conference logo The 21st century has been called the century of environmental revolution. Green innovations and environmentally friendly production systems based on physics, chemistry, materials science, and electronic engineering will be indispensable for ensuring renewable energy and establishing a sustainable society. In particular, production design, materials processing, and fabrication technologies such as welding and joining will be very important components of such green innovations. For these reasons, the International Symposium on Materials Science and Innovation for Sustainable Society - eco-materials and eco-innovation for global sustainability - (ECO-MATES 2011) was organized by the Joining and Welding Research Institute (JWRI) and the Center of Environmental Innovation Design for Sustainability (CEIDS), Osaka University. ECO-MATES 2011 was held at Hotel Hankyu Expo Park, Osaka, Japan from 28-30 November 2011. 435 participants from 20 countries around the world attended the symposium. 149 oral presentations including 60 invited talks and 160 posters were presented at the symposium to discuss the latest research and developments in green innovations in relation to environmental issues. The topics of the symposium covered all environmentally related fields including renewable energy, energy-materials, environment and resources, waste and biomass, power electronics, semiconductor, rare-earth metals, functional materials, organic electronics materials, electronics packaging, smart processing, joining and welding, eco-efficient processes, and green applied physics and chemistry. Therefore, 55 full papers concerning green innovations and environmentally benign production were selected and approved by the editorial board and the program committee of ECO-MATES 2011. All papers were accepted through peer review processes. I believe that all the papers have many informative contents. On behalf of the steering committee of the symposium, I would like to express

  5. Report from AmSECT’s International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion: American Society of ExtraCorporeal Technology Standards and Guidelines for Perfusion Practice: 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Robert A.; Bronson, Shahna L.; Dickinson, Timothy A.; Fitzgerald, David C.; Likosky, Donald S.; Mellas, Nicholas B.; Shann, Kenneth G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract: One of the roles of a professional society is to develop standards and guidelines of practice as an instrument to guide safe and effective patient care. The American Society of Extracorporeal Technology (AmSECT) first published its Essentials for Perfusion Practice, Clinical Function: Conduct of Extracorporeal Circulation in 1993. The International Consortium for Evidence-Based Perfusion (ICEBP), a committee within AmSECT, was tasked with updating this document in 2010. The aim of this report is to describe the method of development and content of AmSECT’s new professional standards and guidelines. The ICEBP committee independently evaluated and provided input regarding the current “Essentials and Guidelines.” Structural changes were made to the entire document, and a draft document was developed, presented, and circulated to the AmSECT Board of Directors and broader membership for comment. Informed by these reviews, a revised document was then presented to the Society for a membership vote. The final document consists of 15 areas of practice covered by 50 Standards and 38 Guidelines (see Appendix 1) with the first standard focusing on the development of institutional protocols to support their implementation and use. A majority of the membership voted to accept the document (81.2% of the voting membership accepting, 18.8% rejecting). After an audit of the balloting process by AmSECT’s Ethics Committee, the results were reported to the membership and the document was officially adopted on July 24, 2013. The Standards and Guidelines will serve as a useful guide for cardiac surgical teams that wish to develop institution-specific standards and guidelines to improve the reliability, safety, and effectiveness of adult cardiopulmonary bypass. The ICEBP recognizes that the development of a Standards and Guidelines statement alone will not change care. Safe, reliable, and effective care will be best served through the development and implementation of

  6. LOW-DOSE AIRBORNE ENDOTOXIN EXPOSURE ENHANCES BRONCHIAL RESPONSIVENESS TO INHALED ALLERGEN IN ATOPIC ASTHMATICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endotoxin exposure has been associated with both protection against development of TH2-immune responses during childhood and exacerbation of asthma in persons who already have allergic airway inflammation.1 Occupational and experimental inhalation exposures to endotoxin have been...

  7. Histological analysis of the association between formocresol and endotoxin in the subcutaneous tissue of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sant'anna, Ana Teresa; Spolidório, Luis Carlos; Ramalho, Lizeti Toledo Oliveira

    2008-01-01

    This study performed a histological analysis of the effect of formocresol associated to endotoxin (LPS) in the subcutaneous connective tissue of mice. Ninety mice were randomly assigned to 3 groups (n=30). Each animal received one plastic tube implant containing endotoxin solution (10 mg/mL), formocresol (original formula) or a mixture of endotoxin and formocresol. The endotoxin and formocresol groups served as controls. The periods of analysis were 7, 15 and 30 days. At each experimental period, tissue samples were collected and submitted to routine processing for histological analysis. Endotoxin and formocresol produced necrosis and chronic inflammation at 7 and 15 days. At 30 days, the endotoxin group showed no necrosis, while in the formocresol group necrosis persisted. The formocresol-endotoxin association produced necrosis and chronic inflammation in the same way as observed with formocresol at all experimental periods. In conclusion, formocresol seems not to be able to inactive the toxic effects of endotoxin in connective tissues.

  8. Puerarin ameliorates experimental alcoholic liver injury by inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jing-Hua; Cui, Tuan; Huang, Fu; Chen, Liang; Zhao, Yu; Xu, Lin; Xu, Li-Li; Feng, Qin; Hu, Yi-Yang

    2013-03-01

    Puerarin, an isoflavone component extracted from Kudzu (Pueraria lobata), has been demonstrated to alleviate alcohol-related disorders. Our study examined whether puerarin ameliorates chronic alcoholic liver injury through inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, the subsequent Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression. Rats were provided with the Liber-DeCarli liquid diet for 8 weeks. Puerarin (90 mg/kg or 180 mg/kg daily) was orally administered from the beginning of the third week until the end of the experiment. Chronic alcohol intake caused increased serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, hepatic gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase, and triglyceride levels as well as fatty liver and neutrophil infiltration in hepatic lobules as determined by biochemical and histologic assays. A significant increase of liver tumor necrosis factor α was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. These pathologic effects correlated with increased endotoxin level in portal vein and upregulated protein expression of hepatic CD68, lipopolysaccharide-binding protein, CD14, Toll-like receptor 2, and Toll-like receptor 4. Meanwhile, the intestinal microvilli were observed to be sparse, shortened, and irregularity in distribution under the transmission electron microscope in conjunction with the downregulated intestinal zonula occludens-1 protein expression. These hepatic pathologic changes were significantly inhibited in puerarin-treated animals as were the endotoxin levels and hepatic CD68 and endotoxin receptors. Moreover, the pathologic changes in intestinal microvillus and the decreased intestinal zonula occludens-1 were also ameliorated with puerarin treatment. These results thus demonstrate that puerarin inhibition of endotoxin gut leakage, Kupffer cell activation, and endotoxin receptors expression is involved in the alleviation of chronic alcoholic liver injury in rats.

  9. Effects of Postoperative Enteral Immune-enhancing Diet on Plasma Endotoxin Level, Plasma Endotoxin Inactivation Capacity and Clinical Outcome

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAO Guoxiang; XUE Xinbo; LU Xingpei; WANG Jianming; QIAN Jiaqin

    2005-01-01

    This study examined the postoperative plasma endotoxin level, plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity and clinical outcome after administration of an enteral diet supplemented with glutamine, arginine and ω-3-fatty acid in patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations on an prospective, randomized and double-blind design. 40 patients undergoing gastrointestinal operations were randomized into two groups, with each having 20 patients. One group received standard enteral nutrition and the other was fed the formulation supplemented with glutamine, arginine and ω-3-fatty acid. The two groups were isonitrogenous. The infusion was started from day 1 after surgery and continued for 7 days. Blood samples were collected on the morning of day 1 before operation and on the morning of 1, 4 and 7 day(s) after operation and analyzed for plasma endotoxin level and endotoxin inactivation capacity (EIC). Our study found no differences between the two groups on plasma endotoxin level. After surgery a rapid reduction in plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity was observed in both groups, a significant recovery of the plasma endotoxin inactivation capacity was observed on morning of day 4 after surgery in the study group (0.12±0.02 EU/mL and 0. 078±0.022 EU/mL respectively, P<0.01). Shortened hospital stay was observed in the experimental group (11.7±2.0 days in the control group and 10.6±1.2 days in the experimental group respectively, P=0.03). It is concluded that perioperative parenteral nutrition supplemented with glutamine, arginine and ω-3-fatty acid ameliorated postoperative immunodepression but without direct effect on endotoxemia.

  10. Selected pioneering works on humus in soils and sediments during the 20th century: A retrospective look from the International Humic Substances Society view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, Christian; Brossard, Michel; Chen, Yona; Landa, Edward R.; Trichet, Jean

    Organic matter in general, and humic substances (HS) in particular, are involved in many processes in soils, sediments, rocks and natural waters. These include rock weathering, plant nutrition, pH buffering, trace metal mobility and toxicity, bioavailability, degradation and transport of hydrophobic organic chemicals, formation of disinfection by-products during water treatment, heterotrophic production in blackwater ecosystems and, more generally, the global carbon cycle. Before the 1970s, natural organic matter of different ecosystem pools ( i.e., soils, sediments, and natural waters) was often studied in isolation, although many similarities exist between them. This is particularly so for HS. In this historical context, a need appeared at the international level for bringing together environmental chemists, soil scientists, hydrologists, and geologists who were interested in HS to provide a forum for the exchange of ideas, to standardize analytical procedures and agree on definitions of HS. The International Humic Substances Society (IHSS) was founded in Denver, Colorado (USA) in 1981 with several objectives among them “to bring together scientists in the coal, soil, and water sciences with interests in humic substances” (home page of the IHSS web site: http://ihss.gatech.edu/ihss2/index.html). This paper presents selected pioneering works on humus in soils and sediments during the 20th century with a special focus on the links between the studies of soil HS and the formation, during early diagenesis, of the precursors of kerogens. Temporal coverage includes key contributions preceding the founding of the IHSS, and a brief history of the organization is presented.

  11. The effects of dopamine on cardiogenic and endotoxin experimental shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, G; Longo, T; Merlo, L; Noseda, V

    1973-01-01

    Studies on dogs show that dopamine improves cardiac performance and increases renal and mesenteric flow. This paper investigates the cardiovascular effects of dopamine on narcotized dogs. 0.2 ml. of mercury was administered into the circumflex branch of the left coronary artery of 2 groups of anesthetized dogs to induce myocardial infarction. 1-3 mg/lg of Eschrichia coli endotoxin was injected in 2 other groups of dogs to induce endotoxin shock. Dopamine was administered intravenousely in one group with cardiogenic shock and in the other group with endotoxin shock; noradrenaline was administered in the other 2 groups. Coronary resistances increased after induction of shock and declined towards normal after dopamine was injected. The effect of dopamine on mesenteric and renal resistance was not signficant. Noradrenaline's effect on cardiac performance was similar to that of dopamine, although unlike dopamine, it contributed to a significant increase of total peripheral, coronary, mesenteric, renal and femoral resistances. The effects of dopamine on the dog's hemodynamics were less evident in endotoxin than in cardiogenic shock on account of the fact that in endotoxin shock, circulatory blood volume declines to a higher extent than in cardiogenic shock, and greater blood alterations develop, mainly acidosis. In such conditions, dopamine alone will not help the hemodynamic parameters return to normal levels. Lotto et al. reports that in shocked humans with serious metabolic acidosis, dopamine is effective only when bicarbonate solutions are infused to adjust blood PH.

  12. Evolution of endotoxin contamination during production of a therapeutic serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaldi, Hugo; Morais, Victor

    2007-01-01

    A comparative bench-scale study of endotoxin contamination is presented for two common processes of immunoglobulin purification from equine plasma: ammonium sulphate fractionation of F(ab')2 fragments and caprylic acid precipitation of non-IgG proteins. To this end, both processes were carried out under normal sterile conditions, using sanitized material and equipment and optimal water quality in a clean but open environment. Stream samples, taken at different stages from each process, were analyzed for endotoxin content by the Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) test. It was found that exogenous contamination preferentially came from endotoxins already present in reagents and/or raw materials, whereas contamination from the environment was minimal. Endogenous endotoxin accumulation, concomitant with the concentration of proteins during processing, was found to be an important factor. With classic technology, blood extraction and sterilizing filtration are critical points for both processes. It is concluded that sterility is not a sufficient condition to obtain an endotoxin-free product. Only with proper sanitization of material, and by applying the caprylic acid purification process with a starting plasma below 4-5 EU/mL, would it be possible to achieve a final product within the norm.

  13. Endotoxin-induced antitumor activity in the mouse is highly potentiated by muramyl dipeptide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, F.M.A.; Bloksma, N.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1984-01-01

    The ability of aqueous solutions of various endotoxin preparations, muramyl dipeptide (MDP) and combinations of endotoxin and MDP, to induce necrosis and regression of subcutaneous Meth A transplants in mice and their toxicity were studied. While intravenously injected toxic endotoxins, in contrast

  14. DMPD: Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17405910 Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. Bosshart H, Heinzelman...n M. Ann N Y Acad Sci. 2007 Jan;1096:1-17. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Targeting bacterial endotoxin:... two sides of a coin. PubmedID 17405910 Title Targeting bacterial endotoxin: two sides of a coin. Authors Bo

  15. Respiratory effects of endotoxin exposure : Individual susceptibility and gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, L.A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/311470882

    2008-01-01

    Endotoxins are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that occur commonly on plants and plant products and as gut commensals. A large variability in airborne endotoxin exposure levels has been measured in a range of agricultural and other occupational environments. Inhalation of endotoxins m

  16. Endotoxin Treatment of Pregnant Rats Affects Sexual Behavior of the Male Offspring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijkstra, S.; Valkhof, N.; Koolhaas, J.M.; Schuiling, G.A.

