WorldWideScience

Sample records for international collective action

  1. Business unusual: collective action against bribery in international business

    OpenAIRE

    Dávid-Barrett, Elizabeth

    2017-01-01

    Collective action initiatives in which governments and companies make anti-corruption commitments have proliferated in recent years. This apparently prosocial behavior defies the logic of collective action and, given that bribery often goes undetected and unpunished, is not easily explained by principal-agent theory. Club theory suggests that the answer lies in the institutional design of anti-corruption clubs: collective action can work as long as membership has high entry costs, members rec...

  2. Collective action on the western range: coping with external and internal threats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail M. York

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative natural resource management institutions enable agents with diverse interests to come together to solve complex problems. These actors must overcome a series of collective action problems to create, maintain, and evolve these institutions. In addition to the challenge of heterogeneous actors, these commons social-ecological systems often face internal and external threats or disturbances. The institutional arrangements may be effective with problems that are internal to a social-ecological system – ones that they are designed to handle, but how do these arrangements cope with external disturbances, especially ones caused by large-scale political and economic decisions, events, and processes. Using ethnographic and archival data we conduct an institutional analysis outlining the existing and emerging collaboratives, the important actors, and ongoing efforts to cope with the five major challenges identified by rangeland actors. We trace the evolution of institutions on the western range with a focus on their ability to cope with challenges that are largely within the system – biodiversity, fire, and water management, and those that are driven externally by actors who are largely absent – border militarization and violence and exurbanization.

  3. Collective Action under Globalization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, Steen

    Collective action in the form of industrial conflict has declined dramatically since the high tide in the 1970s in Europe. This article argues that this decline is the result of significant changes in both economic and institutional factors, influencing the calculations of employees and of their ...

  4. The effect of personal and group discrimination on the subjective well-being of people with mental illness: the role of internalized stigma and collective action intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Garín, Daniel; Molero, Fernando; Bos, Arjan E R

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this study is to test a model in which personal discrimination predicts internalized stigma, while group discrimination predicts a greater willingness to engage in collective action. Internalized stigma and collective action, in turn, are associated to positive and negative affect. A cross-sectional study with 213 people with mental illness was conducted. The model was tested using path analysis. Although the data supported the model, its fit was not sufficiently good. A respecified model, in which a direct path from collective action to internalized stigma was added, showed a good fit. Personal and group discrimination appear to impact subjective well-being through two different paths: the internalization of stigma and collective action intentions, respectively. These two paths, however, are not completely independent, as collective action predicts a lower internalization of stigma. Thus, collective action appears as an important tool to reduce internalized stigma and improve subjective well-being. Future interventions to reduce the impact of stigma should fight the internalization of stigma and promote collective action are suggested.

  5. Developing an approach to assessing the political feasibility of global collective action and an international agreement on antimicrobial resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers Van Katwyk, Susan; Danik, Marie Évelyne; Pantis, Ioana; Smith, Rachel; Røttingen, John-Arne; Hoffman, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global issue. International trade, travel, agricultural practices, and environmental contamination all make it possible for resistant microbes to cross national borders. Global collective action is needed in the form of an international agreement or other mechanism that brings states together at the negotiation table and commits them to adopt or implement policies to limit the spread of resistant microorganisms. This article describes an approach to assessing whether political and stakeholder interests can align to commit to tackling AMR. Two dimensions affecting political feasibility were selected and compared across 82 countries: 1) states' global influence and 2) self-interest in addressing AMR. World Bank GDP ranking was used as a proxy for global influence, while human antibiotic consumption (10-year percent change) was used as a proxy for self-interest in addressing AMR. We used these data to outline a typology of four country archetypes, and discuss how these archetypes can be used to understand whether a proposed agreement may have sufficient support to be politically feasible. Four types of countries exist within our proposed typology: 1) wealthy countries who have the expertise and financial resources to push for global collective action on AMR, 2) wealthy countries who need to act on AMR, 3) countries who require external assistance to act on AMR, and 4) neutral countries who may support action where applicable. Any international agreement will require substantial support from countries of the first type to lead global action, and from countries of the second type who have large increasing antimicrobial consumption levels. A large number of barriers exist that could derail efforts towards global collective action on AMR; issues of capacity, infrastructure, regulation, and stakeholder interests will need to be addressed in coordination with other actors to achieve an agreement on AMR. Achieving a global agreement on

  6. Collective action and its interpreters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Alfredo Costa de Campos Melo Júnior

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This article intention is to give the theorical and intellectual map production regarding collective actions. For such, we will analyze the propositions of five thinkers who have work for the better understanding of this question. We will discuss the contributions of the Chicago School, especially psic-sociology, and Herbert Blumer symbolic interactionism; the classical Marxists approaches on collective actions; Claus Offe and the Marxist point of view on the new models of collective actions; Charles Tilly and his social-historic perspective analysis about social movements; and finally Mancur Olson and collective action from a rational perspective. What we intend is to present comparatively the theorical and practical similarities and exclusions of these contemporary authors who contribute with collective actions today.

  7. Global action networks: agents for collective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glasbergen, P.

    2010-01-01

    Global action networks (GANs) are civil society initiated multi-stakeholder arrangements that aim to fulfill a leadership role for systemic change in global governance for sustainable development. The paper develops a network approach to study some of these GANs as motivators of global collective

  8. Institutionalized Employer Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Christian Lyhne; Navrbjerg, Steen Erik

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies show that employer associations continue to exist in new ways despite internationalisation of the economy, liberalisation of markets and the decline of trade unions. This paradox raises two questions regarding EOs in today’s labour markets: Which employers join employer associations...... and what kind of services do EOs offer employers? This article explores these questions using two comprehensive surveys on EOs in Denmark – a prominent case of coordinated market economies. The main finding of the analyses is that collective activities vis-à-vis trade unions and government are still...

  9. The Neurobiology of Collective Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Joseph Zak

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay introduces a neurologically-informed mathematical model of collective action that reveals the role for empathy and distress in motivating costly helping behaviors. We report three direct tests of model with a key focus on the neuropeptide oxytocin as well as a variety of indirect tests. These studies, from our lab and other researchers, show support for the model. Our findings indicate that empathic concern, via the brain's release of oxytocin, is a trigger for collective action. We discuss the implications from this model for our understanding why human beings engage in costly collective action.

  10. Collective action, clientelism and connectivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shami, Mahvish

    that the unequal relationship between landlords and peasants does not, in and by itself, block peasant collective action. Rather, it is the interaction between clientelism and isolation that allow patrons to block community based projects. Despite still relying on powerful landlords, peasants in connected villages...... face no such constraints. On the contrary, their patrons assisted them in their collective endeavours, making the hierarchical network an added resource for peasants to rely upon....

  11. Commitment to action. Population Action International.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, S

    1994-01-01

    The national chair of Population Action International (formerly the Population Crisis Committee), Robin Chandler Duke, is a crusader for women's reproductive rights. She was in Bangladesh in 1971 during its civil war. Soldiers would rape young Muslim women, and their families would reject them when they became pregnant. The head of the exiled government agreed to let physicians from IPPF perform abortions on these women, which allowed families to take them back. Opposition to the abortions arose, however. This experience in Bangladesh sparked Ms. Duke's interest in population control. Her years as the wife of a US diplomat granted her access to powerful people worldwide. Her predecessor, retired US Army General Bill Draper, called Ms. Duke from his death bed in 1974 to ask her to be national chair of PAI. She served as a delegate in various international meetings, e.g., the 1980 UNESCO meetings in Belgrade. Spain and Luxembourg honored her for her work of campaigning for women's reproductive rights. She believes that rapid population growth is the most significant problem in the world today. It exacerbates poverty, environmental destruction, and political instability. She believes that universal availability of high quality, voluntary family planning services, including safe abortion, is needed to save humanity from the vicious cycle. Since family planning, sex education, and abortion are the most personal and sensitive parts of people's lives, Population Action frames family planning in the context of basic health care. AIDS complicates the issue, because contraception is no longer limited to birth control. Even though the organization realizes that sexual abstinence is the best way to avoid AIDS, it tries to educate female teenagers not to let boys coerce them to have sex. If they do, have sex Population Action advocates condom use. Ms. Duke cites the family planning successes of Indonesia, Zimbabwe, and Thailand.

  12. The temporary international collective chronicle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kravchenko, Yu.Ya.

    2007-01-01

    The temporary international collective brief history is presented from the time of its establishment in 1972 (and even earlier) till the termination of its activity in 1990 (and even later). Works in the temporary international collective framework demonstrate an example of successful cooperation of specialists from different countries in the field of calculation-theoretical and experimental research on the WWER reactor physics. The results of experimental and calculation studies were reported to the topical meetings, workshops, conferences, and symposia as well as were published in the temporary international collective reports and proceedings. The answers to the questions about the temporary international collective activity-What? Where? When?-are presented in this chronicle (Authors)

  13. From Voluntary Collective Action to Organized Collaboration?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hattke, Fabian; Blaschke, Steffen; Frost, Jetta

    2016-01-01

    Our study examines the relationship between voluntary collective action, organized collaboration, and the provision of public goods in pluralistic organizations. Using German higher education as a context, we investigate whether specialized central support structures contribute to performance...

  14. Collective Action of 'Others' in Sydney

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter F Lalich

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Various ethnic communities undertake collective action to satisfy their social needs in a place of settlement. Collectively created social resources are representative of the patterns of fragmented ethnic collective actions that differ in their capability to appropriate human and material resources, orientation, outcome, form and intensity. Through collective creation of social space migrants add a new and dynamic dimension to the social environment. During the dramatic post-1945 changes in Sydney demographic and cultural structures, over 450 “other” (ethnic collectives mobilised through grass-roots efforts their scarce resources and created needed collective goods, such as places of worship, clubs, schools, age care facilities. In this way, through creation of communal roots ethnic collectives navigate the path between exclusion and the various forms of inclusion in a dynamic culturally diverse society. Ethnic communal places signify collective conscience, participation, and the embeddedness of transplanted cultures in a transforming social environment and transnational social space.

  15. Collective Action Situated in Virtual Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, Bridget M.

    2011-01-01

    For the first time in the history of collective action, the offline world has experienced a virtually organized and enacted union strike. While this was the first publicly noticed political action in a virtual world, others have been going on for several years now. As virtual worlds continue to grow in popularity, this type of protest of action…

  16. Affirmative Action Data Collection and Reporting System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marquita; And Others

    A computerized Affirmative Action Data Collection and Reporting System was implemented at the University of Cincinnati to assist in monitoring the progress of the University's Affirmative Action program. The benefits derived from the system were definitely a contributing factor in the University's successful attempt to have its Affirmative Action…

  17. Sustaining Collective Action in Urbanizing China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuang, Xianwen; Goebel, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The recent years have seen a proliferation of scholarship on protests and other forms of collective action in China. Important insights have been gained into how conflicts between social groups and local governments begin, which strategies and instruments protesters apply, and under which...... challenges of sustaining collective action in China: the continuing existence of substantial grievances, the re-activation of strong social ties, the presence of unifying frames and an adaptive protest leadership. The comparison shows that especially the last factor is crucial: while the two villages were...... similar in all other respects, leadership in Village B was far more adaptive in Village A, which goes a long way towards explaining why collective action could be sustained twice as long in Village B....

  18. Self-Organization for Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Putterman, Louis; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Entrusting the power to punish to a central authority is a hallmark of civilization. We study a collective action dilemma in which self-interest should produce a sub-optimal outcome absent sanctions for non-cooperation. We then test experimentally whether subjects make the theoretically optimal...

  19. Connective Versus Collective Action in Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgaard, Daniel; Razmerita, Liana

    of connective action is are sult of mediating technologies especially web 2.0 that inspire and affords emergent digitally networked action, based on large‐scale self‐organized, fluid and weak‐tied networks (Ibid.). These logics are investigated in three different social media movements; #YesAllWomen, #Black......LivesMatter and the #IceBucketChallenge by analyzing Twitter and Facebook data from key periods of these movements,through a net nographic study. In particular, this study has investigated the following research questions: How are the logics of collective and connective action reflected in online social media interactions...... in large‐scale, weak‐tied networks with morphing boundaries. The nature of social media ensures that personalized action frames (e.g. personal stories or memes) and the self‐motivating act of voluntary sharing, as well how this act is reciprocated, is integral for the potential reach and impact...

  20. Global Forest Rights Action Research | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    How can such rights and benefits be distributed equitably within communities? ... strengthened livelihoods through improved forest management;; partnership ... Enhancing the Action Research Capacity of the International Model Forest Network ... by bringing research findings, mainly from earlier IDRC-supported work, into ...

  1. The Environmental Action Internal Control Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith-Sebasto, N. J.; Fortner, Rosanne W.

    1994-01-01

    Reports research designed to develop a reliable and valid instrument to assess the relationship between locus of control of reinforcement and environmentally responsible behavior in (n=853) undergraduate students. Results suggest that the Environmental Action Internal Control Index can accurately predict environmentally responsible behavior.…

  2. The Collective Black and "Principles to Actions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Danny Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, Danny Martin describes five key take-aways and two sets of questions that arose from his reading of "Principles to Actions: Ensuring Mathematics Success for All (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics [NCTM], 2014). Martin begins by noting that "Principles to Actions" is clearly a political document that…

  3. Collective Action Competence: An Asset to Campus Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charlotte R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to operationalize theories of social learning and collective action for campus sustainability practitioners at higher education institutions (IHEs) to enhance their work, and to introduce the concept of collective action competence as a practical tool. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents a…

  4. Introduction to the Social and Psychological Dynamics of Collective Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Iyer, Aarti

    2009-01-01

    Collective action is one of the core mechanisms of social change, and thus of major importance to social scientists, practitioners, and policy-makers. Our goal in editing this issue is to bring together recent advances on the social and psychological dynamics of collective action among members of

  5. Barriers to women engaging in collective action to overcome sexism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radke, Helena R M; Hornsey, Matthew J; Barlow, Fiona Kate

    2016-12-01

    Over centuries women have fought hard to obtain increasing gender equality, but despite these successes absolute equality remains an elusive goal. Theoretically, women's numerical strength makes them well-placed to take effective collective action, and millions of women engage in feminist collective action every day. In this article, however, we argue that women also face barriers to engaging in feminist collective action; barriers that are associated with the social construction and experience of what it means to be a woman. Our review synthesizes sexism research under a contemporary collective action framework to clarify our current understanding of the literature and to offer novel theoretical explanations for why women might be discouraged from engaging in feminist collective action. Using the antecedents of collective action identified by van Zomeren, Postmes, and Spears' (2008) meta-analysis, we critically review the sexism literature to argue that women face challenges when it comes to (a) identifying with other women and feminists, (b) perceiving sexism and expressing group-based anger, and (c) recognizing the efficacy of collective action. We then outline a research agenda with a view to investigating ways of overcoming these barriers. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  6. Tweets and Mobilisation: Collective Action Theory and Social Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cody McClain Brown

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article examines the relationship between social protest and social media from the theoretical perspective of the Collective Action Research Program. While the literature shows strong empirical evidence for a positive relationship between social media use and incidents of social protest, the theoretical underpinnings of this relationship remain contested and often unspecified. In order to provide a stronger theoretical basis for this relationship this paper explores theories of collective action, focusing on how social media can assist in solving the dissident collective action problem. It argues that using collective action theory to understand social media and protest can better inform our understanding of how and why social media shares a positive relationship with incidents of social protest.

  7. Collective action and participation in irrigation water management: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case study of Mooi River Irrigation Scheme in KwaZulu-Natal. Province ..... Seven principal components were extracted using Pearson cor- relations. By applying the ..... OLSON M (1965) The Logic of Collective Action: Public Goods and the.

  8. Mobile phones, social ties, and collective action mobilization in China

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jun

    2017-01-01

    To provide a better understanding of mobile phones as a recruitment tool in collective actions, this study explores the use of mobile phones for mobilizing protest in China. Using in-depth interviews and investigating four cases in which Chinese people employed mobile devices to recruit...... participants for protests, this study observes that mobile communication in China embodies guanxi, the indigenous social tie in Chinese society that introduces reciprocity as an influential facilitator of collective actions. The embedment of reciprocity facilitates the proliferation of mobilizing calls......, legitimizes mobilizing appeals, generates obligations and consolidates solidarity for collective actions. The study concludes with a consideration of the relevance of mobile phones for the embedment of reciprocity in social ties in the mobilization of collective action in authoritarian regimes such as China....

  9. Leadership solves collective action problems in small-scale societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Luke; von Rueden, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Observation of leadership in small-scale societies offers unique insights into the evolution of human collective action and the origins of sociopolitical complexity. Using behavioural data from the Tsimane forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia and Nyangatom nomadic pastoralists of Ethiopia, we evaluate the traits of leaders and the contexts in which leadership becomes more institutional. We find that leaders tend to have more capital, in the form of age-related knowledge, body size or social connections. These attributes can reduce the costs leaders incur and increase the efficacy of leadership. Leadership becomes more institutional in domains of collective action, such as resolution of intragroup conflict, where collective action failure threatens group integrity. Together these data support the hypothesis that leadership is an important means by which collective action problems are overcome in small-scale societies. PMID:26503683

  10. Online collective action dynamics of the crowd in social media

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Nitin; Wigand, Rolf T

    2014-01-01

    This book explores and explains collective action in the new generation of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) enabled by Web 2.0, also referred to as social media, and its capacity to help critical decision and policy making.

  11. The Arab Citizens of Israel: Motivations for Collective Action

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gust, Eric J

    2008-01-01

    ..., and the expropriation of Arab lands. Most studies of collective action and social mobilization predict that repressed groups will eventually mobilize if inclusion in the political process is denied...

  12. Leadership solves collective action problems in small-scale societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glowacki, Luke; von Rueden, Chris

    2015-12-05

    Observation of leadership in small-scale societies offers unique insights into the evolution of human collective action and the origins of sociopolitical complexity. Using behavioural data from the Tsimane forager-horticulturalists of Bolivia and Nyangatom nomadic pastoralists of Ethiopia, we evaluate the traits of leaders and the contexts in which leadership becomes more institutional. We find that leaders tend to have more capital, in the form of age-related knowledge, body size or social connections. These attributes can reduce the costs leaders incur and increase the efficacy of leadership. Leadership becomes more institutional in domains of collective action, such as resolution of intragroup conflict, where collective action failure threatens group integrity. Together these data support the hypothesis that leadership is an important means by which collective action problems are overcome in small-scale societies. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Collective Social Entrepreneurship: Arenas for Gendering Social Innovation and Marginalized Women’s Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Linda Lundgaard; Banerjee, Swati

    2018-01-01

    This chapter focuses on collective(s) and social entrepreneurship and explores how gendering social innovation through marginalized women’s collective actions might add depth and new insight to our understanding of social innovation. We explore different forms of organizations and collectives...... arenas for participation, negotiation of patriarchy in day-to-day lives and spaces for combating poverty, resource deprivation and exclusion. Our theoretical framing situates a discussion of innovation terms like collective action innovation, social action, social innovation linked to a gendered......' agencies and actions, for the creation of social values through production of welfare services or products via market dynamics through collective action, and for co–creation and co-production of citizenship, environment and livelihood. We picture the chosen organizational entities as hybrid and as possible...

  14. Interdependence and Sustainable Collective Action: : The case of four collective housing communities in Mexico City

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montelongo Arana, Marina; Wittek, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    We study under which conditions collective action breaks down into some communities but keeps sustainable in others. The main purpose of our explorative qualitative study is to identify the micro-level pathways that lead to the maintenance and decay of collective action. Drawing on sharing group

  15. Certifying the commons: eco-certification, privatization, and collective action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Foley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We examine new dynamics of privatization and collective action in common pool resource situations facilitated by the nonstate multistakeholder institutions of the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC, the global leader in sustainability certification for wild caught seafood. Through a review of the literature and two case studies of fishing cooperatives in Baja California Sur, Mexico and on Fogo Island in the Canadian Province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL, we advance two interrelated arguments. First, certification and eco-labeling institutions privatize fisheries governance in largely unexamined ways through the injection of new forms of exclusive rights or privileges into common pool resource situations already complicated by access and property privileges, creating conditions for confusion and conflict as well as cooperation. Second, the MSC whole stock definition of sustainability places greater demands on certification clients for engaging in collective action by encouraging coordination over all social extractions from targeted fish stocks. Although rules encouraging collective action in common pool situations militate against the narrow private capture of certificate and eco-label rights, they also undermine the ability of small-scale and community-based fisheries that are embedded in larger unhealthy fishery contexts to acquire the right to the MSC stamp of sustainability. We conclude that MSC certification and eco-labeling create new institutions of private property rights and collective action, which can result in exclusionary practices, inclusionary collective action, or both. Much will depend on the specific common pool context and history of the fishery.

  16. Collective Action Problem in Heterogeneous Groups with Punishment and Foresight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Logan; Shrestha, Mahendra Duwal; Vose, Michael D.; Gavrilets, Sergey

    2018-03-01

    The collective action problem can easily undermine cooperation in groups. Recent work has shown that within-group heterogeneity can under some conditions promote voluntary provisioning of collective goods. Here we generalize this work for the case when individuals can not only contribute to the production of collective goods, but also punish free-riders. To do this, we extend the standard theory by allowing individuals to have limited foresight so they can anticipate actions of their group-mates. For humans, this is a realistic assumption because we possess a "theory of mind". We use agent-based simulations to study collective actions that aim to overcome challenges from nature or win competition with neighboring groups. We contrast the dynamics of collective action in egalitarian and hierarchical groups. We show that foresight allows groups to overcome both the first- and second-order free-rider problems. While foresight increases cooperation, it does not necessarily result in higher payoffs. We show that while between-group conflicts promotes within-group cooperation, the effects of cultural group selection on cooperation are relatively small. Our models predict the emergence of a division of labor in which more powerful individuals specialize in punishment while less powerful individuals mostly contribute to the production of collective goods.

  17. Assessing farmer involvement in collective action for enhancing the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Assessing farmer involvement in collective action for enhancing the sorghum value chain in Soroti, Uganda. ... in six sub-counties of Soroti, Uganda, where associations are established. A binomial logit regression model was employed to ascertain socio-economic factors that influenced membership to farmer associations.

  18. Prejudice is about politics: a collective action perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, John

    2012-12-01

    In line with Dixon et al.'s argument, I contend that prejudice should be understood in broadly political rather than in narrowly psychological terms. First, what counts as prejudice is a political judgement. Second, studies of collective action demonstrate that it is in "political" struggles, where subordinate groups together oppose dominant groups, that prejudice can be overcome.

  19. Beliefs About the Malleability of Immoral Groups Facilitate Collective Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Halperin, Eran; Saguy, Tamar; van Zomeren, Martijn

    Although negative out-group beliefs typically foster individuals' motivation for collective action, we propose that such beliefs may diminish this motivation when people believe that this out-group cannot change in its very essence. Specifically, we tested the idea that believing in the malleability

  20. International Marine Biotechnology Culture Collection (IMBCC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaborsky, O.R.; Baker, K. [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to establish a premier culture collection of tropical marine microorganisms able to generate hydrogen from water or organic substances. Both eukaryotic and prokaryotic microorganisms will serve as the biological reservoir or {open_quotes}library{close_quotes} for other DOE Hydrogen Program contractors, the biohydrogen research community and industry. This project consists of several tasks: (a) transfer of the Mitsui-Miami strains to Hawaii`s International Marine Biotechnology Culture Collection (IMBCC) housed at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI); (b) maintain and distribute Mitsui-Miami strains; (c) characterize key strains by traditional and advanced biotechnological techniques; (d) expand Hawaii`s IMBCC; and (e) establish and operate an information resource (database). The project was initiated only late in the summer of 1995 but progress has been made on all tasks. Of the 161 cyanobacterial strains imported, 147 survived storage and importation and 145 are viable. with most exhibiting growth. Of the 406 strains of other photosynthetic bacteria imported, 392 survived storage and importation and 353 are viable, with many exhibiting growth. This project is linked to cooperative efforts being supported by the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) through its Marine Biotechnology Institute (MBI) and Research Institute of Innovative Technology for the Earth (RITE).

  1. ENEL's DSM actions in the international scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, P.; Russo, S.

    1997-01-01

    In the framework of national policies which, since the end of the 70s, have had the target of making consumers rationally use the natural sources, in particular energy, and in the pursuit of environmental goals, the Governments and the utilities have driven several DSM (Demand-Side Management) actions, in many countries. The activities implemented by ENEL have included the analysis of the different components of the energy chain, from the primary sources to the final uses in industry, agriculture, residential and commercial buildings. This is in order to improve the energy efficiency by new electrotechnologies and more effective appliances. ENEL has carried out commercial initiatives by specific contractual agreements based on the marginal costs of the electric service. The paper explains ENEL's strategies and the actions implemented by the utility on DMS; the results in terms of energy efficiency, electric demand dynamics and of load curve changing are also explained. Finally the paper explores the DSM perspectives in the Italian future scenario, where energy companies will act in a more competitive market. (author)

  2. The return of moral motivation in predicting collective action against collective disadvantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zomeren, M.; Postmes, T.; Spears, R.

    The social psychology of collective action against collective disadvantage has hitherto underspecified, not to say neglected, the profound power of moral motivations. This is particularly important because moral motivations can unite disadvantaged and advantaged group members to fight for a joint

  3. Essays on the collective action dilemma of vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Ahlskog, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Vaccines famously possess positive externalities that make them susceptible to the collective action dilemma: when I get vaccinated, I protect not only myself, but also those who I might otherwise have infected. Thus, some people will have an incentive to free ride on the immunity of others. In a population of rational agents, the critical level of vaccination uptake required for herd immunity will therefore be difficult to attain in the long run, which poses difficulties for disease eradicat...

  4. Networking Alone? Digital Communications and Collective Action in Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Kurfürst

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the potential for the formation of collective action in Vietnam. Referring to land and labour protests, bauxite mining, anti-China demonstrations, as well as the revision of the 1992 Constitution, the article examines the social movement repertoires diverse groups have adopted to reach their objectives. Drawing on social movement theory and communication power, this contribution shows that apart from access to the technology, citizens’ opportunities to participate in digital networks as well as access to the default communication network of the state are necessary prerequisites in order to attain public attention and possibly to achieve social change. Moreover, this article shows that existing power differentials in Vietnam are reproduced in digital space. It concludes that for different collective behaviours to result in a social movement, it is essential to “switch” and to connect the different networks. For the moment, the call to protect Vietnam’s sovereignty offers common ground for collective action.

  5. Evaluating Strategies for Achieving Global Collective Action on Transnational Health Threats and Social Inequalities

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffman, Steven Justin

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation presents three studies that evaluate different strategies for addressing transnational health threats and social inequalities that depend upon or would benefit from global collective action. Each draws upon different academic disciplines, methods and epistemological traditions. Chapter 1 assesses the role of international law in addressing global health challenges, specifically examining when, how and why global health treaties may be helpful. Evidence from 90 quantitati...

  6. Learning Sequences of Actions in Collectives of Autonomous Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Kagan; Agogino, Adrian K.; Wolpert, David H.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we focus on the problem of designing a collective of autonomous agents that individually learn sequences of actions such that the resultant sequence of joint actions achieves a predetermined global objective. We are particularly interested in instances of this problem where centralized control is either impossible or impractical. For single agent systems in similar domains, machine learning methods (e.g., reinforcement learners) have been successfully used. However, applying such solutions directly to multi-agent systems often proves problematic, as agents may work at cross-purposes, or have difficulty in evaluating their contribution to achievement of the global objective, or both. Accordingly, the crucial design step in multiagent systems centers on determining the private objectives of each agent so that as the agents strive for those objectives, the system reaches a good global solution. In this work we consider a version of this problem involving multiple autonomous agents in a grid world. We use concepts from collective intelligence to design goals for the agents that are 'aligned' with the global goal, and are 'learnable' in that agents can readily see how their behavior affects their utility. We show that reinforcement learning agents using those goals outperform both 'natural' extensions of single agent algorithms and global reinforcement, learning solutions based on 'team games'.

  7. Trust and social capital in the design and evolution of institutions for collective action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Six

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at developing an original account of trust in the framework of large scale, international collective action institutions. Our research question focuses on the desired structures and mechanisms that are necessary to sustain the trust needed to uphold the effective operation of institutions for collective action. Our theoretical framework for studying trust is based on the social capital theory. Social capital is defined as the features of social organization, such as trust, networks and norms that facilitate coordination and cooperation for mutual benefit. We claim that in different sectors and contexts stakeholders encounter difficulties in collaborating in setting up experimental institutions for collective action. In order to generate more collaboration, stakeholders need to create structures that incite actors to find the optimal way to sustain trust, to organizationally acknowledge and learn that process, and to nourish it with the precise normative idea behind the institutional apparatus. In the areas of plant genetic resources and biomedicine, stakeholders have encountered these difficulties while experimenting with different coordination mechanisms for dealing with the increased appropriation of knowledge through patents. Our two case studies in plant genetic resources and biomedicine reflect the idea that institutions must be understood as complex pragmatic connectors of trust, i.e. social matrices of collective action that sustain individual commitment, where routine and reflexivity drive trust-based coordination mechanisms in interaction with their environment. From this theoretical framework we derive some recommendations that could be useful in deciding on how to implement this idea.

  8. Territories climate plans: territories in action 21 collectivities involved in the climatic change challenge. 1. experiences collection 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The climate plan invites the collectivities to implement actions of greenhouse reduction. This collection presents the first collectivities involved in a climate approach: towns, natural parks, syndicates, general and regional council. (A.L.B.)

  9. Le sociologue dans l’action collective face au risque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Mormont

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Le risque est une composante centrale des sociétés industrielles modernes qui en ont organisé la prise en charge à travers une série de dispositifs complexes. Les questions environnementales font émerger de nouveaux risques dits modernes parce qu’ils échappent à ces dispositifs d’évaluation et de gestion. A côté d’attitudes de déni de ces risques on voit apparaître des dynamiques qui sont vues comme des dispositifs de capture des peurs qui ont pour effet de donner une emprise forte à ceux qui peuvent mettre en place des dispositifs de contrôle, qui peuvent détruire les collectifs organisés autour de pratiques vivantes. Le sociologue ne peut plus se contenter de répondre à une demande d’analyse des perceptions des risques ; il doit s’engager dans l’action collective qui confronte les collectifs aux risques pour aider à leur reconfiguration tout en préservant leur autonomie.Risk is a central component of modern industrial societies that have organised complex systems to tackle with them. Environmental problems progressively reveal new risks that are said modern risks because they can be dealt with through usual systems of risk assessment and management. If some authorities still deny these risks, it is important to observe new dynamics that are here described as capture of fear and that are giving strong power to those who are able to propose control systems. These systems can be destructive of many original and creative practices. Sociologist can not be confined in analysis of risk perception, he has to be involved in collective action that try to deal with risks by confronting different collectives and by reorganising them while preserving autonomy.

