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Sample records for international commission on radiation units and measurements

  1. The ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements): Its contribution to dosimetry in diagnostic and interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Zoetelief, J.; Menzel, H. G.; Paretzke, H.

    2005-01-01

    The ICRU (International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements was created to develop a coherent system of quantities and units, universally accepted in all fields where ionizing radiation is used. Although the accuracy of dose or kerma may be low for most radiological applications, the quantity which is measured must be clearly specified. Radiological dosimetry instruments are generally calibrated free-in-air in terms of air kerma. However, to estimate the probability of harm at low dose, the mean absorbed dose for organs is used. In contrast, at high doses, the likelihood of harm is related to the absorbed dose at the site receiving the highest dose. Therefore, to assess the risk of deterministic and stochastic effects, a detailed knowledge of absorbed dose distribution, organ doses, patient age and gender is required. For interventional radiology, where the avoidance of deterministic effects becomes important, dose conversion coefficients are generally not yet developed. (authors)

  2. Radioactivity: Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (1962), (ICRU) Report 10 c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook presents recommendations agreed upon at the meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) held in Montreux, Switzerland, in April 1962. It is written in a report form with a preface including symbols, abbreviations and definitions of terms used in the report. The report consists of four…

  3. Minimum exposure limits and measured relationships between the vitamin D, erythema and international commission on non-ionizing radiation protection solar ultraviolet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Nathan; Parisi, Alfio; Butler, Harry; Turner, Joanna; Wainwright, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) has established guidelines for exposure to ultraviolet radiation in outdoor occupational settings. Spectrally weighted ICNIRP ultraviolet exposures received by the skin or eye in an 8 h period are limited to 30 J m(-2). In this study, the time required to reach the ICNIRP exposure limit was measured daily in 10 min intervals upon a horizontal plane at a subtropical Australian latitude over a full year and compared with the effective Vitamin D dose received to one-quarter of the available skin surface area for all six Fitzpatrick skin types. The comparison of measured solar ultraviolet exposures for the full range of sky conditions in the 2009 measurement period, including a major September continental dust event, show a clear relationship between the weighted ICNIRP and the effective vitamin D dose. Our results show that the horizontal plane ICNIRP ultraviolet exposure may be used under these conditions to provide minimum guidelines for the healthy moderation of vitamin D, scalable to each of the six Fitzpatrick skin types. © 2014 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. A History of the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repacholi, M H

    2017-10-01

    Concern about health risks from exposure to non-ionizing radiation (NIR) commenced in the 1950s after tracking radars were first introduced during the Second World War. Soon after, research on possible biological effects of microwave radiation in the former Soviet Union and the U.S. led to public and worker exposure limits being much lower in Eastern European than in Western countries, mainly because of different protection philosophies. As public concern increased, national authorities began introducing legislation to limit NIR exposures from domestic microwave ovens and workplace devices such as visual display units. The International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) was formed in 1966 to represent national radiation protection societies. To address NIR protection issues, IRPA established a Working Group in 1974, then a Study Group in 1975, and finally the International NIR Committee (INIRC) in 1977. INIRC's publications quickly became accepted worldwide, and it was logical that it should become an independent commission. IRPA finally established the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP), chartering its remit in 1992, and defining NIR as electromagnetic radiation (ultraviolet, visible, infrared), electromagnetic waves and fields, and infra- and ultrasound. ICNIRP's guidelines have been incorporated into legislation or adopted as standards in many countries. While ICNIRP has been subjected to criticism and close scrutiny by the public, media, and activists, it has continued to issue well-received, independent, science-based protection advice. This paper summarizes events leading to the formation of ICNIRP, its key activities up to 2017, ICNIRP's 25th anniversary year, and its future challenges.

  5. Thematic procedures of the United Nations Commission on human rights and international law : in search of a sense of community

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gutter, Jeroen

    2006-01-01

    This study investigates the so-called "thematic approach" as a method available to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights to take cognizance of and to react upon violations of human rights worldwide. To this end, three different thematic procedures, the Working Group on Enforced or

  6. International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mettler, F.A.

    2001-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has been involved with protection of patients in medicine since the commission was formed in 1928. The past and current work of the commission emphasizes the importance of patient protection. Committee 3 is concerned with the protection of persons and unborn children when ionizing radiation is used for medical diagnosis, therapy of for biomedical research as well as with the assessment of the medical consequences of accidental exposures. The current committee membership includes eleven practicing physicians and four physicists from ten different countries. The current work of the committee has centred on producing short, readable, user friendly documents related to important and current issues. In this regard the committee and task groups have just published a document on Pregnancy and Medical Radiation. A document on Avoidance of Radiation Injuries from Medical Interventional Procedures is in press, and two documents, Prevention of Accidents to Patients undergoing Radiation Therapy, and Management of Patient Dose in Computed Tomography are being finalized for publication. Some of these documents have been put on the Internet for comment, and many useful comments have been received before manuscript completion

  7. International radiation commissions 1896 to 2008. Research into atmospheric radiation from IMO to IAMAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolle, H.J. (comp.); Moeller, F.; London, J.

    2008-05-15

    The document covers a historical compilation on research into atmospheric radiation from 1896 to 2008. The first part is a brief history of the radiation commissions of IMO (International Meteorological Organization) and IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics) for the period 1824 to 1948. Part 2 Covers the International Radiation Commission (IRC) of IAM (International Association of Meteorology)/IAMAS (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences)/IAMAP (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics); the Re-constitution of the IUGG Radiation Commision, the Officers of the International Radiation Commission of IUUG 1948-2008, and the activities of the Radiation Commision of the IUGG 1948-2008. The appendices include the Radiation Commission Members, the summaries of presented papers from 1954 and 1957, the IRC publications, and acronyms.

  8. International radiation commissions 1896 to 2008. Research into atmospheric radiation from IMO to IAMAS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolle, H.J.; Moeller, F.; London, J.

    2008-01-01

    The document covers a historical compilation on research into atmospheric radiation from 1896 to 2008. The first part is a brief history of the radiation commissions of IMO (International Meteorological Organization) and IUGG (International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics) for the period 1824 to 1948. Part 2 Covers the International Radiation Commission (IRC) of IAM (International Association of Meteorology)/IAMAS (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Sciences)/IAMAP (International Association of Meteorology and Atmospheric Physics); the Re-constitution of the IUGG Radiation Commision, the Officers of the International Radiation Commission of IUUG 1948-2008, and the activities of the Radiation Commision of the IUGG 1948-2008. The appendices include the Radiation Commission Members, the summaries of presented papers from 1954 and 1957, the IRC publications, and acronyms

  9. Recommendations of International Commission of Radiation Protection 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The book summarizes the recommendations on radiation protection of International of Radiation Protection. The main chapters are: 1.- Rates in radiation protection 2.- Biological aspects of radiation protection 3.- Framework of radiation protection. 4.- System of protection. 5.- Implantation of commission's recommendations. 6.- Summary of recommendations

  10. A review to determine the appropriatness and adequacy of existing provisions for the measurement of ionizing radiation in Australia: proceedings of a workshop held at the National Standards Commission on 13 May 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    Current arrangements for the physical measurement of ionizing radiation in Australia are reviewed. Topics covered include the roles of the National Standards Commission, the National Association of Testing Authorities, the Australian Atomic Energy Commission and the Australian Radiation Laboratory. Legal units for ionizing radiation and Australia's measurement standards are discussed. The role of the radiologist and industrial radiographer are examined. Existing codes standards and legislation at both Federal and State government levels are briefly outlined

  11. INTDOS: a computer code for estimating internal radiation dose using recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-09-01

    INTDOS is a user-oriented computer code designed to calculate estimates of internal radiation dose commitment resulting from the acute inhalation intake of various radionuclides. It is designed so that users unfamiliar with the details of such can obtain results by answering a few questions regarding the exposure case. The user must identify the radionuclide name, solubility class, particle size, time since exposure, and the measured lung burden. INTDOS calculates the fractions of the lung burden remaining at time, t, postexposure considering the solubility class and particle size information. From the fraction remaining in the lung at time, t, the quantity inhaled is estimated. Radioactive decay is accounted for in the estimate. Finally, effective committed dose equivalents to various organs and tissues of the body are calculated using inhalation committed dose factors presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This computer code was written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer and is written in Fortran IV. A flow chart and example calculations are discussed in detail to aid the user who is unfamiliar with computer operations

  12. X-rays, radiometers and skin unit dose. The development of measuring methods and measuring units for X radiation in medical physics from the beginning until the international standardization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glessmer-Junike, Simone

    2015-01-01

    X-rays, a special form of ionizing radiation, have been utilized in medicine and technology ever since their discovery at the end of 1895. However, the usage of X-rays made the development of measuring techniques necessary. Newly-developed measuring devices were at first called radiometers', but later the term dosimeter' has gained universal acceptance. The development of numerous dosimeters used in radiotherapy was accompanied by new units of measurement, each corresponding to its individual newly constructed dosimeter or method of measurement. While at first conversions between old and new units were performed, it later became clear that both within Germany and Europe units with similar names were used with different meanings, which was both incompatible and confusing. The first serious attempts of a standardization of units in Germany were made after the First World War, when the when the ionizing properties of X-rays was focused on for both measurements and unit definitions. Efforts towards an international standardization of units became successful in the mid-1920s when the Roentgen was defined as the universal unit. From the development described above, four stages of the evolution of radiation measurement and units in radiotherapy could be identified by means of comprehensive systematic research in printed publications. The first stage was the period of diagnostic application of X-rays, when tools for the determination of X-ray quality were designed. This stage progressed into that of therapeutic administration of X-rays shortly after, when instruments and units for the measurement of X-ray quantities (dose') were implemented. Due to the variety and diversity of measurement apparatus and units a third stage emerged, closely interconnected with the second. During the third stage, a nation-wide standardization was attempted in Germany. With the conclusion of this stage - the resolution of a unit for dose measurement in Germany - the stage of

  13. Review on evolvement of systems of ionizing radiation quantities and units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Junzheng; Zeng Zhi

    2009-01-01

    To scientifically and practically measure the ionizing radiation in unison is an indispensable prerequisite and foundation for the extensive uses of nuclear science and technology, development of radiological protection and safety standards, as well as prevention and treatment of ionizing radiation hazards. Concerning about the quantities and units of ionizing radiation as well as their corresponding measurement and application methods, relevant international organizations and all countries in the world generally adopt the systems proposed by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) which is a well recognized and authoritative academic organization.In the paper,the major evolutions of the systems for ionizing radiation quantities and units in the past decades are summarized. (authors)

  14. Proceedings of the international conference on radiation environment - assessment, measurement and its impact: abstract and souvenir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The international conference on radiation environment-assessment, measurement and its impact is a major step for evolving a consensual perspective on the future course of research in radiation physics and safety aspects in the entire country and global village in wider perspectives. The attempt is to welcome novel ideas and identify the strategies for enhancing safe lives without comprising the immense benefits of radiation sciences. The conference would present progress in radiation physics research. This international conference would strengthen the chain of research activities as well act as a catalyst. In the wake of the disaster at Fukushima, Japan such research activities are the need of the hour. While radiation hazards are immense and one might be quite impulsive in criticizing the so called radiation word, but we have to invite knowledge heads all over to further this science, despite its hazards, so that it may cater to the needs of young generation in present era. The discussion between learned teachers, far sighted scientists and scholars is very relevant and need of the hour. It is expected that a sharing of the current international experiences in radiation physics research through this international exposure will help in enriching understanding of our requirements in a globalised world. We must harness maximum benefit out of this science. It is quite encouraging that the main objective of the seminar is to probe critically the state of the art expertise available and hence deciphering the future prospects available with the field which can be achieved given proper utilization of the available resources. This conference touches many such aspects. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  15. Comparison between Brazilian radiation protection standard and the recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007; Comparacao entre a norma brasileira de radioprotecao e a recomendacao da International Commission on Radiological Protection - ICRP, publicadas em 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S. [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Itatiaia, RJ (Brazil). Fabrica do Combustivel Nuclear. Servico de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A. [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Pereira, J.R.S. [Universidade Veiga de Almeida (UVA), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Curso de Graduacao em Direito

    2015-07-01

    This study aims to evaluate the differences between the CNEN's standard and the publication of ICRP-103, analyzing the philosophy for radiation protection, dose limits and other relevant aspects of radiation protection.

  16. Operational accidents and radiation exposure experience within the United States Atomic Energy Commission, 1943--1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The occupational injury and fatality experience during 32 years of the development of the atomic energy industry under the direction of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineering District, is reviewed. Data are included on the cause of all accidents, including fires and transportation accidents, and the cost of AEC property damage. Fatalities of AEC and contractor personnel from all causes during the 32-year period totaled 321, of which 184 occurred in construction; 121 in AEC operations such as production, research, and services; and 16 in Government functions. There were 19,225 lost-time injuries attributable to all accidental causes, or a 32-year frequency rate of 2.75 based on the number of injuries per million man-hours. There were six deaths attributable to nuclear causes, thee of which were due to blast and flying missiles and three caused by whole-body radiation exposure. Forty-one workers were involved in lost-time radiation accidents, of whom 26 showed clinical manifestations attributable to radiation, resulting in permanent partial-disability of three workers and the loss of a digit by four workers, while the others did not develop evidence of radiation injury

  17. Radiation quantities, units and measurements. Final report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Allisy, A.; Caswell, R.S.

    2000-01-01

    The determination of human exposure to radiation and radioactivity, whether arising from environmental exposures, medical practice or industrial activities, requires a fundamental set of quantities and units with which exposures can be specified and the means and ability to make measurements which yield results in terms of these quantities and units. Radiation protection then, as well as effective use of radiation in medical applications, requires the capability to accurately quantify the characteristics and extent of radiation exposure, so that appropriate and useful assessments of the potential health consequences and risks, whether for protection of the public and workers or for diagnosis and treatment of disease, can be formulated. The work carried out via this concerted action on ''Radiation quantities, units and measurements'' has addressed these needs. Measurement of radiation is a complex subject and is a science in itself. Yet many users of radiation who need to make radiation measurements cannot be expected to become experts in this particular field. They need authoritative guidance on how to deal with the measurement problems connected with their particular use of radiation. The work carried out pursuant to this concerted action has resulted in publications that meet this need. Important achievements include the publication of seven new ICRU reports, the completion of all but the printing of three other ICRU reports, completion of the drafting work on two other reports, the development of many others reports and the initiation of seven new activities that will result in ICRU reports representing important future contribution to the needs identified in this project. (orig.)

  18. International Commission on Radiological Protection Committee 1: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, W F

    2015-06-01

    Commission 1 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection considers the risk of induction of cancer and heritable disease (stochastic effects) together with the underlying mechanisms of radiation action. Committee 1 also considers the risks, severity, and mechanisms of induction of tissue/organ damage and developmental defects (deterministic effects). The Committee was significantly revamped in 2013 and last met in Abu Dhabi in October 2013. Committee 1 evaluated progress on two ongoing task groups: Task Group 64 'Cancer Risk from Alpha Emitters' and Task Group 75 'Stem Cell Radiobiology'. Following approval from the Main Commission, Committee 1 established two new task groups: Task Group 91 'Radiation Risk Inference at Low Dose and Low Dose Rate Exposure for Radiological Protection Purposes' and Task Group 92 'Terminology and Definitions'. This article presents a synopsis of the current status of Committee 1 and outlines the tasks that Committee 1 may undertake in the future. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  19. X-rays, radiometers and skin unit dose. The development of measuring methods and measuring units for X radiation in medical physics from the beginning until the international standardization; X-Strahlen, Radiometer und Hauteinheitsdosis. Die Entwicklung der Messverfahren und Masseinheiten fuer Roentgenstrahlung in der medizinischen Physik von den Anfaengen bis zur internationalen Standardisierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glessmer-Junike, Simone

    2015-01-22

    X-rays, a special form of ionizing radiation, have been utilized in medicine and technology ever since their discovery at the end of 1895. However, the usage of X-rays made the development of measuring techniques necessary. Newly-developed measuring devices were at first called radiometers', but later the term dosimeter' has gained universal acceptance. The development of numerous dosimeters used in radiotherapy was accompanied by new units of measurement, each corresponding to its individual newly constructed dosimeter or method of measurement. While at first conversions between old and new units were performed, it later became clear that both within Germany and Europe units with similar names were used with different meanings, which was both incompatible and confusing. The first serious attempts of a standardization of units in Germany were made after the First World War, when the when the ionizing properties of X-rays was focused on for both measurements and unit definitions. Efforts towards an international standardization of units became successful in the mid-1920s when the Roentgen was defined as the universal unit. From the development described above, four stages of the evolution of radiation measurement and units in radiotherapy could be identified by means of comprehensive systematic research in printed publications. The first stage was the period of diagnostic application of X-rays, when tools for the determination of X-ray quality were designed. This stage progressed into that of therapeutic administration of X-rays shortly after, when instruments and units for the measurement of X-ray quantities (dose') were implemented. Due to the variety and diversity of measurement apparatus and units a third stage emerged, closely interconnected with the second. During the third stage, a nation-wide standardization was attempted in Germany. With the conclusion of this stage - the resolution of a unit for dose measurement in Germany - the stage of

  20. United Nations Commission on Commodities for Women's and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    These studies will assess bottlenecks to availability, affordability, accessibility, and rational use of the selected essential commodities, giving attention to improving access to maternal and newborn health commodities within an equitable health system. IDRC's support will ensure that issues and viewpoints from these parts ...

  1. United Nations Commission on Commodities for Women's and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Too often, cost effective, high impact medicines - those that could address critical health problems such as pneumonia, diarrhea, and post-partum hemorrhage - don't reach the women and children who need them. Some of the things that stand in their way include products that are unaffordable, formulations that are not ...

  2. The Lancet Commission on Syria | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Commission on Syria: Health in conflict” for The Lancet, one of the most prestigious medical and health science publications in the world. The journal has adopted a series of global commissions that convene groups of experts for a limited time to ...

  3. International Commission on Radiological Protection. History, policies, procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo; Dunster, H.J.; Valentin, Jack; )

    2000-01-01

    This report briefly reviews the history, mode of operation, concepts, and current policies of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). It touches upon the objectives of the Commission's recommendations, the quantities used, the biological basis of the Commission's policy, the quantitative basis for its risk estimates, the structure of the system of protection, some problems of interpretation and application in that system, and the need for stability, consistency, and clarity in the Commission's recommendations. (author)

  4. Units of measurement past, present and future international system of units

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, S V

    2010-01-01

    It is for the first time that the subject of quantities and their respective units is dealt this much in detail a glimpse of units of measurements of base quantities of length, time, mass and volume is given for ancient India three and four dimensional systems of measurement units are critically examined establishment of the fact that only four base units are needed to describe a system of units the basics to arrive at the unit of a derived quantity are explained basic, derived and dimensionless quantities including quantity calculus are introduced life history of scientists concerned with measurements units are presented to be inspiring to working metrologists and students. The International System of Units including, Metre Convention Treaty and its various organs including International National of Weights and Measure are described. The realisation of base units is given in detail. Classes of derived units within the SI, units permitted for time to come, units outside SI but used in special fields of measur...

  5. Design And Measurement Of Radiation Exposure Rates At An X-Ray Diagnostic Radiological Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tito-Sutjipto

    2003-01-01

    Every radiation employees suffers radiation exposure risk while doing his job. It is important therefore to investigate the occupational health and safety of radiation employees on its relationship with the design and measurement of radiation exposure rates at an X-ray diagnostic radiological unit in this work, a case study was held on the radiological unit at BP-4 Yogyakarta for patient diagnostics, This research armed to investigate the relationship between the design of radiological unit for X-ray diagnostics and the location of the X-ray machine, based on the distance variable and radiation exposure rate during patient diagnostics. This was performed using radiological unit design data for X-ray diagnostics and the measurement of radiation exposure rates throughout patient diagnostics. The design data can then be used for determining the requirement of primary and secondary shielding materials for radiological unit as well as a calculation basis of radiation exposure rates during patient diagnostics. From the result of the research, it can be concluded that from the occupational health and safety point of view, radiation exposure around the X-ray machines are fairly good, both for the shielding materials in each X-ray room and the radiation exposures received by the workers, because they are far beyond the maximum permittable average limit (16.67 m R/days). (author)

  6. Quantities and Units used in Radiation Safety. Address at the third national course of Radiation Safety in Radiology. May 22-24, 2000 Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dieguez, Lazaro

    2000-05-01

    The address discusses the following issues: the radiological units, radiation dose units, radiation protection units and operational quantities used for individual monitoring recently introduced by the International Commission of Radiological Units

  7. Experiences in commissioning of 1st and 2nd unit of NPP Mochovce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanovic, P.; Klucarova, K.; Cernicka, J.; Toth, L.

    2000-01-01

    Paper is focused on responsibilities and position of VUJE Trnava Inc. in process of commissioning of new NPP units. It describes the order of activities during commissioning from the preparation of measurements to evaluation of measured data. Paper's scope is on the commissioning the 1 st and 2 nd units of the NPP Mochovce, which has been commissioned in the years 1998 and 1999. Basic characteristics of the NPP Mochovce design are also included in this paper. (author)

  8. Seznamte se: International Commission on Mathematical Instruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarmila Novotná

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Článek seznamuje čtenáře s International Commission on Mathematical Instruction (ICMI, komisí nevládní mezinárodní neziskové vědecké organizace International Mathematical Union (IMU, jejímž úkolem je podporovat a zlepšovat mezinárodní spolupráci v matematice. Hlavní pozornost je věnována cílům ICMI, její činnosti, spolupráci s přidruženými organizacemi a některým novým projektům směřujícím ke zlepšení vyučování matematice.

  9. Towards an international regime on radiation and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    2000-01-01

    The 1990s have seen the de facto emergence of what might be called an 'international regime on nuclear and radiation safety'. It may be construed to encompass three key elements: legally binding international undertakings among States; globally agreed international safety standards; and provisions for facilitating the application of those standards. While nuclear and radiation safety are national responsibilities, governments have long been interested in formulating harmonised approaches to radiation and nuclear safety. A principal mechanism for achieving harmonisation has been the establishment of internationally agreed safety standards and the promotion of their global application. The development of nuclear and radiation safety standards is a statutory function of the IAEA, which is unique in the United Nations system. The IAEA Statute expressly authorises the Agency 'to establish standards of safety' and 'to provide for the application of these standards'. As the following articles and supplement in this edition of the IAEA Bulletin point out, facilitating international conventions; developing safety standards; and providing mechanisms for their application are high priorities for the IAEA. (author)

  10. Assessment of exposure to MRI motion-induced fields based on the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberti, Luca; Bottauscio, Oriano; Chiampi, Mario

    2016-10-01

    The goal of this study was to conduct an exposure assessment for workers moving through the stray stationary field of common MRI scanners, performed according to the recent International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines, which aim at avoiding annoying sensory effects. The analysis was performed through numerical simulations, using a high-resolution anatomical model that moved along realistic trajectories in proximity to a tubular and open MRI scanner. Both dosimetric indexes indicated by ICNIRP (maximum variation of the magnetic flux density vector and exposure index for the motion-induced electric field) were computed for three statures of the human model. A total of 51 exposure situations were analyzed. None of them exceeded the limit for the maximum variation of the magnetic flux density, whereas some critical cases were found when computing the induced electric field. In the latter case, the exposure indexes computed via Fourier transform and through an equivalent filter result to be consistent. The results suggest the adoption of some simple precautionary rules, useful when sensory effects experienced by an operator could reflect upon the patient's safety. Moreover, some open issues regarding the quantification of motion-induced fields are highlighted, putting in evidence the need for clarification at standardization level. Magn Reson Med 76:1291-1300, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. International meeting on radiation chemistry and processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    The conference heard 76 papers; the abstracts of 74 of them were inputted in INIS. They deal with the basic principles and mechanisms of radiation chemistry, with radiolysis, radiation cross-linking of polymers, with methods and instruments for irradiation beam dosimetry, and with radiation application in the irradiation of foods and wastes. (M.D.)

  12. Measurement of the natural radiation environment and its dependence on various parameters in Austria and assessment of the natural external and internal radiation dose of various population groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pohl, E.

    1978-06-01

    The natural mean values of natural radionuclides in the air and external gamma radiation were determined from measurements carried out in various parts of Austria and the mean values were used as a basis for the determination of body and organ doses. Moreover frequency distributions of several specific organ doses within various population groups were investigated. Measurements of natural air activity were carried out indoors and outdoors as well as gamma radiation at the following sites - Salzburg Town, Badgastein, Gastein Valley and Mallnitz and several other places at a line crossing the Alps from South to North (Corinthia, Schwarzach, Forstau, Hallein, Kuchl, Grodig and Voggenberg - Bergheim) and in 15 different mines in the Counties of Salzburg and Upper Austria. The methods of calculation of the radiation burden due to inhalation is published in the Proceedings of the Symposium on Biological and Environmental Effects of Low Level Radiation, IAEA, Chicago 1976, Vol. II pages 305-315. It can be concluded from the work that great local differences of some components occur even within relatively small areas. The radioactivity in the air shows great temporal differences at one and the same site. In addition radiation doses had to be calculated separately for various organs and tissues due to the inhomogeneous distribution of doses within the body. Also the estimation had to be made for a variety of individuals depending on sex, age, weight and various physiological states of activity. The highest doses to tissues from inhalation of natural radioactivity are the basal cells of the sigmental epithelium and subsigmental bronchi 4th - 9th generation in the lung model of Weibel. 46% of the population investigated received more than 0.5 rem per year, 25% more than 1.5 rem per year and 1.3% more than 3 rem per year. The different air activities in the living and working rooms are due to differences in the building materials and in the construction of houses

  13. Commission on the Future of the United States Aerospace Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-11-01

    Commission Vice-Chairman Partner, Williams & Connolly LLP Dr. Buzz Aldrin President Starcraft Enterprises Sharespace Starbooster & Starcycler Mr. Edward M...proved illusory.” Commissioner Buzz Aldrin 3 - 4 FINAL REPORT OF THE COMMISSION ON THE FUTURE OF THE UNITED STATES AEROSPACE INDUSTRY Aerospace...building market share, largely at the expense of U.S. companies. Former Apollo astronaut and Commissioner Buzz Aldrin signs Yuri Gagarin’s Tribute Book at

  14. Genesee generating station Unit 1. Construction and commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowsdale, D.R.; Keller, A. [Edmonton Power, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    1995-12-31

    The history of the Genesee Power Project was recapped, providing details of its site plan and design features and a case study of the construction and commissioning of Genesee Unit 1. General principles and specific steps taken to ensure the successful completion of the work were presented. General construction management information and more specific information on scheduling, coordination, quality control and quality assurance measures, site cost control, safety, and labour relations were described. Construction and management problems of all types were recounted, including some significant equipment failures during commissioning. In the end,the construction and commissioning of the Genesee Project was successful, being completed ahead of schedule and under budget. The success of the project was attributed to the best use of available skills and resources, and a capable managerial, engineering and technical staff.

  15. Pilot project for implantation of the National Commission on Radiation Protection and Dosimetry of CONTER, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilha Filho, L.G.; Santos, J.R.A.; Dmitruk, P.P.; Souza, J.H.C.; Hamann, J.H.; Soboll, D.S.

    2017-01-01

    This work presents the pilot project of the National Council of Technicians and Technologists in Radiology (CONTER), which created the National Commission on Radioprotection and Dosimetry (CNRD), in order to develop a radioprotection culture for professionals in radiographic techniques

  16. Pressing problems of measurement of ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fominykh, V.I.; Yudin, M.F.

    1993-01-01

    The current system for ensuring the unity of measurements in the Russian Federation and countries of the former Soviet Union ensures a high quality of dosimetric, radiometric, and spectrometric measurements in accordance with the recommendations of the Consulative Committee on Standards for Measurements of Ionizing Radiations of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (IBWM), International Organization on Radiological Units (ICRU), International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Organization on Legislative Metrology (IOLM), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), etc. Frequent collation of the national primary and secondary standards of Russia with those of IBWM and the leading national laboratories of the world facilitate mutual verification of the measurements of ionizing radiations. The scope of scientific and scientific-technical problems that can be solved by using ionizing radiations has expanded significantly in recent years. In this paper the authors consider some pressing problems of the metrology of ionizing radiations which have arisen as a result of this expansion. These include the need for unity and reliability of measurements involved in radiation protection, the measurement of low doses involving low dose rates, ensuring the unity of measurements when monitoring the radiological security of the population, the need for more uniformity on an international scale regarding the basic physical quantities and their units for characterizing radiation fields, determination of the accuracy of measurement of the radiation dose absorbed by an irradiated tissue or organ, and the development of complex standards for ionizing radiations. 5 refs., 1 tab

  17. Development of the practical application of the recommendations of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection grew out of the International X-ray and Radium Protection Commission set up in 1928. Its Recommendations have developed from simple prescriptive rules for protecting the medical staff using x rays and radium to a complete System of Protection for all human activities that involve exposure to ionizing radiation. The Commission is satisfied that some of the health effects of radiation are caused, albeit with small probabilities, by small doses. Its System of Protection is therefore risk-based. It is no longer prescriptive and has to be applied with judgement. The basis of that judgement and the framework for its application are set out in ICRP Publication 60, the 1990 Recommendations of the Commission

  18. International law and United Nations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savić Matej

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with centuries-lasting open military pretensions of world superpowers, modern diplomacy has developed, as beginning a war, as well as coming to peace demanded political activity which resulted, first in signing, and then coming into effect of international documents, on the basis of which, a foundation for the modern international order has been cast. Further on, by the formation of international organizations, codification has been allowed, as well as a progressive development of international law. Additionally, in the sense of preserving international peace and security, first the League of Nations was formed, and following the ending of World War II, the UN. Generally, the functioning of the United Nation's organs, has been regulated by legal rules, however political goals, tendencies, and mechanisms which the member states are using determine greatly the activity above all of the Security Council, but furthermore of the General Assembly, as a plenary organ. Nevertheless, the achieved results of the Commission for International Law in the meaning of creation of international conventions, as well as state adhering to the same, present unassailable achievements in the sense of development of international law. On the other hand, tendencies of motion of international relationships are aimed at establishing a multi-polar system in the international community. Today, the political scene is assuming a new appearance, by which the nearly built international system is already awaiting further progressive development.

  19. Radiation internal exposure measurements archiving system (REMAS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bitar, A.; Maghrabi, M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a personal-computer-based software, REMAS, which helps users to estimate intake activity and resulting internal doses for all radionuclides existing in (International Commission on Radiological Protection) ICRP 78 and other important elements. In addition to its use in internal dose calculations, it facilitates management of data of monitored persons who are occupationally exposed to unsealed radioactive substances. Furthermore, REMAS offers the possibility to generate different reports of results. The program is suitable for laboratories working in the field of assessment of occupational intake and also for users of radioactive material who are routinely monitored. REMAS, which is bilingual program (English and Arabic), was built with GUI environment and was developed using Microsoft FoxPro. It runs on Microsoft Windows XP operating systems. (authors)

  20. Measurements of Neutron Radiation on the International Space Station: ISS-34 to ISS-40

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin

    Radiation protection associated with human spaceflight is an important issue that becomes more vital as both the length of the mission and the distance from Earth increase. Radiation in deep space is a mixed field due to galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) and solar particle events (SPEs). In low-Earth orbit (LEO), protons and electrons trapped in the Van Allen radiation belts also make a major contribution to the radiation field. Neutrons encountered in LEO, for example on the International Space Station (ISS), are produced by nuclear interactions of GCRs and trapped protons with various elements in the walls and interior components of the spacecraft, and by neutron albedo after GCRs are incident on the Earth’s atmosphere. Previous investigations using bubble detectors (on Russian satellites, the Mir space station, the space shuttle, and the ISS) have shown that neutrons contribute significantly to the total biologically-equivalent radiation dose received by astronauts. As part of the ongoing Matroshka-R experiment, bubble detectors have been used to characterize neutron radiation on the ISS, starting with the ISS-13 mission in 2006. Two types of bubble detectors have been used for these experiments, namely space personal neutron dosimeters (SPNDs) and the space bubble-detector spectrometer (SBDS). The SBDS is a set of six detectors with different energy thresholds, which is used to determine the neutron energy spectrum. During the ISS-34 to ISS-40 expeditions (2012 - 2014) bubble detectors were used in both the US Orbital Segment (USOS) and the Russian segment of the ISS. The Radi-N2 experiment, a repeat of the 2009 Radi-N investigation, started during ISS-34 and included repeated measurements in four USOS modules: Columbus, the Japanese Experiment Module, the US Laboratory, and Node 2. Parallel experiments using a second set of detectors in the Russian segment included the first characterization of the neutron spectrum inside the tissue-equivalent Matroshka-R phantom

  1. Space Radiation Research Unit, International Open Laboratory in NIRS

    OpenAIRE

    Uchihori, Yukio; Hei, Tom K.; Konishi, Teruaki; Kobayashi, Alisa; Kitamura, Hisashi; Kodaira, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Shingo

    2014-01-01

    The radiation environment encountered by astronauts during spaceflight is far more complex than any radiation field existed on Earth. Space crew living and working in the International Space Station (ISS) are exposed to a mixed radiation field comprises primary high-energy cosmic rays, including energetic protons and heavy ions, and to secondary radiations, including energetic neutrons, produced when the primary radiation interacts with the mass of the space station and its contents. The dose...

  2. The recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vennart, J.

    1983-01-01

    The most recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in its Publication 26 differ from all those made earlier by being based quantitatively on the risk of deleterious effects. Two types of effect are considered: stochastic and non-stochastic effects. The recommended dose limits are designed to avoid non-stochastic effects and reduce the risks of stochastic effects to acceptable values. The dose equivalent limits are only part of a much wider system that requires justification for the use of sources of ionizing radiation and consideration of costs and benefits to ensure that doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable. Annual Limits for Intakes (ALIs) of radionuclides by workers are recommended in ICRP Publication 30 and the dosimetric models and sources of data used to derive these values are described. ICRP are currently considering a statement about values of ALI for members of the public. The many factors by which these would differ from those recommended for workers are discussed. (author)

  3. International movement on radiation safety related to the ICRP and the IAEA-RADWASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kosako, Toshiso

    1994-01-01

    Nowadays discussion on Radiation Safety has a spread of world wide range. The main framework on radiation safety was constructed by ICRP (International Commission on Radiological Protection), which was established in 1928. This term of the committee was from June 1993 to May 1997 and the first plenary meeting was held at the Queen's hotel in Bournemouth of the United Kingdom on September 1993. The outline of this meeting, especially related items to the Committee 4, were summarized in this paper. The second point of our workshop considerations is radioactive waste problems, which are now under discussion in RADWASS (Radioactive Waste Safety Standards) project of IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency). This IAEA-RADWASS will last nearly 10 years to cover whole subjects. These discussed items are arranged into various international standards; the safety fundamental, the safety standards, the safety guides and the safety practices. These systematic approach, if we could summarize, would be effective not only to the specialists but also to a general public to get an acceptance of radioactive waste problem. Here, this IAEA-RADWASS project is reviewed. (author)

  4. Operational accidents and radiation exposure experience within the United States Atomic Energy Commission, 1943--1975. [AEC health and safety during first 32 years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1975-01-01

    The occupational injury and fatality experience during 32 years of the development of the atomic energy industry under the direction of the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its predecessor, the Manhattan Engineering District, is reviewed. Data are included on the cause of all accidents, including fires and transportation accidents, and the cost of AEC property damage. Fatalities of AEC and contractor personnel from all causes during the 32-year period totaled 321, of which 184 occurred in construction; 121 in AEC operations such as production, research, and services; and 16 in Government functions. There were 19,225 lost-time injuries attributable to all accidental causes, or a 32-year frequency rate of 2.75 based on the number of injuries per million man-hours. There were six deaths attributable to nuclear causes, thee of which were due to blast and flying missiles and three caused by whole-body radiation exposure. Forty-one workers were involved in lost-time radiation accidents, of whom 26 showed clinical manifestations attributable to radiation, resulting in permanent partial-disability of three workers and the loss of a digit by four workers, while the others did not develop evidence of radiation injury. (CH)

  5. Statement and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection from its 1980 meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A short report of the 1980 annual meeting of the ICRP is given along with the recommendations proposed. These are as follows: 1) for the lens of the eye, the annual dose-equivalent limit should be reduced from 0.3Sv to 0.15 Sv, 2) the recommended annual limit for intake by inhalation for radon-222 daughters is 0.02 J and corresponds to an air concentration of 0.4 working levels in previous practical units, 3) the recent information on estimate of radiation risk does not call for changes in the risk factors for stochastic effects or the dose-effect relationships for non-stochastic effects underlying the dose-equivalent limits recommended in ICRP publication 26. The assessment of the total detriment by summation using weighting factors for different organs is also discussed. (U.K.)

  6. 76 FR 45311 - International Joint Commission Public Hearings on Binational Management of Lake of the Woods and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-28

    .......... Historic Rex--Hotel 7 p.m. Event Room, 103 First Street, NW 56623. Friday, August 19 Stratton, ON... International Joint Commission Public Hearings on Binational Management of Lake of the Woods and Rainy River... water quality science efforts in the watershed; increased local participation in watershed management...

  7. Radiological protection and geological disposal. The guiding principles and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The protection of humans and the environment from the dangers of radiation is an integral part of the development of deep underground disposal for the categories of radioactive waste that will remain significantly radioactive for centuries to come and in which a high level of radioactivity is concentrated. This flyer succinctly presents the concepts and principles recommended in 2013 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), a gathering of the foremost specialists in radiological protection. Intended for the interested public, the flyer uses plain language. Those wishing to learn more are encouraged to consult the ICRP Publication 122. ICRP is an independent, international and non-governmental organisation with more than two hundred volunteer members from approximately thirty countries across six continents. They represent the leading scientists and policy makers in the field of radiological protection. Since 1928, the ICRP has been responsible for the International System of Radiological Protection used world-wide as the common basis for radiological protection policy, standards, legislation, regulation, guidelines, programmes, and practice. Recognizing the importance of geological disposal as a societal issue, the NEA Committees on Radioactive Waste Management and on Radiation Protection and Public Health offer this flyer jointly with the ICRP. The goal of a geological disposal facility is to contain and isolate the waste in order to protect humans and the environment for periods that are comparable with geological time scales. Geological disposal is recognized by international organisations as especially suited for high level radioactive waste or spent fuel in which a high level of radioactivity is concentrated and which will remain significantly radioactive for many thousands of years. Geological disposal may also be used for other long-lived wastes, especially when there is a similar need for long term protection. the ICRP has released

  8. Research on international cooperation for nuclear and radiation safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Jianxiu

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the importance and related requirements of international cooperation on nuclear and radiation safety, analyzes the current status, situation and challenges faced, as well as the existing weakness and needs for improvement, and gives some proposals for reference. (author)

  9. Radiation protection glossary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The glossary is intended to be used as a terminology standard for IAEA documentation on radiation protection. An effort has been made to use definitions contained in internationally accepted publications such as recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), standards of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), reports of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), with only slight modifications in order to tailor them more closely to IAEA needs. The glossary is restricted to ionizing radiation

  10. Investigation on the development of measurement techniques, the behavior in the environment and the estimation of internal radiation dose by inhalation for some typical atmospheric radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Hikaru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-06-01

    Radionuclides in surface atmosphere on the earth are {sup 222}Rn, {sup 220}Rn and their short lived progeny, {sup 7}Be, {sup 85}Kr, {sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 90}Sr and so on. In this paper, among them, {sup 222}Rn, their short lived progeny ({sup 218}Po, {sup 214}Pb, {sup 214}Bi, {sup 214}Po), {sup 7}Be, {sup 3}H, and {sup 90}Sr are focused on as follows based on the experimental and observed results, 1. Development of their measurement techniques, 2. Analysis of their variation of atmospheric concentration with time and places, 3. Analysis of their interaction characteristics with surface environment including plants, 4. Estimation of internal radiation doses by inhalation of them. (author). 228 refs.

  11. Preparation of physics commissioning of Mochovce units 3 and 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, M.; Chrapciak, V.

    2010-01-01

    The Project 'Mochovce Units 3 and 4 Completion' started in 2009 and it will be finished in 2013. VUJE, Inc. is one of the five main Project contractors for the Nuclear Island and it is responsible, inter alia, for Mochovce Units 3 and 4 commissioning. The commissioning of Units 3 and 4 includes the stages of Physics Commissioning and Power Commissioning. This paper deals with the preparation of Mochovce Units 3 and 4 Physics Commissioning. In the paper there is presented a preparation of some commissioning documents, e.g. 'Quality Assurance Programme', 'Commissioning Programme', 'Stage Programme for Physics Commissioning', 'Test working programmes', 'Neutron-physics characteristics for Physics and Power Commissioning', etc. The scope of Physics Commissioning is presented by list of tests. For assessment of tests results so-called three-level acceptance criteria will be applied: realization, design and safety criteria. In the paper there are also presented computer codes, which will be used for neutron-physics characteristics calculation and the fuel loading scheme for the reactor core of Mochovce Unit 3. (Authors)

  12. Basic safety standards for radiation protection and their application to internal exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dousset, M.

    Following a summary of the basic concepts on radiation protection units, the safety standards now in effect in France and those recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP Publication 9, 1965) to be used as a basis to the next Euratom regulations are developed [fr

  13. THE ROLE OF BELARUS NATIONAL COMMISSION ON RADIATION PROTECTION IN THE MINIMIZATION OF CONSEQUENCES OF THE ACCIDENT AT THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Stozharov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Belarus National Commission on Radiation Protection was established in 1991, based on the former Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic Supreme Council Resolution. The Commission works out recommendations on the radiation protection to submit to the state authorities, state institutions under the Republic of Belarus Government and state research institutions, reviews and assesses scientific data in the field of radiation protection and makes suggestions in regards of the implementation of the achieved developments. The Commission engages leading scientists and practitioners from Belarus, involved in the provision of the radiation protection and safety in the state. The methodological cornerstone for the Commission activities was chosen to be the committment to the worldwide accepted approach of the nature and magnitude of the undertaken protective measures justification in the field of radiation safety. The Commission adheres the ALARA optimization criteria as the core of the aforementioned approach. The Commission has also submited to the Government a number of developments which were crucial in the highest level managerial decisions elaboration. The latter impacted directly the state tactics and strategy in the environmental, health and social consequences of the Chernobyl disaster minimization. Following the recommendations of the international institutions (ICRP, IAEA, UNSCEAR, FAO/WHO, developments of the colleagues in the Russian Federation, Ukraine and the local regional experience, the Commission proceeds with the expert observation of the ongoing protective measures to reduce the radiation impact and population exposure resulted from the Chernobyl accident, is actively occupied in the radiation safety ensuring at the Belarussian nuclear power plant being under construction, much contributes to elaboration of the new version of the state Law “On Radiation Protection of Population” and other regulatory documents.

  14. Traceability of small force measurements and the future international system of units (SI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khelifa Naceur-Eddine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The unit of force is connected to the international prototype of the kilogramme, unit of mass in the international system of units (SI, via dead weight machines using calibrated masses. However, forces below 10 μN, ubiquitous in nature and in some devices cannot be measured with a traceability to the SI. The measurement, with the uncertainty of these forces has implications for both basic and applied science. Today, many emerging sectors in micro/nanotechnology and biotechnology have started producing and using systems to implement low forces that, for various reasons, require them to be traceable. Also, the revision of the SI, scheduled for 2018 year, of linking the definitions of the kilogramme, the ampere, the kelvin and the mole to fixed numerical values of fundamental constants, has aroused particular interest in the measurement and calibration of small forces. In this paper, we will give some indications of the state of the art on the small force with a focus on the development of a force sensor using a photoelastic crystal as a monolithic solid-state laser. Basically, the force to be measured is applied to the crystal induces a birefringence in the laser medium which in turn manifests itself by the appearance of a splitting between the frequencies associated with the two polarization components of the oscillating laser mode. This difference is then exploited because, within the elastic limit of the crystal, it is proportional to the force acting on the laser.

  15. 78 FR 40260 - International Joint Commission: Public Comment on a Proposal for Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-03

    ... health of native plants, birds, fish and other animals. While continuing to reduce extreme high and low... L Street NW., Suite 615, Washington, DC 20440 International Joint Commission Secretary, Canadian...

  16. 78 FR 22593 - The United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy Notice of Charter Renewal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... DEPARTMENT OF STATE [Public Notice 8275] The United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy... Commission on Public Diplomacy. The Commission was reauthorized by the Congress and the President under... charged with appraising U.S. Government public diplomacy activities (activities intended to understand...

  17. Measurement and evaluation systems for NPP commissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elko, Marek

    2006-01-01

    Standard core monitoring and information systems are designed with an emphasis on normal operation of nuclear power plant. Their purpose is to provide necessary support for reactor operators and other operating personnel during the fuel cycle. After each fuel reloading, and to the larger extent during the plant commissioning, a variety of start-up tests need to be carried out and evaluated. Sampling periods, accuracy and communication delays of standard systems are not always suitable for test performance and evaluation. For technical and safety reasons, the access to standard monitoring and information systems is very limited. Non-Standard Measurement and Evaluation Systems are highly specialized devices designed with an emphasis on start-up tests performance and evaluation. They are capable of high frequency sampling, processing and communication of hundreds of technological signals with required accuracy and low communication delay. All technological signals needed for the test performance and evaluation are collected from various systems, concentrated in one system and fully accessible to a test leader, a reactor physicist or other users. In addition, Non-Standard Measurement and Evaluation Systems can perform other tasks like data storing and presentation, data distribution to other systems or external computers via network, reactivity calculations, etc. Structure of such systems can vary, but generally it is a mixture of two basic concepts: a mobile system and a stationary system. A basic description of hardware structure and software equipment of Non-Standard Measurement and Evaluation Systems is given in the paper (Authors)

  18. Radiation Litigation and Internal Dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, D.E.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation Litigation refers to those lawsuits filed by individuals who claim to have been injured by some past exposure to ionizing radiation. Law classifies these cases as personal injury or tort cases. However, they are a new breed of such cases and the law is presently struggling with whether these cases can be resolved using the traditional methods of legal analysis or whether new forms of analysis, such as probability of causation, need to be applied. There are no absolutely certain rules concerning how these particular lawsuits will be tried and analyzed. The United States presently is defending cases filed by approximately 7000 plaintiffs. The private nuclear industry is defending cases filed by over 2000 plaintiffs. While not all of these cases will actually be tried on their merits, at least some will and internal dosimetry will play a very important part in many of these trials

  19. Director's Report on the Activity and Management of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) - (1 January 2013 - 31 December 2013) - Supplement: Ionizing Radiation Department

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milton, M.; Los Arcos, J.M.; Burns, D.T.; Kessler, C.; Picard, S.; Roger, P.; Courte, S.; Michotte, C.; Nonis, M.; Ratel, G.

    2014-03-01

    This BIPM Director's Report describes the activity of the BIPM. In order to carry out its mission of ensuring and promoting the global comparability of measurements, the BIPM operates laboratories in the fields of mass, time, electricity, ionizing radiation and chemistry. All of the laboratory work addresses one or more of the agreed objectives for the BIPM, which are: - To establish and maintain appropriate reference standards for use as the basis of a limited number of key international comparisons at the highest level. - To coordinate international comparisons of national measurement standards through the Consultative Committees of the CIPM; taking the role of coordinating laboratory for selected comparisons of the highest priority and undertaking the scientific work necessary to enable this to be done. - To provide selected calibrations for Member States. In this document some highlights of the work carried out during 2013 are presented. Extended reports of the work of each department are available at http://www.bipm.org/en/publications/directors_report/. This document comprises the Director's report with its supplement describing the work of the Ionizing Radiation Department (X- and γ-rays, Radionuclides, Thermometry)

  20. An international intercomparison of absorbed dose measurements for radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taiman Kadni; Noriah Mod Ali

    2002-01-01

    Dose intercomparison on an international basis has become an important component of quality assurance measurement i.e. to check the performance of absorbed dose measurements in radiation therapy. The absorbed dose to water measurements for radiation therapy at the SSDL, MINT have been regularly compared through international intercomparison programmes organised by the IAEA Dosimetry Laboratory, Seibersdorf, Austria such as IAEA/WHO TLD postal dose quality audits and the Intercomparison of therapy level ionisation chamber calibration factors in terms of air kerma and absorbed dose to water calibration factors. The results of these intercomparison in terms of percentage deviations for Cobalt 60 gamma radiation and megavoltage x-ray from medical linear accelerators participated by the SSDL-MINT during the year 1985-2001 are within the acceptance limit. (Author)

  1. Measurement of natural background radiation intensity on a train.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yen-Fu; Lin, Jeng-Wei; Sheu, Rong-Jiun; Lin, Uei-Tyng; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2011-03-01

    This work aims to measure different components of natural background radiation on a train. A radiation measurement system consisting of four types of radiation detectors, namely, a Berkeley Lab cosmic-ray detector, moderated (3)He detector, high-pressure ionisation chamber and NaI(Tl) spectrometer, associated with a global positioning system unit was established for this purpose. For the commissioning of the system, a test measurement on a train along the railway around the northern Taiwan coast from Hsinchu to Hualien with a distance of ∼ 275 km was carried out. No significant variation of the intensities of the different components of natural background radiation was observed, except when the train went underground or in the tunnels. The average external dose rate received by the crew of the train was estimated to be 62 nSv h(-1).