    1991-01-01

    The offspring of endotoxin-infused pregnant rats (0.2 µg endotoxin, 53.3 min, day 18 of pregnancy) did not exhibit different behavior in the Hebb-Williams-type maze test, but the males showed aberrations in the sexual behavior test. Because endotoxin did not cross the placental barrier, it was concl

  17. Respiratory effects of endotoxin exposure : Individual susceptibility and gene-environment interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, L.A.

    2008-01-01

    Endotoxins are cell wall components of Gram-negative bacteria that occur commonly on plants and plant products and as gut commensals. A large variability in airborne endotoxin exposure levels has been measured in a range of agricultural and other occupational environments. Inhalation of endotoxins m

  18. Geographical variation and the determinants of domestic endotoxin levels in mattress dust in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, C.M.; Thiering, E.; Doekes, G.; Zock, J.P.; Bakolis, I.; Norbäck, D.; Sunyer, J.; Villani, S.; Verlato, G.; Täubel, M.; Jarvis, D.

    2012-01-01

    Endotoxin exposures have manifold effects on human health. The geographical variation and determinants of domestic endotoxin levels in Europe have not yet been extensively described. To investigate the geographical variation and determinants of domestic endotoxin concentrations in mattress dust in E

  19. ACTIVATION OF PLASMA SYSTEMS AND BLOOD-CELLS BY ENDOTOXIN IN RABBITS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JANSEN, NJG; VANOEVEREN, W; HOITING, BH; WILDEVUUR, CRH

    1991-01-01

    Endotoxin plays an important role in the pathogenesis of septicaemia by activation of cellular and plasmatic systems. This study was performed to investigate the effects of infusion of endotoxin in rabbits by measuring the activation of cellular and plasma systems. Endotoxin was infused at a rate of

  20. Management of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) in the elderly: a position paper from an international Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauder, R; Eichhorst, B; Hamaker, M E; Kaplanov, K; Morrison, V A; Österborg, A; Poddubnaya, I; Woyach, J A; Shanafelt, T; Smolej, L; Ysebaert, L; Goede, V

    2016-11-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) mainly affects older people: the median age at diagnosis is > 70 years. Elderly patients with CLL are heterogeneous with regard both to the biology of their disease and aging. Following the diagnosis of CLL in an elderly individual, careful risk assessment is essential when treatment options are evaluated. This includes not only clinical staging and evaluation of disease-specific prognostic biomarkers such as 17p deletion and TP53 mutation, but also of comorbidities, physical capacity, nutritional status, cognitive capacity, ability to perform activities of daily living and social support. Comorbidity scoring and geriatric assessment tools are helpful in achieving such multidimensional evaluation in a systematic manner. The introduction of new drugs including novel monoclonal antibodies and kinase inhibitors offers enhanced opportunities for the treatment of elderly patients with CLL. This position paper of a Task Force of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) reviews currently available evidence relevant to such patients. All types of elderly patient (i.e. chronological age > 65-70 years) are considered, from robust (fit) to vulnerable (unfit) to the terminally ill. Among the topics covered are the following: (i) the relationship between chronological age, prognosis and survival, (ii) assessment of biological aging, (iii) biological age as a determinant of treatment feasibility and tolerance and (iv) tailoring of both first and further-line treatment to the circumstances of the individual patient.

  1. Lessons learned from the science of caring: Extending the reach of psychosocial oncology: The International Psycho-Oncology Society 2016 Sutherland Award Lecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bultz, Barry D

    2017-06-01

    In medicine, referral to a medical oncology specialty is based on recent history, physical examination, pathology, surgery reports, imaging, blood work, and the patient's vital signs. By contrast, referral to a psychosocial specialist has typically been based on the patients expressed request for psychosocial support or the health care team's observation of the patient's limited adjustment or poor coping with the diagnosis, treatment, or end-of-life distress. These observations are usually based on clinical acumen not on metrics. In psychosocial oncology, by committing to the science of caring and relying on the use of standardized tools to screen for distress, the multidisciplinary cancer care team assess, communicate, and intervene on what is measured. That is, health care providers can begin to address the patients' identified concerns. Branding distress as the 6th vital sign and incorporating screening for distress into standard cancer practice can be an effective strategy to challenging the resistance in implementation of psychosocial oncology in cancer care institutions. Accreditation agencies are endorsing the need to assess patient distress and better manage symptoms of distress as part of routine and standardized patient care. While many international organizations and societies support the importance of screening, implementing screening for distress still has a long way to go to be operationalized in many cancer care programs. Screening for distress when implemented does, however, create an opportunity for psychosocial oncology to extend its reach into cancer care programs and institutions. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Latin America multidisciplinary research on heat shock proteins and cell stress: proceedings of the first conference of the Latin America Chapter of the Cell Stress Society International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausero, María A

    2015-09-01

    The First Conference of the Latin America Chapter of the Cell Stress Society International (CSSI) organized by CSSI was held in Montevideo, Uruguay, on March 11-14, 2014. The Latin America Chapter of the CSSI (LAC-CSSI) was established at the Workshop on the Molecular Biology of the Stress Response, Porto Alegre, Brazil, May 2012. The chapter's first meeting took place in the beautiful city of Montevideo and was chaired by the first (LAC-CSSI) elected president Professor María Bausero. Forty-two invited speakers presented their work to more than 100 scientists. The first day of the conference was dedicated to an introductory program for students, young investigators, and participants new to the field of molecular chaperones and the stress response. These seminars were held in the Pasteur Institute of Montevideo and the Faculty of Sciences of the University of the Republic. These institutions were carefully selected to give foreign participants a broad view of the diversity of students and institutions doing research in Uruguay, as well as an opportunity for direct interaction with our scientists and students. Invited speakers for the seminar series were Dr. Wolfgang Schumann, Dr. Cristina Bonorino, Dr. Antonio De Maio, Dr. Ian Brown, Dr. Rafael Radi, Dr. Daniel Ciocca, and Dr. Celia Quijano. The remaining days of the conference took place at the Sheraton Hotel in Montevideo, and the scientific sessions are discussed below.

  3. A report of the 2002-2008 paternity testing workshops of the English speaking working group of the International Society for Forensic Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Anni Rønfeldt; Hallenberg, Charlotte; Simonsen, Bo Thisted; Langkjaer, Rikke Breinhold; Morling, Niels

    2009-09-01

    The English Speaking Working Group (ESWG) of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) offers an annual Paternity Testing Workshop open to all members of the group. Blood samples, a questionnaire and a paper challenge are sent to the participants. Here, we present the results of the 2002-2008 Paternity Testing Workshops with the objective to evaluate the uniformity of DNA-profiling and conclusions of the participating laboratories as well as to clarify tendencies in typing strategies and biostatistical evaluations of the laboratories. The numbers of participating laboratories increased from 46 in 2002 to 68 in 2008. The results showed an increasing degree of concordance concerning methods and DNA systems used and a high degree of uniformity in typing results with discrepancies in 0.1 and 0.3 % of all submitted PCR-based results. The paper challenges showed uniformity in the calculation of the weight of evidence for simple cases with straight-forward genetic constellations. However, a high degree of variation existed in complex scenarios with rare genetic constellations such as genetic inconsistencies/possible silent alleles, rare alleles and haplotypes.

  4. Chronic daily headache in a tertiary care population: correlation between the International Headache Society diagnostic criteria and proposed revisions of criteria for chronic daily headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigal, M E; Sheftell, F D; Rapoport, A M; Lipton, R B; Tepper, S J

    2002-07-01

    The International Headache Society (IHS) has been criticized for its approach to classification of chronic daily headache (CDH); Silberstein and Lipton criteria provide an alternative to this approach. The aim of this study is to apply the alternative diagnostic approaches to a sample of CDH patients consulting in specialty care. Our sample consisted of 638 patients with CDH. Patients were classified according to both classification systems. Patients were predominantly female (65.0%), with ages ranging from 11 to 88 years. According to the Silberstein and Lipton classification, we found eight different diagnoses. The most common diagnosis was chronic migraine (87.4%), followed by new daily persistent headache (10.8%). Just six patients had chronic tension-type headache (CTTH). Applying the IHS criteria we found 14 different diagnoses. Migraine was found in 576 (90.2%) patients. CTTH occurred in 621 (97.3%), with only 10 (1.57%) having this as the sole diagnosis. We conclude that both systems allow for the classification of most patients with CDH when daily headache diaries are available. The main difference is that the IHS classification is cumbersome and requires multiple diagnoses. The Silberstein and Lipton system is easier to apply, and more parsimonious. These findings support revision of the IHS classification system to include chronic migraine.

  5. Patients with sudden onset headache not meeting the criteria of the International Headache Society for new daily persistent headache. How to classify them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzillo, Paulo Hélio; Nemoto, Patrícia Homsi

    2011-12-01

    We conducted a retrospective analysis of the records of 1348 patients regularly treated at the headache clinic of Department of Neurology of Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil. Sixty-two patients reported history of daily and persistent headache. From the 62 patients selected, only 21 (group 1) could be diagnosed with new daily-persistent headache (NDPH) according to the International Headache Society (HIS) 2004 criteria. The 41 remaining patients (group 2) could not be diagnosed with NDPH according to IHS-2004 once they presented two or more migraine attack-related symptoms, such as: nausea, photophobia, phonophobia and vomiting, in different combinations. It was not possible to classify them in groups 1 to 4 of primary headaches either. How to classify them? We suggest that the criteria are revised. And one way we can classify them, would be the subdivision: NDPH with migraine features and without migraine features that would allow the inclusion of all individuals present who has a daily and persistent headache from the beginning.

  6. Imaging in the Age of Precision Medicine: Summary of the Proceedings of the 10th Biannual Symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herold, Christian J; Lewin, Jonathan S; Wibmer, Andreas G; Thrall, James H; Krestin, Gabriel P; Dixon, Adrian K; Schoenberg, Stefan O; Geckle, Rena J; Muellner, Ada; Hricak, Hedvig

    2016-04-01

    During the past decade, with its breakthroughs in systems biology, precision medicine (PM) has emerged as a novel health-care paradigm. Challenging reductionism and broad-based approaches in medicine, PM is an approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle. It involves integrating information from multiple sources in a holistic manner to achieve a definitive diagnosis, focused treatment, and adequate response assessment. Biomedical imaging and imaging-guided interventions, which provide multiparametric morphologic and functional information and enable focused, minimally invasive treatments, are key elements in the infrastructure needed for PM. The emerging discipline of radiogenomics, which links genotypic information to phenotypic disease manifestations at imaging, should also greatly contribute to patient-tailored care. Because of the growing volume and complexity of imaging data, decision-support algorithms will be required to help physicians apply the most essential patient data for optimal management. These innovations will challenge traditional concepts of health care and business models. Reimbursement policies and quality assurance measures will have to be reconsidered and adapted. In their 10th biannual symposium, which was held in August 2013, the members of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology discussed the opportunities and challenges arising for the imaging community with the transition to PM. This article summarizes the discussions and central messages of the symposium.

  7. The assessment of the spondyloarthritis international society concept and criteria for the classification of axial spondyloarthritis and peripheral spondyloarthritis: A critical appraisal for the pediatric rheumatologist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgos-Vargas Ruben

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review refers to the origin and current state of the assessment of the SpondyloArthritis International Society (ASAS criteria for the classification of axial and peripheral spondyloarthritis (SpA and the possible implications in the pediatric population. The ASAS criteria evolved from the idea that the earlier the recognition of patients with ankylosing spondylitis, the better the efficacy of tumor necrosis factor blockers. Strategies included the development of new concepts, definitions, and techniques for the study of clinical signs and symptoms. Of relevance, the new definition of inflammatory back pain (IBP and the introduction of sacroiliitis by magnetic resonance imaging represented the most important advance in the early identification of AS in the “pre-radiographic stage” of the disease. AS is considered in this paper as a disease continuum with symptoms depending on age at onset. The application of those specific strategies in children and adolescents with SpA seems limited because the most important manifestation in the early stage of disease is not IBP, but peripheral arthritis and enthesitis. In this instance, the logical approach to juvenile onset SpA according to ASAS criteria should not be through the axial criteria but rather the peripheral set of criteria.

  8. Teaching About the Links Between Soils and Climate: An International Year of Soil Outreach by the Soil Science Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.