  10. Sayyid Quṭb: Individual to Collective Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thameem Ushama

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Sayyid Quṭb was active in mobilising people for independence and eliminating foreign domination of Egypt. He took part in the 1952 revolution in which Jamāl ʿAbd al-Nāṣir rose to power with the predominant support of the Brotherhood. The success of the revolution that brought honour to him is withstanding, Sayyid Quṭb felt betrayed by the leaders of the 1952 Revolution and hence he decided to embark upon collective action by joining the Brotherhood. The ensuing conflict between the Brotherhood and the leaders of the Revolution eventually led to his detention for ten years and finally to his martyrdom.

  11. Resource conflict, collective action, and resilience: an analytical framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake D. Ratner

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Where access to renewable natural resources essential to rural livelihoods is highly contested, improving cooperation in resource management is an important element in strategies for peacebuilding and conflict prevention. While researchers have made advances in assessing the role of environmental resources as a causal factor in civil conflict, analysis of the positive potential of collective natural resource management efforts to reduce broader conflict is less developed. Addressing this need, we present a framework on collective action, conflict prevention, and social-ecological resilience, linking local stakeholder dynamics to the broader institutional and governance context. Accounting for both formal and informal relationships of power and influence, as well as values and stakeholder perceptions alongside material interests, the framework aims to provide insight into the problem of (rebuilding legitimacy of common-pool resource management institutions in conflict-sensitive environments. We outline its application in stakeholder-based problem assessment and planning, participatory monitoring and evaluation, and multi-case comparative analysis.

  12. Acting in solidarity : Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach,

  13. Independent Senior Women Who Travel Internationally: A Collective Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Nine independent women over age 55 who traveled internationally were investigated through a qualitative case study. The purpose of the study was to explore the women's attitudes, actions, and motivations during and after their international travel experiences. The adult, aging, experiential, and transformational theories of researchers such as…

  14. Perceived Power Resources in Situations of Collective Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insa Theesfeld

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses various concepts of power. Its goal is to shed light on a better method for implementing the power concept. The case of Bulgaria’s water user associations’ failure shows the abuse of power by local actors who fear they will lose their influence and the private benefits that they have enjoyed under the former system. The paper provides an empirical study of power resources verified by actors’ perceptions rather than having resource endowments quantified. It also illustrates the contrast between empirically revealed perceived power resources in a local context and their theoretical examination in the distributional theory of institutional change. Studies that set power resources in relation to one another are scarce. Therefore, in this study an innovative, interactive method is used that leads to a ranking of perceived power resources, which is robust against the impact of belonging to different territorial, social, and agricultural producer groups: 1 unrestricted access to information, 2 personal relationships, 3 trustworthiness, 4 cash resources for bribing, 5 menace, and 6 physical power and violence. The implication of this gradation of power resources on collective action solutions addresses complementary measures to disseminate information and compensation measures for those who fear losing their benefits and may therefore oppose the new institutions.

  15. Individual vision and peak distribution in collective actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peng

    2017-06-01

    People make decisions on whether they should participate as participants or not as free riders in collective actions with heterogeneous visions. Besides of the utility heterogeneity and cost heterogeneity, this work includes and investigates the effect of vision heterogeneity by constructing a decision model, i.e. the revised peak model of participants. In this model, potential participants make decisions under the joint influence of utility, cost, and vision heterogeneities. The outcomes of simulations indicate that vision heterogeneity reduces the values of peaks, and the relative variance of peaks is stable. Under normal distributions of vision heterogeneity and other factors, the peaks of participants are normally distributed as well. Therefore, it is necessary to predict distribution traits of peaks based on distribution traits of related factors such as vision heterogeneity and so on. We predict the distribution of peaks with parameters of both mean and standard deviation, which provides the confident intervals and robust predictions of peaks. Besides, we validate the peak model of via the Yuyuan Incident, a real case in China (2014), and the model works well in explaining the dynamics and predicting the peak of real case.

  16. Explaining Radical Group Behavior : Developing Emotion and Efficacy Routes to Normative and Nonnormative Collective Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tausch, Nicole; Becker, Julia C.; Spears, Russell; Christ, Oliver; Saab, Rim; Singh, Purnima; Siddiqui, Roomana N.

    A recent model of collective action distinguishes 2 distinct pathways: an emotional pathway whereby anger in response to injustice motivates action and an efficacy pathway where the belief that issues can be solved collectively increases the likelihood that group members take action (van Zomeren,

  17. Agri-Environmental Resource Management by Large-Scale Collective Action: Determining KEY Success Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Large-scale collective action is necessary when managing agricultural natural resources such as biodiversity and water quality. This paper determines the key factors to the success of such action. Design/Methodology/Approach: This paper analyses four large-scale collective actions used to manage agri-environmental resources in Canada and…

  18. Collective Nostalgia Is Associated With Stronger Outgroup-Directed Anger and Participation in Ingroup-Favoring Collective Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wing-Yee Cheung

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Collective nostalgia refers to longing for the way society used to be. We tested whether collective nostalgia is associated with ingroup-favoring collective action and whether this association is mediated by outgroup-directed anger and outgroup-directed contempt. We conducted an online study of Hong Kong residents (N = 111 during a large-scale democratic social movement, the Umbrella Movement, that took place in Hong Kong in 2014 in response to proposed electoral reforms by the Chinese government in Mainland China. Reported collective nostalgia for Hong Kong’s past was high in our sample and collective nostalgia predicted stronger involvement in ingroup-favoring collective action, and it did so indirectly via higher intensity of outgroup-directed anger (but not through outgroup-directed contempt. We argue that collective nostalgia has implications for strengthening ingroup-serving collective action, and we highlight the importance of arousal of group-based emotions in this process.

  19. APS ACTION--AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance For Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkan, D; Lockshin, M D

    2012-06-01

    AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance For Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION) is the first-ever international research network that has been created specifically to design and conduct well-designed, large-scale, multi-center clinical trials in persistently antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. The founding principle of the APS ACTION is that it is an internationally collaborative effort, open to qualified investigators across the globe who are committed to furthering our understanding of APS and its management. Due to the hard work and collaborative spirit of APS ACTION members, in early 2012, APS ACTION launched two important collaborative international projects: 1) a randomized controlled trial of hydroxychloroquine in the primary thrombosis prevention of persistently aPL-positive but thrombosis-free patients without other systemic autoimmune diseases; and 2) a web-based registry of aPL-positive patients with or without systemic autoimmune diseases, which will also include annual blood collection for aPL-testing and future basic science studies. In the end, we hope to find better treatments for antiphospholipid syndrome, which is a leading cause of thrombosis, pregnancy morbidity and other life-altering consequences, and to heighten awareness about this life-threatening, autoimmune condition.

  20. 78 FR 15047 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ...) 305-2440 or by email, to ITVERP@usdoj.gov . Written comments and suggestions from the public and.../collection: International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program (ITVERP) Application. (3) The agency...

  1. Explaining radical group behavior: Developing emotion and efficacy routes to normative and nonnormative collective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Nicole; Becker, Julia C; Spears, Russell; Christ, Oliver; Saab, Rim; Singh, Purnima; Siddiqui, Roomana N

    2011-07-01

    A recent model of collective action distinguishes 2 distinct pathways: an emotional pathway whereby anger in response to injustice motivates action and an efficacy pathway where the belief that issues can be solved collectively increases the likelihood that group members take action (van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Research supporting this model has, however, focused entirely on relatively normative actions such as participating in demonstrations. We argue that the relations between emotions, efficacy, and action differ for more extreme, nonnormative actions and propose (a) that nonnormative actions are often driven by a sense of low efficacy and (b) that contempt, which, unlike anger, entails psychological distancing and a lack of reconciliatory intentions, predicts nonnormative action. These ideas were tested in 3 survey studies examining student protests against tuition fees in Germany (N = 332), Indian Muslims' action support in relation to ingroup disadvantage (N = 156), and British Muslims' responses to British foreign policy (N = 466). Results were generally supportive of predictions and indicated that (a) anger was strongly related to normative action but overall unrelated or less strongly related to nonnormative action, (b) contempt was either unrelated or negatively related to normative action but significantly positively predicted nonnormative action, and (c) efficacy was positively related to normative action and negatively related to nonnormative action. The implications of these findings for understanding and dealing with extreme intergroup phenomena such as terrorism are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  2. Acting in solidarity: Testing an extended dual pathway model of collective action by bystander group members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saab, Rim; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Cheung, Wing-Yee

    2015-09-01

    We examined predictors of collective action among bystander group members in solidarity with a disadvantaged group by extending the dual pathway model of collective action, which proposes one efficacy-based and one emotion-based path to collective action (Van Zomeren, Spears, Fischer, & Leach, 2004). Based on two proposed functions of social identity performance (Klein, Spears, & Reicher, 2007), we distinguished between the efficacy of collective action at consolidating the identity of a protest movement and its efficacy at achieving social change (political efficacy). We expected identity consolidation efficacy to positively predict collective action tendencies directly and indirectly via political efficacy. We also expected collective action tendencies to be positively predicted by moral outrage and by sympathy in response to disadvantaged outgroup's suffering. These hypotheses were supported in two surveys examining intentions to protest for Palestine in Britain (Study 1), and intentions to attend the June 4th vigil in Hong Kong to commemorate the Tiananmen massacre among a sample of Hong Kong citizens (Study 2). The contributions of these findings to research on the dual pathway model of collective action and the different functions of collective action are discussed. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Social Citizenship, Integration and Collective Action: Immigrant Civic Engagement in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebert, Kim; Okamoto, Dina G.

    2013-01-01

    Collective action has been examined in studies of worker insurgency, homeless protest, the Civil Rights movement and white backlash against racial minorities. Relatively few studies, however, focus on noncontentious forms of immigrant collective action. Utilizing a new data set comprising over 1,000 immigrant "civic" events, we examine whether the…

  4. Organising Collective Action for Effective Environmental Management and Social Learning in Wales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Jane; Gibbon, David; Ingram, Julie; Reed, Matt; Short, Christopher; Dwyer, Janet

    2011-01-01

    The paper explored key factors that might lead to successful agri-environmental social learning and collective action in order to deliver landscape-scale resource management within agri-environment schemes. Using the theory of collective action as an analytical framework the paper examined findings from in-depth interviews with 20 members of two…

  5. Strengthening Collective Action to Improve Marketing Performance: Evidence from Farmer Groups in Central Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochieng, Justus; Knerr, Beatrice; Owuor, George; Ouma, Emily

    2018-01-01

    Purpose: Several development organisations have implemented programs to enhance smallholder farmers' crop productivity and market access through collective action with mixed results. Therefore, this study examines the drivers of success of collective action initiatives as a pathway to improving farmers marketing performance using data from Rwanda…

  6. International Humanitarian Law: The legal framework for humanitarian forensic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaggioli, Gloria

    2018-01-01

    In armed conflicts, death is not an exceptional occurrence, but becomes the rule and occurs on a daily basis. Dead bodies are sometimes despoiled, mutilated, abandoned without any funeral rite and without a decent burial. Unidentified remains may be counted by hundreds or thousands. As a result, families look for years for missing relatives, ignorant of the fate of their loved ones. International Humanitarian Law, also called the laws of war or the law of armed conflict, is an international law branch, which has been developed to regulate and, as far as possible, to humanize armed conflicts. It contains a number of clear and concrete obligations incumbent to belligerent parties on the management of dead bodies, which provide the legal framework for humanitarian forensic action. The purpose of this article is to present, in a simple and concise manner, these rules with a view to extrapolate some key legal principles, such as the obligation to respect the dignity of the dead or the right to know the fate of relatives, which shall guide anyone dealing with human remains. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Collaborating for resilience: conflict, collective action, and transformation on Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blake D. Ratner

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We report on outcomes and lessons learned from a 15-month initiative in Cambodia's Tonle Sap Lake. Employing the appreciation-influence-control (AIC model of participatory stakeholder engagement, the initiative built shared understanding of the sources of vulnerability in fisheries livelihoods and catalyzed collective action to support resilience in this valuable and productive social-ecological system. Outcomes include the transfer of a large, commercial fishing concession to community access, and resolution of a boundary dispute involving community fishery organizations in neighboring provinces. Motivated by these successes, the main national grassroots network representing fishing communities also modified its internal governance and strategy of engagement to emphasize constructive links with government and the formal NGO sector. The AIC approach, we argue, provides an effective route to enable collective action in ways that strengthen dialogue and collaboration across scales, fostering the conditions for local-level transformations that can contribute to improvement in governance. We conclude with a discussion of the broader implications for resilience practice.

  8. A measure of internal synergy of the collective system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikov V.A.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The authors examine the methodology of HRM personnel management based on ratings. Proposed to represent a collective system that uses a matrix of pair relations as a system of linear differential equations. The condition of auto generation of an autonomous system can be determined by the application of the Laplace transformation to the system. This condition mainly depends on the main eigenvalue of dating relationships matrix. Assuming the oscillation frequency is straightly proportional to the system's synergy rating, a special algorithm of comparative evaluation of several collective systems was suggested. Methods: The calculation of the rating of internal synergies is based on the representation of the collective system as a system of linear differential equations, the coefficients of which are obtained by questionnaire survey of all members of the team. Internal representation of the system's synergism as a stimulation of an autonomous system allows using the eigenvector of the system as a measure of internal synergies. Results: The result of this method is the rating of members of interacting collective systems in terms of their contribution to the self-organization sharing behavior.  Conclusions:  Using a matrix of pair relations allows without direct programming and only using MathCad determines the measure of internal synergy of a collective system.  

  9. Carbon geopolitics. International climate action and the problem of tropical deforestation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehrenstein, Vera

    2014-01-01

    The thesis explores the components of concerted action at an international scale by focusing on how the problem of CO_2 emissions attributed to tropical deforestation is handled in climate change negotiations. The constraint faced by actors is as follows: interventions led by a diversity of actors across the world need to be coordinated, in the pursuit of an objective agreed by all states represented at the United Nations whose sovereignty must be respected. Such process builds on operations that can be analyzed from the viewpoint of carbon geopolitics. Some of these operations are related to the spatial extension and the liberal and quantified dimensions of the enterprise. Decision-making at an international level must be organized, comparable carbon measurement methods must be created and incentive-based redistribution systems must be designed. Other operations are specific to the entities concerned by the treated phenomenon, so-called developing countries. The weakness of their technical equipment must be acknowledged, so-called bad governance in their administrations must be dealt with and their civil society must be listened to. The approach developed here is grounded in science and technology studies, a domain that has recently focused on the construction of markets and decision-making. Based on a multi-site investigation, the thesis examines a set of problems characteristic of concerted action at an international scale: international decision-making, project-based action, countries' preparation, the valuation of correct measures, trust-making in economic relationships and the production of consensus. It proposes to call international adjustment the tentative and fragile process through which the interest for climate protection of an international collective is maintained. (author) [fr

  10. Why Follow the Leader? Collective Action, Credible Commitment and Conflict

    OpenAIRE

    Keefer, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Most analyses of conflict assume that conflicting groups act in a unitary fashion. This assumption is often violated: to reduce their risk of replacement, group leaders prevent both group members and soldiers from acting collectively, making it difficult for leaders to make credible commitments to them. Lifting the assumption that groups are unitary shifts the analysis of a wide range of c...

  11. Journaling and Self-Study in an International Research Collective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makaiau, Amber Strong; Leng, Lu; Fukui, Suguru

    2015-01-01

    Drawing from the theoretical foundations of reflective teaching, culturally responsive education, social constructivism, and self-study, this collaborative self-study investigates the role of an interactive online journal in an international research collective. Each from a different country, the authors came together through a common interest in…

  12. Tweeting about sexism: The well-being benefits of a social media collective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Mindi D

    2015-12-01

    Although collective action has psychological benefits in non-gendered contexts (Drury et al., 2005, Br. J. Soc. Psychol., 44, 309), the benefits for women taking action against gender discrimination are unclear. This study examined how a popular, yet unexplored potential form of collective action, namely tweeting about sexism, affects women's well-being. Women read about sexism and were randomly assigned to tweet or to one of three control groups. Content analyses showed tweets exhibited collective intent and action. Analyses of linguistic markers suggested public tweeters used more cognitive complexity in their language than private tweeters. Profile analyses showed that compared to controls, only public tweeters showed decreasing negative affect and increasing psychological well-being, suggesting tweeting about sexism may serve as a collective action that can enhance women's well-being. © 2015 The British Psychological Society.

  13. The moral foundation of collective action against economic crimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daud Vicary Abdullah

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, economic and financial crimes have been increasing at a fast pace. No country, society, culture or community has been immune from its ravages, yet the international community has failed to cooperate in finding a solution. The main reason for failure may be the lack of a clearly articulated moral foundation. A universal moral principle that could serve as the foundation must be concerned with “harm” and its prevention, and attract universal “consent.” We argue that the Golden Rule satisfies these requirements. The golden rule of “no harm” buttressed by the specificity of the four categories of “generic rights” and “basic good,” i.e. human dignity, trust, contract, and property, could emerge as a consensual global moral principle and allow the development of legislations, laws, standards, codes and conventions that would be accepted and respected by the entire international community in the fight against economic crimes.

  14. Big data prediction of durations for online collective actions based on peak's timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shizhao; Wang, Zheng; Pujia, Wangmo; Nie, Yuan; Lu, Peng

    2018-02-01

    Peak Model states that each collective action has a life circle, which contains four periods of "prepare", "outbreak", "peak", and "vanish"; and the peak determines the max energy and the whole process. The peak model's re-simulation indicates that there seems to be a stable ratio between the peak's timing (TP) and the total span (T) or duration of collective actions, which needs further validations through empirical data of collective actions. Therefore, the daily big data of online collective actions is applied to validate the model; and the key is to check the ratio between peak's timing and the total span. The big data is obtained from online data recording & mining of websites. It is verified by the empirical big data that there is a stable ratio between TP and T; furthermore, it seems to be normally distributed. This rule holds for both the general cases and the sub-types of collective actions. Given the distribution of the ratio, estimated probability density function can be obtained, and therefore the span can be predicted via the peak's timing. Under the scenario of big data, the instant span (how long the collective action lasts or when it ends) will be monitored and predicted in real-time. With denser data (Big Data), the estimation of the ratio's distribution gets more robust, and the prediction of collective actions' spans or durations will be more accurate.

  15. On the Conditions of Collective Action in Globalisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Santos Silva

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available One must confer specific attention to “collective action” in the framework of globalisation. The article addresses this issue both at the analytical and normative levels. For the first one, it makes use of sociology. Two main problems are identified: the inequalities and imbalances that constitute globalisation are associated to globalisation; and its institutional embeddedness, that is, the way by which it can be combined with national, social and political structures. For the second level, the article uses the perspective of democratic public policies, advocating the building of a critical metanarrative about globalisation. Three axes can underpin this metanarrative: democracy, law and development.

  16. Beyond You and Me: Stories for Collective Action and Learning? Perspectives from an Action Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gearty, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the combination of storytelling and reflective action research as a means to effect change and learning within and across communities and organizations. Taking the complex challenge of "pro-environmental behaviour change" as an example, the paper reflects on the experiences of a pilot project run for the UK government…

  17. Disappointment expression evokes collective guilt and collective action in intergroup conflict: the moderating role of legitimacy perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solak, Nevin; Reifen Tagar, Michal; Cohen-Chen, Smadar; Saguy, Tamar; Halperin, Eran

    2017-09-01

    Research on intergroup emotions has largely focused on the experience of emotions and surprisingly little attention has been given to the expression of emotions. Drawing on the social-functional approach to emotions, we argue that in the context of intergroup conflicts, outgroup members' expression of disappointment with one's ingroup induces the complementary emotion of collective guilt and correspondingly a collective action protesting ingroup actions against the outgroup. In Study 1 conducted immediately after the 2014 Gaza war, Jewish-Israeli participants received information about outgroup's (Palestinians) expression of emotions (disappointment, fear, or none). As predicted, outgroup's expression of disappointment increased collective guilt and willingness to participate in collective action, but only among those who saw the intergroup situation as illegitimate. Moreover, collective guilt mediated the relationship between disappointment expression and collective action, moderated, again, by legitimacy perception. In Study 2, we replicated these results in the context of racial tension between Black and White Americans in the US. We discuss the theoretical and applied implications of the findings.

  18. Defining Success in Action Learning: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bong, Hyeon-Cheol; Cho, Yonjoo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to explore how the two groups of action learning experts (Korean and non-Korean experts) define success of action learning to see whether there are any cultural differences. To this end, the authors conducted a total of 44 interviews with action learning experts around the world. Research questions guiding…

  19. Internal and External Discipline Following Securities Class Actions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Humphery-Jenner, M.

    2011-01-01

    Companies are sometimes accused of misleading the market. The SEC can punish this with enforcement actions. Alternatively, shareholders can seek redress through a shareholder class action (SCA). While some literature has examined SEC actions, it has not examined SCAs, and has not examined external

  20. Eighth International Chorea–Acanthocytosis Symposium: Summary of Workshop Discussion and Action Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel S. Pappas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chorea-Acanthocytosis (ChAc is a rare hereditary neurological disorder characterized by abnormal movements, red blood cell pathology, and progressive neurodegeneration. Little is understood of the pathogenesis of ChAc and related disorders (collectively Neuroacanthocytosis. The Eighth International Chorea-Acanthocytosis Symposium was held in May 2016 in Ann Arbor, MI, USA, and focused on molecular mechanisms driving ChAc pathophysiology. Accompanying the meeting, members of the neuroacanthocytosis research community and other invited scientists met in a workshop to discuss the current understanding and next steps needed to better understand ChAc pathogenesis. These discussions identified several broad and critical needs for advancing ChAc research and patient care, and led to the definition of 18 specific action points related to functional and molecular studies, animal models, and clinical research. These action points, described below, represent tractable research goals to pursue for the next several years.

  1. Dams and transnational advocacy: Political opportunities in transnational collective action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Teng

    Possible arguments to explain the gradual decline in big dam development and its site transferring from developed to developing countries include technical, economic, and political factors. This study focuses on the political argument---the rise of transnational anti-dam advocacy and its impact on state policy-making. Under what conditions does transnational anti-dam advocacy matter? Under what conditions does transnational advocacy change state dam policies (delay, scale down, or cancel)? It examines the role of transnational anti-dam actors in big dam building in a comparative context in Asia. Applying the social movement theory of political opportunity structure (POS) and using the qualitative case-study method, the study provides both within-case and cross-case analyses. Within-case analysis is utilized to explain the changing dynamics of big dam building in China (Three Gorges Dam and proposed Nu/Salween River dam projects), and to a lesser extent, Sardar Sarovar Project in India and Nam Theun 2 Dam in Laos. Different domestic and international POS (DPOS and IPOS) impact the strategies and outcomes of anti-dam advocacies in these countries. The degree of openness of the POS directly affects the capacity of transnational efforts in influencing state dam policies. The degree of openness or closure is measured by specific laws, institutions, discourse, or elite allies (or the absence of these) for the participation of non-state actors on big dam issues at a particular moment. This degree of openness is relative, varying over time, across countries and regions. This study finds that the impact of transnational anti-dam activism is most effective when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively open. Transnational anti-dam advocacy is least effective in influencing state dam policies when both DPOS and IPOS are relatively closed. Under a relatively open DPOS and closed IPOS, transnational anti-dam advocacy is more likely to successfully change state dam policies and even

  2. International Space Station Data Collection for Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Evans, Cynthia A.

    2015-01-01

    Remotely sensed data acquired by orbital sensor systems has emerged as a vital tool to identify the extent of damage resulting from a natural disaster, as well as providing near-real time mapping support to response efforts on the ground and humanitarian aid efforts. The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique terrestrial remote sensing platform for acquiring disaster response imagery. Unlike automated remote-sensing platforms it has a human crew; is equipped with both internal and externally-mounted remote sensing instruments; and has an inclined, low-Earth orbit that provides variable views and lighting (day and night) over 95 percent of the inhabited surface of the Earth. As such, it provides a useful complement to autonomous sensor systems in higher altitude polar orbits. NASA remote sensing assets on the station began collecting International Disaster Charter (IDC) response data in May 2012. The initial NASA ISS sensor systems responding to IDC activations included the ISS Agricultural Camera (ISSAC), mounted in the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF); the Crew Earth Observations (CEO) Facility, where the crew collects imagery using off-the-shelf handheld digital cameras; and the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO), a visible to near-infrared system mounted externally on the Japan Experiment Module Exposed Facility. The ISSAC completed its primary mission in January 2013. It was replaced by the very high resolution ISS SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System (ISERV) Pathfinder, a visible-wavelength digital camera, telescope, and pointing system. Since the start of IDC response in 2012 there have been 108 IDC activations; NASA sensor systems have collected data for thirty-two of these events. Of the successful data collections, eight involved two or more ISS sensor systems responding to the same event. Data has also been collected by International Partners in response to natural disasters, most notably JAXA and

  3. Evolutionary Dynamics of Collective Action in Structured Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Marta Daniela de Almeida

    The pervasiveness of cooperation in Nature is not easily explained. If evolution is characterized by competition and survival of the fittest, why should selfish individuals cooperate with each other? Evolutionary Game Theory (EGT) provides a suitable mathematical framework to study this problem, central to many areas of science. Conventionally, interactions between individuals are modeled in terms of one-shot, symmetric 2-Person Dilemmas of Cooperation, but many real-life situations involve decisions within groups with more than 2 individuals, which are best-dealt in the framework of N-Person games. In this Thesis, we investigate the evolutionary dynamics of two paradigmatic collective social dilemmas - the N-Person Prisoner's Dilemma (NPD) and the N-Person Snowdrift Game (NSG) on structured populations, modeled by networks with diverse topological properties. Cooperative strategies are just one example of the many traits that can be transmitted on social networks. Several recent studies based on empirical evidence from a medical database have suggested the existence of a 3 degrees of influence rule, according to which not only our "friends", but also our friends' friends, and our friends' friends' friends, have a non-trivial influence on our decisions. We investigate the degree of peer influence that emerges from the spread of cooperative strategies, opinions and diseases on populations with distinct underlying networks of contacts. Our results show that networks naturally entangle individuals into interactions of many-body nature and that for each network class considered different processes lead to identical degrees of influence. None

  4. International technical assistance example. Consortium action in Bulgaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mattei, J.M.; Milhem, J.L.

    1993-03-01

    The safety status achieved last year at the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the capability of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) to assess the safety of the plant and the adequacy of proposed improvements have been matters of international concern. However, the Kozloduy NPP contributes 35-40 per cent of the electrical generating capacity in Bulgaria. For further operation of the plants, it is therefore, essential that safety is improved. In july 1991, the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) instituted a Six Months Emergency Action Programme for Bulgaria under the PHARE regional nuclear safety programme. The programme consisted of three parts: - an industrial emergency programme supporting the utility of the Kozloduy NPP, - a study to evaluate Bulgaria's electricity needs, - technical assistance for reinforcement of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority. For the third part, complementary to the industrial emergency programme carried out by the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators), a Consortium of expert institutions and regulatory from EC member states was established by CEC for assistance to BNSA. The Consortium consisted of: - Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), France, technical support of the French regulatory body, - Gesellschaft fur Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Germany, an organization in safety engineering, technical support of governmental regulatory body, - AIB-Vincotte Nuclear (AVN), Belgium, the organization authorized by the Belgian Government for licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants, - UK Atomic Energy Authority (AEA Technology), an independent UK Government owned nuclear R and D and consultancy organization, - Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the Health and Safety Executive, United Kingdom, the nuclear regulatory body for the United Kingdom

  5. Institutional complexity and the construction of collective action in nonprofit fields

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, John A.

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation contributes to our understanding of how institutional complexity within fields influences efforts to construct interorganisational collective action. Five cases of efforts to construct collective action in two nonprofit fields are studied. One field is in the Republic of Ireland and the other in South Africa. The institutional logics salient in each field are derived using inductive methods and the processes of how these institutional logics influence the five efforts to con...

  6. Believing in "making a difference" to collective efforts : Participative efficacy beliefs as a unique predictor of collective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, Martijn; Saguy, Tamar; Schellhaas, Fabian M. H.

    When rational actors believe that their group can achieve its goals through collective action (i.e., when they have strong group efficacy beliefs), they should not participate in it because they expect little benefit from their own participation. Paradoxically, however, research shows that

  7. Global activism: new paths for Black people movement collective action in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Espinosa Bonilla

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the transformations in actor-network collective action in the Process of Black Communities —pcn—, which were developed as a consequence of the armed conflict worsening in the Pacific region —specifically on the collective lands in the municipalities of Buenaventura and Suárez (Southwestern Colombia— in the last ten years. Information was gathered through semi-structured interviews, observation records, analysis of audio/text documents on the organizations’ claims and communiqués, and the drafting of aggregated data on displacement and conflictual facts in the region. Findings show a significant up surging of conflict within the period, in the face of which PCN’s coalitions with local and global actors have come both to neutralize and make visible armed actors’ actions against populations, and to reorient collective action, introducing innovations in the repertoires of action and setting new goals for this actor-network in the region.

  8. Emotional reactions to success and failure of collective action as predictors of future action intentions: a longitudinal investigation in the context of student protests in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tausch, Nicole; Becker, Julia C

    2013-09-01

    This research examined how emotional responses to success and failure of collective action relate to willingness to engage in collective action in the future. It was hypothesized that both pride (in relation to a success) and anger (in response to failure) would motivate future collective action. Findings are reported from a two-wave longitudinal study (N= 98) in the context of student protests against tuition fees in Germany, which was conducted before and after collective action had resulted in both a success and a failure. While anger positively predicted action intentions, over and above baseline action intentions, pride exerted a significant indirect effect on action intentions via increased efficacy perceptions, over and above baseline efficacy and action intentions. Politicized identification positively predicted the intensity of both pride and anger and baseline group efficacy positively predicted the intensity of anger. The theoretical and practical implications of these findings are discussed. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  9. Toward an integrative social identity model of collective action : A quantitative research synthesis of three socio-psychological perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zomeren, M.; Postmes, T.; Spears, R.