  2. Measurement of natural background radiation intensity on a train

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Y. F.; Lin, J. W.; Sheu, R. J.; Lin, U. T.; Jiang, S. H.

    2011-01-01

    This work aims to measure different components of natural background radiation on a train. A radiation measurement system consisting of four types of radiation detectors, namely, a Berkeley Lab cosmic-ray detector, moderated 3He detector, high pressure ionisation chamber and NaI(Tl) spectrometer, associated with a global positioning system unit was established for this purpose. For the commissioning of the system, a test measurement on a train along the railway around the northern Taiwan coast from Hsinchu to Hualien with a distance of ∼275 km was carried out. No significant variation of the intensities of the different components of natural background radiation was observed, except when the train went underground or in the tunnels. The average external dose rate received by the crew of the train was estimated to be 62 nSv h -1 . (authors)

  3. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, John; Day, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  4. Measurement of dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shigao; Silva, Glauber T; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2005-05-01

    Dynamic radiation force from ultrasound has found increasing applications in elasticity imaging methods such as vibro-acoustography. Radiation force that has both static and dynamic components can be produced by interfering two ultrasound beams of slightly different frequencies. This paper presents a method to measure both static and dynamic components of the radiation force on a sphere suspended by thin threads in water. Due to ultrasound radiation force, the sphere deflects to an equilibrant position and vibrates around it. The static radiation force is estimated from the deflection of the sphere. The dynamic radiation force is estimated from the calculated radiation impedance of the sphere and its vibration speed measured by a laser vibrometer. Experimental results on spheres of different size, vibrated at various frequencies, confirm the theoretical prediction that the dynamic and static radiation force on a sphere have approximately equal magnitudes [G. T. Silva, Phys. Rev. E 71, 056617 (2005)].

  5. International deployment of cooperative intelligent transportation systems : bilateral efforts of the European Commission and United States Department of Transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-08-18

    This task report concerning alternative models of public and private sector involvement is the third in a series comprising the overall study, Overcoming Barriers to ITS - Lessons from Other Technologies: This report examines different ways the publi...

  6. Population commission discusses international migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    At the 30th session of the Commission on Population and Development during February 24-28, 1997, international migration was the main topic, with special linkages between migration and development and on gender issues and the family. New and emerging issues were also considered. Members stressed the need for more reliable data on migration, the direction of migrants flows, and the characteristics of migrants. The Commission requested a task force on basic social services to hold a technical symposium of experts on international migration in 1998. Its chair, Dr. Nafis Sadik, said that migration issues should based on the reality of choice not on coercive measures or quotas. Almost half of the migrants globally are women. The Commission was given a new impetus by the International Conference on Population and Development held at Cairo in 1994. Migration pressures intensified in the second half of the 1980s and in the early 1990s, creating areas of concern: the negative impact of short-term migration on working conditions in host countries; migration pressures emanating from climatic change; the protection of migrant women and their children; the right of receiving countries to regulate access to their territory; the adverse consequences of forced migration; the situation of persons whose asylum claims have been rejected; the trafficking in women and children, prostitution and coercive adoption; and the sudden and massive arrival of refugees in need of international protection. The 1998 session of the Commission will feature the theme of health and mortality, with special emphasis on the linkages between health and development and on gender and age.

  7. Expression of results in quantum chemistry physical chemistry division commission on physicochemical symbols, terminology and units

    CERN Document Server

    Whiffen, D H

    2013-01-01

    Expression of Results in Quantum Chemistry recommends the appropriate insertion of physical constants in the output information of a theoretical paper in order to make the numerical end results of theoretical work easily transformed to SI units by the reader. The acceptance of this recommendation would circumvent the need for a set of atomic units each with its own symbol and name. It is the traditional use of the phrase """"atomic units"""" in this area which has obscured the real problem. The four SI dimensions of length, mass, time, and current require four physical constants to be permitte

  8. 76 FR 28954 - International Conservation and Management Measures Recognized by the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Ocean (Basic Instrument for the North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization--NASCO); Convention on Future Multilateral Cooperation in the Northwest Atlantic Fisheries (Basic Instrument for the Northwest... (Basic Instrument for the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas--ICCAT...

  9. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Hoppe, Richard T.; Li, Ye-Xiong; Tsang, Richard; Wirth, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT

  10. SI units for radiation protection - an interim measure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burns, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The brief memorandum comments on the problems concerning the delay in publishing the report of the ICRU working group on the change to SI units and makes the following suggestions to organisations considering whether to change over to SI units in the near future: a) It would be preferable to delay change-over to SI units for quantities specifying radiation for protection purposes until ICRU publishes its recommendations. This would avoid the risk of having to make two successive changes in procedure, with their attendant cost, need for retraining and the possibility of errors. (b) If, however, in order to be consistent with a change to SI units that has already been made in other applications of radiation, there are strong reasons for changing to SI units before the ICRU recommendations are published, then as an interim measure, measurements of exposure may be converted to dose equivalent using the approximation that 1 mR = 10 μSv. A decision as to whether to alter the scales of existing instruments, or to convert readings to dose equivalent at a later stage will depend on individual circumstances. (U.K.)

  11. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This Revision 9 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 9 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through September 30, 1990. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346. Persons using this Digest are placed on notice that it may not be used as an authoritative citation in support of any position before the Commission or any of its adjudicatory tribunals. Persons using this Digest are also placed on notice that it is intended for use only as an initial research tool, that it may, and likely does, contain errors, including errors in analysis and interpretation of decisions, and that the user should not rely on the Digest analyses and interpretations but must read, analyze and rely on the user's own analysis of the actual Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions cited. Further, neither the United States, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Aspen Systems Corporation, nor any of their employees makes any expressed or implied warranty or assumes liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness or usefulness of any material presented in the Digest. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on general matters. Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. (JF)

  12. Pharmaceutical interventions by collaboration between staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists and implementation of Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards on medication use may optimize pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Chen, Quan Zhou Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of ChinaWe read with great interest the prospective study by Cortejoso et al,1 which describes the characteristics of pharmaceutical interventions in two geriatric wards (orthogeriatric ward and geriatric day unit of a general teaching hospital. We strongly agree with their finding that shows the importance of clinical pharmacist involvement in the optimization of pharmacotherapy in elderly patients. Furthermore, we especially appreciate their new and interesting findings that the clinical pharmacist was more frequently requested by physicians and nurses for information about the pharmacotherapy of the patients on the geriatric day unit, compared with the orthogeriatric ward at admission and discharge (5.7% vs 1.2% and 1.7%, respectively, P<0.05, and that the pharmacist asked for more confirmation of the physician orders on the geriatric day unit rather than the orthogeriatric ward (19.8% vs 1.8% and 15.7% at admission and discharge, respectively, P<0.05. We are from a Joint Commission International (JCI-accredited academic medical center hospital with 3200 beds in China. Safe medication management and use are pivotal to patient safety and quality of care on which the state-of-the-art standards of the Joint Commission focus. We would like to share our perspectives in the following paragraphs.View original paper by Cortejoso and colleagues. 

  13. International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine Consensus Guidelines for On-Site Management and Transport of Patients in Canyoning Incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strapazzon, Giacomo; Reisten, Oliver; Argenone, Fabien; Zafren, Ken; Zen-Ruffinen, Greg; Larsen, Gordon L; Soteras, Inigo

    2018-02-13

    Canyoning is a recreational activity that has increased in popularity in the last decade in Europe and North America, resulting in up to 40% of the total search and rescue costs in some geographic locations. The International Commission for Mountain Emergency Medicine convened an expert panel to develop recommendations for on-site management and transport of patients in canyoning incidents. The goal of the current review is to provide guidance to healthcare providers and canyoning rescue professionals about best practices for rescue and medical treatment through the evaluation of the existing best evidence, focusing on the unique combination of remoteness, water exposure, limited on-site patient management options, and technically challenging terrain. Recommendations are graded on the basis of quality of supporting evidence according to the classification scheme of the American College of Chest Physicians. Copyright © 2017 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. INTERNATIONAL STANDARDS ON FOOD AND ENVIRONMENTAL RADIOACTIVITY MEASUREMENT FOR RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION: STATUS AND PERSPECTIVES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calmet, D; Ameon, R; Bombard, A; Brun, S; Byrde, F; Chen, J; Duda, J-M; Forte, M; Fournier, M; Fronka, A; Haug, T; Herranz, M; Husain, A; Jerome, S; Jiranek, M; Judge, S; Kim, S B; Kwakman, P; Loyen, J; LLaurado, M; Michel, R; Porterfield, D; Ratsirahonana, A; Richards, A; Rovenska, K; Sanada, T; Schuler, C; Thomas, L; Tokonami, S; Tsapalov, A; Yamada, T

    2017-04-01

    Radiological protection is a matter of concern for members of the public and thus national authorities are more likely to trust the quality of radioactivity data provided by accredited laboratories using common standards. Normative approach based on international standards aims to ensure the accuracy or validity of the test result through calibrations and measurements traceable to the International System of Units. This approach guarantees that radioactivity test results on the same types of samples are comparable over time and space as well as between different testing laboratories. Today, testing laboratories involved in radioactivity measurement have a set of more than 150 international standards to help them perform their work. Most of them are published by the International Standardization Organization (ISO) and the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). This paper reviews the most essential ISO standards that give guidance to testing laboratories at different stages from sampling planning to the transmission of the test report to their customers, summarizes recent activities and achievements and present the perspectives on new standards under development by the ISO Working Groups dealing with radioactivity measurement in connection with radiological protection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Genesee generating station, unit 1: Construction and commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trowsdale, D.R.

    1995-12-31

    The Genesee Power Plant is located about 80 kilometers southwest of Edmonton, in an area with vast coal reserves. Completion of the plant`s 410-megawatt Unit 1 in 1994 concluded the last phase of a development originally approved for construction and commercial operation in 1980. This paper reviews the history of the plant, its site plan and general design features, and presents a case study of the construction and commissioning of Unit 1. The case study describes work schedule management, construction coordination, quality control and quality assurance procedures, site cost control, safety management, labor relations, commissioning management, scheduling and staffing, work planning and coordination, and problems encountered during construction and commissioning, as well as actions taken to solve those problems.

  16. 1983 Report of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, Washington, DC.

    Findings and recommendations of a government commissioned study on the United States Information Agency (USIA) are presented. The first of six substantive sections summarizes commission recommendations concerning the following USIA activities and their government funding: Voice of America Radio broadcasts, the Office of Research, cultural…

  17. Comments on the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W.M.

    1960-01-01

    Full text: The Medical Research Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations has considered the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection adopted September 9th, 1958 (Pergamon Press, 1959), and the explanatory statement and amendments to the 1958 recommendations made at the 1959 meeting of the Commission (Brit. J. Radiol., 1960, 33, 189). Subject to the following comments, the Committee advocates the acceptance of the Commission's recommendations. The text of these recommendations is not reproduced here and requires to be read in conjunction with these comments. References below to numbered paragraphs refer to the text of the Commission's recommendations. Occupational exposure - 1. The formula given in para. 47 relates the maximum permissible total occupational dose accumulated in the gonads or certain other organs to the age of a subject above the age of 18 by the relationship D= 5 (N - 8) where D is the tissue dose in rems and N is the age in years. The Committee notes that this formula would permit a maximum dose to the gonads of 60 rems by age 30 and is of the opinion that this dose is acceptable provided that the contribution from this source to the genetic dose for the whole population does not exceed I rem per head of population. 2. The Commission recommends (para. 51c) that, when a person begins to be occupationally exposed at an age of less than 18 years, the dose to various specified tissues shall not exceed 5 rems in any one year under age 18, and the dose accumulated to age 30 shall not exceed 60 rems. The Committee recommends that those persons between the ages of 6 and 18 years who are in occupational contact with radiation should not be allowed to receive, as a result of their occupation. an annual dose in excess of 1-5 rems. This should be sufficient to allow the training of such persons in the use of ionizing radiations in hospitals, industrial establishments, technical colleges and schools. However

  18. Performances of Kevlar and Polyethylene as radiation shielding on-board the International Space Station in high latitude radiation environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narici, Livio; Casolino, Marco; Di Fino, Luca; Larosa, Marianna; Picozza, Piergiorgio; Rizzo, Alessandro; Zaconte, Veronica

    2017-05-10

    Passive radiation shielding is a mandatory element in the design of an integrated solution to mitigate the effects of radiation during long deep space voyages for human exploration. Understanding and exploiting the characteristics of materials suitable for radiation shielding in space flights is, therefore, of primary importance. We present here the results of the first space-test on Kevlar and Polyethylene radiation shielding capabilities including direct measurements of the background baseline (no shield). Measurements are performed on-board of the International Space Station (Columbus modulus) during the ALTEA-shield ESA sponsored program. For the first time the shielding capability of such materials has been tested in a radiation environment similar to the deep-space one, thanks to the feature of the ALTEA system, which allows to select only high latitude orbital tracts of the International Space Station. Polyethylene is widely used for radiation shielding in space and therefore it is an excellent benchmark material to be used in comparative investigations. In this work we show that Kevlar has radiation shielding performances comparable to the Polyethylene ones, reaching a dose rate reduction of 32 ± 2% and a dose equivalent rate reduction of 55 ± 4% (for a shield of 10 g/cm 2 ).

  19. International Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament - A possible international regime to cover radiological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hautecouverture, Benjamin

    2009-10-01

    Even if a 'dirty bomb' has never been used to date, the perception of the existence of a threat is shared by many. Four main types of radiological and nuclear terrorist attacks can be outlined: - acquisition and use of a nuclear weapon, - attacks and acts of sabotage against a nuclear reactor or another nuclear facility, - acquisition of fissile material for the elaboration of an Improvised Nuclear Device, - terrorist use of radiological materials for the elaboration of a Radiological Dispersal Device (RDD). This paper seeks to evaluate the probability for a terrorist group to acquire and make use of radiological materials in the objective of detonating a RDD, and the current international framework put into place to address such a threat. Is an international regime to cover radiological materials already in place? How comprehensive / integrated is it? Does a new and/or separate system need to be set up? Before 9/11, two events in particular served to illustrate the threat of a radiological or nuclear terrorist attack: Moscow in 1996, Argun in 1998. Since the 9/11 attacks, a few other radiological events have occurred, which could suggest that the threat is becoming more pressing. It must be noted that the use of a dirty bomb by a terrorist group would most probably be aimed at the contamination of a given geographical area, rather than mass destruction and killing. Indeed, the lethal impact of such weapons remains limited. For this reason, dirty bombs are considered by analysts as weapons of mass disruption rather than weapons of mass destruction. Impacts would be more important in the psychological or economic realms: - targeting highly populated environments, such as cities, would most probably not result in a high death toll; - compared with impacts on health, psychological impacts of such an attack would be much more serious, both within and outside the targeted population; - economic damage is probably the greatest threat posed by such attacks

  20. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This document contains procedures for review by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission for reviewing and deciding on matters pertaining to nuclear power plant licensing. Also, contained within the document are decisions the Commission has made between July 1972 to September 1989. (F.S.D.)

  1. New recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection-a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A D

    2008-01-01

    For almost half a century, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has revised its recommendations on radiological protection with an average frequency of about 10 years, building on the experience gained in their implementation. This has ensured that the recommendations remain up to date and fit for purpose and it is this that has led in turn to their wide acceptance internationally. Indeed, the 1990 version of the recommendations forms the basis of the international radiological protection standards and the systems of control of exposure to ionizing radiation in many countries throughout the world. This version introduced new concepts and a more holistic approach to radiological protection but marrying the different exposure situations into one coherent framework has proved not to be straightforward and further reflection seemed necessary in order to satisfy both those who are responsible for the development of the control systems as well as a broader audience. Review of the 1990 recommendations started around 1998 and, since then, many ideas have been explored and avenues followed. Eventually, new recommendations were agreed by the Commission at its meeting in Essen in March 2007. This paper provides a review of these new recommendations and their possible implications. (topical review)

  2. Temelin-1 reactor unit commissioning and start-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palecek, K.

    2002-01-01

    The Temelin-1 commissioning process was affected substantially by the change in the Czech political situation in 1989. The effects thereof were both favourable and unfavourable. Among favourable effects are the replacement of the original Instrumentation and Control System by a more advanced system and design changes which have brought about additional improvement of the Temelin NPP design safety, although on the other hand, this had an adverse impact on the time span and price of the power plant construction. Additional adverse effects included an unstable political and economic situation, associated with frequent changes in the management of the utility CEZ, a.s. (owner of the plant) as well as frequent replacement of persons in the position of the managing director of the Temelin plant itself. Despite all the difficulties encountered, Temelin-1 reactor unit could be ultimately put into trial operation in June 2002. (author)

  3. Release of patients after radionuclide therapy. With contributions from the [International Commission on Radiological Protection] ICRP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The use of unsealed radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of disease is common practice worldwide. This approach was widely employed some years ago and, following a decline, there has recently been a resurgence of interest in it. The combination of newly accessible radionuclides, improved labelling technology and developments in biotechnology has resulted in more enthusiasm and a wider range of applications for this form of therapy. Radionuclide treatments are performed with either the patient admitted to hospital or as an outpatient only. The criteria to determine which approach is best vary considerably, and are not always closely linked with the well established standards of radiation protection practice. Safety issues for the patient, their family, associated carers, staff and the general public arise with either approach. The potential risks are from both external irradiation and contamination. The International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources (BSS) specify the dose constraints and limits for all of these groups, and their more general provisions with respect to the as low as reasonably achievable principle and justification also apply. One way of managing exposures of the various groups is to control when patients are released from hospital. While they are in hospital, it is relatively easy to control exposure. Once they have returned to their family in the community, they must be advised on how to restrict the exposure of those people that they will come into contact with. Until recently, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) did not provide specific advice in this area, and relied on the application of dose limits and constraints. However, regulators in some countries took a prescriptive approach, often using estimates of retained activity as a release criterion. These only loosely relate to dose limits. This publication attempts to bring newly available advice

  4. International conference on the protection of the environment from the effects of ionizing radiation. Contributed papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    An International Conference on the Protection of the Environment from the Effects of Ionizing Radiation, organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the European Commission (EC) and the International Union of Radioecology (IUR), will be held in Stockholm, Sweden, from 6-10 October 2003. This Conference will be hosted by the Government of Sweden through the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority (SSI). This publication contains contributed papers submitted on issues within the scope of the conference, which were accepted following a review by the Conference Programme Committee. The primary objective of this Conference is to foster information exchange, with the aim of promoting the development of a coherent international policy on the protection of the environment from effects attributable to ionizing radiation. This Conference is one in a series of meetings organized by, or held in co-operation with, the IAEA on this subject. It will include a review of recent developments in this area, and consideration of their implications for future work at national and international levels. The topics on which contributed papers were requested are as follows: Existing environmental protection approaches; Development of an international assessment framework; The scientific basis for environmental radiation assessment; Development of management approaches

  5. International Society of Radiology and Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Standertskjoeld-Nordenstam, C.G.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the International Society of Radiology (ISR), as being the global organization of radiologists, is to promote and help co-ordinate the progress of radiology throughout the world. In this capacity and as a co-operating organization of the IAEA, the ISR has a specific responsibility in the global radiological protection of patients. Globally, there are many users of medical radiation, and radiology may be practised in the most awkward circumstances. The individuals performing X ray studies as well as those interpreting them may be well trained, as in industrialized parts of the world, but also less knowledgeable, as in developing areas. The problems of radiological protection, both of patients and of radiation workers, still exist, and radiation equipment is largely diffused throughout the world. That is why a conference like this is today as important as ever. Radiation protection is achieved through education, on the one hand, and legislation, on the other. Legislation and regulation are the instruments of national authorities. The means of the ISR are education and information. Good radiological practice is something that can be taught. The ISR is doing this mainly through the biannual International Congress of Radiology (ICR), now arranged in an area of radiological need; the three previous ICRs were in China, in India and in South America; the next one is going to be in Mexico in 2002. The goal of the ICR is mainly to be an instructive and educational event, especially designed for the needs of its surrounding region. The ISR is aiming at producing educational material. The International Commission on Radiological Education (ICRE), as part of the ISR, is launching the production of a series of educational booklets, which also include radiation protection. The ICRE is actively involved in shaping and organizing the educational and scientific programme of the ICRs

  6. Principles of the International Commission on Radiological Protection system of dose limitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorne, M.C.

    1987-01-01

    The formulation of a quantitative system of dose limitation based on ICRP principles of 'stochastic' and 'non-stochastic' effects requires that judgements be made on several factors including: relationships between radiation dose and the induction of deleterious effects for a variety of endpoints and radiation types; acceptable levels of risk for radiation workers and members of the public; and methods of assessing whether the cost of introducing protective measures is justified by the reduction in radiation detriment which they will provide. In the case of patients deliberately exposed to ionising radiations, the objectives of radiation protection differ somewhat from those applying to radiation workers and members of the public. For patients, risks and benefits relate to the same person and upper limits on acceptable risks may differ grossly from those appropriate to normal individuals. For these reasons, and because of its historical relationship with the International Congress of Radiology, the ICRP has given special consideration to radiation protection in medicine and has published reports on protection of the patient in diagnostic radiology and in radiation therapy. (author)

  7. Internal radiation burden of coal and uranium miners. Radioactivity measurement of pathological tissue samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobor, J.

    1994-01-01

    The components of natural radioactivity exposure of miners are the external gamma radiation, inhalation of 222 Rn and its short-halflife daughter products, and exposure to long isotope radiation ( 238 U to 226 Ra, 232 Th, 210 Pb to 210 Po). Pathological tissue samples were examined by alpha and beta radioactivity measurements to determine the contribution of radiation burden from incorporated long-halflife natural isotopes, and to determine the possible fluctuations at various populations of miners. (N.T.) 19 refs.; 7 figs.; 3 tabs

  8. On the Report by the Commission on the Measurement of Economic Performance and Social Progress (2009)

    OpenAIRE

    André Vanoli

    2010-01-01

    The Commission’s aim was to ascertain the limits of Gross Domestic Product (GDP) as an indicator of economic performance and social progress, and to propose more appropriate indicators. Within a short period of time, a considerable amount of work was generated and a very interesting report was produced. This document reviews the main ideas and proposals which have been put forward and discussed during the last forty years in relation to problems such as the measurement of growth, development,...

  9. Relations between radiation risks and radiation protection measuring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrmann, K.; Kraus, W.

    Relations between radiation risks and radiation protection measuring techniques are considered as components of the radiation risk. The influence of the exposure risk on type and extent of radiation protection measurements is discussed with regard to different measuring tasks. Based upon measuring results concerning the frequency of certain external and internal occupational exposures in the GDR, it has been shown that only a small fraction of the monitored persons are subjected to a high exposure risk. As a consequence the following recommendations are presented: occupationally exposed persons with small exposure risk should be monitored using only a long-term desimeter (for instance a thermoluminescence desimeter). In the case of internal exposure, the surface and air contamination levels should be controlled so strictly that routine measurements of internal contamination need not be performed

  10. A report on progress towards new recommendations. A communication from the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Throughout the hundred-year history of the uses of ionising radiation in medicine and industry there has been advice on the need to protect people from the hazards associated with exposure. Protection standards have evolved throughout this period to reflect both the scientific understanding of the biological effects of exposure and the social and ethical standards to be applied. The Main Commission of ICRP is now considering a revised, simpler approach that is based on an individual-oriented philosophy and represents a potential shift by the Commission from the past emphasis on societal-oriented criteria. The initial proposals were promulgated through IRPA and an open literature publication was published in the Journal of Radiological Protection in June 1999. On the basis of comments received and the observations presented at the IRPA 10 congress in May 2000, the Commission is beginning to develop the Nest Recommendations. The author describes the issues involved in the preparation of the Next Recommendations and indicates the process that the Commission proposed to follow. The Commission wishes there to be an on-going debate with an iteration of ideas over the next few years

  11. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Radiation and Thyroid Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reiners, Christoph; Yasumura, Seiji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Shinichi; Shimura, Hiroki; Matsui, Shiro; Ohtsuru, Akira; Sakai, Akira; Kamiya, Kenji; Abe, Masafumi; Schuez, Joachim; Miyauchi; Gamhewage, Gaya; Van Deventer, Emilie; Kurihara, Osamu; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, M.; Akiba, S.; Chung, Jae Hoon; Jacob, Peter; Ulanovsky, Alexander; Kaiser, Christian; Bouville, Andre; Hatch, Maureen; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Shore, Roy; Furukawa, Kyoji; Imaizumi, Misa; Ivanov, Victor; Tronko, Mykola; Bogdanova, T.; Oliynik, V.; Shpak, V.; Tereshchenko, V.; Zurnadzgy, L.; Zamotaeva, G.; Mabuchi, K.; Hatch, M.; Bouville, A.; Brenner, A.; Likhtarev, I.; Gulak, L.; Shchepotin, I.; Demidchik, Yuri; Fridman, M.; Vaswani, Ashok; Sobue, Tomotaka; Yoshinaga, Shinji; Taniguchi, Nobuyuki; Miyakawa, Megumi; Momose, Takumaro; Siemann, Michael; Lazo, Ted; ); Lochard, Jacques; Schneider, Thierry; Takamura, Noboru; Bolch, Wesley

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this workshop was to develop a state-of-the-art scientific understanding of radiation-induced thyroid cancer, and to share knowledge and experience in this area in order to support the efforts of the Japanese government and the Fukushima Prefecture to enhance public health. Experience in holding effective social dialogues, in order to best understand and appropriately address social concerns, was also a workshop focus. The workshop began with a half-day tutorial session, followed by two days of plenary presentations and discussion, including panel sessions summarising the results of each session. A closing panel provided overall results and conclusions from the workshop. A Rapporteur provided a workshop summary report and assisted the session co-chairs in summarising key points. This document brings together the available presentations (slides), dealing with: 1.1 - Overview of Radiation-induced Thyroid Cancer (C. Reiners); 1.2 - Overview of the Fukushima Health Management Survey (S. Yasumura); 1.3 - Overview of Epidemiology of Thyroid Cancer in the Context of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident (J. Schuez); 1.4 - Overview of the Clinical Features of Thyroid Cancer (Miyauchi); 1.5 - Dialogue with Stakeholders in Complex Radiological Circumstances (G. Gamhewage); 1.6 - Session 1 (tutorial session): Radiation and Thyroid Cancer - Summary Discussion and Questions. 2.1 - WHO Thyroid Dose Estimation (E. van Deventer); 2.2 - Basic Survey External Dose Estimation (T. Ishikawa); 2.3 - NIRS Estimation of Internal Dose to the Thyroid (O. Kurihara); 2.4 - Estimation of Internal Dose to the Thyroid (S. Tokonami); 3.1 - FMU Thyroid Ultrasound Surveys in the Fukushima Prefecture (S. Suzuki); 3.2 - FMU Thyroid Ultrasound Surveys in the Yamanashi Prefecture and Review of Latent Thyroid (H. Shimura); 3.3 - Childhood Thyroid Cancer in Korea: Results of Recent Surveys (J. H. Chung); 4.1 - Ultrasonography Surveys and Thyroid Cancer in the Fukushima Prefecture (P

  12. State of the art on dose prescription, reporting and recording in Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy (ICRU report No. 83)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gregoire, V.; Mackie, T.R.

    2011-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) report No. 83 provides the information necessary to standardize techniques and procedures and to harmonize the prescribing, recording, and reporting of intensity modulated radiation therapy. Applicable concepts and recommendations in previous ICRU reports concerning radiation therapy were adopted, and new concepts were elaborated. In particular, additional recommendations were given on the selection and delineation of the targets volumes and the organs at risk; concepts of dose prescription and dose-volume reporting have also been refined. (authors)

  13. 77 FR 39560 - International Joint Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-03

    ... International Joint Commission International Joint Commission Invites Public Comment on Upper Great Lakes Report The International Joint Commission (IJC) announced today that it is inviting public comment on the.... The Commission is considering proposed changes to its Orders of Approval for the outflows of Lake...

  14. Division G Commission 21: Galactic and Extragalactic Backgrounds Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Jayant; Witt, Adolf; Baggaley, W. Jack; Dwek, Eli; Levasseur-Regourd, Anny-Chantal; Mann, Ingrid; Mattila, Kalevi; Watanabe, Jun-Ichi

    2016-04-01

    Commission 21 was one of the oldest and smallest in the IAU yet one which underwent the most evolution since its inception. It began in 1955 as Light of the Night Sky (Lumière du Ciel Nocturne) under the Presidentship of Jean Dufay (University Observatory at Lyon). As the name suggested, in the years before space observations, its focus was on observations of atmospheric light which, at the time, was the domain of astronomers. Thus the early proceedings of the Commission were dominated by reports of the daytime and nighttime emission as observed from different locations and different conditions. Our knowledge of the Earth's atmosphere is still shaped by these early observations (Meier R.R., 1991, Space Sci. Rev. 58, 1). Members of Commission 21 were key to organizing interational collaborations to set up atmospheric stations at different latitudes, including in the Souther hemisphere and in ensuring a consistent calibration between the instruments. The Commission also bought in results from Soviet scientists in an era where communication was limited by both politics and language.

  15. International perspectives on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine: outcomes of an IAEA conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortt, Ken; Davidsson, Lena; Hendry, Jolyon; Dondi, Maurizio; Andreo, Pedro

    2008-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international conference called, "Quality Assurance and New Techniques in Radiation Medicine" (QANTRM). It dealt with quality assurance (QA) in all aspects of radiation medicine (diagnostic radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiotherapy) at the international level. Participants discussed QA issues pertaining to the implementation of new technologies and the need for education and staff training. The advantage of developing a comprehensive and harmonized approach to QA covering both the technical and the managerial issues was emphasized to ensure the optimization of benefits to patient safety and effectiveness. The necessary coupling between medical radiation imaging and radiotherapy was stressed, particularly for advanced technologies. However, the need for a more systematic approach to the adoption of advanced technologies was underscored by a report on failures in intensity-modulated radiotherapy dosimetry auditing tests in the United States, which could imply inadequate implementation of QA for these new technologies. A plenary session addressed the socioeconomic impact of introducing advanced technologies in resource-limited settings. How shall the dual gaps, one in access to basic medical services and the other in access to high-quality modern technology, be addressed?

  16. Proceedings of the International Conference on Modern Radiotherapy. Advances and Challenges in Radiation Protection of Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-12-01

    The use of ionizing radiation in medicine has led to major improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of human diseases. While bringing new benefits for cancer treatment, modern radiotherapy also poses new challenges in terms of radiation protection of patients. Prevention of radiotherapy incidents and accidents is a major issue in this area. In December 2009, the French Nuclear Safety Authority (ASN) organised the 1. international conference on radiation protection of patients in radiotherapy. The major objective of the conference was to provide a platform for exchanging experience, and reviewing the actions implemented to improve the radiation safety in radiotherapy both at national and international level. The expected result was: - to reach a consensus about the necessity to strengthen existing international actions for prevention of incidents and accidents, - to set up an international cooperation to improve management for overexposed patients, - to outline a strategy for strengthening regulation, - to contribute to the elaboration of an international scale to rate patient related events for communication and reporting purpose. 360 delegates from 50 countries across the world participated at the 3-day conference. 41 presentations were made and 67 posters were displayed. The conference brought together a broad spectrum of expertise: scientists, health professionals, medical devices manufacturers, risk management specialists, radiation protection experts, representatives from Radiation Protection and Health Authorities as well as patient's associations. The programme covered both scientific and medical issues, such as patient sensitivity to ionising radiation and the treatment of complications. It also provided scope to discuss the benefits and risks of modern radiotherapy and to explore treatment safety issues from various perspectives, including human resources, expertise, education and training along with control and prevention strategies. The conference

  17. International symposium on standards and codes of practice in medical radiation dosimetry. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The development of radiation measurement standards by National Metrology Institutes (NMIs) and their dissemination to Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratories (SSDLs), cancer therapy centres and hospitals represent essential aspects of the radiation dosimetry measurement chain. Although the demands for accuracy in radiotherapy initiated the establishment of such measurement chains, similar traceable dosimetry procedures have been implemented, or are being developed, in other areas of radiation medicine (e.g. diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine), in radiation protection and in industrial applications of radiation. In the past few years the development of primary standards of absorbed dose to water in 60 Co for radiotherapy dosimetry has made direct calibrations in terms of absorbed dose to water available in many countries for the first time. Some laboratories have extended the development of these standards to high energy photon and electron beams and to low and medium energy x-ray beams. Other countries, however, still base their dosimetry for radiotherapy on air kerma standards. Dosimetry for conventional external beam radiotherapy was probably the field where standardized procedures adopted by medical physicists at hospitals were developed first. Those were related to exposure and air kerma standards. The recent development of Codes of Practice (or protocols) based on the concept of absorbed dose to water has led to changes in calibration procedures at hospitals. The International Code of Practice for Dosimetry Based on Standards of Absorbed Dose to Water (TRS 398) was sponsored by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), World Health Organization (WHO), Pan-American Health Organization (PAHO) and the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (ESTRO) and is expected to be adopted in many countries worldwide. It provides recommendations for the dosimetry of all types of beams (except neutrons) used in external radiotherapy and satisfies

  18. 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection adopted by the Commission in November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This publication represents a completely new set of basic recommendations, outdating ICRP Publication 26. They aim to: a) take account of new biological information and of trends in setting safety standards; b) improve the presentation of the recommendations: c) maintain as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information. The recommendations cover quantities, biological aspects, the conceptual framework of radiological protection, proposed and continuing practices (occupational, medical and public exposure) and implementation of the Commission's Recommendations. (UK)

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) launch, commissioning, and early operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeck, Steven P.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Hou, Arthur Y.

    2014-10-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership co-led by NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The mission centers on the GPM Core Observatory and consists of an international network, or constellation, of additional satellites that together will provide next-generation global observations of precipitation from space. The GPM constellation will provide measurements of the intensity and variability of precipitation, three-dimensional structure of cloud and storm systems, the microphysics of ice and liquid particles within clouds, and the amount of water falling to Earth's surface. Observations from the GPM constellation, combined with land surface data, will improve weather forecast models; climate models; integrated hydrologic models of watersheds; and forecasts of hurricanes/typhoons/cylcones, landslides, floods and droughts. The GPM Core Observatory carries an advanced radar/radiometer system and serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from all satellites that fly within the constellation. The GPM Core Observatory improves upon the capabilities of its predecessor, the NASA-JAXA Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), with advanced science instruments and expanded coverage of Earth's surface. The GPM Core Observatory carries two instruments, the NASA-supplied GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the JAXA-supplied Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI measures the amount, size, intensity and type of precipitation, from heavy-tomoderate rain to light rain and snowfall. The DPR provides three-dimensional profiles and intensities of liquid and solid precipitation. The French Centre National d'Études Spatiales (CNES), the Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the U.S. Department of Defense are partners with NASA and

  20. Radiation dose measurements of an on-board imager X-ray unit using optically-stimulated luminescence dosimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Leon; Haque, Mamoon; Hill, Robin; Morales, Johnny

    2015-01-01

    Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) is now widely used to image radiotherapy patients prior to treatment for the purpose of accurate patient setup. However each CBCT image delivered to a patient increases the total radiation dose that they receive. The measurement of the dose delivered from the CBCT images is not readily performed in the clinic. In this study, we have used commercially available optically stimulated luminescence (OSLD) dosimeters to measure the dose delivered by the Varian OBI on a radiotherapy linear accelerator. Calibration of the OSLDs was achieved by using a therapeutic X-ray unit. The dose delivered by a head CBCT scan was found to be 3.2 ± 0.3 mGy which is similar in magnitude to the dose of a head computed tomography (CT) scan. The results of this study suggest that the radiation hazard associated with CBCT is of a similar nature to that of conventional CT scans. We have also demonstrated that the OSLDs are suitable for these low X-ray dose measurements.

  1. Comparison between the Brazilian regulation of radioprotection and the recommendation of International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007; Comparacao entre a norma brasileira de radioprotecao e a recomendacao da International Commission on Radiological Protection publicadas em 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Py Junior, Delcy A.; Dantas, Marcelino V.A.; Oliveira, Sergio Q. de, E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b, E-mail: marcelino@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Mortagua, Valter Jose, E-mail: Valter@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (USIN/INB), SP (Brazil). Usina de Interlagos

    2011-10-26

    This paper intends to compare the Brasilian basic regulation on radiological protection with the new recommendations of ICRP through existent differences. The main difference between the publication 60 and the publication 103 of the ICRP is the changing of concept of protection based on the process by use of practice and intervention concepts, to the protection based on the exposure situation, through the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existent situation. For adequacy to the Brazilian regulation it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation weighing and tissues, up dating of radiation detriments, besides to make clear the concept of environmental radioprotection

  2. Comparison between the Brazilian regulation of radioprotection and the recommendation of International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Py Junior, Delcy A.; Dantas, Marcelino V.A.; Oliveira, Sergio Q. de; Kelecom, Alphonse; Mortagua, Valter Jose

    2011-01-01

    This paper intends to compare the Brasilian basic regulation on radiological protection with the new recommendations of ICRP through existent differences. The main difference between the publication 60 and the publication 103 of the ICRP is the changing of concept of protection based on the process by use of practice and intervention concepts, to the protection based on the exposure situation, through the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existent situation. For adequacy to the Brazilian regulation it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation weighing and tissues, up dating of radiation detriments, besides to make clear the concept of environmental radioprotection

  3. Low doses of ionizing radiation: Biological effects and regulatory control. Invited papers and discussions. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The levels and biological effects resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation are continuously reviewed by the United Nations Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). Since its creation in 1928, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has issued recommendations on protection against ionizing radiation. The UNSCEAR estimates and the ICRP recommendations have served as the basis for national and international safety standards on radiation safety, including those developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the World Health Organization (WHO). Concerning health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation, the international standards are based on the plausible assumption that, above the unavoidable background radiation dose, the probability of effects increases linearly with dose, i.e. on a 'linear, no threshold' (LNT) assumption. However, in recent years the biological estimates of health effects of low doses of ionizing radiation and the regulatory approach to the control of low level radiation exposure have been much debated. To foster information exchange on the relevant issues, an International Conference on Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Biological Effects and Regulatory Control, jointly sponsored by the IAEA and WHO in co-operation with UNSCEAR, was held from 17-21 November 1997 at Seville, Spain. These Proceedings contain the invited special reports, keynote papers, summaries of discussions, session summaries and addresses presented at the opening and closing of the Conference

  4. Current situation and prospect of market on the latest radiation measuring instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Chang Ho; Kim, Wang Geum; Cho, Gyu Seong

    2009-12-01

    This book deals with current situation and prospect of market on the latest radiation measuring instrument. The contents of this book are basic of technology on radiation measuring instrument with basic principle of various measuring instrument, current situation of technology and prospect of radiation measuring instrument, effect of spreading and application field of radiation measuring instrument, facility for making and research and development of radiation measuring instrument, prospect of market about radiation measuring instrument, strategy for market entry with the latest radiation measuring instrument and general prospect for the future.

  5. ISES [International Solar Energy Society] and the UNCED [United Nations Conference on Environment and Development] process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorriman, D.

    1992-01-01

    The International Solar Energy Society (ISES)/United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development (UNCED) process, developed as a preparation for the Earth Summit 92 held in Brazil, involved the collection and compilation of material and the development of consensus. The process involved five phases of a survey on environment and energy issues, roundtable events, and final input into the Earth Summit. The following are results from the ISES survey. When setting national energy policies, the two least important considerations are concern for global environmental impacts and life cycle costs of energy options. In terms of electricity supply, the main issues are reliability and dispatchability. The most significant issues impacting economic development in developing countries are population growth and land resource degradation. Fresh water pollution was a concern in all countries. In industrialized countries with adequate power supply, the main issue is improved quality of life. In developing countries, growth dominates the need for new energy supplies. A large number of recommendations for United Nations action are presented. 3 refs

  6. Radiation protection instrumentation: A comparison of US and international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, J.M.; Hickey, E.E.; Swinth, K.L.

    1988-09-01

    The quality and performance of radiation protection instruments are extremely important in providing conservative protection to radiation workers. The recent American National Standards Institute (ANSI) draft standards on radiation protection instrumentation provide more specific performance requirements and definitive performance tests. International standards for radiation protection instrumentation, published by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC), specify general performance, type, and acceptance test requirements. This paper discusses the similarities and differences between the two sets of standards. The results of testing selected instruments against the new draft ANSI standards also are presented. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has tested more than 100 instruments against criteria in draft ANSI N42.17A, which has resulted in changes in the standard. For example, the test for temperature performance was changed to permit more time for equilibration at each test temperature, and the instrument precision requirement was changed from ≤2.5% to ≤10%. 2 refs., 2 tabs

  7. Commissioning and Performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with high energy collisions at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Alonso, A; The ATLAS collaboration

    2011-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300,000 thin-wall drift-tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points for charged particle tracks. The straws have 0.13 mm resolution and measure tracks with $ ert eta ert < 2 $ and $ pT> 0.5 GeV$. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high Lorenz gamma particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of LHC proton-proton collisions.

  8. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster (Germany); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mauch, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mikhaeel, N. George [Department of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  9. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S.; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T.; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N. George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  10. Modern radiation therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma: field and dose guidelines from the international lymphoma radiation oncology group (ILROG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Berthelsen, Anne Kiil; Constine, Louis S; Eich, Hans Theodor; Girinsky, Theodore; Hoppe, Richard T; Mauch, Peter; Mikhaeel, N George; Ng, Andrea

    2014-07-15

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and an important component of therapy for many patients. These guidelines have been developed to address the use of RT in HL in the modern era of combined modality treatment. The role of reduced volumes and doses is addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional (3D) planning and advanced techniques of treatment delivery. The previously applied extended field (EF) and original involved field (IF) techniques, which treated larger volumes based on nodal stations, have now been replaced by the use of limited volumes, based solely on detectable nodal (and extranodal extension) involvement at presentation, using contrast-enhanced computed tomography, positron emission tomography/computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, or a combination of these techniques. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements concepts of gross tumor volume, clinical target volume, internal target volume, and planning target volume are used for defining the targeted volumes. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated radiation therapy, breath-hold, image guided radiation therapy, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented when their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control. The highly conformal involved node radiation therapy (INRT), recently introduced for patients for whom optimal imaging is available, is explained. A new concept, involved site radiation therapy (ISRT), is introduced as the standard conformal therapy for the scenario, commonly encountered, wherein optimal imaging is not available. There is increasing evidence that RT doses used in the past are higher than necessary for disease control in this era of combined modality therapy. The use of INRT and of lower doses in early-stage HL is supported by available data. Although the

  11. Unit Commissioning of “Belene” NPP (Bulgaria)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    This presentations gives detailed information about the following topics about commissioning: principles of NPP commissioning; phases of NPP commissioning; organization of commissioning activities; duties and responsibilities of the parties for carrying out unit commissioning activities; responsibility and obligations of the sides during commissioning of power unit; documentation required for power unit commissioning; quality assurance for commissioning activities

  12. The origins of informed consent: the International Scientific Commission on Medical War Crimes, and the Nuremburg code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weindling, P

    2001-01-01

    The Nuremberg Code has generally been seen as arising from the Nuremberg Medical Trial. This paper examines developments prior to the Trial, involving the physiologist Andrew Conway Ivy and an inter-Allied Scientific Commission on Medical War Crimes. The paper traces the formulation of the concept of a medical war crime by the physiologist John West Thompson, as part of the background to Ivy's code on human experiments of 1 August 1946. It evaluates subsequent responses by the American Medical Association, and by other war crimes experts, notably Leo Alexander, who developed Ivy's conceptual framework. Ivy's interaction with the judges at Nuremberg alerted them to the importance of formulating ethical guidelines for clinical research.

  13. Photon energy scale determination and commissioning with radiative Z decays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondu Olivier

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The CMS electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL is composed of 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. It has been designed to be fast, compact, and radiation hard, with fine granularity and excellent energy resolution. Obtaining the design resolution is a crucial challenge for the SM Higgs search in the two photon channel at the LHC, and more generally good photon calibration and knowledge of the photon energy scale is required for analyses with photons in the final state. The behavior of photons and electrons in the calorimeter is not identical, making the use of a dedicated standard candle for photons, complementary to the canonical highyield Z decay to electrons, highly desirable. The use of Z decays to a pair of muons, where one of the muons emits a Bremsstrahlung photon, can be such a standard candle. These events, which can be cleanly selected, are a source of high-purity, relatively high-pt photons. Their kinematics are well-constrained by the Z boson mass and the precision on the muon momenta, and can be used for numerous calibration and measurement purposes. This proceeding presents the event selection method and the results of the photon energy scale measurement via Z0 → μμγ events as well as their use in evaluating the efficiency of photon identification requirements, based on data recorded by the CMS experiment in 2010.

  14. 75 FR 7254 - International Whaling Commission; 2010 Intersessional Meetings; Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XU28 International Whaling Commission; 2010... meetings of the International Whaling Commission (IWC). The non-federal representative(s) selected as a... United States under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, 1946. The U.S. IWC...

  15. International symposium on radiative heat transfer: Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The international symposium on radiative heat transfer was held on 14-18 August 1995 Turkey. The specialists discussed radiation transfer in materials processing and manufacturing, solution of radiative heat transfer equation, transient radiation problem and radiation-turbulence interactions, raditive properties of gases, atmospheric and stellar radiative transfer , radiative transfer and its applications, optical and radiative properties of soot particles, inverse radiation problems, partticles, fibres,thermophoresis and waves and modelling of comprehensive systems at the meeting. Almost 79 papers were presented in the meeting

  16. Measuring and modeling exposure from environmental radiation on tidal flats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gould, T.J.; Hess, C.T.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the shielding effects of the tide cycle, a high pressure ion chamber was used to measure the exposure rate from environmental radiation on tidal flats. A theoretical model is derived to predict the behavior of exposure rate as a function of time for a detector placed one meter above ground on a tidal flat. The numerical integration involved in this derivation results in an empirical formula which implies exposure rate ∝tan-1(sint). We propose that calculating the total exposure incurred on a tidal flat requires measurements of only the slope of the tidal flat and the exposure rate when no shielding occurs. Experimental results are consistent with the model

  17. The development of practice manual for LSC based on job analysis in radiation measurement and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, W. H.; Park, T. J.

    2017-06-01

    Radiation technology is closely related to the industrial growth and the creation of employment in Korea. The techniques as radiation or/and radioactivity measurement, and the practical skills achieving a higher level analysis are required. In this study, practice manual for liquid scintillation counter were developed by job analysis. Raw data applied in job analysis are collected by on/off line survey by 420 workers employed in KOREA. Importance-priority analysis was performed to make duties and competency unit that consists of knowledge, skills as each task. Refined data was reviewed by expert who experienced actual duties on site. Classification was conducted by focus group interview to deduct duties and competency unit. From the radiation devices in measurement and analysis, liquid scintillation counter was preferentially selected because of the high demands for training. Investigation of build-up status to liquid scintillation counter in KOREA was conducted. Then technical specification and operating procedure of 2 main devices were analyzed and integrated by practice manual. Duties and competency unit were applied to integrated materials respectively. To validate effectiveness, test curriculum was designed by the advanced course to workers who engaged in radiation measurement and analysis. The developed manual is structured to take advantage of test training. This manual will be a practical handbook that can improve the knowledge, skills of radiation workers in Korea.

  18. Measurement and detection of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    This is an update of the standard textbook for the field of radiation measurement. It includes illustrative examples and new problems. The research and applications of nuclear instrumentation have grown substantially since publication of the previous editions. With the miniaturization of equipment, increased speed of electronic components, and more sophisticated software, radiation detection systems are now more productively used in many disciplines, including nuclear nonproliferation, homeland security, and nuclear medicine. Continuing in the tradition of its bestselling predecessors, "Measurement and Detection of Radiation, Third Edition" illustrates the fundamentals of nuclear interactions and radiation detection with a multitude of examples and problems. It offers a clearly written, accessible introduction to nuclear instrumentation concepts. The following are new to the third edition: a new chapter on the latest applications of radiation detection, covering nuclear medicine, dosimetry, health physics, no...

  19. Sailors and syphilis on Europe's waterways International Health Organizations and the Rhine Commissions, c. 1900-1953

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Lotysz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article will focus on efforts to address the problem of sexually-transmitted disease among a maritime labour force in the first half of the twentieth-century as it became a core concern for a wide range of international health organizations. In focusing on those working on the Rhine it challenges existing accounts that have considered the place of seamen only in particular national contexts and which have tended to focus on the open seas. It explores the reasons why, despite repeated efforts to establish wide-ranging surveillance and treatment mechanisms, these remained beyond reach for those seeking to deal with the problem.