    2015-04-01

    Soil scientists are well aware of the intimate links that exist between soils and climate, but the same is not always true of the broader population. In an attempt to help address this, the Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) has designated the theme "Soils and Climate" for the month of November, 2015 as part of the SSSA International Year of Soil (IYS) celebration. The topic has been further subdivided into three subthemes: 1) carbon sequestration and greenhouse gases, 2) Soils and past environments, and 3) Desertification and drought. Each subtheme outreach has two parts 1) lesson plans that K-12 educators can use in their classrooms, and 2) materials that a trained soil scientist can present to the general public. Activities developed for the theme include classroom activities to accompany an online game that students can play to see how farm management choices influence greenhouse gas emissions, questions to go with a vermicomposting activity, and discussion session questions to go with a movie on the USA Dust Bowl. All materials are available online free of charge. The Soils and Climate materials can be found at https://www.soils.org/iys/12-month-resources/november; all of the SSSA IYS materials can be found at https://www.soils.org/iys.

  9. Advances in caring for the older cancer patient:a report from the 2015 conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rob Stepney

    2016-01-01

    A paradox in cancer research is that the majority of patients enrolled in clinical trials are relatively young and fit while typical patients in daily practice are elderly and have comorbidities and impaired organ function. Given these differences, many major studies provide an imperfect guide to optimizing the treatment of the majority of patients. Since cancer incidence is highly correlated with age, and since the world's population is rapidly ageing, this problem can only increase. For this reason, oncologists and geriatricians need to collaborate in developing tools to systematically assess the health status of elderly patients and their fitness to receive cancer therapies of various intensity. Tailoring anti-cancer treatments and supportive care to individual needs should be seen as part of the move towards personalized medicine. Achieving this goal is as much of a challenge to developing and middle-income countries as it is to western nations. The 2015 annual conference of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) held in Prague, Czech Republic, November 2015 and had a global focus on advancing the science of geriatric oncology and supportive care. Central to this approach is the systematic assessment of life expectancy, independent functioning, and the physical and psychological health of older cancer patients. The assumption behind comprehensive geriatric assessment is that elderly cancer patients have complex needs. The implication is that effective intervention will require a multidisciplinary team. Examples of effective geriatric assessment, multidisciplinary working and supportive care were presented at the SIOG conference.

  10. Summary of the 1st Schizophrenia International Research Society Conference oral sessions, Venice, Italy, June 21-25, 2008: the rapporteur reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubaker, Roohi; Alaerts, Maaike; Allman, Ava-Ann; Barnett, Jennifer; Belujon, Pauline; Bittner, Robert A; Burne, Thomas H J; Cahn, Wiepke; Chance, Steven; Cherkerzian, Sara; deSouza, Renan; Di Forti, Marta; du Bois, Teresa; Fatjó-Vilas, Mar; Green, Melissa; Halperin, Demian; Halpern, Demian; John, John P; Kemp, Aaron; Koelkebeck, Katja; Lee, Jimmy; Lodge, Daniel J; Michalopoulou, Panayiota; Mompremier, LaNina; Nelson, Barnaby; Perälä, Jonna; Rotarska-Jagiela, Anna; Schoeman, Renata; Thakkar, Katharine N; Valuri, Giuletta; Varambally, Shivarama; Zai, Clement; DeLisi, Lynn E

    2008-10-01

    The Schizophrenia International Research Society held its first scientific conference in Venice, Italy, June 21 to 25th, 2008. A wide range of controversial topics were presented in overlapping and plenary oral sessions. These included new genetic studies, controversies about early detection of schizophrenia and the prodrome, treatment issues, clinical characteristics, cognition, neuropathology and neurophysiology, other etiological considerations, substance abuse co-morbidity, and animal models for investigating disease etiology and for use as targets in drug studies. Young investigators in the field were awarded travel grants to participate in the congress and one of their roles was to summarize the oral sessions and subsequent discussions. The reports that follow are the culmination of this work produced by 30 young investigators who attended the congress. It is hoped that these summaries will be useful synopses of what actually occurred at the congress for those who did not attend each session or were unable to be present. The abstracts of all presentations, as submitted by the authors a few months prior, were previously published as supplement 2 to volume 102/1-3, June 2008.

  11. International Committee on Mental Health in Cystic Fibrosis: Cystic Fibrosis Foundation and European Cystic Fibrosis Society consensus statements for screening and treating depression and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quittner, Alexandra L; Abbott, Janice; Georgiopoulos, Anna M; Goldbeck, Lutz; Smith, Beth; Hempstead, Sarah E; Marshall, Bruce; Sabadosa, Kathryn A; Elborn, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    Studies measuring psychological distress in individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) have found high rates of both depression and anxiety. Psychological symptoms in both individuals with CF and parent caregivers have been associated with decreased lung function, lower body mass index, worse adherence, worse health-related quality of life, more frequent hospitalisations and increased healthcare costs. To identify and treat depression and anxiety in CF, the CF Foundation and the European CF Society invited a panel of experts, including physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, nurses, social workers, a pharmacist, parents and an individual with CF, to develop consensus recommendations for clinical care. Over 18 months, this 22-member committee was divided into four workgroups: Screening; Psychological Interventions; Pharmacological Treatments and Implementation and Future Research, and used the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome methodology to develop questions for literature search and review. Searches were conducted in PubMed, PsychINFO, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Psychiatry online and ABDATA by a methodologist at Dartmouth. The committee reviewed 344 articles, drafted statements and set an 80% acceptance for each recommendation statement as a consensus threshold prior to an anonymous voting process. Fifteen guideline recommendation statements for screening and treatment of depression and anxiety in individuals with CF and parent caregivers were finalised by vote. As these recommendations are implemented in CF centres internationally, the process of dissemination, implementation and resource provision should be closely monitored to assess barriers and concerns, validity and use.

  12. An approach to the diagnosis of flat intraepithelial lesions of the urinary bladder using the World Health Organization/ International Society of Urological Pathology consensus classification system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; McKenney, Jesse K

    2002-07-01

    The classification of flat urothelial (transitional cell) lesions with atypia has historically varied in its application from institution to institution with no fewer than six major nomenclature systems proposed in the past 25 years. In 1998, the World Health Organization/ International Society of Urological Pathology (WHO/ISUP) published a consensus classification that included the following categories for flat urinary bladder lesions: reactive atypia, atypia of unknown significance, dysplasia (low-grade intraepithelial neoplasia), and carcinoma in situ (high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia). This classification expands the definition traditionally used for urothelial carcinoma in situ, basing its diagnosis primarily on the severity of cytologic changes. In proposing the classification system for flat lesions of the bladder with atypia, it was hoped that consistent use of uniform diagnostic terminology would ultimately aid in a better understanding of the biology of these lesions. In this review, the authors discuss the history of the concept of flat urothelial neoplasia, the rationale and histologic criteria for the WHO/ISUP diagnostic categories, an approach to the diagnosis of flat lesions, and problems and pitfalls associated with their recognition in routine surgical pathology specimens.

  13. Patients with sudden onset headache not meeting the criteria of the International Headache Society for new daily persistent headache. How to classify them?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Hélio Monzillo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available We conducted a retrospective analysis of the records of 1348 patients regularly treated at the headache clinic of Department of Neurology of Santa Casa de São Paulo, Brazil. Sixty-two patients reported history of daily and persistent headache. From the 62 patients selected, only 21 (group 1 could be diagnosed with new daily-persistent headache (NDPH according to the International Headache Society (HIS 2004 criteria. The 41 remaining patients (group 2 could not be diagnosed with NDPH according to IHS-2004 once they presented two or more migraine attack-related symptoms, such as: nausea, photophobia, phonophobia and vomiting, in different combinations. It was not possible to classify them in groups 1 to 4 of primary headaches either. How to classify them? We suggest that the criteria are revised. And one way we can classify them, would be the subdivision: NDPH with migraine features and without migraine features that would allow the inclusion of all individuals present who has a daily and persistent headache from the beginning

  14. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 5: surgical margins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Puay Hoon; Cheng, Liang; Srigley, John R; Griffiths, David; Humphrey, Peter A; van der Kwast, Theodore H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston, made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to surgical margin assessment were coordinated by working group 5. Pathologists agreed that tumor extending close to the 'capsular' margin, yet not to it, should be reported as a negative margin, and that locations of positive margins should be indicated as either posterior, posterolateral, lateral, anterior at the prostatic apex, mid-prostate or base. Other items of consensus included specifying the extent of any positive margin as millimeters of involvement; tumor in skeletal muscle at the apical perpendicular margin section, in the absence of accompanying benign glands, to be considered organ confined; and that proximal and distal margins be uniformly referred to as bladder neck and prostatic apex, respectively. Grading of tumor at positive margins was to be left to the discretion of the reporting pathologists. There was no consensus as to how the surgical margin should be regarded when tumor is present at the inked edge of the tissue, in the absence of transected benign glands at the apical margin. Pathologists also did not achieve agreement on the reporting approach to benign prostatic glands at an inked surgical margin in which no carcinoma is present.

  15. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 3: extraprostatic extension, lymphovascular invasion and locally advanced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magi-Galluzzi, Cristina; Evans, Andrew J; Delahunt, Brett; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; van der Kwast, Theo H; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars L; Humphrey, Peter A

    2011-01-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to extraprostatic extension (pT3a disease), bladder neck invasion, lymphovascular invasion and the definition of pT4 were coordinated by working group 3. It was agreed that prostate cancer can be categorized as pT3a in the absence of adipose tissue involvement when cancer bulges beyond the contour of the gland or beyond the condensed smooth muscle of the prostate at posterior and posterolateral sites. Extraprostatic extension can also be identified anteriorly. It was agreed that the location of extraprostatic extension should be reported. Although there was consensus that the amount of extraprostatic extension should be quantitated, there was no agreement as to which method of quantitation should be employed. There was overwhelming consensus that microscopic urinary bladder neck invasion by carcinoma should be reported as stage pT3a and that lymphovascular invasion by carcinoma should be reported. It is recommended that these elements are considered in the development of practice guidelines and in the daily practice of urological surgical pathology.

  16. The value of the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) modified Gleason grading system as a predictor of biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billis, Athanase; Quintal, Maisa M Q; Meirelles, Luciana; Freitas, Leandro L L; Costa, Larissa B E; Bonfitto, João F L; Diniz, Betina L; Poletto, Paola H; Magna, Luís A; Ferreira, Ubirajara

    2014-05-01

    To compare time and risk to biochemical recurrence (BR) after radical prostatectomy of two chronologically different groups of patients using the standard and the modified Gleason system (MGS). Cohort 1 comprised biopsies of 197 patients graded according to the standard Gleason system (SGS) in the period 1997/2004, and cohort 2, 176 biopsies graded according to the modified system in the period 2005/2011. Time to BR was analyzed with the Kaplan-Meier product-limit analysis and prediction of shorter time to recurrence using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards model. Patients in cohort 2 reflected time-related changes: striking increase in clinical stage T1c, systematic use of extended biopsies, and lower percentage of total length of cancer in millimeter in all cores. The MGS used in cohort 2 showed fewer biopsies with Gleason score ≤ 6 and more biopsies of the intermediate Gleason score 7. Time to BR using the Kaplan-Meier curves showed statistical significance using the MGS in cohort 2, but not the SGS in cohort 1. Only the MGS predicted shorter time to BR on univariate analysis and on multivariate analysis was an independent predictor. The results favor that the 2005 International Society of Urological Pathology modified system is a refinement of the Gleason grading and valuable for contemporary clinical practice.

  17. The new World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology (WHO/ISUP) classification for TA, T1 bladder tumors: is it an improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Jonathan I

    2003-08-01

    The World Health Organization/International Society of Urological Pathology (WHO/ISUP) consensus classification of urothelial neoplasms of the urinary bladder was developed in an attempt to both improve upon prior classification systems as well as to adopt a classification system that would have widespread acceptance. Prior to this classification system, numerous diverse grading schemes for bladder cancer existed whereby the same lesion seen by different pathologists would result in very different diagnoses solely based on definitional differences of lesions. Another strength of the consensus classification system is that it provides detailed histological criteria for papillary urothelial lesions. In contrast, prior grading systems for bladder tumors were vague and subjective. The current classification system allows for designation of a lesion (papillary urothelial neoplasm of low malignant potential), which biologically has a very low risk of progression, yet is not entirely benign. In the past, these lesions were a source of controversy, as some experts in the field required very restrictive criteria for the diagnosis of papilloma and would label such lesions as malignant. Other experts in the field, not wanting to label a patient with such a low-grade papillary lesion as having carcinoma, would diagnose these lesions as papilloma. This intermediate category allows both schools of thought to diagnose a lesion as not fully malignant, yet still documents need for additional follow-up. Since its inception, several studies have been published documenting the relationship of tumors classified using the WHO/ISUP system to prognosis. These articles are summarized within this review.