    An integrative social identity model of collective action (SIMCA) is developed that incorporates 3 socio-psychological perspectives on collective action. Three meta-analyses synthesized a total of 182 effects of perceived injustice, efficacy, and identity on collective action (corresponding to these

  10. Toward an integrative Social Identity model of Collective Action: A quantitative research synthesis of three socio-psychological perspectives.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Zomeren, M.; Postmes, T.; Spears, R.

    2008-01-01

    An integrative social identity model of collective action (SIMCA) is developed that incorporates 3 socio-psychological perspectives on collective action. Three meta-analyses synthesized a total of 182 effects of perceived injustice, efficacy, and identity on collective action (corresponding to these

  11. International Space Station Data Collection for Disaster Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanov, William L.; Evans, Cynthia A..

    2014-01-01

    Natural disasters - including such events as tropical storms, earthquakes, floods, volcanic eruptions, and wildfires -effect hundreds of millions of people worldwide, and also cause billions of dollars (USD) in damage to the global economy. Remotely sensed data acquired by orbital sensor systems has emerged as a vital tool to identify the extent of damage resulting from a natural disaster, as well as providing near-real time mapping support to response efforts on the ground and humanitarian aid efforts. The International Space Station (ISS) is a unique terrestrial remote sensing platform for acquiring disaster response imagery. Unlike automated remote-sensing platforms it has a human crew; is equipped with both internal and externally-mounted remote sensing instruments; and has an inclined, low-Earth orbit that provides variable views and lighting (day and night) over 95 percent of the inhabited surface of the Earth. As such, it provides a useful complement to free-flyer based, sun-synchronous sensor systems in higher altitude polar orbits. While several nations have well-developed terrestrial remote sensing programs and assets for data collection, many developing nations do not have ready access to such resources. The International Charter, Space and Major Disasters (also known as the "International Disaster Charter", or IDC; http://www.disasterscharter.org/home) addresses this disparity. It is an agreement between agencies of several countries to provide - on a best-effort basis - remotely sensed data of natural disasters to requesting countries in support of disaster response. The lead US agency for interaction with the IDC is the United States Geological Survey (USGS); when an IDC request or "activation" is received, the USGS notifies the science teams for NASA instruments with targeting information for data collection. In the case of the ISS, the Earth Sciences and Remote Sensing (ESRS) Unit, part of the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science

  12. Mechanical spectroscopy, internal friction and ultrasonic attenuation: Collection of works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magalas, L.B.

    2009-01-01

    An extensive collection of recommended books and proceedings from numerous conferences on internal friction, mechanical spectroscopy, and ultrasonic attenuation is provided. Reflecting the complicated history of the 20th century, books published in English and in Russian are presented in two separate sections. International and national conferences organized in various countries are listed. Supplementary lists referring to conferences held in the People's Republic of China, Poland, Russia, the Soviet Union, and Ukraine are also provided. The interesting evolution of mechanical spectroscopy from internal friction and ultrasonic attenuation in solids is clearly demonstrated, and a choice list of retrospective papers illustrates the evolution of the field. A brief review of mechanical spectroscopy, therefore, is included. Numerous research areas investigated by internal friction and mechanical spectroscopy are addressed, including point defect relaxations, electronic and phonon relaxations, dislocation relaxations, grain boundary relaxations, domain induced relaxations (magnetic, ferroelectric), magnetomechanical relaxations, phase transformations, glass transitions, interface effects as well as a wide array of applications specific to physics and materials science. For many years now, there has been a definite need to provide a thorough list of references that might cover major national conferences and books published in English and other languages. This work strives to achieve this goal.

  13. International Space Station Instmments Collect Imagery of Natural Disasters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, C. A.; Stefanov, W. L.

    2013-01-01

    A new focus for utilization of the International Space Station (ISS) is conducting basic and applied research that directly benefits Earth's citizenry. In the Earth Sciences, one such activity is collecting remotely sensed imagery of disaster areas and making those data immediately available through the USGS Hazards Data Distribution System, especially in response to activations of the International Charter for Space and Major Disasters (known informally as the "International Disaster Charter", or IDC). The ISS, together with other NASA orbital sensor assets, responds to IDC activations following notification by the USGS. Most of the activations are due to natural hazard events, including large floods, impacts of tropical systems, major fires, and volcanic eruptions and earthquakes. Through the ISS Program Science Office, we coordinate with ISS instrument teams for image acquisition using several imaging systems. As of 1 August 2013, we have successfully contributed imagery data in support of 14 Disaster Charter Activations, including regions in both Haiti and the east coast of the US impacted by Hurricane Sandy; flooding events in Russia, Mozambique, India, Germany and western Africa; and forest fires in Algeria and Ecuador. ISS-based sensors contributing data include the Hyperspectral Imager for the Coastal Ocean (HICO), the ISERV (ISS SERVIR Environmental Research and Visualization System) Pathfinder camera mounted in the US Window Observational Research Facility (WORF), the ISS Agricultural Camera (ISSAC), formerly operating from the WORF, and high resolution handheld camera photography collected by crew members (Crew Earth Observations). When orbital parameters and operations support data collection, ISS-based imagery adds to the resources available to disaster response teams and contributes to the publicdomain record of these events for later analyses.

  14. The transition of emotions in collective action. The #Yo Soy 132 youth discourse analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica García Martínez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Emotions belong human nature, they must not be disaggregated, however, they have been rejected by many disciplinary perspectives that overlap rational action to emotional in the analysis of collective action. Although recently the interest arises to analyze how emotions boost social mobilizations. The objective of this work is analyze the emotions arising in the context of the collective action which was taken by young Mexicans in the movement #Yo Soy 132 through social constructionism of emotions as the theoretical perspective and using as method the discourse analysis. This paper is presented in five parts: in the first the emotions in the collective action are discussed, subsequently the studied phenomenon is contextualized, in the third the analysis method is detailed, in the fourth, results are presented, and in the last section, the findings are confronted on the basis of theoretical approaches recovered. It is concluded that regardless of the context, emotions keep on a similar path in collective action, and the emerged emotions are not positive or negative, instead they are impulsor and detractor of such action.

  15. Producers’ motivation for collective action for kola production and marketing in Cameroon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Franzel

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Collective action has been used as a strategy to improve the benefits of smallholder producers of kola nuts in Cameroon. Despite demonstrated benefits, not all producers are involved in the collective action. The presented study used a modified Technology Acceptance Model (TAM namely the Collective Action Behaviour model (CAB model to analyse kola producers’ motivation for collective action activities. Five hypotheses are formulated and tested using data obtained from 185 farmers who are involved in kola production and marketing in theWestern highlands of Cameroon. Results which were generated using Partial Least Squares (PLS approach for Structural Equation Modelling (SEM showed that farmers’ intrinsic motivators and ease of use influenced their behavioural intent to join a group marketing activities. The perceived usefulness that was mainly related to the economic benefits of group activities did not influence farmers’ behavioural intent. It is therefore concluded that extension messages and promotional activities targeting collective action need to emphasise the perceived ease of use of involvement and social benefits associated with group activities in order to increase farmers’ participation.

  16. Re-construction of action awareness depends on an internal model of action-outcome timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Max-Philipp; Bauer, Markus; Machts, Judith; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Haggard, Patrick; Dolan, Raymond J

    2014-04-01

    The subjective time of an instrumental action is shifted towards its outcome. This temporal binding effect is partially retrospective, i.e., occurs upon outcome perception. Retrospective binding is thought to reflect post-hoc inference on agency based on sensory evidence of the action - outcome association. However, many previous binding paradigms cannot exclude the possibility that retrospective binding results from bottom-up interference of sensory outcome processing with action awareness and is functionally unrelated to the processing of the action - outcome association. Here, we keep bottom-up interference constant and use a contextual manipulation instead. We demonstrate a shift of subjective action time by its outcome in a context of variable outcome timing. Crucially, this shift is absent when there is no such variability. Thus, retrospective action binding reflects a context-dependent, model-based phenomenon. Such top-down re-construction of action awareness seems to bias agency attribution when outcome predictability is low. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Territories climate plans: territories in action 21 collectivities involved in the climatic change challenge. 1. experiences collection 2007; Plans climat territoriaux: des territoires en action 21 collectivites engagees dans la releve du defi climatique. 1. recueil d'experiences 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The climate plan invites the collectivities to implement actions of greenhouse reduction. This collection presents the first collectivities involved in a climate approach: towns, natural parks, syndicates, general and regional council. (A.L.B.)

  18. Prejudice Reduction and Collective Action: A Conflict or Confluence of Interests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas B. Mazur

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing body of research findings suggesting that prejudice reduction strategies can have unintended negative consequences, particularly by helping to stabilize systems of inequality. In light of these findings, a handful of scholars have suggested that the field be guided less by the prejudice reduction tradition, so as to focus more on collective action. While agreeing with the recent critiques of prejudice reduction, I argue that in more robustly embracing a collective action approach we should be careful not to abandon the notion of perceptualism that colored original thinking on prejudice reduction, lest we artificially narrow the scope of social psychological research and unintentionally ignore communities that do not fit well within current thinking in the collective action tradition.

  19. From organized internal traffic to collective navigation of bacterial swarms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ariel, Gil; Shklarsh, Adi; Kalisman, Oren; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Ingham, Colin

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial swarming resulting in collective navigation over surfaces provides a valuable example of cooperative colonization of new territories. The social bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits successful and diverse swarming strategies. When grown on hard agar surfaces with peptone, P. vortex develops complex colonies of vortices (rotating bacterial aggregates). In contrast, during growth on Mueller–Hinton broth gelled into a soft agar surface, a new strategy of multi-level organization is revealed: the colonies are organized into a special network of swarms (or ‘snakes’ of a fraction of millimeter in width) with intricate internal traffic. More specifically, cell movement is organized in two or three lanes of bacteria traveling between the back and the front of the swarm. This special form of cellular logistics suggests new methods in which bacteria can share resources and risk while searching for food or migrating into new territories. While the vortices-based organization on hard agar surfaces has been modeled before, here, we introduce a new multi-agent bacterial swarming model devised to capture the swarms-based organization on soft surfaces. We test two putative generic mechanisms that may underlie the observed swarming logistics: (i) chemo-activated taxis in response to chemical cues and (ii) special align-and-push interactions between the bacteria and the boundary of the layer of lubricant collectively generated by the swarming bacteria. Using realistic parameters, the model captures the observed phenomena with semi-quantitative agreement in terms of the velocity as well as the dynamics of the swarm and its envelope. This agreement implies that the bacteria interactions with the swarm boundary play a crucial role in mediating the interplay between the collective movement of the swarm and the internal traffic dynamics. (paper)

  20. Enhancing the Action Research Capacity of the International Model ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... the UNCED (United Nations Conference on Environment and Development) Rio ... an international network of working models of sustainable forest management ... countries in Africa, Asia, Canada, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, ...

  1. Internalization, separation-individuation, and the nature of therapeutic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blatt, S J; Behrends, R S

    1987-01-01

    Based on the assumption that the mutative factors that facilitate growth in psychoanalysis involve the same fundamental mechanisms that lead to psychological growth in normal development, this paper considers the constant oscillation between gratification and deprivation leading to internalization as the central therapeutic mechanism of the psychoanalytic process. Patients experience the analytic process as a series of gratifying involvements and experienced incompatibilities that facilitate internalization, whereby the patient recovers lost or disrupted regulatory, gratifying interactions with the analyst, which are real or fantasied, by appropriating these interactions, transforming them into their own, enduring, self-generated functions and characteristics. Patients internalize not only the analyst's interpretive activity, but also the analyst's sensitivity, compassion and acceptance, and, in addition, their own activity in relation to the analyst such as free association. Both interpretation and the therapeutic relationship can contain elements of gratifying involvement and experienced incompatibility that lead to internalization and therefore both can be mutative factors in the therapeutic process.

  2. Dangerous climate change and collective action. Comment on "Climate change governance, cooperation and self-organization" by Jorge M. Pacheco, Vítor V. Vasconcelos, and Francisco C. Santos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannenberg, Astrid

    2014-12-01

    Climate change perhaps is the greatest collective action problem mankind has ever faced and the international community is still at a loss for how to get the ever rising greenhouse gas emissions under control. Does the risk of crossing a "dangerous" climate threshold improve the prospects of collective action?

  3. 26 CFR 601.102 - Classification of taxes collected by the Internal Revenue Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Rules § 601.102 Classification of taxes collected by the Internal Revenue Service. (a) Principal... 26 Internal Revenue 20 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Classification of taxes collected by the Internal Revenue Service. 601.102 Section 601.102 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. COLLECTIVE ACTION AND COLLECTIVE SCHEME IN THE MOBILIZATION OF LEARNING CHEMISTRY ACCORDING TO VERGNAUD’S THEORY OF CONCEPTUAL FIELDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Machado de Andrade

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This research’s aim was to analyze the mobilization in learning chemistry promoted by the collective action of three entrant students in higher education courses, in a college located in Santo André. For such, cognitive indicators mobilized by them while living individual and group situations on water’s boiling point, using Screencast video lessons as a motivational strategy, were analyzed. The fulfilment of these situations’ corresponding tasks was filmed, and the recordings were transcribed and analyzed with the help from the Transana software. The indicators used for the Discursive Textual Analysis were created by associating Vicente Talanquer’s Chemistry Knowledge Space to Gérard Vergnaud’s Theory of Conceptual Fields. The results displayed higher quantity and better quality to the indicators in situations with collective character, to the detriment to the ones with individual character. Thus, one might conclude that, under this research’s conditions, collective action, generated by a collective scheme, was capable of mobilizing the learning of chemistry.

  5. The internal anticipation of sensory action effects: when action induces FFA and PPA activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Kühn

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Voluntary action – in particular the ability to produce desired effects in the environment – is fundamental to human existence. According to ideomotor theory we can achieve goals in the environment by means of anticipating their outcomes. We aimed at providing neurophysiological evidence for the assumption that performing actions calls for the activation of brain areas associated with the sensory effects usually evoked by the actions. We conducted an fMRI study in which right and left button presses lead to the presentation of face and house pictures. We compared a baseline phase with the same phase after participants experienced the association between button presses and pictures. We found an increase in the parahippocampal place area (PPA for the response that has been associated with house pictures and fusiform face area (FFA for the response that has been coupled with face pictures. This observation constitutes support for ideomotor theory.

  6. 5th International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Trawinski, Bogdan; Nguyen, Ngoc

    2014-01-01

    The book consists of 19 extended and revised chapters based on original works presented during a poster session organized within the 5th International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence that was held between 11 and 13 of September 2013 in Craiova, Romania. The book is divided into three parts. The first part is titled “Agents and Multi-Agent Systems” and consists of 8 chapters that concentrate on many problems related to agent and multi-agent systems, including: formal models, agent autonomy, emergent properties, agent programming, agent-based simulation and planning. The second part of the book is titled “Intelligent Computational Methods” and consists of 6 chapters. The authors present applications of various intelligent computational methods like neural networks, mathematical optimization and multistage decision processes in areas like cooperation, character recognition, wireless networks, transport, and metal structures. The third part of the book is titled “Language and Knowled...

  7. Internal Controls for Accounting Areas. Alliance Action Information Sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Technical Assistance ALLIANCE for Parent Centers, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Internal controls are important to ensure your Parent Center's resources are well protected. Steps should be taken to ensure that finance transactions are authorized by management, executed properly and on time, and recorded appropriately. Some centers may not have staff with all of the titles used in the procedures presented in this paper.…

  8. Recruiting from within: Action-Oriented Research Solutions to Internal Student Recruitment in Collegiate Aviation Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Brent; Carstenson, Larry; Hansen, Frederick

    1999-01-01

    Discusses student recruitment in aviation education and establishes that internal recruitment methods are the most productive and cost effective. Provides examples of recruitment strategies based on a model of action research. (JOW)

  9. The Interplay of Networking Activities and Internal Knowledge Actions for Subsidiary Influence within MNCs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tavani, Zhaleh Najafi; Giroud, Axèle; Andersson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    Building on resource dependency theory; this research investigates the joint impacts of subsidiary knowledge based actions (Reverse Knowledge Transfer (RKT) and knowledge development) and networking activities (internal and external embeddedness) on its strategic influence in the multinational co...

  10. Identity and collective action via computer-mediated communication: A review and agenda for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priante, Anna; Ehrenhard, Michel L; van den Broek, Tijs; Need, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of large-scale waves of mobilisation in 2011, the importance of identity in the study of collective action via computer-mediated communication (CMC) has been a source of contention. Hence, our research sets out to systematically review and synthesise empirical findings on identity

  11. Sexual-Minority College Women's Experiences with Discrimination: Relations with Identity and Collective Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Carly; Leaper, Campbell

    2010-01-01

    This study examined sexual-minority women's reports of sexism, heterosexism, and gendered heterosexism (discrimination that is both sexist and heterosexist) as predictors of social identity and collective action during college. A measure of gendered heterosexism was developed that assesses women's experiences with discrimination that is…

  12. Nationalism and Media Coverage of Indigenous People's Collective Action in Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkes, Rima; Corrigall-Brown, Catherine; Ricard, Danielle

    2010-01-01

    Over the past several decades indigenous people in Canada have mounted hundreds of collective action events such as marches, demonstrations, road blockades, and land occupations. What the general public knows about these events and their causes overwhelmingly comes from the mainstream mass media. For this reason, media coverage of these events…

  13. The social affirmation use of social media as a motivator of collective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kende, Anna; van Zomeren, Martijn; Ujhelyi, Adrienn; Lantos, Nóra Anna

    The mobilizing potential of the internet has been widely recognized but also sharply criticized. We propose and test in two studies that the social affirmation use of social media motivates individuals for collective action to achieve social change. In Study 1, we surveyed participants of a

  14. Agricultural Extension, Collective Action and Innovation Systems: Lessons on Network Brokering from Peru and Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellin, Jon

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: New approaches to extension service delivery are needed that stimulate increased agricultural production, contribute to collective action and which also foster the emergence of agricultural innovation systems. Research in Peru and Mexico explores some of these new approaches. Design/methodology/approach: In both countries, a qualitative…

  15. Positive Portrayals of Feminist Men Increase Men's Solidarity with Feminists and Collective Action Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiley, Shaun; Srinivasan, Ruhi; Finke, Elizabeth; Firnhaber, Joseph; Shilinsky, Alyssa

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined whether positive portrayals of feminist men could increase men's sense of solidarity with feminists and, through it, their intentions to engage in collective action in support of women. A sample of 102 mostly White men between the ages of 18 and 63 was recruited from Mechanical Turk, an online crowdsourcing marketplace.…

  16. Human Rights as Practice: Dalit Women's Collective Action to Secure Livelihood Entitlements in rural South India

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mangubhai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this dissertation, I investigate how Dalit women in rural South India secure livelihood entitlements by analysing processes of social exclusion as well as collective action by these women through their perspectives. This problematic requires focus on how caste, class and gender mutually construct

  17. Identity and collective action via computer-mediated communication : A review and agenda for future research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Priante, Anna; Ehrenhard, Michel Léon; van den Broek, Tijs Adriaan; Need, Ariana

    2017-01-01

    Since the start of large-scale waves of mobilisation in 2011, the importance of identity in the study of collective action via computer-mediated communication (CMC) has been a source of contention. Hence, our research sets out to systematically review and synthesise empirical findings on identity

  18. Impact of Group Emotions on Student Collective Action Tendencies, Ties, and Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundararajan, Malavika; Sundararajan, Binod; Manderson, Jill

    2016-01-01

    The authors tested the dynamics of collective action tendencies of student teams when trying to accomplish a shared goal, with a focus on the impact of member ties and team member interaction and emotional responses on team performance. The results show the direct and indirect impacts of both positive and negative group emotions on the student…

  19. Income Groups, Social Capital, and Collective Action on Small-Scale Irrigation Facilities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miao, Shanshan; Heijman, Wim; Zhu, Xueqin; Qiao, Dan; Lu, Qian

    2018-01-01

    This article examines whether relationships between social capital characteristics and the willingness of farmers to cooperate in collective action is moderated by the farmers' income level. We employed a structural equation model to analyze the influence of social capital components (social

  20. Reply : Collective Action and the Empirical Content of Stochastic Learning Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Macy, M.W.; Flache, A.

    2007-01-01

    We are grateful for the opportunity that Bendor, Diermeier, and Ting (hereafter BDT) have provided to address important questions about the empirical content of learning theoretic solutions to the collective action problem. They discuss two well-known classes of adaptive models— stochastic learning

  1. Making Facilitation Work: The Challenges on an International DBA Action Learning Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    OFarrell, Jack

    2018-01-01

    This account relates my experiences as facilitator of an action learning set on a DBA cohort comprising international students and myself. It outlines the reasons for my selection as facilitator and describes my initial expectations and assumptions of action learning. I chart the difficulty in separating the 'what' of my own research from the…

  2. Institutional Development to Build a Succesfull Local Collective Action in Forest Management from Arau Watershed Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nursidah Nursidah

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The study was aimed to build institution model of sustainable forest management, through analysis of action arena, community attributes and forest management rules in Arau Watershed Unit Management Area.  To achieve sustainable forest management, recognition and incorporation of local institutions in forest policy formulation is very important because it had great potential for collective action and had characteristics of common pools resources sustainable management needed.  To achieve a successful local collective action, the institution must be had: the rules in use suitable with local community norms; the organization has power to give reward and punishment as well as recognized and respected by society; specific management according location; rules of the game was made participatory; there are economic incentives for owners and users; there is an instrument for controlling sustainable use; and conflict resolution through negotiations to reach an concencus agreement.  The finding of institutional models  analysis  show  that  co-management  model  between government and local communities, called Nagari Forest Management Model is more suitable, because it gives greater opportunities for indigenous rights recognition to communal forest, until the capacity of villages get better, then the choice of forest management can be shifted into Nagari Community Based Forest Management Model.Keywords: sustainable forest management, institution, collective action, nagari

  3. Regulation of international energy markets: Economic effects of political actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakova, Anastasia V.

    Recent increases in volatility of energy prices have led many governments to reevaluate their regard of national energy reserves and reconsider future exploration, production, and consumption patterns. The flurry of activity that has been generated by such price volatility has included large-scale nationalizations of energy sectors, unilateral renegotiations of foreign energy development contracts, and expropriations of resources from foreign energy firms on one hand, and on the other hand more rapid energy sector liberalization, intensified search for and development of renewable fuels and technologies, and development of incentives for increased energy efficiency and conservation. The aim of this dissertation is to examine and quantify the extent of positive and negative effects that have resulted from some of these activities. The first chapter focuses on quantifying the effect that nationalistic sentiment has had on economic attractiveness of energy sectors during the decade prior to the recent global economic crisis, as measured by foreign direct investment (FDI) inflows. Empirical results demonstrate that both political and economic conditions play an important role in investors' decisions. A combination of investment friendliness, corruption levels, and democracy all help to explain the trends in energy-sector investment levels over time in my sample countries, although differences in the types of corruption existing in these nations do not. Investment levels, in turn, appear to influence future levels of oil production, underscoring the significance of good investment policies for future success of energy sectors. Chapter two considers the response of energy stock prices to severe regulatory actions. It employs an event study framework to examine causal effects of critical informational announcements (i.e. events of expropriation and nationalization) on daily returns and cumulative losses in firm value of energy corporations. Results show that a firm

  4. Capitalist collective action: competition, cooperation and conflict in the coal industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John R. Bowman [City University of New York, New York, NY (USA). Queens College

    2006-11-15

    This volume presents a theory of capitalist collective action and a case study of the pre-World War II American coal industry to which the theory is applied. The author examines the irony of capitalist firms that do not want to compete with each other, but often cannot avoid doing so. He then explains under what conditions businesses would be able to organize their competition and identifies the economic and political factors that facilitate or inhibit this organization. The case study not only illustrates the theory, but demonstrates how the competitive relations of capitalist firms are critically important determinants of their political behavior. The author argues that the traditional Marxist concern with conflict between workers and capitalists should be supplemented with a concern for the competitive conflicts among capitalists. Contents are: 1: 1. Economic competition and market organization: the logic of capitalist collective action; 2. Forms of capitalist collective action; Part II: 3. Price and wage games in the bituminous coal industry; 4. Workers organize capitalists: collective bargaining and market organization, 1880-1914; 5. The coal industry on the defensive, 1916-1922; 6. Labor-capital conflict and the disorganization of the coal market, 1921-1928; 7. From free competition to state intervention; Part III: 8. Capitalists, workers, and the state; Bibliography; Indexes. This text was originally published in 1989 in hardback (ISBN 0-521-36265-2).

  5. Leadership, entrepreneurship and collective action: A case study from the Colombian Pacific Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván D. Lobo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Building upon case-based evidence this paper explores the role of leaders in Ecomanglar, a community-based enterprise in the Black collective territory of La Plata-Bahía Málaga in the Colombian Pacific Basin, whose purpose is to provide eco and ethno-tourism services. This purpose is inextricably bound up with the region’s biophysical and institutional characteristics, both of which make management of common-pool resources a key strategic task for Ecomanglar. We propose an analytical framework to understand the role of these leaders based on the interaction of two dimensions: institutional transfer channels and operational capacity. We further analyse the role of leaders as essential ‘brokers’ to initialise and sustain collective action, a role that brings about entrepreneurial solutions for sustainable development but also creates, or exacerbates, conflicts within the community. Our findings challenge approaches which view collective action as an emergent decentralised group-oriented outcome. The paper contributes to the literature on leadership, entrepreneurship and collective action by identifying missing links and potential points of convergence. It also sheds light on some of the challenges in promoting entrepreneurship as a means to advance sustainable development in rural communities.

  6. Making Cooperation Work: Generalized Social Trust and Large-N Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    It has often been argued that generalized social trust, the belief that most people are trustworthy, enhances cooperation in large-N collective action dilemmas. Large-N dilemmas are situations where an actor has to decide whether to contribute to the provision of public goods that benefit a large...... number of people. Modern societies abound with such dilemmas, and if generalized social trust does enhance voluntary contributions it would be a very valuable asset that would benefit every society. This dissertation digs into this frequently posited relationship. A series of empirical analyses drawing...... on survey and national level data from several countries is used to investigate if, how, and when generalized social trust leads to collective action. Specifically, citizens' behavior in relation to the environment is used as the indicator of voluntary public good provision. This indicator affords excellent...

  7. Financial and economic determinants of collective action: The case of wastewater management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunner, Norbert; Starkl, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Where public environmental funds support development of wastewater infrastructure, funding institutions ensure the economic use of funds, while the beneficiaries minimize their own costs. In rural areas, there is often a choice between decentralized or centralized (multi-village) systems: if the centralized system is most economic, then only this system is eligible for public funding. However, its implementation requires a voluntary cooperation of the concerned communities, who need to organize themselves to develop and run the infrastructure. The paper analyzes the social determinants of collaboration in a generic case study, using the following variables: method of (economic) assessment, modeled by the social discount rate, funding policy, modeled by the funding rate, and users' self-organization, modeled by cost sharing. In a borderline situation, where the centralized system turns out to be most economic, but this assessment is contingent on the assessment method, collective action may fail: the advantages of collective action from funding are too small to outweigh organizational deficiencies. Considering in this situation sanitation as a human right, authors recommend using innovative forms of organization and, if these fail, reassessing either the amount of funding or the eligibility for funding of more acceptable alternatives. - Highlights: ► A generic case study models collective action and funding in wastewater management. ► Determinants of success: economic assessment, funding policy and self-organization. ► Success indicators: conflict rate, funds needed to make cost shares fair. ► Method for analyzing centralized vs. decentralized disputes. ► If collective action has less benefits, innovative cost sharing may ensure success.

  8. A continuous time model of the bandwagon effect in collective action

    OpenAIRE

    Arieh Gavious; Shlomo Mizrahi

    2001-01-01

    The paper offers a complex and systematic model of the bandwagon effect in collective action using continuous time equations. The model treats the bandwagon effect as a process influenced by ratio between the mobilization efforts of social activists and the resources invested by the government to counteract this activity. The complex modeling approach makes it possible to identify the conditions for specific types of the bandwagon effect, and determines the scope of that effect. Relying on ce...

  9. Integrating simultaneous prosocial and antisocial behavior into theories of collective action

    OpenAIRE

    Basurto, Xavier; Blanco, Esther; Nenadovic, Mateja; Vollan, Bj?rn

    2016-01-01

    Trust and cooperation constitute cornerstones of common-pool resource theory, showing that ?prosocial? strategies among resource users can overcome collective action problems and lead to sustainable resource governance. Yet, antisocial behavior and especially the coexistence of prosocial and antisocial behaviors have received less attention. We broaden the analysis to include the effects of both ?prosocial? and ?antisocial? interactions. We do so in the context of marine protected areas (MPAs...

  10. Financial and economic determinants of collective action: The case of wastewater management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Norbert, E-mail: norbert.brunner@cemds.org [Center for Environmental Management and Decision Support, Gregor Mendel Str. 33, A-1180 Vienna (Austria); Starkl, Markus, E-mail: markus.starkl@boku.ac.at [Competence Centre for Decision-Aid in Environmental Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences/DIB, Gregor Mendel Strasse 33, 1180 Wien (Austria)

    2012-01-15

    Where public environmental funds support development of wastewater infrastructure, funding institutions ensure the economic use of funds, while the beneficiaries minimize their own costs. In rural areas, there is often a choice between decentralized or centralized (multi-village) systems: if the centralized system is most economic, then only this system is eligible for public funding. However, its implementation requires a voluntary cooperation of the concerned communities, who need to organize themselves to develop and run the infrastructure. The paper analyzes the social determinants of collaboration in a generic case study, using the following variables: method of (economic) assessment, modeled by the social discount rate, funding policy, modeled by the funding rate, and users' self-organization, modeled by cost sharing. In a borderline situation, where the centralized system turns out to be most economic, but this assessment is contingent on the assessment method, collective action may fail: the advantages of collective action from funding are too small to outweigh organizational deficiencies. Considering in this situation sanitation as a human right, authors recommend using innovative forms of organization and, if these fail, reassessing either the amount of funding or the eligibility for funding of more acceptable alternatives. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A generic case study models collective action and funding in wastewater management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Determinants of success: economic assessment, funding policy and self-organization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Success indicators: conflict rate, funds needed to make cost shares fair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Method for analyzing centralized vs. decentralized disputes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer If collective action has less benefits, innovative cost sharing may ensure success.