  20. Dissemination in the United Kingdom of units for the quantities involved in radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jennings, W.A.

    1976-01-01

    The British metrological structure in the field of ionizing radiation measurement is outlined. It was set up to guarantee the calibration chain from routine instruments to national standards. The National Physics Laboratory (NPL) is the British center for the exact measurement of radioactivity and ionizing radiations, the primary standards necessary being prepared and kept in the Ionizing Radiation Science Division. Various calibration services are provided and different methods have been developed to transmit units required for exposure, absorbed dose, activity and neutron flux density measurements. This variety is due to the needs dictated by different radiations, different intensities (radiation protection, therapy and industrial treatment levels) and different users. To satisfy these needs a secondary calibration center network has been set up in certain fields, and appropriate secondary calibration equipment developed. For example the Public Health Ministry has organized a plan covering all radiotherapeutic calibrations in the United Kingdom, while the wider needs of radiation protection are expected to be met in collaboration with the British Calibration Service (BCS) [fr

  1. International geomechanical commission. Underground nuclear testing in French Polynesia: stability and hydrology issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The International Geomechanical Commission is an independent group of experts in rock mechanics and hydrology. This commission has carried out a study on the rocks stability and hydrology of the atolls of Mururoa and Fangataufa (French Polynesia) after the stoppage of the French underground nuclear tests (147 tests all of all, from which 6 took place in 1995 and 1996). This book presents the results of this study. (J.S.)

  2. Report on air and water radioactivity measurement presented to the Commission for Protection against Ionizing Radiations of the State Secretary for Public Health (sessions of the 6 January and 18 February 1957). Report on the determination of radioactivity of mineral waters presented to High Council for Thermal cures of the State Secretary for Public Health (6 February 1957)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallot, P.; Bugnard, L.

    1957-06-01

    The first part of this document discusses radioactivity measurement techniques which seem to be recommended for the monitoring of the release of radio-elements by civil and military applications of nuclear energy. These methods first concern air radioactivity due to uranium ore extraction, ore storage, air-cooling of piles, uranium fuel sheath failure, plutonium extraction and fission product processing, and nuclear explosion. Methods are discussed for the measurement of gas or aerosol radioactivity. The measurement of water radioactivity is then addressed by distinguishing measurements performed on rainfalls or snow, on effluents from nuclear plants. The second part discusses the determination of radioactivity of mineral waters. The authors describe the three main principles on which measurement methods are based: direct measurement of radioactivity of gases contained by water, direct measurement of gas radioactivity by the active deposit method, and measurement of alpha and beta radiations of the evaporation residue or of water precipitation product. Notably about radon measurement in waters, the instrumentation, dosing procedure, measurement sensitivity and precision are presented and discussed

  3. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire future international leaders in the field of radioisotope for the first time. The project would enable promote abilities of radioactive isotopes professions, and to build the human network with future leaders in the world-wide nuclear and radiation field. Especially by offering opportunity to construct human networks between worldwide radiation field leaders of next generation, intangible assets and pro-Korean human networks are secured among international radiation industry personnel. This might enhance the power and the status of Korean radiation industries, and establish the fundamental base for exporting of radiation technology and its products. We developed the performance measurement method for the school. This shows that 2010 WNU RI School was the first training program focusing on the radioisotope and very useful program for the participants in view of knowledge management and strengthening personal abilities. Especially, the experiences and a human network with world-wide future-leaders in radiation field are most valuable asset. It is expected that the participants could this experience and network developed in the program as a stepping stone toward the development of Korea's nuclear and radiation industry.

  4. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y.

    2010-08-01

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire future international leaders in the field of radioisotope for the first time. The project would enable promote abilities of radioactive isotopes professions, and to build the human network with future leaders in the world-wide nuclear and radiation field. Especially by offering opportunity to construct human networks between worldwide radiation field leaders of next generation, intangible assets and pro-Korean human networks are secured among international radiation industry personnel. This might enhance the power and the status of Korean radiation industries, and establish the fundamental base for exporting of radiation technology and its products. We developed the performance measurement method for the school. This shows that 2010 WNU RI School was the first training program focusing on the radioisotope and very useful program for the participants in view of knowledge management and strengthening personal abilities. Especially, the experiences and a human network with world-wide future-leaders in radiation field are most valuable asset. It is expected that the participants could this experience and network developed in the program as a stepping stone toward the development of Korea's nuclear and radiation industry

  5. Radiation measurements and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, H.C.; Rogers, W.L.

    1990-01-01

    This 1990 symposium was the seventh in a series of meetings which began in 1964. The 300 participants from 23 countries and the 65 oral and 77 poster presentations were more than double the size of the 1985 symposium. Some of this increase derived from the broadened scope of the program. Previous meetings emphasized X-rays and gamma-rays, but it has been increasingly clear that distinction from other forms of radiation (i.e., electrons, alpha-particles and neutrons) was contrived. This broadening led to papers in fields such as ''airport'' monitors and arms control. However, most of the increase in size of the symposium is simply a reflection of the vigorous activity, both academic and industrial in radiation measurements and their many applications. The papers in these Proceedings are arranged by major topic without regard to whether the paper was invited or contributed, oral or poster. Discussion, although an important part of the meeting, was not recorded and therefore is not included in the Proceedings

  6. OpenRadiation: citizens get a grip on measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2018-01-01

    OpenRadiation is a dosimetry collaborative tool that may be used by any people in France who wants to measure radioactivity at any place, and publish the results on a dedicated web site. The system is composed of a Geiger-Muller counter (to be acquired) connected to a personal smart-phone where the OpenRadiation application has been downloaded. Every measurement is geo-localized, and complemented with data on environmental conditions (altitude, open air or inside a building, a plane, etc.). Users of the system may be local information commissions (CLI) as well as students, schools, etc. An English version is planned

  7. International and national radiation protection standards and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    The recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and their basis are discussed with particular emphasis on the extensive review of its earlier recommendations undertaken by the ICRP during the 1970s. The new recommendations issued in 1977 after this review are described. The dose limits for various organs and tissues before and after 1977 are compared. The optimization principle contained in the 1977 recommendations is assessed. The implementation of the 1977 recommendations, the subsequent changes to them and the ICRP's 1987 statement on cancer risk assessments are discussed. The National Radiological Protection Board's October 1987 radiation protection recommendations are outlined. 8 refs., 1 fig

  8. International Radiation Monitoring and Information System (IRMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sanjoy; Baciu, Florian; Stowisek, Jan; Saluja, Gurdeep; Kenny, Patrick; Albinet, Franck

    2017-09-01

    This article describes the International Radiation Monitoring Information System (IRMIS) which was developed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) with the goal to provide Competent Authorities, the IAEA and other international organizations with a client server based web application to share and visualize large quantities of radiation monitoring data. The data maps the areas of potential impact that can assist countries to take appropriate protective actions in an emergency. Ever since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident in April of 19861 European Community (EC) has worked towards collecting routine environmental radiological monitoring data from national networked monitoring systems. European Radiological Data Exchange Platform (EURDEP) was created in 19952 to that end - to provide radiation monitoring data from most European countries reported in nearly real-time. During the response operations for the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant accident (March 2011) the IAEA Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC) managed, harmonized and shared the large amount of data that was being generated from different organizations. This task underscored the need for a system which allows sharing large volumes of radiation monitoring data in an emergency. In 2014 EURDEP started the submission of the European radiological data to the International Radiation Monitoring Information System (IRMIS) as a European Regional HUB for IRMIS. IRMIS supports the implementation of the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident by providing a web application for the reporting, sharing, visualizing and analysing of large quantities of environmental radiation monitoring data during nuclear or radiological emergencies. IRMIS is not an early warning system that automatically reports when there are significant deviations in radiation levels or when values are detected above certain levels. However, the configuration of the visualization features offered by IRMIS may

  9. Report by the AERES on the unit: Department of Nuclear Technology under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Atomic Energy Commission (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-02-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, the DTN (Department of Nuclear Technology) which comprises four departments: technology of industrial reactors, advanced technologies and processes, transfer modelling and nuclear measurements, thermal-hydraulic and technological studies. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved, risks and recommendations, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. The same discussion is proposed for the different research themes: design of nuclear installation circuits and components, thermal-hydraulic and severe accidents, instrumentation for nuclear measurements and process control, transfers in reactors and in the environment

  10. Report of the international workshop on safety measures to address the year 2000 issue at medical facilities which use radiation generators and radioactive materials. (Supplement to IAEA-TECDOC-1074)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-08-01

    In resolution GC(42)/RES/11 on 'Measures to Address the Year 2000 (Y2K) Issue', adopted on 25 September 1998, the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) - inter alia - urged Member States 'to share information with the Secretariat regarding diagnostic and corrective actions being planned or implemented by operating and regulatory organizations at their ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make those facilities Year 2000 ready', encouraged the Secretariat 'within existing resources to act as a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions being taken at ... medical facilities which use radioactive materials to make these facilities Year 2000 ready', urged the Secretariat 'to handle the information provided by Member States carefully' and requested the Director General to report to it at its next (1999) regular session on the implementation of that resolution. To foster exchange of information and experience and to develop more specific advice based on this experience, the IAEA, in co-operation with the World Health Organization, conducted an International Workshop on Safety Measures to Address the Year 2000 Issue at Medical Facilities Which Use Radiation Generators and Radioactive Materials, held in Vienna, 28-30 June 1999. Whereas the focus in IAEA-TECDOC-1074 had been on identifying what might go wrong as a result of Y2K problems and on proposing methods to address them, the focus of the International Workshop was on sharing the experience gained in implementing the proposed methods - an approach consistent with the role of the Secretariat as 'a clearing-house and central point of contact for Member States to exchange information regarding diagnostic and remediation actions'

  11. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This 2nd revision of the sixth edition of the NRC Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period of July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1991, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Pratice in 10 CFR Part 2

  12. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-08-01

    This Revision Number 7 of the fifth edition of the NRC Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period July 1, 1972 to March 31, 1990, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2

  13. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This 2nd revision of the sixth edition of the NRC Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period of July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1991, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2

  14. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    This revision of the sixth edition of the NRC Practice and Procedure Digest contains a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period of July 1, 1972 to March 31, 1991, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2

  15. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-08-01

    This 7th revision of the sixth edition of the NRC Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period of July 1, 1972 to September 30, 1992, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2

  16. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-05-01

    This 6th revision of the sixth edition of the NRC Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period of July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1992, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2

  17. Development of radiation protection and measurement technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Si Young; Lee, T. Y.; Kim, J. L.; Kim, B. H.; Lee, B. J.; Chung, K. K.; Lee, K. C.; Chung, R. I.; Han, Y. D.; Kim, J. S.; Lee, H. S.; Kim, C. K.; Yoon, K. S.; Jeong, D. Y.; Yoon, S. C.; Yoon, Y. C.; Lee, S. Y.; Kim, J. S.; Seo, K. W. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, J. K.; Lee, J. K. [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    Reference X-, gamma, beta and neutron radiation fields complying with the ISO and ANSI standards have been established and evaluated to provide a basic technical support in national radiation protection dosimetry program and to provide calibration measurement devices. Personal dose evaluation algorithm has been developed with these reference radiation fields, which comply well with both domestic and the new ANSI N13.11, to evaluate accurate personal dose equivalents. A personal internal dosimetry algorithm which can estimate the intakes of radionuclides from the results of in vivo bioassay and the resulting internal doses has been developed and verified its performance. It was also evaluated to be equality excellent compared with those being used in foreign countries and used to make a computer code for internal dose evaluation which can be run with PC under the Windows environment. A BOMAB phantom for precise calibration of in vivo system has been also designed, fabricated and test-evaluated. Based on the ALARA concept of the optimization principle of radiation protection, a method for estimating the cost for radiation protection has been studied and an objective monetary cost of detriment due to radiation exposure, called {alpha} value ($/man-Sv) has been derived and proposed based on the Korean socio-economic situation and human risk factors to provide basic data for the radiation protection optimization study in Korea. (author). 100 refs., 104 tabs., 69 figs.

  18. On the new recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Publication 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukhin, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radioligical Protection (ICRP) published in 1990 new main recommendations (Publication 60), in which the recommendations of 1977 (Publication 26) were revised and noticeable changes were introduced. The main changes in ICRP recommendations important for practical personnel are discussed. These important changes include introduction of two protection systems, which are the protection system in practice and that during intervention, conception of potential irradiation, dose and risk limits, changes in dose limits and risk coefficients, determination of the effective dose and its numerical values by changing the weighting coefficients. The problems open to arguments are formulated

  19. Measurement and detection of radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    This fourth edition reflects recent major developments that have occurred in radiation detector materials, systems, and applications. It continues to provide the most practical and up-to-date introduction to radiation detector technology, proper measurement techniques, and analysis of results for engineers and scientists using radiation sources. New chapters emphasize the expanded use of radiation detection systems in nuclear non-proliferation, homeland security, and nuclear medicine. The book also discusses the correct ways to perform measurements following current health physics procedures.

  20. Do governing body and CSU nurses on clinical commissioning groups really lead a nursing agenda? Findings from a 2015 Survey of the Commissioning Nurse Leaders' Network Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Driscoll, Mike; Allan, Helen T; Lee, Gay; Savage, Jan; Tapson, Christine; Dixon, Roz

    2018-03-05

    This paper reports the findings from a 2015 survey of the Commissioning Nurse Leaders' Network. Our aim was to understand how governing body nurses perceive their influence and leadership on clinical commissioning groups. An online survey method was used with a census sample of 238 governing body nurses and nurses working in Commissioning Support Units, who were members of the Commissioning Nurse Leaders' Network. The response rate was 40.7% (n = 97). While most governing body nurses felt confident in their leadership role, this was less so for non-executive governing body nurses. Nurses in Commissioning Support Units were much less positive than governing body nurses about their influence on clinical commissioning groups. Governing body nurses were satisfied with their impact on clinical commissioning groups and so could be said to be leading a nursing agenda but this evidence is limited to their own perceptions and more objective or diverse measures of impact are needed. The purpose of such roles to 'represent nursing, and ensure the patient voice is heard' may be a flawed aspiration, conflating nursing leadership and patient voice. This is the first study to explore explicitly the differences between executive and non-executive governing body nurses and nurses working in commissioning support units. Achieving clinical commissioning groups' goals, including developing and embedding nursing leadership roles in clinical commissioning groups, may be threatened if the contributions of governing body nurses, and other nurses supporting clinical commissioning groups, go unrecognised within the profession, or if general practitioners or other clinical commissioning group executive members dominate decision-making on clinical commissioning groups. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Current international intercomparison measurement on radon and its progeny

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamasaki, Keizo [Kyoto Univ., Kumatori, Osaka (Japan). Research Reactor Inst.

    1996-12-01

    The international intercomparison measurement on radon and its progeny was held between the EML of USDOE and several Japanese organisations, using the radon test chamber installed in EML. Japanese results of radon concentration by the active method using the ionization chamber or scintillation cell and the passive method using the solid track detector were about 5% small compared to that of EML. On the results of radon progeny, there were not any large systematic differences between EML and Japanese participants in spite of wide range of deviation except for the results at the condition of low aerosol density. (author)

  2. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff practice and procedure digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This sixth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to December 31, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This sixth edition replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through December 31, 1990

  3. Radiation Measured with Different Dosimeters for ISS-Expedition 18-19/ULF2 on Board International Space Station during Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dazhuang; Gaza, R.; Roed, Y.; Semones, E.; Lee, K.; Steenburgh, R.; Johnson, S.; Flanders, J.; Zapp, N.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation field of particles in low Earth orbit (LEO) is mainly composed of galactic cosmic rays (GCR), solar energetic particles and particles in SAA (South Atlantic Anomaly). GCR are modulated by solar activity, at the period of solar minimum activity, GCR intensity is at maximum and the main contributor for space radiation is GCR. At present for space radiation measurements conducted by JSC (Johnson Space Center) SRAG (Space Radiation Analysis Group), the preferred active dosimeter sensitive to all LET (Linear Energy Transfer) is the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC); the preferred passive dosimeters are thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) and optically stimulated luminescence dosimeters (OSLDs) sensitive to low LET as well as CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTDs) sensitive to high LET. For the method using passive dosimeters, radiation quantities for all LET can be obtained by combining radiation results measured with TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 PNTDs. TEPC, TLDs/OSLDs and CR-39 detectors were used to measure the radiation field for the ISS (International Space Station) - Expedition 18-19/ULF2 space mission which was conducted from 15 November 2008 to 31 July 2009 - near the period of the recent solar minimum activity. LET spectra (differential and integral fluence, absorbed dose and dose equivalent) and radiation quantities were measured for positions TEPC, TESS (Temporary Sleeping Station, inside the polyethylene lined sleep station), SM-P 327 and 442 (Service Module - Panel 327 and 442). This paper presents radiation LET spectra measured with TEPC and CR-39 PNTDs and radiation dose measured with TLDs/OSLDs as well as the radiation quantities combined from results measured with passive dosimeters.

  4. Internal stray radiation measurement for cryogenic infrared imaging systems using a spherical mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qijie; Chang, Songtao; He, Fengyun; Li, Zhou; Qiao, Yanfeng

    2017-06-10

    Internal stray radiation is a key factor that influences infrared imaging systems, and its suppression level is an important criterion to evaluate system performance, especially for cryogenic infrared imaging systems, which are highly sensitive to thermal sources. In order to achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation, an approach is proposed, which is based on radiometric calibration using a spherical mirror. First of all, the theory of spherical mirror design is introduced. Then, the calibration formula considering the integration time is presented. Following this, the details regarding the measurement method are presented. By placing a spherical mirror in front of the infrared detector, the influence of internal factors of the detector on system output can be obtained. According to the calibration results of the infrared imaging system, the output caused by internal stray radiation can be acquired. Finally, several experiments are performed in a chamber with controllable inside temperatures to validate the theory proposed in this paper. Experimental results show that the measurement results are in good accordance with the theoretical analysis, and demonstrate that the proposed theories are valid and can be employed in practical applications. The proposed method can achieve accurate measurement for internal stray radiation at arbitrary integration time and ambient temperatures. The measurement result can be used to evaluate whether the suppression level meets the system requirement.

  5. Accuracy validation of incident photon fluence on DQE for various measurement conditions and X-ray units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haba, Tomonobu; Kondo, Shimpei; Hayashi, Daiki; Koyama, Shuji

    2013-07-01

    Detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used as a comprehensive metric for X-ray image evaluation in digital X-ray units. The incident photon fluence per air kerma (SNR²(in)) is necessary for calculating the DQE. The International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) reports the SNR²(in) under conditions of standard radiation quality, but this SNR²(in) might not be accurate as calculated from the X-ray spectra emitted by an actual X-ray tube. In this study, we evaluated the error range of the SNR²(in) presented by the IEC62220-1 report. We measured the X-ray spectra emitted by an X-ray tube under conditions of standard radiation quality of RQA5. The spectral photon fluence at each energy bin was multiplied by the photon energy and the mass energy absorption coefficient of air; then the air kerma spectrum was derived. The air kerma spectrum was integrated over the whole photon energy range to yield the total air kerma. The total photon number was then divided by the total air kerma. This value is the SNR²(in). These calculations were performed for various measurement parameters and X-ray units. The percent difference between the calculated value and the standard value of RQA5 was up to 2.9%. The error range was not negligibly small. Therefore, it is better to use the new SNR²(in) of 30694 (1/(mm(2) μGy)) than the current [Formula: see text] of 30174 (1/(mm(2) μGy)).

  6. Development of an on-line radiation detection and measurements laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Derick G.

    An on-line radiation detection and measurements lab is being developed with a grant from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The on-line laboratory experiments are designed to provide a realistic laboratory experience and will be offered to students at colleges/universities where such a course is not offered. This thesis presents four web-based experiments: 1) nuclear electronics, 2) gamma-ray spectroscopy with scintillation detectors, 3) gamma-ray attenuation in matter and external dosimetry, and 4) alpha spectroscopy and absorption in matter. The students access the experiments through a broad-band internet connection. Computer-controlled instrumentation developed in National Instruments (NI) LabVIEW(TM) communicates with the URSA-II (SE International, Inc.) data acquisition system, which controls the detector bias voltage, pulse shaping, amplifier gain, and ADC. Detector and amplifier output pulses can be displayed with other instrumentation developed in LabVIEW(TM) for the digital oscilloscope (USB-5132, NI). Additional instrumentation developed in LabVIEW(TM) is used to control the positions of all sources with stepper motor controllers (VXM-1, Velmex, Inc.) and to adjust pressure in the alpha chamber with a digital vacuum regulator (Model 200, J-KEM, Inc.). Unique interactive interfaces are created by integrating all of the necessary instrumentation to conduct each lab. These interfaces provide students with seamless functionality for data acquisition, experimental control, and live data display with real-time updates for each experiment. A webcam is set up to stream the experiment live so the student can observe the physical instruments and receive visual feedback from the system in real time.

  7. Eating habits and internal radiation exposures in Japanese

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraishi, Kunio

    1995-01-01

    Recently, annual dose equivalent for Japanese was estimated to be 3.75 mSv. Medical radiation exposures (2.25 mSv/y) and exposures from natural sources of radiation (1.48 mSv/y) were the major contributors to this dose. Dietary intakes of both natural and man-made radionuclides directly related to internal exposures. In this paper, internal doses received only through ingestion of radionuclides in food are described; internal doses through inhalation have been excluded. First, the representative intakes of radionuclides for Japanese were estimated from the literature. Second, the annual dose equivalents were calculated according to intakes of individual radionuclides and weighted committed dose equivalents (Sv/Bq) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection Pub. 30. Total annual doses through radiation of natural sources and man-made sources, were estimated as 0.35 mSv and 0.001 mSv, respectively. Furthermore, the effects of imported foods on internal dose in Japanese were calculated preliminarily, because the contribution of imported foods to Japanese eating habits is increasing annually and will not be negligible when assessing internal dose in the near future. (author)

  8. Measurement and evaluation of internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae Young; Chang, S. Y.; Lee, J. I.; Song, M. Y.

    2006-01-01

    This report describes the contents and results for implementation of internal radiation monitoring programme, measurement of uranium present in lung by lung counter and assessment of committed effective dose for radiation workers of the KNFC. The aim of radiation protection was achieved by implementing this activity

  9. International workshop on the 'Physics of interfaces by synchrotron radiation and other high energy probes'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krummacher, S.; Gudat, W.

    1986-05-01

    The present 'book of abstracts' consists of the abstracts of 23 lectures, held at the international workshop on the 'Physics of interfaces by synchrotron radiation and other high energy probes', April 1986, Bad Honnef, FRG. The subjects are: The use of photoemission in the study of interfaces and adsorbates, EEL spectroscopy applications, spin polarization, photoionization processes and EXAFS. (BHO)

  10. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr

    1999-01-01

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations

  11. 6th international conference on biophysics and synchrotron radiation. Program/Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pittroff, Connie; Strasser, Susan Barr [lead editors

    1999-08-03

    This STI product consists of the Program/Abstracts book that was prepared for the participants in the Sixth International Conference on Biophysics and Synchrotron Radiation that was held August 4-8, 1998, at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory. This book contains the full conference program and abstracts of the scientific presentations.

  12. Abstracts from the fourth annual meeting of the council on ionizing radiation measurements and standards (CIRMS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The Council on Ionizing Radiation Measurements and Standards held its fourth annual meeting at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland on November 28-30, 1995. The organization represents thousands of users of ionizing radiation and radioactive sources engaged in industrial radiation processing and sterilization, medical radiation diagnostics and therapy, nuclear power, and worker radiation protection programs. CIRMS provides a forum for discussing ionizing radiation issues; identifying, defining and prioritizing needed work; disseminating information on standards; and organizing workshops and meetings to advance ionizing radiation technology. Over 100 participants attended the meeting, which highlighted advanced techniques in radiation dosimetry and radioactivity measurements for the different ionizing radiation communities. Representatives attended from 28 corporations, 10 federal agencies, 8 national laboratories, 12 universities, and 1 state. Advanced techniques and future measurement needs were discussed in four sessions: (I) Medical Dosimetry, Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, (II) Occupational and Radiation Protection Dosimetry, (III) Measurement Techniques for Public and Environmental Radiation Protection, and (IV) Measurement Techniques for Radiation Effects on Materials. An additional session (Session V) was added to this annual meeting on the implementation of ISO 9000 for those CIRMS members involved in instrument and product manufacturing, and those providing radiation measurement services. Abstracts are also included from the poster session (Session VI) held on the final day of the meeting. The 4th Annual Meeting was organized by the Chairman of the Science and Technology Committee, Mr. Joseph C. McDonald of the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory

  13. International Electrotechnical Commission standards and French material control standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furet, J.; Weill, J.

    1978-01-01

    There are reported the international standards incorporated into the IEC Subcommitee 45 A (Nuclear Reactor Instrumentation) and the national standards elaborated by the Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique, CEA, Group of normalized control equipment, the degree of application of those being reported on the base design, call of bids and exploitation of nuclear power plants. (J.E. de C)

  14. 2nd International Conference on Measurement Instrumentation and Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Preface It is our great pleasure to welcome you to 2017 2nd International Conference on Measurement Instrumentation and Electronics which has been held in Prague, Czech Republic during June 9-11, 2017. ICMIE 2017 is dedicated to issues related to measurement instrumentation and electronics. The major goal and feature of the conference is to bring academic scientists, engineers, industry researchers together to exchange and share their experiences and research results, and discuss the practical challenges encountered and the solutions adopted. Professors from Czech Republic, Germany and Italy are invited to deliver keynote speeches regarding latest information in their respective expertise areas. It is a golden opportunity for the students, researchers and engineers to interact with the experts and specialists to get their advice or consultation on technical matters, teaching methods and strategies. These proceedings present a selection from papers submitted to the conference from universities, research institutes and industries. All of the papers were subjected to peer-review by conference committee members and international reviewers. The papers selected depended on their quality and their relevancy to the conference. The volume tends to present to the readers the recent advances in the field of computer and communication system, system design and measurement and control technology, power electronics and electrical engineering, materials science and engineering, power machinery and equipment maintenance, architectural design and project management, environmental analysis and detection etc. We would like to thank all the authors who have contributed to this volume and also to the organizing committee, reviewers, speakers, chairpersons, and all the conference participants for their support to ICMIE 2017. ICMIE 2017 Organizing Committee June 20th, 2017 (paper)

  15. Radiation monitoring. Lecture 26, course on advances in radiation: International School of Radiation Damage and Protection, Erice, Italy, September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1979-09-01

    The practices and rationales of radiation monitoring as applied at high-energy accelerator laboratories are presented. Area, environmental, and personal techniques are discussed and examples given. (ACR)

  16. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This Revision 8 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to June 30, 1990 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 8 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through June 30, 1990

  17. Proceeding of The Third International on Radiation Sciences and Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-11-01

    The proceeding contains of 920 pages, the available of 62 contributions: and covering of conference topics: Plenary, Invited, Keynote Talks. Insects, Chemical preparation, Separation Processes, Radioactive materials, contaminations, Radioactive wastes and Medicine

  18. Regional and International Networking to Support the Energy Regulatory Commission of Thailand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavansiri, Direk; Bull, Trevor

    2010-09-15

    The Energy Regulatory Commission of Thailand is a new regulatory agency. The structure of the energy sector; the tradition of administration; and, the lack of access to experienced personnel in Thailand all pose particular challenges. The Commission is meeting these challenges through regional and international networking to assist in developing policies and procedures that allow it to meet international benchmarks.

  19. Report by the AERES on the unit: Research unit for man radiation protection under the supervision of establishments and bodies: IRSN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-10-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, whose activity is dedicated to man radiation protection, and is organized about four main themes: means to determine in any circumstances the dose received by a victim of an external irradiation or internal contamination, characterization of the biological effects ionizing radiations may create in a sane tissue, epidemiological approaches to the assessment of the exceeding risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation on different populations, and experimental toxicology for the identification of biological effects induced par long duration and low dose exposures to some radionuclides. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. These same aspects are then discussed and commented for each theme: dosimetry, ionizing radiation pathology and experimental therapies, epidemiology of ionizing radiations, experimental and post-accidental radio-toxicology

  20. Scatter radiation intensities around a clinical digital breast tomosynthesis unit and the impact on radiation shielding considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob

    2016-03-01

    To measure the scattered radiation intensity around a clinical digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) unit and to provide updated data for radiation shielding design for DBT systems with tungsten-anode x-ray tubes. The continuous distribution of scattered x-rays from a clinical DBT system (Hologic Selenia Dimensions) was measured within an angular range of 0°-180° using a linear-array x-ray detector (X-Scan 0.8f3-512, Detection Technology, Inc., Finland), which was calibrated for the x-ray spectrum range of the DBT unit. The effects of x-ray field size, phantom size, and x-ray kVp/filter combination were investigated. Following a previously developed methodology by Simpkin, scatter fraction was determined for the DBT system as a function of angle around the phantom center. Detailed calculations of the scatter intensity from a DBT system were demonstrated using the measured scatter fraction data. For the 30 and 35 kVp acquisition, the scatter-to-primary-ratio and scatter fraction data closely matched with data previously measured by Simpkin. However, the measured data from this study demonstrated the nonisotropic distribution of the scattered radiation around a DBT system, with two strong peaks around 25° and 160°. The majority scatter radiation (>70%) originated from the imaging detector assembly, instead of the phantom. With a workload from a previous survey performed at MGH, the scatter air kerma at 1 m from the phantom center for wall/door is 1.76 × 10(-2) mGy patient(-1), for floor is 1.64 × 10(-1) mGy patient(-1), and for ceiling is 3.66 × 10(-2) mGy patient(-1). Comparing to previously measured data for mammographic systems, the scatter air kerma from Holgoic DBT is at least two times higher. The main reasons include the harder primary beam with higher workload (measured with total mAs/week), added tomosynthesis acquisition, and strong small angle forward scattering. Due to the highly conservative initial assumptions, the shielding recommendation from NCRP

  1. Scatter radiation intensities around a clinical digital breast tomosynthesis unit and the impact on radiation shielding considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Kai, E-mail: kyang11@mgh.harvard.edu; Li, Xinhua; Liu, Bob [Division of Diagnostic Imaging Physics, Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, 55 Fruit Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: To measure the scattered radiation intensity around a clinical digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) unit and to provide updated data for radiation shielding design for DBT systems with tungsten-anode x-ray tubes. Methods: The continuous distribution of scattered x-rays from a clinical DBT system (Hologic Selenia Dimensions) was measured within an angular range of 0°–180° using a linear-array x-ray detector (X-Scan 0.8f3-512, Detection Technology, Inc., Finland), which was calibrated for the x-ray spectrum range of the DBT unit. The effects of x-ray field size, phantom size, and x-ray kVp/filter combination were investigated. Following a previously developed methodology by Simpkin, scatter fraction was determined for the DBT system as a function of angle around the phantom center. Detailed calculations of the scatter intensity from a DBT system were demonstrated using the measured scatter fraction data. Results: For the 30 and 35 kVp acquisition, the scatter-to-primary-ratio and scatter fraction data closely matched with data previously measured by Simpkin. However, the measured data from this study demonstrated the nonisotropic distribution of the scattered radiation around a DBT system, with two strong peaks around 25° and 160°. The majority scatter radiation (>70%) originated from the imaging detector assembly, instead of the phantom. With a workload from a previous survey performed at MGH, the scatter air kerma at 1 m from the phantom center for wall/door is 1.76 × 10{sup −2} mGy patient{sup −1}, for floor is 1.64 × 10{sup −1} mGy patient{sup −1}, and for ceiling is 3.66 × 10{sup −2} mGy patient{sup −1}. Conclusions: Comparing to previously measured data for mammographic systems, the scatter air kerma from Holgoic DBT is at least two times higher. The main reasons include the harder primary beam with higher workload (measured with total mAs/week), added tomosynthesis acquisition, and strong small angle forward scattering. Due to the

  2. LIPAc personnel protection system for realizing radiation licensing conditions on injector commissioning with deuteron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Hiroki, E-mail: takahashi.hiroki@jaea.go.jp [IFMIF/EVEDA Accelerator Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Narita, Takahiro; Kasugai, Atsushi [IFMIF/EVEDA Accelerator Group, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Kojima, Toshiyuki [Gitec Co. Ltd., Hachinohe, Aomori (Japan); Marqueta, Alvaro; Nishiyama, Koichi [IFMIF/EVEDA Project Team, Rokkasho, Aomori (Japan); Sakaki, Hironao [Quantum Beam Science Center, JAEA, Kizu, Kyoto (Japan); Gobin, Raphael [Commissariat à l’Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives, CEA/Saclay, DSM/IRFU, Gif/Yvette (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • Personnel Protection System (PPS) is developed to adapt the radiation licensing. • PPS achieves the target performance to secure the personnel safety. • Pulse Duty Management System (PDMS) is developed to manage the beam-operation-time. • Satisfying performance of PDMS is confirmed by injector operation with H+ beam. • By the result of PPS and PDMS tests, the radiation license was successfully obtained. - Abstract: The performance validation of the Linear IFMIF Prototype Accelerator (LIPAc), up to the energy of 9 MeV deuteron beam with 125 mA continuous wave (CW), is planned in Rokkasho, Japan. There are three main phases of LIPAc performance validation: Injector commissioning, RFQ commissioning and LIPAc commissioning. Injector commissioning was started by H{sup +} and D{sup +} beam. To apply the radiation licensing for the Injector commissioning, the entering/leaving to/from accelerator vault should be under control, and access to the accelerator vault has to be prohibited for any person during the beam operation. The Personnel Protection System (PPS) was developed to adapt the radiation licensing conditions. The licensing requests that PPS must manage the accumulated D{sup +} current. So, to manage the overall D{sup +} beam time during injector operation, Pulse Duty Management System (PDMS) was developed as a configurable subsystem as part of the PPS. The PDMS was tested during H{sup +} beam (as simulated D{sup +}) operation, to confirm that it can handle the beam inhibit from Injector before the beam accumulation is above the threshold value specified in the radiation licensing condition. In this paper, the design and configuration of these systems and the result of the tests are presented.

  3. Quantum metrology foundation of units and measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Goebel, Ernst O

    2015-01-01

    The International System of Units (SI) is the world's most widely used system of measurement, used every day in commerce and science, and is the modern form of the metric system. It currently comprises the meter (m), the kilogram (kg), the second (s), the ampere (A), the kelvin (K), the candela (cd) and the mole (mol)). The system is changing though, units and unit definitions are modified through international agreements as the technology of measurement progresses, and as the precision of measurements improves. The SI is now being redefined based on constants of nature and their realization by quantum standards. Therefore, the underlying physics and technologies will receive increasing interest, and not only in the metrology community but in all fields of science. This book introduces and explains the applications of modern physics concepts to metrology, the science and the applications of measurements. A special focus is made on the use of quantum standards for the realization of the forthcoming new SI (the...

  4. Fifth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porstendoerfer, J.; Swedjemark, G.A.; Baeverstam, U.; Lowder, W.M.; Miller, K.M.; Fisenne, I.M.

    1993-01-01

    The fifth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment organized a series of tutorial sessions. One of the five major fields concerned with the radon issue. The tutorials dealt with important issues of the radon problem and covered the following aspects: Cosmic and Terrestrial Gamma Radiation Measurement, Properties and Behaviour of Radon and Thoron and Their Decay Products in the Air, Radon and Radon Daughters Metrology: Basic Aspects Long Lived Radionuclides in the Environment, in Food and in Human Beings, Design and Analysis of Radon Surveys with Epidemiological Utility

  5. Effects of radiation on health and safety measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, J.K.; Chawla, Raman; Sharma, Rakesh Kumar

    2007-01-01

    The most striking aspect of the effects of ionizing radiation on the living organisms at various levels of organization, is the grave damage produced by relatively trivial amounts of absorbed energy. At the physical level the reason for this lies in the fact that the energy is deposited in concentrated packets along the tracks of the ionizing particles. Injury to living tissue results from the transfer of energy to atoms and molecules in the cellular structure. Ionizing radiation causes atoms and molecules to become ionized or excited. These excitations and ionizations produce free radicals causing breakage of chemical bonds, production of new chemical bonds and cross-linkage between macromolecules and molecules in a critical structure (e.g. DNA, RNA, membrane or other organelle). It initiates in the fraction of seconds from subatomic level eventually effects complete biosphere

  6. The role of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in relation to medical radiation exposures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shrimpton, P.C.

    2001-01-01

    In 1955, growing global concerns about ionizing radiation led the General Assembly of the United Nations to establish the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). The mandate of this committee, which presently includes 21 Member States, is to assess and report on the levels and effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. Accordingly, UNSCEAR applies scientific judgement in undertaking comprehensive reviews and evaluations concerning radiation and maintains an independent and neutral position in drawing its conclusions. These are published in authoritative reports to the UN General Assembly, with there having been 14 such substantive reports, with technical annexes, since 1958. The information provided by UNSCEAR assists the General Assembly in making recommendations in relation, for example, to international collaboration in the field of health. Governments and organizations all over the world rely on the committee's evaluations as the scientific basis for estimating radiation risk, establishing radiation protection and safety standards, and regulating radiation sources

  7. 75 FR 7927 - National Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... Commission on Fiscal Responsibility and Reform By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution... Fiscal Responsibility and Reform (Commission). Sec. 2. Membership. The Commission shall be composed of 18...

  8. Croatian Participation at National Symposia and International Congresses on Radiation Protection 1992-2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar Bronic, I.; Ranogajec-Komor, M

    2003-01-01

    Croatian Radiation Protection Association (CRPA) was formed as an independent association in 1991, and since 1992 it is a member of the International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA). CRPA organises regular national symposia with international participation, and takes part in organisation of regional IRPA congresses. The members of CRPA take part also in international and European congresses. In this paper we analyse the participation of Croatian authors in national symposia and international congresses in the period from 1992 to 2002. The number of papers in proceedings of the national symposia is rather constant (about 60), while at the First symposium in 1992 it was slightly higher (68). The fraction of papers by Croatian authors was also the highest at the First Symposium (∼ 90%), while at the following symposia it varied between 70% and 80%. Although the analysed period is rather short, one can see slight changes in the research topics. Radioecology, including radon and related topics, was the most frequent research area (36% of all papers) at the national CRPA symposia 1992-1998, followed by the biological effects of radiation and radiation protection in medicine (24%), dosimetry, methods and instrumentation (21%), general topics (11%) and radioactive waste (7%). The distribution of topics at the Fifth symposium is: 27% radioecology and radon, 30% biological and medical topics, as well as professional and public exposure, 24% dosimetry, 14% general topics and 5% non-ionising radiations. In this Symposium we have separate sections for non-ionising radiations and public exposure, although several papers on these subjects were presented already at the previous symposia. (author)

  9. International workshop on greenhouse gas mitigation technologies and measures: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    More than 150 countries are now Party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), which seeks to stabilize atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases at a level that would prevent dangerous human interference with the global climate system. Climate change country studies are a significant step for developing countries and countries with economies in transition to meet their national reporting commitments to the FCCC. These studies also provide the basis for preparation of National Climate Change Action Plans and implementation of technologies and practices which reduce greenhouse gas emissions or enhance carbon sinks. The broad goals of the workshop were to: (1) present results of country study mitigation assessments, (2) identify promising no-regrets greenhouse gas mitigation options in land-use and energy sectors, (3) share information on development of mitigation technologies and measures which contribute to improved National Climate Change Actions Plans, and (4) begin the process of synthesizing mitigation assessments for use by FCCC subsidiary bodies. The 59 papers are arranged into the following topical sections: (1) national mitigation assessments, technology priorities, and measures; (2) sector-specific mitigation assessment results, subdivided further into: energy sector; non-energy sector; renewable energy; energy efficiency in industry and buildings; transportation; electricity supply; forestry; and methane mitigation; (3) support for mitigation technologies and measures; and (4) activities implemented jointly. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. Radiation and society: Comprehending radiation risk. V. 2. Poster papers. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    This IAEA international conference on Radiation and Society was the first major international meeting devoted to the comprehension of radiation risk, public attitude towards radiation risk and hazards encountered by the general public in contaminated areas. Volume two of the proceedings mainly deals with assessment of radiation exposure levels, radiation health effects, impact of radiation on the environment, perception of and managing radiation risk. Refs, figs, tabs

  11. International Scientific Conference on 'Radiation-Thermal Effects and Processes in Inorganic Materials'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The International Scientific Conference on 'Radiation-Thermal Effects and Processes in Inorganic Materials' is a traditional representative forum devoted to the discussion of fundamental problems of radiation physics and its technical applications. The first nine conferences were held four times in Tomsk, then in Ulan-Ude (Russia), Bishkek (Kyrgyzstan), Tashkent (Uzbekistan), Sharm El Sheikh (Egypt), and the island of Cyprus. The tenth conference was held in Tomsk, Russia. The program of the Conference covers a wide range of technical areas and modern aspects of radiation physics, its applications and related matters. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to: • Physical and chemical phenomena in inorganic materials in radiation, electrical and thermal fields; • Research methods and equipment modification states and properties of materials; • Technologies and equipment for their implementation; • The use of radiation-thermal processes in nanotechnology; • Adjacent to the main theme of the conference issues The conference was attended by leading scientists from countries near and far abroad who work in the field of radiation physics of solid state and of radiation material science. The School-Conference of Young Scientists was held during the conference. The event was held with the financial support of the Russian Foundation for Basic Research, projects № 14-38-10210 and № 14-02-20376. (introduction)

  12. Report of the CIRRPC Policy Subpanel on SI metric radiation units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-12-01

    Recognizing that use of the International System of Units (SI) for radiological quantities is increasing internationally but is not currently widely accepted in the United States, and recognizing that the existing US policy is to plan for the increasing voluntary use of SI units domestically, it is recommended that it be US policy to use dual radiation units in Federal activities. However, it is recognized that in certain operational situations, by reason of economy or safety, the utilization of dual units is undesirable. Therefore, in justified situations, agencies may adopt that system of units which best meets their needs. The objective of the recommended use of dual units is primarily to familiarize people with the SI units. This should serve to ease transition when and where transition is appropriate and mitigate economic and safety concerns. The Subpanel has made suggestions on how this policy should be implemented by Federal agencies: using dual units in issuing regulations containing radiation units, except where determined to be impractical, incorporating dual units in agency internal operating procedures as they are written or revised; and using dual units in contracts and procurement. The Subpanel recommends that this policy be reexamined in about five years following an assessment of the use of SI radiation units both internationally and within the United States. 11 refs

  13. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-02-01

    This first supplement to the second edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from April 1, 1978 to September 30, 1978 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. The supplement also includes additional material from adjudicatory decisions rendered prior to April 1, 1978 and, to a very limited degree, material from adjudicatory decisions and regulation changes after September 30, 1978. The supplement, which is intended to be used as a pocket-part supplement to the Digest itself, includes a number of new subsections and topics not covered in the Digest. The new subsections are noted in the index for the supplement

  14. Comparison of TOMS retrievals and UVMRP measurements of surface spectral UV radiation in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Xu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Surface noontime spectral ultraviolet (UV irradiances during May-September of 2000–2004 from the total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS satellite retrievals are systematically compared with the ground measurements at 27 climatological sites maintained by the USDA UV-B Monitoring and Research Program. The TOMS retrievals are evaluated by two cloud screening methods and local air quality conditions to determine their bias dependencies on spectral bands, cloudiness, aerosol loadings, and air pollution. Under clear-sky conditions, TOMS retrieval biases vary from −3.4% (underestimation to 23.6% (overestimation. Averaged over all sites, the relative mean biases for 305, 311, 325, and 368 nm are respectively 15.4, 7.9, 7.6, and 7.0% (overestimation. The bias enhancement for 305 nm by approximately twice that of other bands likely results from absorption by gaseous pollutants (SO2, O3, and aerosols that are not included in the TOMS algorithm. For all bands, strong positive correlations of the TOMS biases are identified with aerosol optical depth, which explains nearly 50% of the variances of TOMS biases. The more restrictive in-situ cloud screening method reduces the biases by 3.4–3.9% averaged over all sites. This suggests that the TOMS biases from the in-situ cloud contamination may account for approximately 25% for 305 nm and 50% for other bands of the total bias. The correlation coefficients between total-sky and clear-sky biases across 27 sites are 0.92, 0.89, 0.83, and 0.78 for 305, 311, 325, and 368 nm, respectively. The results show that the spatial characteristics of the TOMS retrieval biases are systematic, representative of both clear and total-sky conditions.

  15. Report by the AERES on the unit: Fuel Study Department (DEC) under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, the DEC (Departement d'Etudes des Combustibles, Fuel Study Department) which comprises four departments: a department of analysis and characterization of fuel behaviour (SA3C) which comprises four laboratories, a Plutonium, Uranium and Minor Actinides department (SPUA) which comprises four laboratories, a department for the investigation and simulation of fuel behaviour (four laboratories) and the Leca-Star department (3 laboratories and a project group). The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved, risks and recommendations, productions and publications on different themes (fundamental research on fuels, fuel design, fabrications, characterizations and property measurements, experimental irradiations, characterization of irradiated fuels and chemical and radio-chemical analysis, modelling and simulation). A more detailed assessment is presented for each theme in terms of scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project

  16. Abstracts of 3. International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    Third International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Science gave the state of art in the subject of application of synchrotron radiation in many different branches of basic and applied science. The most of studies have been done in the range of solid state physics. The synchrotron methods give unique possibilities for investigating crystal structure and defects, molecular structure, bulk and surface properties as well as magnetic and electrical properties in different physical conditions. The great progress,due to synchrotrons application, has also been attained in medical diagnosis, earth science, materials engineering and testing

  17. Abstracts of 3. International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Third International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Science gave the state of art in the subject of application of synchrotron radiation in many different branches of basic and applied science. The most of studies have been done in the range of solid state physics. The synchrotron methods give unique possibilities for investigating crystal structure and defects, molecular structure, bulk and surface properties as well as magnetic and electrical properties in different physical conditions. The great progress,due to synchrotrons application, has also been attained in medical diagnosis, earth science, materials engineering and testing.

  18. The pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tohyama, Naoki; Kodama, Takashi; Hatano, K.

    2013-01-01

    Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) allows higher radiation dose to be focused to the target volumes while minimizing the dose to OAR. To start of clinical treatment in IMRTvwe must perform commissioning strictly than 3D-conformal radiotherapy (CRT). In this report, pitfalls of dosimetric commissioning for intensity modulated radiation therapy were reviewed. Multileaf collimator (MLC) offsets and MLC transmissions are important parameters in commissioning of RTPS for IMRT. Correction of depth scaling and fluence scaling is necessary for dose measurement using solid phantom. (author)

  19. Effects of ionizing radiation on plants and animals at levels implied by current radiation protection standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The 1977 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection stated that the commission believes that if man is adequately protected from radiation, other organisms are also likely to be sufficiently protected. The present report examines this statement by considering the effects of ionizing radiation on animals and plants in both terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The conclusions are that chronic dose rates of IMGy.d -1 or less are unlikely to cause measurable deleterious effects in terrestrial populations, and that in the aquatic environment limiting chronic dose rates to 10MGy.d -1 to the maximally exposed individuals would provide adequate protection for the population. Thus specific radiation protection standards for non-human organisms are not needed. 193 refs, 2 figs, 7 tabs

  20. Solar and infrared radiation measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Vignola, Frank; Michalsky, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    The rather specialized field of solar and infrared radiation measurement has become more and more important in the face of growing demands by the renewable energy and climate change research communities for data that are more accurate and have increased temporal and spatial resolution. Updating decades of acquired knowledge in the field, Solar and Infrared Radiation Measurements details the strengths and weaknesses of instruments used to conduct such solar and infrared radiation measurements. Topics covered include: Radiometer design and performance Equipment calibration, installation, operati

  1. The Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported.

  2. An analysis on international trends of radiation application and security of radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, J. S.; Yang, M. H.

    2003-01-01

    Radiation technologies are being utilized in a wide range of daily modern life and provide the public with valuable benefits through applications in fields of medical, industrial, agricultural, and science and engineering research. On the other hand, there is a high possibility that radioactive materials could be used for potentially malevolent purposes such as dirty bombs. International community, therefore, has made efforts to improve security of radioactive sources for protecting the public from radiological terrorism. This study investigated current status of radiation technologies and radioactive sources which could be used by radiological dispersal devices. This paper also reviewed the possibility of radiological weapon attacks, international trends and our methods to enhance security of radioactive sources

  3. Analysis of internal radiation and radiotoxicity source base on aerosol distribution in RMI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yuwono, I.