  18. Validation of International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) grading for prostatic adenocarcinoma in thin core biopsies using TROG 03.04 'RADAR' trial clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delahunt, B; Egevad, L; Srigley, J R; Steigler, A; Murray, J D; Atkinson, C; Matthews, J; Duchesne, G; Spry, N A; Christie, D; Joseph, D; Attia, J; Denham, J W

    2015-10-01

    In 2014 a consensus conference convened by the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) adopted amendments to the criteria for Gleason grading and scoring (GS) for prostatic adenocarcinoma. The meeting defined a modified grading system based on 5 grading categories (grade 1, GS 3+3; grade 2, GS 3+4; grade 3, GS 4+3; grade 4, GS 8; grade 5, GS 9-10). In this study we have evaluated the prognostic significance of ISUP grading in 496 patients enrolled in the TROG 03.04 RADAR Trial. There were 19 grade 1, 118 grade 2, 193 grade 3, 88 grade 4 and 79 grade 5 tumours in the series, with follow-up for a minimum of 6.5 years. On follow-up 76 patients experienced distant progression of disease, 171 prostate specific antigen (PSA) progression and 39 prostate cancer deaths. In contrast to the 2005 modified Gleason system (MGS), the hazards of the distant and PSA progression endpoints, relative to grade 2, were significantly greater for grades 3, 4 and 5 of the 2014 ISUP grading scheme. Comparison of predictive ability utilising Harrell's concordance index, showed 2014 ISUP grading to significantly out-perform 2005 MGS grading for each of the three clinical endpoints.

  19. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in testicular tumors: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R

    2014-08-01

    The judicious use of immunostains can be of significant diagnostic assistance in the interpretation of testicular neoplasms when the light microscopic features are ambiguous. A limited differential diagnosis by traditional morphology is required for the effective use of immunohistochemistry (IHC); otherwise, the inevitable occurrence of exceptions to anticipated patterns will lead to "immunoconfusion." The diagnosis of tumors in the germ cell lineage, the great majority of primary tumors of the testis, has been considerably facilitated over the past decade by IHC directed at developmentally important nuclear transcription factors, including OCT4, SALL4, SOX2, and SOX17, that are mostly restricted to certain tumor histotypes. In conjunction with other markers, a specific diagnosis can be achieved in most instances through a panel of 3 or 4 immunostains and often fewer. IHC among tumors in the sex cord-stromal group may produce a significant proportion of false-negative cases until more sensitive and equally specific markers are validated. The negativity of these tumors for the IHC stains used for germ cell tumors is key in the important distinction of neoplasms in these 2 general categories. In this review, the International Society of Urological Pathologists (ISUP) provides diagnostic guidelines in the form of algorithms to assist practicing pathologists confronting a differential diagnostic question concerning a testicular neoplasm. The goal of ISUP is to anticipate commonly encountered differential diagnoses and recommend an efficient and limited pattern of IHC stains to resolve the question.

  20. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 1: specimen handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaratunga, Hemamali; Montironi, Rodolfo; True, Lawrence; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; Humphrey, Peter A; van der Kwast, Theo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the handling and processing of radical prostatectomy specimens were coordinated by working group 1. Most uropathologists followed similar procedures for fixation of radical prostatectomy specimens, with 51% of respondents transporting tissue in formalin. There was also consensus that the prostate weight without the seminal vesicles should be recorded. There was consensus that the surface of the prostate should be painted. It was agreed that both the prostate apex and base should be examined by the cone method with sagittal sectioning of the tissue sample. There was consensus that the gland should be fully fixed before sectioning. Both partial and complete embedding of prostates was considered to be acceptable as long as the method of partial embedding is stated. No consensus was determined regarding the necessity of weighing and measuring the length of the seminal vesicles, the preparation of whole mounts rather than standardized blocks and the methodology for sampling of fresh tissue for research purposes, and it was agreed that these should be left to the discretion of the working pathologist.

  1. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 4: seminal vesicles and lymph nodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Daniel M; Wheeler, Thomas M; Grignon, David J; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David F; Humphrey, Peter A; van der Kwast, Theo; Montironi, Rodolfo; Delahunt, Brett; Egevad, Lars; Srigley, John R

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology Consensus Conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the infiltration of tumor into the seminal vesicles and regional lymph nodes were coordinated by working group 4. There was a consensus that complete blocking of the seminal vesicles was not necessary, although sampling of the junction of the seminal vesicles and prostate was mandatory. There was consensus that sampling of the vas deferens margins was not obligatory. There was also consensus that muscular wall invasion of the extraprostatic seminal vesicle only should be regarded as seminal vesicle invasion. Categorization into types of seminal vesicle spread was agreed by consensus to be not necessary. For examination of lymph nodes, there was consensus that special techniques such as frozen sectioning were of use only in high-risk cases. There was no consensus on the optimal sampling method for pelvic lymph node dissection specimens, although there was consensus that all lymph nodes should be completely blocked as a minimum. There was also a consensus that a count of the number of lymph nodes harvested should be attempted. In view of recent evidence, there was consensus that the diameter of the largest lymph node metastasis should be measured. These consensus decisions will hopefully clarify the difficult areas of pathological assessment in radical prostatectomy evaluation and improve the concordance of research series to allow more accurate assessment of patient prognosis.

  2. Immunomodulatory effects of honey cannot be distinguished from endotoxin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Michael; Bartelt, Stine; Hansen, Erik Wind

    2008-01-01

    in vitro effects of honey. Our results show that natural honeys induce interleukin-6 release from Mono Mac 6 cells as well as release of reactive oxygen species from all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) differentiated HL-60 cells. The natural honeys contained substantial amounts of endotoxin, and the responses...... observed in the cell based assays were similar to the responses induced by endotoxin alone. In addition, we determined that the immunomodulatory component present in the natural honeys was retained in the ultra filtrated fraction with a molecular weight greater than 20 kDa. The component was resistant...... to boiling and its immunomodulatory activity could be abrogated by the addition of polymyxin B. We speculate that the observed in vitro immunomodulatory effects of honey might solely be explained by the endotoxin content in the natural honeys....

  3. Determination of endotoxins in sugar with the Limulus test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskå, G; Nystrand, R

    1979-12-01

    The Limulus amebocyte lysate test has been used for determination of pyrogens in sugar of different qualities. All the samples of domestic white sugar and beet raw sugar produced in Sweden during 1976 had a very low content of endotoxins, less than 10 ng/g of sugar. Imported cane raw sugar was, however, highly contaminated. The highest value obtained corresponds to about 100 mg of Escherichia coli endotoxin per g of raw sugar. Such crude sugar cannot, even after refining, be used for medical purposes. Instead, Swedish beet sugar is used as the raw material for production of invert sugar solutions for parenteral administration. The amount of endotoxin in this sugar is less than 1 ng/g.

  4. Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navigate Home What is the Society Becoming a Member (US Membership) Becoming a Member (International Membership) International Task Force Mission and Vision Ethics & Endorsement Policy Message from ...

  5. Screening of Anti-endotoxin Components from Radix Isatidis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wenqing; FANG Jianguo; LIU Yunhai; XIE Wei

    2006-01-01

    To find a component with the strongest anti-endotoxin effect from the four components (F021 , F022, F023, and F024 ) of chloroform extract (F02) of Radix Isatidis, the protective effects of the five components on endotoxin-challenged mice and their effects on the production of TNFα and IL-6 by macrophages from the endotoxin-challenged mice were compared. It was found that the five components all had protective effects on endotoxin-challenged mice in terms of mortality. The mortalities of the mice challenged by 2.42 mg/kg endotoxin were 30 %, 50 %, 20 %, 50 % and 60 %after treatment with F02, E021 , F022, F023, and F024. The 5 components all had inhibitory effects on the production of TNFα and IL-6 by macrophages from the mice. At a concentration of LPS of 50 ng/mL, the inhibitory rates of F02 , F021 1, F022 , F023 , and F024 for the production of TNFα and IL-6were 76.54 %, 30.86 %, 78. 60 %, 36.63 %, 2.06 % and 75.85 %, 18. 45 %, 77.68 %, 24.41%, 3.64% and at the dose of 100 ng/mL, the inhibitory rates were 49.65 %, 16.86 %, 66.97 %, 13.39 %, 7.16 % and 59.78 %, 1.28 %, 61.86 %, 2.08 %, 1.44 %, respectively. It is concluded that the component F022 of Radix Isatidis has the strongest anti-endotoxin effect.

  6. Trends in Attendance at Scoliosis Research Society Annual Meetings (SRS AM) and International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques (IMAST): Location, Location, Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Foster; Cho, Woojin; Kim, Han Jo; Levine, David B

    2017-07-01

    Descriptive, respective. Although overall membership in Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) has grown over the years, we were curious to see the effects of changing event venue location and timing on conference attendance. Every year, the SRS hosts two major meetings: the Annual Meeting (SRS AM) in the autumn, and the International Meeting on Advanced Spine Techniques (IMAST) in the summer. Sites have alternated from within and outside North America. Often, these meetings have also overlapped with several holidays in certain countries. This was an observational study of attendance from past SRS AM and IMAST meetings. Fourteen years of AM and 8 years of IMAST data were made available from the SRS. Participation based on delegate type and countries were tallied. Details from the 10 most represented nations and host nations per year were also tallied, and their national holidays were reviewed for overlaps with the AM. Membership in AM and IMAST increased from 820 in 2003 to 1,323 in 2016. Attendance at the AM has increased, whereas attendance at IMAST has declined, even after adjusting for membership size. Trends in participation were highly influenced by location. Participation by attendees from the host continent, and especially the host country, is generally high. The negative impact of distant meetings is profoundly seen with North Americans, whereas the positive impact of a nearby meeting was mostly clearly demonstrated by South Americans. Although SRS AM overlapped with holidays in China, Japan, or Korea nearly 50% of the time, this did not influence participation by delegates from these countries. Participation in the AM is highly influenced by location. Although North Americans represented the largest constituency, their presence was not needed to drive total attendance and was not sufficient to turn around the downturn in IMAST attendance. Choice of location can encourage the participation of delegates from the host and neighboring nations; through strategic

  7. Metal ions potentiate microglia responsiveness to endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachmawati, Dessy; Peferoen, Laura A N; Vogel, Daphne Y S; Alsalem, Inás W A; Amor, Sandra; Bontkes, Hetty J; von Blomberg, B Mary E; Scheper, Rik J; van Hoogstraten, Ingrid M W

    2016-02-15

    Oral metal exposure has been associated with diverse adverse reactions, including neurotoxicity. We showed previously that dentally applied metals activate dendritic cells (MoDC) via TLR4 (Ni, Co, Pd) and TLR3 (Au). It is still unknown whether the low levels of dental metals reaching the brain can trigger local innate cells or prime them to become more responsive. Here we tested whether dentally applied metals (Cr, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Au, Hg) activate primary human microglia in vitro and, as a model, monocytic THP-1-cells, in high non-toxic as well as near-physiological concentrations. In addition the effects of 'near-physiological' metal exposure on endotoxin (LPS) responsiveness of these cells were evaluated. IL-8 and IL-6 production after 24h was used as read out. In high, non-toxic concentrations all transition metals except Cr induced IL-8 and IL-6 production in microglia, with Ni and Co providing the strongest stimulation. When using near-physiological doses (up to 10× the normal plasma concentration), only Zn and Cu induced significant IL-8 production. Of note, the latter metals also markedly potentiated LPS responsiveness of microglia and THP-1 cells. In conclusion, transition metals activate microglia similar to MoDCs. In near-physiological concentrations Zn and Cu are the most effective mediators of innate immune activation. A clear synergism between innate responses to Zn/Cu and LPS was observed, shedding new light on the possible relation between oral metal exposure and neurotoxicity.

  8. Advancing radiology through informed leadership: Summary of the proceedings of the Seventh Biannual Symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology (IS 3R), 23-25 August 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Muellner (Ada); G.M. Glazer (Gary); M.F. Reiser (Maximilian); W.G. Bradley Jr. (William); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); H. Hricak (Hedvig); J.H. Thrall (James)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology (IS 3R) brings together thought leaders from academia and industry from around the world to share ideas, points of view and new knowledge. This article summarizes the main concepts presented at the 2007 IS 3R symposium,

  9. Advancing radiology through informed leadership: Summary of the proceedings of the Seventh Biannual Symposium of the International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology (IS 3R), 23-25 August 2007

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Muellner (Ada); G.M. Glazer (Gary); M.F. Reiser (Maximilian); W.G. Bradley Jr. (William); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); H. Hricak (Hedvig); J.H. Thrall (James)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractThe International Society for Strategic Studies in Radiology (IS 3R) brings together thought leaders from academia and industry from around the world to share ideas, points of view and new knowledge. This article summarizes the main concepts presented at the 2007 IS 3R symposium, providi

  10. An evidence-based unified definition of lifelong and acquired premature ejaculation : report of the second International Society for Sexual Medicine Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serefoglu, Ege Can; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Althof, Stanley E; Shindel, Alan; Adaikan, Ganesh; Becher, Edgardo F; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne J G; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation developed the first evidence-based definition for lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) in 2007 and concluded that there were insufficient published objective data at that ti

  11. An evidence-based unified definition of lifelong and acquired premature ejaculation : report of the second international society for sexual medicine ad hoc committee for the definition of premature ejaculation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serefoglu, Ege Can; McMahon, Chris G; Waldinger, Marcel D; Althof, Stanley E; Shindel, Alan; Adaikan, Ganesh; Becher, Edgardo F; Dean, John; Giuliano, Francois; Hellstrom, Wayne Jg; Giraldi, Annamaria; Glina, Sidney; Incrocci, Luca; Jannini, Emmanuele; McCabe, Marita; Parish, Sharon; Rowland, David; Segraves, R Taylor; Sharlip, Ira; Torres, Luiz Otavio

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The International Society for Sexual Medicine (ISSM) Ad Hoc Committee for the Definition of Premature Ejaculation developed the first evidence-based definition for lifelong premature ejaculation (PE) in 2007 and concluded that there were insufficient published objective data at that ti

  12. Forest economics and policy in a changing environment: how market, policy, and climate transformations affect forests -- Proceedings of the 2016 Meeting of the International Society of Forest Resource Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory E. Frey; Prakash Nepal

    2016-01-01

    Economics can affect decisions about forest resource management and utilization, and in turn, the ecosystem benefits received. In a time of market, policy, and climate transformations, economic analyses are critical to help policy-makers and resource managers make appropriate decisions. At the 2016 Meeting of the International Society of Forest Resource Economics (...