  11. Raging Against the Machine: Network Gatekeeping and Collective Action on Social Media Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Myers West

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Social media platforms act as networked gatekeepers—by ranking, channeling, promoting, censoring, and deleting content they hold power to facilitate or hinder information flows. One of the mechanisms they use is content moderation, or the enforcement of which content is allowed or disallowed on the platform. Though content moderation relies on users’ labor to identify content to delete, users have little capacity to influence content policies or enforcement. Despite this, some social media users are turning to collective action campaigns, redirecting information flows by subverting the activities of moderators, raising the visibility of otherwise hidden moderation practices, and organizing constituencies in opposition to content policies. Drawing on the example of the campaign to change Facebook’s nudity policy, this paper examines the strategies and tactics of users turning to collective action, considering which factors are most influential in determining the success or failure of a campaign. It finds that network gatekeeping salience is a good model for assessing which collective action efforts are most likely to be effective in achieving individual user goals. This indicates that the users who are already most able to harness the attention economy of social media platforms are more likely to successfully navigate the content moderation process. The analysis concludes by attending to what users might learn from the dynamics of network gatekeeping as they seek to resist the asymmetrical power relations of platforms.

  12. Incorporating institutions and collective action into a sociohydrological model of flood resilience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, David J.; Sangwan, Nikhil; Sung, Kyungmin; Chen, Xi; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2017-02-01

    Stylized sociohydrological models have mainly used social memory aspects such as community awareness or sensitivity to connect hydrologic change and social response. However, social memory alone does not satisfactorily capture the details of how human behavior is translated into collective action for water resources governance. Nor is it the only social mechanism by which the two-way feedbacks of sociohydrology can be operationalized. This study contributes toward bridging of this gap by developing a sociohydrological model of a flood resilience that includes two additional components: (1) institutions for collective action, and (2) connections to an external economic system. Motivated by the case of community-managed flood protection systems (polders) in coastal Bangladesh, we use the model to understand critical general features that affect long-term resilience of human-flood systems. Our findings suggest that occasional adversity can enhance long-term resilience. Allowing some hydrological variability to enter into the polder can increase its adaptive capacity for resilience through the preservation of social norm for collective action. Further, there are potential trade-offs associated with optimization of flood resistance through structural measures. By reducing sensitivity to floods, the system may become more fragile under the double impact of floods and economic change.

  13. 75 FR 66119 - Proposed Information Collection; International Conservation Grant Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-27

    ... Species, and Amphibians in Decline). Currently, information that we collect for Critically Endangered... collection for Amphibians in Decline grants is approved under OMB Control No. 1018-0144, which expires...

  14. Action Prediction Allows Hypothesis Testing via Internal Forward Models at 6 Months of Age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Gredebäck

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We propose that action prediction provides a cornerstone in a learning process known as internal forward models. According to this suggestion infants’ predictions (looking to the mouth of someone moving a spoon upward will moments later be validated or proven false (spoon was in fact directed toward a bowl, information that is directly perceived as the distance between the predicted and actual goal. Using an individual difference approach we demonstrate that action prediction correlates with the tendency to react with surprise when social interactions are not acted out as expected (action evaluation. This association is demonstrated across tasks and in a large sample (n = 118 at 6 months of age. These results provide the first indication that infants might rely on internal forward models to structure their social world. Additional analysis, consistent with prior work and assumptions from embodied cognition, demonstrates that the latency of infants’ action predictions correlate with the infant’s own manual proficiency.

  15. Actions of radiation protection in the collection of discarded radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neri, E.P.M.; Silva, F.C.A. da

    2017-01-01

    Brazil has approximately 2000 radiative facilities that use radiation sources in their processes and are controlled by The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN through standards, authorizations and inspections. These radioactive materials, whether in the form of waste or radioactive source, used in medical, industrial, research, etc. are sometimes discarded and found in inappropriate places, such as garbage dumps, industrial waste, streets, squares, etc. found by urban cleaning professionals without the proper knowledge of them. The work presents the radiation protection actions required for the safe collection of radioactive material to be performed by these professionals. According to the type of radioactive material the main actions of radiation protection are, among others: recognition of a radioactive material; correct use of personal protective equipment to contain possible radiation contamination; implementation of an area control etc. In order for the actions of recognition and collection of discarded radioactive material to be effective, there is a need to implement a training program in radiation protection for urban cleaning professionals

  16. Social Identities in a Globalized World: Challenges and Opportunities for Collective Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenmann, Amir; Reese, Gerhard; Cameron, James E

    2016-03-01

    Globalization-the increasing interconnectedness of societies, economies, and cultures-is a defining feature of contemporary social life. Paradoxically, it underlies both the dynamics of global crises (e.g., rising inequality, climate change) and the possibilities for ameliorating them. In this review, we introduce globalization as a multifaceted process and elaborate its psychological effects with respect to identity, culture, and collective action. Using a social identity approach, we discuss three foci of identification: local culture, globalized Western culture, and humanity in its entirety. Each source of identification is analyzed in terms of its psychological meaning and position vis-à-vis the global power structure. Globalized Western culture forms the basis for an exclusive globalized identity, which privileges only some cultures and ways of life. We conceptualize reactions to its core values in terms of cultural identification and rejection and acceptance of, or opposition to, its global social order. Opposition to this inequitable global order is central to inclusive globalized identities (e.g., identification with humanity). These identities may encourage globally minded collective action, even as more research is needed to address their potential caveats. We consider possibilities for social change and action and conclude that a focused application of psychological science to the study of these issues is overdue. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. A Cultural Psychological Analysis of Collective Memory as Mediated Action: Constructions of Indian History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahana Mukherjee

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research applies a cultural psychological perspective on collective memory as mediated action to examine how constructions of a national past serve as tools that both reflect and shape national identity concerns. We employ a situation-sampling method to investigate collective memory in a series of studies concerning intergroup relations in the Indian context. In Study 1, participants (N = 55 generated three historical events that they considered important/relevant for Indian history. In Study 2, participants (N = 95 rated the importance and relevance of these events in a within-participant design. Illuminating the psychological constitution of cultural reality, frequency of recall (Study 1 and ratings of importance/relevance (Study 2 were greater for nation-glorifying events celebrating ingroup triumph than for typically silenced, critical events acknowledging ingroup wrongdoing. Moreover, these patterns were stronger among participants who scored higher in national identification. In Studies 3 (N = 65 and 4 (N = 160, we exposed participants to different categories of events in a between-participants design. Illuminating the cultural constitution of psychological experience, participants exposed to typically silenced, critical events reported lower national identification and greater perception of injustice against marginalized groups than did participants exposed to nation-glorifying events. Together, results illuminate a conception of collective memory as mediated action. Producers invest memory products with an identity-interested charge that directs subsequent intergroup relations toward identity-consistent ends.

  18. Presence in International Organisms: A Policy for a Collective Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Montobbio

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available What does the presence of Spaniards in international organisations signify and entail? Why, for what, and how should this be promoted? In order to answer such questions, the author analyses the meaning and implications of this presence in a globalised world in which a commitment to effective multilateralism entails a commitment to the international organisms as forums for and actors in global governance, and their presence in our societies and lives. This means both the promoting of Spanish presence in the administrations inwhich the proposals are formed which embody the general interest of the international organisations, like the multilateralisation of Spanish society. For this reason, in the framework of its multilateral policy, Spain is currently developing a policy of promoting the presence of Spaniards in international organisations in the areas of information, training, promotion and incentives, the outlines and results of which are described in this article.

  19. Collective action as a way to develop Organic Farming in Armenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armen Ghazaryan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Armenia is a landlocked country which gained its independence about 24 years ago. A big portion of population (44.2% is still involved in agriculture and mostly consists of smallholder farmers. More than 20% of Armenia’s GDP comes from agriculture. The government considers organic agriculture as a priority area in the country’s agro-food policy as well as part of sustainable development. However, organic farming is still on its early stages of development just like in other Eastern European, Caucasian and Central Asian countries. Yet, the country already has an organic certification body which is recognized both in the US and the EU, organic supermarket in the capital city and a growing demand for organic products. Those smallholder farmers and especially the organic producers face difficulties accessing markets, gathering necessary information, meeting quality control and food safety requirements, certifying their production as organic or fair trade, accessing credits and so on. Researchers believe that smallholder agriculture can play an important role in reducing global poverty as a vast number of world’s poor are rural households that are involved in agriculture. Armenian smallholders are no exception and they face most of the same challenges and problems that peasants from other parts of the world do. This paper studies one of the ways that these challenges can be overcome, that is, collective action which has proved to be successful in many cases. Although collective action can be very useful and helpful for smallholder farmers and there is even a small successful example from the organic sector in Armenia, it is not a panacea. Organizing a collective action is not an easy task and its success depends on many factors such as small group size, clearly defined boundaries, shared norms, past successful experiences and others.

  20. Intergroup Contact and Social Change: Implications of Negative and Positive Contact for Collective Action in Advantaged and Disadvantaged Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimer, Nils Karl; Becker, Julia C; Benz, Angelika; Christ, Oliver; Dhont, Kristof; Klocke, Ulrich; Neji, Sybille; Rychlowska, Magdalena; Schmid, Katharina; Hewstone, Miles

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has shown that (a) positive intergroup contact with an advantaged group can discourage collective action among disadvantaged-group members and (b) positive intergroup contact can encourage advantaged-group members to take action on behalf of disadvantaged outgroups. Two studies investigated the effects of negative as well as positive intergroup contact. Study 1 ( n = 482) found that negative but not positive contact with heterosexual people was associated with sexual-minority students' engagement in collective action (via group identification and perceived discrimination). Among heterosexual students, positive and negative contacts were associated with, respectively, more and less LGB (lesbian, gay, bisexual) activism. Study 2 ( N = 1,469) found that only negative contact (via perceived discrimination) predicted LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) students' collective action intentions longitudinally while only positive contact predicted heterosexual/cisgender students' LGBT activism. Implications for the relationship between intergroup contact, collective action, and social change are discussed.

  1. Purposeful collective action in ambiguous and contested situations: exploring ‘enabling capacities’ and cross-level interplay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Patterson

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purposeful collective action is important for sustainably managing many kinds of natural resource issues in social-ecological systems. However, cultivating purposeful collective action is challenging in ambiguous and contested situations involving multiple issues, actors, levels, and drivers, and weak or missing feedback. A particular example is the problem of managing waterway health in large and diverse landscapes. This paper analyses the emergence of purposeful collective action for managing waterway health, focusing on a case study of a large and diverse region in Australia. It applies a heuristic developed to guide inquiry into 'enabling capacities' underpinning purposeful collective action, to analyse three local cases embedded within a broader regional landscape. A diverse range of enabling capacities at both local and regional levels, and cross-level interplay between these levels, are shown to be important. Findings imply that efforts to generate purposeful collective action require building enabling capacities across multiple levels of organisation, from which contextually-appropriate and adaptive action can emerge. Moreover, findings indicate the need for a practice-focused ‘knowledge-action perspective’ that recognises the importance of intersubjectivity and agency. The paper demonstrates a promising approach for investigating purposeful collective action in ambiguous and contested water and environmental governance situations.

  2. Implementing Experiential Action Learning in International Management Education: The Global Business Strategic (GLOBUSTRAT) Consulting Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamath, Shyam; Agrawal, Jagdish; Krickx, Guido

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the theoretical foundations and implementation challenges and outcomes of a unique "hands-on" global consulting program that is integrated into an international EMBA program for mid-career and senior American and European managers. It details the challenges for the integration of experiential action learning, double-loop…

  3. Factors affecting collective action for forest fire management: a comparative study of community forest user groups in central Siwalik, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Lok Mani; Shrestha, Rajendra Prasad; Jourdain, Damien; Shivakoti, Ganesh P

    2015-01-01

    The attributes of social ecological systems affect the management of commons. Strengthening and enhancing social capital and the enforcement of rules and sanctions aid in the collective action of communities in forest fire management. Using a set of variables drawn from previous studies on the management of commons, we conducted a study across 20 community forest user groups in Central Siwalik, Nepal, by dividing the groups into two categories based on the type and level of their forest fire management response. Our study shows that the collective action in forest fire management is consistent with the collective actions in other community development activities. However, the effectiveness of collective action is primarily dependent on the complex interaction of various variables. We found that strong social capital, strong enforcement of rules and sanctions, and users' participation in crafting the rules were the major variables that strengthen collective action in forest fire management. Conversely, users' dependency on a daily wage and a lack of transparency were the variables that weaken collective action. In fire-prone forests such as the Siwalik, our results indicate that strengthening social capital and forming and enforcing forest fire management rules are important variables that encourage people to engage in collective action in fire management.

  4. Performance during internal medicine residency training and subsequent disciplinary action by state licensing boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Maxine A; Arnold, Gerald K; Blank, Linda L; Holmboe, Eric S; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2008-06-03

    Physicians who are disciplined by state licensing boards are more likely to have demonstrated unprofessional behavior in medical school. Information is limited on whether similar performance measures taken during residency can predict performance as practicing physicians. To determine whether performance measures during residency predict the likelihood of future disciplinary actions against practicing internists. Retrospective cohort study. State licensing board disciplinary actions against physicians from 1990 to 2006. 66,171 physicians who entered internal medicine residency training in the United States from 1990 to 2000 and became diplomates. Predictor variables included components of the Residents' Annual Evaluation Summary ratings and American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) certification examination scores. 2 performance measures independently predicted disciplinary action. A low professionalism rating on the Residents' Annual Evaluation Summary predicted increased risk for disciplinary action (hazard ratio, 1.7 [95% CI, 1.3 to 2.2]), and high performance on the ABIM certification examination predicted decreased risk for disciplinary action (hazard ratio, 0.7 [CI, 0.60 to 0.70] for American or Canadian medical school graduates and 0.9 [CI, 0.80 to 1.0] for international medical school graduates). Progressively better professionalism ratings and ABIM certification examination scores were associated with less risk for subsequent disciplinary actions; the risk ranged from 4.0% for the lowest professionalism rating to 0.5% for the highest and from 2.5% for the lowest examination scores to 0.0% for the highest. The study was retrospective. Some diplomates may have practiced outside of the United States. Nondiplomates were excluded. Poor performance on behavioral and cognitive measures during residency are associated with greater risk for state licensing board actions against practicing physicians at every point on a performance continuum. These findings support

  5. Value Chain Dynamics & Impact of Collective Action on Smallholder Livelihood Improvement in Kenya

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mutonyi, Sarah

    involved in the production and marketing of mango were interviewed. Data were analyzed using structural equation modeling, factor analysis and ordinary least squares regression in order to understand the relationships between producers and buyers. Propensity score matching was used to analyze the impact...... are key determinants of supplier/producer performance, while trust plays a moderating role between fairness and producer financial performance. Third, we showed that collective action through producer organizations increases smallholder income and asset holdings thereby reducing rural poverty. Lastly, we...... found that the determinants of smallholders’ participation in collective sale are trust in other producer group members, the farmer’s level of education and the production capacity in terms of the number of trees owned. Similarly, group size, farmer age and trust in the producer group leadership were...

  6. The International Children's Digital Library Enhances the Multicultural Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmons, Karen

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author talks about the International Children's Digital Library (ICDL), an online digital library which gives students an opportunity to read and learn about other cultures and countries in a different way. The library's web site (http://www.icdlbooks.org) was designed by children, with the guidance and expertise of adults.…

  7. Politics and economics in collective action: an ethnographic critique of dichotomic premisses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julieta Quirós

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Distancing itself from the formal models that have served as an axis for studies of collective action and social movements, this article seeks to reinstate the lived dimension of political engagement. Basing itself on the ethnographic analysis of a set of neighbourhoods in Greater Buenos Aires, it explores the multiple and heterogeneous ways in which people become involved in the so-called movimentos piqueteros. It indicates that these experiences become intelligible through their inscription in a wider plot of relations and possibilities. Starting from a figurational perspective, the text discusses some of the assumptions of the literature on piquetero organization, in particular, and social movements more generally; it questions that dichotomy between material reason and politico-moral reason through which the question of the motivations of collective action have been addressed; it is mistrustful of a rigid opposition between the State and social movements, pointing to the creative - and not merely co-optive - character of state policies; and, finally, it proposes to sociologize the locus of the "the pleasure of doing" in the origin and continuity of political engagement.

  8. Challenges to collective action in the post-Snowden era: visions from Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Ricaurte Quijano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to introduce the contributions to the monograph "The challenges of collective action in the post-Snowden era: readings from Latin America" ​​and is intended to promote further discussion in our social and cultural context. Techno-surveillance is located in the center of a regulatory system of relationships, interactions, and behaviours in contemporary societies. We argue that state institutions, Internet Service Providers, industries of personal data and surveillance, and the media are acting as articulated forces. Technological, financial, narrative, and legal devices are created to legitimate surveillance. The implications are reflected in the production of laws, artifacts, events, discourses, imaginaries, cultural practices, bodies and places for surveillance. Surveillance questions our understanding of privacy, freedom of expression, security, social relations, and the exercise of citizenship. Targeted and mass surveillance shape both public and private spheres. This fact demands a reflection on the possibilities of collective action and resistance. Analytical frameworks are needed to identify the mechanisms and implications of the surveillance society.

  9. Stocking the genetic supermarket: reproductive genetic technologies and collective action problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyngell, Chris; Douglas, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Reproductive genetic technologies (RGTs) allow parents to decide whether their future children will have or lack certain genetic predispositions. A popular model that has been proposed for regulating access to RGTs is the 'genetic supermarket'. In the genetic supermarket, parents are free to make decisions about which genes to select for their children with little state interference. One possible consequence of the genetic supermarket is that collective action problems will arise: if rational individuals use the genetic supermarket in isolation from one another, this may have a negative effect on society as a whole, including future generations. In this article we argue that RGTs targeting height, innate immunity, and certain cognitive traits could lead to collective action problems. We then discuss whether this risk could in principle justify state intervention in the genetic supermarket. We argue that there is a plausible prima facie case for the view that such state intervention would be justified and respond to a number of arguments that might be adduced against that view. © 2014 The Authors. Bioethics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Locust Control in Transition: The Loss and Reinvention of Collective Action in Post-Soviet Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazbek Toleubayev

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The inability to organize collective action for pest control can lead to severe problems. This paper focuses on the locust management system in Kazakhstan since the formation of the Soviet State. During the Transition Period after the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Plant Protection Service disintegrated. The principles of central planning were replaced with individualistic approaches with little state involvement in pest control activities or pesticide regulation. The financial and ideological reasons for dismantling the existing pest control system did not recognize the potential impact that policy-induced changes in agro-ecological conditions and control practices would have on pest development. Nature hit back at the induced institutional change that occurred in the Kazakh pest control system: an extremely harmful locust plague took the country by surprise between 1998 and 2001. This paper examines from an interdisciplinary perspective the co-evolution of locust populations, land use systems, knowledge about locusts, campaigns against them, and institutions in Soviet times and in the Transition Period. It argues the need for collective action theory to extend its present focus from local level institutions for resource management to higher level social-technical systems.

  11. Rural Associativity of Small Milk Producers and Collective Actions in the Free Market and Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germán Andrés Cortés Millán

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper emerges as a result of the research “Design of public policies for the Associativity o milk producers in Colombia”. The creation process of milk producers associations in Cundinamarca is shown, with the goal of offering a framework for public policy that makes it possible to support and recognize rural communities immersed in globalization processes, involved in free commerce treaties with the United States and the European Union. The methodology defined for the project had a qualitative framework, expressed through an interpretative discursive typology. Thorough interviews were made with a focus on categorization that, for the project, linked the narrations and perceptions of the collective identity components, traditional practices and collective political action. On the other hand, the methodological experience made it possible to link complementary strategies such as social cartography, documentary collection and ethnographic diaries, with which it was possible not only to collect information related to the categories of the study in an important proportion, but also to enrich the analysis itself, with the diversity and plurality that suggests an investigation of this nature.

  12. Interfaces in Social Innovation: an Action Research Story on a Tribal Women's Collective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Banu Soletti

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the nature of social interfaces that has emerged in the context of social innovations with vulnerable and marginalised tribal communities along the Tansa Reservoir in Maharashtra, India. This paper is part of a larger action research project that strives towards improving the livelihoods of tribal women through collectives such as self-help groups. The analysis presented in this paper pertains to the experiences of 13 tribal women who have come forward to form a self-help group to supplement their livelihoods. According to the tribal women, the collective spaces that the self-help group provide has itself been termed as innovation. In the above-mentioned context, this paper specifically examines the nature of diverse values and beliefs, interests, knowledge and power among different actors involved in promoting livelihood-based women’s collectives. It also explores the nature of response among tribal women to the intervention of outside experts in the day-to-day activities of their collective. The findings of this paper illustrate the discontinuities associated with the collective and specifically on the nature of frictions, disagreements and conflicts between actors, which are mediated and transformed at critical junctures. This signifies an underlying asymmetry between the knowledge systems of tribal women and outside experts respectively. Furthermore, this paper argues that if not properly nurtured, such innovative collective spaces can become sites of domination and agents for the perpetuation of mere socio-technical interest. Instead, the discourse of social innovation needs to be socially embedded within the issues of rights, recognition, representation and empowerment of those people who are vulnerable and marginalised in the society.

  13. Collecting Data among Ethnic Minorities in an International Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feskens, R.C.W.; Hox, J.J.; Lensvelt-Mulders, G.J.L.M.; Schmeets, J.J.G.

    2006-01-01

    This article examines strategies to reduce nonresponse rates among ethnic minorities. The authors review nonresponse rates and data collection strategies among ethnic minorities with respect to response rates and response bias in six European countries. The national statistical institutes of these

  14. ‘This will bring shame on our nation’: The role of anticipated group-based emotions on collective action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Lee; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S.R.

    2013-01-01

    In three studies we examined whether the anticipation of group-based guilt, shame and anger predicts the desire to undertake collective action against a proposed ingroup transgression. In Studies 1 (N = 179) and 2 (N = 186), the relation between appraising a proposed ingroup transgression as illegitimate and collective action was mediated (or partially mediated) by anticipated group-based shame and anger. In Study 3 (N = 128) participants with high self-investment group identification were less willing to engage in collective action against the prospective ingroup transgression when aversive anticipated group-based emotions were made salient. This effect was mediated by anticipated group-based shame. We discuss the implications of these results with regard to collective action and the morality of intergroup behavior. PMID:23690650

  15. Can moral convictions motivate the advantaged to challenge social inequality? Extending the social identity model of collective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Zomeren, M.; Postmes, T.; Spears, R.; Bettache, K.

    This article examines whether and how moral convictions, defined as strong and absolute stances on moralized issues, motivate advantaged group members to challenge social inequality. Specifically, we propose that violations of moral convictions against social inequality motivate collective action

  16. Progressing beyond SLMTA: Are internal audits and corrective action the key drivers of quality improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maina, Robert N; Mengo, Doris M; Mohamud, Abdikher D; Ochieng, Susan M; Milgo, Sammy K; Sexton, Connie J; Moyo, Sikhulile; Luman, Elizabeth T

    2014-01-01

    Kenya has implemented the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme to facilitate quality improvement in medical laboratories and to support national accreditation goals. Continuous quality improvement after SLMTA completion is needed to ensure sustainability and continue progress toward accreditation. Audits were conducted by qualified, independent auditors to assess the performance of five enrolled laboratories using the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) checklist. End-of-programme (exit) and one year post-programme (surveillance) audits were compared for overall score, star level (from zero to five, based on scores) and scores for each of the 12 Quality System Essential (QSE) areas that make up the SLIPTA checklist. All laboratories improved from exit to surveillance audit (median improvement 38 percentage points, range 5-45 percentage points). Two laboratories improved from zero to one star, two improved from zero to three stars and one laboratory improved from three to four stars. The lowest median QSE scores at exit were: internal audit; corrective action; and occurrence management and process improvement (service, internal audit and information management (≥ 50 percentage points). The two laboratories with the greatest overall improvement focused heavily on the internal audit and corrective action QSEs. Whilst all laboratories improved from exit to surveillance audit, those that focused on the internal audit and corrective action QSEs improved substantially more than those that did not; internal audits and corrective actions may have acted as catalysts, leading to improvements in other QSEs. Systematic identification of core areas and best practices to address them is a critical step toward strengthening public medical laboratories.

  17. A concerted action towards improved international response to nuclear and radiological events

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugletveit, F.

    2006-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident in 1986, two conventions, the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident and the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, were established in order to provide a framework for enhanced international cooperation in the response to such events. It has however been widely recognised that a better practical implementation of these conventions could significantly enhance our response capabilities. In order to achieve this the IAEA Member States, their Competent Authorities and the IAEA Secretariat have developed an International Action Plan for Strengthening the International Preparedness and Response System for Nuclear and Radiological Emergencies, 2004-2009. This Action Plan has three main elements: International communication International assistance Sustainable infrastructure and Working Groups and Expert Groups have been established to carry out the work in accordance with the plan. The implementation of the Action Plan is managed jointly by the IAEA Secretariat and the National Competent Authority Coordinating Group, N.C.A.C.G.. Currently some 65 experts from about 30 different states and international organisations are taking part. Two of the main goals of this work are to develop standardised/harmonized response procedures necessary for efficient provision of international assistance and establishment of a common unified communication platform. A more detailed update on the development of the work will be given. The development and implementation of this Action Plan is an important milestone in nuclear and radiological emergency preparedness and response and will offer an opportunity for the international society to establish a better and more cost efficient response capability. The standardised procedures and the unified communication platform established will subsequently have to be adopted and implemented by states and international organisations. This may have significant

  18. 78 FR 38957 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Trends in International Mathematics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ...; Comment Request; Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS): 2015 Recruitment and Field... of Collection: Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS): 2015 Recruitment and... Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is an international assessment of fourth and eighth grade students...

  19. 77 FR 38766 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; International Client Life-Cycle Multi-Purpose...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... Request; International Client Life-Cycle Multi-Purpose Forms AGENCY: International Trade Administration...-0151, 0625-0215, 0625-0220, 0625-0228, and 0625- 0238. These collections include all client intake... trade events to U.S. organizations. The International Client Life-cycle Multi-Purpose Forms, previously...

  20. The making of a new working class? A study of collective actions of migrant workers in South China

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Chris King-Chi; Pun, Ngai

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we argue that the specific process of the proletarianization of Chinese migrant workers contributes to the recent rise of labour protests. Most of the collective actions involve workers' conflict with management at the point of production, while simultaneously entailing labour organizing in dormitories and communities. The type of living space, including workers' dormitories and migrant communities, facilitates collective actions organized not only on bases of locality, ethnici...

  1. Grassroots (Economic Activism in Times of Crisis: Mapping the Redundancy of Collective Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo D’Alisa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the current economic crisis of industrialized society, social movements face two types of challenges: firstly, they are confronting institutions that are less capable of and have no propensity for mediating new socio-economic demands; secondly, they are experiencing difficulties in building strong and lasting bonds of solidarity and cooperation among people. The latter are fundamental resources for the emergence of collective action; however, the highly individualized structure of contemporary society makes the creation of social ties ever the more difficult. As a consequence, contemporary waves of protest are often short-lived. Nonetheless, in response to the multidimensional crises, the consolidation of grassroots mutualistic and cooperative experiences, within which new affiliations for collective action are experienced, is on the rise. Indeed, it is a fact that even though conditions are not favorable, social movements have continued to ex-pand and promote community-led initiatives for social and economic sustainability. In some cases, these initiatives play a decisive role in the fight against poverty and in guaranteeing human livelihood. Solidarity-based exchanges and networks, such as barter groups, urban gardening, new consumer-producer networks and cooperatives, time banks, local savings groups, urban squatting, and others similar experiences are typical examples of continuous reactivation of people's desire to be agents of their own destiny. This combination of formal and informal networks are a testimony to an ability and an aspiration. Indeed, on one hand, they are indicative of citizens' capacity to self-organize in order to tolerate, absorb, cope with and adjust to the environmental and social threats posed by neoliberal policies. On the other hand, they are attempting to change an economic system, increasingly perceived as unfair and ecological disruptive, by building an alternative in the cracks of the former, based on greater

  2. The Things You Do: Internal Models of Others' Expected Behaviour Guide Action Observation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberley C Schenke

    Full Text Available Predictions allow humans to manage uncertainties within social interactions. Here, we investigate how explicit and implicit person models-how different people behave in different situations-shape these predictions. In a novel action identification task, participants judged whether actors interacted with or withdrew from objects. In two experiments, we manipulated, unbeknownst to participants, the two actors action likelihoods across situations, such that one actor typically interacted with one object and withdrew from the other, while the other actor showed the opposite behaviour. In Experiment 2, participants additionally received explicit information about the two individuals that either matched or mismatched their actual behaviours. The data revealed direct but dissociable effects of both kinds of person information on action identification. Implicit action likelihoods affected response times, speeding up the identification of typical relative to atypical actions, irrespective of the explicit knowledge about the individual's behaviour. Explicit person knowledge, in contrast, affected error rates, causing participants to respond according to expectations instead of observed behaviour, even when they were aware that the explicit information might not be valid. Together, the data show that internal models of others' behaviour are routinely re-activated during action observation. They provide first evidence of a person-specific social anticipation system, which predicts forthcoming actions from both explicit information and an individuals' prior behaviour in a situation. These data link action observation to recent models of predictive coding in the non-social domain where similar dissociations between implicit effects on stimulus identification and explicit behavioural wagers have been reported.

  3. A New International Standard for "Actions from Waves and Currents on Coastal Structures"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørum, Alf; Burcharth, Hans F.; Goda, Yoshimi

    2007-01-01

    The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) is going to issue a new standard concerning "Actions from Waves and Currents on Coastal Structures," which becomes the first international standard in coastal engineering. It is composed of a normative part (29 pages), an informative part (80...... pages) and Bibliography ( 17 pages). The normative part describes what is considered as the norm of the matters in concern, while the informative part provides the information on recommended practice. The paper introduces the main points of the normative part and discusses the influence of the new...