    2000-01-01

    Destructive testing of nuclear fuel element during post irradiation examination in radio metallurgy installation may cause air contamination in the working area in the form of radioactive aerosol. Inhalation of the radioactive aerosol by worker will to become internal radiation source. Potential hazard of radioactive particle in the body also depends on the particle size. Analysis of internal radiation source and radiotoxicity showed that in the normal operation only natural radioactive materials are found with high radiotoxicity, i.e. Pb-212 and Ac-228. High deposit in the alveolar instersial (Ai) is 95 % and lower in the bronchial area (BB) is 1 % for particle size 11.7 nm and 350 nm respectively. (author)

  4. Radiation environment assessment, measurement and its impact on health and sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Pradeep; Panwar, Brijandra Singh

    2012-01-01

    Present paper deals with Radiation Environment Assessment, Measurement and its Impact on Health, its meaning and in particular with sustainable development perspective. Health and Environment appears to be different subjects and concepts, but in reality they are interrelated and interdependent. One cannot exist without the other. For good health hygienic environment is a sine qua non. Article 3 of Universal Declaration of Human Right 1948 incorporates the right to life. It has been interpreted by the international court that the word life does not means simply to live but it means to live with dignity and in well and pollution and radiation free environment which is a gift of nature on this universe. There is no doubt about the nuclear revolution that has taken place and has made life of human beings worth living on this earth with comfort. It is growing development of the nation. But in the process the development that has been done at the cost of human life, public health and environment which will prove fatal in the long run. So there is a need for Sustainable Development of the human and environment of the world. Precisely and concisely, the sustainable development is a process that meets the needs of the present without compromising ability of future generations to meet their own needs. A hygienic and redaction free environment will ensure the better Health of the people. Environment and nuclear power plant can coexist. The harmonization of the two needs has led to the concept of Radiation Environment Assessment and sustainable development, so much so that it has become the most significant and focal point of environmental legislation relating to the same. Sustainable development, simply put, is a process in which development can be sustained over generations effects of radiation on humans and on the environment. Finally, this paper deals with the impact of radiation on environment and the need of sustainable development for achieving a better human. (author)

  5. Review report: safety and reliability issues on digital instrumentation and control systems in nuclear power plants and United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission's dispositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Suzudo, Tomoaki

    1998-09-01

    Recently, digital instrumentation and control (I and C) systems have been applied to nuclear power plants (NPPs) in various countries. Introduction of digital I and C systems, however, raises special issues on design, implementation, safety and licensing. Since FY 1997, the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been carrying out a project, Study on Reliability of Digital I and C Systems, which includes extensive reviews of design approaches, technical standards, regulatory processes, especially, in the United States. This report summarizes the results from the study of National Research Council (NRC) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (USNRC's) responses to the recommendations made by the NRC's study. That study identified six technical key issues (system aspects of digital I and C technology, software quality assurance, common-mode software failure potential, safety and reliability assessment methods, human factors and man-machine interface, dedication of commercial off-the-shelf hardware and software) and two strategic key issues (case-by-case licensing process, adequacy of technical infrastructure) that arise from the introduction of digital I and C technology and then, made recommendations to the USNRC for coping with digital I and C applications. The USNRC responded to each recommendation and showed their own dispositions in which the USNRC agreed with most of the recommendations. In Japan, it is expected that introduction of digital I and C technology is inevitable in NPPs because the vendors are gradually discontinuing support and stocking of analog components. To cope with such situations, there is a need to develop and update the standards and guidelines applicable to digital I and C technology. The key issues and the USNRC's dispositions provided in this report is believed to be useful for developing and updating them. (J.P.N.)

  6. COMMISSIONING AND FIRST RESULTS FROM CHANNELING RADIATION AT FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halavanau, A. [NIU, DeKalb; Mihalcea, D. [NIU, DeKalb; Broemmelsiek, D. [Fermilab; Edstrom, D. [Fermilab; Sen, T. [Fermilab; Romanov, A. [Fermilab; Ruan, J. [Fermilab; Shiltsev, V. [Fermilab; Kobak, P. [BYU-I; Rush, W. [Kansas U.; Hyun, J. [Tsukuba, Graduate U. Adv. Studies

    2016-10-18

    X-rays have widespread applications in science and industry, but developing a simple, compact, and high-quality X-ray source remains a challenge. Our collaboration has explored the possible use of channeling radiation driven by a 50 MeV low-emittance electron beam to produce narrowband hard X-rays with photon energy of 40 to 140 keV [8,9,11]. Here we present the simulated X-ray spectra including the background bremsstrahlung contribution, and a description of the required optimization of the relevant electron-beam parameters necessary to maximize brilliance of the resulting X-ray beam. Results are presented from our test of this, carried out at the Fermilab Accelerator Science & Technology (FAST) facility’s 50-MeV low-energy electron injector. As a result of the beam parameters, made possible by the photo-injector based SRF linac, the average brilliance at FAST was expected to be about one order of magnitude higher than that in previous experiments.

  7. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  8. Effect of respiratory motion on internal radiation dosimetry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Estimation of the radiation dose to internal organs is essential for the assessment of radiation risks and benefits to patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine procedures including PET. Respiratory motion induces notable internal organ displacement, which influences

  9. National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force: Report to the President and Congress of the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-30

    ernments and the defense industrial base to evaluate vulnerabilities of critical infra- structure and key resources. CYBER RANGE 38 CHAPTER 4...General 5 General Public 206 Industry 82 (identifying themselves with their business interest or as Chamber of Commerce) Academia 4 Former...Affairs Chief Master Sergeant Cameron B. Kirksey (USAF), Command Chief Master Sergeant, Air Force Reserve Chief Master Sergeant James W. Hotaling (ANG

  10. Report of the Virginia Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution to the Governor and Virginia General Assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virginia Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution, Charlottesville.

    The U.S. Constitution bicentennial celebrations across the state of Virginia have contributed to greater public understanding of the Constitution and enhanced appreciation of the immense contribution that Virginians made to the document. Virginians have discovered that the story of the U.S. founding is also a Virginia story. Even after the…

  11. Combined exposures: an update from the International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroux, Tony; Klaeboe, Ronny

    2012-01-01

    International Commission on Biological Effects of Noise (ICBEN) Team 8 deals with the effects of combined "agents" in the urban and work place settings. Results presented at the ICBEN conference indicate that some pesticides, more specifically the organophosphates, and a wider range of industrial chemicals are harmful to the auditory system at concentrations often found in occupational settings. Effects of occupational noise on hearing are exacerbated by toluene and possibly by carbon monoxide. Several of the chemicals studied found to be potentially toxic not only to hair cells in the cochlea but also to the auditory nerve. In urban environments, team 8 focuses on additive and synergetic effects of ambient stressors. It was argued that noise policies need to pay attention to grey areas with intermediate noise levels. Noteworthy is also stronger reactions to vibrations experienced in the evening and during the night. An innovative event-based model for sound perception was presented.

  12. The International Commission on Geoheritage (ICG) and the Heritage Sites and Collections Subcommission (HSCS): A new global framework for advancing the science and practice of geodiversity conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Kevin; de Wever, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    The ICG is a new Scientific Commission within IUGS, established at the 35th IGC, Cape Town, South Africa, in August 2016. The ICG was incorporates two pre-existing Task Groups, on Geoheritage (TGG) and the Heritage Stones (HSTG), now transformed into, respectively, the Heritage Sites and Collections Subcommission (HSCS) (http://geoheritage-iugs.mnhn.fr) and the Heritage Stones Subcommission (HSS) (http://globalheritagestone.com/). Although the latter focuses on culturally significant geological heritage resources, its recognition and selection of Global Heritage Stone Resources (GHSR) demonstrates the close symbiosis that exists between the two Subcommissions. The HSTG, however, will focus on those aspects of Geodiversity and Geoheritage associated with natural geological materials and processes, both in-situ (e.g. within 'geosites') and ex-situ in institutional collections - and hence, primarily facets of a natural rather than a cultural heritage. Although the foundations of an appreciation of this aspect of natural heritage conservation go back to at least the late 19th century, it was not until the 1980s that international collaborations began to develop, for instance in Europe, leading to the formation of ProGEO in Europe in 1993, with other groups, often focussed on specific tasks, developing in Africa, Australasia and within IUGS, UNESCO and IUCN. Nevertheless, until the GTG was formed in 2008, there had been no explicitly global focus for all aspects of geological heritage and its sustainable management. The GTG began the process of building a global resource for Geoheritage sites and collections through the establishment of a comprehensive website, including a review of national conservation legislation, links to national geosite inventories (with interactive maps) and the beginnings of an inventory of 'Global Geosites' (a process first begun, abortively, in the 1990s in IUGS). The work of the GTG has confirmed within IUGS the significance of Geoheritage as

  13. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission's intern program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilmour, P.E.

    2002-01-01

    The Intern Program was introduced at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission, Canada's Nuclear Regulator in response to the current competitive market for engineers and scientists and the CNSC's aging workforce. It is an entry level staff development program designed to recruit and train new engineering and science graduates to eventually regulate Canada's nuclear industry. The program provides meaningful work experience and exposes the interns to the general work activities of the Commission. It also provides them with a broad awareness of the regulatory issues in which the CNSC is involved. The intern program is a two-year program focusing on the operational areas and, more specifically, on the generalist functions of project officers. (author)

  14. [Comparative analysis of occupational health physician's duties based upon legislative decree 81/2008 art. 25 and upon the Ethics Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, G; Mora, Erika

    2009-01-01

    Ethical behaviour consists ofindividual choices inspired by knowledge and professional experience derived from the universally acknowledged ethical principles of beneficience/nonmaleficience, autonomy and justice. However, in spite of the unanimous consent on their universal importance, such principles do not usually have the strength of a law. The recently introduced Italian law on the protection of workers' health represents a novelty because it gives the Ethics Code of the International Commission on Occupational Health legal strength. This paper aims at examining article 25 of legislative decree 81/2008 by comparing the points of the Ethics Code and the Deontology Code of the Italian medical profession. The relationships between the 12 points of paragraph 1 of article 25, the 26 points ofthe Code ofEthics and the 75 articles of the Deontology Code are described with regard to the occupational health physician's duties (i) of collaboration with other occupational health professionals, (ii) of organization and execution of health surveillance, (iii) of recording, securing, transmitting of medical files on workers' health and (iv) of employee and employer information on the importance and meaning of health surveillance.

  15. Report by the AERES on the unit: Reactor Study Department (DER) under the supervision of the establishments and bodies: Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission (CEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-02-01

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, the DER (Departement d'Etudes des Reacteurs, Reactor Study Department) whose activity if focused on four main themes: neutron transport simulation in reactor cores, thermal-hydraulic simulation of reactors, design and safety of innovative reactors, nuclear instrumentation for reactors. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, aspects to be improved, risks and recommendations, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. These same aspects are then discussed and commented for each theme

  16. EVALUATING INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES ON RISK-INFORMED REGULATORY PRACTICES FOR THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, L.K.; Wight, E.H.; Caruso, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation has begun a program to create a risk-informed environment within the reactor program. The first step of the process is to evaluate the existing environment and internal NRC stakeholder perceptions of risk-informed regulatory practices. This paper reports on the results of the first phase of this evaluation: assessing the current environment, including the level of acceptance of risk-informed approaches throughout the reactor program, the level of integration, areas of success, and areas of difficulty. The other two phases of the evaluation will identify barriers to the integration of risk into NRC activities and gather input on how to move to a risk-informed environment

  17. EVALUATING INTERNAL STAKEHOLDER PERSPECTIVES ON RISK-INFORMED REGULATORY PRACTICES FOR THE NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, L.K.; Wight, E.H.; Caruso, M.A.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation has begun a program to create a risk-informed environment within the reactor program. The first step of the process is to evaluate the existing environment and internal NRC stakeholder perceptions of risk-informed regulatory practices. This paper reports on the results of the first phase of this evaluation: assessing the current environment, including the level of acceptance of risk-informed approaches throughout the reactor program, the level of integration, areas of success, and areas of difficulty. The other two phases of the evaluation will identify barriers to the integration of risk into NRC activities and gather input on how to move to a risk-informed environment.

  18. Curricula in Mathematics: A Comparison of Courses in the Countries Represented in the International Commission on the Teaching of Mathematics. Bulletin, 1914, No. 45. Whole Number 619

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J. C.

    1915-01-01

    The International Commission on the Teaching of Mathematics created by the International Congress of Mathematics at Rome, Italy, in 1908, submitted a large body of reports to the congress at Cambridge, England, in 1912. Those for the United States have been published as bulletins for the Bureau of Education. The material in this bulletin shows…

  19. An international intercomparison of passive dosemeters, electronic dosemeters and dose rate meters used for environmental radiation measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtter-Jensen, L.; Thompson, I.M.G.

    1995-01-01

    To assist towards the harmonisation within the EC countries, the Eastern European countries and the USA, of the measurement of environmental dose rates from photon radiation an EC sponsored intercomparison of environmental dose rate meters, electronic dosemeters and TL dosemeters was performed...

  20. The Cold War legacy of regulatory risk analysis: The Atomic Energy Commission and radiation safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Joseph B.

    From its inception in 1946 the Atomic Energy Commission pioneered the use of risk analysis as a mode of regulatory rationality and political rhetoric, yet historical treatments of risk analysis nearly always overlook the important role it played in the administration of atomic energy during the early Cold War. How this absence from history has been achieved and why it characterizes most historical accounts are the subjects of Chapter II. From there, this study goes on to develop the thesis that the advent of the atomic bomb was a world-shattering event that forced the Truman administration to choose between two novel alternatives: (1) movement towards global governance based initially on cooperative control of atomic energy or (2) unsparing pursuit of nuclear superiority. I refer to these as nuclear internationalism and nuclear nationalism, respectively. Each defined a social risk hierarchy. With the triumph of nuclear nationalism, nuclear annihilation was designated the greatest risk and a strong nuclear defense the primary means of prevention. The AEC's mission in the 1950s consisted of the rapid development of a nuclear arsenal, continual improvements in weapons technologies, and the promotion of nuclear power. The agency developed a risk-based regulatory framework through its dominant position within the National Committee on Radiation Protection. It embraced a technocratic model of risk analysis whose articulation and application it controlled, largely in secret. It used this to undergird a public rhetoric of reassurance and risk minimization. In practice, safety officials adjusted exposure levels within often wide parameters and with considerable fluidity in order to prevent safety concerns from interfering with operations. Secrecy, the political climate of the time, and a lack of accountability enabled the agency to meld technical assessments with social value judgments in a manner reflective of nuclear nationalism's risk hierarchy. In the late fifties

  1. Effect of Joint Commission International Accreditation on the Nursing Work Environment in a Tertiary Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagan, Ilya; Farkash-Fink, Naomi; Fish, Miri

    2016-01-01

    How might a tertiary hospital's nursing staff respond to the huge improvement effort required for external accreditation if they are encouraged to lead the change process themselves? This article reports the results of a concurrent evaluation of the nursing work climate at ward level, before and after accreditation by the Joint Commission International. Physician-nurse relations improved; the involvement of social workers, dieticians, and physiotherapists increased; support services responded more quickly to requests; and management-line staff relations became closer.

  2. International Conference on Instrumentation, Measurement, Circuits and Systems (ICIMCS 2011)

    CERN Document Server

    Instrumentation, Measurement, Circuits and Systems

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Mechanical Engineering and Technology, held on London, UK, November 24-25, 2011.   Mechanical engineering technology is the application of physical principles and current technological developments to the creation of useful machinery and operation design. Technologies such as solid models may be used as the basis for finite element analysis (FEA) and / or computational fluid dynamics (CFD) of the design. Through the application of computer-aided manufacturing (CAM), the models may also be used directly by software to create "instructions" for the manufacture of objects represented by the models, through computer numerically controlled (CNC) machining or other automated processes, without the need for intermediate drawings.   This volume covers the subject areas of mechanical engineering and technology, and also covers interdisciplinary subject areas of computers, communications, control and automation...

  3. On output measurements via radiation pressure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leeman, S.; Healey, A.J.; Forsberg, F.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown, by simple physical argument, that measurements of intensity with a radiation pressure balance should not agree with those based on calorimetric techniques. The conclusion is ultimately a consequence of the circumstance that radiation pressure measurements relate to wave momentum, while...

  4. 78 FR 70959 - Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Renewal of the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform... Secretary of the Interior is renewing the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform. FOR FURTHER...

  5. An overview of the International Electrotechnical Commission's activities on quality assurance in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Julius, H.W.; Ammers, H. van; Henshaw, E.T.

    1989-01-01

    In 1981, the International Electrotechnical Commission Sub-committee 62B set up a Working Group (WG 10) to deal with quality assurance in diagnostic X-ray departments and, more specifically, to develop international standards describing procedures to test the constancy of parameters of diagnostic X-ray installations. Since then, the working group has produced a report on General Aspects of Quality Assurance in Diagnostic X-ray Departments and four draft standards on specific topics, while seven more documents are in advanced drafting stage. Several others are presently under consideration. According to the approach adopted by the Working Group, these documents are meant to assist in establishing quality assurance programmes in hospitals and provide guidance on how to perform the tests and interpret their results. This paper reveals the general philosophy behind the activities of the Working Group as well as some details of the standard produced so far, with emphasis on the physical parameters of diagnostic X-ray installations and their proposed criteria for satisfactory performance. (author)

  6. Photocatalytic Active Radiation Measurements and Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Bruce A.; Underwood, Lauren W.

    2011-01-01

    Photocatalytic materials are being used to purify air, to kill microbes, and to keep surfaces clean. A wide variety of materials are being developed, many of which have different abilities to absorb various wavelengths of light. Material variability, combined with both spectral illumination intensity and spectral distribution variability, will produce a wide range of performance results. The proposed technology estimates photocatalytic active radiation (PcAR), a unit of radiation that normalizes the amount of light based on its spectral distribution and on the ability of the material to absorb that radiation. Photocatalytic reactions depend upon the number of electron-hole pairs generated at the photocatalytic surface. The number of electron-hole pairs produced depends on the number of photons per unit area per second striking the surface that can be absorbed and whose energy exceeds the bandgap of the photocatalytic material. A convenient parameter to describe the number of useful photons is the number of moles of photons striking the surface per unit area per second. The unit of micro-einsteins (or micromoles) of photons per m2 per sec is commonly used for photochemical and photoelectric-like phenomena. This type of parameter is used in photochemistry, such as in the conversion of light energy for photosynthesis. Photosynthetic response correlates with the number of photons rather than by energy because, in this photochemical process, each molecule is activated by the absorption of one photon. In photosynthesis, the number of photons absorbed in the 400 700 nm spectral range is estimated and is referred to as photosynthetic active radiation (PAR). PAR is defined in terms of the photosynthetic photon flux density measured in micro-einsteins of photons per m2 per sec. PcAR is an equivalent, similarly modeled parameter that has been defined for the photocatalytic processes. Two methods to measure the PcAR level are being proposed. In the first method, a calibrated

  7. Ionizing Radiation Environment on the International Space Station: Performance vs. Expectations for Avionics and Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, Paul A.; Pankop, Courtney; Reddell, Brandon

    2005-01-01

    The role of structural shielding mass in the design, verification, and in-flight performance of International Space Station (ISS), in both the natural and induced orbital ionizing radiation (IR) environments, is reported. Detailed consideration of the effects of both the natural and induced ionizing radiation environment during ISS design, development, and flight operations has produced a safe, efficient manned space platform that is largely immune to deleterious effects of the LEO ionizing radiation environment. The assumption of a small shielding mass for purposes of design and verification has been shown to be a valid worst-case approximation approach to design for reliability, though predicted dependences of single event effect (SEE) effects on latitude, longitude, SEP events, and spacecraft structural shielding mass are not observed. The Figure of Merit (FOM) method over predicts the rate for median shielding masses of about 10g/cm(exp 2) by only a factor of 3, while the Scott Effective Flux Approach (SEFA) method overestimated by about one order of magnitude as expected. The Integral Rectangular Parallelepiped (IRPP), SEFA, and FOM methods for estimating on-orbit (Single Event Upsets) SEU rates all utilize some version of the CREME-96 treatment of energetic particle interaction with structural shielding, which has been shown to underestimate the production of secondary particles in heavily shielded manned spacecraft. The need for more work directed to development of a practical understanding of secondary particle production in massive structural shielding for SEE design and verification is indicated. In contrast, total dose estimates using CAD based shielding mass distributions functions and the Shieldose Code provided a reasonable accurate estimate of accumulated dose in Grays internal to the ISS pressurized elements, albeit as a result of using worst-on-worst case assumptions (500 km altitude x 2) that compensate for ignoring both GCR and secondary particle

  8. Radiation protection measurement. Philosophy and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recht, P.; Lakey, J.R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A selection from the proceedings of the International Symposium held by the U.K. Society for radiological protection in June 1974 was presented. The central theme was the philosophy of radiation protection measurement and its interpretation although some specific areas of good health physics practice were included. The 28 papers selected were chosen to be either representative of the central theme or of wider interest. The papers have been grouped in 6 main sections: philosophy of measurements; interpretation of measurements; implementation by legislation and monitoring; radiation exposure and control; reactor safety and siting; accidents

  9. Meeting report: the 5th International expert symposium in Fukushima on radiation and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenko, Vladimir A; Thomas, Geraldine A; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2017-01-18

    The symposium entitled "Chernobyl +30, Fukushima +5: Lessons and Solutions for Fukushima's Thyroid Question" was held in September, 2016 in Fukushima. The aim of the Symposium was to revisit and recapitulate evidence from the studies in Chernobyl in order to share multidisciplinary opinions and views on the likely reason for the high rate of thyroid cancer detected by the Thyroid Ultrasound Examination program in Fukushima Prefecture. The high prevalence of thyroid cancer in young individuals causes concerns among Fukushima residents and the general public that it might be due to putative radiation exposure from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. Twenty-six experts from Japan and abroad, including participants affiliated with international organizations, reviewed the results of radiation epidemiology investigations in Chernobyl, presented clinical experience of diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of patients with radiation-related thyroid cancer, and scrutinized the findings on thyroid cancer in Fukushima. Conclusions drawn at the symposium included understanding that in contrast to Chernobyl, doses to the public from the accident in Fukushima were too low to give rise to a discernible excess risk for thyroid cancer. The high detection rate of thyroid cancer and benign abnormalities resulted from the use of highly sensitive ultrasound equipment and sophisticated protocol of examination used in the Thyroid Ultrasound Examination, and therefore not attributable to radiation. Coordinated efforts will be necessary to avoid overdiagnosis and overtreatment, which may carry its own health disbenefits. Clear communication to the screening participants and their families is recommended in regard to why the examination is being conducted and to explain the likely outcomes and risks, including the means and options for treatment if a thyroid disorder is detected.

  10. Automated pavement horizontal curve measurement methods based on inertial measurement unit and 3D profiling data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Luo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pavement horizontal curve is designed to serve as a transition between straight segments, and its presence may cause a series of driving-related safety issues to motorists and drivers. As is recognized that traditional methods for curve geometry investigation are time consuming, labor intensive, and inaccurate, this study attempts to develop a method that can automatically conduct horizontal curve identification and measurement at network level. The digital highway data vehicle (DHDV was utilized for data collection, in which three Euler angles, driving speed, and acceleration of survey vehicle were measured with an inertial measurement unit (IMU. The 3D profiling data used for cross slope calibration was obtained with PaveVision3D Ultra technology at 1 mm resolution. In this study, the curve identification was based on the variation of heading angle, and the curve radius was calculated with kinematic method, geometry method, and lateral acceleration method. In order to verify the accuracy of the three methods, the analysis of variance (ANOVA test was applied by using the control variable of curve radius measured by field test. Based on the measured curve radius, a curve safety analysis model was used to predict the crash rates and safe driving speeds at horizontal curves. Finally, a case study on 4.35 km road segment demonstrated that the proposed method could efficiently conduct network level analysis.

  11. Radiation protection measures applied during the autopsies on the casualties of the Goiania accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, N.S.F.; Silva, L.H.C.; Rosa, R.

    1998-01-01

    The most seriously affected casualties of the radiological accident caused by the opening of a 137 Cs source capsule in Goiania were treated at the Marcilio Dias Naval Hospital (HNMD) in Rio de Janeiro in the period from October to December 1987. Four of the injured died in October. The autopsies were performed at this institution. Due to the external and internal contamination presented by these victims, specific radiation protection procedures were adopted to enable the medical team to perform their duties. The radiation protection staff, under the co-ordination of technicians of the Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), were responsible for the preparation of the autopsy room and for advising the professionals on duty during these events. The radiation protection staff took specific measures to prevent the spread of contamination throughout the hospital, the contamination of persons attending the autopsies and to minimize any radiation dose to the medical and professional team. The measures aimed at personal control and the preparation of the autopsy room are described as well as the radiation protection steps applied in connection with the performance of the autopsies, the emplacement of the bodies into the coffins and their transport back to Goiania. (author)

  12. Radiation protection: Philosophy, recommendations and practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodhead, D.S.

    1997-01-01

    The philosophy developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection for the control of human radiation exposure will be described. The application of the ICRP recommendations to the authorization and control of the disposal of radioactive wastes to the sea will be discussed in the context of the practice in the United Kingdom. (author)

  13. Electronic publication of new animal names - An interview with Frank-T. Krell, Commissioner of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature and Chair of the ICZN ZooBank Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    On the 4th September 2012 the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature announced an amendment to the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature allowing for electronic publication of the scientific names of animals. In this interview Frank-T. Krell discusses the implications of this amendment for authors wishing to publish descriptions of newly identified animal species in online and open access journals, and for the future of taxonomic science. PMID:22978411

  14. Comparative study of Malaysian and Philippine regulatory infrastructures on radiation and nuclear safety with international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cayabo, Lynette B.

    2013-06-01

    This study presents the results of the critical reviews, analysis, and comparison of the regulatory infrastructures for radiation and nuclear safety of Malaysis and the Philippines usi ng the IAEA safety requirements, GSR Part 1, G overnment, Legal and Regulatory Framework for Safety'' as the main basis and in part, the GSR Part 3, R adiation Protection and Safety of Radiation Sources: International Basic Safety Standards . The scope of the comparison includes the elements of the relevant legislations, the regulatory system and processes including the core functions of the regulatory body (authorization, review and assessment, inspection and enforcement, development of regulations and guides); and the staffing and training of regulatory body. The respective availabe data of the Malaysian and Philippine regulatory infrastructures and current practices were gathered and analyzed. Recommendations to fill the gaps and strengthen the existing regulatory infrastructure of each country was given using as bases relevant IAEA safety guides. Based on the analysis made, the main findings are: the legislations of both countries do not contain al the elements of teh national policy and strategy for safety as well as those of teh framework for safety in GR Part I. Among the provision that need to be included in the legislations are: emergency planning and response; decommissioning of facilities safe management of radioactive wastes and spent fuel; competence for safety; and technical sevices. Provisions on coordination of different authorities with safety responsibilities within the regulatory framework for safety as well as liaison with advisory bodies and support organizations need to be enhanced. The Philippines needs to establish an independent regulatory body, ie. separate from organizations charged with promotion of nuclear technologies and responsible for facilitiesand activities. Graded approach on the system of notification and authorization by registration and

  15. Radiation Safety in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit: Too Little or Too Much Concern?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chung Yu

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available With rising numbers of extremely premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU who require multiple radiologic examinations for their complex medical conditions, concerns the risk of radiation exposure become a more prevalent issue. The biological effects from cumulative doses of both primary and secondary radiation can be particularly troubling for very premature babies due to their inherent sensitivity to both iatrogenic and environmental insults. Similarly, radiologic studies performed in the NICU pose potentially significant exposure risks to caretakers and to the families of patients often present in the NICU during these examinations. The purpose of this article is to critically review the available literature regarding current exposure rates in the NICU, address the validity of radiation exposure concerns, and suggest areas for improvement. With few exceptions, studies reveal that there were only low doses of radiation derived from any single radiographic examination in standard NICUs and that the radiation dosage used was in compliance with recommendations made by the Commission of European Communities (EC and International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP. However, there were wide variations in the radiation dose per single examination (mean entrance skin doses ranged from 15 to 73.6 μGy and in the frequency (mean ranged from 3.2 to 31 examinations per infant of those examinations. Studies also reported low secondary exposure rates from scatter radiation to others present in the NICU during radiographic examinations. Key to limiting unnecessary radiation exposure in the NICU is the employment of proper radiation techniques and safety measures. Thus, adhering to recommendations made by the EC and ICRP can help to reduce the anxiety of patients' families and medical staff regarding their risks from the effects of ionizing radiation in the NICU.

  16. Measurements of Radiation Exposure on Commercial Aircraft with the LIULIN-3M Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, C. A.; Dachev, T. P.; Brucker, G. J.; Tomov, B. T.; Dimitrov, P. G.

    1998-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a compact radiation monitor/dosimeter, the LIULIN-3M, and on extended measurements conducted on the ground and on commercial aircraft on domestic and international flights.

  17. Radiation Calibration Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Omondi, C.

    2017-01-01

    KEBS Radiation Dosimetry mandate are: Custodian of Kenya Standards on Ionizing radiation, Ensure traceability to International System (SI ) and Calibration radiation equipment. RAF 8/040 on Radioisotope applications for troubleshooting and optimizing industrial process established Radiotracer Laboratory objective is to introduce and implement radiotracer technique for problem solving of industrial challenges. Gamma ray scanning technique applied is to Locate blockages, Locate liquid in vapor lines, Locate areas of lost refractory or lining in a pipe and Measure flowing densities. Equipment used for diagnostic and radiation protection must be calibrated to ensure Accuracy and Traceability

  18. Commissioning of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and single LHC beams

    CERN Document Server

    Cwetanski, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2009-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three subsystems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of close to 300000 thin-wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 35 two-dimensional space points with 0.17 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with pT > 0.5 GeV within |η| < 2. Transition radiation X-rays, generated by particles with γ > 1000 in the special material between the straws, are absorbed in the Xenon based gas mixture and give rise to large signal amplitudes. The front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (< 300 eV) for registering the passage of minimum ionizing particles, and a high threshold (> 6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. The talk will report on the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector and its sophisticated off-detector systems for cooling, active gas, lo...

  19. 10 CFR 35.633 - Full calibration measurements on remote afterloader units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full calibration measurements on remote afterloader units. 35.633 Section 35.633 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon... replacement of the source or following reinstallation of the unit in a new location outside the facility; and...

  20. New technology development for radiation dose measurement and evaluation based on the operational quantity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jang Lyul; Kim, B. H.; Lee, J. I.; Lim, K. S.; Song, M. Y.; Joo, G. S.; Kim, S. I.; Chang, I. S.

    2012-04-01

    · Development of optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) technique for multi-purpose radiation dosimetry - Development of a semi-automatic type OSL measurement system · Number of sample holders: 10 ea · Development of a built-in type reference radiation irradiation system using 50 kV-1 mA X-rays of the maximum dose rate of 230 mGy/s - Development of an automatic diameter control system and crystal growth system for making a new OSL material: LiMgF 3 : X, LiAlO 2 : C - Development of a procedure of retrospective accident dosimetry · Establishment of Practical Technology for Internal Dose Assessment - Development of the technology to the internal dose assessment for an injection of radionuclides and intercomparison on the evaluation results of the committed effective dose between the estimators of Korea · Construction of workplace monitoring technique by quantification of neutron fields - Preparation of the neutron spectra DB of various neutron fields and production of those dosimetric data: 29 kinds of neutron fields using a thermal neutron irradiator, a proton accelerator and a neutron generator - Neutron monitoring procedure at workplace using neutron fluence spectra

  1. Global trends in center accreditation by the Joint Commission International: growing patient implications for international medical and surgical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Ambar; Goldstein, Seth D; Makary, Martin A

    2017-09-01

    Millions of patients travel internationally for medical and surgical care. We found that the annual number of centers accredited by the Joint Commission International increased from one center in 1999 to 132 centers in 2016; there are currently 939 accredited centers across 66 countries. Public health and medicolegal implications related to medical travel deserve attention. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Space weather effects measured in atmospheric radiation on aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiska, W. K.; Bouwer, D.; Bailey, J. J.; Didkovsky, L. V.; Judge, K.; Wieman, S. R.; Atwell, W.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Rice, D.; Schunk, R. W.; Bell, L. D.; Mertens, C. J.; Xu, X.; Wiltberger, M. J.; Wiley, S.; Teets, E.; Shea, M. A.; Smart, D. F.; Jones, J. B. L.; Crowley, G.; Azeem, S. I.; Halford, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    Space weather's effects upon the near-Earth environment are due to dynamic changes in the energy transfer processes from the Sun's photons, particles, and fields. Of the domains that are affected by space weather, the coupling between the solar and galactic high-energy particles, the magnetosphere, and atmospheric regions can significantly affect humans and our technology as a result of radiation exposure. Since 2013 Space Environment Technologies (SET) has been conducting observations of the atmospheric radiation environment at aviation altitudes using a small fleet of six instruments. The objective of this work is to improve radiation risk management in air traffic operations. Under the auspices of the Automated Radiation Measurements for Aerospace Safety (ARMAS) and Upper-atmospheric Space and Earth Weather eXperiment (USEWX) projects our team is making dose rate measurements on multiple aircraft flying global routes. Over 174 ARMAS and USEWX flights have successfully demonstrated the operation of a micro dosimeter on commercial aviation altitude aircraft that captures the radiation environment resulting from Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCRs), Solar Energetic Protons (SEPs), and outer radiation belt energetic electrons. The real-time radiation exposure is measured as an absorbed dose rate in silicon and then computed as an ambient dose equivalent rate for reporting dose relevant to radiative-sensitive organs and tissue in units of microsieverts per hour. ARMAS total ionizing absorbed dose is captured on the aircraft, downlinked in real-time, processed on the ground into ambient dose equivalent rates, compared with NASA's Langley Research Center (LaRC) most recent Nowcast of Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation System (NAIRAS) global radiation climatology model runs, and then made available to end users. Dose rates from flight altitudes up to 56,700 ft. are shown for flights across the planet under a variety of space weather conditions. We discuss several space weather

  3. International intercalibration and intercomparison programme for radon, thoron and daughters measuring equipment. Part. 1: Radon measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knutson, E.O.; Solomon, S.B.

    1986-01-01

    The International Intercalibration and Intercomparison Programme for Radon, Thoron and Daughters Monitoring Equipment, abbreviated IIIP, is a program organized jointly by Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the Radiation Protection Research Programme of the Commission of European Communities. The broad purpose of the IIIP is to determine if the somewhat diverse calibration procedures used in different countries are equivalent. The general approach was to select four regional reference laboratories and entrust them with the details of project definition and execution. The four selected laboratories are: Australian Radiation Laboratory, US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory, UK National Radiation Protection Board, US DOI Bureau of Mines. The Organizing Committee that selected the four laboratories remained intact and served an oversight function in all work to date

  4. Book of abstracts of the international conference on high levels of natural radiation held in Ramsar, Islamic Republic of Iran, 3-7 Nov 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohrabi, M.; Borhan Azad, S.; Katouzi, M.

    1990-01-01

    Papers presented in international conference on high levels of natural radiation was in the following subjects: A review of world natural radiation, environmental transfer pathway,technologically enhanced natural radiation environment,radon in the environment,radium determination in water,cytogenetic studies in high natural radiation areas,epidemiological studies in high natural radiation areas and radiation measurements methods

  5. Modeling and design of radiative hydrodynamic experiments with X-ray Thomson Scattering measurements on NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, K. H.; Lefevre, H. J.; Belancourt, P. X.; MacDonald, M. J.; Doeppner, T.; Keiter, P. A.; Kuranz, C. C.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-10-01

    Recent experiments at the National Ignition Facility studied the effect of radiation on shock-driven hydrodynamic instability growth. X-ray radiography images from these experiments indicate that perturbation growth is lower in highly radiative shocks compared to shocks with negligible radiation flux. The reduction in instability growth is attributed to ablation from higher temperatures in the foam for highly radiative shocks. The proposed design implements the X-ray Thomson Scattering (XRTS) technique in the radiative shock tube platform to measure electron temperatures and densities in the shocked foam. We model these experiments with CRASH, an Eulerian radiation hydrodynamics code with block-adaptive mesh refinement, multi-group radiation transport and electron heat conduction. Simulations are presented with SiO2 and carbon foams for both the high temperature, radiative shock and the low-temperature, hydrodynamic shock cases. Calculations from CRASH give estimations for shock speed, electron temperature, effective ionization, and other quantities necessary for designing the XRTS diagnostic measurement. This work is funded by the LLNL under subcontract B614207, and was performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by LLNL under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  6. Evaluation of the accuracy, consistency, and stability of measurements of the Planck constant used in the redefinition of the international system of units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possolo, Antonio; Schlamminger, Stephan; Stoudt, Sara; Pratt, Jon R.; Williams, Carl J.

    2018-02-01

    The Consultative Committee for Mass and related quantities (CCM), of the International Committee for weights and measures (CIPM), has recently declared the readiness of the community to support the redefinition of the international system of units (SI) at the next meeting of the General Conference on Weights and Measures (CGPM) scheduled for November, 2018. Such redefinition will replace the international prototype of the Kilogram (IPK), as the definition and sole primary realization of the unit of mass, with a definition involving the Planck constant, h. This redefinition in terms of a fundamental constant of nature will enable widespread primary realizations not only of the kilogram but also of its multiples and sub-multiples, best to address the full range of practical needs in the measurement of mass. We review and discuss the statistical models and statistical data reductions, uncertainty evaluations, and substantive arguments that support the verification of several technical preconditions for the redefinition that the CCM has established, and whose verification the CCM has affirmed. These conditions relate to the accuracy and mutual consistency of qualifying measurement results. We review also an issue that has surfaced only recently, concerning the convergence toward a stable value, of the historical values that the task group on fundamental constants of the committee on Data for Science and Technology CODATA-TGFC has recommended for h over the years, even though the CCM has not deemed this issue to be relevant. We conclude that no statistically significant trend can be substantiated for these recommended values, but note that cumulative consensus values that may be derived from the historical measurement results for h seem to have converged while continuing to exhibit fluctuations that are typical of a process in statistical control. Finally, we argue that the most recent consensus value derived from the best measurements available for h, obtained using

  7. 76 FR 34209 - International Whaling Commission; 63rd Annual Meeting; Nominations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA486 International Whaling Commission; 63rd... a call for nominees for the U.S. Delegation to the July 2011 International Whaling Commission (IWC... obligations of the United States under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, 1946. The U...

  8. 77 FR 25408 - International Whaling Commission; 64th Annual Meeting; Announcement of Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XB150 International Whaling Commission; 64th... annual International Whaling Commission (IWC) meeting. DATES: The public meeting will be held June 5... the United States under the International Convention for the Regulation of Whaling, 1946. The U.S. IWC...

  9. Diagnosis, injury and prevention of internal radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuzaki, Hideo

    2012-01-01

    Radiation exposure is classified into three categories: external exposure, surface contamination, and internal exposure (also called internal contamination). Internal exposure is an exposure by the ionizing radiation emitted from radioactive materials taken into a human body. Uptake of radioactive materials can go through inhalation, ingestion, or wound contamination. Not like external exposure, alpha ray or beta ray, which has a limited penetration, is also important in internal exposure. Diagnosis of internal exposure is based on measurement and dose assessment in addition to the history taking. Two methods, direct measurement and/or bioassay (indirect measurement), are used for the measurement. These measurements provide information of radioactive materials in the body at the time of the measurement. The exposure dose to the body needs to be calculated in a process of dose assessment, based on the results of these measurements and history of intake, either acute intake or chronic intake. Another method, measurement of environmental samples or food stuff, is also used for dose assessment. For internal exposure, radiation dose to the body is expressed as committed effective dose or committed equivalent dose, which are accumulation of dose over a defined period. Radioactive materials taken into body are transferred among many body components depending on the type of radionuclide or chemicals etc. Some radioactive materials concentrate in a specific organ. Symptoms and signs depend on the distribution of the radioactive materials in the body. Monitoring the concentration in air or foods is conducted in order to control human activities and foods and consequently reduce the amount of intake to human bodies as a preventive measure. Prevention of internal exposure is also conducted by protective gears such as full face masks. Iodine prophylaxis could be used against radioactive iodine intake. Stable iodine, mostly potassium iodide, could be taken into the thyroid and

  10. Guidance as to restrictions on exposures to time varying electromagnetic fields and the 1988 recommendations of the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, J A

    1989-01-01

    Under a direction from the Health Ministers, NRPB is required to advise on the acceptability to the United Kingdom of standards recommended or proposed by certain international bodies relating to protection from both ionising radiations and non-ionising electromagnetic radiations. This document contains the Board's advice in response to guidelines recommended by the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee (INIRC) on limiting exposures to electromagnetic fields in the frequency range 100 kHz to 300 GHz (Health Physics, 54, 115 (1988)). The Board's advice, however, extends over all frequencies up to 300 GHz. It has been prepared after considering advice from the Medical Research Council and responses to consultative documents published by the Board in 1982 and 1986. The Board's advice is intended to protect against the thermal effects of the absorption of electromagnetic energy and against the possibilities of electric shock and burn. It consists of a set of basic restrictions both on the average rate of...

  11. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods....

  12. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  13. Equipment performance and radiation protection status in X-ray fluoroscopy units in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N. A.; Nayl, A. I.; Suliman, I. I.

    2012-01-01

    The number of fluoroscopy and fluoroscopically guided procedures has been substantially growing in developing countries at the same time advanced and sophisticated equipment are used in some hospitals. However, radiation protection requirements are not necessarily well adopted. In this study nine fluoroscopy X-ray units in Sudan were examined for compliance with international standards. The tests included: beam quality, entrance surface air kerma, image quality and radiation field measurements. Staff radiation protection tools such as lead aprons and eye glasses were also visually examined to find out whether international recommendations were fulfilled and to determine the level of staff awareness. The measured peak tube voltage deviation exceeded the recommended tolerance level in 30 % of the measurements. The results of patient doses measurements exceeded the recommended reference dose levels in 43 % of the measurements; however image quality and radiation field generally fulfilled the requirements for most units. The study revealed that a considerable number of fluoroscopy units were not performing according to the international standards and highlights the need of optimisation of radiation protection. (authors)

  14. Addendum report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (3). Recent related overseas activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Kawaura, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    Following the Statement on Tissue Reaction issued by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), revisions and discussions are underway in various international organizations about the standards, guidelines and methods for the eye dosimetry. We have previously discussed these issues in six interim reports, followed by two addendum reports on lens dosimetry. This addendum report reviews ongoing overseas discussion and work in relation to research on radiogenic cataracts and implementation of the new eye lens dose limit, such as those in the European Commission, Low Dose Research towards Multidisciplinary Integration (DoReMi), Open Project for European Radiation Research Area (OPERRA), and the Unite Sates National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). This report serves as the last part of a series of reports by the Japan Health Physics Society Expert Committee on Radiation Protection of the Lens of the Eye. (author)

  15. Effect of emaciation and obesity on small-animal internal radiation dosimetry for positron-emitting radionuclides

    OpenAIRE

    Xie Tianwu; Zaidi Habib

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Rats are widely used in biomedical research involving molecular imaging and therefore the radiation dose to animals has become a concern. The weight of laboratory animals might change through emaciation or obesity as a result of their use in various research experiments including those investigating different diet types. In this work we evaluated the effects of changes in body weight induced by emaciation and obesity on the internal radiation dose from common positron emitting radion...

  16. International commission radiological protection: its policy, its works, its thoughts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nenot, J.C.

    1999-01-01

    The I.C.R.P. is an advisory organism. It offers recommendations to regulatory and advisory organisms at the international and national levels. Given the differences that exist between the national legislations, its recommendations cannot be directly transcribed in regulatory terms. The base recommendations are used for the essential in the international regulations and in particular in the European Directive, whom transposition in national law is compulsory. The aim of the Commission is to elaborate a protection system against ionizing radiations, sufficiently general to apply at the totality of situations during which ones the human is exposed or could be exposed to radiations. (N.C.)

  17. Statement from the 1987 Como meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    A summary of the 1987 meeting of the ICRP is given. Topics covered include the work on cancer risk assessment, in particular the atomic bomb survivor studies, the risk of mental retardation by exposure of children to radiation in utero, health risks from radon in spas and reference terms for estimates of radiation dose for X-ray mammography. Forthcoming publications are mentioned. (UK)

  18. A global survey on occupational health services in selected international commission on occupational health (ICOH) member countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantanen, Jorma; Lehtinen, Suvi; Valenti, Antonio; Iavicoli, Sergio

    2017-10-05

    The United Nations General Assembly (UNGA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the World Health Organization (WHO), the International Commission on Occupational Health (ICOH), and the European Union (EU) have encouraged countries to organize occupational health services (OHS) for all working people irrespective of the sector of economy, size of enterprise or mode of employment of the worker. The objective of this study was to survey the status of OHS in a sample of countries from all continents. A questionnaire focusing on the main aspects of OHS was developed on the basis of ILO Convention No. 161 and several other questionnaire surveys used in various target groups of OHS. The questionnaire was sent to 58 key informants: ICOH National Secretaries. A total of 49 National Secretaries responded (response rate 84.5%), from countries that employ 70% of the total world labour force. The majority of the respondent countries, 67%, had drawn up an OHS policy and implement it with the help of national occupational safety and health (OSH) authorities, institutes of occupational health or respective bodies, universities, and professional associations. Multidisciplinary expert OHS resources were available in the majority (82%) of countries, but varied widely in quantitative terms. The average OHS coverage of workers was 24.8%, with wide variation between countries. In over two thirds (69%) of the countries, the content of services was mixed, consisting of preventive and curative services, and in 29% preventive only. OHS financing was organized according to a mixed model among 63% and by employers only among 33% of the respondents. The majority of countries have drawn up policies, strategies and programmes for OHS. The infrastructures and institutional and human resources for the implementation of strategies, however, remain insufficient in the majority of countries (implementation gap). Qualitatively, the content and multidisciplinary nature of OHS corresponds to

  19. Selected materials of the international workshop on radiation risk and its origin at molecular and cellular level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinak, Miroslav

    2003-11-01

    The workshop ''International Workshop on Radiation Risk and its Origin at Molecular and Cellular Level'' was held at The Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the 6th and 7th of February 2003. The Laboratory of Radiation Risk Analysis of JAERI organized it. This international workshop attracted scientists from several different scientific areas, including radiation physics, radiation biology, molecular biology, crystallography of biomolecules, modeling and bio-informatics. Several foreign and domestic keynote speakers addresses the very fundamental areas of radiation risk and tried to establish a link between the fundamental studies at the molecular and cellular level and radiation damages at the organism. The symposium consisted of 13 oral lectures, 10 poster presentations and panel discussion. The 108 participants attended the workshop. This publication comprises of proceedings of oral and poster presentations where available. For the rest of contributions the abstracts or/and selections of presentation materials are shown instead. The 5 papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Organization and operation of the Sixth International Symposium on the Natural Radiation Environment (NRE VI)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1996-01-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogenic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in the dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits and harm the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied to the situation

  1. International conference on quality assurance and new techniques in radiation medicine. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    programmes that ensure the most effective use of available equipment and human resources. In diagnostic radiology, QA systems are being implemented to improve the determination of risk by calculating doses to organs of individual patients based on their specific anatomy and the details of the procedure that was performed. In medical radiation physics, recent developments in specific areas of QA of the physical and technical aspects in diagnostic and therapeutic applications and their links to comprehensive quality systems are of interest. In this context, contributions are expected on QA programmes and QC protocols in diagnostic radiology (e.g., mammography, CT, interventional, digital imaging, etc.), in nuclear medicine (e.g., dose assessment, radiopharmacy, PET/CT image fusion), and in radiation therapy (e.g., treatment planning and delivery, conformal therapy, stereotactic radiosurgery, etc.). Cross-cutting issues will be explored that have broad impact on quality such as, education, training and accreditation; telemedicine; data management and storage; etc. In addition, interdependent, cross-discipline issues are important. For example, special attention will be paid to the fidelity of tumour localization as delivered by diagnostic equipment since this is key input to the cancer treatment planning process and ongoing monitoring of treatment effects. In public health, DEXA bone densitometry is used widely in the diagnosis of osteoporosis as well as in measurements of body composition in nutrition evaluations. The technique is often used in longitudinal studies (repeated measures), for example to monitor the efficacy of a nutrition intervention. As DEXA is used in the monitoring of changes in body composition and changes in bone density, vulnerable population groups such as children and young adults are involved as well as postmenopausal women. As a result of bringing together experts in QA and health care professionals faced with practical decisions to be taken every day

  2. The contract for the completion and commissioning of Cernavoda NPP - Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    On May 18, 2001 the commercial contract for the completion and commissioning of the Cernavoda NPP Unit 2 has been signed by Nuclearelectrica National Company (SNN SA) and its partners, AECL-Canada and ANSALDO-Italy. This contract represents a continuation of the cooperation with AECL-Canada (the owner of the licence and the designer of the nuclear part of Cernavoda NPP Unit1) and ANSALDO-Italy (the designer of the conventional part of Cernavoda NPP Unit1). The completion is scheduled to last for 54 months (4.5 years) since the date the contract takes effect and the nuclear reactor start-up (the first criticality) is scheduled for the 49 th month. The total negotiated cost for the completion was estimated to amount to 689 million dollars, against the 750 million dollars initially estimated. The works at the site will be managed by an integrated staff team of specialized personnel form AECL-Canada (111 positions), ANSALDO-Italy (72 positions) and Romania (1200 positions)

  3. Commission on Legal Matters

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    What is a commission within the Staff Association (SA)? A commission is a working group of the CERN Staff Council, led by a staff representative. The commission is composed mainly of staff representatives, but interested members of the SA can apply to participate in the work of a commission. What is the commission on legal matters? The commission on legal matters works on texts governing the employment conditions of staff (Employed Members of Personnel and Associated Members of Personnel). This covers legal documents such as the Staff Rules and Regulations, administrative and operational circulars, as well as any other document relating to employment conditions. How is the work organised in this commission? The revision process of the text is generally done along following lines: The HR department, and its legal experts, proposes new texts or modifications to existing texts. A schedule for the study of these texts is established each year and this calendar by the commission to plan its work. The new or modi...