  13. First International Conference on Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Disease Sponsored by the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward J. Goetzl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The First International Conference on “Lysophospholipids and Related Bioactive Lipids in Biology and Diseases” was held in Tucson, AZ on June 10�14, 2001, under the sponsorship of the Federation of American Societies of Experimental Biology (FASEB. More than 100 scientists from 11 countries discussed the recent results of basic and clinical research in the broad biology of this emerging field. Immense progress was reported in defining the biochemistry of generation and biology of cellular effects of the bioactive lysophospholipids (LPLs. These aspects of LPLs described at the conference parallel in many ways those of the eicosanoid mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. As for eicosanoids, the LPLs termed lysophosphatidic acid (LPA and sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P are produced enzymatically from phospholipid precursors in cell membranes and act on cells at nanomolar concentrations through subfamilies of receptors of the G protein–coupled superfamily. The rate-limiting steps in production of LPLs were reported to be controlled by specific phospholipases for LPA and sphingosine kinases for S1P. The receptor subfamilies formerly were designated endothelial differentiation gene-encoded receptors or Edg Rs for their original discovery in endothelial cells. A currently active nomenclature committee at this conference suggested the ligand-based names: S1P1 = Edg-1, S1P2 = Edg-5, S1P3 = Edg-3, S1P4 = Edg-6, and S1P5 = Edg-8; LPA1 = Edg-2, LPA2 = Edg-4, and LPA3 = Edg-7 receptors. Several families of lysophospholipid phosphatases (LPPs have been characterized, which biodegrade LPA, whereas S1P is inactivated with similar rapidity by both a lyase and S1P phosphatases.

  14. GPCR structure, function, drug discovery and crystallography: report from Academia-Industry International Conference (UK Royal Society) Chicheley Hall, 1-2 September 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Alexander; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Seifert, Roland; Tate, Christopher G; Sexton, Patrick M; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Fourmy, Daniel; Cherezov, Vadim; Marshall, Fiona H; Storer, R Ian; Moraes, Isabel; Tikhonova, Irina G; Tautermann, Christofer S; Hunt, Peter; Ceska, Tom; Hodgson, Simon; Bodkin, Mike J; Singh, Shweta; Law, Richard J; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the targets of over half of all prescribed drugs today. The UniProt database has records for about 800 proteins classified as GPCRs, but drugs have only been developed against 50 of these. Thus, there is huge potential in terms of the number of targets for new therapies to be designed. Several breakthroughs in GPCRs biased pharmacology, structural biology, modelling and scoring have resulted in a resurgence of interest in GPCRs as drug targets. Therefore, an international conference, sponsored by the Royal Society, with world-renowned researchers from industry and academia was recently held to discuss recent progress and highlight key areas of future research needed to accelerate GPCR drug discovery. Several key points emerged. Firstly, structures for all three major classes of GPCRs have now been solved and there is increasing coverage across the GPCR phylogenetic tree. This is likely to be substantially enhanced with data from x-ray free electron sources as they move beyond proof of concept. Secondly, the concept of biased signalling or functional selectivity is likely to be prevalent in many GPCRs, and this presents exciting new opportunities for selectivity and the control of side effects, especially when combined with increasing data regarding allosteric modulation. Thirdly, there will almost certainly be some GPCRs that will remain difficult targets because they exhibit complex ligand dependencies and have many metastable states rendering them difficult to resolve by crystallographic methods. Subtle effects within the packing of the transmembrane helices are likely to mask and contribute to this aspect, which may play a role in species dependent behaviour. This is particularly important because it has ramifications for how we interpret pre-clinical data. In summary, collaborative efforts between industry and academia have delivered significant progress in terms of structure and understanding of GPCRs and will be

  15. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorn, K.A.; Cox, L.G.

    2009-01-01

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS 15N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by 15N NMR. Liquid state 15N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (1H-15N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  16. Concordance between the chang and the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) ototoxicity grading scales in patients treated with cisplatin for medulloblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Johnnie K; Huang, Jie; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Chang, Kay W; Bhagat, Shaum P; Chintagumpala, Murali; Bartels, Ute; Gururangan, Sridharan; Hassall, Tim; Heath, John A; McCowage, Geoffrey; Cohn, Richard J; Fisher, Michael J; Robinson, Giles; Broniscer, Alberto; Gajjar, Amar; Gurney, James G

    2014-04-01

    Reporting ototoxicity is frequently complicated by use of various ototoxicity criteria. The International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOP) ototoxicity grading scale was recently proposed for standardized use in reporting hearing loss outcomes across institutions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the concordance between the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity grading scales. Differences between the two scales were identified and the implications these differences may have in the clinical setting were discussed. Audiological evaluations were reviewed for 379 patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma (ages 3-21 years). Each patient was enrolled on one of two St. Jude clinical protocols that included craniospinal radiation therapy and four courses of 75 mg/m(2) cisplatin chemotherapy. The latest audiogram conducted 5.5-24.5 months post-protocol treatment initiation was graded using the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity criteria. Clinically significant hearing loss was defined as Chang grade ≥2a and SIOP ≥2. Hearing loss was considered serious (requiring a hearing aid) at the level of Chang grade ≥2b and SIOP ≥3. A strong concordance was observed between the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity scales (Stuart's tau-c statistic = 0.89, 95% CI: 0.86, 0.91). Among those patients diagnosed with serious hearing loss, the two scales were in good agreement. However, the scales deviated from one another in classifying patients with less serious or no hearing loss. Although discrepancies between the Chang and SIOP ototoxicity scales exist primarily for patients with no or minimal hearing loss, the scales share a strong concordance overall. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic natural organic matter samples of the International Humic Substances Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thorn, Kevin A.; Cox, Larry G.

    2009-02-28

    The naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic NOM samples from the International Humic Substances Society has been characterized by solid state CP/MAS ¹⁵N NMR. Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite humic acid. Aquatic samples include Suwannee River humic, fulvic and reverse osmosis isolates, Nordic humic and fulvic acids and Pony Lake fulvic acid. Additionally, Nordic and Suwannee River XAD-4 acids and Suwannee River hydrophobic neutral fractions were analyzed. Similar to literature reports, amide/aminoquinone nitrogens comprised the major peaks in the solid state spectra of the soil humic and fulvic acids, along with heterocyclic and amino sugar/terminal amino acid nitrogens. Spectra of aquatic samples, including the XAD-4 acids, contain resolved heterocyclic nitrogen peaks in addition to the amide nitrogens. The spectrum of the nitrogen enriched, microbially derived Pony Lake, Antarctica fulvic acid, appeared to contain resonances in the region of pyrazine, imine and/or pyridine nitrogens, which have not been observed previously in soil or aquatic humic substances by ¹⁵N NMR. Liquid state ¹⁵N NMR experiments were also recorded on the Elliot soil humic acid and Pony Lake fulvic acid, both to examine the feasibility of the techniques, and to determine whether improvements in resolution over the solid state could be realized. For both samples, polarization transfer (DEPT) and indirect detection (¹H–¹⁵N gHSQC) spectra revealed greater resolution among nitrogens directly bonded to protons. The amide/aminoquinone nitrogens could also be observed by direct detection experiments.

  18. Collaboration and practice patterns among urologists and gynecologists in the treatment of urinary incontinence and pelvic floor prolapse: a survey of the International Continence Society members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madjar, S; Evans, D; Duncan, R C; Gousse, A E

    2001-01-01

    Both urologists and gynecologists are involved in the care of women with urinary incontinence (UI) and pelvic floor prolapse (PFP). This study was designed to examine the differences among urologists and gynecologists who treat UI and PFP, and to characterize the collaboration between them. A 14-question survey was mailed to the International Continence Society (ICS) members who are urologists or gynecologists. Questions dealt with professional training, type of practice, volume of UI and PFP procedures, preferred procedures for various types of UI and PFP, and the type and extent of collaboration. Of the 666 urologists and gynecologists to whom the questionnaire was sent, 229 responded (34.4% response rate). Among them, 63.7% were urologists and 36.2% were gynecologists. Collaboration in the operating room was reported by 140 responders (50.7%) and was significantly correlated with the specialty, and with the country of practice, with P values of 0.004, and 0.004, respectively. Collaboration in the operating room was reported mainly in procedures for the correction of vaginal vault prolapse or enterocele, and hysterectomy. It was not statistically correlated with the time dedicated to UI and PFP, the volume of surgeries performed, UI and PFP fellowship training, university hospital affiliation, and years in practice. Reasons for not collaborating in the operating room included familiarity with all or most of the anti-incontinence and pelvic floor reconstruction procedures (44.5%), unavailability of the other professional (6.1%), and reimbursement problems (3.1%). While urologists and gynecologists do collaborate extensively in clinical research and diagnosis of challenging cases, surgical collaboration is limited to procedures traditionally performed by gynecologists. Future training programs exposing trainees to both fields of expertise may enable better ground for collaboration and improved care for women with UI and PFP.

  19. International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Consensus Conference on Handling and Staging of Radical Prostatectomy Specimens. Working group 2: T2 substaging and prostate cancer volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kwast, Theo H; Amin, Mahul B; Billis, Athanase; Epstein, Jonathan I; Griffiths, David; Humphrey, Peter A; Montironi, Rodolfo; Wheeler, Thomas M; Srigley, John R; Egevad, Lars; Delahunt, Brett

    2011-01-01

    The 2009 International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference in Boston made recommendations regarding the standardization of pathology reporting of radical prostatectomy specimens. Issues relating to the substaging of pT2 prostate cancers according to the TNM 2002/2010 system, reporting of tumor size/volume and zonal location of prostate cancers were coordinated by working group 2. A survey circulated before the consensus conference demonstrated that 74% of the 157 participants considered pT2 substaging of prostate cancer to be of clinical and/or academic relevance. The survey also revealed a considerable variation in the frequency of reporting of pT2b substage prostate cancer, which was likely a consequence of the variable methodologies used to distinguish pT2a from pT2b tumors. Overview of the literature indicates that current pT2 substaging criteria lack clinical relevance and the majority (65.5%) of conference attendees wished to discontinue pT2 substaging. Therefore, the consensus was that reporting of pT2 substages should, at present, be optional. Several studies have shown that prostate cancer volume is significantly correlated with other clinicopathological features, including Gleason score and extraprostatic extension of tumor; however, most studies fail to demonstrate this to have prognostic significance on multivariate analysis. Consensus was reached with regard to the reporting of some quantitative measure of the volume of tumor in a prostatectomy specimen, without prescribing a specific methodology. Incorporation of the zonal and/or anterior location of the dominant/index tumor in the pathology report was accepted by most participants, but a formal definition of the identifying features of the dominant/index tumor remained undecided.

  20. Endotoxin levels in settled airborne dust in European schools: the HITEA school study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, J H; Krop, E J M; Borras-Santos, A; Zock, J-P; Taubel, M; Hyvarinnen, A; Pekkanen, J; Doekes, G; Heederik, D J J

    2014-04-01

    Indoor exposure to microbial agents is known to influence respiratory health. Besides home exposure, exposure in schools can affect respiratory health. In this study, we measured endotoxin in settled dust in primary schools in three European countries from three different geographical regions with different climates. Our aim was to characterize endotoxin levels in primary schools and evaluate associations with potential determinants. Endotoxin levels were repeatedly assessed in 23 schools in Spain (n = 7), the Netherlands (n = 10), and Finland (n = 6) using electrostatic dustfall collectors. In total, 645 measurements were taken in 237 classrooms. Endotoxin levels differed significantly between countries; Dutch schools had the highest levels, while Finnish schools showed the lowest levels. In each country, differences in endotoxin levels were observed between schools and over the sampling periods. Estimates improved after adjustment for sampling period. Factors affecting endotoxin levels in a school differed per country. In general, endotoxin levels were higher in lower grades and in classrooms with higher occupancy. School endotoxin levels may contribute significantly to total endotoxin exposure in children and teachers. As the correlation between the repeated measurements is reasonable, single endotoxin measurements form a reasonable basis for estimating annual endotoxin levels in schools.