  4. Inequality, Collective Action and Redistribution: a New Indicator for Assessing a Complex Relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Traversa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The predominant theoretical viewpoint about the problem of income redistribution in capitalist democracies continues to postulate that the pressure towards redistribution is greatest in democracies with more inequality. However, this assumption does not seem to be corroborated empirically; perhaps this is because sometimes inequality only increases between the lower reaches of the distribution of income. In these cases, inequality increases the dispersion of earnings among the stakeholders of redistribution, and this increases their collective action problems. This paper proposes a new theoretical principle for the analysis of the relationship between inequality and redistribution, and develops an indicator consistent to this principle. A preliminary empirical exploration is carried out to illustrate how the proposed indicator is signifi cantly associated with the levels of income redistribution in 19 OECD countries between 1974 and 2005.

  5. Improving Nutritional Health of the Public through Social Change: Finding Our Roles in Collective Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Kim D

    2014-09-01

    Improving the nutritional health of the public continues to be a major challenge. Our mission of advancing health through food and nutrition has become increasingly complex, particularly as food environments shape the availability, affordability, and social acceptability of food and nutrition "choices". Promoting nutritional health requires that dietitians expand our knowledge in understanding the determinants of healthy eating and of social change strategies that advocates for and acts on improving food environments. While no single strategy can solve the challenges of public health nutrition, we can each identify unique strengths and opportunities. If we practice in complementary ways, using those strengths for collective action will make us stronger together toward social change supporting improved nutritional health of the public.

  6. Harvesting a knowledge commons: collective action, transparency, and innovation at the Portland Fish Exchange

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer F. Brewer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available While localist visions of alternative food systems advocate for the expansion of local ecological knowledge through more proximate producer-consumer relationships, globalized seafood supply-demand chains persist. Moving beyond this dichotomy, commons scholars recognize that collective action among resource users at the local level can shape cross-scalar producer relations with government and more capitalized firms operating in regional and global markets. In the case of the New England groundfishery, a quasi-public fish auction not only transformed the scalar, logistical, and financial parameters of harvester-buyer relationships, it altered the production and use of local knowledge among some harvesters, and their technological choices. Resulting markets offer potential benefits that extend to broader publics, by increasing the monetary value and experimental development of a knowledge commons. Qualitative analysis of field data shows that with new market transparency, fish are no longer valued as an undifferentiated commodity, but as a variety of products with individually nuanced price structures. Displacement of local seafood buyers incurred some shoreside job losses, but fishers on smaller, owner-operated boats in multi-generational fishing harbours benefit particularly from new opportunities compared to larger, fleet boats due to different labour relations, allocations of decision-making responsibilities, observational contexts, and associated information flows. Implications for the mobilization of knowledge-action linkages to influence formal resource management arenas merit further research.

  7. Collective actions of women´s organizations for peace in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Lucia Sánchez Mora

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, Colombia is conducting a peace process that could glimpse the peace the country craves. This peace would bring the end of the armed conflict but not systematically the end of all kind of violence. To ensure the participation and influence of women in this process, it is essential to know the current role performed by the Colombian women’s peace networks. This is the aim of this article. This article explores the main ways of political action undertaken by Colombian women in peacebuilding. In order to do it, we have analyzed the main repertoires of collective action, organizational structure, framing processes and impacts of two women’s networks —Women’s Pacific Route and the Initiative of Colombian Women for Peace—. This analysis was conducted using qualitative techniques. We have made thus three in-depth interviews with the main leaders of each organization studied. Our results present what are the differences and similarities between both women’s networks through the observation of their political practices and their relationship with the concepts peace/conflict; and gender/feminism. While for the Pacific Route the articulating axis is the feminist movement, for the IMP it is the institutional framework. On the other hand, we remarked on identifying civil resistance developed by women in the different Colombia’s peace processes, the limits found by themselves, the strategies to overcome them and the political health of these movements.

  8. When Algorithms Shape Collective Action: Social Media and the Dynamics of Cloud Protesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Milan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available How does the algorithmically mediated environment of social media restructure social action? This article combines social movement studies and science and technology studies to explore the role of social media in the organization, unfolding, and diffusion of contemporary protests. In particular, it examines how activists leverage the technical properties of social media to develop a joint narrative and a collective identity. To this end, it offers the notion of cloud protesting as a theoretical approach and framework for empirical analysis. Cloud protesting indicates a specific type of mobilization that is grounded on, modeled around, and enabled by social media platforms and mobile devices and the virtual universes they identify. The notion emphasizes both the productive mediation of social and mobile media and the importance of activists’ sense-making activities. It also acknowledges that social media set in motion a process that is sociotechnical in nature rather than merely sociological or communicative, and thus can be understood only by intersecting the material and the symbolic dimensions of contemporary digitally mediated collective action. The article shows how the specific materiality of social media intervenes in the actors’ meaning work by fostering four mechanisms—namely performance, interpellation, temporality, and reproducibility—which concur to create a “politics of visibility” that alters traditional identity dynamics. In addition, it exposes the connection between organizational patterns and the role of individuals, explaining how the politics of visibility is the result of a process that originates and ends within the individual—which ultimately creates individuals-in-the-group rather than groups.

  9. Ethnic Forces in Collective Action: Diversity, Dominance, and Irrigation in Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M. Waring

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Mounting evidence suggests that ethnic interactions damage cooperation in the provision of public goods, yet very few studies of collective action in common pool resource management have found strong evidence for the effects of ethnic diversity. Research on both public goods and common pool resource management that does find negative ethnic effects on cooperation tend to ignore the importance of interethnic relationships, particularly ethnic inequality, stratification, or dominance. This study presents data from agricultural villages in Tamil Nadu's Palani Hills to test the importance of a range of ethnic effects using caste interactions in a traditional irrigation system. I provide corroborating evidence of a negative cooperative effect of ethnic diversity, but also demonstrate that factors of ethnic dominance such as hierarchical stratification and demographic dominance strongly determine outcomes in collective irrigation management. I argue that the most important measure of equity, irrigation access, is socially, technologically, and institutionally embedded, and demonstrate that the distribution of irrigation channels is explained by measures of inequality, such as wealth inequality, Dalit status, and demographic dominance.

  10. Institutional Diversity in Collective Action: Investigating Successful Village Level Maintenance of Hand Pumps in Malawi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joubert, Brian Anthony

    Providing clean water to rural communities in sub-Saharan Africa remains a challenge. Unsanitary and distant water sources cause a host of health and humanitarian problems. A common means of remedying this situation has been the donation of improved water sources, fitted with low-cost hand pumps. Due donor capacity and/ or policy most hand pumps are donated under the guise of Village Level Operation and Maintenance (VLOM). This premises the notion that recipient communities will take ownership of the new pump and as such will ensure its maintenance. To assist with this many donors carry out programs of technical repair training and the structuring of in-village leadership and management groups. The reality is that a high proportion of these pumps break down after donation and cease to work thereafter. Measures to redress technical elements of these failures through increased training or adequate distribution of spares has seen some success but failure rates remains high. This has led to a call for more attention to demand side issues, focusing on the communal aspects that may influence a village to act collectively in the maintenance of its hand pump. This thesis researched five Malawian villages where the community had maintained their hand pumps for a period of 10 or more years. These hand pumps were treated as shared resources and the literature on common-pool resources and social institutions was used as a theoretical framework. Applying these theories proved to be appropriate for analyzing the norms, conventions and forms of cooperative conduct. This allowed the research to gain insights into institutional diversity and the relationship between 'formal institutions', most often exogenous in nature, and informal' or customary collective action institutions embedded within the communities. Findings showed the emergence of three predominant themes within these successful case studies: 1) the role of leadership at varying levels and how it is embodied

  11. Are we all in this together?: co-victimization,inclusive social identity and collective action in solidarity with the disadvantaged.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subašić, Emina; Schmitt, Michael T; Reynolds, Katherine J

    2011-12-01

    Common experience of injustice can be a potent motivator of collective action and efforts to achieve social change - and of such efforts becoming more widespread. In this research, we propose that the effects of co-victimization on collective action are a function of inclusive social identity. Experiment 1 (N= 61) demonstrated that while presence (compared to absence) of co-victimization positively predicted consumer (i.e., participants) willingness to act collectively in solidarity with sweatshop workers, this effect was mediated by inclusive social identity. In Experiment 2 (N= 120), the salience of inclusive social identity was experimentally manipulated and interacted with co-victimization to predict collective action. When inclusive social identity was salient, co-victimization enhanced collective action, including willingness to pay extra for products made ethically and in support of fair wages for workers. In contrast, collective action was attenuated when co-victimization took place in the absence of inclusive social identity. Implications for understanding when co-victimization is transformed into common fate and political solidarity with the disadvantaged are discussed. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  12. Sustained Large-Scale Collective Climate Action Supported by Effective Climate Change Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niepold, F., III; Crim, H.; Fiorile, G.; Eldadah, S.

    2017-12-01

    Since 2012, the Climate and Energy Literacy community have realized that as cities, nations and the international community seek solutions to global climate change over the coming decades, a more comprehensive, interdisciplinary approach to climate literacy—one that includes economic and social considerations—will play a vital role in knowledgeable planning, decision-making, and governance. City, county and state leaders are now leading the American response to a changing climate by incubating social innovation to prevail in the face of unprecedented change. Cities are beginning to realize the importance of critical investments to support the policies and strategies that will foster the climate literacy necessary for citizens to understand the urgency of climate actions and to succeed in a resilient post-carbon economy and develop the related workforce. Over decade of federal and non-profit Climate Change Education effective methods have been developed that can support municipality's significant educational capabilities for the purpose of strengthening and scaling city, state, business, and education actions designed to sustain and effectively address this significant social change. Looking to foster the effective and innovative strategies that will enable their communities several networks have collaborated to identify recommendations for effective education and communication practices when working with different types of audiences. U.S. National Science Foundation funded Climate Change Education Partnership (CCEP) Alliance, the National Wildlife Federation, NOAA Climate Program Office, Tri-Agency Climate Change Education Collaborative and the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network (CLEAN) are working to develop a new web portal that will highlight "effective" practices that includes the acquisition and use of climate change knowledge to inform decision-making. The purpose of the web portal is to transfer effective practice to support communities to be

  13. Success factors for international HTA projects: evaluating EUnetHTA Joint Action as an exemplar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guegan, Eleanor Woodford; Cook, Andrew

    2014-11-01

    Evaluation is essential for the management of international projects or networks in health technology assessment (HTA). It extends beyond the normal process of project management by incorporating qualitative dimensions and provides information about a project's effectiveness and achievements. This article aimed to identify the factors that are important for the success of international HTA projects. The European network for Health Technology Assessment Joint Action (EUnetHTA JA) is presented as an exemplar. METHODS for the evaluation of international HTA projects include interviews, focus groups, questionnaires, observations and documentary review, and the key points of these approaches have been summarized. The impact and effectiveness of the EUnetHTA JA was evaluated by questionnaires of project participants and external stakeholders, and by documentary review. The response rate for the three annual questionnaires sent to project participants ranged from 86 percent to 88 percent and for external stakeholders ranged from 65 percent to 88 percent. Key factors for project success included production of deliverables according to the workplan, achievement of objectives, added value generated, effective communication, involvement of external stakeholders, workstream management and progress from the preceding EUnetHTA 2006-2008 project. The experience of this project can inform the evaluation of future international HTA collaborations, such as the EUnetHTA 2nd Joint Action and HTAsiaLink. A high response rate was achieved to the self-completion questionnaires and the strategy followed is recommended for evaluation of international HTA projects. Future assessments of international HTA projects should strive to measure outcomes and impact, not just outputs and process.

  14. 77 FR 65602 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: INTERNationalConnections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ..., to become future Department employees. The legal authorities pertaining to this collection include... from 2005 through spring 2008. The intern alumni were queried as to their motivation in seeking an...

  15. Collecting core data in severely injured patients using a consensus trauma template: an international multicentre study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringdal, Kjetil G; Lossius, Hans Morten; Jones, J Mary

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: No worldwide, standardised definitions exist for documenting, reporting, and comparing data from severely injured trauma patients. This study evaluated the feasibility of collecting the data variables of the international consensus-derived Utstein Trauma Template. METHODS:...

  16. "I Have No English Friends": Some Observations on the Practice of Action Learning with International Business Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Cheryl; Milner, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    This account reports on some experiences of facilitating action learning with international business students. Interest in international student learning and the international student experience is significant and increasing with a considerable range of literature on the subject. Some of this literature is concerned with the perceived…

  17. Third international radioecological conference. The fate of spent nuclear fuel: problems and reality. Abstracts collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In the book there are abstracts collection of the third International radioecological conference 'The fate of spent nuclear fuel: problems and reality' (June, 22-27, 1996, Krasnoyarsk, Russia) and International workshop meeting 'Defence nuclear waste disposal in Russia'. In the collection there are materials concerning the problems of technology, economics, ecology and safety of two types of nuclear cycle as well as the problems of health of population living near nuclear ojects and on contaminated territories

  18. International technical assistance example. Consortium action in Bulgaria; Exemple d`assistance internationale. Cas de la Bulgarie, action du consortium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattei, J M; Milhem, J L [CEA Centre d` Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Heuser, F W; Kelm, P [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit mbH (GRS), Koeln (Germany)

    1993-03-01

    The safety status achieved last year at the Kozloduy Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) and the capability of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority (BNSA) to assess the safety of the plant and the adequacy of proposed improvements have been matters of international concern. However, the Kozloduy NPP contributes 35-40 per cent of the electrical generating capacity in Bulgaria. For further operation of the plants, it is therefore, essential that safety is improved. In july 1991, the Commission of the European Communities (CEC) instituted a Six Months Emergency Action Programme for Bulgaria under the PHARE regional nuclear safety programme. The programme consisted of three parts: - an industrial emergency programme supporting the utility of the Kozloduy NPP, - a study to evaluate Bulgaria`s electricity needs, - technical assistance for reinforcement of the Bulgarian Nuclear Safety Authority. For the third part, complementary to the industrial emergency programme carried out by the WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators), a Consortium of expert institutions and regulatory from EC member states was established by CEC for assistance to BNSA. The Consortium consisted of: - Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN), France, technical support of the French regulatory body, - Gesellschaft fur Anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Germany, an organization in safety engineering, technical support of governmental regulatory body, - AIB-Vincotte Nuclear (AVN), Belgium, the organization authorized by the Belgian Government for licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants, - UK Atomic Energy Authority (AEA Technology), an independent UK Government owned nuclear R and D and consultancy organization, - Nuclear Installations Inspectorate (NII) of the Health and Safety Executive, United Kingdom, the nuclear regulatory body for the United Kingdom.

  19. 5th International scientific-research conference Radioactive waste management. Collection of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Materials of the 5-th International scientific-research conference Radioactive waste management are represented. Reports illustrate such problems as experience of nuclear power plant exploitation connected with radioactive waste management, technologies and actions on decrease of radioactive waste volumes, decontamination of equipment and nuclear power plant units, management with radioactive wastes during nuclear power plant decommission [ru

  20. Are REDD+ community forest projects following the principles for collective action, as proposed by Ostrom?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul-Razak Saeed

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Forested countries in the global south that have agreed to engage in REDD+, a policy mechanism for addressing climate change, are receiving support to improve laws, policies, systems and structures. As a mechanism initiated at the global level and seeking to use forests to address a global commons crisis (atmospheric carbon concentration, understanding how REDD+ translates into implementation at the local level is essential. Therefore, using a systematic review approach, we examined 15 studies of REDD+ in the context of public and/or community managed forests, drawn from a comprehensive application of inclusion criteria to identify relevant published peer-reviewed empirical research. The common property resources literature was used to highlight the role of local institutions in REDD+ and to distil how REDD+ community forest projects conform to Ostrom’s collective action principles. The review revealed limited sharing of information and decision-making authority with communities; a general absence of FPIC; and a lack of defined benefit sharing and conflict resolution arrangements in many of the REDD+ projects.

  1. Integrating simultaneous prosocial and antisocial behavior into theories of collective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basurto, Xavier; Blanco, Esther; Nenadovic, Mateja; Vollan, Björn

    2016-03-01

    Trust and cooperation constitute cornerstones of common-pool resource theory, showing that "prosocial" strategies among resource users can overcome collective action problems and lead to sustainable resource governance. Yet, antisocial behavior and especially the coexistence of prosocial and antisocial behaviors have received less attention. We broaden the analysis to include the effects of both "prosocial" and "antisocial" interactions. We do so in the context of marine protected areas (MPAs), the most prominent form of biodiversity conservation intervention worldwide. Our multimethod approach relied on lab-in-the-field economic experiments (n = 127) in two MPA and two non-MPA communities in Baja California, Mexico. In addition, we deployed a standardized fishers' survey (n = 544) to verify the external validity of our findings and expert informant interviews (n = 77) to develop potential explanatory mechanisms. In MPA sites, prosocial and antisocial behavior is significantly higher, and the presence of antisocial behavior does not seem to have a negative effect on prosocial behavior. We suggest that market integration, economic diversification, and strengthened group identity in MPAs are the main potential mechanisms for the simultaneity of prosocial and antisocial behavior we observed. This study constitutes a first step in better understanding the interaction between prosociality and antisociality as related to natural resources governance and conservation science, integrating literatures from social psychology, evolutionary anthropology, behavioral economics, and ecology.

  2. Culture, Materiality, Memory: Collective Ownership and Action In Romanian Mutual Funds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis TULBURE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the tensions between collectivist and corporatist forms of ownership for Romanian mutual funds. Drawing on my research among retail investors of funds that ended up in bankruptcy throughout the postsocialist period, I document the material practices and graphic artefacts they deploy in litigation as ways to make claims and produce evidence regarding their ongoing financial involvement and the rights to compensations. I focus specifically on the files documenting their personal histories (providing moral reasons for pursuing “speculative” investments as well as those materializing the memory of their involvement with the capital market. I conclude that material practices are constitutive of vernacular forms of financial and legal knowledge. Furthermore, they engender specific types of property that serve as premises for the defense of investor rights and as grounds for emerging forms of collective action. Methodologically, the conclusion of the paper is that qualitative methods constitute alternative approaches and a valuable complement of quantitate research methods for the behaviors of mutual fund investors illustrating some of the cultural components giving specific dynamics to the popular participation to the capital market that can be subsequently quantified.

  3. If it matters for the group then it matters to me: collective action outcomes for seasoned activists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Leda M; Louis, Winnifred R

    2012-03-01

    The present article reports a longitudinal study of the psychological antecedents for, and outcomes of, collective action for a community sample of activists. At Time 1, activist identification influenced intentions to engage in collective action behaviours protesting the Iraq war, both directly and indirectly via perceptions of the efficacy of these behaviours for achieving group goals, as well as perceptions of individual-level benefits. At Time 2, identification was associated with differences in the dimensions on which the movement's success was evaluated. In the context of the movement's failure to achieve its stated objectives of troop withdrawal, those with strong activist identity placed less importance on influencing government decision making. The implications are discussed in terms of models of collective action and social identity, focusing on a dynamic model that relates identification with a group to evaluations of instrumentality at a group and individual level; and to beliefs about strategic responses to achieve group goals. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  4. Collective action for implementation: a realist evaluation of organisational collaboration in healthcare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rycroft-Malone, Jo; Burton, Christopher R; Wilkinson, Joyce; Harvey, Gill; McCormack, Brendan; Baker, Richard; Dopson, Sue; Graham, Ian D; Staniszewska, Sophie; Thompson, Carl; Ariss, Steven; Melville-Richards, Lucy; Williams, Lynne

    2016-02-09

    depending on attention to evaluation. These collaborations did not emerge from a vacuum, and they needed time to learn and develop. Their life cycle started with their position on collaboration, knowledge and implementation. More impactful attempts at collective action in implementation might be determined by the deliberate alignment of a number of features, including foundational relationships, vision, values, structures and processes and views about the nature of the collaboration and implementation.

  5. Different goods, different effects: Exploring the effects of generalized social trust in large-N collective action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Kim Mannemar

    2009-01-01

    Does generalized social trust help solve large-N collective action problems? This paper argues so, offering a novel explanation for the relationship: People tend to cooperate if they expect others to be cooperating, which implies that people holding generalized social trust more readily cooperate...... in large-N dilemmas because they expect that most people will cooperate. The paper tests the explanation in a rigorous design. The analyses show a positive, robust effect of generalized social trust on public good provision, but no effect is found in a joint product situation. This supports the hypothesis......, indicating that trust specifically enhances cooperation in collective action dilemmas....

  6. Maximizing the use of Special Olympics International's Healthy Athletes database: A call to action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Meghann; Foley, John T; Temple, Viviene A

    2018-02-01

    There is a critical need for high-quality population-level data related to the health of individuals with intellectual disabilities. For more than 15 years Special Olympics International has been conducting free Healthy Athletes screenings at local, national and international events. The Healthy Athletes database is the largest known international database specifically on the health of people with intellectual disabilities; however, it is relatively under-utilized by the research community. A consensus meeting with two dozen North American researchers, stakeholders, clinicians and policymakers took place in Toronto, Canada. The purpose of the meeting was to: 1) establish the perceived utility of the database, and 2) to identify and prioritize 3-5 specific priorities related to using the Healthy Athletes database to promote the health of individuals with intellectual disabilities. There was unanimous agreement from the meeting participants that this database represents an immense opportunity both from the data already collected, and data that will be collected in the future. The 3 top priorities for the database were deemed to be: 1) establish the representativeness of data collected on Special Olympics athletes compared to the general population with intellectual disabilities, 2) create a scientific advisory group for Special Olympics International, and 3) use the data to improve Special Olympics programs around the world. The Special Olympics Healthy Athletes database includes data not found in any other source and should be used, in partnership with Special Olympics International, by researchers to significantly increase our knowledge and understanding of the health of individuals with intellectual disabilities. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. 77 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Reporting Required for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ...), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork..., industry and other governmental parties to comment on the continuing need and usefulness of BTS collecting... whether (1) the supplemental reports are needed by BTS to fulfill the United States treaty obligation of...

  8. NATO Intervention in Kosovo in light of Security Council Actions and International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA. Arben Salihu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The horrors of World War Two made it universally clear that the world cannot progress without general respect for human rights. Still, the need for humanitarian intervention arose several times before 1999, but international political and military organisations including the UN, were either late or hesitant to prevent genocides or other related human catastrophes worldwide. The NATO intervention in Kosovo, however, marked the beginning of the new era in international relations. The facet of this intervention in view of legality is the topic of this paper. The aim of this study, above all, is to analyze the Security Council actions, debates and resolutions concerning situation in Kosovo, and the level of impact that the military operation had in international law (in particular and international relations (in general.  The study uses many authentic documents issued by the United Nations Security Council itself and other material related to the theme in order to develop an argument on the points raised. Throughout, this research paper has attempted to answer numerous issues related to the topic and offer a balanced view on the all the themes examined. Several but distinct points raised focus on relevant core subjects, discuss the challenges and opportunities of the humanitarian intervention and offer recommendations regarding the future of such operation for the well being of the humanity.

  9. Collective action and technology development: up-scaling of innovation in rice farming communities in Northern Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Limnirankul, B.

    2007-01-01

    Keywords:small-scale rice farmers, collective action, community rice seed, local innovations, green manure crop, contract farming, participatory technology development, up-scaling, technological configuration, grid-group theory,

  10. 'This will bring shame on our nation' : The role of anticipated group-based emotions on collective action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shepherd, Lee; Spears, Russell; Manstead, Antony S. R.

    In three studies we examined whether the anticipation of group-based guilt, shame and anger predicts the desire to undertake collective action against a proposed ingroup transgression. In Studies 1 (N = 179) and 2 (N = 186), the relation between appraising a proposed ingroup transgression as

  11. THE FAILURE OF COLLECTIVE SECURITY IN THE POST WORLD WARS I AND II INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOSEPH C. EBEGBULEM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The League of Nations and the United Nations Organization were two post-World War (World War I and World War II organizations established for the maintenance of peace and security in the international system. One of the cardinal objectives of these organizations was the promotion of a Collective Security System which was considered as vital in the pursuit of global peace and security. In other words, Collective Security is an institutional mechanism established to address a comprehensive list of major threats to peace and security around the world. With the escalation of conflicts and wars in different parts of the world, there is therefore the need for collective responses at global, regional and national levels in conflict situations. The achievement of collective security in the international system would be based on the principle that any attack on any member of the United Nations would be considered as an attack on all the members. After a panoramic discourse of the meaning and nature of Collective Security, the paper also examines the problems of collective security in the international system; its failure under the League of Nations and the United Nations. The paper concludes that the weaknesses inherent in the system do not make it unuseful as it is a relevant factor in the maintenance of international peace and security.

  12. The Junta de Andalucia’s External Action in Morocco: the Case of International Cooperation for Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thierry Desrues

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available After 25 years of experience, International Cooperation for Development has become an important instrument for external action among many of Spain’s autonomous communities. This is not only a result of the accompanying ethical and humanitarian dimension, but also of the social legitimacy that it provides in an area of external influence, where action has traditionally been monopolised by the State Government. This article analyses the Junta de Andalucia’s external action toward Morocco through the case of the policy of International Cooperation for Development.

  13. Governance issues, potentials and failures of participative collective action in the Kafue Flats, Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry Nixon Chabwela

    2010-09-01

    2004 for creating by-laws based on initiatives of local staff of the Department of Fisheries, local interest groups and researchers. A broad local debate on how to manage the fisheries in a sustainable way and develop locally based by-laws for joint management of fisheries gives good potential for success and appears promising for the future of fisheries in Kafue Flats. Despite many difficulties it is an example of local collective action in order to scale up governance of common-pool resources.

  14. International obligations through collective rights: Moving from foreign health assistance to global health governance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Benjamin Mason; Fox, Ashley M

    2010-06-15

    This article analyzes the growing chasm between international power and state responsibility in health rights, proposing an international legal framework for collective rights - rights that can reform international institutions and empower developing states to realize the determinants of health structured by global forces. With longstanding recognition that many developing state governments cannot realize the health of their peoples without international cooperation, scholars have increasingly sought to codify international obligations under the purview of an evolving human right to health, applying this rights-based approach as a foundational framework for reducing global health inequalities through foreign assistance. Yet the inherent limitations of the individual human rights framework stymie the right to health in impacting the global institutions that are most crucial for realizing underlying determinants of health through the strengthening of primary health care systems. Whereas the right to health has been advanced as an individual right to be realized by a state duty-bearer, the authors find that this limited, atomized right has proven insufficient to create accountability for international obligations in global health policy, enabling the deterioration of primary health care systems that lack the ability to address an expanding set of public health claims. For rights scholars to advance disease protection and health promotion through national primary health care systems - creating the international legal obligations necessary to spur development supportive of the public's health - the authors conclude that scholars must look beyond the individual right to health to create collective international legal obligations commensurate with a public health-centered approach to primary health care. Through the development and implementation of these collective health rights, states can address interconnected determinants of health within and across countries

  15. Indigenous Storytelling and Participatory Action Research: Allies Toward Decolonization? Reflections From the Peoples' International Health Tribunal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caxaj, C Susana

    2015-01-01

    Storytelling, in its various forms, has often been described as a practice with great emancipatory potential. In turn, Indigenous knowledge shows great promise in guiding a participatory action research (PAR) methodology. Yet these two approaches are rarely discussed in relation to one another, nor, has much been written in terms of how these two approaches may work synergistically toward a decolonizing research approach. In this article, I report on a community-driven knowledge translation activity, the Peoples' International Health Tribunal, as an exemplar of how narrative and PAR approaches, guided by local Indigenous knowledge, have great potential to build methodologically and ethically robust research processes. Implications for building globally relevant research alliances and scholarship are further discussed, particularly in relation to working with Indigenous communities.

  16. Collective action, political identites and armed conflict: the ethnization of a black community in the norte of the Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Jimena López León

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the production process of nonviolent collective action in a Afro-Colombian community in response to the social, political, environmental, labor conflicts that have jeopardized their stay in the territory. The artvile presents elements of analysis of ethnographic work conducted by the author in 2012 and 2013 in the municipality of Santander de Quilichao are presented. The theoretical development of the paper takes the concept proposed by Elisabeth Wood on “social processes of the Civil War” (2010 to establish correspondences between social dynamics generated by conflict –increased since 2008 in the region– and processes of collective action and identity agency of Afro-Colombians. Some of these conflicts are territorial tensions between different social actors in the processes of legalization and expansion of ethnic territories, mining, the process of Land Consolidation; and the strengthening of interethnic organizational alliances, and organizational process of black communities in the area. Under these conditions, the narratives of “ancestral”, “being black” and “autonomy” have become guiding axes of collective action that legitimizes the territorial presence of the study community and its demand in the access to rights such as collective ownership and consultation.

  17. Report on International Roundtable Meeting on Collection Security held at the British Library

    OpenAIRE

    Andy Stephens; Helen Shenton

    2008-01-01

    Anonymised report on some of the issues raised at an international roundtable on collection security of thirteen major research libraries and national libraries from Europe and North America. Recurring themes of case studies included: 1) perpetrator profiling; 2) relations with the criminal justice system; 3) systems; 4) looking out; 5) aftermath.

  18. Report on International Roundtable Meeting on Collection Security held at the British Library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy Stephens

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Anonymised report on some of the issues raised at an international roundtable on collection security of thirteen major research libraries and national libraries from Europe and North America. Recurring themes of case studies included: 1 perpetrator profiling; 2 relations with the criminal justice system; 3 systems; 4 looking out; 5 aftermath.

  19. An international study of the performance of sample collection from patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dzik, WH; Murphy, MF; Andreu, G; Heddle, N; Hogman, C; Kekomaki, R; Murphy, S; Shimizu, M; Smit Sibinga, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Background and Objectives Collection of a blood sample from the correct patient is the first step in the process of safe transfusion. The aim of this international collaborative study was to assess the frequency of mislabelled and miscollected samples drawn for blood grouping. Materials and Methods

  20. 78 FR 24158 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application for NATO International Competitive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Bureau of Industry and Security Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application for NATO International Competitive Bidding AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and Security... Commerce, Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) is the executive agency responsible for certifying U.S...

  1. 78 FR 24159 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; International Import Certificate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-24

    ... several other countries have increased the effectiveness of their respective controls over international... information collection). Affected Public: Business or other for-profit organizations. Estimated Number of... Total Annual Cost to Public: $0. IV. Request for Comments Comments are invited on: (a) Whether the...