  4. Radiation protection at workplaces with increased natural radiation exposure in Greece: recording, monitoring and protection measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Potiriadis, C.; Koukoliou, V.

    2002-01-01

    Greek Atomic Energy Commission (GAEC) is the regulatory, advisory and competent authority on radiation protection matters. It is the authority responsible for the introduction of Radiation Protection regulations and monitoring of their implementation. In 1997, within the frame of its responsibilities the Board of the GAEC appointed a task group of experts to revise and bring the present Radiation Protection Regulations into line with the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) 96/29/Euratom Directive and the 97/43/Euratom Directive (on health protection of individuals against the dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure). Concerning the Title 7. of the new European BSS Directive, which refers to the Radiation Protection at work places with increased levels of natural radiation exposure, the Radiation Protection Regulations provides that the authority responsible for recording, monitoring and introducing protection measures at these places is the GAEC. Practices where effective doses to the workers due to increased natural radiation levels, may exceed 1mSv/y, have to be specified and authorised by the GAEC. The identification procedure is ongoing

  5. Measurement and detection of radiation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsoulfanidis, Nicholas; Landsberger, Sheldon

    2011-01-01

    .... With the miniaturization of equipment, increased speed of electronic components, and more sophisticated software, radiation detection systems are now more productively used in many disciplines...

  6. Proceedings of the international conference on emerging frontiers and challenges in radiation biology: abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purohit, R.K.; Chakrawarti, Aruna; Agarwal, Manisha; Arora, Anil

    2012-01-01

    This abstract volume includes abstracts related to six technical sessions of the conference viz., Radiation induced genomic instability and bystander effects, Radiation dosimetry and dose limits, Radiation protection and nuclear technology application, Molecular diagnosis and targeted therapy for cancer, cancer care and chemoradiotherapy, health hazards of radiation and protection. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  7. ICRP 2015. International symposium on the radiation protection system. Report and reflection on a significant symposium; ICRP 2015. 3. Internationales Symposium zum System des Strahlenschutzes. Bericht und Reflexion ueber ein bedeutsames Symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenz, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    The ICRP international symposium on the radiation protection system provides always extensive information on new developments in radiation protection. The ICRP 2105 discussed the following issues: radiation effects of low dose irradiation, dose coefficients for internal and external exposures, radiation protection in nuclear medicine, application of ICRP recommendations, environmental protection, studies on existing exposure situations, medical radiation protection today, science behind radiation doses, new developments in radiation effects, and ethics in radiation protection.

  8. Statement from the 1983 meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Protection: annual limits for intakes (ALI) and derived air concentrations (DAC) for members of the public

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The limitation of the committed effective dose equivalent for members of the public is sufficient to provide compliance over a lifetime with the limit for single organs, thus avoiding non-stochastic effects. Relative values for infants and adults of the committed dose equivalent in a number of tissues per unit intake for each of a few radionuclides have been given: the values for infants are just more than 1 up to 100 times greater than those for adult workers. In each of these cases the appropriate annual dose-equivalent limits recommended by the Commission for members of the public are 10 times less than the corresponding values for workers; the resulting ALI for infants aged six months will be smaller than the values given in ICRP Publication 30 for limiting stochastic effects in workers by factors that range from just more than 10 (for caesium-137) to 1,000 (for ingested plutonium-239). Intermediate factors would apply for older members of the public. The magnitude of the range emphasises the need to consider each situation carefully, with particular reference to children and women. (author)

  9. Radiation and society: Comprehending radiation risk. V. 3. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    This IAEA international conference on Radiation and Society was the first major international meeting devoted to the comprehension of radiation risk, public attitude towards radiation risk and hazards encountered by the general public in contaminated areas. Volume three of the proceedings contains the speeches, ten introductory papers, summaries of the technical discussion sessions, the key note paper on uncertainties in the health impact of environmental pollutants. Refs, figs, tabs

  10. Internal and external radiation exposures of Fukushima residents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayano, Ryugo

    2014-01-01

    The soil at Fukushima prefecture and its outskirts was heavily contaminated with radioactive materials from the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, and the residents suffered risk from internal and external radiation exposure. At first, the average dose of internal radiation exposure was estimated to be several mSv based upon the results of Chernobyl nuclear disaster. But the result of massive measurements using whole body counters shows that the average quantity of internal radioactive cesium is less than that at the Cold Water period. In the meantime, someone shows exposure dose much higher than the average. The distribution of these abnormal doses is called 'Long Tail'. One must pay attention to the long tail at the assessment of the internal radiation exposure by Fukushima nuclear disaster. The main origin of the long tail is related to frequency eating of special food. It is thus important to find persons situated in the long tail and give them guidance on the meals. (J.P.N.)

  11. Liver cancer and selective internal radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, C.

    2002-01-01

    Liver cancer is the biggest cancer-related killer of adults in the world. Liver cancer can be considered as two types: primary and secondary (metastatic). Selective Internal Radiation Therapy (SIRT) is a revolutionary treatment for advanced liver cancer that utilises new technologies designed to deliver radiation directly to the site of tumours. SIRT, on the other hand, involves the delivery of millions of microscopic radioactive spheres called SIR-Spheres directly to the site of the liver tumour/s, where they selectively irradiate the tumours. The anti-cancer effect is concentrated in the liver and there is little effect on cancer at other sites such as the lungs or bones. The SIR-Spheres are delivered through a catheter placed in the femoral artery of the upper thigh and threaded through the hepatic artery (the major blood vessel of the liver) to the site of the tumour. The microscopic spheres, each approximately 35 microns (the size of four red blood cells or one-third the diameter of a strand of hair), are bonded to yttrium-90 (Y-90), a pure beta emitter with a physical half-life of 64.1 hours (about 2.67 days). The microspheres are trapped in the tumour's vascular bed, where they destroy the tumour from inside. The average range of the radiation is only 2.5 mm, so it is wholly contained within the patient's body; after 14 days, only 2.5 percent of the radioactive activity remains. The microspheres are suspended in water for injection. The vials are shipped in lead shields for radiation protection. Treatment with SIR-Spheres is generally not regarded as a cure, but has been shown to shrink the cancer more than chemotherapy alone. This can increase life expectancy and improve quality of life. On occasion, patients treated with SIR-Spheres have had such marked shrinkage of the liver cancer that the cancer can be surgically removed at a later date. This has resulted in a long-term cure for some patients. SIRTeX Medical Limited has developed three separate cancer

  12. Acceptance, commissioning and quality control in radiosurgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toreti, Dalila Luzia

    2009-01-01

    Stereotactic Radiosurgery is a treatment technique that uses narrow beams of radiation focused with great accuracy in a small lesion. The introduction of micro multi leaf collimators (mMLC) allows this technique to reach a higher degree of dose conformation of the target lesion allowing a smaller irradiation of critical structures and normal tissues. This paper presents the results of the acceptance tests and commissioning of a Varian 6EX linear accelerator dedicated to radiosurgery associated with the BrainLab micro multi leaf collimator installed in the Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da USP (HC-FMUSP) and establish feasible quality assurance program for the services that employ this special technique. The results of the acceptance tests were satisfactory and are willing with the specifications provided by the manufacturer and the commissioning tests were within the international recommendations. The tests and measures that are part of quality control process should be specific to each treatment unit, and the need, frequency and levels of tolerance

  13. Determinants of Effective Unit Performance: Research on Measuring and Managing Unit Training Readiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-07-01

    ARI was concerned with filtering exercise data to facilitate data processing (Meliza, Tan, and Bessemer , in prepa- ration). A tremendous number of...Unit Training Feedback in the Distributed Interactive Simulation Environment ................ 257 Larry L. Meliza, David W. Bessemer , and Jack H...Army systems and conceptualizing required improvements is a sea change that is yet in the process of forming. Neale Cosby has provided the positive

  14. On implementing reference radiations for calibrating and testing solid state detectors for dose measurements in radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, P.M.C.; Da Silva, T.A.; Baptista N, A.T.; Pereira, E.G.; Nogueira, M.S.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Ionizing radiation metrology laboratories seek to assure a metrological coherence among their radiation beams. Reference radiations have been established and recommended to be implemented worldwide in order to allow dosemeter calibrations under similar conditions and radiation characteristics (ISO 1991, IEC 2005). Solid state detectors like thermoluminescent dosemeters, semiconductors, ionization chambers, etc. have been used for dose measurements on individuals or areas. This work reports the results of the implementation of reference radiations recommended by IEC (2005) for calibrating and testing detectors to be used for accurate dose measurements on patients or in phantoms in radiology. As part of the reference radiation implementation procedure, attenuation curves of nine beam qualities with voltage from 40 to 150 kV were carried out. The constant potential Agfa Pantak HS320 x-ray machine that is installed at the CDTN Dosemeter Calibration Laboratory (DCL) was used. Ionization measurements were performed with a 6cc Radcal 10X5-6 ionization chamber traceable to the Brazilian National Laboratory for Ionizing Metrology. Although 99.9% purity aluminium filters are recommended by the IEC standard, 99.5% purity filters were used in this work because they were available and one expects they will cause negligible influence on the energy spectrum. Variation of the beam intensity against the added filtration was measured to the nine RQR IEC reference radiations. The first half value layer (HVL), which it is defined as the aluminum filter thickness that reduces the beam intensity to half of its original value, and the homogeneity coefficient (HC), which it is given by the ratio between the first to second HVL, were determined. For all RQR radiations the 1st HVL measured at the DCL agreed with the C values with a maximum deviation of 2.3%. The HC also showed a good agreement since the DCL and the IEC values had a maximum deviation of 0.03, therefore RQR

  15. Ultraviolet radiation: effects on risks of prostate cancer and other internal cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Samuel J. [Human Genomics Research Group, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine and Department of Urology, Keele University School of Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hartshill Campus, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7PA Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Fryer, Anthony A. [Human Genomics Research Group, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine and Department of Urology, Keele University School of Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hartshill Campus, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7PA Staffordshire (United Kingdom); Strange, Richard C. [Human Genomics Research Group, Institute of Science and Technology in Medicine and Department of Urology, Keele University School of Medicine, University Hospital of North Staffordshire, Hartshill Campus, Stoke-on-Trent, ST4 7PA Staffordshire (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: paa00@keele.ac.uk

    2005-04-01

    Governmental and research agencies worldwide have strongly advocated sun avoidance strategies in an attempt to counter marked increases in skin cancer incidence. Concurrently, there are reports describing widespread Vitamin D{sub 3} deficiency. Because 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3}, through interaction with the Vitamin D receptor, exerts pleiotrophic effects, such deficiency might be expected to have clinical consequences. Indeed, various reports indicate that exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exerts a protective effect on development of some common diseases including internal cancers and multiple sclerosis. We describe studies indicating that modest exposure reduces risk of prostate cancer. The effect of UVR is mediated by skin type; at lower levels of exposure a relative inability to effect skin pigmentation is protective presumably because it allows more efficient Vitamin D{sub 3} synthesis. Polymorphic variants in genes associated with pigmentation including melanocyte stimulating hormone receptor and tyrosinase are also associated with prostate cancer risk. Overall, though preliminary and requiring cautious interpretation, these data indicate that moderate UVR exposure together with characteristics linked with less effective tanning confer reduced prostate cancer risk. Clearly, it is important to define safe levels of UVR that do not result in increased risk of skin cancers such as malignant melanoma.

  16. Radiation doses to neonates and issues of radiation protection in a special care baby unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armpilia, C.I.; Fife, I.A.J.; Croasdale, P.L.

    2001-01-01

    Radiographs are most commonly taken in the neonatal period to assist in the diagnosis and management of respiratory difficulties. Frequent accurate radiographic assessment is required and a knowledge of the radiation dose is necessary to make the justification of such exposures. A survey of radiation doses to neonates from diagnostic X-ray examinations (chest and abdomen) has been carried out in the special care baby unit (SCBU) of the Royal Free Hospital. Entrance surface dose (ESD) was calculated from Quality Control measurements on the X-ray set itself. Direct measurement of radiation doses was also performed using highly sensitive thermoluminescence dosimeters (LiF:Mg,Cu,P), calibrated and tested for consistency in sensitivity. The mean ESD per radiograph was calculated to be 36μGy (with a standard deviation of 6μGy), averaged over 95 X-ray examinations. The ESD's as derived from the TLD crystals, ranged from 18μGy to 60μGy. The mean energy imparted (EI) and the mean whole body dose per radiograph were estimated to be 14μJ and 10μGy respectively. Assuming that neonates and foetuses are equally susceptible to carcinogenic effects of radiation (it involves an overestimation of risk), the radiation risk of childhood cancer from a single radiograph was estimated to be of the order (0.3-1.3)x10 -6 . Radiation doses compared favourably with the reference value of 80μGy ESD published by CEC in 1996. (author)

  17. Online educative activities for solar ultraviolet radiation based on measurements of cloud amount and solar exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisi, A V; Downs, N; Turner, J; Amar, A

    2016-09-01

    A set of online activities for children and the community that are based on an integrated real-time solar UV and cloud measurement system are described. These activities use the functionality of the internet to provide an educative tool for school children and the public on the influence of cloud and the angle of the sun above the horizon on the global erythemal UV or sunburning UV, the diffuse erythemal UV, the global UVA (320-400nm) and the vitamin D effective UV. Additionally, the units of UV exposure and UV irradiance are investigated, along with the meaning and calculation of the UV index (UVI). This research will help ensure that children and the general public are better informed about sun safety by improving their personal understanding of the daily and the atmospheric factors that influence solar UV radiation and the solar UV exposures of the various wavebands in the natural environment. The activities may correct common misconceptions of children and the public about UV irradiances and exposure, utilising the widespread reach of the internet to increase the public's awareness of the factors influencing UV irradiances and exposures in order to provide clear information for minimizing UV exposure, while maintaining healthy, outdoor lifestyles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Special Issue on the Second International Workshop on Micro- and Nano-Scale Thermal Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhuomin; Liu, Linhua; Zhu, Qunzhi; Mengüç, M. Pinar

    2015-06-01

    Micro- and nano-scale thermal radiation has become one of the fastest growing research areas because of advances in nanotechnology and the development of novel materials. The related research and development includes near-field radiation transfer, spectral and directional selective emitters and receivers, plasmonics, metamaterials, and novel nano-scale fabrication techniques. With the advances in these areas, important applications in energy harvesting such as solar cells and thermophotovoltaics, nanomanufacturing, biomedical sensing, thermal imaging as well as data storage with the localized heating/cooling have been pushed to higher levels.

  19. Radiation safety: New international standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    This article highlights an important result of this work for the international harmonization of radiation safety: specifically, it present an overview of the forthcoming International Basic Safety Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources - the so-called BSS. They have been jointly developed by six organizations - the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the International Labour Organization (ILO), the Nuclear Energy Agency of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (NEA/OECD), the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), and the World Health Organization (WHO)

  20. Exposure of Finnish population to ultraviolet radiation and radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoikkala, M.; Lappalainen, J.; Leszczynski, K.; Paile, W.

    1990-01-01

    This report is based on a survey of the literature on radiation risks involved in sunbathing and the use of solaria. The purpose of the report is to provide background information for the development of regulations on solaria and for informing the public about the risks posed by solaria and the sun. The report gives an overview of the properties and biological effects of ultraviolet radiation. The most important regulations and recommendations issued in various countries are presented. The connection between ultraviolet radiation and the risks of skin cancer is examined both on a general level and in reference to information obtained from the Finnish Cancer Registry. In Finland, the incidence of melanomas nearly tripled between 1960 and 1980. The most important cause is considered to be the population's increased exposure to the su's ultraviolet radiation. There are no reliable data on the connection between the use of solaria and the risks of skin cancer. It is estimated, however, that solaria account for less than 10 per cent of the skin cancer risk of the whole population. There are some difficult physical problems associated with the measurement of ultraviolet radiation emitted by both natural sources and solaria. A preliminary study of these problems has been undertaken by means of a survey of the available literature, supplemented by a review of measurements performed by the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety. The estimated inaccuracy of the Optronic 742 spectroradiometer used by the Centre in the measurement of ultraviolet radiation emitted by the sun and solaria is about +-14%

  1. Proceedings of the XIII International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Science 2016, Ustroń-Jaszowiec, Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Maciej; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Piszora, Paweł

    2017-11-01

    This special issue of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research Section B of Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research was prepared to present recent achievements in synchrotron radiation science and mark the 25th anniversary of the Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society (PSRS) which fell in 2016. It presents selected papers submitted after the 13th International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Science (ISSRNS 2016) which was organized by PSRS in cooperation with the Adam Mickiewicz University. It is worth noting that PSRS is probably one of the earliest founded scientific societies focused on promoting the use of synchrotron radiation research (for details visit the PSRS home page: http://www.synchrotron.org.pl.

  2. Detection and measurement of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1990-01-01

    All detection or measurement of radiation rests in the possibility of recognizing the interactions of radiation with matter. When radiation passes through any kind of material medium, all or a portion of its energy is transferred to this medium. This transferred energy produces an effect in the medium. In principle, the detection of radiation is based on the appearance and the observation of this effect. In theory, all of the effects produced by radiation may be used in detecting it: in practice, the effects most commonly employed are: (1) ionization of gases (gas detectors), or of some chemical substance which is transformed by radiation (photographic or chemical dosimeters); (2) excitations in scintillators or semiconductors (scintillation counters, semiconductor counters); (3) creation of structural defects through the passage of radiation (transparent thermoluminescent and radioluminescent detectors); and (4) raising of the temperature (calorimeters). This study evaluates in detail, instruments based on the ionization of gases and the production of luminescence. In addition, the authors summarize instruments which depend on other forms of interaction, used in radiation medicine and hygiene (radiology, nuclear medicine)

  3. Review of cosmic background radiation spectrum measurements: limits on distortions, energy release, and cosmological processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smoot, G.F.

    1986-01-01

    This paper reviews the three major cosmic microwave background radiation (CMBR) spectrum measurement programs conducted and published since the last (XVII) IAU General Assembly. The results are consistent with a Planckian spectrum with temperature 2.72 +- 0.03 K spanning a wavelength range of 0.1 to 12 cm. Limits on possible distortions and implications are outlined. Ongoing and future measurements are discussed

  4. The ICRP 66 Internal Radiation Exposure Control and Dose Evaluation of The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pang, H. F.; Hwang, W. S.; Chiu, J. H.

    2004-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Council (AEC) is the regulatory body of ionization radiation protection in Taiwan. To effectively control the safety in ionization radiation, AEC brought into force the Ionization Radiation Protection Act on 1 February, 2003 with clear statements of the penalty for violating the Law. The Article 5 of the Act provides: In order to limit the radiation exposure from radiation sources or practices, the Competent Authority shall refer to the latest standards of the International Commission on Radiological Protection to lay down the Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation. Thus, AEC is going to draft new safety standards of ionization radiation protection of Taiwan according to ICRP Publication 60. The Institute of Nuclear Energy Research (INER), the governmental institute working on ionization radiation research in Taiwan, took the responsibility of assisting AEC in establishing guidelines on the control of internal radiation exposure and responding to the regulations in the new standards as soon as possible. So, according to the recommendations of ICRP Publications 60, 66,67,68,69,71,78,88, and IAEA Safety Standard Series No. RS-G- 1.1 and 1.2, INER undertook researches on the internal radiation exposure control and dose evaluations for INER's radiation workers as well as dose evaluations for the general public. The research accomplishments not only can be the reference of AEC when making new standards, but also can be followed by other radiation protection businesses. (Author) 23 refs

  5. An Audit of Emergency Department Accreditation Based on Joint Commission International Standards (JCI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrooz Hashemi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite thousands of years from creation of medical knowledge, it not much passes from founding the health care systems. Accreditation is an effective mechanism for performance evaluation, quality enhancement, and the safety of health care systems. This study was conducted to assess the results of emergency department (ED accreditation in Shohadaye Tajrish Hospital, Tehran, Iran, 2013 in terms of domesticated standards of joint commission international (JCI standards. Methods: This is a cohort study with a four months follow up which was conducted in the ED of Shohadaye Tajrish hospital in December 2013. The standard evaluation check list of Iran hospitals (based on JCI standards included 24 heading and 337 subheading was used for this purpose. The effective possible causes of weak spots were found and their solutions considered. After correction, assessment of accreditation were repeated again. Finally, the achieved results of two periods were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Results: Quality improvement, admission in department and patient assessment, competency and capability test for staffs, collection and analysis of data, training of patients, and facilities had the score of below 50%. The mean of total score for accreditation in ED in the first period was 60.4±30.15 percent and in the second period 68.9±22.9 (p=0.005. Strategic plans, head of department, head nurse, resident physician, responsible nurse for the shift, and personnel file achieved the score of 100%. Of total headings below 50% in the first period just in two cases, collection and analysis of data with growth of 40% as well as competency and capability test for staffs with growth of 17%, were reached to more than 50%. Conclusion: Based on findings of the present study, the ED of Shohadaye Tajrish hospital reached the score of below 50% in six heading of quality improvement, admission in department and patient assessment, competency and capability test for

  6. Selective internal radiation therapy for liver tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundram, Francis X; Buscombe, John R

    2017-10-01

    Primary and secondary liver malignancies are common and associated with a poor prognosis. Surgical resection is the treatment of choice; however, many patients have unresectable disease. In these cases, several liver directed therapies are available, including selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT). SIRT is a multidisciplinary treatment involving nuclear medicine, interventional radiology and oncology. High doses of localised internal radiation are selectively delivered to liver tumour tissues, with relative sparing of adjacent normal liver parenchyma. Side effects are minimal and radiation protection measures following treatment are straightforward. In patients who have progressed following chemotherapy, clinical trials demonstrate prolonged liver progression-free survival. SIRT is offered at 10 centres in England via the NHS England Commissioning through Evaluation programme and is approved by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence for certain liver malignancies. SIRT holds unique promise for personalised treatment of liver tumours. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  7. Proceedings of the 4. International Symposium on Radiation Physics - Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-01-01

    The studies on: fundamental processes in radiation physics; radiation sources and detectors; physical, chemical and biological radiation effects; plasma technology; radioisotope application in medicine and agriculture; environment; use of radiation in material science and; reactor technology, are presented. (M.C.K.) [pt

  8. The Impact of International Financial Reporting Standards on Accounting Curriculum in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapragada, RamMohan R.; Toma, Alfred G.; Roe, C. William

    2011-01-01

    According to the time line presently specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), business firms in the United States (US) should switch from the existing US accounting reporting guidelines of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) by the year 2014. The US business…

  9. Spin transport at the international linear collider and its impact on the measurement of polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beckmann, Moritz

    2013-12-15

    At the planned International Linear Collider (ILC), the longitudinal beam polarization needs to be determined with an unprecedented precision. For that purpose, the beam delivery systems (BDS) are equipped with two laser Compton polarimeters each, which are foreseen to achieve a systematic uncertainty of {<=} 0.25 %. The polarimeters are located 1.6 km upstream and 150 m downstream of the e{sup +}e{sup -} interaction point (IP). The average luminosity-weighted longitudinal polarization P{sup lumi}{sub z}, which is the decisive quantity for the experiments, has to be determined from these measurements with the best possible precision. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the spin transport in the BDS is mandatory to estimate how precise the longitudinal polarization at the IP is known from the polarimeter measurements. The envisaged precision for the propagation of the measurement value is {<=} 0.1 %. This thesis scrutinizes the spin transport in view of the achievable precision. A detailed beamline simulation for the BDS has been developed, including the simulation of the beam-beam collisions at the IP. The following factors which might limit the achievable precision is investigated: a variation of the beam parameters, the beam alignment precision at the polarimeters and the IP, the bunch rotation at the IP, the detector magnets, the beam-beam collisions, the emission of synchrotron radiation and misalignments of the beamline elements. In absence of collisions, a precision of 0.085% on the propagation of the measured longitudinal polarization has been found achievable. This result however depends mainly on the presumed precisions for the parallel alignment of the beam at the polarimeters and for the alignment of polarization vector. In presence of collisions, the measurement at the downstream polarimeter depends strongly on the intensity of the collision and the size of the polarimeter laser spot. Therefore, a more detailed study of the laser-bunch interaction is

  10. Methodology and boundary conditions applied to the analysis on internal flooding for Kozloduy NPP units 5 and 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demireva, E.; Goranov, S.; Horstmann, R.

    2004-01-01

    Within the Modernization Program of Units 5 and 6 of Kozloduy NPP a comprehensive analysis of internal flooding has been carried out for the reactor building outside the containment and for the turbine hall by FRAMATOME ANP and ENPRO Consult. The objective of this presentation is to provide information on the applied methodology and boundary conditions. A separate report called 'Methodology and boundary conditions' has been elaborated in order to provide the fundament for the study. The methodology report provides definitions and advice for the following topics: scope of the study; safety objectives; basic assumptions and postulates (plant conditions, grace periods for manual actions, single failure postulate, etc.); sources of flooding (postulated piping leaks and ruptures, malfunctions and personnel error); main activities of the flooding analysis; study conclusions and suggestions of remedial measures. (authors)

  11. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko Surface Composition as a Playground for Radiative Transfer Modeling and Laboratory Measurements: an international ISSI team

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, K.; Ciarniello, M.; Beck, P.; Filacchione, G.; Moroz, L.; Pilorget, C.; Pommerol, A.; Quirico, E.; Raponi, A.; Schröder, S.; Kappel, D.; Vinogradoff, V.; Istiqomah, I.; Rousseau, B.

    2017-12-01

    Remote sensing observations at visible-infrared (VIS-IR) wavelengths of the nucleus of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko performed by VIRTIS (Coradini et al., 2007) aboard the Rosetta mission have revealed a surface ubiquitously covered by low-albedo material (Capaccioni et al., 2015; Ciarniello et al., 2015), characterized by the presence of refractory and semi-volatile organics and dark opaque phases (Capaccioni et al., 2015; Quirico et al., 2016). However, a quantitative determination of the physical properties (grain size, porosity) and chemical composition of the surface regolith, from spectrophotometric analysis, is still missing. This subject will be investigated within an international team hosted by ISSI (International Space Science Institute), taking advantage of available and dedicated laboratory reflectance measurements on cometary analogue samples and radiative transfer models (Hapke, 2012; Shkuratov et al., 1999; Monte Carlo ray-tracing), applied to Rosetta spectrophotometric observations of the nucleus. The convergence between models and measurements will allow us to provide a thorough characterization of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko surface. At the same time, the comparison of theoretical predictions with results from laboratory reflectance spectroscopy on powders of analog materials give us the possibility to constrain the capability of the models to characterize their composition (endmember abundances and mixing modalities) and physical properties. We report about the state of the art of laboratory reflectance spectroscopy and spectral modeling applied to 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko VIS-IR spectrum as well as preliminary results of the team activity and planned future work. Acknowledgements: the team thanks ISSI-Switzerland for the logistic and financial support.

  12. History of International Workshop on Mini-Micro- and Nano- Dosimetry (MMND) and Innovation Technologies in Radiation Oncology (ITRO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, Anatoly B.; Zaider, Marco; Yamada, Josh; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    The biannual MMND (former MMD) - IPCT workshops was founded in collaboration between the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics, University of Wollongong and the Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in 2001 and has become an important international multidisciplinary forum for the discussion of advanced quality assurance (QA) dosimetry technology for radiation therapy and space science, as well as advanced technologies for clinical cancer treatment.

  13. Organization and operation of the sixth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE VI). Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hopke, P.K.

    1995-01-01

    An important source of human exposure to radiation is the natural world including cosmic rays, cosmogonic radionuclides, natural terrestrial radionuclides, and radon isotopes and its decay products. Considerable effort is being expended on a worldwide basis to characterize the exposure to the natural radiation environment and determine the important pathways for the exposure to result in dose to tissue that leads to injury and disease. The problem of background exposure to naturally occurring radioactivity has been the subject of research since the initial discovery of the radioactivity of uranium and thorium. However, with the advent of artificial sources of radiation with both benefits (medical x-rays and nuclear medicine), and harm (Chernobyl fallout), the nature and magnitude of the natural radiation environment and the effects on various populations are important in the development of overall public health strategies as ALARA principles are applied. To facilitate the exchange of information and the review of uncertainties and scientific research priorities, a series of 5 international meetings on Natural Radiation Environment, 1963, 1987, 1991. This conference (Montreal, 1995) covers the range of natural radiation environments that give rise to human exposure and dose. This document is a program summary

  14. Second response to the recommendations by the Monopolies and Mergers Commission in their report ''United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority: a Report on the Service Provided by the Authority''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    The Monopolies and Mergers Commission made a series of recommendation about the way AEA Technology should operate. These recommendations are made about the structure and organisation of AEA, its corporate policy, the financial aspects, management, use of assets, industrial relations, pay and employment policies, the efficient use of manpower, investment, pricing, marketing, project management, safety and the quality of goods and services. The response of AEA to each recommendation is given in parallel with the recommendation. Many have already been implemented or are in the process of implementation. (UK)

  15. Impact of Mindfulness Training on Physiological Measures of Stress and Objective Measures of Attention Control in a Military Helicopter Unit

    OpenAIRE

    Meland, Anders; Ishimatsu, Kazuma; Pensgaard, Anne Marte; Wagstaff, Anthony; Fonne, Vivianne; Garde, Anne Helene; Harris, Anette

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study sought to determine if mindfulness training (MT) has a measurable impact on stress and attentional control as measured by objective physiological and psychological means. Background: Periods of persistent, intensive work demands are known to compromise recovery and attentional capacity. The effects of 4-month MT on salivary cortisol and performance on 2 computer-based cognitive tasks were tested on a military helicopter unit exposed to a prolonged period of high workload...

  16. [Classification of Histopathological Findings in the Liver Cited in the Pesticides Risk Assessment Reports Published by the Food Safety Commission of Japan and Thesaurus Construction Based on the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic (INHAND) Criteria].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Umemura, Takashi; Yoshida, Midori

    2015-01-01

    Histopathological findings are important to the understanding of toxicity profiles of pesticides. The liver is often a target organ of chemicals. In the present study, histopathological findings in the liver cited in the pesticides risk assessment reports published by the Food Safety Commission of Japan were classified. The histopathological findings were obtained in repeated-dose 90-day oral toxicity studies of mice, rats and dogs and carcinogenicity studies of rodents. After the classification, a thesaurus was constructed based on the International Harmonization of Nomenclature and Diagnostic (INHAND) Criteria. We recommend the use of INHAND criteria in risk assessment reports to improve mutual understanding between applicants and risk assessors.

  17. United States contributions to international hydrology and the UNESCO International Hydrological Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M. C.; Schneider, V. R.

    2007-12-01

    The combination of climate change, population growth, and growing use of irrigated agriculture has resulted in increased stress on water resources around the world. The problem is worsened with the expansion of population centers in water-scarce regions, for example in the southwestern United States, central Mexico, along the Mediterranean coast of Africa, southern India, and southeast Australia. As such, water has emerged as a global issue that requires international cooperation on assessment, research, and management. Entities such as the UNESCO International Hydrological Programme (IHP) focus activities on water research, water resources management, education, and capacity-building. The U.S. National Committee for UNESCO IHP, reorganized in 2006, includes members of the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO, U.S. government agencies, academic institutions, and external organizations with expertise in hydrology and hydraulics. The responsibilities of the U.S. National Committee for IHP are to: provide programmatic advice to IHP; assist in supporting other UNESCO water resources activities; represent U.S. domestic and international water activities to UNESCO; support IHP training, research, and capacity building efforts from a U.S. perspective; recommend and support the participation of other U.S. water programs in the IHP; and advise the U.S. Government on its participation in UNESCO and the IHP. Working through its membership, the U.S. National Committee for UNESCO IHP seeks to build improved relationships and involve and provide opportunities to the U.S. hydrological community.

  18. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  19. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C H; Buckleton, J S

    2006-01-01

    The DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) was convened at the 21st congress of the International Society for Forensic Genetics held between 13 and 17 September in the Azores, Portugal. The purpose of the group was to agree on guidelines to encourage best practice...

  20. EDITORIAL: The 9th International Symposium on Measurement Science and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII-2009) The 9th International Symposium on Measurement Science and Intelligent Instruments (ISMTII-2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chugui, Yuri

    2010-05-01

    The papers for this special feature have been selected for publication after the successful measurement forum that took place in Saint Petersburg, Russia, in 2009. ISMTII-2009 presented state-of-the-art approaches and solutions in the most challenging areas and focused on microscale and nanoscale measurements and metrology; novel measurements and diagnostic technologies, including nondestructive and dimensional inspection; measurements for geometrical and mechanical quantities, terahertz technologies for science, industry and biomedicine; intelligent measuring instruments and systems for industry and transport; optical and x-ray tomography and interferometry, metrology and characterization of materials, measurements and metrology for the humanitarian fields; and education in measurement science. We believe that scientists and specialists around the world found there the newest information on measurement technology and intelligent instruments, and this will stimulate work in these areas which is an essential part of progress in measurement. The ISMTII Symposia have been held successfully every two years from 1989 in the People's Republic of China, Hungary, Egypt, Hong Kong, UK and Japan under the direction of ICMI. In 2009 the ISMTII measuring forum took place in Russia, and it is a great honour for our country, as well as for the Russian Academy of Sciences and its Siberian Branch—Novosibirsk Scientific Center. This Symposium was located in historic Saint Petersburg, which from its foundation has been a unique bridge of communication between countries on all continents, and participation provided an excellent opportunity for the exchange of experience, information and knowledge between specialists from different countries and fields. On behalf of the Organizers, Steering Committee and International Program Committee I would like to thank all the participants for their valuable contributions without which this special feature would not have become reality, as well

  1. Radiation protection recommendations on dose limits: the role of the NCRP and the ICRP and future developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinclair, Warren K.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the role of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in making recommendations on dose limits for ionizing radiation exposure for workers and for the public. The text describes the new limits for workers and public recommended by ICRP in 1991 and NCRP in 1993 and the composition of the radiation health detriment on which they are based. The main component of this detriment is the risk of radiation induced cancer which is now estimated to be about three times greater than a decade or so earlier. Uncertainties in these risk estimates are discussed. Some special radiation protection problems, such as those for the embryo or fetus are described. The article also addresses future progress in radiation protection particularly with regard to future improvements in the scientific basis for radiation protection recommendations

  2. Ultraviolet radiation, measurements and safety evaluations for radiation protection purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witew, B.; Fischer, P.G.

    1983-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of ultraviolet radiation, one has to study that photobiologically effective radiation which induces a just measurable threshold reaction. For practical radiation protection, one has to determine the permissible duration of exposure at the end of which the threshold reaction is induced. This time limit is derived by means of spectral measurements and determination of radiation intensity. Detrimental photobiological effects can be avoided, and favourable effects optimized, by observing the time limit. Thus these measurements are used to determine the threshold at which the desired effects of ultraviolet radiation will be accompanied by unwanted effects or damage to persons, as for instance in the use of ultraviolet radiation for operating room sterilization, arc welding work, or cosmetic purposes. (orig.) [de

  3. Commission on Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-03-03

    Then, within it, a narrower column of debris swirled upward, spreading out into an awesome mushroom-shaped apparition high in the atmosphere.96 Next...in the Federal Register, was at pains to state that "it is entirely possible that many persons belonging to such organizations may be loyal to the...What is merely painful is for all those physicists to measure the overall strength of an economy in terms of coal and steel production thirteen years

  4. Radiation and radiation protection; Strahlung und Strahlenschutz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomaeus, Melanie (comp.)

    2017-04-15

    The publication of the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz covers the following issues: (i) Human beings in natural and artificial radiation fields; (ii) ionizing radiation: radioactivity and radiation, radiation exposure and doses; measurement of ionizing radiation, natural radiation sources, artificial radiation sources, ionizing radiation effects on human beings, applied radiation protection, radiation exposure of the German population, radiation doses in comparison; (iii) non-ionizing radiation; low-frequency electric and magnetic fields, high-frequency electromagnetic fields, optical radiation; (iiii) glossary, (iv) units and conversion.

  5. How can interventions for inhabitants be justified after a nuclear accident? An approach based on the radiological protection system of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahara, Shogo; Homma, Toshimitsu; Yoneda, Minoru; Shimada, Yoko

    2016-01-01

    Management of radiation-induced risks in areas contaminated by a nuclear accident is characterized by three ethical issues: (1) risk trade-off, (2) paternalistic intervention and (3) individualization of responsibilities. To deal with these issues and to clarify requirements of justification of interventions for the purpose of reduction in radiation-induced risks, we explored the ethical basis of the radiological protection system of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The ICRP's radiological protection system is established based on three normative ethics, i.e. utilitarianism, deontology and virtue ethics. The three ethical issues can be resolved based on the decision-making framework which is constructed in combination with these ethical theories. In addition, the interventions for inhabitants have the possibility to be justified in accordance with two ways. Firstly, when the dangers are severe and far-reaching, interventions could be justified with a sufficient explanation about the nature of harmful effects (or beneficial consequences). Secondly, if autonomy of intervened-individuals can be promoted, those interventions could be justified. (author)

  6. Influence of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements: insights from field and laboratory experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Sandro M.; Pietsch, Helga; Baumgartner, Dietmar J.; Rieder, Harald E.

    2016-04-01

    A precise knowledge of the surface energy budget, which includes the solar and terrestrial radiation fluxes, is needed to accurately characterize the global energy balance which is largely determining Earth's climate. To this aim national and global monitoring networks for surface radiative fluxes have been established in recent decades. The most prominent among these networks is the so-called Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN) operating under the auspices of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) (Ohmura et al., 1998). National monitoring networks such as the Austrian RADiation Monitoring Network (ARAD), which has been established in 2010 by a consortium of the Central Agency of Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the University of Graz, the University of Innsbruck, and the University of Natural Resources and Applied Sciences, Vienna (BOKU), orient themselves on BSRN standards (McArthur, 2005). ARAD comprises to date five sites (Wien Hohe Warte, Graz/University, Innsbruck/University, Kanzelhöhe Observatory and Sonnblick (which is also a BSRN site)) and aims to provide long-term monitoring of radiation budget components at highest accuracy and to capture the spatial patterns of radiation climate in Austria (Olefs et al., 2015). Given the accuracy requirement for the local monitoring of radiative fluxes instrument offsets, triggered by meteorological factors and/or instrumentation, pose a major challenge in radiation monitoring. Within this study we investigate effects of ambient meteorology on the accuracy of radiation measurements performed with pyranometers contained in various heating/ventilation systems (HV-systems), all of which used in regular operation within the ARAD network. We focus particularly on instrument offsets observed following precipitation events. To quantify pyranometer responses to precipitation we performed a series of controlled laboratory experiments as well as targeted field campaigns in 2015 and 2016. Our results indicate

  7. Present activities of the Nuclear Energy Commission in the field of safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials in Mongolia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oyuntulkhuur, N.

    2001-01-01

    The Radiation Safety Department of the Nuclear Energy Commission (NEC) is a regulatory body in Mongolia established in 1997. The paper gives a general overview of the main activities of the NEC on regulatory control of radiation sources in Mongolia. Mongolia declared itself a nuclear-weapon-free zone in 1992. Legal framework and waste management issues are described. The regulatory authority's co-operation with other agencies in radiation protection is also presented in this paper. (author)

  8. Commentary on guidelines for radiation measurement and treatment of substances including naturally occurring radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakurai, Naoyuki; Ishiguro, Hideharu

    2007-01-01

    Study group on safety regulation on research reactors in Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) reported the guidelines of 'Guidelines on radiation measurement and treatment of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM)' on 6 February 2006. RANDEC made the website contents 'Study on use and safety of the substances including uranium or thorium', based on the contract with MEXT to make theirs contents. This paper describes the outline of the website in MEXT homepage, background and contents of NORM guidelines in order to understand easily and visually the NORM guidelines, adding in some flowcharts and figures. (author)

  9. Proceedings of international symposium on radiation education (ISRE 98)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Symposium on Radiation Education, which commemorates the centenary of the discovery of radium by the Curies, was held on December 11-14, 1998 in Kanagawa, Japan. At present, radiation and radioactivity are not indispensable in medical diagnosis and treatment, but also are widely used in scientific research and industrial activities. Nuclear power generation is also playing an important role in saving nonrenewable natural energy resources, and without producing the potentially hazardous carbon dioxide. However, a majority of people has a insufficient knowledge or information about radiation and radioactivity. The symposium intended to generalize the scientific knowledge about radiation and radioactivity and also about various aspects of risks associated with the life in the civilized society, by discussing how to improve education in general and young generations at schools in particular, and by exchanging the newest scientific information relevant to the education. The symposium consisted of 5 sessions with 61 submitted papers, and involved about 170 participants from Australia, Bangladesh, France, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Korea, Philippine, Pakistan, Thailand, Turkey, UK and USA. (author)

  10. Proceedings of international symposium on radiation education (ISRE 98)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The International Symposium on Radiation Education, which commemorates the centenary of the discovery of radium by the Curies, was held on December 11-14, 1998 in Kanagawa, Japan. At present, radiation and radioactivity are not indispensable in medical diagnosis and treatment, but also are widely used in scientific research and industrial activities. Nuclear power generation is also playing an important role in saving nonrenewable natural energy resources, and without producing the potentially hazardous carbon dioxide. However, a majority of people has a insufficient knowledge or information about radiation and radioactivity. The symposium intended to generalize the scientific knowledge about radiation and radioactivity and also about various aspects of risks associated with the life in the civilized society, by discussing how to improve education in general and young generations at schools in particular, and by exchanging the newest scientific information relevant to the education. The symposium consisted of 5 sessions with 61 submitted papers, and involved about 170 participants from Australia, Bangladesh, France, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Korea, Philippine, Pakistan, Thailand, Turkey, UK and USA. (author)

  11. Statement from the 1987 Como meeting of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1988-01-01

    The Commission is presently revising its basic recommendations which were presented in ICRP Publication 26 in 1977 and in a number of subsequent statements and amendments as well as in other ICRP reports. The revised recommendations are expected to be completed by 1990 after preparatory work by the Commission's four expert committees and a number of ad hoc task groups. This work included a review and re-assessment of the complete system of dose limitation, including the values of the dose limits. In this article certain dose limit problems are discussed

  12. LHC injection optics measurements at commissioning (2015)

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Tabares Valdivieso, Ana; Coello De Portugal - Martinez Vazquez, Jaime Maria; Garcia-Bonilla, Alba-Carolina; Langner, Andy Sven; Maclean, Ewen Hamish; Malina, Lukas; Mcateer, Meghan Jill; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Skowronski, Piotr Krzysztof; Tomas Garcia, Rogelio; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    This report describes the measurement and correction process followed during the 2015 LHC injection optics commissioning which extended into Machine Developments (MDs). Results have been analyzed and compared to the 2012 measurements.

  13. On Effective Radiative Forcing of Partial Internally and Externally Mixed Aerosols and Their Effects on Global Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chen; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Shuyun; Li, Jiangnan

    2018-01-01

    The total effective radiative forcing (ERF) due to partial internally mixed (PIM) and externally mixed (EM) anthropogenic aerosols, as well as their climatic effects since the year of 1850, was evaluated and compared using the aerosol-climate online coupled model of BCC_AGCM2.0_CUACE/Aero. The influences of internal mixing (IM) on aerosol hygroscopicity parameter, optical properties, and concentration were considered. Generally, IM could markedly weaken the negative ERF and cooling effects of anthropogenic aerosols. The global annual mean ERF of EM anthropogenic aerosols from 1850 to 2010 was -1.87 W m-2, of which the aerosol-radiation interactive ERF (ERFari) and aerosol-cloud interactive ERF (ERFaci) were -0.49 and -1.38 W m-2, respectively. The global annual mean ERF due to PIM anthropogenic aerosols from 1850 to 2010 was -1.23 W m-2, with ERFari and ERFaci of -0.23 and -1.01 W m-2, respectively. The global annual mean surface temperature and water evaporation and precipitation were reduced by 1.74 K and 0.14 mm d-1 for EM scheme and 1.28 K and 0.11 mm d-1 for PIM scheme, respectively. However, the relative humidity near the surface was slightly increased for both mixing cases. The Intertropical Convergence Zone was southwardly shifted for both EM and PIM cases but was less southwardly shifted in PIM scheme due to the less reduction in atmospheric temperature in the midlatitude and low latitude of the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. Ion production rate in a boreal forest based on ion, particle and radiation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Laakso

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study the ion production rates in a boreal forest were studied based on two different methods: 1 cluster ion and particle concentration measurements, 2 external radiation and radon concentration measurements. Both methods produced reasonable estimates for ion production rates. The average ion production rate calculated from aerosol particle size distribution and air ion mobility distribution measurements was 2.6 ion pairs cm-3s-1, and based on external radiation and radon measurements, 4.5 ion pairs cm-3s-1. The first method based on ion and particle measurements gave lower values for the ion production rates especially during the day. A possible reason for this is that particle measurements started only from 3nm, so the sink of small ions during the nucleation events was underestimated. It may also be possible that the hygroscopic growth factors of aerosol particles were underestimated. Another reason for the discrepancy is the nucleation mechanism itself. If the ions are somehow present in the nucleation process, there could have been an additional ion sink during the nucleation days.

  15. Mass measurements on neutron-deficient nuclides at SHIPTRAP and commissioning of a cryogenic narrow-band FT-ICR mass spectrometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrer Garcia, R.

    2007-01-01

    The dissertation presented here deals with high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry on short-lived radionuclides. Owed to the ability of revealing all nucleonic interactions, mass measurements far off the line of β-stability are expected to bring new insight to the current knowledge of nuclear properties and serve to test the predictive power of mass models and formulas. In nuclear astrophysics, atomic masses are fundamental parameters for the understanding of the synthesis of nuclei in the stellar environments. This thesis presents ten mass values of radionuclides around A=90 interspersed in the predicted rp-process pathway. Six of them have been experimentally determined for the first time. The measurements have been carried out at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP using the destructive time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance (TOF-ICR) detection technique. Given the limited performance of the TOF-ICR detection when trying to investigate heavy/superheavy species with small production cross sections (σ <1 μb), a new detection system is found to be necessary. Thus, the second part of this thesis deals with the commissioning of a cryogenic double-Penning trap system for the application of a highly-sensitive, narrow-band Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron-resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique. With the non-destructive FT-ICR detection method a single singly-charged trapped ion will provide the required information to determine its mass. First off-line tests of a new detector system based on a channeltron with an attached conversion dynode, of a cryogenic pumping barrier, to guarantee ultra-high vacuum conditions during mass determination, and of the detection electronics for the required single-ion sensitivity are reported. (orig.)

  16. Mass measurements on neutron-deficient nuclides at SHIPTRAP and commissioning of a cryogenic narrow-band FT-ICR mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrer Garcia, R.

    2007-07-01

    The dissertation presented here deals with high-precision Penning trap mass spectrometry on short-lived radionuclides. Owed to the ability of revealing all nucleonic interactions, mass measurements far off the line of {beta}-stability are expected to bring new insight to the current knowledge of nuclear properties and serve to test the predictive power of mass models and formulas. In nuclear astrophysics, atomic masses are fundamental parameters for the understanding of the synthesis of nuclei in the stellar environments. This thesis presents ten mass values of radionuclides around A=90 interspersed in the predicted rp-process pathway. Six of them have been experimentally determined for the first time. The measurements have been carried out at the Penning-trap mass spectrometer SHIPTRAP using the destructive time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance (TOF-ICR) detection technique. Given the limited performance of the TOF-ICR detection when trying to investigate heavy/superheavy species with small production cross sections ({sigma} <1 {mu}b), a new detection system is found to be necessary. Thus, the second part of this thesis deals with the commissioning of a cryogenic double-Penning trap system for the application of a highly-sensitive, narrow-band Fourier-transform ion-cyclotron-resonance (FT-ICR) detection technique. With the non-destructive FT-ICR detection method a single singly-charged trapped ion will provide the required information to determine its mass. First off-line tests of a new detector system based on a channeltron with an attached conversion dynode, of a cryogenic pumping barrier, to guarantee ultra-high vacuum conditions during mass determination, and of the detection electronics for the required single-ion sensitivity are reported. (orig.)

  17. The Impact of Different Control Techniques of Industrial Irradiation Processing Units (Cobalt 60 Irradiator) on Maintaining Safety for Radiation and Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshek, A. B.