  1. The effect of endotoxin and anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.D. Gottschalk

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available The effects of a commercially available equine hyperimmune anti-endotoxin serum on synovial fluid parameters were evaluated in an induced synovitis model in normal horses. Four groups of 3 horses each received lipopolysaccharide (LPS plus hyperimmune antiendotoxin (anti-LPS, LPS, anti-LPS, and Ringers lactate (control respectively injected into the left intercarpal joint. Synovial fluid parameters were measured at 4, 8, 24 and 72 h. It was found that anti-LPS had no attenuating effect on the LPS and that it induced a synovitis almost equivalent to that induced by LPS alone. The introduction of sterile Ringers lactate solution into the carpal joint together with repeated aseptic arthrocentesis induces a mild inflammatory response.

  2. [Review on characteristics and detecting assay of bacterial endotoxin contamination in water environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Can; Liu, Wen-Jun; Zhang, Ming-Lu; Tian, Fang; Yang, Yi; An, Dai-Zhi

    2014-04-01

    Endotoxins, also known as lipopolysaccharide complexes, are anchored in the outer membrane cell wall of most Gram-negative bacteria and some cyanobacteria. They are continuously released to environment during cell decay. Being common pyrogens and highly immunogenic molecules, endotoxins are related to many human diseases. Due to the tolerances and thermo-stability of endotoxin molecules, they were hard to be removed by common methods. The health risk caused by the endotoxin contamination in drinking water and water environment by various exposure pathways have attracted more and more attention in recent years. In this paper, the physical and chemical properties, biological activities and detection assay of the endotoxin contamination were reviewed, and interfere factors of the main assay, the LAL/TAL (Limulus amebocyte lysate/Tachypleus amebocyte lysate) assay, for detecting endotoxin in water sample were investigated, and the development tendency of the endotoxin detection assay was analyzed.

  3. Endotoxin contamination and control in surface water sources and a drinking water treatment plant in Beijing, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Zhang; Wenjun, Liu; Wen, Sun; Minglu, Zhang; Lingjia, Qian; Cuiping, Li; Fang, Tian

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, endotoxin contamination was determined in treated water following each unit of a drinking water treatment plant (WTP) in Beijing, China and its source water (SW) from a long water diversion channel (Shijiazhuang-Beijing) originating from four reservoirs in Hebei province, China. The total-endotoxin activities in SW ranged from 21 to 41 EU/ml at five selected cross sections of the diversion channel. The total-endotoxin in raw water of the WTP ranged from 11 to 16 EU/ml due to dilution and pretreatment during water transportation from Tuancheng Lake to the WTP, and finished water of the WTP ranged from 4 to 10 EU/ml, showing a 49% decrease following the full-scale treatment process at the WTP. Compared with the 31% removal of free-endotoxin, the WTP removed up to 71% of bound-endotoxin in raw water. The traditional treatment processes (coagulation, sedimentation and filtration) in the WTP removed substantial amounts of total-endotoxin (up to 63%), while endotoxin activities increased after granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorption and chlorination. The total-endotoxin in the actual water was composed of free-endotoxin and bound-endotoxin (endotoxin aggregates, bacteria-bound endotoxins and particle-attached endotoxins). The endotoxin aggregates, bacteria-bound endotoxins and particle-attached endotoxins co-exist as suspended particles in water, and only the bacteria-bound endotoxins were correlated with bacterial cells suspended in water. The particle distribution of endotoxin aggregates in ultrapure water was also tested and the results showed that the majority (64-89%) of endotoxin aggregates had diameters endotoxin contamination and control in treated water following each unit of the WTP processes and its SW from reservoirs are discussed and compared with regard to bacterial cell counts and particle characteristics, which were dependent, to a certain extent, on different flow rates and turbulence of the water environments.

  4. Integrating murine gene expression studies to understand obstructive lung disease due to chronic inhaled endotoxin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peggy S Lai

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. METHODS: We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. RESULTS: A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene

  5. Development of endotoxin tolerance in humans in vivo.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Draisma, A.; Pickkers, P.; Bouw, M.P.W.J.M.; Hoeven, J.G. van der

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) tolerance is characterized by a reduced responsiveness to a subsequent LPS challenge. In animal and human in vitro experiments, LPS tolerance is associated with an attenuated response of proinflammatory cytokines and an enhanced production of anti-infl

  6. Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption in Gram-negative septic shock patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoi Ping Shum

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Severe sepsis and septic shock are common causes of mortality and morbidity in an intensive care unit setting. Endotoxin, derived from the outer membranes of Gram-negative bacteria, is considered a major factor in the pathogenesis of sepsis. This study investigated the effect of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption device on Gram-negative septic shock patients. Materials and Methods: An open, controlled, prospective, randomized, single-center trial was conducted between February 2010 and June 2012. Patients with septic shock due to intra-abdominal sepsis were randomized to either conventional therapy (n = 8 or conventional therapy plus two 2-hourly sessions of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption (n = 7. Primary endpoint was the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA score changes from 0 to 72 h. Secondary end points included vasopressor requirement, PaO 2 /FiO 2 ratio (PFR, length of stay (LOS, and 28-day mortality. Results: This study was terminated early as interim analysis showed a low probability of significant findings. No significant difference was noted between the two groups with respect to change in SOFA score, vasopressor score, PFR, LOS, and 28-day mortality. Side-effect was minimal. Conclusions: We could not identify any clinical benefit on the addition of Alteco endotoxin hemoadsorption to conventional therapy in patients who suffered from intra-abdominal sepsis with shock. The side effect profile of this novel device was acceptable.

  7. Endotoxin exposure and atopic sensitization in adult pig farmers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portengen, L.; Preller, L.; Tielen, M.; Doekes, G.; Heederik, D.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have reported a low prevalence of atopic sensitization and respiratory allergy in children growing up on farms. Objectives: We sought to evaluate the dose-response relationship between endotoxin and atopic sensitization in adult farmers and to assess the effect on respirat

  8. [The importance of endotoxin producing bacterias for practical purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmel, Dietrich

    1994-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (endotoxin) cause according to resorption out of the intestinal tract or aerogenic inhalation or by a septic infection clinical signs. The clinical reactions are praeshock symptoms, acute forms of shock and death. The experimental intratracheally administration of lipopolysaccharides into calves caused pneumonic lesions without bacterial experimental infection.

  9. Endotoxin exposure-response in a fiberglass manufacturing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, D K; Wypij, D; Kriebel, D; Walters, M D; Hammond, S K; Evans, J S

    1996-01-01

    Peak expiratory flow (PEF) and workplace exposure to endotoxin, phenolic resin, and formaldehyde were measured to investigate asthma symptoms and medication use among employees in a fiberglass wool manufacturing plant. Self-recorded PEF was obtained from 37 workers, for a total of 181 days off work and 187 days at work with concurrent personal exposure monitoring. Pre- and post-shift spirometry were obtained on at least 2 days. The 8 hr time-weighted average personal exposure ranges were endotoxin; 0.4-759 ng/m3; phenolic resin, 5.7-327 micrograms/m3; and formaldehyde, 1.2-265 micrograms/m3. Amplitude percent mean peak flow was associated with years since starting regular work in the highest endotoxin exposure area, although current assignment in that area was associated with reduced amplitude--evidence for a healthy worker effect. Exposure-response was analyzed by regression of lung function change on exposure using generalized estimating equations with robust variance estimates. Endotoxin exposure above 4 ng/m3 (8 hr time-weighted average) was associated with a decline in lung function across the work shift, and with drops in lung function 16-20 hr after exposure. Phenolic resin exposure was not consistently associated with decrements, and formaldehyde was not associated with decrements in lung function.

  10. A selective sorbent for removing bacterial endotoxins from blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. S.; Kopitsyna, M. N.; Bessonov, I. V.; Karelina, N. V.; Nuzhdina, A. V.; Sarkisov, I. Yu.; Pavlova, L. A.; Tsyurupa, M. P.; Blinnikova, Z. K.; Davankov, V. A.

    2016-12-01

    Synthetic ligands carrying a positive charge and capable of selective binding of bacterial endotoxins are covalently immobilized on surfaces of domestic hemosorbent Styrosorb-514 based on hypercrosslinked polystyrene. It is shown that the resulting sorbent aimed at treating sepsis exceeds imported specific hemosorbent in Toraymyxin™ columns in removing lipopolysaccharides, and can be used in domestically-produced Desepta columns.

  11. Role of vasoactive amines in the antitumor activity of endotoxin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofhuis, F.M.A.; Bloksma, N.; Kuper, C.F.; Willers, J.M.N.

    1984-01-01

    To estimate a possible role of vasoamines in the antitumor action of endotoxin, effects of isoproterenol, serotonin and adrenaline on subcutaneosly transplanted murine Meth A sarcoma and the capacity of these agents to elicit antitumor factors were studied. Macroscopically all agents induced tumor n

  12. Streptomycetes in house dust: associations with housing characteristics and endotoxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to mold, indoor bioaerosols also contain bacterial components that may have implications for human health. Endotoxin is a cell wall component in Gram-negative bacteria present at varying levels indoors that has been found to have respiratory health implications. Stre...

  13. Dephosphorylation of endotoxin by alkaline phosphatase in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelstra, Klaas; Bakker, W.W; Klok, P.A; Kamps, J.AAM; Hardonk, M.J; Meijer, D.K F

    1997-01-01

    Natural substrates for alkaline phosphatase (AP) are at present not identified despite extensive investigations. Difficulties in imagining a possible physiological function involve its extremely high pH optimum for the usual exogenous substrates and its localization as an ecto-enzyme. As endotoxin i

  14. Septic Participation in Cardiogenic Shock: Exposure to Bacterial Endotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Paula; Villarreal, Esther; Gordon, Monica; Gómez, María Dolores; de Hevia, Luis; Vacacela, Karla; Gisbert, Teresa; Quinzá, Adrian; Ruiz, Jesús; Alonso, Ricardo; Bonastre, Juan; Vila, Jordi

    2017-05-01

    In cardiogenic shock (CS), presence of fever, leukocytosis, relatively low systemic vascular resistances, and high serum procalcitonin levels are quite frequent and recurrently involve the search for an infectious complication. We hypothesized that endotoxin exposure in CS could explain this sepsis-like syndrome. Prospective observational study of consecutive CS patients admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU). Patients were followed during the first 3 days after CS onset. All clinical, hemodynamic, and microbiological data were collected. Inflammatory biomarkers and anti-endotoxin antibodies (IgM EndoCAb) were daily measured. We included 37 consecutive CS patients. Twenty-two patients (60%) had body temperature >38.3°C or 14,000/mm or <4,000/mm. Microbiological study was performed in 30 patients (81%). No infection was diagnosed in the studied patients. All the patients had serum inflammatory biomarkers levels above normal values including procalcitonin (19 patients [51%] had serum procalcitonin above 2 ng/mL). All the patients had IgM EndoCAb below the normal median value; 22 patients (59.5%) had IgM anti-endotoxin value below 10th percentile range for healthy people. Hemodynamic and respiratory stabilization was achieved in 23 patients (62%) and the ICU mortality rate was 38%, only procalcitonin and interleuquin-6 were associated with higher mortality rate. We have detected extremely low titers of IgM EndoCAb in CS suggesting endotoxin exposure. However, only inflammatory biomarkers were related to ICU mortality.