  2. Antenna design for fast ion collective Thomson scattering diagnostic for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leipold, Frank; Furtula, Vedran; Salewski, Mirko

    2009-01-01

    Fast ion physics will play an important role for the international thermonuclear experimental reactor (ITER), where confined alpha particles will affect and be affected by plasma dynamics and thereby have impacts on the overall confinement. A fast ion collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostic...

  3. FROM THE MULTI-PARTY PROCESS OF CLASS ACTIONS TO THE COLLECTIVE PROCESS OF REPETITIVE CASES: MODELS OF COLLECTIVE TUTELAGE IN BRAZILIAN LAW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziela Argenta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the models of multi-party litigation established in Brazilian law, considering the class action model and the model systematized by the Civil Procedure Code of 2015 consisting of repetitive case judgments. It exposes the evolution, influences and consolidation of multi-party litigation in the Brazilian legal system, identifies the collective actions microsystem and deals with its relationship with the Civil Procedure Codes of 1973 and 2015, under a constitutional perspective. It presents characteristics of the incident of resolution of repetitive demands and the repetitive extraordinary and special appeals, with comparisons with the model of class actions. It discusses, from a comparative law perspective, the three great models of collective tutelage (American, European, and Brazilian in their relationship with the holders of individual rights. Finally, it brings forward considerations about the due process of law, presenting a doctrinal vision based on the need to evaluate the conflict and the complexity of the litigation to adapt the forms of multi-party conflicts resolution.

  4. The collective actions in the form of cooperatives and the relevance in the soy production chain in Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lediany Freitas de Campos

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to discuss the influence of collective actions, with a focus on cooperatives located on the soy production chain. It was noted that rural producers organize themselves in groups aiming to preserve their common interests, when they know they would succeed to act individually. The actions are performed by latent groups, through economic incentives, and there is strong influence of institutional environment. Collective cooperation results in benefits to all involved, in addition to generating positive externalities upstream and downstream on the chain. Cooperatives have had intense influence on the soy production in the State of Paraná, being responsible for a significant portion of the production, processing and distribution. By means of cooperatives, the state has maintained second position at national level in relation to the production of soy, with revealed comparative advantage, has gotten improvements in productivity and conquest of foreign markets.

  5. When algorithms shape collective action: Social media and the dynamics of cloud protesting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milan, S.

    2015-01-01

    How does the algorithmically mediated environment of social media restructure social action? This article combines social movement studies and science and technology studies to explore the role of social media in the organization, unfolding, and diffusion of contemporary protests. In particular, it

  6. Collective Action in the Management of a Tropical Dry Forest Ecosystem: Effects of Mexico's Property Rights Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Natalia Mariel; Castillo, Alicia

    2013-04-01

    Dilemmas of natural resources governance have been a central concern for scholars, policy makers, and users. Major debates occur over the implications of property rights for common resources management. After the Mexican Revolution (1910-1917), land was distributed mainly as ejidos conceived as a hereditary but unalienable collective form of property. In 1992, a new Agrarian Law was decreed that allows individual ownership by removing various restrictions over the transfer of land. Scholars have examined the reform mainly focusing on land-tenure changes and environmental fragmentation. This study examines how the new ownership regime is affecting collective decision-making in ejidos located in a tropical dry forest (TDF) ecosystem. Information on decision-making processes before and after the 1992 reform was gathered through 52 interviews conducted in four ejidos selected along a gradient including agricultural, cattle-raising, and TDF use. The new individualized land property system reduced collective action in ejidos but did not trigger it. Collective action responses to the 1992 reform were buffered by self-organization each ejido already had. Heterogeneous users who shared a short history and showed little understanding of TDF and low dependence on its resources seemed to explain why ejidos have not been able to share a sense of community that would shape the construction of institutions for the collective management of forest resources. However, when a resource is scarce and highly valuable such as water the same users showed capacities for undertaking costly co-operative activities.

  7. Managing physical therapy resources: an analogy to the freedom of the commons and the need for collective action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Gerard P

    2012-06-01

    Tragedy results when we each pursue our own best interest in a society that believes in the freedom of a commons, such as clean air, fresh water, or natural fishing grounds. The purpose of this editorial is to consider how resources related to healthcare, and specifically to the delivery of physical therapy, can suffer the tragedy of the commons, and to consider an alternative strategy by which we can manage physical therapy resources effectively through collective action.

  8. Territories climate plans: territories in action 21 collectivities involved in the climatic change challenge. 1. experiences collection 2007; Plans climat territoriaux: des territoires en action 21 collectivites engagees dans la releve du defi climatique. 1. recueil d'experiences 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The climate plan invites the collectivities to implement actions of greenhouse reduction. This collection presents the first collectivities involved in a climate approach: towns, natural parks, syndicates, general and regional council. (A.L.B.)

  9. AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION): 5-Year Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbhaiya, Medha; Andrade, Danieli; Erkan, Doruk

    2016-10-01

    Antiphospholipid Syndrome Alliance for Clinical Trials and International Networking (APS ACTION) is the first-ever international network created to design and conduct large-scale, multicenter clinical trials and research in persistently antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients. Since its inception in 2010, the APS ACTION has made important strides toward our goal of international research collaboration and data sharing. Through the dedication and hard work of 50 APS ACTION members, collaborative international projects are currently underway including a multicenter web-based registry and repository of aPL-positive patients, a randomized controlled clinical trial assessing the efficacy of hydroxychloroquine for primary thrombosis prevention in persistently aPL-positive but thrombosis-free patients, standardization of aPL testing through the use of core laboratories worldwide, identification of the limitations in the existing aPL/APS literature, and conducting observational research studies to further our understanding of the disease. Thus far, APS ACTION has held annual workshops and summits with the aim of facilitating international collaboration and developing initiatives to recruit young scholars to APS research. This paper describes updates related to the organization's structure, ongoing research efforts, and recent accomplishments and discusses future directions.

  10. Collective Memory of International Women’s Day in Part of the Feminist Community in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Petras

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the collective memory of International Women’s Day in part of the feminist community in Croatia. Having in mind the importance of social context and mnemonic communities for the (reconstruction of memory, the development of women’s movements in Yugoslavia and Croatia is presented. Relying on Zerubavel’s concept of collective memory and qualitative analysis of interviews, this paper discusses the origins of International Women’s Day, its historical horizon, the memory of commemorations in socialist and post-socialist periods, and the mnemonic battles arising around them. Data necessary to describe these elements of collective memory of International Women’s Day was collected through semi-structured interviews conducted with several members of the feminist community in Croatia. Even though today’s feminist community in Croatia, to a certain point, consolidates the legacies of both bourgeois feminism and proletarian feminism, collective memory of International Women’s Day, at least on the part of the feminist mnemonic community, serves as a reminder of its socialist or communist origins. An important form of commemoration in both the socialist and the post-socialist period is public commemoration, whether as protest walks or petition signings. On the other hand, commemorative pluralism and overall decline in the importance or symbolic value of IWD in Croatian society in the post-socialist period, is the most significant difference from the period of socialism. Elements of IWD which appear in both the socialist and post-socialist period and are the focal points of mnemonic battles that are fought over the meaning of IWD and its forms of commemoration are: Mother’s Day and Valentine’s Day symbolism, the conflict between politicized commemoration and depoliticized celebration, and cooptation or patronization by the politics. The most important factor for the appearance of mnemonic battles is found in the

  11. Committed dis(s)idents: participation in radical collective action fosters disidentification with the broader in-group but enhances political identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Julia C; Tausch, Nicole; Spears, Russell; Christ, Oliver

    2011-08-01

    The present research examined the hypothesis that participation in radical, but not moderate, action results in disidentification from the broader in-group. Study 1 (N = 98) was a longitudinal study conducted in the context of student protests against tuition fees in Germany and confirmed that participation in radical collective action results in disidentification with the broader in-group (students) whereas participation in moderate collective action does not. Both types of action increased politicized identification. Study 2 (N = 175) manipulated the normativeness of different types of imagined collective actions in the same context and replicated this disidentification effect for radical actions, but only when this action mismatched the broader in-group's norms. This study also indicated that these effects were partially mediated by perceived lack of solidarity and perceived lack of commitment to the cause among the broader in-group. The implications of these findings for understanding radicalization within social movements are discussed.

  12. When will collective action be effective? Violent and non-violent protests differentially influence perceptions of legitimacy and efficacy among sympathizers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Emma F; Louis, Winnifred R

    2014-02-01

    Collective action will be effective in achieving broader social change goals to the extent that it influences public opinion yet the degree to which collective action "works" in changing opinion is rarely studied. Experiment 1 (n = 158) showed that, consistent with a logic of strategic non-violence, non-violent collective action more effectively conveys a sense of the illegitimacy of the issue and the efficacy of the group, thereby promoting support for future non-violent actions. Experiment 2 (n = 139) explored the moderating role of allegations of corruption. A social context of corruption effectively undermined the efficacy and legitimacy of non-violent collective action, relative to support for violence, thereby promoting (indirectly) support for future extreme action. The implications of this research, for the logic of strategic non-violence and mobilizing supportive public opinion, are discussed.

  13. On the Commons and Climate Change: Collective Action and GHG Mitigation - Working Paper No. 2012-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cochran, Ian

    2012-07-01

    Reducing greenhouse-gas (GHG) emissions from anthropogenic activity may be one of the greatest collective-action problems faced by humanity. This poses challenges not only in terms of the institutional configurations to support coordinated governance processes, but equally the information tools and expertise necessary to link GHG mitigation with other policy priorities. This paper theoretically explores how the adoption of a modified theory of collective action based upon a behavioral theory of the individual allows for a re-framing of the climate-change policy challenge. As such, it appears important to develop a context within which collective action becomes possible where success is no longer solely tied to incentives, but equally to the provision of information, learning, and interaction between stakeholders while simultaneously fostering trust and reciprocity among actors. At all levels of government, information plays a key role to both inform and to facilitate communication, as well as to identify and develop the necessary actions and investments and to track changes in conditions. In the case of climate change, greenhouse-gas inventories and other informational tools are necessary components to track an a priori intangible emission. As such, it is key to analyze the legitimacy, credibility and saliency of information and expertise integrated into the decision-making process. Further, it is important to recognize that the construction of indicators and other information tools is not apolitical, but rather the product of a number of assumptions, interests and decisions concerning what is included and what is excluded shaped by the involved actors. (author)

  14. International health research monitoring: exploring a scientific and a cooperative approach using participatory action research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantler, Tracey; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Miiro, George; Hantrakum, Viriya; Nanvubya, Annet; Ayuo, Elizabeth; Kivaya, Esther; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Parker, Michael; Njuguna, Patricia; Ashley, Elizabeth; Guerin, Philippe J; Lang, Trudie

    2014-02-17

    To evaluate and determine the value of monitoring models developed by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit and the East African Consortium for Clinical Research, consider how this can be measured and explore monitors' and investigators' experiences of and views about the nature, purpose and practice of monitoring. A case study approach was used within the context of participatory action research because one of the aims was to guide and improve practice. 34 interviews, five focus groups and observations of monitoring practice were conducted. Fieldwork occurred in the places where the monitoring models are coordinated and applied in Thailand, Cambodia, Uganda and Kenya. Participants included those coordinating the monitoring schemes, monitors, senior investigators and research staff. Transcribed textual data from field notes, interviews and focus groups was imported into a qualitative data software program (NVIVO V. 10) and analysed inductively and thematically by a qualitative researcher. The initial coding framework was reviewed internally and two main categories emerged from the subsequent interrogation of the data. The categories that were identified related to the conceptual framing and nature of monitoring, and the practice of monitoring, including relational factors. Particular emphasis was given to the value of a scientific and cooperative style of monitoring as a means of enhancing data quality, trust and transparency. In terms of practice the primary purpose of monitoring was defined as improving the conduct of health research and increasing the capacity of researchers and trial sites. The models studied utilise internal and network wide expertise to improve the ethics and quality of clinical research. They demonstrate how monitoring can be a scientific and constructive exercise rather than a threatening process. The value of cooperative relations needs to be given more emphasis in monitoring activities, which seek to ensure that research protects

  15. Ground truth data collection on mining industrial explosions registered by the International Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehl'tekov, A.Yu.; Gordon, V.P.; Firsov, V.A.; Chervyakov, V.B.

    2004-01-01

    The presentation is dedicated to organizational and technical issues connected with the task of Comprehensive Test-Ban-Treaty Organization timely notification on large chemical explosions including data on explosion location and time, on applied explosive substance quantity and type, and also on configuration and assumed purpose of explosion. Explosions registered by International Monitoring System are of special interest. Their data could be used for calibration of the monitoring system. Ground truth data collection and some explosions location results on Russia's mining enterprises were given. Ground truth data collection peculiarities according to mining industrial explosions were considered. (author)

  16. An overview of international actions to deal with climate change problem and the scientific update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usher, P.

    1995-01-01

    The atmospheric environment is under threat from anthropogenic emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases to the extent that irreversible changes to the climate, the ozone layer and the quality of the air we breathe could occur. However, considerable scientific uncertainty remains with regard to the extent and magnitude of the change in climate as a result of human activities, and the impacts of such change. The natural variability of climate makes assessment of the human induced climate change difficult. Even if the magnitude of global warming from greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could be defined the impacts of this global average warming on, for example, the sea-level; the weather patterns such as rainfall, cloudiness, storms and droughts, agriculture; and marine and terrestrial eco-systems would have to be defined on regional, national and local scales. The assessments of these environmental impacts are, in turn, necessary for estimating the socio-economic impacts of environmental changes. This paper gives an overview of the international actions in combatting climate change and some information on the status of science on the climate change and its impacts. (EG)

  17. Balance between automation and human actions in nuclear power plant operation. Results of international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Olmstead, R.; Oudiz, A.; Jenkinson, J.; Kossilov, A.

    1990-01-01

    Automation has long been an established feature of power plants. In some applications, the use of automation has been the significant factor which has enabled plant technology to progress to its current state. Societal demands for increased levels of safety have led to greater use of redundancy and diversity and this, in turn, has increased levels of automation. However, possibly the greatest contributory factor in increased automation has resulted from improvements in information technology. Much recent attention has been focused on the concept of inherently safe reactors, which may simplify safety system requirements and information and control system complexity. The allocation of tasks between man and machine may be one of the most critical activity in the design of new nuclear plants and major retro-fits and it therefore warrants a design approach which is commensurate in quality with the high levels of safety and production performance sought from nuclear plants. Facing this climate, in 1989 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) formed an advisory group from member countries with extensive experience in nuclear power plant automation. The task of this group was to advise on the appropriate balance between manual and automatic actions in plant operation. (author) [fr

  18. An overview of international actions to deal with climate change problem and the scientific update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usher, P. [United Nations Environment Programme, Climate Unit, Nairobi (Kenya)

    1995-06-01

    The atmospheric environment is under threat from anthropogenic emissions of pollutants and greenhouse gases to the extent that irreversible changes to the climate, the ozone layer and the quality of the air we breathe could occur. However, considerable scientific uncertainty remains with regard to the extent and magnitude of the change in climate as a result of human activities, and the impacts of such change. The natural variability of climate makes assessment of the human induced climate change difficult. Even if the magnitude of global warming from greenhouse gases in the atmosphere could be defined the impacts of this global average warming on, for example, the sea-level; the weather patterns such as rainfall, cloudiness, storms and droughts, agriculture; and marine and terrestrial eco-systems would have to be defined on regional, national and local scales. The assessments of these environmental impacts are, in turn, necessary for estimating the socio-economic impacts of environmental changes. This paper gives an overview of the international actions in combatting climate change and some information on the status of science on the climate change and its impacts. (EG)

  19. Balance between automation and human actions in nuclear power plant operation. Results of international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, B.; Olmstead, R.; Oudiz, A.; Jenkinson, J.; Kossilov, A.

    1990-01-01

    Automation has long been an established feature of power plants. In some applications, the use of automation has been the significant factor which has enabled plant technology to progress to its current state. Societal demands for increased levels of safety have led to greater use of redundancy and diversity and this, in turn, has increased levels of automation. However, possibly the greatest contributory factor in increased automation has resulted from improvements in information technology. Much recent attention has been focused on the concept of inherently safe reactors, which may simplify safety system requirements and information and control system complexity. The allocation of tasks between man and machine may be one of the most critical activity in the design of new nuclear plants and major retro-fits and it therefore warrants a design approach which is commensurate in quality with the high levels of safety and production performance sought from nuclear plants. Facing this climate, in 1989 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) formed an advisory group from member countries with extensive experience in nuclear power plant automation. The task of this group was to advise on the appropriate balance between manual and automatic actions in plant operation

  20. Dynamics of a Pipeline under the Action of Internal Shock Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Il'gamov, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    The static and dynamic bending of a pipeline in the vertical plane under the action of its own weight is considered with regard to the interaction of the internal pressure with the curvature of the axial line and the axisymmetric deformation. The pressure consists of a constant and timevarying parts and is assumed to be uniformly distributed over the entire span between the supports. The pipeline reaction to the stepwise increase in the pressure is analyzed in the case where it is possible to determine the exact solution of the problem. The initial stage of bending determined by the smallness of elastic forces as compared to the inertial forces is introduced into the consideration. At this stage, the solution is sought in the form of power series and the law of pressure variation can be arbitrary. This solution provides initial conditions for determining the further process. The duration of the inertial stage is compared with the times of sharp changes of the pressure and the shock waves in fluids. The structure parameters are determined in the case where the shock pressure is accepted only by the inertial forces in the pipeline.

  1. History Teaches Us That Confronting Antibiotic Resistance Requires Stronger Global Collective Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolsky, Scott H; Bud, Robert; Gradmann, Christoph; Hobaek, Bård; Kirchhelle, Claas; Mitvedt, Tore; Santesmases, María Jesús; Thoms, Ulrike; Berild, Dag; Kveim Lie, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Antibiotic development and usage, and antibiotic resistance in particular, are today considered global concerns, simultaneously mandating local and global perspectives and actions. Yet such global considerations have not always been part of antibiotic policy formation, and those who attempt to formulate a globally coordinated response to antibiotic resistance will need to confront a history of heterogeneous, often uncoordinated, and at times conflicting reform efforts, whose legacies remain apparent today. Historical analysis permits us to highlight such entrenched trends and processes, helping to frame contemporary efforts to improve access, conservation and innovation. © 2015 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  2. Self-Regulation by Associations: Collective Action Problems in European Environmental Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    HERITIER, Adrienne; ECKERT, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    Research for this paper has been supported by the European Union under the 6th Framework programme (Contract No CIT1-CT-2004-506392). For more information about the Integrated Project "New Modes of Governance", co-ordinated by the European University Institute in Florence, please visit the project website at www.eu-newgov.org. How and to what effect do firms coordinate their actions in order to deal with the negative external effects of productive activity? Under which conditions do firm a...

  3. Participating in an International Stereotactic Radiotherapy Patient Registry: The Establishment of Data Collection Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahya, Aylin; Arneric, Eva; Kernutt, Elizabeth; Baldacchino, Fiona; Haworth, Claire; Kedda, Mary-Anne; Tang, Colin; Bydder, Sean; Corica, Tammy

    2017-06-29

    Aim To describe data collection pathways and practical challenges experienced by an academic comprehensive cancer centre aiming to record clinical data for patients being treated with a novel radiotherapy treatment modality. Methods Various options to capture data from all patients treated with the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) in Western Australia were explored. An international multicenter web-based secure database established and maintained by the Radiosurgery Society the RSSearch® Patient Registry was selected. Data were collected and entered over four contiguous phases, with either opt-in or opt-out consent and the completion of Patient Reported Outcome questionnaires for specific sub-groups. Results Between April 2014 and June 2016, 461 patients at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital were enrolled in the RSSearch® Patient Registry with the collection of over 17,500 data items. From 461 patients enrolled, 447 patients were treated with the CyberKnife Robotic Radiosurgery System. The majority of patients were treated for either a malignant primary (43.2%) or metastatic disease (39.4%). The establishment of matrix organisational processes for data collection led to the development of improved workflow patterns and data collection pathways. Conclusions This article describes the processes developed by a single centre to establish an efficient system for data collection and participation in an international registry. The opt-out approach was more efficient in terms of patient recruitment compared to the informed-consent method used in earlier phases. The experience of this single centre may help inform other institutions considering data collection options for assessments of new or novel treatments.

  4. Internal friction and dislocation collective pinning in disordered quenched solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Anna, G.; Benoit, W.; Vinokur, V. M.

    1997-12-01

    We introduce the collective pinning of dislocations in disordered quenched solid solutions and calculate the macroscopic mechanical response to a small dc or ac applied stress. This work is a generalization of the Granato-Lücke string model, able to describe self-consistently short and long range dislocation motion. Under dc applied stress the long distance dislocation creep has at the microscopic level avalanche features, which result in a macroscopic nonlinear "glassy" velocity-stress characteristic. Under ac conditions the model predicts, in addition to the anelastic internal friction relaxation in the high frequency regime, a linear internal friction background which remains amplitude-independent down to a crossover frequency to a strongly nonlinear internal friction regime.

  5. The Power of Popular Education and Visual Arts for Trauma Survivors' Critical Consciousness and Collective Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escueta, Mok; Butterwick, Shauna

    2012-01-01

    How can visual arts and popular education pedagogy contribute to collective recovery from and reconstruction after trauma? This question framed the design and delivery of the Trauma Recovery and Reconstruction Group (TRRG), which consisted of 12 group sessions delivered to clients (trauma survivors) of the Centre for Concurrent Disorders (CCD) in…

  6. Children's Reasoning as Collective Social Action through Problem Solving in Grade 2/3 Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2016-01-01

    Research on young children's reasoning show the complex relationships of knowledge, theories, and evidence in their decision-making and problem solving. Most of the research on children's reasoning skills has been done in individualized and formal research settings, not collective classroom environments where children often engage in learning and…

  7. The American Board of Internal Medicine Maintenance of Certification Examination and State Medical Board Disciplinary Actions: a Population Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Furman S; Duhigg, Lauren M; Arnold, Gerald K; Hafer, Ruth M; Lipner, Rebecca S

    2018-03-07

    Some have questioned whether successful performance in the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM) Maintenance of Certification (MOC) program is meaningful. The association of the ABIM Internal Medicine (IM) MOC examination with state medical board disciplinary actions is unknown. To assess risk of disciplinary actions among general internists who did and did not pass the MOC examination within 10 years of initial certification. Historical population cohort study. The population of internists certified in internal medicine, but not a subspecialty, from 1990 through 2003 (n = 47,971). ABIM IM MOC examination. General internal medicine in the USA. The primary outcome measure was time to disciplinary action assessed in association with whether the physician passed the ABIM IM MOC examination within 10 years of initial certification, adjusted for training, certification, demographic, and regulatory variables including state medical board Continuing Medical Education (CME) requirements. The risk for discipline among physicians who did not pass the IM MOC examination within the 10 year requirement window was more than double than that of those who did pass the examination (adjusted HR 2.09; 95% CI, 1.83 to 2.39). Disciplinary actions did not vary by state CME requirements (adjusted HR 1.02; 95% CI, 0.94 to 1.16), but declined with increasing MOC examination scores (Kendall's tau-b coefficient = - 0.98 for trend, p actions were less severe among those passing the IM MOC examination within the 10-year requirement window than among those who did not pass the examination. Passing a periodic assessment of medical knowledge is associated with decreased state medical board disciplinary actions, an important quality outcome of relevance to patients and the profession.

  8. 4th International Conference on Computational Collective Intel- ligence Technologies and Applications (ICCCI 2012)

    CERN Document Server

    Trawiński, Bogdan; Katarzyniak, Radosław; Jo, Geun-Sik; Advanced Methods for Computational Collective Intelligence

    2013-01-01

    The book consists of 35 extended chapters which have been selected and invited from the submissions to the 4th International Conference on Computational Collective Intelligence Technologies and Applications (ICCCI 2012) held on November 28-30, 2012 in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The book is organized into six parts, which are semantic web and ontologies, social networks and e-learning, agent and multiagent systems, data mining methods and applications, soft computing, and optimization and control, respectively. All chapters in the book discuss theoretical and practical issues connected with computational collective intelligence and related technologies. The editors hope that the book can be useful for graduate and Ph.D. students in Computer Science, in particular participants in courses on Soft Computing, Multiagent Systems, and Data Mining. This book can be also useful for researchers working on the concept of computational collective intelligence in artificial populations. It is the hope of the editors that ...

  9. «Sochi Goes International» – Required Actions to be Taken to Facilitate the Stay for International Tourists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard Besel

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available As host city of many big international sport events, Sochi's publicity is increasing and people from all over the world will discover it as a new travel destination. To guarantee and enlarge the attractiveness and popularity of the city, some essential improvements, which would facilitate the stay for international tourists, are recommended.

  10. 75 FR 39204 - Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by the U.S. Agency for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Emergency Relief Information. Type of Review: Renewal of Information Collection. Purpose: The purpose of... AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by... International Development (USAID) is making efforts to reduce the paperwork burden. USAID invites the general...

  11. Emergence of collective action and environmental networking in relation to radioactive waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, R.G.; Payne, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    This paper explores the relationship between the national environmental movement and nuclear technology in relation to a local emergent group. The historical development of nuclear technology in this conutry has followed a path leading to continued fear and mistrust of waste management by a portion of the population. At the forefront of opposition to nuclear technology are people and groups endorsing environmental values. Because of the antinuclear attitudes of environmentalists and the value orientation of appropriate technologists in the national environmental movement, it seems appropriate for local groups to call on these national groups for assistance regarding nuclear-related issues. A case study is used to illustrate how a local action group, once integrated into a national environmental network, can become an effective, legitimate participant in social change. The formation, emergence, mobilization, and networking of a local group opposed to a specific federal radioactive waste management plan is described based on organizational literature. However, inherent contradictions in defining the local versus national benefits plus inherent problems within the environmental movement could be acting to limit the effectiveness of such networks. 49 refs

  12. Datasets collected in general practice: an international comparison using the example of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgiss, Elizabeth; van Boven, Kees

    2018-06-04

    International datasets from general practice enable the comparison of how conditions are managed within consultations in different primary healthcare settings. The Australian Bettering the Evaluation and Care of Health (BEACH) and TransHIS from the Netherlands collect in-consultation general practice data that have been used extensively to inform local policy and practice. Obesity is a global health issue with different countries applying varying approaches to management. The objective of the present paper is to compare the primary care management of obesity in Australia and the Netherlands using data collected from consultations. Despite the different prevalence in obesity in the two countries, the number of patients per 1000 patient-years seen with obesity is similar. Patients in Australia with obesity are referred to allied health practitioners more often than Dutch patients. Without quality general practice data, primary care researchers will not have data about the management of conditions within consultations. We use obesity to highlight the strengths of these general practice data sources and to compare their differences. What is known about the topic? Australia had one of the longest-running consecutive datasets about general practice activity in the world, but it has recently lost government funding. The Netherlands has a longitudinal general practice dataset of information collected within consultations since 1985. What does this paper add? We discuss the benefits of general practice-collected data in two countries. Using obesity as a case example, we compare management in general practice between Australia and the Netherlands. This type of analysis should start all international collaborations of primary care management of any health condition. Having a national general practice dataset allows international comparisons of the management of conditions with primary care. Without a current, quality general practice dataset, primary care researchers will not

  13. (Devaluing Intern Labour: Journalism Internship Pay Rates and Collective Representation in Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Errol Salamon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Unpaid journalism internships have attracted increasing media coverage, but they have received limited scholarly attention. This paper traces the connections between trade unions (in unionized media organizations and the labour conditions marking journalism internships. While some unions can be complicit in sustaining the exploitation and devaluation of interns with regard to the standard market value of entry-level labour, other unions have fought to establish internships, locking higher salaries into collective agreements. Building on the concept of precarity, this article surveys internships at 19 mainstream English-language newspapers and magazines in Canada. It draws on documentary evidence from and personal communication with labour unions and journalism organizations, internship advertisements, and media coverage to offer a typology of the relationships between pay rates and collective representation within journalism internships: unpaid/low paid and not under union jurisdiction; unpaid/low paid and under union jurisdiction; paid at intern rates and not under union jurisdiction; paid at intern rates and under union jurisdiction; and paid at entry-level employee rates and under union jurisdiction.