    2010-01-01

    Negative results were caused by fire events inside and outside the industrial irradiation facilities by Co 60 irradiators. It included bad effects on equipment cables, electrical components, product boxes, products, fire detectors radiation detectors various radiation concrete shielding and big volumes of smoke. Big volumes of water and water spray were used to resist and to cool fire inside irradiation facilities. Flooded water was collected on the floor of the irradiation room, it tranced through maze legs to outside the main door and through the electrical tunnels casing big damage outside irradiation unit. The work show two different designs, the first system is the cleaner agent fire suppression by carbon dioxide. CO 2 containers are located outside irradiation concrete facility, and attached by special metallic pipes system. By fire detector and automatic control valves maintain CO 2 to suppress fire inside irradiation room and maintain clean agent fire suppression. The second system depend on Nuclear Regulatory commission C.F.R 10 of 2005 to prevent flooding and trance. The need to design a new system which trances the excessive water from inside irradiation room and to prevent it from escaping to outside irradiation facility during resisting fire by water curtion the excessive water is escaped from the storage pool by electrical pump; the second line will trance the excessive water outside the main building to store inside separated tank

  18. Level measurement based on the detection of internal sources of gamma radiation.. The application of neuron networks for level measurements in nuclear reactors; Fuellstandsmessung auf der Basis der Detektion interner Gammastrahlungsquellen [FMDIG]. Anwendung neuronaler Netze zur Fuellstandsmessung an Kernreaktoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hampel, R.; Draeger, F. [Hochschule fuer Technik, Wirtschaft und Sozialwesen Zittau/Goerlitz, Zittau (Germany). Inst. fuer Prozesstechnik, Prozessautomatisierung und Messtechnik e.V. (IPM)

    1997-12-01

    The improved monitoring of the operation of nuclear powerstations requires the use of new techniques in signal processing. To obtain information from highly complex signal fields, neuron networks are available both for the extraction of information and for the storage and quick provision of this information. In this article, a process for determining the level in Boiling Water Reactors was introduced, which can determine the level from the measurement of the distribution of intensity of the gamma radiation field outside the reactor pressure vessel. The investigation of a comprehensive sensitivity analysis showed that the developed neuron algorithm for the shutdown reactor gives very precise results and is robust against interference. The work to produce the characteristic for operation on power is not yet complete. [Deutsch] Die verbesserte Ueberwachung des Betriebes von Kernkraftwerken erfordert den Einsatz neuer Technologien in der Signalverarbeitung. Zur Gewinnung von Informationen aus hochkomplexen Signalfeldern bieten sich neuronale Netze sowohl fuer die Extraktion von Information als auch fuer die Speicherung und schnelle Bereitstellung dieser Information an. In diesem Beitrag wurde ein Verfahren zur Fuellstandsbestimmung an Siedewasserreaktoren vorgestellt, welches in der Lage ist, den Fuellstand aus der Messung der Intensitaetsverteilung des Gammastrahlungsfeldes ausserhalb des Reaktordruckbehaelter zu bestimmen. Die Untersuchungen einer umfangreichen Sensbilitaetsanalyse ergaben, dass der entwickelte neuronale Algorithmus fuer den abgeschalteten Reaktor sehr genaue Ergebnisse liefert und robust gegen Stoerungen ist. Die Arbeiten fuer die Erstellung des Kennfeldes fuer den Leistungsbetrieb sind noch nicht abgeschlossen. (orig.)

  19. ISRE04. Proceedings of the third international symposium on radiation education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-03-01

    The Third International Symposium on Radiation Education was held on August 23-26, 2004 at Nagasaki, Japan. The fundamental knowledge of radiation and related nuclear matters should be properly communicated to students and general public. The symposium has been devoted for developing an effective method of radiation education. To remove unnecessary fears for radiation and to utilize radiation and nuclear energy to contribute to the human welfare, the spirit of radiation education was first announced internationally in 1998 at Hayama, Japan, and then confirmed in 2002 at Debrecen, Hungary, and now was reassured in August 2004 at Nagasaki. The 80 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  1. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  2. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, the DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  3. Errors in measuring absorbed radiation and computing crop radiation use efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallo, K.P.; Daughtry, C.S.T.; Wiegand, C.L.

    1993-01-01

    Radiation use efficiency (RUE) is often a crucial component of crop growth models that relate dry matter production to energy received by the crop. RUE is a ratio that has units g J -1 , if defined as phytomass per unit of energy received, and units J J -1 , if defined as the energy content of phytomass per unit of energy received. Both the numerator and denominator in computation of RUE can vary with experimental assumptions and methodologies. The objectives of this study were to examine the effect that different methods of measuring the numerator and denominator have on the RUE of corn (Zea mays L.) and to illustrate this variation with experimental data. Computational methods examined included (i) direct measurements of the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed (f A ), (ii) estimates of f A derived from leaf area index (LAI), and (iii) estimates of f A derived from spectral vegetation indices. Direct measurements of absorbed PAR from planting to physiological maturity of corn were consistently greater than the indirect estimates based on green LAI or the spectral vegetation indices. Consequently, the RUE calculated using directly measured absorbed PAR was lower than the RUE calculated using the indirect measures of absorbed PAR. For crops that contain senesced vegetation, green LAI and the spectral vegetation indices provide appropriate estimates of the fraction of PAR absorbed by a crop canopy and, thus, accurate estimates of crop radiation use efficiency

  4. International cooperative initiatives and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakhtiari, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    transparent performance monitoring and reporting mechanisms. The article concludes with two considerations. Firstly, it advocates for the United Nations Environment Programme as one entity that could bring much-needed coordination among ICIs, and between ICIs and national government-led efforts to mitigate...... issues: there is a plethora of uncoordinated initiatives, often lacking specific, time-bound goals; to a greater or lesser extent most initiatives overlap with the activities conducted under the aegis of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC); and few initiatives have set up...

  5. Radiation effects on resins and zeolites at Three Mile Island Unit II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reilly, J.K.; Grant, P.J.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Quinn, G.J.; Runion, T.C.

    1984-01-01

    The March 1979 accident at Three Mile Island created certain waste forms that are not routinely encountered in normal light water reactor plants and were the subject of a research and development program. Fifty EPICOR II organic resin containers were loaded to as much as 2200 Ci (of predominantly cesium plus strontium) in the course of processing contaminated water. Resin samples were taken from two of the EPICOR II vessels and examined. Nineteen zeolite containers loaded with radioactive cesium plus strontium to as much as 55,000 Ci have been analyzed. The makeup and purification system demineralizer resins, highly contaminated by the letdown of reactor coolant, have been radiation surveyed, and gas, liquid, and resin samples have been obtained. On-site sampling and analysis of these wastes indicated that combustible gases (hydrogen and oxygen) were being generated as a result of radiolysis. The results of this work are discussed, compared, and presented

  6. Final report from the Spanish Society of Radiotherapy and Oncology Infrastructures Commission about department standards recommendable in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esco, R.; Pardo, J.; Palacios, A.; Biete, A.; Fernandez, J.; Valls, A.; Herrazquin, L.; Roman, P.; Magallon, R.

    2001-01-01

    The publication of the Royal Decree 1566/1988 of July 17 th , about Quality Assurance and Control in Radiation Therapy, mandates the elaboration of protocols in Radiation Therapy. Those protocols must contemplate the material and human resources necessary to implement a quality practical radiation therapy according to law. In order to establish norms regarding human and material resources, it is necessary to establish beforehand some patient care standards that serve as a frame of reference to determine the resources needed for each procedure. Furthermore, the necessary coordination of resources, material and humans that have to be present in a correct patient care planning, mandates the publication of rules that are easy to interpret and follow up. In this direction, both editions of the 'White Book of Oncology in Spain', the 'GAT Document for Radiotherapy', and the rules edited by the Committee of Experts in Radiation Therapy of the Academy of Medical Sciences of Catalunya and Balears, have represented an important advance in the establishment of these criteria in Spain. The Spanish Society of Radiation Therapy and Oncology (AERO), in an attempt to facilitate to all its associates and the health authorities some criteria for planning and implementing resources, requested its Commission of Infrastructures to elaborate a set of rules to determine the necessary resources in each radiation therapy procedure. The objective of this document is to establish some recommendations about the minimal necessities of treatment units and staff, determining their respective work capabilities, to be able to develop a quality radiation therapy in departments already existing. In summary, it is intended that the patient care is limited in a way that quality is not affected by patient overload. Also it tries to offer the Public Administration some planning criteria useful to create the necessary services of Radiation Oncology, with the adequate resources, which will bring a

  7. The third session of the United Nations Commission on Sustainable Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerrero, Juan Carlos

    1996-01-01

    Between the 11 and April of 1995, 28 almost three years later of the summit of the earth, representatives of countless countries and non government organizations (ONG) to carry out the third session of the Commission of Sustainable Development (CSD); in her were shared and they evaluated the different national experiences once again in the implementation of the program 21. The third session of the CSD began its work with two discussions in panel. The first; about the resources and financial mechanisms.; and the second; on regional matters. Then were carried out general debates on the advances in the execution of the program 21 and the drafts of the different recommendations were discussed adopted in three discussion groups: the group to that treated the chapters 2, 3, 4, 5 and 33 of the program 21; the group b that discussed the chapters 8, 34, 35 and 40; and the group c (regional matters) that embraced the chapters 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 21 of the program 21. Two days they were devoted to the presentation of national strategies for the sustainable development and of national experiences in the administration of the earth and the sustainable agriculture that showed local advances in the implementation of the program 21

  8. FOREWORD: IX International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS-2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potylitsyn, Alexander; Karataev, Pavel

    2012-05-01

    This volume contains papers presented at the IX International Symposium on Radiation from Relativistic Electrons in Periodic Structures (RREPS'11) which was held at Royal Holloway, University of London on September 12-16, Egham, United Kingdom. The symposium was organized jointly by Royal Holloway, University of London and Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk, Russia. RREPS is a biennial series of symposia founded in September 1993 as an initiative of the Nuclear Physics Institute at Tomsk Polytechnic University. The intention was to strengthen the basic and applied research focused on radiation from relativistic electrons in condensed media, particularly from natural and artificial periodic structures, and to review the research activity in this area. Since then, the symposium has developed into a forum attracting young scientists from different areas of research and from many countries. Previous successful symposia were held at Tomsk, Russia (1993, 1995, 1997, 2003), Lake Baikal, Russia (1999), Lake Aiya, Altai, Russia (2001), Czech Technical University in Prague, Czech Republic (2007) and Zvenigorod, Moscow region, Russia (2009). As an outcome of the symposia the conference proceedings have been published in Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research, Section B (Vol. 145 No 1-2, October 1998; Vol. 173 No 1-2, January 2001; Vol. 201 No 1 January 2003; Vol. 227 No 1-2, January 2005; Vol. 266 No 17, September 2008) and Journal of Physics: Conference Series (Vol. 236, June 2010). The purpose of the present RREPS'11 symposium was to review the up-to-date situation in the area of electromagnetic radiation generated by relativistic charged particles in condensed media, and to discuss the research strategy for the near future. Nowadays, electromagnetic radiation studies cover electron energies from a few MeV up to hundreds of GeV in many laboratories throughout the world. The goal is to study the physics of the generation of various kinds of radiation and their

  9. Soft x-ray camera for internal shape and current density measurements on a noncircular tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fonck, R.J.; Jaehnig, K.P.; Powell, E.T.; Reusch, M.; Roney, P.; Simon, M.P.

    1988-05-01

    Soft x-ray measurements of the internal plasma flux surface shaped in principle allow a determination of the plasma current density distribution, and provide a necessary monitor of the degree of internal elongation of tokamak plasmas with a noncircular cross section. A two-dimensional, tangentially viewing, soft x-ray pinhole camera has been fabricated to provide internal shape measurements on the PBX-M tokamak. It consists of a scintillator at the focal plane of a foil-filtered pinhole camera, which is, in turn, fiber optically coupled to an intensified framing video camera (/DELTA/t />=/ 3 msec). Automated data acquisition is performed on a stand-alone image-processing system, and data archiving and retrieval takes place on an optical disk video recorder. The entire diagnostic is controlled via a PDP-11/73 microcomputer. The derivation of the polodial emission distribution from the measured image is done by fitting to model profiles. 10 refs., 4 figs

  10. Radiation protection measures in the case of incidents and radiation accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herzberg, B.

    1976-01-01

    Measures to be taken in the case of radiation accidents connected with an unusually high radiation exposure to persons, the amounts of which exceed the limiting values, with depend on whether there has been an external or an internal exposure. In order to give further treatment in the case of whole-body or partial-body irradiation, it is necessary to estimate the exposure dose. In nuclear medicine the accident doses are generally low, i.e. acute radiation damage does not occur here, and immediate measures are not necessary. Therapeutic measures in the case of incorporation accidents are only necessary when the maximum amounts for the nuclide in question recommended by the ICRP has been reached or exceeded in the organism. However, decorporation measures ought to be carried out only by qualified radiation protection physicians. The type of radiation accident which occurs most frequently in nuclear medicine is radiation exposure as a result of contamination. If in the case of contamination of a person the measurement exceeds the radioactivity limit, the decontamination measures are necessary. In the present contribution, these measures for cases without injuries are described in detail. (orig./HP) [de

  11. Measurement of the CNA I's (Atucha I nuclear power plant) control rods reactivity during its commissioning on January 8th, 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, R.M.; Gomez, A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements were made on integral and differential calibration of rod 16, fuel racks RG and R3 and extinction reactivity during Atucha I nuclear power plant's commissioning on January 8th., 1990. These were the first physical measurements performed after the first critical nuclear power plant's commissioning. (Author) [es

  12. The International Whaling Commission – Beyond Whaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew John Wright

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Since its establishment in 1946 as the international body intended to manage whaling, the International Whaling Commission (IWC has expanded its areas of interest to ensure the wider conservation of whales. Several key conservation topics have been taken forward under its auspices including climate change, chemical and noise pollution, marine debris and whale watching. Work on each of these topics at the IWC has grown substantially since the 1990s and remains ongoing. Important developments were the establishment of the Standing Working Group on Environmental Concerns in 1996 and the IWC’s Conservation Committee in 2003. Trying to address this diverse set of issues is obviously a challenge but will be necessary if the long term conservation of cetaceans is to be achieved. Through research, workshops, resolutions and collaboration with other organisations, the IWC has advanced both the understanding of the various issues and the means to manage them with increasing effectiveness. The IWC is likely to remain on the forefront of continuing efforts to address these, and other, conservation concerns and ensure the continued viability of cetacean populations around the globe.

  13. The United Nations convention against corruption and its impact on international companies

    OpenAIRE

    Argandoña, Antonio

    2006-01-01

    Corruption is a serious economic, social, political and moral blight, especially in many emerging countries. It is a problem that affects companies in particular, especially in international commerce, finance and technology transfer. And it is becoming an international phenomenon in scope, substance and consequences. That is why, in recent years, there has been a proliferation of international efforts to tackle the problem of corruption. One such international cooperative initiative is the Un...

  14. 9. International symposium on nuclear chemistry, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    The report presents the abstracts of 30 contributions covering mainly photochemical reactions, irradiation of organic chemicals, gamma-radiation in wastewater treatment, PIXE analysis, and some aspects of nuclear spectroscopic instrumentation in radiochemical analysis

  15. 76 FR 40388 - Establishment of the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-08

    ... Establishment of the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... the establishment of the Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (Commission). The... Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform. The Commission is in the public interest in connection...

  16. International Society of Radiographers and Radiological Technologists and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yule, A.

    2001-01-01

    The ISRRT was formed in 1962 with 15 national societies and by the year 2000 has grown to comprise more than 70 member societies. The main objects of the organization are to: Improve the education of radiographers; Support the development of medical radiation technology worldwide; Promote a better understanding and implementation of radiation protection standards. The ISRRT has been a non-governmental organization in official relations with the World Health Organization (WHO) since 1967. It is the only international radiographic organization that represents radiation medicine technology and has more than 200 000 members within its 70 member countries. Representatives of the ISRRT have addressed a number of assemblies of WHO regional committees on matters relating to radiation protection and radiation medicine technology. In this way, the expertise of radiographers worldwide contributes to the establishment of international standards in vital areas, such as: Quality control; Legislation for radiation protection; Good practice in radiographic procedures; Basic radiological services. The ISRRT believes that good and consistent standards of practice throughout the world are essential

  17. Sources, Organization, Utilization of International Documentation; Proceedings of the International Symposium on the Documentation of the United Nations and Other Intergovernmental Organizations (Geneva, 21-23 August 1972).

    Science.gov (United States)

    International Federation for Documentation, The Hague (Netherlands).

    The symposium, organized by the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) with the cooperation of the Association of International Libraries (AIL), International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA), and International Federation for Documentation (FID), brought together 274 participants having a professional interest in the…

  18. Environmental assessment of radiological effluents from data gathering and maintenance operation on Three Mile Island Unit 2: interim criteria approved by the Commission on April 7,1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-05-01

    The staff is currently in the process of preparing a programmatic environmental impact statement (PEIS) for TMI-2 which will address all radiological releases that may occur as a result of the cleanup and recovery operations. These operations will begin after the PEIS is published in final form provided the proposed cleanup programs have been found to be environmentally acceptable. In the interim period it is necessary for the licensee to conduct data gathering and maintenance operations on the damaged reactor. The action of approval of these interim operations does not foreclose any of the options of the PEIS. In addition, regardless of what cleanup choice is made in the PEIS, the approval of these data gathering and maintenance operations enhance the ability of the licensee to maintain the reactor in a safe configuration and to plan effectively for recovery operations. This Environmental Impact Appraisal evaluates the effects on the environment of allowing these data gathering and maintenance operations to be conducted. These data gathering and maintenance operations do not include purging of the containment atmosphere, disposal of EPICOR-II water, or the treatment and disposal of high level radioactively contaminated water in the reactor building

  19. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Schietinger

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and test bed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the x-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultralow-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics measurements performed during the operation of the test facility, including the results of the test of an in-vacuum undulator prototype generating radiation in the vacuum ultraviolet and optical range.

  20. International conference on individual monitoring of ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanhavere, Filip

    2016-01-01

    This special issue of the journal Radiation Protection Dosimetry is dedicated to the Proceedings of the International Conference on Individual Monitoring of Ionising Radiation (IM2015), which is the fifth of a series of conferences dealing with individual monitoring. This conference series is initiated by EURADOS, the European Radiation Dosimetry Group, and is organised every 5 years. In 2015, the conference was jointly organised by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre (SCK.CEN), AV Controlatom, and the Vrije Universiteit Brussel. It brought together scientists from regulatory authorities, individual monitoring services (IMS), research bodies, European networks and companies, for the purpose of facilitating the dissemination of knowledge, exchanging experiences and promoting new ideas in the field of individual monitoring. After the conference, 124 papers were submitted for publication in these peer-reviewed proceedings. From these, 103 were finally accepted for publication. The help of the numerous referees and the guest editors is very much appreciated. These proceedings provide a full image of the IM2015 conference. The high-level publications will be useful to improve the state of individual monitoring all over the world and aim to inspire many scientists to continue their work on a better monitoring of radiologically exposed workers

  1. Report by the AERES on the unit: Research unit for man radiation protection under the supervision of establishments and bodies: IRSN; Rapport de l'AERES sur l'unite: Unite de recherche pour la protection radiologique de l'homme sous tutelle des etablissements et organismes: IRSN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-10-15

    This report is a kind of audit report on a research laboratory, whose activity is dedicated to man radiation protection, and is organized about four main themes: means to determine in any circumstances the dose received by a victim of an external irradiation or internal contamination, characterization of the biological effects ionizing radiations may create in a sane tissue, epidemiological approaches to the assessment of the exceeding risk associated with exposure to ionizing radiation on different populations, and experimental toxicology for the identification of biological effects induced par long duration and low dose exposures to some radionuclides. The authors discuss an assessment of the whole unit activities in terms of strengths and opportunities, productions and publications, scientific quality, influence and attractiveness (awards, recruitment capacity, capacity to obtain financing and to tender, participation to international programs), strategy and governance, and project. These same aspects are then discussed and commented for each theme: dosimetry, ionizing radiation pathology and experimental therapies, epidemiology of ionizing radiations, experimental and post-accidental radio-toxicology

  2. International workshop on non-ionizing radiation protection in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, Zenon

    2013-11-01

    An international workshop brought together a range of stakeholders to consider protection from non-ionizing radiation used in medicine, research and cosmetics. Presentations on specific topics were followed by a general discussion on possible improvements in protection. Participants considered that adherence to science-based, harmonized exposure guidelines to limit exposures for clinical staff and other workers was a key prerequisite to safety in all situations. In addition, to engender an awareness of the risks involved to both the patient as well as the operator, equipment should be operated only by suitably qualified persons who have received appropriate training in the safe use of that device. This training should be carried out under the auspices of an accredited safety provider, and preferably offer a recognized qualification. Specific advice included the necessity for correct eye protection with higher power optical radiation sources, and avoiding the use of ultrasound for all exposures without medical benefit. Finally, the possibility of a harmonized approach to safety for both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation was considered worthy of further discussion.

  3. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  4. Radiation detection and measurement concepts, methods and devices

    CERN Document Server

    McGregor, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    This text on radiation detection and measurement is a response to numerous requests expressed by students at various universities, in which the most popularly used books do not provide adequate background material, nor explain matters in understandable terms. This work provides a modern overview of radiation detection devices and radiation measurement methods. The topics selected in the book have been selected on the basis of the author’s many years of experience designing radiation detectors and teaching radiation detection and measurement in a classroom environment.

  5. Proceedings of the 10. International conference on small-angle scattering; Workshop on synchrotron radiation and neutron SAS: instrumentation and industrial applications. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, Aldo

    1996-01-01

    This publication contains the abstracts of the papers presented during the 10. International conference on small-angle scattering (SAS-96) and also during the Workshop on synchrotron radiation and neutron SAS: instrumentation and industrial applications. Works on the areas of inorganic materials, polymers, biology and liquid crystals are presented

  6. Quantities and concepts used in radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, G.A.; Carlsson, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is a pure physical science, as fostered by the elegant work of the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), in defining the basic quantities and units of dosimetry. Nevertheless, questions concerning the interpretation and application of some quantities still remain. The present work focuses on some of these questions and in particular deals with the quantity fluence which is frequently misunderstood. Radiation dosimetry is closely related to radiation transport theory, and the usefulness of the vectorial quantities used extensively in transport theory is pointed out. It is proposed that vectorial quantities be included in the radiometry considerations of the ICRU. This would contribute to clarifying the basic concepts of dosimetry and promoting its establishment as a physical science. Equations are given for calculating the absorbed dose in various conditions of radiation equilibrium, along with discussions of the quantities needed for their evaluations. These equations are relevant to the important field of cavity theory. Refinements of existing cavity theories, in particular those for photon and electron irradiations, can benefit from a deeper understanding of these equations and the various conditions of equilibrium in which they are valid. (author)

  7. International Symposium on Standards, Applications and Quality Assurance in Medical Radiation Dosimetry (IDOS). Book of Extended Synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The major goal of the symposium is to provide a forum where advances in radiation dosimetry during the last decade, in radiation medicine and radiation protection can be disseminated and scientific knowledge exchanged. It will include all specialties in radiation medicine and radiation protection dosimetry with a specific focus on those areas where the standardization of dosimetry has improved in the recent years (brachytherapy, diagnostic radiology and nuclear medicine). It will also summarize the present status and outline future trends in medical radiation dosimetry and identify possible areas for improvement. Its conclusions and summaries should lead to the formulation of recommendations for the scientific community

  8. Statistical analysis of electromagnetic radiation measurements in the vicinity of GSM/UMTS base station installed on buildings in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koprivica, Mladen; Slavkovic, Vladimir; Neskovic, Natasa; Neskovic, Aleksandar

    2016-01-01

    As a result of dense deployment of public mobile base stations, additional electromagnetic (EM) radiation occurs in the modern human environment. At the same time, public concern about the exposure to EM radiation emitted by such sources has increased. In order to determine the level of radio frequency radiation generated by base stations, extensive EM field strength measurements were carried out for 664 base station locations, from which 276 locations refer to the case of base stations with antenna system installed on buildings. Having in mind the large percentage (42 %) of locations with installations on buildings, as well as the inevitable presence of people in their vicinity, a detailed analysis of this location category was performed. Measurement results showed that the maximum recorded value of total electric field strength has exceeded International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection general public exposure reference levels at 2.5 % of locations and Serbian national reference levels at 15.6 % of locations. It should be emphasised that the values exceeding the reference levels were observed only outdoor, while in indoor total electric field strength in no case exceeded the defined reference levels. (authors)

  9. Statistical analysis of electromagnetic radiation measurements in the vicinity of GSM/UMTS base station installed on buildings in Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koprivica, Mladen; Slavkovic, Vladimir; Neskovic, Natasa; Neskovic, Aleksandar

    2016-03-01

    As a result of dense deployment of public mobile base stations, additional electromagnetic (EM) radiation occurs in the modern human environment. At the same time, public concern about the exposure to EM radiation emitted by such sources has increased. In order to determine the level of radio frequency radiation generated by base stations, extensive EM field strength measurements were carried out for 664 base station locations, from which 276 locations refer to the case of base stations with antenna system installed on buildings. Having in mind the large percentage (42 %) of locations with installations on buildings, as well as the inevitable presence of people in their vicinity, a detailed analysis of this location category was performed. Measurement results showed that the maximum recorded value of total electric field strength has exceeded International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection general public exposure reference levels at 2.5 % of locations and Serbian national reference levels at 15.6 % of locations. It should be emphasised that the values exceeding the reference levels were observed only outdoor, while in indoor total electric field strength in no case exceeded the defined reference levels. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The world population plan of action and the regional commissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    Since their establishment, the regional commissions of the United Nations have been devoting particular attention to population and development concerns. Each commission with its unique social, demographic, economic and political characteristics, has contributed to the international debate on population issues. The commissions have provided a suitable forum for the discussion of those issues, have established programs and activities to respond to them, and, with growing experience and expertise, have contributed to a better understanding of them. National Governments, international organizations, private groups, and the public in general have benefited from their regional activities. This article deals with the substantive contributions of the regional commissions to the last 2 population conferences, the World Population Conference (Bucharest, 1974), where the World Population Plan of Action was adopted, and the International Conference on Population (Mexico City, 1984), where the experience in applying Plan of Action was assessed and a set recommendations for the further implementation of the Plan adopted.

  11. Paternity Testing Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on genetic investigations in paternity cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Allen, Robert W; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-01-01

    The International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has established a Paternity Testing Commission (PTC) with the purpose of formulating international recommendations concerning genetic investigations in paternity testing. The PTC recommends that paternity testing be performed in accordance...

  12. Commissioning of energy-efficiency measures: Costs and benefits for 16 buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piette, M.A.; Nordman, B.; Greenberg, S.

    1995-04-01

    Building systems and energy-efficiency measures (EEMs) often don`t perform as well in practice as expected at the design stage. This fact has become clear to many organizations concerned with ensuring building performance. What to do about these problems is less clear. Several electric utilities around the U.S. have begun to take action to address the start-up, control, and operational problems that are found in nearly every building. One of the most beneficial periods to intervene in the building life cycle is during the start-up phase of a now building. Building commissioning during start up is such an intervention. Commissioning can be defined as: a set of procedures, responsibilities, and methods to advance a system from static installation to full working order in accordance with design intent. In broad terms, commissioning can extend from design reviews through operations and maintenance planning and training. With such a broad scope aimed at the entire building life cycle, commissioning is often likened to {open_quotes}Total Quality Management{close_quotes} Yet the heart of commissioning are the procedures developed and executed to ensure that all building systems function as intended. The incorporation of energy-efficiency criteria into building commissioning is a new development.

  13. Assessment and comparison of methods for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leszczynski, K.

    1995-06-01

    In the study, the different methods to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation are compared. The methods included are spectroradiometric, erythemally weighted broadband and multi-channel measurements. The comparison of the different methods is based on a literature review and assessments of optical characteristics of the spectroradiometer Optronic 742 of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and of the erythemally weighted Robertson-Berger type broadband radiometers Solar Light models 500 and 501 of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and STUK. An introduction to the sources of error in solar UV measurements, to methods for radiometric characterization of UV radiometers together with methods for error reduction are presented. Reviews on experiences from world-wide UV monitoring efforts and instrumentation as well as on the results from international UV radiometer intercomparisons are also presented. (62 refs.)

  14. Assessment and comparison of methods for solar ultraviolet radiation measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leszczynski, K.

    1995-06-01

    In the study, the different methods to measure the solar ultraviolet radiation are compared. The methods included are spectroradiometric, erythemally weighted broadband and multi-channel measurements. The comparison of the different methods is based on a literature review and assessments of optical characteristics of the spectroradiometer Optronic 742 of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK) and of the erythemally weighted Robertson-Berger type broadband radiometers Solar Light models 500 and 501 of the Finnish Meteorological Institute and STUK. An introduction to the sources of error in solar UV measurements, to methods for radiometric characterization of UV radiometers together with methods for error reduction are presented. Reviews on experiences from world-wide UV monitoring efforts and instrumentation as well as on the results from international UV radiometer intercomparisons are also presented. (62 refs.).

  15. 10th International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids - COSIRES 2010. Abstracts and Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    COSIRES 2010 is the 10 th International Conference on Computer Simulation of Radiation Effects in Solids. This series of conferences addresses the development and application of advanced computer modeling techniques to the study of phenomena taking place during interaction of energetic particles and clusters (from several eV to some MeV) with solids. Due to the continuous development of new theoretical methodologies and permanent increase of computer power this research field is growing fast. The application of computer simulations leads to a better understanding of basic microscopic processes taking place during and after irradiation. Fundamental understanding of such processes is often not accessible by experimental methods since they occur on very small time and length scales. However, computer simulation techniques are not only used for investigations of basic phenomena but also increasingly applied in the development of modern industrial technologies. Conference topics include, but are not limited to: I) Computer modeling of following phenomena: · Sputtering; · Formation and evolution of radiation defects in materials; · Radiation responses of structural materials important for nuclear and fusion industry; · Irradiation-induced evolution of surface topography and ripple formation; · Ion beam synthesis of thin films and nanostructures; · Ion-, electron and photon-induced physical and chemical effects at surfaces, interfaces and nanostructures; · Irradiation-induced charge redistribution, electron excitation and electron-phonon interactions II) Development of new computer modeling protocols and interatomic potentials for investigation of radiation effects. The conference follows previous meetings that were held in Berlin/Germany (1992), Santa Barbara/USA (1994), Guildford/UK (1996), Okayama/Japan (1998), State College/USA (2000), Dresden/Germany (2002), Helsinki/Finland (2004), Richland/USA (2006) and finally in Beijing/China (2008). Current meeting is

  16. Safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials. Proceedings of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This International Conference, hosted by the Government of France and co-sponsored by the European Commission, the International Criminal Police Organization (Interpol) and the World Customs Organization (WCO), was the first one devoted to the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials and - for the first time - brought together radiation safety experts, regulators, and customs and police officers, who need to closely co-operate for solving the problem of illicit trafficking. The technical sessions reviewed the state of the art of twelve major topics, divided into two groups: the safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials. The safety part comprised regulatory control, safety assessment techniques, engineering and managerial measures, lessons from experience, international cooperation through reporting systems and databases, verification of safety through inspection and the use of performance indicators for a regulatory programme. The security part comprised measures to prevent breaches in the security of radioactive materials, detection and identification techniques for illicit trafficking, response to detected cases and seized radioactive materials, strengthening awareness, training and exchange of information. The Conference was a success in fostering information exchange through the reviews of the state of the art and the frank and open discussions. It raised awareness of the need for Member States to ensure effective systems of control and for preventing, detecting and responding to illicit trafficking in radioactive materials. The Conference finished by recommending investigating whether international undertakings concerned with an effective operation of national systems for ensuring the safety of radiation sources and security of radioactive materials

  17. Estimation of Asian dust aerosol effect on cloud radiation forcing using Fu-Liou radiative model and CERES measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Su

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The impact of Asian dust on cloud radiative forcing during 2003–2006 is studied by using the Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy Budget Scanner (CERES data and the Fu-Liou radiative transfer model. Analysis of satellite data shows that the dust aerosol significantly reduced the cloud cooling effect at TOA. In dust contaminated cloudy regions, the 4-year mean values of the instantaneous shortwave, longwave and net cloud radiative forcing are −138.9, 69.1, and −69.7 Wm−2, which are 57.0, 74.2, and 46.3%, respectively, of the corresponding values in pristine cloudy regions. The satellite-retrieved cloud properties are significantly different in the dusty regions and can influence the radiative forcing indirectly. The contributions to the cloud radiation forcing by the dust direct, indirect and semi-direct effects are estimated using combined satellite observations and Fu-Liou model simulation. The 4-year mean value of combination of dust indirect and semi-direct shortwave radiative forcing (SWRF is 82.2 Wm−2, which is 78.4% of the total dust effect. The dust direct effect is only 22.7 Wm−2, which is 21.6% of the total effect. Because both first and second indirect effects enhance cloud cooling, the aerosol-induced cloud warming is mainly the result of the semi-direct effect of dust.

  18. Proceedings of the international workshop on building the new HRA: errors of commission - from research to application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The main mission of the Working Group on Risk Assessment (RISK) is to advance the understanding and utilisation of probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) in ensuring continued safety of nuclear installations in Member countries. One of the major criticisms of current PSAs is that they do not adequately address an important class of human system interactions, namely inappropriate actions, particularly those that might occur during the response to a transient or accident, that place the plant in a situation of higher risk. This class of inappropriate actions is often referred to as 'errors of commission'. The principal characteristic of an error of commission in a PSA context is that its consequence is a state of unavailability of a component, system or function. This is in contrast to an error of omission, which is characterised by a lack of action and, therefore, preserves the status quo of a system, component, or function. In the PSA context, the most significant errors of commission are those that, in addition to resulting in failure to perform some function, also fail or make unavailable other equipment or functions needed to mitigate the accident scenario, or otherwise exacerbate the situation. The workshop reported herein is an extension of the work of the Working Group on Risk Assessment (RISK) performed to review errors of commission in probabilistic safety analysis (NEA/CSNI/R(2000)17). The main purpose of the meeting was to provide a forum for exchange of information including lessons learned, identification of gaps in our current understanding and knowledge, data needs, and research needs. This workshop also provides a perspective for another workshop, Building the New HRA: Strengthening the Link Between Experience and HRA, to be held in Munich in January of 2002. Individual speakers present a broad international perspective that summarises technical issues, lessons learned, and experiences gained through applying second-generation human reliability

  19. Radiation damage studies on natural and synthetic rock salt utilizing measurements made during electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swyler, K.J.; Levy, P.W.

    1977-01-01

    The numerous radiation damage effects which will occur in the rock salt surrounding radioactive waste disposal canisters are being investigated with unique apparatus for making optical and other measurements during 1 to 3 MeV electron irradiation. This equipment, consists of a computer controlled double beam spectrophotometer which simultaneously records 256 point absorption and radioluminescence spectra, in either the 200 to 400 or 400 to 800 nm region, every 40 seconds. Most often the measurements commence as the irradiation is started and continue after it is terminated. This procedure provides information on the kinetics and other details of the damage formation process and, when the irradiation is terminated, on both the transient and stable damage components. The exposure rates may be varied between 10 2 or 10 3 to more than 10 8 rad per hour and the sample temperature maintained between 25 and 800 or 900 0 C. Although this project was started recently, measurements have been made on synthetic NaCl and on natural rock salt from two disposal sites and two mines. Both unstrained and purposely strained samples have been used. Most recently, measurements at temperatures between 25 and 200 0 C have been started. The few measurements completed to date indicate that the damage formation kinetics in natural rock salt are quite different from those observed in synthetic NaCl

  20. Investigation on Main Radiation Source at Operation Floor of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Hideo; Kondo, Kenjiro; Suzuki, Seishiro; Hamamoto, Shimpei; Iwanaga, Kohei

    2017-09-01

    Pulse height distributions were measured using a LaBr3 detector set in a 1 cm lead collimator to investigate main radiation source at the operation floor of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Unit 4. It was confirmed that main radiation source above the reactor well was Co-60 from the activated steam dryer in the DS pool (Dryer-Separator pool) and that at the standby area was Cs-134 and Cs-137 from contaminated buildings and debris at the lower floor. Full energy peak count rate of Co-60 was reduced about 1/3 by 12mm lead sheet placed on the floor of the fuel handling machine.

  1. Título da página: International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Cristina Santos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission (IGLHRC é uma organização não governamental criada em 1990 por um grupo de activistas russos e norte-americanos. Tendo por objectivo denunciar situações de discriminação em todo o mundo e garantir o respeito pelos direitos humanos de todas as pessoas independentemente da sua orientação sexual ou identidade de género, esta ONG reúne na sua página informação sobre legislação em vigor (especialmente para candidatos/as a pedidos de asilo, ...

  2. A European handbook for teachers on radiation and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teunen, D.

    1994-01-01

    The Commission of the European Communities (Directorate General XI) has taken several initiatives to assist Member States, one of them being the development of a handbook for teachers on radiation and radiation protection, in order to give teachers a clear, scientifically valid and objective set of materials to enable those who so wish to includes courses on radiation protection in their teaching programmes. The draft handbook has been tested in five countries and is to be published in English and French in 1993. Translations in all Community languages are envisaged

  3. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff Practice and Procedure Digest. Digest No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-08-01

    This second edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to March 31, 1978 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This second edition replaces the first edition and its supplements and includes appropriate changes reflecting the recent amendments to the Rules of Practice which became effective on May 26, 1978

  4. 75 FR 54225 - Comment Request for the Financial Literacy and Education Commission on the Draft National...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Comment Request for the Financial Literacy and Education Commission on the Draft National Strategy, Entitled National Strategy for Financial Literacy 2010 AGENCY: Department... Literacy and Education Commission (Commission) through passage of the Financial Literacy and Education...

  5. Radiation research within the framework programmes of the European Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karaoglou, A.; Kelly, G.N.; Desmet, G.; Menzel, H.G.; Schibilla, H.; Olast, M.; Gasperini, F.; Chadwick, K.H.; Sinnave, J. [European Commission Directorate General science, Brussels (Belgium). Research and Development, Radiation Protection Research Action

    1997-09-01

    The background to the radiation protection research and training programme of the European Commission is described in the presentation. The objectives and achievements of the third framework programme are summarised together with a description of how the achievements led to the establishment of the priorities for the fourth framework programme. Indications on the preliminary prospects for the fifth framework programme, 1998-2002 are also given. (6 refs.).

  6. International cooperative effort to establish ASTM [American Society for Testing and Materials] standards for the measurement of radiation dose for food processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, H. IV.

    1987-01-01

    A task group has been formed within the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) specifically to develop standards for measuring radiation dose for food processing. The task group, which has 78 members, including 16 from Europe, consists of a broad cross section of food industry, government, regulatory, manufacturing, and university interests. The group is working on seven standards; three specifically for food irradiation applications, and four for using specific dosimeter types for all radiation applications, including food processing. Together, this set of standards will specify acceptable methods of accomplishing the required irradiation treatment of food and other products, and will be available for adoption by regulatory agencies in food irradiation protocols. 1 tab

  7. Surgical volume and postoperative mortality rate at a referral hospital in Western Uganda: Measuring the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery indicators in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Geoffrey A; Ilcisin, Lenka; Abesiga, Lenard; Mayanja, Ronald; Portal Benetiz, Noralis; Ngonzi, Joseph; Kayima, Peter; Shrime, Mark G

    2017-06-01

    The Lancet Commission on Global Surgery recommends that every country report its surgical volume and postoperative mortality rate. Little is known, however, about the numbers of operations performed and the associated postoperative mortality rate in low-income countries or how to best collect these data. For one month, every patient who underwent an operation at a referral hospital in western Uganda was observed. These patients and their outcomes were followed until discharge. Prospective data were compared with data obtained from logbooks and patient charts to determine the validity of using retrospective methods for collecting these metrics. Surgical volume at this regional hospital in Uganda is 8,515 operations/y, compared to 4,000 operations/y reported in the only other published data. The postoperative mortality rate at this hospital is 2.4%, similar to other hospitals in low-income countries. Finding patient files in the medical records department was time consuming and yielded only 62% of the files. Furthermore, a comparison of missing versus found charts revealed that the missing charts were significantly different from the found charts. Logbooks, on the other hand, captured 99% of the operations and 94% of the deaths. Our results describe a simple, reproducible, accurate, and inexpensive method for collection of the Lancet Commission on Global Surgery variables using logbooks that already exist in most hospitals in low-income countries. While some have suggested using risk-adjusted postoperative mortality rate as a more equitable variable, our data suggest that only a limited amount of risk adjustment is possible given the limited available data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The internal structure of the unit performance construct as measured by the performance index (PI1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roline Henning

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to investigate the internal structure of the Performance Index in order to establish the interrelationships between the eight unit performance latent variables. The present study forms part of a larger study aimed at validating the Leadership Behaviour Inventory (LBI (Spangenberg & Theron, 2002b against work unit performance. The validation sample, after imputation of missing values, consisted of 273 cases with observations on all 56 items. Item analysis and dimensionality analysis was performed on each of the sub-scales using SPSS-windows. Thereafter, confirmatory factor analysis was performed on the reduced data set using LISREL. The results indicated satisfactory factor loadings on the measurement model. Acceptable model fit was achieved. Subsequently, the structural model was tested using LISREL. The results provided statistics of good fit. Only four hypotheses failed to be corroborated in this study. The results are discussed and suggestions for further research are made. Opsomming Die doel van hierdie studie was om die interne struktuur van die Performance Indexs (PI (Spangenberg en Theron, 2002b te ondersoek ten einde die interverwantskappe tussen die agt latente eeheidprestasiedimensies te bepaal. Hierdie studie vorm deel van ’n meer omvattende studie wat daarop gemik is om die Leadership Behaviour Inventory (LBI teen werkeenheidprestasie te valideer. Die steekproef, na imputasie van ontbrekende waardes, het uit 273 gevalle bestaan met waarnemings ten opsigte van al 56 items. Item- en dimensionaliteitontledings is met behulp van SPSS-windows op elke subskaal gedoen. Bevestigende faktorontleding is daarna met behulp van LISREL op die verkleinde datastel uitgevoer. Die resultate het op bevredigende faktorbeladings vir die metingsmodel en ’n bevredigende passing van die metingsmodel gedui. Daarna is die strukturele model met behulp van LISREL getoets. Die resultate het bevredigende passing getoon, met

  9. Proceedings of the International Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management 'sharing practices and experiences'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-06-01

    The objective of the Workshop on Occupational Radiation Protection in Severe Accident Management was to share practices and experiences in approaches to severe accident management. The workshop: provided an international forum for information and experience exchange amongst nuclear electricity utilities and national regulatory authorities on approaches to, and issues in severe accident management, including national and international implications. Focus was placed on sharing practices and experiences in many countries on approaches to severe accident management; identified best occupational radiation protection approaches in strategies, practices, as well as limitations for developing effective management. This included experiences in various countries; identified national experiences to be incorporated into the final version of ISOE EG-SAM report. The workshop included a series of plenary presentations that provided participants with an overview of practices and experiences in severe accident management from various countries. Furthermore, by taking into account the structure of the interim report, common themes and issues were discussed in follow-up breakout sessions. Sessions included invited speakers, moderated by designated experts, allowing participants to discuss their national experiences and possible inputs into the report. The outcomes of the breakout sessions were presented in plenary by the respective moderators followed by an open discussion, with a view towards elaborating ways forward to achieve more effective severe accident management. This document brings together the abstracts and the slides of the available presentations

  10. Commissioning and performance of the ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker with Cosmic Rays and first high energy collision at LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wagner, P; The ATLAS collaboration

    2010-01-01

    The ATLAS Transition Radiation Tracker (TRT) is the outermost of the three sub-systems of the ATLAS Inner Detector at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. It consists of 298,304 thin- wall drift tubes (straws) providing on average 30 two-dimensional space points with 0.13 mm resolution for charged particle tracks with |η| 0.5 GeV. Along with continuous tracking, it provides particle identification capability through the detection of transition radiation X-ray photons generated by high velocity particles in the many polymer fibers or films that fill the spaces between the straws. The front-end electronics implements two thresholds to discriminate the signals: a low threshold (6 keV) to flag the absorption of transition radiation X-rays. In this talk, a review of the commissioning and first operational experience of the TRT detector will be presented. Emphasis will be given to initial performance studies based on the reconstruction and analysis of several million cosmic ray tracks collected in the ATLAS cavern....

  11. Radiation risk estimation based on measurement error models

    CERN Document Server

    Masiuk, Sergii; Shklyar, Sergiy; Chepurny, Mykola; Likhtarov, Illya

    2017-01-01

    This monograph discusses statistics and risk estimates applied to radiation damage under the presence of measurement errors. The first part covers nonlinear measurement error models, with a particular emphasis on efficiency of regression parameter estimators. In the second part, risk estimation in models with measurement errors is considered. Efficiency of the methods presented is verified using data from radio-epidemiological studies.

  12. China's international trade and air pollution in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jintai; Pan, Da; Davis, Steven J; Zhang, Qiang; He, Kebin; Wang, Can; Streets, David G; Wuebbles, Donald J; Guan, Dabo

    2014-02-04

    China is the world's largest emitter of anthropogenic air pollutants, and measurable amounts of Chinese pollution are transported via the atmosphere to other countries, including the United States. However, a large fraction of Chinese emissions is due to manufacture of goods for foreign consumption. Here, we analyze the impacts of trade-related Chinese air pollutant emissions on the global atmospheric environment, linking an economic-emission analysis and atmospheric chemical transport modeling. We find that in 2006, 36% of anthropogenic sulfur dioxide, 27% of nitrogen oxides, 22% of carbon monoxide, and 17% of black carbon emitted in China were associated with production of goods for export. For each of these pollutants, about 21% of export-related Chinese emissions were attributed to China-to-US export. Atmospheric modeling shows that transport of the export-related Chinese pollution contributed 3-10% of annual mean surface sulfate concentrations and 0.5-1.5% of ozone over the western United States in 2006. This Chinese pollution also resulted in one extra day or more of noncompliance with the US ozone standard in 2006 over the Los Angeles area and many regions in the eastern United States. On a daily basis, the export-related Chinese pollution contributed, at a maximum, 12-24% of sulfate concentrations over the western United States. As the United States outsourced manufacturing to China, sulfate pollution in 2006 increased in the western United States but decreased in the eastern United States, reflecting the competing effect between enhanced transport of Chinese pollution and reduced US emissions. Our findings are relevant to international efforts to reduce transboundary air pollution.

  13. Communications before the African Commission on Human and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Communications before the African Commission on Human and Peoples' Rights 1988-2002. Magnus Killander. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for ...

  14. Comment on the report "Operational Earthquake Forecasting" by the International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting for Civil Protection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Crampin

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available

    The recently published report Operational Earthquake Forecasting: State of Knowledge and Guidelines for Utilization by the International Commission on Earthquake Forecasting for Civil Protection (ICEF presupposes that there is no method for the short-term prediction of large earthquakes that has been demonstrated to be both reliable and skillful. This is no longer correct. Earthquakes can be deterministically stress-forecast by using shear-wave splitting to monitor stress-accumulation in the rock mass surrounding the earthquake source. This new understanding of fluid-rock deformation means that the recommendations of the ICEF Report are no longer appropriate. This comment reviews this new understanding and suggests that the way forward for operational earthquake forecasting in Italy is to install one or more controlled-source three-borehole Stress-Monitoring Sites and use shear-wave splitting to monitor stress-accumulation and stress-forecast all damaging (M ≥ 5 earthquakes in Italy.

  15. International workshop 'Effect of ionizing radiation on ecological situation of countries from Caucasian region and Caspian sea basin'. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimov, M.K.; Birsen, N.; Gaziev, A.I.

    2002-10-01

    The scientists from following countries took part at the international workshop: Azerbaijan, Turkey, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Russia, Uzbekistan. The activity was conducted in two sections. Section A was devoted to the problems of radiation safety and natural sciences of radiation contamination in Caucasian region and Caspian sea basin, oil industry and technology and environment monitoring. Section B was devoted to the evaluation of radiation risks, radioprotectors, ecological and genetical consequences of the anthropogenic factors effect on the environment

  16. Global view on radiation protection in medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vano, E.

    2011-01-01

    When planning good management of ionising radiation in medicine, key factors such as ensuring that health professionals work together and convincing them that radiation protection (RP) represents a substantial part of the quality management system in their clinical practice are of utmost importance. The United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation has decided that one of the thematic priorities will be medical radiation exposure of patients. The International Commission on Radiological Protection has recently updated the report on RP in medicine and continues to work on focused documents centred on specific areas where advice is needed. The roles of the International Atomic Energy Agency, World Health Organization and the European Commission, in the area of RP in medicine, are described in the present document. The industry, the standardisation organisations as well as many scientific and professional societies are also dedicating significant effort to radiation safety aspects in medicine. Some of the efforts and priorities contemplated in RP in medicine over the coming years are suggested. The best outcome will be accomplished when all the actors, i.e. medical doctors, other health professionals, regulators, health authorities and the industry manage to work together. (authors)

  17. 28 CFR 0.124 - United States Parole Commission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false United States Parole Commission. 0.124... United States Parole Commission § 0.124 United States Parole Commission. The U.S. Parole Commission is composed of nine Commissioners of whom one is designated Chairman. The Commission: (a) Has authority, under...