  15. Teaching Global Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peet, Richard

    2002-01-01

    Describes the course, "Global Society," for first-year International Studies students at a Massachusetts liberal arts college. The course, which takes a historical approach, informs students about the nature, history, and present characteristics of the global system, taking theoretical, historical, and critical approaches that stress the…

  16. Treatment of non-metastatic rhabdomyosarcomas in childhood and adolescence. Results of the second study of the International Society of Paediatric Oncology: MMT84

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oberlin, O.; Terrier-Lacombe, M.-J. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Paediatric Oncology, 94805 Villejuif (France); Barrett, A. [Radiotherapy, Beatson Oncology Centre, Western Infirmary, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Martelli, H. [Paediatric Surgery, Hopital Necker, Paris (France); Habrand, J.L. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Paediatric Oncology, 94805 Villejuif (France); Voute, P.A. [Paediatric Oncology, Emma Kinderziekenhuis, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Otten, J. [Paediatric Oncology, Academisch Ziekenhuis VUB, Brussels (Belgium); Brunat-Mentigny, M. [Paediatric Oncology, Centre Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Theobald, S. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Paediatric Oncology, 94805 Villejuif (France); Quintana, E. [Paediatric Oncology, Institut Curie, Paris (France); Sommelet, D. [Paediatric Oncology, CHU Nancy (France); Praquin, M.-T.; Rey, A.; Rodary, C.; Flamant, F. [Institut Gustave-Roussy, Department of Paediatric Oncology, 94805 Villejuif (France)

    1998-06-01

    The second International Society of Paediatric Oncology (SIOP) study for rhabdomyosarcoma (MMT84) had several goals. The two principal aimswere: (1) to improve the survival of children with rhabdomyosarcoma; and (2) to reduce the late effects from therapy by restricting the indications for surgery and/or radiotherapy after good response to initial chemotherapy. A further aim was to investigate the role of high-dose chemotherapy in young patients with parameningeal primary tumours. 186 previously untreated eligible patients entered the study. Patients with completely resected primary tumour received three courses of IVA (ifosfamide, vincristine and actinomycin D). Patients with incompletely resected tumour received six to 10 courses of IVA according to stage. Patients achieving complete remission with chemotherapy alone did not usually receive radiotherapy or undergo extensive surgery, but patients remaining in partial remission received local therapy with surgery and/or radiotherapy. Only patients over 5 years of age with parameningeal disease and patients over 12 years with tumours at any site were given systematic irradiation. Complete remission was achieved in 91% (170/186) of all patients. With a median follow-up of 8 years, the 5-year overall survival was 68% ({+-}3% standard error of the mean (SEM)) and the 5-year event-free survival 53% ({+-}4% SEM). These results show an improvement over previous SIOP study (RMS75) in which survival was 52% and event-free survival was 47%. Among the 54 patients who exhibited isolated local relapse, 35% (19/54) survived in further remission longer than 2 years after retreatment, including local therapy (surgery{+-}radiotherapy). Analysis of the overall burden of therapy received by all surviving children (including primary treatment and treatment for relapse if required) showed that 24% (28/116) were treated by limited surgery followed by three courses of IVA, 29% (34/116) were treated by chemotherapy alone (after initial

  17. Economical and ambient sustainability: an ideal of the international society Sustentabilidade econômica e ambiental: um ideal da sociedade internacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marlene Kempfer Bassoli

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The incorporation of the environmental issue by international offices and regional blocks in the last decades, has demonstrated a growing preoccupation with the road to sustainable socio-economic development. The contemporary development process, consolidated by the capitalist production model, has exercised great influence on society in general. This globalized economic model gave rise to a new network of relations which have affected the political structures of the States. Thus, among the many concerns involving these changes is the incorporation of environmental values to reach sustainable development, to promote economic development taking into account environment protection and social justice. In face of the transnacionality issue and the importance of the objective at hand, it is fundamental to raise people’s awareness of the legal harmonization issue.A incorporação do tema ambiental por organismos internacionais e blocos regionais, ao longo das últimas décadas do século XX, demonstra uma lenta preocupação com o caminho do desenvolvimento sócio-econômico sustentável. O processo de desenvolvimento, que se consolidou a partir do modo de produção capitalista, exerceu influência sobre a sociedade de um modo geral. Um modelo econômico de efeito globalizante, trouxe à tona uma nova rede de relações, com reflexos, inclusive, nas estruturas políticas dos Estados. Assim, entre as necessárias preocupações, diante das mudanças, está a incorporação de valores relacionados ao meio ambiente para alcançar o desenvolvimento sustentável, ou seja, desenvolvimento econômico com preservação do meio ambiente e justiça social. Diante da transnacionalidade da questão ambiental e para alcançar tal objetivo, é fundamental despertar para a consciência do caminho da harmonização legislativa.

  18. In vitro assessment of dialysis membrane as an endotoxin transfer barrier: geometry, morphology, and permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrie, Michael; Ford, Cheryl; Andersen, Marion; Stroup, Eric; Diaz-Buxo, Jose; Madsen, Ben; Britt, David; Ho, Chih-Hu

    2008-09-01

    High-flux dialysis membranes used with bicarbonate dialysis fluid increase the risk of back diffusion of bacterial endotoxin into the blood during hemodialysis. Endotoxin transfer of various synthetic fiber membranes was tested with bacterial culture filtrates using an in vitro system testing both diffusive and convective conditions. Membranes were tested in a simulated dialysis mode with endotoxin challenge material (approximately 420 EU/mL) added to the dialysis fluid, with saline used to model both blood and dialysis fluid. Samples were taken of both blood and dialysis fluid, and analyzed using a kinetic turbidimetric Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay. Endotoxin was found in all of the blood circuit samples, except for the Fresenius Optiflux F200NR(e) and thick-wall membranes. All membranes tested removed approximately 95% of the endotoxin from solution, with the residual approximately 5% recirculating within the dialysis fluid compartment. Endotoxin distribution through the fiber membrane was examined using a fluorescent-labeled endotoxin conjugate. Fluorescence images indicate that adsorption occurs throughout the membrane wall, with the greatest concentration of endotoxin located at the inner lumen. Contact angle analysis was able to show that all membranes exhibit a more hydrophilic lumen and a more hydrophobic outer surface except for the polyethersulfone membranes, which were of equal hydrophobicity. Resulting data indicate that fiber geometry plays an important role in the ability of the membrane to inhibit endotoxin transfer, and that both adsorption and filtration are methods by which endotoxin is retained and removed from the dialysis fluid circuit.

  19. Endotoxin release from biologically active bench-scale drinking water anthracite/sand filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, W.B.; Mayfield, C.I.; Huck, P.M. [University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON (Canada). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

    2008-12-15

    Endotoxin release from biologically active dual-media (anthracite/sand) bench-scale drinking water filters was investigated. The biological filters were typically net producers of endotoxin during normal operation with mean concentrations increasing from 6 endotoxin units (EU)/mL to 16 EU/mL in filter influent and effluent, respectively. The filter operating condition resulting in the greatest release of endotoxin occurred upon shutdown and subsequent restart, with the highest observed filter effluent endotoxin concentration being 745 EU/mL in the first pore volume following the return of flow through the filter. Effluent samples collected following filter shutdowns were chlorinated to determine the effect of bacterial cell death on endotoxin release. Chlorination did not induce immediate 'dumping' of endotoxin, nor did holding the chlorinated samples for 5 d result in an increase in aqueous endotoxin concentration. In addition to endotoxin, measurable quantities of potassium were detected in the interstitial water in the biofilter during shutdown periods. In order to reduce potential risk to dialysis patients and humidifier users, it is recommended that, following even short biofilter shutdowns, filters should be immediately backwashed or, failing this, the first five pore volumes of effluent water be discharged to waste to allow endotoxin levels to return to pre-shutdown values.

  20. Endotoxin depletion of recombinant protein preparations through their preferential binding to histidine tags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Laura; Brill, Boris; Delis, Natalia; Groner, Bernd

    2014-12-01

    The presence of endotoxins in preparations of recombinantly produced therapeutic proteins poses serious problems for patients. Endotoxins can cause fever, respiratory distress syndromes, intravascular coagulation, or endotoxic shock. A number of methods have been devised to remove endotoxins from protein preparations using separation procedures based on molecular mass or charge properties. Most of the methods are limited in their endotoxin removal capacities and lack general applicability. We are describing a biotechnological approach for endotoxin removal. This strategy exploits the observation that endotoxins form micelles that expose negative charges on their surface, leading to preferential binding of endotoxins to cationic surfaces, allowing the separation from their resident protein. Endotoxins exhibit high affinity to stretches of histidines, which are widely used tools to facilitate the purification of recombinant proteins. They bind to nickel ions and are the basis for protein purification from cellular extracts by immobilized metal affinity chromatography. We show that the thrombin-mediated cleavage of two histidine tags from the purified recombinant protein and the adsorption of these histidine tags and their associated endotoxins to a nickel affinity column result in an appreciable depletion of the endotoxins in the purified protein fraction.

  1. Endotoxin inactivation via steam-heat treatment in dilute simethicone emulsions used in biopharmaceutical processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Keith A; Galvin, Jeffrey; Gammell, Patrick; Nti-Gyabaah, Joseph; Boras, George; Kolwyck, David; Ramirez, José G; Presente, Esther; Naugle, Gregory

    2014-01-01

    Simethicone emulsion is used to regulate foaming in cell culture operations in biopharmaceutical processes. It is also a potential source of endotoxin contamination. The inactivation of endotoxins in dilute simethicone emulsions was assessed as a function of time at different steam temperatures using a Limulus amebocyte lysate kinetic chromogenic technique. Endotoxin inactivation from steam-heat treatment was fit to a four-parameter double exponential decay model, which indicated that endotoxin inactivation was biphasic, consisting of fast and slow regimes. In the fast regime, temperature-related effects were dominant. Transitioning into the slow regime, the observed temperature dependence diminished, and concentration-related effects became increasingly significant. The change in the Gibbs free energy moving through the transition state indicated that a large energy barrier must be overcome for endotoxin inactivation to occur. The corresponding Arrhenius pre-exponential factor was >10(12) s(-1) suggesting that endotoxins in aqueous solution exist as aggregates. The disorder associated with the endotoxin inactivation reaction pathway was assessed via the change in entropy moving through the transition state. This quantity was positive indicating that endotoxin inactivation may result from hydrolysis of individual endotoxin molecules, which perturbs the conformation of endotoxin aggregates, thereby modulating the biological activity observed. Steam-heat treatment decreased endotoxin levels by 1-2 logarithm (log) reduction (LRV), which may be practically relevant depending on incoming raw material endotoxin levels. Antifoam efficiency and cell culture performance were negligibly impacted following steam-heat treatment. The results from this study show that steam-heat treatment is a viable endotoxin control strategy that can be implemented to support large-scale biopharmaceutical manufacturing.

  2. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  3. Time course of endotoxin-induced airways' inflammation in healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyen, Virginie; Kassengera, Zaina; Dinh, Duc Huy Phong; Michel, Olivier

    2012-02-01

    Few data are available on the kinetic of the airways' inflammation induced by inhaled endotoxin in a given subject. The purpose of this study was to evaluate in healthy subjects the time-related endotoxin-induced airways' inflammation. The cells counts from the induced-sputum were evaluated before, 6 and 24 h, and 7 days after an exposure to 20 mcg inhaled endotoxin, in eight pre-selected volunteers. To avoid interference of the induced-sputum procedure on the response to endotoxin, each time-point was evaluated in randomized order at 2-weeks interval after three separate inhalations of endotoxin. A significant rise of the relative number of lymphocytes (pinflammation after 6 h, peaked at 24 h and recovered after 7 days. When repeated endotoxin inhalations are used as a model of inflammation, a wash-out period of at least 7 days should be applied between each exposure in each subject.

  4. Endotoxin Contamination in Nanomaterials Leads to the Misinterpretation of Immunosafety Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Given the presence of engineered nanomaterials in consumers’ products and their application in nanomedicine, nanosafety assessment is becoming increasingly important. In particular, immunosafety aspects are being actively investigated. In nanomaterial immunosafety testing strategies, it is important to consider that nanomaterials and nanoparticles are very easy to become contaminated with endotoxin, which is a widespread contaminant coming from the Gram-negative bacterial cell membrane. Because of the potent inflammatory activity of endotoxin, contaminated nanomaterials can show inflammatory/toxic effects due to endotoxin, which may mask or misidentify the real biological effects (or lack thereof of nanomaterials. Therefore, before running immunosafety assays, either in vitro or in vivo, the presence of endotoxin in nanomaterials must be evaluated. This calls for using appropriate assays with proper controls, because many nanomaterials interfere at various levels with the commercially available endotoxin detection methods. This also underlines the need to develop robust and bespoke strategies for endotoxin evaluation in nanomaterials.

  5. Endotoxin contamination: a key element in the interpretation of nanosafety studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Boraschi, Diana

    2016-02-01

    The study of toxicity and potential risks of engineered nanoparticles is of particular importance in nanomedicine. Endotoxin, a common contaminant of bacterial origin, has biological effects that can mask the true biological effects of nanoparticles, if its presence is overlooked. In this review, we report the features of nanoparticle contamination by endotoxin, and the different biological effects of endotoxin-contaminated nanoparticles. We will describe different methods for endotoxin detection applied to nanoparticles, and discuss their pros and cons. Eventually, we describe various methods for eliminating endotoxin contamination in nanoparticles. Although there is no universal technique for efficiently removing endotoxin from nanoparticles, specific solutions can be found case by case, which can allow us to perform nanosafety studies in biologically relevant conditions.

  6. Lead, cadmium, endotoxin interaction: effect on mortality and hepatic function. [Salmonella enteriditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, J.A.; Marconi, E.A.; Di Luzio, N.R.

    1974-05-01

    I/v administration of some heavy metals increases the sensitivity of animals to bacterial endotoxins. Methylprednisolone prevents death following lead-endotoxin reaction. Liver function of rats was impaired and they were more sensitive to endotoxin when lead acetate or cadmium acetate was given i/v with the toxin. Cadmium acetate alone caused liver dysfunction, but lead acetate alone had no effect. Also, cadmium acetate had a greater effect than lead acetate in enhancing the effect of endotoxin. Methylprednisolone did not alleviate the detrimental effect of combining cadmium with endotoxin, and these conflicting results leave the cause of the sensitizing action of heavy metals on endotoxin shrouded in mystery. 36 references, 7 tables.

  7. Comparative studies of endotoxin uptake by isolated rat Kupffer and peritoneal cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Fox, E S; Thomas, P; Broitman, S A

    1987-01-01

    The process of uptake of endotoxin by cells of the reticuloendothelial system is of current interest. Rabbit peritoneal macrophages have been used to study macrophage-endotoxin interactions and have suggested a receptor-mediated process. It is generally believed that the site of in vivo endotoxin clearance is the liver and that this clearance involves the Kupffer cell population. In the current report, the uptake characteristics of iodine-125-labeled Salmonella minnesota lipopolysaccharide (L...