  14. Feasibility of international data collection and feedback on post-operative pain data: proof of concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslansky, R; Chapman, C R; Rothaug, J; Bäckström, R; Brill, S; Davidson, E; Elessi, K; Fletcher, D; Fodor, L; Karanja, E; Konrad, C; Kopf, A; Leykin, Y; Lipman, A; Puig, M; Rawal, N; Schug, S; Ullrich, K; Volk, T; Meissner, W

    2012-03-01

    Post-operative pain exacts a high toll from patients, families, healthcare professionals and healthcare systems worldwide. PAIN-OUT is a research project funded by the European Union's 7th Framework Program designed to develop effective, evidence-based approaches to improve pain management after surgery, including creating a registry for feedback, benchmarking and decision support. In preparation for PAIN-OUT, we conducted a pilot study to evaluate the feasibility of international data collection with feedback to participating sites. Adult orthopaedic or general surgery patients consented to participate between May and October 2008 at 14 collaborating hospitals in 13 countries. Project staff collected patient-reported outcomes and process data from 688 patients and entered the data into an online database. Project staff in 10 institutions met the enrolment criteria of collecting data from at least 50 patients. The completeness and quality of the data, as assessed by rate of missing data, were acceptable; only 2% of process data and 0.06% of patient-reported outcome data were missing. Participating institutions received access to select items as Web-based feedback comparing their outcomes to those of the other sites, presented anonymously. We achieved proof of concept because staff and patients in all 14 sites cooperated well despite marked differences in cultures, nationalities and languages, and a central database management team was able to provide valuable feedback to all. © 2011 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  15. Relancer Saint-Étienne. Conditions institutionnelles et capacité d’action collective dans une ville en déclin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Béal

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available L'objectif de cet article est de comprendre comment une capacité d’action collective peut se construire dans une ville marquée par une industrialisation ancienne et, plus récemment, par un déclin démographique et économique. La thèse principale de l'article, inspirée par l’économie politique et le néo-institutionnalisme, est que la difficulté d’un territoire d’ancienne industrialisation à constituer une capacité d’action collective peut certes s’expliquer par une position défavorable dans la nouvelle division internationale du travail mais aussi par les conditions institutionnelles engendrées par ce passé industriel et la crise économique et démographique. Dans le cas de Saint-Étienne analysé dans cet article, les modalités historiques de l’industrialisation mais aussi les modalités de gestion de la crise de désindustrialisation ont engendré des conditions institutionnelles –dispositions à la prise de parole età la coopération, nature des rapports entre les différents types d’organisation (milieux économiques, classe politique locale, État- peu favorables à l’émergence d’une capacité d’action collective et à l’élaboration de stratégies partagées de sortie de crise.The objective of the article is to understand how a political capacity can emerge in a city characterised by an ancient process of industrialisation and, more recently, by an economic and demographic decline. The central thesis of the article is inspired by political economy and neo-institutionalism. One considers that the difficulties faced by a place of old industry to build up a political capacity can admittedly be explained by an unfavourable position in the international division of labour but also the institutional conditions generated by the industrial past and the economic and demographic crisis. In the case of the French city of Saint-Étienne, analysed in this article, the historical modalities in which

  16. Fairness compatibility constraints and collective actions%公平相容约束与集体行动

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    皮建才

    2007-01-01

    基于公平相容约束扩展了朱宪辰和李玉连(2007)的模型,扩展后的模型更具有现实解释力.集体行动能不能实现,除了要考虑组织者和参与者的个体理性约束以外,还必须考虑组织者和参与者的公平相容约束.符合组织者的个体理性约束但不符合其公平相容约束的集体行动照样不能实现.而且,搭便车者的破坏性作用是不容小视的.%This paper extends the work of Zhu Xianchen and Li Yulian (2007) by introducing the fairness compatibility constraint. Our work strengthens the explanatory power of their model. Whether a collective action can be realized depends not only on the organizer and followers' individual rationality constraints,but also on their fairness compatibility constraints. Collective actions that meet the organizer's individual rationality constraint but do not meet his fairness compatibility constraints cannot be realized. Furthermore, free-riders play a destructive role, which should not be ignored.

  17. Overview and comparative study of GPR international standards and guidelines - COST Action TU1208

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajewski, Lara; Marciniak, Marian; Benedetto, Andrea; Tosti, Fabio

    2016-04-01

    Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) can be effectively used for non-destructive testing of composite structures and diagnostics affecting the whole life-cycle of civil engineering works. Nevertheless, few recognised international standards exist in this field and inhomogeneous recommendations are present in different countries. Moreover, the levels of knowledge, awareness and experience regarding the use of GPR in civil engineering vary strongly across different European areas. The COST Action TU1208 is working hard on leveraging these differences, by sharing and disseminating knowledge and experience, as well as by developing guidelines and protocols for a safe and effective use of GPR in civil engineering. GPR users need to know which is the best way to conduct GPR measurements and what the quality level for the results should be. The TU1208 guidelines will ensure a higher efficiency and quality of GPR services and they will constitute a scientific basis for the introduction of European Standards on the application of GPR in civil engineering. The aim of this contribution is to present an in-depth overview and critical analysis of the existing GPR international and national standards and guidelines. The main documents considered in our work are listed and briefly described in the following. Three standards are provided by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM), to guide the GPR use for subsurface investigation, evaluation of asphalt-covered concrete bridge decks, and determination of pavement-layer thickness: 1. ASTM D6432-11, Standard Guide for Using the Surface Ground Penetrating Radar Method for Subsurface Investigation, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2011, www.astm.org, DOI: 10.1520/D6432-11. 2. ASTM D6087-08, Standard Test Method for Evaluating Asphalt-Covered Concrete Bridge Decks Using Ground Penetrating Radar, ASTM International, West Conshohocken, PA, 2008, www.astm.org, DOI: 10.1520/D6087-08. 3. ASTM D4748-10, Standard Test Method

  18. Building a community of practice for sustainability: strengthening learning and collective action of Canadian biosphere reserves through a national partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Maureen G; Godmaire, Hélène; Abernethy, Paivi; Guertin, Marc-André

    2014-12-01

    Deliberation, dialogue and systematic learning are now considered attributes of good practice for organizations seeking to advance sustainability. Yet we do not know whether organizations that span spatial scales and governance responsibilities can establish effective communities of practice to facilitate learning and action. The purpose of this paper is to generate a framework that specifies actions and processes of a community of practice designed to instill collective learning and action strategies across a multi-level, multi-partner network. The framework is then used to describe and analyze a partnership among practitioners of Canada's 16 UNESCO biosphere reserves, and additional researchers and government representatives from across Canada. The framework is a cycle of seven action steps, beginning and ending with reflecting on and evaluating present practice. It is supported by seven characteristics of collaborative environmental management that are used to gauge the success of the partnership. Our results show that the partnership successfully built trust, established shared norms and common interest, created incentives to participate, generated value in information sharing and willingness to engage, demonstrated effective flow of information, and provided leadership and facilitation. Key to success was the presence of a multi-lingual facilitator who could bridge cultural differences across regions and academia-practitioner expectations. The project succeeded in establishing common goals, setting mutual expectations and building relations of trust and respect, and co-creating knowledge. It is too soon to determine whether changes in practices that support sustainability will be maintained over the long term and without the help of an outside facilitator. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mediating Political Action: Internet related Beliefs and Frustrations amongst International Solidarity Campaigns in Britain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Barassi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available El terreny de l'activisme en els mitjans de comunicació avui s'associa a internet; s'ha construït sobretot per mitjà de xarxes o plataformes en línia i, a poc a poc, va transformant la manera d'imaginar, experimentar i organitzar l'acció política. Aquest article explora els efectes que tenen les creences i frustracions relacionades amb internet sobre les formes contemporànies d'acció política. Partint del context etnogràfic en què se situen les campanyes de solidaritat internacional i els sindicats britànics, el treball proposa que la relació que mantenen els activistes amb les tecnologies d'internet és complexa i s'insereix en una doble tensió entre l'apoderament i la frustració. Tal com sosté l'article, és mitjançant una exploració etnogràfica d'aquesta tensió que els especialistes poden arribar a entendre més bé els conflictes permanents i les negociacions socials creats arran de les transformacions tecnològico-històriques dels últims quinze anys. The terrain of media activism today has become an internet connected one; one that is primarily constructed through online networks or platforms; one that is gradually transforming the way in which political action is imagined, experienced and organised. The following article explores the effects of internet related beliefs and frustrations on contemporary forms of political action. Drawing from the ethnographic context of international solidarity campaigns and the trade unions in Britain, the paper argues that activists' relationship to internet technologies is a complex one, which is embedded in a double tension of empowerment and frustration. It is by ethnographically exploring this tension, the paper contends, that scholars can gain important insights on the ongoing social conflicts and negotiations created by the techno-historical transformations of the last fifteen years.  El terreno del activismo en los medios de comunicación hoy se asocia a internet; se ha

  20. C. elegans Stress-Induced Sleep Emerges from the Collective Action of Multiple Neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Ravi D; Chow, Elly S; Wang, Han; Schwarz, Erich M; Sternberg, Paul W

    2016-09-26

    The genetic basis of sleep regulation remains poorly understood. In C. elegans, cellular stress induces sleep through epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent activation of the EGF receptor in the ALA neuron. The downstream mechanism by which this neuron promotes sleep is unknown. Single-cell RNA sequencing of ALA reveals that the most highly expressed, ALA-enriched genes encode neuropeptides. Here we have systematically investigated the four most highly enriched neuropeptides: flp-7, nlp-8, flp-24, and flp-13. When individually removed by null mutation, these peptides had little or no effect on stress-induced sleep. However, stress-induced sleep was abolished in nlp-8; flp-24; flp-13 triple-mutant animals, indicating that these neuropeptides work collectively in controlling stress-induced sleep. We tested the effect of overexpression of these neuropeptide genes on five behaviors modulated during sleep-pharyngeal pumping, defecation, locomotion, head movement, and avoidance response to an aversive stimulus-and we found that, if individually overexpressed, each of three neuropeptides (nlp-8, flp-24, or flp-13) induced a different suite of sleep-associated behaviors. These overexpression results raise the possibility that individual components of sleep might be specified by individual neuropeptides or combinations of neuropeptides. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Agroecology in Europe: Research, Education, Collective Action Networks, and Alternative Food Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Wezel

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Agroecology is considered with different focus and weight in different parts of the world as a social and political movement, as science, and as practice. Despite its multitude of definitions, agroecology has begun in Europe to develop in different regional, national and continental networks of researchers, practitioners, advocates and movements. However, there is a lack of a comprehensive overview about these different developments and networks. Therefore, this paper attempts to document and provide a mapping of the development of European agroecology in its diverse forms. Through a literature review, interviews, active conference participation, and an extensive internet search we have collected information about the current state and development of agroecology in Europe. Agroecological research and higher education exist more in western and northern Europe, but farm schools and farmer-to-farmer training are also present in other regions. Today a large variety of topics are studied at research institutions. There is an increasing number of bottom-up agroecological initiatives and national or continental networks and movements. Important movements are around food sovereignty, access to land and seeds. Except for France, there are very few concrete policies for agroecology in Europe. Agroecology is increasingly linked to different fields of agri-food systems. This includes Community Supported Agriculture systems, but also agroecological territories, and some examples of labelling products. To amplify agroecology in Europe in the coming years, policy development will be crucial and proponents of agroecology must join forces and work hand-in-hand with the many stakeholders engaged in initiatives to develop more sustainable agriculture and food systems.

  2. Participating in Politics Resembles Physical Activity: General Action Patterns in International Archives, United States Archives, and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguchi, Kenji; Handley, Ian M.; Albarracín, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    A series of studies examined whether political participation can emerge from general patterns of indiscriminate activity. In the first two studies, general action tendencies were measured by combining national and state-level indicators of high activity (e.g., impulsiveness, pace of life, and physical activity) from international and U.S. data. This action-tendency index positively correlated with a measure of political participation that consisted of voting behaviors and participation in political demonstrations. The following two experimental studies indicated that participants exposed to action words (e.g., go, move) had stronger intentions to vote in an upcoming election and volunteered more time to make phone calls on behalf of a university policy than participants exposed to inaction words did (e.g., relax, stop). These studies suggest that political participation can be predicted from general tendencies toward activity present at the national and state levels, as well as from verbal prompts suggestive of activity. PMID:21177515

  3. Fight against the greenhouse effect. From the local to the international action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mousel, M.

    2002-01-01

    In the fight against the greenhouse gases emissions, the local government are directly concerned. This sheet aims to explain the greenhouse effect, the kyoto protocol, the french national policy and to orientate the local actions. (A.L.B.)

  4. Internalization Mediation towards the Relationship between Entrepreneurial Action and Individual Performance for the Next Generation of Family Companies in Surabaya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Novi Mustikarini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study  examined the effect of entrepreneurial action for the performance of the next generation using the sample of students who joined the Family Business Community. In this study, there is a high contribution given by the role of entrepreneurship education in preparing the next generation in the family business. In addition, entrepreneurship education is considered possible through the process of internalization of the leaning process that is going on. For example, it is noted that entrepreneurial action can have a significant effect on the performance of the organization. In the context of the family business and entrepreneurial education at the University of Ciputra, both variables (entrepreneurial action and individual performance are necessary to be tested and therefore, the researcher finds it possible to cary out a research that is supposed to have a contribution to the family business. This study uses a hierarchical regression analysis, to test the stages of the mediation process. The results showed that most of relationships mediate internalization Entrepreneurial Action and Individual Performance.

  5. Collective Memories of Portuguese Colonial Action in Africa: Representations of the Colonial Past among Mozambicans and Portuguese Youths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Feijó

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Social representations of the colonization and decolonization processes among young people from a former European colonial power (Portugal and from an African ex-colony (Mozambique were investigated through surveys using open- and closed-ended questions about national history, focusing on the identity functions of collective memories. Hegemonic and contested representations were found of the most prominent events related to Portuguese colonization of Mozambique, arousing a range of collective emotions. A central place is occupied by memories of the Colonial War, which ended with the Carnation Revolution in Portugal and the subsequent independence of the Portuguese African colonies. Overall, the depiction of colonialism was more negative for Mozambican than for Portuguese participants. The violent effects of colonial action were very salient in Mozambican memories, which stressed the most oppressive aspects of the colonial period, associated with slave trade and brutal repression. On the Portuguese side, the idealization of the voyages of discovery persisted, obscuring the most violent effects of colonial expansion. However, collective memories of colonization of former colonizer and former colonized do not simply stand opposed. Both Mozambican and Portuguese participants reported ambivalent feelings towards the colonization process.

  6. International action strategies for the protection of the earth's atmosphere. Internationale Handlungsstrategien zum Schutz der Erdatmosphaere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtigaeller, J [Deutsches Uebersee-Institut, Hamburg (Germany). Inst. fuer Allgemeine Ueberseeforschung

    1991-01-01

    The present three conventions - the already adopted convention for protection of the ozone layer, the convention as regards the abatement of trace gas pollution, and the convention for conserving the tropical woods, could all culminate in an international convention for protection of the earth's atmosphere, which would have to comprise comprehensive regulations for an international environment policy and an international environment fund. In addition, an international environment convention should have the aim of sustainable development in all countries, leaving living conditions intact, taking account of the requirements of future generations, and helping the Third World to overcome its poverty in particular. (orig./HSCH).

  7. Who will attack the competitors? How political parties resolve strategic and collective action dilemmas in negative campaigning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolezal, Martin; Ennser-Jedenastik, Laurenz; Müller, Wolfgang C

    2017-11-01

    Negative campaigning presents parties with a collective action problem. While parties would prefer to have their competitors attacked, potential backlash effects from negative messages mean that individual politicians typically lack the incentives to carry out such attacks. We theorize that parties solve this problem by implementing a division of labour that takes into account the incentives of individual office holders, their availability for campaign activity, and media relevance. Drawing on these arguments we expect that holders of high public office and party leaders are less likely to issue attacks, leaving the bulk of the 'dirty work' to be carried out by party floor leaders and general secretaries. Examining almost 8000 press releases issued by over 600 individual politicians during four election campaigns in Austria, we find strong support for our theoretical expectations.

  8. A solution to the collective action problem in between-group conflict with within-group inequality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilets, Sergey; Fortunato, Laura

    2014-03-26

    Conflict with conspecifics from neighbouring groups over territory, mating opportunities and other resources is observed in many social organisms, including humans. Here we investigate the evolutionary origins of social instincts, as shaped by selection resulting from between-group conflict in the presence of a collective action problem. We focus on the effects of the differences between individuals on the evolutionary dynamics. Our theoretical models predict that high-rank individuals, who are able to usurp a disproportional share of resources in within-group interactions, will act seemingly altruistically in between-group conflict, expending more effort and often having lower reproductive success than their low-rank group-mates. Similar behaviour is expected for individuals with higher motivation, higher strengths or lower costs, or for individuals in a leadership position. Our theory also provides an evolutionary foundation for classical equity theory, and it has implications for the origin of coercive leadership and for reproductive skew theory.

  9. Applying international standards and guidelines on corporate social responsibility: An action plan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cramer, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    How can a company start the process of corporate social responsibility in an international context, thereby makinge use of diverse standards and guidelines? This question immediately came to the fore emerged after the start of the programme ‘Corporate social responsibility in international context’

  10. Assessing the role of learning devices and geovisualisation tools for collective action in natural resource management: Experiences from Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castella, Jean-Christophe

    2009-02-01

    In northern Vietnam uplands the successive policy reforms that accompanied agricultural decollectivisation triggered very rapid changes in land use in the 1990s. From a centralized system of natural resource management, a multitude of individual strategies emerged which contributed to new production interactions among farming households, changes in landscape structures, and conflicting strategies among local stakeholders. Within this context of agrarian transition, learning devices can help local communities to collectively design their own course of action towards sustainable natural resource management. This paper presents a collaborative approach combining a number of participatory methods and geovisualisation tools (e.g., spatially explicit multi-agent models and role-playing games) with the shared goal to analyse and represent the interactions between: (i) decision-making processes by individual farmers based on the resource profiles of their farms; (ii) the institutions which regulate resource access and usage; and (iii) the biophysical and socioeconomic environment. This methodological pathway is illustrated by a case study in Bac Kan Province where it successfully led to a communication platform on natural resource management. In a context of rapid socioeconomic changes, learning devices and geovisualisation tools helped embed the participatory approach within a process of community development. The combination of different tools, each with its own advantages and constraints, proved highly relevant for supporting collective natural resource management.

  11. 75 FR 62366 - Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by the U.S. Agency for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... on the respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of... Division, U.S. Agency for International Development, Room 2.07-106, RRB, Washington, DC 20523, (202) 712..., Participant Training Team, United States Agency for International Development, Ronald Reagan Building, 1300...

  12. Collaborative Philippine-Canadian Action Cycles for Strategic International Coastal Ecohealth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Paul David; Pajaro, Marivic Gosamo

    2014-01-01

    Canadian-Philippine linkages on multi-year coastal Action Research and learning cycles are detailed within established participatory development strategies. Philippine sustainable development is further considered as a function of inter-jurisdictional considerations, and reflexive role shifts for academe. An organizational process is outlined to…

  13. INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support): summary and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanyika, S

    2013-10-01

    This supplement presents the foundational elements for INFORMAS (International Network for Food and Obesity/non-communicable diseases Research, Monitoring and Action Support). As explained in the overview article by Swinburn and colleagues, INFORMAS has a compelling rationale and has set forth clear objectives, outcomes, principles and frameworks for monitoring and benchmarking key aspects of food environments and the policies and actions that influence the healthiness of food environments. This summary highlights the proposed monitoring approaches for the 10 interrelated INFORMAS modules: public and private sector policies and actions; key aspects of food environments (food composition, labelling, promotion, provision, retail, prices, and trade and investment) and population outcomes (diet quality). This ambitious effort should be feasible when approached in a step-wise manner, taking into account existing monitoring efforts, data sources, country contexts and capacity, and when adequately resourced. After protocol development and pilot testing of the modules, INFORMAS aims to be a sustainable, low-cost monitoring framework. Future directions relate to institutionalization, implementation and, ultimately, to leveraging INFORMAS data in ways that will bring key drivers of food environments into alignment with public health goals. © 2013 The Authors. Obesity Reviews published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  14. Collective Success or Collective Failure?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fayyaz, Anjum

    study of soccer village project to learn how various attempts at facilitating joint CSR action in the Pakistani football manufacturing have consistently failed in addressing international CSR compliance demands. I conclude that this form of collective failure – along with technological changes, lack...... of innovation, and government failure - can partly explain why Sialkot has been marginalized in terms of its overall share of world football manufacturing in the last decade....

  15. Imprescribility of the action and the disciplinary sanction by violation of human rigths and infractions to the humanitarian international right.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Milena Daza-Márquez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This article puts forward an analysis of the problem of the imprescriptibility of action and disciplinary sanctions for grave violations of human rights and international humanitarian law, committed by civil servants, particularly, members of the Military Forces and the National Police. The study deals with the regulation of disciplinary action for grave conduct within the disciplinary regime applicable to the Public Forces over the past thirty years and in the current Code of Practice on Disciplinary and Grievance Proceedures. I also illustrate the legal, political, social and economic consequences—for the Colombian State—of investigation and disciplinary sanctions for crimes against humanity or war crimes being ommitted or delayed through negligence of State offi- cials. The declaration of a prescription may be considered a means to impunity for administrative sanctions and, in turn, provides proof of the State’s failure to comply with International committments that guarantee and protect Human Rights and International Humanitarian Law. Finally, given the controversy regarding diciplinary imprescriptibility, this paper proposes a llegal reform which extends the term of prescription in order to preserve the rights of victims and the disciplined.

  16. IGF-1 and insulin exert opposite actions on ClC-K2 activity in the cortical collecting ducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaika, Oleg; Mamenko, Mykola; Boukelmoune, Nabila; Pochynyuk, Oleh

    2015-01-01

    Despite similar stimulatory actions on the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC)-mediated sodium reabsorption in the distal tubule, insulin promotes kaliuresis, whereas insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) causes a reduction in urinary potassium levels. The factors contributing to this phenomenon remain elusive. Electrogenic distal nephron ENaC-mediated Na(+) transport establishes driving force for Cl(-) reabsorption and K(+) secretion. Using patch-clamp electrophysiology, we document that a Cl(-) channel is highly abundant on the basolateral plasma membrane of intercalated cells in freshly isolated mouse cortical collecting duct (CCD) cells. The channel has characteristics attributable to the ClC-K2: slow gating kinetics, conductance ∼10 pS, voltage independence, Cl(-)>NO3 (-) anion selectivity, and inhibition/activation by low/high pH, respectively. IGF-1 (100 and 500 nM) acutely stimulates ClC-K2 activity in a reversible manner. Inhibition of PI3-kinase (PI3-K) with LY294002 (20 μM) abrogates activation of ClC-K2 by IGF-1. Interestingly, insulin (100 nM) reversibly decreases ClC-K2 activity in CCD cells. This inhibitory action is independent of PI3-K and is mediated by stimulation of a mitogen-activated protein kinase-dependent cascade. We propose that IGF-1, by stimulating ClC-K2 channels, promotes net Na(+) and Cl(-) reabsorption, thus reducing driving force for potassium secretion by the CCD. In contrast, inhibition of ClC-K2 by insulin favors coupling of Na(+) reabsorption with K(+) secretion at the apical membrane contributing to kaliuresis. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  17. International health research monitoring: exploring a scientific and a cooperative approach using participatory action research

    OpenAIRE

    Chantler, Tracey; Cheah, Phaik Yeong; Miiro, George; Hantrakum, Viriya; Nanvubya, Annet; Ayuo, Elizabeth; Kivaya, Esther; Kidola, Jeremiah; Kaleebu, Pontiano; Parker, Michael; Njuguna, Patricia; Ashley, Elizabeth; Guerin, Philippe J; Lang, Trudie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate and determine the value of monitoring models developed by the Mahidol Oxford Tropical Research Unit and the East African Consortium for Clinical Research, consider how this can be measured and explore monitors’ and investigators’ experiences of and views about the nature, purpose and practice of monitoring. Research design A case study approach was used within the context of participatory action research because one of the aims was to guide and improve practice. 34 inte...

  18. Eighth International Chorea-Acanthocytosis Symposium : Summary of Workshop Discussion and Action Points

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pappas, Samuel S; Bonifacino, Juan; Danek, Adrian; Dauer, William T; De, Mithu; De Franceschi, Lucia; DiPaolo, Gilbert; Fuller, Robert; Haucke, Volker; Hermann, Andreas; Kornmann, Benoit; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Levin, Johannes; Neiman, Aaron M; Rudnicki, Dobrila D; Sibon, Ody; Velayos-Baeza, Antonio; Vonk, Jan J; Walker, Ruth H; Weisman, Lois S; Albin, Roger L

    2017-01-01

    Chorea-Acanthocytosis (ChAc) is a rare hereditary neurological disorder characterized by abnormal movements, red blood cell pathology, and progressive neurodegeneration. Little is understood of the pathogenesis of ChAc and related disorders (collectively Neuroacanthocytosis). The Eighth

  19. Culture of the entrepreneur: collective entrepreneurial action and profile of the entrepreneur Cultura empreendedora: empreendedorismo coletivo e perfil empreendedor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Maria Schmidt

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The culture of the entrepreneur is fundamental because it represents the essence of entrepreneurial action which may be exemplified in many ways. An analysis was made of the contribution of this culture to the formation of a local productive arrangement for sustainable tourism in Nova Russia, Blumenau, S.C.. Data were obtained from the ten owner managers involved by means of a participative survey as well as meetings, visits, presentations and structured interviews. An entrepreneurial culture was identified; however it is still weak, in spite of collective entrepreneurial actions undertaken. The entrepreneurial profiles of those investigated were in an incipient stage hindering the arrangement at this time. More extensive development of the profiles would encourage progress of the arrangement and stimulate collective and timely innovations in view of continuing market developments.A cultura empreendedora é fundamental, pois representa a essência do empreendedorismo, e pode manifestar-se de várias formas. Dessa forma, o objetivo geral desta pesquisa foi analisar a contribuição dessa cultura para a formação do Arranjo Produtivo Local (APL de turismo sustentável na Nova Rússia em Blumenau - SC. O estudo foi realizado mediante pesquisa participante com os dez proprietários-dirigentes do aglomerado turístico da Nova Rússia. Os dados foram obtidos de reuniões, visitas, palestras e entrevistas estruturadas. Como principal resultado, identificou-se que existe cultura empreendedora na região, porém bem fragilizada, pois, apesar de existirem ações de empreendedorismo coletivo na Nova Rússia, o perfil empreendedor dos investigados ainda apresenta um nível bastante baixo de desenvolvimento, o que compromete o início do APL neste momento. Caso a cultura empreendedora estivesse mais caracterizada, teria influência muita positiva sobre a formação do APL, pois os empreendedores se tornariam inovadores diante das constantes evoluções do

  20. Development of Non-Compliance (NC) and Corrective Actions of Internal Audit Database from Year 2005 to 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nik Arlina Nik Ali; Fairuz Faisal; Nurhanisah Adnan; Periasamy, M.

    2015-01-01

    Audit is a systematic process and independent assessment carried out to ensure that all activities related to the Quality Management System is functional and effective in achieving the objectives set . A database using Microsoft Access was developed to record details of each noncompliance and corrective actions taken. Data recorded were the result of internal audit from year 2005 to 2014. The database can be used as a reference platform and guidelines to prevent a similar breach is repeated and help other process owners deal with non-compliance process derived. (author)

  1. [[The global significance of the Cairo conference: the new program of action of the International Conference on Population and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atoh, M

    1994-10-01

    "The [1994] International Conference on Population and Development was held in Cairo, Egypt.... In this essay I briefly described global population trends and [their] economic and ecological implications, stated the temporal progress from arguments in the three Preparatory Committees toward the achievement of consensus at the end of the Cairo Conference, summarized and commented [on] each chapter of the Programme of Action, clarified the major characteristics of the Cairo document compared to the documents in Bucharest and Mexico City, and finally discussed the effectiveness of the strategy suggested in the Cairo document for addressing population and development issues in the context of sustainability." (SUMMARY IN ENG) excerpt

  2. Attitudes and action: public opinion and the occurrence of international terrorism

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krueger, A. B.; Malečková, Jitka

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 325, č. 5947 (2009), s. 1534-1536 ISSN 0036-8075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E08090 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z70850503 Keywords : international terrorism * public opinion toward another country Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 29.747, year: 2009

  3. Towards an "International Forum for Teacher Educator Development": An Agenda for Research and Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelchtermans, Geert; Smith, Kari; Vanderlinde, Ruben

    2018-01-01

    The outcomes of an international collaborative project are presented, involving experienced teacher educators and researchers from eight different countries, who engaged in a series of structured discussions on the professional development of teacher educators. We start with an overview of the needs in practice and policy, as well as the research…

  4. Social Protection as Development Policy: A New International Agenda for Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François-Xavier Merrien

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available At the turn of the millennium, social protection became a new priority for both states of the global South and international development policy more generally. As, in the past, social protection policies were considered unsuitable for development countries, the elevation of social protection to the level of a preferred instrument of development marks a fundamental paradigm shift. This shift began in the late 1990s, driven by disenchantment with the results of economic adjustment programmes, the 1997 Asian economic crisis, and a heightened awareness of the negative effects of global poverty. Social protection thus became a preferred instrument of the Millennium Development Goals, while the World Bank promoted social protection as a key component of international poverty reduction strategies (social risk management. The Department for International Development (DfID in the United Kingdom, along with other organisations, promoted a development model centred on the rights of the poor. Successful social protection programmes developed in the Global South – such as Brazilian and South African social pension schemes and conditional cash transfers (CCT established in Mexico and Brazil – were adopted as model programmes at the global level. The purpose of this article is to analyse the emergence of social protection in development policies. From this perspective, it examines the various types of programmes promoted by the international community, with a specific focus on CCT. It concludes with an assessment of the relative appropriateness of social protection policies for developing countries.

  5. Anticipatory action in self-defence: essence and limits under international law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tibori Szabó, K.

    2011-01-01

    The legality of preemptive strikes is one of the most controversial questions of contemporary international law. At the core of this controversy stands the temporal dimension of self-defence: when and for how long can a state defend itself against an armed attack? Can it resort to armed force before

  6. International Strategy for Action in the Field of Environmental Education and Training for the 1990s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    United Nations Environment Programme, Nairobi (Kenya).

    This document is the result of discussion, additions, amendments, and approval of a working document submitted for this purpose to the Unesco-UNEP (United Nations Environment Programme) International Congress on Environmental Education and Training (Moscow, USSR, August 1987). Part 1 seeks to highlight certain needs and priorities in respect to…

  7. Collection and presentation of animal data relating to internally distributed radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lathrop, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Data obtained from laboratory animals on the distribution of an internally administered radionuclide may be put to use by various people in ways quite different from the one for which the original observations were made. Consideration for these other scientists, sometimes in unrelated fields, can be shown by attention to a few details in the method of data collection and reporting that may improve the author's credibility, the reader's comprehension, and the value of the data. Briefly stated, two rules should be followed: Account for 100% of the administered radioactivity; and report data as fraction of administered activity per organ. The first rule serves as an internal check on the proper functioning of counting equipment, and may disclose excretion, contamination of counting tubes, or failure to inject the desired amount of activity. The second rule allows anyone to make use of the raw data. Presentation of the data only in complicated, manipulated form either totally prevents reconstruction of the raw data, or demands tedious, uncertain conversions. Examples of such manipulated data include percent dose per gram per 1% body weight and percent kilogram dose per gram. At the other extreme in reporting data for radioactivity, and to be equally avoided, are completely unprocessed values, such as counts per minute, with no reference made to the number of counts injected or to the time lapse between counts. Adherence to these two principles will permit the reader to follow through on any permutations of the data that the author may make, and to apply the data in unrelated situations

  8. “When a breach arises”: Good burocratic action and informal scrap metal collection in Northern Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Tauber

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyses affirmative bureaucratic intervention into the informal commercial practices of scrap metal collection among the Sinti in a North-Italian province. To contextualize these events it is vital to examine institutional logics, and how they resonate with public officials’ sense of self as well as political loyalties. In everyday bureaucracy Gypsies are considered to be perplexing subjects, provoking contrasting images of poverty and excess. These cultural representations are the opposite of the idea of a decent social-work client. Hence, bureaucratic intervention on behalf of the Sinti put the former in a deontological and moral limbo, one which stimulates them to navigate the political and organisational structures of their organisations in a creative way. This paper aims to bring a positive example of where the social and institutional discrimination against Roma and Sinti in Italy and Europe can be broken. Even if it is not possible to reverse this discrimination, it at least introduces affirmative bureaucratic action as an enlightening direction for anthropological study.