  18. Optics measurements and corrections at the early commissioning of SuperKEKB

    CERN Document Server

    Ohnishi, Y; Morita, A; Koiso, H; Oide, K; Ohmi, K; Zhou, D; Funakoshi, Y; Carmignani, N; Liuzzo, S M; Biagini, M E; Boscolo, M; Guiducci, S

    2017-01-01

    We present experimental results of measurements and corrections for the optics at the early Phase-1 commissioning of SuperKEKB. The aim of SuperKEKB is a positron-electron collider built to achieve the target luminosity of 8x10^35 cm^−2s^−1. We have three stages; Phase-1 is the commissioning of the machine without the final focus magnets and detector solenoid(no collision); the collision with the final focus system and the Belle II detector will be performed at Phase-2 and Phase-3. The strategy for the luminosity upgrade is a novel "nano-beam” scheme found elsewhere[1]. In order to achieve the target luminosity, the vertical emittance has to be reduced by corrections of machine error measured with an orbit response. The vertical emittance should be achieved to be less than 10pm(∼0.2% coupling) during Phase-1 by fully utilizing correction tools of skew quadrupole-likecoils wound on sextupole magnets and power supplies for each correction coil in quadrupole magnets.

  19. 76 FR 53847 - New International Commission on Radiological Protection; Recommendations on the Annual Dose Limit...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-30

    ... operate nuclear facilities under the NRC's jurisdiction. Of these, the regulations that are most relevant... regulations. For example, 10 CFR part 35, ``Medical Use of Byproduct Material,'' contains requirements related... radiation-induced cataract formation is now considered by the ICRP to be 0.50 Gy (50 rem). Consequently, for...

  20. The international food unit: a new measurement aid that can improve portion size estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucher, T; Weltert, M; Rollo, M E; Smith, S P; Jia, W; Collins, C E; Sun, M

    2017-09-12

    Portion size education tools, aids and interventions can be effective in helping prevent weight gain. However consumers have difficulties in estimating food portion sizes and are confused by inconsistencies in measurement units and terminologies currently used. Visual cues are an important mediator of portion size estimation, but standardized measurement units are required. In the current study, we present a new food volume estimation tool and test the ability of young adults to accurately quantify food volumes. The International Food Unit™ (IFU™) is a 4x4x4 cm cube (64cm 3 ), subdivided into eight 2 cm sub-cubes for estimating smaller food volumes. Compared with currently used measures such as cups and spoons, the IFU™ standardizes estimation of food volumes with metric measures. The IFU™ design is based on binary dimensional increments and the cubic shape facilitates portion size education and training, memory and recall, and computer processing which is binary in nature. The performance of the IFU™ was tested in a randomized between-subject experiment (n = 128 adults, 66 men) that estimated volumes of 17 foods using four methods; the IFU™ cube, a deformable modelling clay cube, a household measuring cup or no aid (weight estimation). Estimation errors were compared between groups using Kruskall-Wallis tests and post-hoc comparisons. Estimation errors differed significantly between groups (H(3) = 28.48, p estimations were most accurate in the group using the IFU™ cube (Mdn = 18.9%, IQR = 50.2) and least accurate using the measuring cup (Mdn = 87.7%, IQR = 56.1). The modelling clay cube led to a median error of 44.8% (IQR = 41.9). Compared with the measuring cup, the estimation errors using the IFU™ were significantly smaller for 12 food portions and similar for 5 food portions. Weight estimation was associated with a median error of 23.5% (IQR = 79.8). The IFU™ improves volume estimation accuracy compared to other methods. The

  1. Protecting agriculture against nuclear radiations: conception and measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehmann Hans-Joerg

    1997-01-01

    In case of atomic and chemical (AC) accident or attacks the agriculture is severely affected. This became clearly after the Chernobyl disaster, after which the authorities mobilized and increased the efforts to protect the agriculture. In Switzerland the Federal Commission for AC protection has undertaken the necessary actions in collaboration with the Federal Office for Agriculture. The protection of agriculture against radioactive fallout has many aspects. One of these concerns the requirement of informing farmers with all the necessary instruction to ensure the protection of rural population and animals, foods and forages, to make them able to take essential protection measures without exterior assistance, and to provide the agriculture buildings with simple and durable tools necessary in case of emergency intervention. To implement these requirements on Confederation level educational programs were developed to instruct agriculture agents and advisors on basic notions of radioactivity and radiation protection. These programs are thought to make the farmer aware with the implications of nuclear chemical and nuclear menace and the measures of protecting its enterprise by own means. Special instructions are to be applied by the enterprise chiefs to ensure first that the personnel protection is the top priority and then how to minimize and limit the damage produced by the radiation accident

  2. Manual on radiation haematology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1971-01-01

    Studies of the biological effects of ionizing radiation have led to the introduction of various measures to protect both the public and personnel engaged in occupations where they could be exposed to such radiations. Many recent studies deal with the basic mechanism of radiation injuries and with their treatment, and some of these investigations have been sponsored by the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Agency. Fundamental studies of the blood-forming tissue have provided the information necessary for formulating recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Heinecke in 1903 was the first to note damage to the haemato-poietic tissue after whole-body irradiation. Since that time we have learned much of the functions of the various components of the blood. Many studies have been undertaken to understand the proliferative capacities of the various 'stem' cells involved in the haematopoietic processes and the extent to which these processes can be interfered with by ionizing radiations. We now understand which are the reliable criteria by which radiation damage can be assessed from its effects on the haematopoietic system. In addition, much work has been done to determine how radiation injury to the hematopoietic system may be offset by therapy. In developing countries radiation is being increasingly applied in medical work and many other fields, and there is an immediate need to disseminate information relevant to radiation hazards. This Manual on Radiation Haematology is an attempt at a synthesis of much that is relevant to these matters. As the Contents List shows, many experts have contributed to the book. Their styles have been changed as little as possible. A certain amount of duplication of information could not be avoided; where an editorial decision to remove a passage would have resulted in losing the exact concept that the author wished to express, this passage has been retained. Information from

  3. Basic concepts in dosimetry. A critical analysis of the concepts of ionizing radiation and energy imparted

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlson, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    The concepts of ionizing radiation and energy imparted defined by the ICRU in 1971 (Radiation Quantities and Units, Report 19, International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Washington, D.C., 1971) are critically analyzed. It is found that the definitions become more consistent by changing them at two points. Charged particles with insufficient kinetic energy to ionize by collision but which are capable of initiating nuclear and elementary particle transformations are suggested to be classified as ionizing particles. In addition, the expressions ''the energy released'' or the ''energy expended'' in a nuclear or elementary particle transformation are suggested to be specified as ''the change in rest-mass energy of nuclei and elementary particles.'' Then the ionization caused by, for instance, nuclear reactions contributes to the energy imparted and the Q-value of an excitation or deexcitation of the electron structure, regarded as an elementary particle transformation, is zero

  4. Impact of Mindfulness Training on Physiological Measures of Stress and Objective Measures of Attention Control in a Military Helicopter Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meland, Anders; Ishimatsu, Kazuma; Pensgaard, Anne Marte; Wagstaff, Anthony; Fonne, Vivianne; Garde, Anne Helene; Harris, Anette

    2015-10-02

    Objective : This study sought to determine if mindfulness training (MT) has a measurable impact on stress and attentional control as measured by objective physiological and psychological means. Background : Periods of persistent, intensive work demands are known to compromise recovery and attentional capacity. The effects of 4-month MT on salivary cortisol and performance on 2 computer-based cognitive tasks were tested on a military helicopter unit exposed to a prolonged period of high workload. Methods : MT participants were compared to a wait list control group on levels of saliva cortisol and performance on a go-no go test and a test of stimulus-driven attentional capture. Participants also reported mental demands on the go-no go test, time of wakeup, sleep duration, quality of sleep, outcome expectancies, physical activity level, self-perceived mindfulness, and symptoms of depression and anxiety. Results : The results from a mixed between-within analysis revealed that the MT participants compared to the control group had a larger pre to post increase in high- and low-cortisol slopes, and decrease in perceived mental demand imposed by the go-no go test. Conclusion : MT alleviates some of the physiological stress response and the subjective mental demands of challenging tasks in a military helicopter unit during a period of high workload.

  5. Radiation protection commissioning of neutron beam instruments at the OPAL research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkes, Alison; Saratsopoulos, John; Deura, Michael; Kenny, Pat

    2008-01-01

    The neutron beam facilities at the 20 MW OPAL Research Reactor were commissioned in 2007 and 2008. The initial suite of eight neutron beam instruments on two thermal neutron guides, two cold neutron guides and one thermal beam port located at the reactor face, together with their associated shielding were progressively installed and commissioned according to their individual project plans. Radiation surveys were systematically conducted as reactor power was raised in a step-wise manner to 20 MW in order to validate instrument shielding design and performance. The performance of each neutron guide was assessed by neutron energy spectrum and flux measurements. The activation of beam line components, decay times assessments and access procedures for Bragg Institute beam instrument scientists were established. The multiple configurations for each instrument and the influence of operating more than one instrument or beamline simultaneously were also tested. Areas of interest were the shielding around the secondary shutters, guide shield and bunker shield interfaces and monochromator doors. The shielding performance, safety interlock checks, improvements, radiation exposures and related radiation protection challenges are discussed. This paper discusses the health physics experience of commissioning the OPAL Research Reactor neutron beam facilities and describes health physics results, actions taken and lessons learned during commissioning. (author)

  6. Terror weapons. Ridding the world of nuclear, biological and chemical weapons - Commission on mass destruction weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.; Journe, V.

    2010-01-01

    This book approaches in 8 chapters the ambitious challenge of ridding the world of all mass destruction weapons: 1 - re-launching disarmament; 2 - terror weapons: nature of threats and answers (weakness of traditional answers, counter-proliferation); 3 - nuclear weapons: preventing proliferation and terrorism, reducing threat and nuclear weapons number, from regulation to banning); 4 - biological or toxin weapons; 5 - chemical weapons; 6 - vectors, anti-missile defenses and space weapons; 7 - exports control, international assistance and non-governmental actors; 8 - respect, verification, enforcement and role of the United Nations. The recommendations and works of the Commission are presented in appendix together with the declaration adopted on April 30, 2009. (J.S.)

  7. Commission on Social Security

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2010-01-01

    A commission studying past, present, and future social stakes ! For many years we have been hearing about the problems of funding of health insurance benefits in our different Member States. At CERN we are not totally immune from this problem.  To start with, let us recall that we have a mutual-benefit scheme which covers everyone for the consequences of the uncertainties in life (illness and accidents). The rules of our scheme are established by CERN in the framework of a sub-group of the Standing Concertation Committee, the CERN Health Insurance Scheme Board (CHISB), which is also in charge of managing the scheme.  The work of the “ProtSoc” (Protection Sociale – Social Security) commission, as we like to call it at the Staff Association, is to help your representatives on the CHISB, by preparing together with them the subjects and positions to be put forward and defended. This commission, which groups together the staff delegates who wish to invest their ...

  8. Reliability of individual doses relating to the epidemiological studies on nuclear industry workers in Japan (1). Historical changes on definition of radiation dose, historical changes on technical standards of measurement and radiation workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, Takao; Ishiguro, Hideharu; Kawada, Yasushi; Minami, Kentaro; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    Records of radiation workers collected in the Research Organization for Information of Science and Technology, concerning individual doses from 1957 to 1992 were used for epidemiological studies for obtaining the scientific information of the effect of low dose radiation. Since many changes were made on definition of radiation dose, dosimetry technology and so on during such a long time period, reliability of recorded individual doses and of their measurement should be evaluated for validation, which is the purpose of this paper. Followings were discussed and validation was made. Historical changes on standards for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and ICRU Report, and changes of law concerning radiation dose in Japan and of dose standards. Changes on dosimetry for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and working place dosimetry, trends of investigations for introduction of measured practical doses, ICRU sphere as a receptor, and introduction of measured practical doses. Characteristics of radiation field and radiation exposure: Radiation source and characteristics of radiation field; Research and development organizations for atomic power, atomic power plants, facilities for nuclear fuel, Classification of radiation works and characteristics of the exposure; BWR, PWR, GCR. Changes on the standards of individual dosemeter and on its use: method to use individual dosemeter and its installation, measurement of individual dose and Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS); Standard of the film badge for X and gamma rays, Standard of the film badge for neutron, Standard for thermoluminescence dosemeter, and changes on selection of the major apparatus and on its use. (K.H.)

  9. Influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Yan, Lei; Wang, Jianping; Cai, Lin; Hu, Dongcai

    2015-07-08

    In this study, the influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor was investigated in order to derive a theoretical basis for adjustment of radiation dose for patients with spinal tumor and internal fixation. Based on a common method of internal fixation after resection of spinal tumor, different models of spinal internal fixation were constructed using the lumbar vertebra of fresh domestic pigs and titanium alloy as the internal fixation system. Variations in radiation dose in the vertebral body and partial spinal cord in different types of internal fixation were studied under the same radiation condition (6 MV and 600 mGy) in different fixation models and compared with those irradiated based on the treatment planning system (TPS). Our results showed that spinal internal fixation materials have great impact on the radiation dose absorbed by spinal tumors. Under the same radiation condition, the influence of anterior internal fixation material or combined anterior and posterior approach on radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was the greatest. Regardless of the kinds of internal fixation method employed, radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was significantly different from that at other positions. Notably, the influence of posterior internal fixation material on the anterior wall of the vertebral canal was the greatest. X-ray attenuation and scattering should be taken into consideration for most patients with bone metastasis that receive fixation of metal implants. Further evaluation should then be conducted with modified TPS in order to minimize the potentially harmful effects of inappropriate radiation dose.

  10. Brief introduction to the 'Recommendations of International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) in the year 1990'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Li Chen

    1994-01-01

    Currently, the ionizing radiation protection standards in most countries around the world are established by referring to reports of ICRP Pub. 26 and 30 as the most important technical documents. In ICRP Pub. 26, the experts emphasize that their major task is to establish a set of complete and reasonable radiation protection limiting system. But the emphasis in the report of ICRP Pub. 60 published in 1991 is devoted to the expanding of the dose limiting system which was developed in 1977 to a more extensive radiological protection system. The main aims of this paper is to discuss the major differences between ICRP Pub. 26 and ICRP Pub. 60 which could be of benefit in the revision task of amending regulations in the future. 10 refs., 5 tabs

  11. Modern radiation therapy for extranodal lymphomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yahalom, Joachim; Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena

    2015-01-01

    , involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far...... adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other...

  12. Report made on behalf of the inquiry commission for the enforcement of the measures preconized for the safety of the maritime transport of hazardous or polluting products and for the evaluation of their efficiency; Rapport fait au nom de la commission d'enquete sur l'application des mesures preconisees en matiere de securite du transport maritime des produits dangereux ou polluants et l'evaluation de leur efficacite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    On February 5, 2003, three years after the creation of an inquiry commission about the Erika tanker-ship wreck, the principle of a new inquiry commission about the safety of maritime transports was decided by the French house of commons. Its mission is: to evaluate the efficiency of the existing measures of prevention of marine pollution by hydrocarbons, to examine if the preconized safety measures for the transport of dangerous or polluting products are effectively enforced, and to evaluate the status of the transposition of the European directives relative to the control of hazardous ships. This document is the first tome of the report made on behalf of this inquiry commission. It comprises four parts dealing with: 1 - the Prestige tanker-ship wreck and the pollution of Spanish and French coasts: similarities with the Erika wreck but differences in the conditions of crisis management, diverging accident analyses, problems encountered in Spain, a significantly improved management of the crisis by the French administration, the public opinion and the local economy, the global increase of maritime transport and the reduction of accidents frequency; 2 - the real improvements after the Erika wreck: the significant advances but their partial implementation, the acceleration of actions following the Prestige wreck; 3 - the expected and realistic perspectives: the sustain of the political will at the national scale, the concretizing of the European decisions and the follow up of the retained trends, the need for more outstanding evolutions at the international scale; 4 - the international liability and compensation regime: its limitation to the hydrocarbons pollution, the lack of victims indemnification in the case of chemical pollution, the need for an increase of the liability of all actors of the maritime transport and the improvement of the compensation system, a community compensation fund to compensate the inefficiencies of the international compensation mechanisms

  13. 75 FR 57898 - NIST Blue Ribbon Commission on Management and Safety-II

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    ... on Management and Safety--II AGENCY: National Institute of Standards and Technology, Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of establishment of the NIST Blue Ribbon Commission on Management and Safety--II... NIST Blue Ribbon Commission on Management and Safety--II ``Commission''. The Commission will assess...

  14. 77 FR 43855 - Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-26

    ... Office of the Secretary Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office... announcing that the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) will... Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform, established under Secretarial Order No. 3292, dated...

  15. 77 FR 64534 - Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-22

    ... Office of the Secretary Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office... announcing that the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) will... Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform, established under Secretarial Order No. 3292, dated...

  16. 77 FR 70805 - Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... Office of the Secretary Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform Meeting... meeting of the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) scheduled... Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform was established under Secretarial Order No. 3292, dated...

  17. 78 FR 66376 - Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... Office of the Secretary Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office... announcing that the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) will... INFORMATION: The Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform was established under...

  18. 77 FR 5528 - National Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... Office of the Secretary National Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office of... that the National Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) will hold its... Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform established under Secretarial Order No. 3292, dated...

  19. Fifth international symposium on the natural radiation environment (NRE - V). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    Most of the 219 contributions Are on radon (to a much lesser extent: thoron) and its daughter products in dwellings and in the environment; on corresponding measuring instruments and - methods; on measurements done; and on radiation doses to professional workers and to the public. The section heading give a fairly good account of the subject matters treated. Measurement Techniques and Metrology (Nrs 1-33); Exposure to Natural Radiation in Non-Domestic Environments (34-56); Natural Radionuclides and Transfer Pathways (57-107); Radioactivity and Radiation in the Human Environment (108-183); Health Effects of Natural Radiation (184-205); Industrially Modified Levels of Radiation Exposure (206-219). (Quittner)

  20. Report on the behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission on the bill project n 3080 authorizing the ratification of the statutes of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document first recalls that the creation of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) is due to a German initiative. It recalls the rather quick negotiations (2007-2009) which led to the creation of the Agency, outlines that its statutes were inspired by those of other organizations coming under the United Nations. It comments the content of the article which defines the agency's missions. Then it discusses some questions which have been shelved: the absence of China and Russia, the risk of non ratification by the United States, the language issue. In a second part, the document reports the discussions during the bill examination by the Commission. An appendix indicates the countries which have signed or ratified the IRENA statutes

  1. Crown discoloration induced by endodontic sealers: spectrophotometric measurement of Commission International de I'Eclairage's L*, a*, b* chromatic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, K; Beltes, P; Lambrianidis, T; Kapagiannidis, D; Karagiannis, V

    2013-01-01

    Despite the improvement of endodontic materials, crown discoloration induced by root canal sealers remains a concerning clinical issue. The aim of this study is the measurement of the alterations in CIE L*, a*, b* chromatic parameters of tooth crowns after placement of commonly used and new-generation endodontic sealers in pulp chambers. Eighty intact, fully developed third mandibular molars were randomly assigned in five groups. Crowns were cross-sectioned from the root complex 1 mm below the cement-enamel junction. The internal axial walls of the pulp chambers were debrided and coated with endodontic sealers (Roth-811, AH-26, Guttaflow, Epiphany SE). The apical access was sealed with glass-ionomer cement. The control group was only debrided. Crowns were stored in individually marked vials in standard conditions (100% humidity, 37°C). The spectral reflectance lines were recorded with a UV-Vis spectrophotometer in the visual spectrum. The CIE L*a*b* parameters were obtained by a linked computer software before sealer placement (baseline), after one week, one, three, and six months, respectively. Statistical analysis was performed with two-way mixed ANOVA models. The level of statistical significance was set at p<0.05. With the exception of the control group, experimental groups presented varying chromatic alterations. Among all experimental groups, Roth-811 sealer induced the most severe alterations in CIE L*, a*, b* chromatic parameters, during all observation periods. After root canal obturation, the clinician should be aware of the presence of remaining root canal filling materials. Thorough debridement of the pulp chamber is essential for the prevention of sealer-induced discoloration.

  2. Measurement Of Electromagnetic Field Radiation In The Internet Halls And Educational Computer Laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanim Thiab Hasan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available     There are more concerns about possible health effects related to electromagnetic fields from computer monitors and other video display terminals because of the widespread using of computers in laboratories ,offices and internet halls. This research aims to detect the effect of electromagnetic field radiations in these halls and laboratories and study the successful ways of minimizing its negative  health  effect on human health. The research has been performed on both the mathematical calculations and practical measurements. The obtaining results show that the practical measurements are consistent with the  mathematical calculations results. Comparison of  these results with the safety standard guideline  limits shows that they are within the acceptable exposuring limits recommended by the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection  (ICNIRP and that means there is no health risk from exposure to these fields if the exposure is within the acceptable limits.     

  3. Portable, transportable or installed X or gamma radiation ratemeters for environmental monitoring. Part 1: Ratemeters (International Electrotechnical Commission Standard Publication 61017-1:1991)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    2000-01-01

    This standard is applicable to portable, transportable or installed assemblies intended to measure environmental air kerma rates from 30 nGy h -1 to 10 μGy h -1 (3 μrad h -1 to 1 mrad h -1 ) due to X or gamma radiation of energy between at least 50 keV and 1.5MeV * . If the assembly is to be used to measure air measure air kerma rates in the area surrounding a nuclear reactor producing 6 MeV radiation it will be necessary to determine the response at this energy. For the purpose of radiation protection these assemblies comprise at least: - a detection sub-assembly (e.g. ionization chamber, GM counter tube, scintillation detector, etc.); - a measuring sub-assembly including a display device, which may be connected together either rigidly or by means of a flexible cable or incorporated into a single assembly. The installed assembly may also comprise a continuous recorder (e.g. chart or magnetic cassette recorder or telemetry equipment). The requirements of this standard are also applicable to assemblies that use integration of ionization current, count-rate, etc. to enable a mean air kerma rate to be indicated or determined. For the assemblies described above, this standard specifies general characteristics, general test procedures, radiation characteristics, electrical, mechanical, safety and environmental characteristics as well the identification certificate. Assemblies that indicate air kerma from integration of the detector's signal will be dealt with in the future IEC Publication 1017-2. This standard does not apply to thermoluminescence dosimetry systems or other passive integrating devices. This standard does not provide for the measurement of beta radiation

  4. Perspectives on the World: International Education Instructional Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallner, Pam; And Others

    This publication is a compilation of lessons and unit plans developed by teachers of the Bexley, Ohio City School District through an international education program. Sample lesson plans include: "Giant Pandas from China" (Grade 1); "Haiku Writing" (Grade 4); and "Treasures--Ancient Civilizations of Ohio" (Grade 7).…

  5. Environmental gamma radiation measurements on providence of Camaguey, Cuba

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigido, F.O.; Barrerras Caballero, A.; Montalvan Estrada, A.; Queipo Garcia, M.; Perez Sanchez, D.

    1999-01-01

    The population exposure to those living on the Camaguey Province of Cuba, was estimated by measuring the natural gamma background. Gamma spectra of soils and measurements of absorbed dose rate in air were taken. Radiological measurements carried out with a portable ionization chamber RSS-112 at the sampled sites revealed an average outdoor absorbed dose rate of 63.6 n Gy.h 1 - due to cosmic rays and terrestrial gamma radiation. Computed dose rates obtained through the UNSCEAR(1993) dose coefficients range from 5-136 n Gy.h 1 - , with a mean value of 39.2 n Gy.h 1 - , due to natural terrestrial gamma radiation

  6. Requirements for internal contamination monitoring units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner, E.; Beyer, D.; Doerfel, H.; Erlenbach, H.; Fischbach, G.; Henrichs, K.; Keller, K.D.; Koenig, K.; Riedel, W.; Scheler, R.; Schieferdecker, H.

    1994-01-01

    For the evaluation of internal contamination by officially authorized monitoring units according to section 63 (6) of the German radiation protection ordinance, a directive will be prepared in order to define uniform requirements for the laboratories in charge of incorporation monitoring by appointment of the relevant authorities. These requirements refer to equipment, to performance of measurements, to interpretation of measured values, to quality control as well as to documentation and to delivery of results. The duties of such laboratories comprise measurements of radioactivity, evaluation of intakes of radionuclides and of the resulting internal radiation dose, but also transmission of results to the employer, to the central dose registry, and under certain circumstances to the authorities. Among the requirements to be met by the laboratory for incorporation control are a sufficient measuring efficiency, the implementation of in-house checks, and the participation in intercomparison programs. For the accomplishment of such duties the laboratory needs appropriate apparatus, rooms, facilities, and staffing. (orig.) [de

  7. 12th International School and Symposium on Synchrotron Radiation in Natural Sciences (ISSRNS 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Maciej; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Kowalski, Bogdan

    2015-12-01

    Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society (PTPS - Polskie Towarzystwo Promieniowania Synchrotronowego), founded in 1991, is one of the oldest world scientific societies gathering not only active users of synchrotron radiation, but also a large group of those interested in synchrotron techniques (http://www.synchrotron.org.pl)

  8. Modeling Internal Radiation Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Egon; Schouten, Theo E.; Pellegrini, M.; Fred, A.; Filipe, J.; Gamboa, H.

    2011-01-01

    A new technique is described to model (internal) radiation therapy. It is founded on morphological processing, in particular distance transforms. Its formal basis is presented as well as its implementation via the Fast Exact Euclidean Distance (FEED) transform. Its use for all variations of internal

  9. Different atmospheric parameters influence on spectral UV radiation (measurements and modelling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarova, N.Y. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Meteorological Observatory; Krotkov, N.A. [Maryland Univ., MD (United States). JCESS/Meteorology Dept.; Geogdzhaev, I.V.; Bushnev, S.V.; Kondranin, T.V. [SUMGF/MIPT, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation); Khattatov, V.U. [Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The ultraviolet (UV) radiation plays a vital role in the biophysical processes despite its small portion in the total solar flux. UV radiation is subject to large variations at the Earth surface depending greatly on solar elevation, ozone and cloud amount, aerosols and surface albedo. The analysis of atmospheric parameters influence is based on the spectral archive data of three spectral instruments: NSF spectroradiometer (Barrow network) (NSF Polar Programs UV Spectroradiometer Network 1991-1992,1992), spectrophotometer (SUVS-M) of Central Aerological Observatory CAO, spectroradiometer of Meteorological Observatory of the Moscow State University (MO MSU) and model simulations based on delta-Eddington approximation

  10. History: The Catholic Commission for Justice and Peace and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dissemination of objective information; second that the Commission succeeded in countering Rhodesian government's propaganda and psychological warfare campaign; third and finally that the Commission brought enough internal and external pressure to bear on the Rhodesian government to hasten its collapse.

  11. Know Your Rights on Campus: A Guide on Racial Profiling, and Hate Crime for International Students in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvard Civil Rights Project, Cambridge, MA.

    This guide to the rights of international students explains racial profiling and hate crimes. Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, many immigrants and international students have experienced heightened scrutiny and outright discrimination. Racial profiling refers to the reliance by law enforcement officers on a person's ethnicity,…

  12. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Lamy

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer Morgenstern et al.(2008. However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR Bais et al.(2015. Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere Erickson et al.(2015, especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle Hader et al.(2007. It can affect phytoplankton productivity Smith and Cullen(1995. This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007. Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014, which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009. Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E, in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC. In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993 and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016

  13. Ultraviolet radiation modelling from ground-based and satellite measurements on Reunion Island, southern tropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Kévin; Portafaix, Thierry; Brogniez, Colette; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Bencherif, Hassan; Morel, Béatrice; Pazmino, Andrea; Metzger, Jean Marc; Auriol, Frédérique; Deroo, Christine; Duflot, Valentin; Goloub, Philippe; Long, Charles N.

    2018-01-01

    Surface ultraviolet radiation (SUR) is not an increasing concern after the implementation of the Montreal Protocol and the recovery of the ozone layer (Morgenstern et al., 2008). However, large uncertainties remain in the prediction of future changes of SUR (Bais et al., 2015). Several studies pointed out that UV-B impacts the biosphere (Erickson et al., 2015), especially the aquatic system, which plays a central part in the biogeochemical cycle (Hader et al., 2007). It can affect phytoplankton productivity (Smith and Cullen, 1995). This influence can result in either positive or negative feedback on climate (Zepp et al., 2007). Global circulation model simulations predict an acceleration of the Brewer-Dobson circulation over the next century (Butchart, 2014), which would lead to a decrease in ozone levels in the tropics and an enhancement at higher latitudes (Hegglin and Shepherd, 2009). Reunion Island is located in the tropics (21° S, 55° E), in a part of the world where the amount of ozone in the ozone column is naturally low. In addition, this island is mountainous and the marine atmosphere is often clean with low aerosol concentrations. Thus, measurements show much higher SUR than at other sites at the same latitude or at midlatitudes. Ground-based measurements of SUR have been taken on Reunion Island by a Bentham DTMc300 spectroradiometer since 2009. This instrument is affiliated with the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC). In order to quantify the future evolution of SUR in the tropics, it is necessary to validate a model against present observations. This study is designed to be a preliminary parametric and sensitivity study of SUR modelling in the tropics. We developed a local parameterisation using the Tropospheric Ultraviolet and Visible Model (TUV; Madronich, 1993) and compared the output of TUV to multiple years of Bentham spectral measurements. This comparison started in early 2009 and continued until 2016. Only

  14. Internal Performance Measurement Systems: Problems and Solutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Morten; Mitchell, Falconer; Nørreklit, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    . The analysis uses and extends N rreklit's (2000) critique of the BSC by applying the concepts developed therein to contemporary research on the BSC and to the development of practice in performance measurement. The analysis is of relevance for many companies in the Asia-Pacific area as an increasing numbers......This article pursues two aims: to identify problems and dangers related to the operational use of internal performance measurement systems of the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) type and to provide some guidance on how performance measurement systems may be designed to overcome these problems...

  15. 78 FR 12355 - Notice of Establishment of the National Commission on Forensic Science and Solicitation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-22

    ... Forensic Science and Solicitation of Applications for Commission Membership AGENCY: Department of Justice... Commission on Forensic Science. This notice establishes criteria and procedures for the selection of members... General will be establishing the National Commission on Forensic Science (``Commission''). The Attorney...

  16. Alien invasive species and biological pollution of the Great Lakes Basin ecosystem[Great Lakes Water Quality Board : Report to the International Joint Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-05-01

    The displacement of important native species in the Great Lakes is a result of an invasion by a succession of non indigenous aquatic species. These invasion also resulted in interference with the proper human water uses and cost billions of dollars. The problem was considered serious enough that the International Joint Commission asked the Great Lakes Water Quality Board in 1999 to review the regulations in place and make recommendations, if necessary, for the implementation of additional measures that could be considered to keep control over the introduction of alien invasive species. Escapes from aquaria, aquaculture, research and educational facilities, canal and diversion water flows, and release of live bait are all sources of this invasion. The effectiveness of alternative technologies to control the invasion was to be examined by the Board. Other efforts taking place to address the situation in the basin are being complemented by the publication of this report. It is considered that the most important source of alien invasive species (AIS) to the Great Lakes is the discharge of ballast water from shipping vessels coming from outside the United States and Canada. A major concern is the role played by vessels reporting no ballast on board (NOBOB) upon entering the basin. A number of recommendations were made concerning: (1) implementation and enforcement of the ballast water discharge standards agreed upon by both countries, (2) the evaluation of the effectiveness of alternative technologies to achieve ballast water discharge standards over the long term, combined with the use of chemical treatment while the evaluation is being performed, (3) the implementation of optimal management practices to control sediments in shipping vessels, (4) modifications to the design of shipping vessels, and (5) the monitoring and contingency plans in the event of a repeat scenario in the future. Composed of an equal number representatives from the United States and Canada, at

  17. Electromagnetic Radiation Measurements and Safety Issues of some Cellular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available As the mobile telecommunication systems are tremendously growing allover the world then the numbers of handheld andbase stations are also rapidly growing and it became very popular to see these base stations distributed everywhere in theneighborhood and on roof tops which has caused a considerable amount of panic to the public in Palestine concerning witherthe radiated electromagnetic field from these base stations may cause any health effect or hazard. This paper focuses on theradiated electromagnetic energy from some typical mobile base stations around the city of Nablus. The exposure levels dueto these stations were measured and compared to some international standard guidelines like ICNIRP and FCC to see if itmeets these standards, this is in order to answer some of the public fear and concern. The results are presented and somecomments are made on the other sources of electromagnetic radiation in the 200 kHz to 3 GHz range.

  18. Assessment of intake and internal radiation dose for exposed persons to iodine 131 by uptake technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Maghrabi, M.; Aaba, A.; Doubal, W.

    2010-11-01

    Workers who prepare and inject iodine I 131 at the medical centers in Syria are potentially exposed to the radioactive intake by ingestion or inhalation during preparation or injection processes, the received amount of the radioactive intake differs according to: First: The amount of theI 131 that released during the preparation or injection processes. Second: the work conditions and the applying ways of the radiation protection principles. Because of this radioactive intake the thyroid gland may expose to amounts of I 131 which may negatively affect the health of the workers. This work presents the development of in vivo (direct thyroid measurement by using thyroid gland counting) and in vitro bioassay techniques (urine sample measurement by using gamma spectrometry) aimed to quantify incorporation of radionuclide used in Nuclear Medicine and other radioisotopes center in Syrian Arab republic, we have done comparison between two methods and we arrived the necessity of dependant on vivo method because its easy for applying and gave a good and more reliable results from the results get them in vitro method. The results of assessment intake and yearly internal dose for workers in atomic energy commission and other medical centers show that some workers results were lower than 1 mSv, there is no risk and no need for routine monitoring programme, prefer in this case registration the results, the results of other workers were between (1 mSv-6 mSv), workers classified as low risk, prefer making of collective monitoring which include three matters (shows some workers to do individual monitoring, airborne activities by means of fixed monitors or simple procedures such as nose blow samples may be regarded as sufficient, monitoring of surface contamination), and the results of yearly internal dose for some workers was exceed 7 mSv, this worker classified as high risk must be monitored individually, allowing a reliable estimation of the annual exposure and ensuring that the

  19. Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protecion (1977) ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    The subject is dealt with under the following headings: principles of radiation protection (the reports of ICRP; basis for establishing dose limits; types of radiation harm; occupational dose limits; estimates of tissue dose equivalent; uniformity of tissue dose equivalent; systems of dose limitation; protection of members of the public; exposure of the population); radiation protection in practice (protection standards, types of exposure). (U.K.)

  20. Interim report of the JHPS expert committee on radiation protection of the lens of the eye (4). Current activities of ICRP and ICU: External dosimetric concepts for the lens of the eye

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, Keiichi; Tatsuzaki, Hideo; Iimoto, Takeshi; Ichiji, Takeshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Fujimichi, Yuki; Iwai, Satoshi; Ohguchi, Hiroyuki; Ohno, Kazuko; Yamauchi-Kawaura, Chiyo; Tsujimura, Norio; Hotta, Yutaka; Yamasaki, Tadashi; Yokoyama, Sumi

    2015-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) have been defined operational quantities and protection quantities. Dose limits have been also recommended by the ICRP using protection quantities. These quantities and some related values for main radiation such as photons, electrons, and neutrons, are summarized in this article with some historical considerations. The ICRP indicated conversion coefficients for the lens of the eye as absorbed dose per fluence as protection quantities. equivalent dose is not used because a protection quantity that uses radiation weighting factors is not intended to be calculated for tissue reactions. So far, the ICRP has not indicated a specific RBE value for cataract formation. Operational quantities are used for measurements. There have been three types of phantoms, namely a slab phantom, a reduced phantom, and a cylindrical phantom, but none of them has been definitely recommended for the lens of the eye by the ICRP or the ICRU. Although conversion coefficients to personal dose equivalent, H p (3), for electrons have been recommended, no other conversion coefficients to personal dose equivalent for the lens of the eye has been indicated by the ICRP or the ICRU. However, there have been several studies described personal dose equivalent. Ambient dose equivalent, H * (3), and directional dose equivalent, H(3, α), have been indicated in several limited conditions by the ICRP and the ICRU. These status are overviewed in this article. (author)

  1. 13th Workshop on Radiation Monitoring for the International Space Station - Final Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Workshop on Radiation Monitoring for the International Space Station (WRMISS) has been held annually since 1996. The major purpose of WRMISS is to provide a forum for discussion of technical issues concerning radiation dosimetry aboard the International Space Station. This includes discussion of new results, improved instrumentation, detector calibration, and radiation environment and transport models. The goal of WRMISS is to enhance international efforts to provide the best information on the space radiation environment in low-Earth orbit and on the exposure of astronauts and cosmonauts in order to optimize the radiation safety of the ISS crew. During the 13 th Annual WRMISS, held in the Institute of Nuclear Physics (Krakow, Poland) on 8-10 September 2008, participants presented 47 lectures

  2. The United States and International Music Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Outlines music education's history since World War II, highlighting the work of the Music Educators National Conference (MENC). Emphasizes U.S. music educators' influence in international music education, arguing this influence should reflect multicultural, global perspectives. Notes the importance of understanding mass media's influence on young…

  3. Cosmic radiation dosimetry in international flights argentine airlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciancio, Vicente R.; Oliveri, Pedro V.; Di Giovan B, Gustavo; Ciancio, Vanina L.; Lewis, Brent J.; Green, Anna R.; Bennet, L.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Introduction: In commercial aviation the most important determinants of radiation exposure in humans are the altitude, latitude, flight duration and the solar cycle's period. This study was conducted to address this type of exposure trough radiation dosimetry. Method: The study was performed in the business-class cabin of an Airbus 340-200 aircraft, provided by Argentine Airlines, during 2 flights routes: New York-Miami-Buenos Aires (trans equatorial) and Buenos Aires-Auckland (circumpolar). Measurements addressed the electromagnetic spectrum or low Linear Energy Transfer (LET) and corpuscular radiation (High LET). The instruments used were an Ion Chamber (IC), to measure the ionizing component of radiation (i.e., gamma radiation), the SWENDI, to measure only the neutron component, and the Tissue Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC) for measuring all radiation types. Results: The routes' dose rates are presented in the table. TEPC rates agreed with the LET findings. The total dose rates of high latitude flights were higher than those of low latitude flights. The SWENDI (High LET) results for the flights over the equator, at low latitude, represented only 1/3 of the total radiation. The New York-Miami and Buenos Aires-Auckland flights, at high latitude, represented just under 1/2 of the Total radiation (-45%). Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, the annual dose rates of radiation exposure of air crew personnel serving on international flights offered by Argentine Airlines is between 3 and 7 mSv. This rate is higher than the maximum recommended for the general population by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), which is 1 milli Sv./y. Therefore, these personnel must be officially considered 'Occupationally Exposed to Radiation' in way to provide the appropriate measures that must be implemented for their protection in accordance to ICRP guidelines. Dose(uSv): Route N Y-Miami, IC 6.07, SWENDI 5.07, TEPC 11.04; Route

  4. Performance planning and measurement for DOE EM-International Technology Integration Program. A report on a performance measurement development workshop for DOE's environmental management international technology integration program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan, G.B.; Reed, J.H.; Wyler, L.D.

    1997-03-01

    This report describes the process and results from an effort to develop metrics for program accomplishments for the FY 1997 budget submission of the U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management International Technology Integration Program (EM-ITI). The four-step process included interviews with key EM-ITI staff, the development of a strawman program logic chart, and all day facilitated workshop with EM-ITI staff during which preliminary performance plans and measures were developed and refined, and a series of follow-on discussions and activities including a cross-organizational project data base. The effort helped EM-ITI to crystallize and develop a unified vision of their future which they can effectively communicate to their own management and their internal and external customers. The effort sets the stage for responding to the Government Performance and Results Act. The metrics developed may be applicable to other international technology integration programs. Metrics were chosen in areas of eight general performance goals for 1997-1998: (1) number of forums provided for the exchange of information, (2) formal agreements signed, (3) new partners identified, (4) customers reached and satisfied, (5, 6) dollars leveraged by EM technology focus area and from foreign research, (7) number of foreign technologies identified for potential use in remediation of DOE sites, and (8) projects advanced through the pipeline

  5. Effects of neutron radiation and residual stresses on the corrosion of welds in light water reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaaf, Bob van der; Gavillet, Didier; Lapena, Jesus; Ohms, Carsten; Roth, Armin; Dyck, Steven van

    2006-01-01

    After many years of operation in Light Water Reactors (LWR) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC) of internals has been observed. In particular the heat-affected zone (HAZ) has been associated with IASCC attack. The welding process induces residual stresses and micro-structural modifications. Neutron irradiation affects the materials response to mechanical loading. IASCC susceptibility of base materials is widely studied, but the specific conditions of irradiated welds are rarely assessed. Core component relevant welds of Type 304 and 347 steels have been fabricated and were irradiated in the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten to 0.3 and 1 dpa (displacement per atom). In-service welds were cut from the thermal shield of the decommissioned BR-3 reactor. Residual stresses, measured using neutron diffraction, ring core tests and X-ray showed residual stress levels up to 400 MPa. Micro-structural characterization showed higher dislocation densities in the weld and HAZ. Neutron radiation increased the dislocation density, resulting in hardening and reduced fracture toughness. The sensitization degree of the welds, measured with the electrochemical potentio-dynamic reactivation method, was negligible. The Slow Strain Rate Tensile (SSRT) tests, performed at 290 deg. C in water with 200 ppb dissolved oxygen, (DO), did not reveal inter-granular cracking. Inter-granular attack of in-service steel is observed in water with 8 ppm (DO), attributed not only to IASCC, but also to IGSCC from thermal sensitization during fabrication. Stress-relieve annealing has caused Cr-grain boundary precipitation, indicating the sensitization. The simulated internal welds, irradiated up to 1.0 dpa, did not show inter-granular cracking with 8 ppm DO. (authors)

  6. Three Mile Island nuclear reactor accident of March 1979. Environmental radiation data: Volume I. A report to the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bretthauer, E.W.; Grossman, R.F.; Thome, D.J.; Smith, A.E.

    1981-03-01

    This report contains a listing of environmental radiation monitoring data collected in the vicinity of Three Mile Island (TMI) following the March 28, 1979 accident. These data were collected by the EPA, NRC, DOE, HHS, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, or the Bethlehem Steel Corporation. The original report was printed in September 1979 and the update was released in December 1979. Volume 1 consists of the following 5 tables: Table 1-Measurements made by principal participants; Table 2-Cross-check program instituted by US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for iodine-131 in milk. Table 3-Comparison of EPA and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) air data collected at the Three Mile Island (TMI) Observation Center; Table 4-Summary of EPA Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas (EMSL-LV) and EPA Eastern Environmental Radiation Facility-Montgomery (EERF-Montgomery) sampling and analytical procedures; Table 5-Computer printout of environmental data collected by EPA

  7. NO global warming = YES nuclear energy. The International Nuclear Forum and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, Emma

    2000-01-01

    The nuclear industry sits along side the renewable energy sector in its role as a non carbon emitting technology. But persuading international political leaders of this fact presents a challenge. Generating electricity from nuclear fuel avoids at least 2 billion tonnes of carbon dioxide every year through its 16% share of world wide electricity generation. Nuclear energy is essential to minimising greenhouse gas emissions. This presentation highlights the main issues resulting from the climate change negotiations that are highly relevant to the industry; explains the activities of the International Nuclear Forum and our interaction with the delegates to the process; outlines future activities. The International Nuclear Forum (INF) was formed to provide a collective voice lobbying for nuclear at the climate change negotiations. It's internationally representative of the industry and comprises of: the Uranium Institute; the Nuclear Energy Institute; the Japan Atomic Industry Forum; the Canadian Nuclear Association; the European Nuclear Society, and Foratom. All are accredited non governmental observers to the negotiations of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change

  8. Decommissioning and radioactive waste management. The European Commission overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehak, M

    2010-01-01

    In this lecture author deals with the European Commission overview on the decommissioning and radioactive waste management. Financial support of European Commission of decommissioning of the Ignalina NPP, Bohunice V1 NPP and Kozloduy Units 1 and 2 is presented.

  9. International Conference Medical Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Full text : The second edition of the international conference Medical radiation : research and applications which took place in Marrakech (Morocco) from 7 to 9 April 2010, was designed to bring together researchers and physicians from different countries who dedicated their talents and time to this endeavour. The conference's program defined goals were is to identify the most reliable techniques among the several tested so far and to establish the most practical standardized methodologies, taking into account such recent technological development in radiation medical research. The scientific objectives of this conference are as follows : present the state of the art of the various topics of the congress, give a progress report on the impact of the interaction of the various scientific and technical disciplinary fields (Medicine, Biology, Mathematics, Physics,..) on the applications of radiations in medicine, promote the interdisciplinary efforts of research among researchers, present new technologies and research and development tasks prepared in the field of medical radiations, contribute to the emergence of new ideas of research and development of new collaborations [fr

  10. Assessing the service quality of Iran military hospitals: Joint Commission International standards and Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Yaghoubi, Maryam; Alimohammadzadeh, Khalil

    2014-01-01

    Military hospitals are responsible for preserving, restoring and improving the health of not only armed forces, but also other people. According to the military organizations strategy, which is being a leader and pioneer in all areas, providing quality health services is one of the main goals of the military health care organizations. This study was aimed to evaluate the service quality of selected military hospitals in Iran based on the Joint Commission International (JCI) standards and comparing these hospitals with each other and ranking them using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) technique in 2013. This was a cross-sectional and descriptive study conducted on five military hospitals, selected using the purposive sampling method, in 2013. Required data collected using checklists of accreditation standards and nominal group technique. AHP technique was used for prioritizing. Furthermore, Expert Choice 11.0 was used to analyze the collected data. Among JCI standards, the standards of access to care and continuity of care (weight = 0.122), quality improvement and patient safety (weight = 0.121) and leadership and management (weight = 0.117) had the greatest importance, respectively. Furthermore, in the overall ranking, BGT (weight = 0.369), IHM (0.238), SAU (0.202), IHK (weight = 0.125) and SAB (weight = 0.066) ranked first to fifth, respectively. AHP is an appropriate technique for measuring the overall performance of hospitals and their quality of services. It is a holistic approach that takes all hospital processes into consideration. The results of the present study can be used to improve hospitals performance through identifying areas, which are in need of focus for quality improvement and selecting strategies to improve service quality.

  11. Detection of DNA damage by space radiation in human fibroblasts flown on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tao; Zhang, Ye; Wong, Michael; Feiveson, Alan; Gaza, Ramona; Stoffle, Nicholas; Wang, Huichen; Wilson, Bobby; Rohde, Larry; Stodieck, Louis; Karouia, Fathi; Wu, Honglu

    2017-02-01

    Although charged particles in space have been detected with radiation detectors on board spacecraft since the discovery of the Van Allen Belts, reports on the effects of direct exposure to space radiation in biological systems have been limited. Measurement of biological effects of space radiation is challenging due to the low dose and low dose rate nature of the radiation environment, and due to the difficulty in distinguishing the radiation effects from microgravity and other space environmental factors. In astronauts, only a few changes, such as increased chromosome aberrations in their lymphocytes and early onset of cataracts, are attributed primarily to their exposure to space radiation. In this study, cultured human fibroblasts were flown on the International Space Station (ISS). Cells were kept at 37 °C in space for 14 days before being fixed for analysis of DNA damage with the γ-H2AX assay. The 3-dimensional γ-H2AX foci were captured with a laser confocal microscope. Quantitative analysis revealed several foci that were larger and displayed a track pattern only in the Day 14 flight samples. To confirm that the foci data from the flight study was actually induced from space radiation exposure, cultured human fibroblasts were exposed to low dose rate γ rays at 37 °C. Cells exposed to chronic γ rays showed similar foci size distribution in comparison to the non-exposed controls. The cells were also exposed to low- and high-LET protons, and high-LET Fe ions on the ground. Our results suggest that in G1 human fibroblasts under the normal culture condition, only a small fraction of large size foci can be attributed to high-LET radiation in space.