  8. Treatment Characteristics of Polysaccharides and Endotoxin Using Oxygen Plasma Produced by RF Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazaki, Satoshi; Hayashi, Nobuya; Goto, Masaaki

    2010-10-01

    Treatment of polysaccharides and endotoxin were attempted using oxygen plasma produced by RF discharge. Oxygen radicals observed by optical light emission spectra are factors of decomposition of polysaccharides and endotoxin. Fourier transform infrared spectra indicate that most of chemical bonds in the polysaccharides are dissociated after irradiation of the oxygen plasma. Also, the decomposition rate of endotoxin was approximately 90% after irradiation of the oxygen plasma for 180 min.

  9. Endotoxin-like activity associated with Lyme disease Borrelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumarola, D; Munno, I; Marcuccio, C; Miragliotta, G

    1986-12-01

    The newly recognized spirochete, Borrelia burgdorferi, the causative agent of Lyme Disease, has been examined for endotoxin-like activities as measured by the standard Farmacopea Ufficiale della Republica Italiana rabbit fever test and the Limulus amoebocyte lysate assay. The suspension of heat-killed microorganism caused a febrile response at a dose of 1 X 10(8) bacteria pro kilo. Similar results were obtained in the Limulus assay where the heat-killed spirochetes stimulated formation of solid clot until the concentration of 1 X 10(5) per ml. Both in pyrogen test and in Limulus assay heat-killed Escherichia coli exhibited a higher degree of potency. These results show that LD-Borrelia possess endotoxin-like activities which could help in understanding the pathogenesis of the clinical symptomatology of the disease.

  10. [Endotoxin adsortion as adjuvant therapy in gram negative severe sepsis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candel, F J; Martínez-Sagasti, F; Borges, M; Maseda, E; Herrera-Gutiérrez, M; Garnacho-Montero, J; Maynar, F J; Zaragoza, R; Mensa, J; Azanza, J R

    2010-09-01

    The mortality rate of severe sepsis and septic shock remains still high. Within the last years a better knowledge of its physiopathology and the implementation of a group of measures addressed to a fast identification and early treatment of the septic patients have proved to reduce mortality rate. Likewise, it continues being investigated in modulating the inflammatory response and limiting the harmful action of the bacterial products on the immune system. As a result of this research some endotoxin adsorber devices have been designed to control one of the most important targets that start the inflammatory cascade when gram negative microorganisms are involved.The usefulness that these endotoxin removal devices might have as adjuvant treatment in the Septic Syndrome and its applicability are reviewed in this paper. Likewise a profile of patient that might be to the benefit of this therapy is suggested according to the current knowledge.

  11. Peripherally administered orexin improves survival of mice with endotoxin shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yasuhiro; Irukayama-Tomobe, Yoko; Murakoshi, Nobuyuki; Kiyama, Maiko; Ishikawa, Yui; Hosokawa, Naoto; Tominaga, Hiromu; Uchida, Shuntaro; Kimura, Saki; Kanuka, Mika; Morita, Miho; Hamada, Michito; Takahashi, Satoru; Hayashi, Yu; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis is a systemic inflammatory response to infection, accounting for the most common cause of death in intensive care units. Here, we report that peripheral administration of the hypothalamic neuropeptide orexin improves the survival of mice with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced endotoxin shock, a well-studied septic shock model. The effect is accompanied by a suppression of excessive cytokine production and an increase of catecholamines and corticosterone. We found that peripherally administered orexin penetrates the blood-brain barrier under endotoxin shock, and that central administration of orexin also suppresses the cytokine production and improves the survival, indicating orexin’s direct action in the central nervous system (CNS). Orexin helps restore body temperature and potentiates cardiovascular function in LPS-injected mice. Pleiotropic modulation of inflammatory response by orexin through the CNS may constitute a novel therapeutic approach for septic shock. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21055.001 PMID:28035899

  12. Are Educational Governance Reforms in a Post-Conflict Society Conforming to Global Standards? Examining the Application of Education Convergence Theory in an Internationally Supervised and Politicized Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Taro

    2016-01-01

    This article examines whether and to what extent educational reforms in a post-conflict society conform to "global (regional) standards," and explores the meaning of inconsistencies observed in the process of global reform transfer. Among the nations of the world, nowhere is the influence of external forces on educational reforms more…

  13. Detection and Identification System of Bacteria and Bacterial Endotoxin Based on Raman Spectroscopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Muhammad Elsayeh; Ahmed H.Kandil

    2016-01-01

    .... Raman spectroscopes represent a q uick and accurate identification and detection method, for bacteria and bacterial endotoxin, which this plays an important role in delivering high quality biomedical...

  14. Complex links between dietary lipids, endogenous endotoxins and metabolic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugerette, Fabienne; Vors, Cécile; Peretti, Noël; Michalski, Marie-Caroline

    2011-01-01

    Metabolic diseases such as obesity are characterized by a subclinical inflammatory state that contributes to the development of insulin resistance and atherosclerosis. Recent reports also indicate that (i) there are alterations of the intestinal microbiota in metabolic diseases and (ii) absorption of endogenous endotoxins (namely lipopolysaccharides, LPS) can occur, particularly during the digestion of lipids. The aim of the present review is to highlight recently gained knowledge regarding the links between high fat diets, lipid digestion, intestinal microbiota and metabolic endotoxemia & inflammation.

  15. Cardiotrophin-1 attenuates endotoxin-induced acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido, E J; Shames, B D; Pennica, D; O'leary, R M; Bensard, D D; Cain, B S; McIntyre, R C

    1999-06-15

    Cardiotrophin-1 (CT-1) is a recently discovered member of the gp130 cytokine family, which includes IL-6, IL-11, leukemia inhibitory factor, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and oncostatin M. Recent evidence suggests that, like other members of this family, CT-1 may possess anti-inflammatory properties. We hypothesized that in vivo CT-1 administration would attenuate endotoxin (ETX)-induced acute lung injury. We studied the effects of CT-1 (100 microgram/kg ip, 10 min prior to ETX) in a rat model of ETX-induced acute lung injury (Salmonella typhimurium lipopolysaccharide, 20 mg/kg ip). Six hours after ETX, lungs were harvested for determination of neutrophil accumulation (myeloperoxidase, MPO, assay) and lung edema (wet-to-dry weight ratio). Mechanisms of pulmonary vasorelaxation were examined in isolated pulmonary artery rings at 6 h by interrogating endothelium-dependent (response to acetylcholine) and endothelium-independent (response to sodium nitroprusside) relaxation following alpha-adrenergic (phenylephrine)-stimulated preconstriction. CT-1 abrogated the endotoxin-induced lung neutrophil accumulation: 2.3 +/- 0.2 units MPO/g wet lung (gwl) vs 6. 3 +/- 0.3 units MPO/gwl in the ETX group (P 0.05 vs control). Similarly, CT-1 prevented ETX-induced lung edema: wet-to-dry-weight ratio, 4.473 +/- 0.039 vs 4.747 +/- 0.039 in the ETX group (P 0.05 vs control). Endotoxin caused significant impairment of both endothelium-dependent and -independent pulmonary vasorelaxation, and CT-1 attenuated this injury. Thus, cardiotrophin-1 possesses significant anti-inflammatory properties in a model of endotoxin-induced acute lung injury. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  16. Effects of endotoxin on proliferation of human hematopoietic cell precursors

    OpenAIRE

    Rinehart, John J.; Keville, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    In examining the effects of corticosteroids on hematopoiesis in vitro, we observed that results were highly dependent on the lot of commercial fetal calf serum (FCS) utilized. We hypothesized that this variability correlated with the picogram (pg) level of endotoxin contaminating the FCS. Randomly obtained commercial lots of FCS contained 0.39 to 187 pg/ml of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Standard FCS concentrations in hematopoietic precursor proliferation assays (granulocyte-marcrophage colony f...

  17. Proceedings of the 2009 annual general conference and associated specialty conferences of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering : on the leading edge[Includes the CSCE forum on professional practice and career development : 1. international engineering mechanics and materials specialty conference : 1. international/3. coastal, estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference : 2. international/8. construction specialty conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lye, L.; Burrell, B.; Snow, M.; Hussein, A.; Thomas, M.; Isgor, B.; Elliott, C.; Christian, J.; Rankin, J. [Canadian Society for Civil Engineering, Montreal, PQ (Canada)] (eds.)

    2009-07-01

    This 2009 international conference of the Canadian Society for Civil Engineering (CSCE) focused on the findings of the latest research and the emergence of the civil engineering profession. It was held in conjunction with the following specialty conferences: the first international and first engineering mechanics and materials (IEMM)specialty conference; the first international and third international hydrotechnical coastal estuarine and offshore engineering specialty conference (IHSC); the second international and eighth construction specialty (ICS) conference; and the forum on professional practice and career development (FPD). The conference and associated specialty conferences provided a forum to discuss recent developments in all areas of civil engineering. Delegates from industrial, research, and academic institutions presented innovative technologies in the different areas of civil engineering and identified future directions for sustainable development. The presentations addressed a broad range of issues, such as the need for sustainable infrastructure while improving the safety of roads, dams, water supply and sewage treatment systems. Technical sessions addressed infrastructure management issues, risk assessment, hydrotechnical engineering and transportation engineering. The conference featured 182 presentations, of which 19 have been catalogued separately for inclusion in this database. refs., tabs., figs.

  18. Assessment of endotoxin activity in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guizani, Mokhtar; Dhahbi, Mahmoud; Funamizu, Naoyuki

    2009-07-01

    Endotoxic material, commonly associated to biological reactions, is thought to be one of the most important constituents in water. This has become a very important topic because of the common interest in microbial products governed by the possible shift to water reuse for drinking purposes. In this light, this study was conducted to provide an assessment of endotoxic activity in reclaimed wastewater. A bacterial endotoxin test (LAL test) was applied to water samples from several wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) in Sapporo, Japan keeping in view the seasonal variation. Samples were taken from several points in WWTP (influent, effluent, return sludge, advanced treatment effluent). The findings of this study indicated that wastewater shows high endotoxin activity. The value of Endotoxin (Endo) to COD ratio in the effluent is usually higher than that of the influent. Moreover, it is found that wastewater contains initially endotoxic active material. Some of those chemicals are biodegradable and but most of them are non-biodegradable. Batch scale activated sludge studies were undertaken to understand the origin of endotoxic active material in the effluent. This study showed that those chemicals are mainly produced during biological reactions, more precisely during decay process. Moreover, raw wastewater (RWW) contains high amounts of organic matter having endotoxicity which remains in the effluent.

  19. Research on fostering the ability of studentsts to suit the society of International trade professional%国际贸易专业学生社会适应能力培养研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    焦娟妮

    2012-01-01

      文章主要从探讨社会适应能力的概念及内容入手,分析了国际贸易专业学生社会适应能力研究的意义,然后在分析国际贸易专业学生社会适应能力现状的基础上,结合目前人才市场对国际贸易专业学生的需求特点,提出了培养在校国际贸易专业学生社会适应能力的具体措施和方法。%  The article mainly, from discussing the concept and content of international trade specialty the ability of social adaptation, analyzes the significance of the research on the students' adaptability to the society. Then, in the analysis of the current situations ' ability of social adaptation the international trade major students, combined with the characteristics of market demand for international trade professional students', puts forward the specific measures and methods to foster the col ege students’ ability to adapt to the society of international trade.

  20. Quantification of endotoxins in infected root canals and acute apical abscess exudates: monitoring the effectiveness of root canal procedures in the reduction of endotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ezilmara L R; Martinho, Frederico C; Nascimento, Gustavo G; Leite, Fabio R M; Gomes, Brenda P F A

    2014-02-01

    This clinical study was conducted to measure the endotoxin levels in infected root canals (RCs) and exudates related to acute apical abscesses (AAAs). In addition, the effectiveness of RC procedures in reducing the endotoxin levels in RCs was monitored. Paired samples of infected RCs and exudates from AAAs were collected from 10 subjects by using paper points. RCs samples were collected before (RCS1) and after chemomechanical preparation (CMP) (RCS2), after 17% EDTA (RCS3), and after 30 days of intracanal medication (Ca[OH]2 + chlorhexidine) (RCS4). A turbidimetric kinetic limulus amebocyte lysate assay was used for the measurement of endotoxins. Endotoxins were detected in 100% of the baseline samples of AAAs and RCs (RCS1) with median values of 175 EU/mL and 41.5 EU/mL, respectively (P < .05). After CMP (RCS2), endotoxins were reduced to a median value of 0.54 EU/mL (P < .05). Subsequent irrigation with EDTA (RCS3) failed to present a significant effectiveness in reducing the endotoxin levels (median= 0.37 EU/mL) (P = .07). However, intracanal medication for 30 days (RCS4) reduced endotoxins to median values of 0.03 EU/mL (P < .01). The present study revealed a strong association between the high levels of endotoxins found in AAAs and RCs collected from the same tooth. Moreover, the effectiveness of CMP in reducing the endotoxin levels from RCs in acute endodontic infection was improved by the use of RC medication. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.