  12. Designing and commissioning of a setup for timing-jitter measurements using electro-optic temporal decoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borissenko, Dennis

    2016-12-15

    Precise measurements of the arrival time jitter between the ionization laser, used to create the plasma, and the driver beam in the PWFA setup of the FLASHForward project are of high interest for the operation and optimization of the experiment. In this thesis, an electro-optic temporal decoding (EOTD) setup with near crossed polarizer detection scheme is presented, which can measure the timing-jitter to an accuracy of around 30 fs. This result was obtained during several measurements conducted at the coherent transition radiation beamline CTR141 at FLASH, using a 100 μm thick GaP crystal and coherent diffraction/transition radiation, generated from the FLASH1 electron bunches. Measurements were performed during long and short electron bunch operation at FLASH, showing that best results are obtained with CDR from long electron bunches. Utilizing CTR led to a higher EO signal and ''over-compensation'' of the SHG background level during the measurement, which resulted in a double-peak structure of the observed THz pulses. To resolve the single-cycle nature of these THz pulses, the SHG background had to be adjusted properly. Furthermore, EOTD measurements during a short bunch operation run at FLASH exhibited strong oscillations in the EO signal, which were suspected to come either from internal lattice resonances of the EO crystal or internal reflections, or excitation of water vapor in the humid air in the laboratory. The oscillations spoiled the observed EOTD trace leading to no sensible measurements of the arrival time jitter during this short bunch operation. To evaluate the capabilities of the setup for monitoring the timing jitter of short PWFA accelerated electron bunches or very short driver bunches at FLASHForward, further investigations on the observed oscillations in the EOTD traces have to be performed during short bunch operation at FLASH with different crystals and under vacuum conditions, to understand the oscillations of the EO

  13. Designing and commissioning of a setup for timing-jitter measurements using electro-optic temporal decoding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borissenko, Dennis

    2016-12-01

    Precise measurements of the arrival time jitter between the ionization laser, used to create the plasma, and the driver beam in the PWFA setup of the FLASHForward project are of high interest for the operation and optimization of the experiment. In this thesis, an electro-optic temporal decoding (EOTD) setup with near crossed polarizer detection scheme is presented, which can measure the timing-jitter to an accuracy of around 30 fs. This result was obtained during several measurements conducted at the coherent transition radiation beamline CTR141 at FLASH, using a 100 μm thick GaP crystal and coherent diffraction/transition radiation, generated from the FLASH1 electron bunches. Measurements were performed during long and short electron bunch operation at FLASH, showing that best results are obtained with CDR from long electron bunches. Utilizing CTR led to a higher EO signal and ''over-compensation'' of the SHG background level during the measurement, which resulted in a double-peak structure of the observed THz pulses. To resolve the single-cycle nature of these THz pulses, the SHG background had to be adjusted properly. Furthermore, EOTD measurements during a short bunch operation run at FLASH exhibited strong oscillations in the EO signal, which were suspected to come either from internal lattice resonances of the EO crystal or internal reflections, or excitation of water vapor in the humid air in the laboratory. The oscillations spoiled the observed EOTD trace leading to no sensible measurements of the arrival time jitter during this short bunch operation. To evaluate the capabilities of the setup for monitoring the timing jitter of short PWFA accelerated electron bunches or very short driver bunches at FLASHForward, further investigations on the observed oscillations in the EOTD traces have to be performed during short bunch operation at FLASH with different crystals and under vacuum conditions, to understand the oscillations of the EO

  14. Reflections on the Gordon Commission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haertel, Edward

    2014-01-01

    Background:This brief reflection on the work of the Gordon Commission calls out significant themes and implications found in the various papers authored by the commissioners and other scholars, especially those included in this special issue of Teachers College Record. Purpose: The forward-looking vision of the Gordon Commission is contrasted with…

  15. Measurement of Cerenkov Radiation Induced by the Gamma-Rays of Co-60 Therapy Units Using Wavelength Shifting Fiber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoung Won Jang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a wavelength shifting fiber that shifts ultra-violet and blue light to green light was employed as a sensor probe of a fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor. In order to characterize Cerenkov radiation generated in the developed wavelength shifting fiber and a plastic optical fiber, spectra and intensities of Cerenkov radiation were measured with a spectrometer. The spectral peaks of light outputs from the wavelength shifting fiber and the plastic optical fiber were measured at wavelengths of 500 and 510 nm, respectively, and the intensity of transmitted light output of the wavelength shifting fiber was 22.2 times higher than that of the plastic optical fiber. Also, electron fluxes and total energy depositions of gamma-ray beams generated from a Co-60 therapy unit were calculated according to water depths using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons over the Cerenkov threshold energy and the energy depositions of gamma-ray beams from the Co-60 unit is a near-identity function. Finally, percentage depth doses for the gamma-ray beams were obtained using the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, and the results were compared with those obtained by an ionization chamber. The average dose difference between the results of the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor and those of the ionization chamber was about 2.09%.

  16. 78 FR 35645 - Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION [Investigation No. 337-TA-792] Certain Static Random Access Memories and Products Containing Same; Commission Determination Affirming a Final Initial Determination..., and the sale within the United States after importation of certain static random access memories and...

  17. International Expert Team Concludes IAEA Peer Review of Poland's Regulatory Framework for Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Full text: International safety experts last week concluded a two-week International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) mission to review the regulatory framework for nuclear and radiation safety in Poland. In its preliminary report, the Integrated Regulatory Review Service (IRRS) mission team found that Poland's nuclear regulator, Panstwowa Agencja Atomistyki (PAA), has a clear commitment to safety, a high level of transparency, competent staff and leadership, and a good recognition of challenges ahead related to Poland's efforts to develop nuclear power. ''Poland's regulatory framework and the work of PAA give high confidence of strong radiation protection for the Polish people. Further, there has been significant progress in the development of Poland's regulatory framework in preparation for the challenge of regulating nuclear power,'' said team leader Robert Lewis, a senior executive in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The mission was conducted at the request of the Government of Poland from 15-25 April. The team was made up of 11 regulatory experts from Belgium, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, the Republic of Korea, Slovakia, Slovenia, Sweden, the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom and the United States, as well as five IAEA staff members. The IRRS review team was very thorough in its review, and we welcome its advice on how to continue to improve our programmes to protect people and the environment , said Janusz Wlodarski, President of PAA. The team interviewed members of PAA and officials from various ministries, as well as key players in the Polish safety framework. Such IRRS missions are peer reviews based on IAEA Safety Standards, not inspections or audits. Among its main observations the IRRS review team identified the following good practices: Applying the considerable experience of PAA's senior management to regulatory issues; The introduction of changes to Poland's laws and regulations following broad public consultation at an early stage in

  18. Tripartite conferences on radiation protection: Canada, United Kingdom, United States (1949-1953)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, L.S.

    1984-08-01

    As a result of largely informal contacts between scientists from the United States, Canada, and United Kingdom, it became evident to their governments that, to insure compatible protection practices, closer technical cooperation must be established. This led to a two-day conference between representatives of the three governments at Chalk River, Ontario in September 1949; it was the first of what became known as the Tripartite Conferences. The initial talks led quickly to agreement on the new NCRP proposals for a basic permissible dose for the exposure of workers to external sources of radiation. A second meeting in Harwell, England, during the summer of 1950 reached tentative agreement on the outstanding problems. The third and last Tripartite Conference took place at Harriman, New York, in early spring 1953. This meeting produced the final recommendations, insofar as they involved agreements between the three countries, for new protection standards. Questions regarding the proceedings of the conferences and interpretations of their findings have arisen over the succeeding years; even as recently as 1983. Continued interest and consequent inquiries emphasized the desirability of providing more permanent documentation of those very important conferences. This author, a member of the United States delegation to all three conferences, came into possession of most of the working papers and final reports, hence he has felt the obligation to assemble this material for both technical and historical reference. This report compromises mainly of a brief discussion of the conferences themselves, with some background information leading up to their organization

  19. Regulatory view on licensing and commissioning of Temelin NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drabova, D.; Boehm, K.; Brandejs, P.; Tipek, Z.

    2004-01-01

    The competencies delegated to the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety by Czech legislation are highlighted and the history of construction and commissioning of the Temelin nuclear power plant in relation to the licensing process is described. (P.A.)

  20. ANIMMA 2009 - International Conference on Advancements in Nuclear Instrumentation, Measurement Methods and their Applications - Compilation of slides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chabre, A.; Lyoussi, A.; Martin-Deidier, L.; Caverni, J.P.; Deconinck, F.; Cesarsky, C.; Kjems, J.; Spiro, M.; Abdallah, J.; Mandic, I.; Cindro, V.; Gorisek, A.; Kramberger, G.; Mikuz, M.; Hartert, J.; Bronner, J.; Franz, S.; Minano, M.; Fleta, C.; Garcia, C.; Lacasta, C.; Lozano, M.; Marco, R.; Marti, I.; Garcia, S.; Pellegrini, G.; Soldevila, U.; Ullan, M.; Larsen, R.; Downing, R.; Saunders, C.; Pavlicek, V.; Jezynski, T.; Rehlich, K.; An Liu, Z.; Nomachi, M.; Le Du, P.; Benekos, N.; Cortes Gonzales, A.; Coggeshall, J.; Liss, A.M.; Baudot, J.; Barbier, R.; Brogna, A.; Chabanat, E.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Depasse, P.; Degerli, Y.; De Masi, R.; Deveaux, M.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziere, G.; Dritsa, C.; Dulinski, W.; Estre, N.; Fang, X.C.; Fontaine, J.C.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Himmi, A.; Hu-Guo, C.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Minano, M.; Bruynseraede, Y.; Benekos, N.; Collazuol, G.M.; Baudot, J.; Hoffmann, D.; Alami, R.; Marie, F.; Fontana, A.; Duval, P.Y.; Rosca, A.; Copic, K.; Iracane, D.; Rempe, J.; Shippen, D.; Choo, K.N.; Breitkreutz, H.; Petry, W.; Itagaki, W.; Zaristkiy, S.; Jammes, C.; Imel, G.; Ritter, G.; Casoli, P.; Blaise, P.; Lecouey, J.L.; Rohrmoser, A.; Bignan, G.; Bruynseraede, Y.; March, R.; Janulyte, A.; Morichi, M.; Adams, J.; Popov, V.; Costley, A.; Moreau, P.; Sabot, R.; Leyrat, J.P.; Angelone, M.; Flament, O.; Thfoin, I.; Boullis, B.; Rouquerol, J.; Nonell, A.; Simon, A.C.; Lyoussi, A.; De Bruycker, A.; Ducros, G.; Katsuyama, K.; Barat, E.; Swinhoe, M.; Dogny, S.; Carrel, F.; Granier, G.; Raoux, A.C.; Pluquet, A.; Ahlen, S.; Butchins, L.; Porta, A.; Valkovic, V.; Dazeley, S.; Furuta, H.; Quiter, B.; Piccotti, A.; Swinhoe, M.; Bruggeman, M.; Ruddy, F.; El kanawati, W.; Cabrera-Palmer, B.; Sweet, M.; Parrat, D.; Cavedon, J.M.; Babu, C.; Baskaran, B.; Villard, J.F.; Buimistriuc, G.; Rosenkrantz, E.; Coulon, R.; Schyns, M.; Bronson, F.; Giraud, A.; Vuillemard, C.; Ait Abderrahim, H.; Marie, F.; Beeley, P.; Andre, J.; Turpin, L.; Waker, A.; Pafilis, C.; Townsend, D.; Chatal, J.F.; Gao, W.; Kawachi, N.; Townsend, D.; Le Foulher, F.; Magne, S.; Valkovic, V.; Rottner, B.; Lebrun, A.; Ianakiev, K.; Giot, M.; Flescher, H.

    2009-01-01

    The program of this conference is focused on instrumentation, but emphasizes the latest developments in all measurement stages: nuclear radiation detection and in-pile measurements, modelling, electronics, signal acquisition and analysis, radiotherapy, interpretation and associated training activities. This document is composed of the program of the conference and of the slides of about 102 presentations

  1. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG): an update of the recommendations on the use of Y-STRs in forensic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusmão, L; Butler, John M; Carracedo, Angel

    2006-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y...

  2. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: revised and extended guidelines for mitochondrial DNA typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parson, W; Gusmão, L; Hares, D R; Irwin, J A; Mayr, W R; Morling, N; Pokorak, E; Prinz, M; Salas, A; Schneider, P M; Parsons, T J

    2014-11-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the question of human identification. Previous recommendations published in 2000 addressed the analysis and interpretation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in forensic casework. While the foundations set forth in the earlier recommendations still apply, new approaches to the quality control, alignment and nomenclature of mitochondrial sequences, as well as the establishment of mtDNA reference population databases, have been developed. Here, we describe these developments and discuss their application to both mtDNA casework and mtDNA reference population databasing applications. While the generation of mtDNA for forensic casework has always been guided by specific standards, it is now well-established that data of the same quality are required for the mtDNA reference population data used to assess the statistical weight of the evidence. As a result, we introduce guidelines regarding sequence generation, as well as quality control measures based on the known worldwide mtDNA phylogeny, that can be applied to ensure the highest quality population data possible. For both casework and reference population databasing applications, the alignment and nomenclature of haplotypes is revised here and the phylogenetic alignment proffered as acceptable standard. In addition, the interpretation of heteroplasmy in the forensic context is updated, and the utility of alignment-free database searches for unbiased probability estimates is highlighted. Finally, we discuss statistical issues and define minimal standards for mtDNA database searches. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. About Solar Radiation Intensity Measurements and Data Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MICH-VANCEA Claudiu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Measuring the intensity of solar radiation is one of the directions of investigation necessary for the implementation of photovoltaic systems in a particular geographical area. This can be done by using specific measuring equipment (pyranometer sensors based onthermal or photovoltaic principle. In this paper it is presented a method for measuring solar radiation (which has two main components - direct radiation and diffuse radiation with sensors based on photovoltaic principle. Such data are processed for positioning solarpanels, in order their efficiency to be maximized.

  4. Development and Education. International Commission on Education for the Twenty-First Century, Second Session (Dakar, Senegal, September 18-22, 1993).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blondel, Daniele

    This paper reviews the evolution of the different theories concerning education as a factor of development. It is important to see exactly how the struggle against scarcity and the production of material goods can be made more effective by allocating financial and human resources to the production and transmission of knowledge. The growth theory…

  5. Climate change. Important findings from the 4. fact finding report of the intergovernmental commission on climate change of the United Nations (IPCC); Klimaaenderung. Wichtige Erkentnisse aus dem 4. Sachstandsbericht des Zwischenstaatlichen Ausschusses fuer Klimaaenderungen der Vereinten Nationen (IPCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeder, Claudia

    2009-12-19

    The Report covers the following topics: 1. anthropogenic climate change - since when do we know about it? 2. IPCC - the intergovernmental commission for climate change. 3. Assignable causes for climate change: changes of incoming solar radiation, changes of the reflected solar radiation, change of the heat radiation lost into space, aerosols, internal variability of the climate system. 4. Historical climate changes in long periods. 5. Development of the greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. 6. Observed climate changes. 7. Projections of future climate changes. 8. Consequences of climate change: consequences of the actual temperature increase, possible future consequences, freshwater resources and their management, ecosystems, agricultural production, coastal regions and low lying areas.

  6. Benchmark studies of the effectiveness of structural and internal materials as radiation shielding for the international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Heilbronn, L.; Stephens, D.; Wilson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    Accelerator-based measurements and model calculations have been used to study the heavy-ion radiation transport properties of materials in use on the International Space Station (ISS). Samples of the ISS aluminum outer hull were augmented with various configurations of internal wall material and polyethylene. The materials were bombarded with high-energy iron ions characteristic of a significant part of the galactic cosmic-ray (GCR) heavy-ion spectrum. Transmitted primary ions and charged fragments produced in nuclear collisions in the materials were measured near the beam axis, and a model was used to extrapolate from the data to lower beam energies and to a lighter ion. For the materials and ions studied, at incident particle energies from 1037 MeV/nucleon down to at least 600 MeV/nucleon, nuclear fragmentation reduces the average dose and dose equivalent per incident ion. At energies below 400 MeV/nucleon, the calculation predicts that as material is added, increased ionization energy loss produces increases in some dosimetric quantities. These limited results suggest that the addition of modest amounts of polyethylene or similar material to the interior of the ISS will reduce the dose to ISS crews from space radiation; however, the radiation transport properties of ISS materials should be evaluated with a realistic space radiation field. Copyright 2003 by Radiation Research Society.

  7. Dose measurement, its distribution and individual external dose assessments of inhabitants on high background radiation area in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, Taeko; Morishima, Hiroshige; Tatsumi, Kusuo; Nakai, Sayaka; Sugahara, Tsutomu; Yuan Yongling; Wei Luxin

    2001-01-01

    As a part of the China-Japan cooperative research on the natural radiation epidemiology, we have carried out a dose-assessment study to evaluate the external to natural radiation in the high background radiation area (HBRA) of Yangjiang in Guangdong province and in the control area (CA) of Enping prefecture since 1991. Because of the difficulties in measuring the individual doses of all inhabitants directly by the personal dosimeters, an indirect method was applied to estimate the exposed dose rates from the environmental radiation dose rates measured by survey meters and the occupancy factors of each hamlet. An individual radiation dose roughly correlates with the environmental radiation dose and the life style of the inhabitant. We have analyzed the environmental radiation doses in the hamlets and the variation of the occupancy factors to obtain the parameters of dose estimation on the inhabitants in selected hamlets; Madi and the several hamlets of the different level doses in HBRA and Hampizai hamlet in CA. With these parameters, we made estimations of individual dose rates and compared them with those obtained from the direct measurement using dosimeters carried by selected individuals. The results obtained are as follows: 1) The environmental radiation dose rates are influenced by the natural radioactive nuclide concentrations in building materials, the age of the building and the arrangement of the houses in a hamlet. There existed a fairly large and heterogeneous distribution of indoor and outdoor environmental radiation. The indoor radiation dose rates were due to the exposure from the natural radioactive nuclides in the building materials and they were about twice higher than the outdoor radiation dose rates. This difference was not observed in CA. 2) The occupancy factor was affected by the age of individuals and the seasons of a year. Indoor occupancy factors were higher for infants and aged individuals than for other age groups. This lead to higher

  8. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG): an update of the recommendations on the use of Y-STRs in forensic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusmão, L; Butler, J M; Carracedo, A

    2006-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y-chromosome po......The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y......-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). Since then, the use of Y-STRs has become very popular, and numerous new loci have been introduced. The current recommendations address important aspects to clarify problems regarding the nomenclature, the definition of loci and alleles...

  9. [Summary report of the 18th session of the United Nations Population Commission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, T

    1975-04-01

    An outline of the 18th Session of the United Nations Population Commission is described in 4 parts in this report. A total of 50 member and non-member nations participated. 8 agenda were presented: election of officers; adoption of the agenda; implications of the world population conference; report on the world population year 1974; report on the progress of work; biennial work programme; medium-term plan, and long-term perspectives; draft provisional agenda for the 19th session of the commission; adoption of the report of the commission. Problems of the world population conference were examined as well as actions to implement the recommendations of the world population conference at the national and international levels; implications of the conference for strengthening of the relevant units of the secretariat; and recommendation to the economic and social council. 4 resolutions were adopted: population; the status of women and the integration of women in development; guidelines on population related factors for development planners; and work programme in the field of population international migration.

  10. Effect of production system and flock age on eggshell and egg internal quality measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samiullah, Sami; Omar, Amal Saleh; Roberts, Juliet; Chousalkar, Kapil

    2017-01-01

    Egg quality was measured in eggs from different flocks that were reared together and then allocated to different production systems. Eggs were processed for measurements of eggshell and egg internal quality variables, scoring of ultrastructural mammillary layer features, completeness of cuticle cover, and protoporphyrin IX (PP IX) quantification. There was a significant main effect (P egg weight, and egg internal quality and significant effects of flock age on most measurements. The mammillary layer ultrastructural variables showed no clear relationship with production system and flock age. However, there was a significant interaction between production system and flock age for mammillary cap, early and late fusions. Cuticle cover ([Formula: see text]), was significantly higher in barn eggs (19.20), followed by free range (17.57), and cage eggs (15.99). Completeness of cuticle cover was significantly higher in eggs from the 44 week old flock than for 64 week and 73 week old flocks. For eggshells with cuticle intact, there was a significant main effect of both production system and flock age, and significant interaction between the two, for shell reflectivity, L*a*b* values and amount of PP IX. For PP IX, when this difference was calculated for the cuticle alone, there were no statistically significant differences. In 1 g of shell with and without cuticle, there was more PP IX in cage eggs (9.49 × 10 -8 , 7.90 × 10 -8  mM) followed by free range (8.24 × 10 -8 , 6.90 × 10 -8  mM), and barn eggs (8.64 × 10 -8 , 7.28 × 10 -8  mM). Similar trends were recorded for the amount of PP IX in 1 g of cuticle, but the difference was not statistically significant. The amount of PP IX decreased significantly with increasing flock age. Comparing the cage and barn production systems at 68 week of flock age, there was no difference for the amount of PP IX in shell with or without cuticle, or in the cuticle alone. Eggs from the cage production system were darker in color

  11. International Chernobyl project - input from the Commission of the European Communities to the evaluation of the relocation policy adopted by the former Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    In October 1989, the Government of the USSR formally requested the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to carry out: '...an international experts' assessment of the concept which the USSR has evolved to enable the population to live safely in areas affected by radioactive contamination following the Chernobyl accident, and an evaluation of the effectiveness of the steps taken in those areas to safeguard the health of the population'. The response to this request was a proposal for a multinational team to undertake an assessment of the radiological situation in the three affected Soviet Republics - the Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic (UKrSSR), the Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic (BSSR) and the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (RSFSR). The International Chernobyl Project was established for this purpose with the participation of the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Labour Office (ILO), the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). An International Advisory Committee, comprising scientists from 10 countries and seven international organizations, was established to direct the Project and be responsible for its findings. The results of the Project have been published in two reports - an overview and a technical report -prepared by the International Advisory Committee

  12. Atmospheric Ionizing Radiation (AIR): Analysis, Results, and Lessons Learned From the June 1997 ER-2 Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W. (Editor); Jones, I. W. (Editor); Maiden, D. L. (Editor); Goldhagen, P. (Editor)

    2003-01-01

    The United States initiated a program to assess the technology required for an environmentally safe and operationally efficient High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) for entrance on the world market after the turn of the century. Due to the changing regulations on radiation exposures and the growing concerns over uncertainty in our knowledge of atmospheric radiations, the NASA High Speed Research Project Office (HSRPO) commissioned a review of "Radiation Exposure and High-Altitude Flight" by the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP). On the basis of the NCRP recommendations, the HSRPO funded a flight experiment to resolve the environmental uncertainty in the atmospheric ionizing radiation levels as a step in developing an approach to minimize the radiation impact on HSCT operations. To minimize costs in this project, an international investigator approach was taken to assure coverage with instrument sensitivity across the range of particle types and energies to allow unique characterization of the diverse radiation components. The present workshop is a result of the flight measurements made at the maximum intensity of the solar cycle modulated background radiation levels during the month of June 1997.

  13. European developments on radiation protection in health care. An international public health perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neira, M.; Del Rosario Perez, M.

    2010-01-01

    The World Health Organisation's Programme on Radiation and Environmental Health is engaged in a range of global, regional and national collaborations to protect patients, workers and the public from planned, existing and emergency radiation exposures. Collaboration with European countries in this field is very active, with the ultimate goal of ensuring appropriate use of radiation worldwide. The WHO 'Global Initiative on Radiation Safety in Health Care Settings' is now being developed to mobilize the health sector towards safer and effective use of radiation in medicine. European collaboration in this initiative can have impact not only regionally but globally. This article provides an overview of relevant European developments in radiation protection in health care, from an international public health perspective. The 'Global Initiative' presents new opportunities for European countries to expand the horizons of their achievements globally, therefore contributing to improved radiation protection worldwide. (authors)

  14. 10 CFR 35.632 - Full calibration measurements on teletherapy units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full calibration measurements on teletherapy units. 35.632 Section 35.632 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL Photon Emitting... calibration corrected mathematically for radioactive decay; (ii) Following replacement of the source or...

  15. 10 CFR 35.635 - Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Full calibration measurements on gamma stereotactic radiosurgery units. 35.635 Section 35.635 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT... decay; (ii) Following replacement of the sources or following reinstallation of the gamma stereotactic...

  16. Measurement of internal radiation exposure among decontamination workers in villages near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokura, Masaharu; Nihei, Masahiko; Sato, Katsumi; Masaki, Shin; Sakuma, Yu; Kato, Shigeaki; Sugimoto, Amina; Nomura, Shuhei; Matsumura, Tomoko; Miyazaki, Makoto; Hayano, Ryugo; Shibuya, Kenji; Kami, Masahiro; Sasaki, Taro

    2013-10-01

    Decontamination workers may face a high risk of exposure to internal irradiation through inhalation during decontamination activities; there is, however, little previous research on the levels of internal contamination during decontamination procedures. The authors reviewed the medical records, including whole body counter measurements, of decontamination workers in villages near the crippled Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant to assess their levels of internal radiation exposure. In total, 83 decontamination workers were enrolled in this study. They were regularly engaged in decontamination activities in highly contaminated areas where surface 137Cs deposition density was over 100 kBq m-2. The present study showed low levels of internal exposure among the decontamination workers near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. The cesium burdens of all the decontamination workers were below detection limits. They had reported no acute health problems. The resuspension of radioactive materials may cause minimal internal contamination during decontamination activities.

  17. Effects of body habitus on internal radiation dose calculations using the 5-year-old anthropomorphic male models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xie, Tianwu; Kuster, Niels; Zaidi, Habib

    2017-01-01

    Computational phantoms are commonly used in internal radiation dosimetry to assess the amount and distribution pattern of energy deposited in various parts of the human body from different internal radiation sources. Radiation dose assessments are commonly performed on predetermined reference com...

  18. Noncontact localized internal infrared radiation measurement using an infrared point detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisaka, Masaki

    2017-12-01

    The techniques for temperature measurement within the human body are important for clinical applications. A method for noncontact local infrared (IR) radiation measurements was investigated deep within an object to simulate how the core human body temperature can be obtained. To isolate the IR light emitted from a specific area within the object from the external noise, the radiating IR light was detected using an IR point detector, which comprises a pinhole and a thermopile positioned at an imaging relation with the region of interest within the object. The structure of the helical filament radiating IR light inside a light bulb was thermally imaged by scanning the bulb in two dimensions. Moreover, this approach was used to effectively measure IR light in the range of human body temperature using a glass plate placed in front of the heat source, mimicking the ocular fundus.

  19. Assessment of occupational radiation doses due to inhalation of iodine-131 by workers in some Egyptian hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rizk, R.A.M.; Mahrous, A.; Eid, I.; HELAL, N.L.

    2006-01-01

    The present study deals with the assessment of internal radiation doses due to intake of 131 I for workers of nuclear medicine units in some hospitals in Egypt. Intake of isotopes may occur via different pathways, therefore, monitoring of workers and workplaces are integral part of the occupational radiation protection and radiation control programs. For estimating 131 I intake and consequently the internal radiation doses for some occupational radiation workers in radiotherapy sections of hospitals, 24 h urine samples were weekly collected for six weeks. The 131 I activity in three samples was measured using hyper pure germanium (HPGe) detector. The obtained results were compared with the dose limits recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP, 1991)

  20. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Staff practice and procedure digest: Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board Decisions, July 1972--December 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This Revision 2 of the fifth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and Licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to December 31, 1988, interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 2 replaces in part earlier editions and revisions and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice Effective through December 31, 1988. The Practice and Procedure Digest was originally prepared by attorneys in the NRC's Office of the Executive Legal Director (now, Office of the General Counsel) as an internal research tool. Because of its proven usefulness to those attorneys, it was decided that it might also prove useful to members of the public. Accordingly, the decision was made to publish the Digest and subsequent editions thereof. This edition of the Digest was prepared by attorneys from Aspen Systems Corporation pursuant to Contract number 18-89-346

  1. Introduction and fundamentals: Lecture No. 2. Course on advances in radiation, International School of Radiation Damage and Protection, Erice, Italy, September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1979-09-01

    This lecture discusses advances in the fundamental sciences which underlie that science variously called health physics or radiation. Some of the underlying assumptions of radiation protection are discussed, and some developments in the radiological sciences since 1975 described

  2. Introduction and fundamentals: Lecture No. 2. Course on advances in radiation, International School of Radiation Damage and Protection, Erice, Italy, September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1979-09-01

    This lecture discusses advances in the fundamental sciences which underlie that science variously called health physics or radiation. Some of the underlying assumptions of radiation protection are discussed, and some developments in the radiological sciences since 1975 described. (ACR)

  3. United States nuclear regulatory commission program for inspection of decommissioning nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harris, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC or Commission) has been inspecting decommissioning commercial nuclear power plants in the United States (U.S.) since the first such facility permanently shutdown in September 1967. Decommissioning inspections have principally focused on the safe storage and maintenance of spent reactor fuel; occupational radiation exposure; environmental radiological releases; the dismantlement and decontamination of structures, systems, and components identified to contain or potentially contain licensed radioactive material; and the performance of final radiological survey of the site and remaining structures to support termination of the USNRC-issued operating license. Over the last 5 years, USNRC inspection effort in these areas has been assessed and found to provide reasonable confidence that decommissioning can be conducted safely and in accordance with Commission rules and regulations. Recently, the staff has achieved a better understanding of the risks associated with particular decommissioning accidents 1 and plans to apply these insights to amendments proposed to enhance decommissioning rules and regulations. The probabilities, scenarios, and conclusions resulting from this effort are being assessed as to their applicability to the inspection of decommissioning commercial power reactors. (author)

  4. A history of study on safety of irradiated foods (2). Clostridium botulinum in irradiated seafood from the reports by the United States Atomic Energy Commission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Makoto

    2004-01-01

    This review is a part of ''history of study on the wholesomeness of irradiated foods''. Clostridium botulinum in irradiated seafood have been of great concern at the beginning of development of irradiated food. This review describes the studies on Clostridium botulinum by US. Atomic Energy Commission in 1960's with their data and what they recognized it as a risk factor of irradiated foods. In 1999 FAO/IAEA/WHO reported that Clostridium botulinum type A and B spors are apparently the most resistant and thus of great concern in the radiation sterilization of food, whereas the less radiation-resistant type E spores are important in low dose irradiation of foods, particularly fishery products. This review also describes current break-through application by NASA and Canadian irradiator. (author)

  5. Evaluation of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 demonstration run

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvaic, I.; Miskolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contains evaluation of the 144 hour demonstration run of the Mochovce Unit 1. In the document, the courses and results of additional tests in this phase of power commissioning are summarized, evaluation of the performance of important systems and equipment of the unit is carried out, as well as of the compliance with Limits and Conditions in the course of the demonstration run. On this basis, conclusions are drawn and recommendations given for the unit to by ready for trial operation. The evaluation was developed by the scientific management of the Mochovce commissioning providing an independent support for the operators for supervising the commissioning tasks from the point of nuclear safety

  6. Influence of radiation fractionation on survival of mice and spleen colony-forming units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Bullis, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    C57B1/6 mice were given Gy X-rays fractionated in several ways. There was a cyclical pattern of animal survival which was correlated to the fractionation interval and which indicated a periodicity of 6 h. Ten grays given a single dose is fatal to 100% of the mice and depresses the CFU-S to about one per leg with no evidence of proliferation during the remaining life. Ten grays given in 2.5-Gy increments at 24-h intervals causes no fatalities and results in a similar CFU-S depression but is followed by an exponential increase in CFU-S over the ensuing 12 days. Although bone marrow from survivors of such treatment was comparable to control marrow in its capacity for short-term rescue, it was clearly, inferior in its capability for long-term rescue. The periodicity of 6 h suggests that the cells responsible for survival of the mice have been synchronized into more or less radiosensitive and radioresistant stages of the cell cycle as a result of the time between the 25-Gy increments. Implications for the CFU-S and long-term repopulating cells are discussed. 22 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  7. Effective UV radiation from model calculations and measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feister, Uwe; Grewe, Rolf

    1994-01-01

    Model calculations have been made to simulate the effect of atmospheric ozone and geographical as well as meteorological parameters on solar UV radiation reaching the ground. Total ozone values as measured by Dobson spectrophotometer and Brewer spectrometer as well as turbidity were used as input to the model calculation. The performance of the model was tested by spectroradiometric measurements of solar global UV radiation at Potsdam. There are small differences that can be explained by the uncertainty of the measurements, by the uncertainty of input data to the model and by the uncertainty of the radiative transfer algorithms of the model itself. Some effects of solar radiation to the biosphere and to air chemistry are discussed. Model calculations and spectroradiometric measurements can be used to study variations of the effective radiation in space in space time. The comparability of action spectra and their uncertainties are also addressed.

  8. The clinical safety, biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry of [{sup 18}F]fluciclovine in healthy adult volunteers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McParland, Brian J. [Imaging Technology Group, GE Healthcare Medical Diagnostics, Amersham, Buckinghamshire (United Kingdom); Wall, Anders; Soerensen, Jens [Uppsala University, Section of Nuclear Medicine and PET, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Johansson, Silvia [Uppsala University, Section of Oncology, Department of Radiology, Oncology and Radiation Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2013-08-15

    We report on the biodistribution and internal radiation dosimetry in humans of [{sup 18}F]fluciclovine, a synthetic L-leucine analogue being investigated as a potential diagnostic biomarker for neoplasia. Whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scans of 6 healthy volunteers were acquired at up to 16 time points up to about 5 h after a bolus administration of [{sup 18}F]fluciclovine (153.8 {+-} 2.2 MBq). Venous blood samples were taken up to about 4 h post-injection from which {sup 18}F activity concentrations in whole blood and plasma were measured. Urine was collected as voided up to 4 h post-injection, from which the excreted {sup 18}F activity was measured. Absolute values of the {sup 18}F activity contained in up to 11 source regions (brain, salivary glands, lung, heart, pancreas, spleen, liver, red bone marrow, kidneys, uterus and urinary bladder contents) were determined directly from quantitative analysis of the images. For each source region, the {sup 18}F activity decay-corrected and normalised to that injected, as a function of time, was fit by an analytical function which was subsequently integrated to yield the cumulated activity normalised to the injected activity. These normalised cumulated activities were then used as input to the Organ Level INternal Dose Assessment/EXponential Modelling (OLINDA/EXM) package to calculate the internal radiation dosimetry of each subject following the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) schema. An effective dose was then estimated for each subject. [{sup 18}F]Fluciclovine was clinically well tolerated in this study. Very little {sup 18}F was excreted with only a mean value of 3.3 % present in the urine at about 4 h post-injection; no activity within the intestinal contents was noted. The highest mean initial uptakes were measured in the liver (13.8 %), red bone marrow (11.1 %) and lung (7.1 %). The highest mean radiation absorbed doses per unit administered activity were received by the pancreas (102.2 {mu

  9. 77 FR 52340 - Meeting of the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-29

    ... Office of the Secretary Meeting of the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform... on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) will hold a public meeting on September 13... Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform was established under Secretarial Order No. 3292, dated...

  10. Radiation dose measurement and alarm equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girle, H.D.

    1977-01-01

    This portable radiation personal dosemeter contains only commercially available electronic components and is light, easy to operate, stable and requires practically no maintenance. The radiation which is present produces electrical impulses in a detector in the well known way, whose frequency is propertional to the intensity of radiation. The added number of pulses is therefore a measure of the incoming radiation dose. After passing through a pulse forming circuit the pulses are stored in a digital counter, i.e. they are added. An AND circuit connected to the counter output produces the excitation of the sound generator through a subsequent bistable circuit, if a number of pulses preset in the counter is reached. The sound generator feeds a warning signal to a loudspeaker. A second output after the digital counter converts the added number of pulses to an instrument reading in a digital - analogue converter. This makes it possible to read the instantaneous value of dose while the digital value is not indicated but only used for setting off the alarm. (HP) [de

  11. PIP-II Injector Test’s Low Energy Beam Transport: Commissioning and Selected Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemyakin, A. [Fermilab; Alvarez, M. [Fermilab; Andrews, R. [Fermilab; Carneiro, J.-P. [Fermilab; Chen, A. [Fermilab; Hanna, B. [Fermilab; Prost, L. [Fermilab; Scarpine, V. [Fermilab; D' Arcy, R. [University Coll. London; Wiesner, C. [Goethe U., Frankfurt (main)

    2016-09-16

    The PIP2IT test accelerator is under construction at Fermilab. Its ion source and Low Energy Beam Transport (LEBT) in its initial (straight) configuration have been commissioned to full specification parameters. This paper introduces the LEBT design and summarizes the outcome of the commissioning activities.

  12. Radiation, people and the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ford, J.

    2004-02-01

    Radiation is a fact of life. We live in a world in which radiation is naturally present everywhere. Light and heat from nuclear reactions in the Sun are essential to our existence. Radioactive materials occur naturally throughout the environment, and our bodies contain radioactive materials such as carbon-14, potassium-40 and polonium-210 quite naturally. All life on Earth has evolved in the presence of this radiation. Since the discovery of X rays and radioactivity more than 100 years ago, we have found ways of producing radiation and radioactive materials artificially. The first use of X rays was in medical diagnosis, within six months of their discovery in 1895. So a benefit from the use of radiation was established very early on, but equally some of the potential dangers of radiation became apparent in the doctors and surgeons who unwittingly overexposed themselves to X rays in the early 1900s. Since then, many different applications of radiation and radioactive materials have been developed. We can classify radiation according to the effects it produces on matter, into ionizing and non-ionizing radiation. Ionizing radiation includes cosmic rays, X rays and the radiation from radioactive materials. Non-ionizing radiation includes ultraviolet light, radiant heat, radio waves and microwaves. This book deals with ionizing radiation, a term, which for simplicity, is often shortened to just radiation. It has been prepared by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in co-operation with the National Radiological Protection Board (United Kingdom) as a broad overview of the subject of ionizing radiation, its effects and uses, as well as the measures in place to use it safely. As the United Nations agency for nuclear science and its peaceful applications, the IAEA offers a broad spectrum of expertise and programmes to foster the safe use of radiation internationally

  13. Evaluation of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 power level up to 100 % Nnom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvaic, I.; Mickolci, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document contains an evaluation of the power phase of power commissioning of the Mochovce Unit 1 in the phase up to the power level of 100 % N nom .In the document, the courses and results of tests in this phase of power commissioning are summarized, evaluation of the performance of important systems and equipment of the unit is carried out, and the compliance with Limits and Conditions in the course of the phase is assessed. On this basis, conclusions are drawn and recommendations for the unit to be ready for subsequent phases of the power commissioning. The evaluation was developed by the scientific management of the Mochovce commissioning providing an independent support for the operators for supervising the commissioning tasks from the point of nuclear safety

  14. Method and apparatus for measuring electromagnetic radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Been, J. F. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An apparatus and method are described in which the capacitance of a semiconductor junction subjected to an electromagnetic radiation field is utilized to indicate the intensity or strength of the radiation.

  15. Scoping Study on Research and Development Priorities for Distribution-System Phasor Measurement Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eto, Joseph H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Stewart, Emma M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Smith, Travis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Buckner, Mark [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kirkham, Harold [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tuffner, Francis [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schoenwald, David A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-04-01

    This report addresses the potential use of phasor measurement units (PMUs) within electricity distribution systems, and was written to assess whether or not PMUs could provide significant benefit, at the national level. We analyze examples of present and emerging distribution-system issues related to reliability, integration of distributed energy resources, and the changing electrical characteristics of load. We find that PMUs offer important and irreplaceable advantages over present approaches. However, we also find that additional research and development for standards, testing and calibration, demonstration projects, and information sharing is needed to help industry capture these benefits.

  16. Foundations of the International System of Units (SI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Robert A.

    1981-01-01

    Traces the events leading to the creation of the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM). Discusses how the units have been represented by their standards, and investigates how the original metric system evolved into the International System of Units (SI), focusing on the meter, second, kilogram, and electrical units. (SK)

  17. Internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Mills

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the arena of radiation oncology special procedures, medical physicists are often the focus professionals for implementation and administration of advanced and complex technologies. One of the most vexing and challenging aspects of managing complexity concerns the ongoing internal qualification and credentialing of radiation oncology physicists to perform patient special procedures. To demonstrate ongoing qualification, a physicist must a document initial training and successful completion of competencies to implement and perform this procedure, b demonstrate familiarity with all aspects of the commissioning and quality assurance process, c demonstrate continuing education respecting this procedure, d demonstrate the peer-reviewed completion of a minimum number of patient special procedures during a specified time span, and e demonstrate satisfactory overall progress toward maintenance of specialty board certification. In many respects, this information complement is similar to that required by an accredited residency program in therapy physics. In this investigation, we report on the design of a management tool to qualify staff radiation oncology physicists to deliver patient procedures.

  18. FAO/IAEA/WHO international conference on ensuring the safety and quality of food through radiation processing. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    This document contains extended synopses of 90 articles presented to the FAO/IAEA/WHO international conference on ensuring the safety and quality of food through radiation processing, held in Anatalya, Turkey, 19-22 October, 1999. The major themes covered include food irradiation technologies, public acceptance of irradiated food items, effectiveness and economic aspects of food irradiation

  19. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff practice and procedure digest: Commission, Appeal Board and Licensing Board decisions, July 1972--December 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-11-01

    This Revision 10 of the fourth edition of the NRC Staff Practice and Procedure Digest contains a digest of a number of Commission, Atomic Safety and Licensing Appeal Board, and Atomic Safety and licensing Board decisions issued during the period from July 1, 1972 to December 31, 1987 interpreting the NRC's Rules of Practice in 10 CFR Part 2. This Revision 10 replaces in part earlier editions and supplements and includes appropriate changes reflecting the amendments to the Rules of Practice effective through December 31, 1987. The Digest is roughly structured in accordance with the chronological sequence of the nuclear facility licensing process as set forth in Appendix A to 10 CFR Part 2. Those decisions which did not fit into that structure are dealt with in a section on ''general matters.'' Where appropriate, particular decisions are indexed under more than one heading. Some topical headings contain no decision citations or discussion

  20. KOALA, a wide-field 1000 element integral-field unit for the Anglo-Australian Telescope: assembly and commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhelem, Ross; Brzeski, Jurek; Case, Scott; Churilov, Vladimir; Ellis, Simon; Farrell, Tony; Green, Andrew; Heng, Anthony; Horton, Anthony; Ireland, Michael; Jones, Damien; Klauser, Urs; Lawrence, Jon; Miziarski, Stan; Orr, David; Pai, Naveen; Staszak, Nick; Tims, Julia; Vuong, Minh; Waller, Lew; Xavier, Pascal

    2014-07-01

    The KOALA optical fibre feed for the AAOmega spectrograph has been commissioned at the Anglo-Australian Telescope. The instrument samples the reimaged telescope focal plane at two scales: 1.23 arcsec and 0.70 arcsec per image slicing hexagonal lenslet over a 49x27 and 28x15 arcsec field of view respectively. The integral field unit consists of 2D hexagonal and circular lenslet arrays coupling light into 1000 fibres with 100 micron core diameter. The fibre run is over 35m long connecting the telescope Cassegrain focus with the bench mounted spectrograph room where all fibres are reformatted into a one-dimensional slit. Design and assembly of the KOALA components, engineering challenges encountered, and commissioning results are discussed.

  1. 78 FR 46596 - Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... Office of the Secretary Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform AGENCY: Office... announcing that the Secretarial Commission on Indian Trust Administration and Reform (the Commission) will... about the trust relationship, other trust models, and trust reform, and aspects of trust that are unique...

  2. Glenohumeral internal rotation measurements differ depending on stabilization techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilk, Kevin E; Reinold, Michael M; Macrina, Leonard C; Porterfield, Ron; Devine, Kathleen M; Suarez, Kim; Andrews, James R

    2009-03-01

    The loss of glenohumeral internal rotation range of motion in overhead athletes has been well documented in the literature. Several different methods of assessing this measurement have been described, making comparison between the results of studies difficult. Significant differences in the amount of internal rotation range of motion exist when using different methods of stabilization. Descriptive laboratory study. THREE TECHNIQUES WERE USED BILATERALLY IN RANDOM FASHION TO MEASURE GLENOHUMERAL INTERNAL ROTATION RANGE OF MOTION: stabilization of the humeral head, stabilization of the scapula, and visual inspection without stabilization. An initial study on 20 asymptomatic participants was performed to determine the intrarater and interrater reliability for each measurement technique. Once complete, measurements were performed on 39 asymptomatic professional baseball players to determine if a difference existed in measurement techniques and if there was a significant side-to-side difference. A 2-way repeated-measures analysis of variance was used. While interrater reliability was fair between all 3 methods, scapular stabilization provided the best intrarater reliability. A statistically significant difference was observed between all 3 methods (P < .001). Internal rotation was significantly less in the dominant shoulder than in the nondominant shoulder (P < .001). Differences in internal rotation range of motion measurements exist when using different methods. The scapula stabilization method displayed the highest intrarater reproducibility and should be considered when evaluating internal rotation passive range of motion of the glenohumeral joint. A standardized method of measuring internal rotation range of motion is required to accurately compare physical examinations of patients. The authors recommend the use of the scapula stabilization method to assess internal rotation range of motion by allowing normal glenohumeral arthrokinematics while stabilizing the

  3. Radiation measurements in Austria in 1999 - date and evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobek, E.; Streeruwitz, E.

    2000-12-01

    natural radiation exposure do occur. There are regions with particular geological conditions where exposure levels by far exceed the average dose due to high radon values. Artificial radiation exposure is predominantly caused by the use of radioactive substances and of ionizing radiation in medical applications, in particular by x-ray diagnostics, leading on the average to approximately 1.3 mSv per person annually in the reporting period. By comparison, the dose to the Austrian population due to the effects of the reactor accident at Chernobyl amounting in 1999 to less than 0.02 mSv is small. The exposure as a result of the operation of the nuclear installations at the Austrian Research Center Seibersdorf and at the Atomic Institute of the Austrian Universities in 1999 was negligible. Investigative measurements by the authorities of gaseous and liquid emissions and the internal surveillance by the operators show that maximum permissible levels never were exceeded. Also environmental monitoring in the surroundings could not detect any inadmissibly high gamma dose rates or immissions. The artificial radionuclide content of air, precipitation and surface water in the reporting period was mainly caused by the Chernobyl accident and similarly low as in the previous years. In these media the values for caesium-137 - which nowadays is the only significant radionuclide left from the Chernobyl fallout - are only slightly higher than before the accident. However, in soils from certain regions much higher caesium-137 concentrations can be found than before the accident. Since in most agriculturally used sods radiocaesium is fixed strongly to clay minerals and thus is only marginally available for plant uptake, foodstuffs and agricultural products generally show only minor caesium-137 concentrations. In comparison, significantly higher values still can be found in some forest produce such as wild growing fungi and game. In semi-natural forest ecosystems the fixation of caesium is

  4. The experimental setup of the Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation collaboration at Mainzer Mikrotron: Design, commissioning, and tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lietti, D., E-mail: Daniela.Lietti@cern.ch [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); Backe, H.; Lauth, W. [Institut für Kernphysik der Universität Mainz, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bagli, E.; Bandiera, L.; Germogli, G.; Guidi, V.; Mazzolari, A. [Università degli Studi di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); INFN Sezione di Ferrara, Via Saragat 1, 44100 Ferrara (Italy); Berra, A.; Prest, M. [Università degli Studi dell’Insubria, Via Valleggio 11, 22100 Como (Italy); INFN Sezione di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Carturan, S.; De Salvador, D. [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35131 Padova (Italy); INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Viale dell’Università 2, 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Vallazza, E. [INFN Sezione di Trieste, Via Valerio 2, 34127 Trieste (Italy)

    2015-04-15

    Silicon/germanium flat/bent crystals are thin devices able to efficiently deflect charged particle GeV-energy beams up to a few hundreds of μrad; moreover, high intensity photons can be efficiently produced in the so-called Multi-Volume Reflection (MVR) and Multiple Volume Reflections in One Crystal (MVROC) conditions. In the last years, the research interest in this field has moved to the dynamic studies of light negative leptons in the low energy range: the possibility to deflect negative particles and to produce high intensity γ sources via the coherent interactions with crystals in the sub-GeV energy range has been proved by the ICE-RAD (Interaction in Crystals for Emission of RADiation) Collaboration at the MAinzer MIkrotron (MAMI, Germany). This paper describes the setup used by the ICE-RAD experiment for the crystals characterization (both in terms of deflection and radiation emission properties): a high precision goniometer is used to align the crystals with the incoming beam, while a silicon based profilometer and an inorganic scintillator reconstruct, respectively, the particle position and the photon spectra after the samples. The crystals manufacturing process and their characterization, the silicon profilometer commissioning at the CERN PS T9 beamline, and the commissioning of the whole setup installed at MAMI are presented.

  5. Early national and international recommendations for X-ray and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesinska, E.

    2008-01-01

    The first three decades of pioneering work in the field of X-ray and natural radioactivity research and use took its toll all over the world because of lack of knowledge and caution. Coordinated, international cooperation in the field of X-ray and radium protection and standardization of measures was established after the World War I. The First and the Second International Congress of Radiology held in London in 1925 and in Stockholm in 1928 respectively, played a crucial role in it. Based on these congresses' initiatives and resolutions, the International X-ray Unit Committee and the International X-ray and Radium Protection Committee were established in 1828. The early recommendations on the international X-ray unit and on X-ray and radium protection, as passed by the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928, are presented and compared with two related national initiat