  9. Global warming risk in Russia: National actions and some options for international cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sokolov, V.I.

    1995-01-01

    In the management of global environmental risks the Russia case is a special one regarding certain specific features which determine the position of the country, particularly in a new international community emerged on the territory of the former Soviet Union, large scientific interest to the global physical processes and low interest and capabilities to deal with such risks on the part of social institutions inherited from the USSR. The largest country in the world with visible geopolitical role and probably biggest regional differences could not be ignored as a one of major players in the management of global environmental risks. The understanding of all deficiencies and positive sides of global risks management process in this country are absolutely important for extrapolating the appropriate trends in some other parts of the world. At the same time the ex-Soviet Union case shows clearly how the social learning process can radically ''change the course'', diverting to the opposite direction the social goals and preferences. Starting the studies on possibilities to change the climate for improving the human being, the former soviet society perceived the risks of human impact on climate and started to regulate it and to participate in the process of international management of global warming. The level of activity in this process on the part of Russia will however depend heavily on how much national interests will be reflected in the specific prevention measures realized by the international community

  10. COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence': International Conference on Fundamentals, Experiments, Numeric and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Bodenschatz, Eberhard; Toschi, Federico

    2011-12-01

    Turbulent flows are ubiquitous in nature and technology. Turbulent flows govern the transport of particulate matter in nature. For example, in atmospheric flows turbulence impacts the dynamics of aerosols, droplets, spores and of the living world by either chemo-attractant transport or transport of the insects themselves. In marine flows examples include the bubble dynamics that governs the uptake of oxygen and carbon dioxide at the ocean air interface, or the impact of turbulence on the life of phyto- and zoo-plankton, or the spread of pollutants in the oceans and estuaries. Turbulence is equally important for technology from process engineering in chemical and pharmaceutical industries to energy transport and energy generation. The COST Action MP0806 'Particles in Turbulence' has as the primary objective the support of the fundamental research on the statistical properties of particle transport in turbulent flows. The Action provides excellent opportunities for the exchange of ideas by bringing together scientists from different areas of research and applications, or different views on the problem. The COST Action MP0806 organizes several events annually. The conference held at the University of Potsdam from 16 to 18 March 2011 was the main meeting of the Action in 2011. In total 87 researchers from 18 countries (of which 12 were European) met and presented their work, discussed new ideas on theoretical, numerical and experimental approaches, as well as on applications to various scientific domains. The conference attracted also a number of participants from outside the COST Action. The scientific presentations focused on inertial and finite-size particles, particle collisions, as well as advection and reaction in simple and complex flow geometries. Very interesting results were presented at the forefront of the field: the increasing computational power combined with novel numerical techniques now allows for the first time simulation of the dynamics of finites

  11. The international dosimetry exchange for BNCT. A basis for pooling and collectively analyzing clinical results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riley, K.J.; Binns, P.J.; Harling, O.K.; Kiger, W.S. III; Seppaelae, T.; Savolainen, S.; Moss, R.; Marek, M.; Rezaei, A.

    2006-01-01

    An international collaboration was organized by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) to undertake a dosimetry exchange for the eventual purpose of combining results from various clinical centers that employ different methods for measuring and prescribing absorbed dose in the mixed radiation fields used for neutron capture therapy. Treatment plans calculated at NCT centers in the Czech Republic, Finland, The Netherlands and Sweden were normalized to corresponding measurements performed by the MIT dosimetry group in each beam. More than half of the normalizations for individual absorbed dose components (photon, fast neutron, thermal neutron and boron) determined by comparing MIT measurements to the dose specified in treatment plans from the different centers were statistically significant and ranged from 8 to 400%. Each facility had at least one dose component that would require normalization for the specified doses to be accurately compared. These normalizations establish a technical basis to begin collectively analyzing treatment plans between the European and US centers. Simple but pertinent treatment parameters such as the maximum dose to brain can now be properly compared, once the clinical data is available. This could held to more precisely and quickly determine various dose-response relationships as for example those related to adverse events. Future efforts to determine dose normalization at other centers performing human studies as well as more sophisticated analyses using combined data from several centers should be guided by clearly defined clinical objectives with active participation from clinical BNCT experts. (author)

  12. Acción colectiva y educación popular: contribuciones para un conocimiento emancipatorio Collective action and popular education: contributions for emancipatory knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Delgado S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available El texto recoge los planteamientos expuestos en el Congreso Internacional Vecindades y Fronteras en abril de 2010, en Bogotá. Acogiendo los referentes centrales expuestos por B. De Sousa en su empeño por renovar la teoría crítica y reinventar la emancipación social, el artículo presenta una reflexión acerca de la invención y actualización de un conocimiento emancipatorio desde la acción colectiva que emprenden los movimientos sociales en el contexto de América Latina. De igual manera, es de su interés destacar algunas relaciones y retos que se establecen entre los movimientos sociales y los procesos de educación popular, respecto a la necesidad de potenciar una pedagogía crítica de la traducción cultural que propicie el diálogo y el intercambio de una ecología de los saberes entre los movimientos sociales, las ONGs y los científicos sociales, generando espacios de aprendizaje colectivo que revitalicen las acciones sociales y las redes locales y globales de conocimiento orientado hacia la trasformación social.The text includes the issues outlined in the International Congress of Neighborhoods and Borders in April 2010 in Bogotá. Welcoming the central referents presented by B. De Sousa in their efforts to renew critical theory and reinvent social emancipation, the article presents a reflection about the invention and gives an update of an emancipatory knowledge from the collective action undertaken by social movements in the Latin American context. Similarly, it is of interest to highlight some relationships and challenges that arise between social movements and processes of popular education on the need to promote critical pedagogy of cultural translation that promotes dialogue and exchange of an ecology of knowledge between social movements, NGOs and social scientists, generating collective learning spaces to revitalize the social actions and the local and global networks of knowledge-oriented social transformation.

  13. Moving from information and collaboration to action: report from the 3rd International Dog Health Workshop, Paris in April 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Dan G; Keijser, Sylvia F A; Hedhammar, Åke; Kisko, Caroline; Leroy, Gregoire; Llewellyn-Zaidi, Aimée; Malm, Sofia; Olson, Patricia N; Packer, Rowena M A; Rousselot, Jean Francois; Seath, Ian J; Stull, Jason W; Bonnett, Brenda N

    2017-01-01

    Breed-related health problems in dogs have received increased focus over the last decade. Responsibility for causing and/or solving these problems has been variously directed towards dog breeders and kennel clubs, the veterinary profession, welfare scientists, owners, regulators, insurance companies and the media. In reality, all these stakeholders are likely to share some responsibility and optimal progress on resolving these challenges requires all key stakeholders to work together. The International Partnership for Dogs (IPFD), together with an alternating host organization, holds biennial meetings called the International Dog Health Workshops (IDHW). The Société Centrale Canine (French Kennel Club) hosted the 3rd IDHW, in Paris, in April, 2017. These meetings bring together a wide range of stakeholders in dog health, science and welfare to improve international sharing of information and resources, to provide a forum for ongoing collaboration, and to identify specific needs and actions to improve health, well-being and welfare in dogs. The workshop included 140 participants from 23 countries and was structured around six important issues facing those who work to improve dog health. These included individualized breed-specific strategies for health and breeding, extreme conformations, education and communication in relation to antimicrobial resistance, behavior and welfare, genetic testing and population-based evidence. A number of exciting actions were agreed during the meeting. These included setting up working groups to create tools to help breed clubs accelerate the implementation of breed-health strategies, review aspects of extreme conformation and share useful information on behavior. The meeting also heralded the development of an online resource of relevant information describing quality measures for DNA testing. A demand for more and better data and evidence was a recurring message stressed across all themes. The meeting confirmed the benefits from

  14. Internalization, Trafficking, Intracellular Processing and Actions of Antibody-Drug Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi

    2015-11-01

    This review discusses the molecular mechanism involved in the targeting and delivery of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), the new class of biopharmaceuticals mainly designed for targeted cancer therapy. this review goes over major progress in preclinical and clinical studies of ADCs, in the past 5 years. The pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of ADCs involve multiple mechanisms, including internalization of ADCs by target cells, intracellular trafficking, release of conjugated drugs, and payload. These mechanisms actually jointly determine the efficacy of ADCs. Therefore, the optimization of ADCs should take them as necessary rationales.

  15. Experiences of an international trade action with irradiated onions between GDR and Hungary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zachariev, G.; Kiss, I.; Luther, T.; Huebner, G.; Doellstaedt, R.

    1988-01-01

    Extensive work has been carried out in the field of food irradiation in the GDR and Hungary in recent years. The irradiation of onions for sprout inhibition has reached a commercial stage in the GDR of more than 5,000 tons in 1986. The export of onions is the first example of international trade in irradiated food between socialist countries. Experiences of this trade is presented in the paper. Results of quality control of the bulbs (losses in weight an quality) after an intermediate storage period are discussed. Hungarian consumer reactions to irradiated onions is also evaluated. (author)

  16. International Children's Palliative Care Network: A Global Action Network for Children With Life-Limiting Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marston, Joan; Boucher, Sue; Downing, Julia

    2018-02-01

    The International Children's Palliative Care Network (ICPCN) is a global network of individuals and organizations working together to reach the estimated 21 million children with life-limiting conditions and life-threatening illnesses. The drive to establish the ICPCN was born from the recognition of the gaps in service provision for children's palliative care and the need to collaborate, network, and share resources. Established in 2005 during a meeting in Seoul, South Korea, the ICPCN has developed over the years into an established network with a global membership. The history of the organization is described, including some of the key events since its inception. Working in collaboration with others, ICPCN has five key focus areas: Communication; Advocacy; Research; Education; and Strategic development, and is the only international charity working globally for the rights of children with palliative care needs. Activities in these areas are discussed, along with the inter-connection between the five areas. Without the ICPCN, palliative care for children would not have developed as far as it has over the years and the organization is committed to ongoing work in this area until all children requiring palliative care have access to quality services, wherever they live around the world. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Tourism, international relations and businesses: an approach to the transnational and supranational actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Luiz de Souza Vieira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The tourist activities, as an important economic segment of world, need  more attention on  the part  of  Applied  Social  Sciences,  in  special  of the  International  Relations. This  article  aims  to initiate a discussion on this subject, based on the conceptual  constructions  of  transnationalism and supranationalism, as well as the reconstruction of  the  notion of  national  sovereignty.  The nations,  in  order  to  establish  the globalized tourist activities, adapt their legislation under the orders  of  the  international  conventions,  aiming the  growth  of  employment  rates,  the  increase of  income,  and  social  cultural  economical  and technological  development, generated  from  the tourist  activities,  which  put into motion trillions of dollars yearly.

  18. 78 FR 6171 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: INTERNational Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... not exist which would enable the Department to capture the intern-to-hire ratio or conversion rate, or... in a measurable conversion of interns into Department hires for the Foreign or Civil Service. The...

  19. Knowledge to action for solving complex problems: insights from a review of nine international cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, B L; Robinson, K L; Gamble, J; Finegood, D T; Sheppard, D; Penney, T L; Best, A

    2015-05-01

    Solving complex problems such as preventing chronic diseases introduces unique challenges for the creation and application of knowledge, or knowledge to action (KTA). KTA approaches that apply principles of systems thinking are thought to hold promise, but practical strategies for their application are not well understood. In this paper we report the results of a scan of systems approaches to KTA with a goal to identify how to optimize their implementation and impact. A 5-person advisory group purposefully selected 9 initiatives to achieve diversity on issues addressed and organizational forms. Information on each case was gathered from documents and through telephone interviews with primary contacts within each organization. Following verification of case descriptions, an inductive analysis was conducted within and across cases. The cases revealed 5 guidelines for moving from conceiving KTA systems to implementing them: (1) establish and nurture relationships, (2) co-produce and curate knowledge, (3) create feedback loops, (4) frame as systems interventions rather than projects, and (5) consider variations across time and place. Results from the environmental scan are a modest start to translating systems concepts for KTA into practice. Use of the strategies revealed in the scan may improve KTA for solving complex public health problems. The strategies themselves will benefit from the development of a science that aims to understand adaptation and ongoing learning from policy and practice interventions, strengthens enduring relationships, and fills system gaps in addition to evidence gaps. Systems approaches to KTA will also benefit from robust evaluations.

  20. Behavior of Internal Customer in Family Business: Strategies and Actions for Improving Their Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Broncano, Santiago; Jiménez-Estévez, Pedro; Del Carmen Zabala-Baños, María

    2017-01-01

    Determining the relevant aspects of family businesses (FBs) that make them increasingly competitive is the main objective of researchers in this field. Despite this, there is little empirical literature on the behavior of the internal customer (IC) in FBs or how businesses increase their satisfaction. Basing our work on psychological theories and with both quantitative and qualitative information from 31 semi-structured interviews, this work establishes certain characteristics of the ICs of the FB and proposes a series of guidelines for increasing their satisfaction, thereby facilitating the continuity of this type of business. FBs that are able to understand that the motivation of their ICs is more important than other qualities, and that this requires a more comprehensive management will be able to get sustainable competitive advantages in the future.

  1. Behavior of Internal Customer in Family Business: Strategies and Actions for Improving Their Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Broncano, Santiago; Jiménez-Estévez, Pedro; del Carmen Zabala-Baños, María

    2017-01-01

    Determining the relevant aspects of family businesses (FBs) that make them increasingly competitive is the main objective of researchers in this field. Despite this, there is little empirical literature on the behavior of the internal customer (IC) in FBs or how businesses increase their satisfaction. Basing our work on psychological theories and with both quantitative and qualitative information from 31 semi-structured interviews, this work establishes certain characteristics of the ICs of the FB and proposes a series of guidelines for increasing their satisfaction, thereby facilitating the continuity of this type of business. FBs that are able to understand that the motivation of their ICs is more important than other qualities, and that this requires a more comprehensive management will be able to get sustainable competitive advantages in the future. PMID:28790958

  2. Health promotion through sport: international sport federations' priorities, actions and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountjoy, Margo; Costa, A; Budgett, R; Dvorak, J; Engebretsen, L; Miller, S; Moran, J; Foster, J; Carr, J

    2018-01-01

    To identify areas of priority and activity for international sportsfederations (IFs) with respect to athlete health and safety, and global health. Results serve to direct the work of the Association of Summer Olympic IF Medical and Scientific Consultative Group, the International Olympic Committee and to influence IFs' planning and priorities. The 28 IFs participating in the Summer Olympic Games (2016) were asked to rank the relative importance of 11 health-related topics and to report their activities or research initiatives on 27 identified topics using an electronic survey. A comparison with a similar survey (2012) was made. The response rate was 100%. In general, the ' fight against doping ' had the highest priority followed by 'image as a safe sport '. The topics with the lowest importance ratings were ' increasing the number of elite athletes ', and ' health of the general population '. Despite ranking ' health of your athletes ,' as a top priority, IFs are not addressing all aspects of athlete health. In comparison with 2012, there was a significant decrease in priority for IFs is ' health of the general population '. Despite the widespread knowledge of the importance of the promotion of physical activity (sport) on global health, the decreasing priority and programming of the IFs on physical activity promotion is concerning. Although IFs have prioritised the protection of the health of elite athletes, there are gaps in programming demonstrating that IFs are missing important areas of athlete health. Improving recreational athlete health programming could also benefit population health as well as improve IF fan base and sport participation. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Actions at Hamburg International Association of Seismology and Physics of the Earth's Interior

    Science.gov (United States)

    The third Workshop on Historical Seismograms, held in Hamburg on August 18-19, 1983, in conjunction with the meeting of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics in Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany, was specifically organized to discuss the status of historical seismic data for Latin America and Europe. Since it is unlikely that an additional workshop will be held on this subject, reports for other regions were included as well.In the first session, H. Meyers described the purpose of the workshop and gave some history of the previous activities of the IASPEI/Unesco Working Group on Historical Seismograms. E.R. Engdahl noted that thus far more than 500,000 seismograms have been filmed as part of the Historical Microfilming Project and emphasized the importance of the activities to be covered during the workshop. M. Hashizume, representing Unesco, described the importance of historical seismic data and the Unesco interests in having these data available for the analysis of seismic risks, particularly in areas where the recurrence rate of significant earthquakes is very low and for regions where much data do not exist. He mentioned that both these conditions occur frequently in developing nations.

  4. Balance between automation and human actions in NPP operation: Results of international co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bastl, W.; Jenkinson, J.; Kossilov, A.; Olmstead, R.A.; Oudiz, A.; Sun, B.

    1991-01-01

    Automation is an essential feature of NPPs. The degree of automation can be seen to be increasing, owing to technical and social factors, but also as a result of advances in information technology. Deciding upon the appropriate level of automation, the allocation of functions to man, or to a machine or a combination of both may be one of the most critical aspects of NPP design. It is important that automation is carried out in a sufficiently systematic way. There appears to be need for additional guidance in this key area. In 1989 the International Atomic Energy Agency formed an advisory group to consider this problem. The group has proposed a methodology for allocating functions between man and machine. This methodology, which is described in the paper, takes account of the factors which influence the allocation process, considers viable approaches to automation and gives guidance on decision making. In addition, areas where future research may be justified are discussed. (author). 8 refs, 1 fig

  5. Animal model for angiotensin II effects in the internal anal sphincter smooth muscle: mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ya-Ping; Puri, Rajinder N; Rattan, Satish

    2002-03-01

    Effect of ANG II was investigated in in vitro smooth muscle strips and in isolated smooth muscle cells (SMC). Among different species, rat internal and sphincter (IAS) smooth muscle showed significant and reproducible contraction that remained unmodified by different neurohumoral inhibitors. The AT(1) antagonist losartan but not AT(2) antagonist PD-123319 antagonized ANG II-induced contraction of the IAS smooth muscle and SMC. ANG II-induced contraction of rat IAS smooth muscle and SMC was attenuated by tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and tyrphostin, protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor H-7, Ca(2+) channel blocker nicardipine, Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 or p(44/42) mitogen-activating protein kinase (MAPK(44/42)) inhibitor PD-98059. Combinations of nicardipine and H-7, Y-27632, and PD-98059 caused further attenuation of the ANG II effects. Western blot analyses revealed the presence of both AT(1) and AT(2) receptors. We conclude that ANG II causes contraction of rat IAS smooth muscle by the activation of AT(1) receptors at the SMC and involves multiple intracellular pathways, influx of Ca(2+), and activation of PKC, Rho kinase, and MAPK(44/42).

  6. 78 FR 39829 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments...: Title: Reporting of Nonpayroll Withheld Tax Liabilities. OMB Number: 1545-1413. Regulation Project...

  7. 78 FR 23975 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... definition of a controlled foreign corporation, foreign base company income and foreign personal holding...

  8. 76 FR 51126 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Notice; Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Notice; Notice AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... in electing investment partnership (EIP). DATES: Written comments should be received on or before...

  9. 76 FR 43381 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... Financial Asset Securitization Investment Trusts; Real Estate Mortgage Investment Conduits (TD 9004 (final...

  10. Trends in Cyber-Physical Multi-Agent Systems. The PAAMS Collection - 15th International Conference

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando De la Prieta; Zita Vale; Luis Antunes; Tiago Pinto; Andrew T. Campbell; Vicente Julián; Antonio J.R. Neves; María N. Moreno

    2017-01-01

    PAAMS, the International Conference on Practical Applications of Agents and Multi-Agent Systems is an evolution of the International Workshop on Practical Applications of Agents and Multi-Agent Systems. PAAMS is an international yearly tribune to present, to discuss, and to disseminate the latest developments and the most important outcomes related to real-world applications. It provides a unique opportunity to bring multi-disciplinary experts, academics and practitioners together to exchange...

  11. Europe's Share of the Climate Challenge. Domestic Actions and International Obligations to Protect the Planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaps, Charles; Erickson, Peter; Kartha, Sivan; Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2009-11-15

    Firstly, we analyse how Europe can embark on a transition to a low GHG future - enabling it to achieve large emission reductions on a rapid timescale. We present a detailed sector-by-sector mitigation scenario for all 27 EU countries that can achieve GHG emissions reductions of 40 per cent in 2020 and 90 per cent in 2050 relative to 1990 levels. This scenario achieves these cuts by a combination of radical improvements in energy efficiency, the accelerated retirement of fossil fuels and a dramatic shift toward various types of renewable energy, including wind, solar, wave, geothermal and biomass-based combined heat and power (CHP). Secondly, we assess Europe's international obligations for assisting the world's developing nations make a transition to a low-GHG future. We estimate Europe's fair share to be between Euro 150 billion and Euro 450 billion in 2020 depending on the assumed average cost of mitigation, which translates into approximately 1.1 per cent and 3.3 per cent of the EU's projected 2020 GDP of Euro 13.6 trillion, respectively. This analysis is designed to explore whether the specified levels of emissions reductions can be met without resorting to certain potentially significant mitigation options. In particular, we assume no new nuclear power, the phase out of existing nuclear power facilities, no carbon capture and storage (CCS) for fossil-based electricity generation and no biofuels (often referred to as agrofuels), whether produced within the EU or imported. Even without these mitigation options, Europe is still able to fully meet its 2020 target of 40 per cent solely through domestic options, i.e., with no international offsets. In addition to the scenario's technical measures we also examine the role of sufficiency and equity in helping promote the needed transition to a low carbon future. In our mitigation scenario, GDP grows by a factor of 'only' 1.6 between 2008 and 2050 versus the 1.8 times growth seen in the baseline scenario. Our

  12. Creativity in action: elegantly simple idea puts firm on international pipeline map

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podlubny, J.

    2002-05-06

    A saddle bag-like device, a relatively simple invention to carry weights to hold pipelines stable in wet environments, has catapulted a small Athabasca, Alberta, company to international prominence. The saddle bag is made of 100 per cent non-biodegradable material called geotextile, commonly referred to as road matting. The bags have a life expectancy of 100 years or more, easily outlasting the pipe they protect from shifting. Weighting systems are used on pipelines to achieve the negative buoyancy required to prevent them from floating out of wet ground. They are essential in wide swats of the northern areas where the oil and gas industry operates. The saddle bags replace the traditional concrete weights which have been either bolted down or set on top of the pipe. They were bulky and hard to transport, as well as difficult to place on the pipe. In contrast, the saddle bags are easy to transport and easy to install. Indeed, the production process is portable, so that the weighted saddle bags can be made at the site of the pipeline construction job involved. This makes it easier to do pipeline weighting jobs in cold weather, at remote locations or in spots where considerable travel time is involved in completing projects. Saddle Tech has recently joined forces with the giant in the weighting system world from the United States, CRC-Evans. The U.S. firm is marketing the bags under a trademarked name 'the saddle bag'. The product being used on projects in California, as well as on almost 90 per cent of wetlands pipeline work in Alberta and British Columbia. Production was 17,000 bags in the first year of operation. So far this season, more than 40,000 bags have been made and distributed throughout North America. Plans are afoot to expand and convert the production facility to an automated operation, running 24 hours a day.

  13. Relocalising Academic Literacy: Diversity, Writing and Collective Learning in an International Master's Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemensen, Nana; Holm, Lars

    2017-01-01

    This article contributes to the continuing discussion about academic literacy in international higher education. Approaching international study programmes as temporary educational contact zones, marked by a broad diversity in students' educational and discursive experiences, we examine the negotiation and relocalisation of academic literacy among…

  14. Making the COP21 work. From international to national scope: the impact of climate negotiations on public action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefebvre, Coline; Delory, Linda; Guibert, Geraud

    2015-12-01

    How to appreciate, when the time comes, the results of the COP21? What are the elements that can make it truly useful? La Fabrique Ecologique and CliMates, on the basis of an exclusive and meticulous international survey underline them: the important part of an efficient climate action does not always rely on what we believe. The most influential aspect will be the commitment to future objectives and steps, strong principles of transparency and the extent of real domestic commitments for a new development strategy. A few weeks ahead of the COP21, what can we really expect? It is very likely that, as for the previous COPs, there will be an agreement, but we still need to see if it will be satisfactory. Facing the extent of the climate challenge and the complex negotiation, it remains urgent to have a clear and precise vision of what this international conference could bring. To measure it, La Fabrique Ecologique and CliMates have led an exclusive survey on the impact in recent years of the annual meetings of the COPs on climate policies of 16 States and 5 local authorities. This survey shows several paradoxes: the legally binding character proved to be not so binding after all; the sense of failure sometimes hid real successes; the negotiation itself having a strong impact on its results. It enables to identify the most important factors which have already led to action: the creation of shared knowledge and transparency standards, the obligation of setting an example for countries willing to be included in the negotiation, the search of economic and social co-benefits of climate action with a view to a new development strategy, the emergence of a global climate civil society. Far too often, the COP21 is presented as a deadline, a final date to solve the most complex and global challenge Man has ever faced: climate deregulation. Presented as the umpteenth 'last-ditch conference', the Paris negotiation might generate many 'climate resigned people

  15. The Autism Simplex Collection : an international, expertly phenotyped autism sample for genetic and phenotypic analyses

    OpenAIRE

    Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Bolshakova, Nadia; Brownfeld, Jessica M.; Anney, Richard J. L.; Bender, Patrick; Bernier, Raphael; Cook, Edwin H.; Coon, Hilary; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Freitag, Christine M.; Hallmayer, Joachim; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Klauck, Sabine M.; Nurnberger, John I.; Oliveira, Guiomar

    2014-01-01

    Background: There is an urgent need for expanding and enhancing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) samples, in order to better understand causes of ASD. Methods: In a unique public-private partnership, 13 sites with extensive experience in both the assessment and diagnosis of ASD embarked on an ambitious, 2-year program to collect samples for genetic and phenotypic research and begin analyses on these samples. The program was called The Autism Simplex Collection (TASC). TASC sample collection ...

  16. 77 FR 26824 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review; Reporting Required for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-07

    ...), Bureau of Transportation Statistics (BTS), DOT. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance with the Paperwork... CONTACT: Jeff Gorham, Office of Airline Information, RTS-42, Room E34, RITA, BTS, 1200 New Jersey Avenue..., Office of Management and Budget, 725-17th Street NW., Washington, DC 20503, Attention: RITA/BTS Desk...

  17. 78 FR 14518 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for the International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-06

    ..., numeracy, and problem-solving skills in technology-rich environments and collects survey information from respondents about their education and employment experience and about the skills they use at work. PIAAC... burden of this collection on the respondents, including through the use of information technology. Please...

  18. Microbiomes of the Dust Particles Collected from the International Space Station and Spacecraft Assembly Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The safety of the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers and maintenance of ISS hardware are the primary rationale for monitoring microorganisms in this...

  19. Debt Collection: More Aggressive Action Needed To Collect Debts Owed by Health Professionals. United States General Accounting Office Report to the Honorable John R. Kasich, House of Representatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    The General Accounting Office (GAO) reviewed and evaluated debt collection activities of five programs of the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) that provide financial assistance to health professions students and medical facilities. The principal findings include: (1) HRSA changes have improved delinquency rates; however, large…

  20. Collective action in a tropical estuarine lagoon: adapting Ostrom’s SES framework to Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta, Colombia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Elba Torres Guevara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper contributes to the social-ecological systems literature byadapting and using Elinor Ostrom’s Social-Ecological System (SES frameworkin the context of a coastal ecosystem. We modified the SES framework in thecase of the Ciénaga Grande de Santa Marta (CGSM, an estuarine lagoon inthe Caribbean coast of Colombia. The ecological importance of CGSM and itsspecies is undeniable. This paper aims to understand why collective action fora sustainable use of CGSM’s fishery resources has not taken place. In order torespond to that question, we created new variables within the social, economic,and political settings of the SES framework. The results show that the fishers’ fearof the indiscriminate and strong violence that illegal armed groups have inflictedon them since the 1960s and the economic development in the ColombianCaribbean region help explain the lack of collective action.

  1. From Credit to Collective Action: The Role of Microfinance in Promoting Women's Social Capital and Normative Influence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Paromita

    2009-01-01

    Can economic ties positively influence social relations and actions? If so, how does this influence operate? Microfinance programs, which provide credit through a group-based lending strategy, provide the ideal setting for exploring these questions. This article examines whether structuring socially isolated women into peer-groups for an…

  2. Improving maternity care in the Dominican Republic: a pilot study of a community-based participatory research action plan by an international healthcare team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Jennifer; Gossett, Sarah; Burgos, Rosa; Cáceres, Ramona; Tejada, Carmen; Dominguez García, Luis; Ambrosio Rosario, Angel; Almonte, Asela; Perez, Lydia J

    2015-05-01

    This article is a report of the process and results of a feasibility pilot study to improve the quality of maternity care in a sample of 31 women and their newborns delivering in a public, tertiary hospital in the Dominican Republic. The pilot study was the first "action step" taken as a result of a formative, community-based participatory research (CBPR) study conducted between 2008 and 2010 by an interdisciplinary, international partnership of U.S. academic researchers, Dominican medical/nursing personnel, and Dominican community health workers. Health personnel and community health workers separately identified indicators most important to measure quality of antepartum maternity care: laboratory and diagnostic studies and respectful, interpersonal communication. At the midpoint and the completion of data collection, the CBPR team evaluated the change in quality indicators to assess improvement in care. The pilot study supports the idea that joint engagement of community health workers, health personnel, and academic researchers with data creation and patient monitoring is motivating for all to continue to improve services in the cultural context of the Dominican Republic. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. Identifying Drivers of Collective Action for the Co-management of Coastal Marine Fisheries in the Gulf of Nicoya, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Lozano, Alejandro J.; Heinen, Joel T.

    2016-04-01

    Small-scale fisheries are important for preventing poverty, sustaining local economies, and rural livelihoods, but tend to be negatively impacted by traditional forms of management and overexploitation among other factors. Marine Areas for Responsible Fishing (Áreas Marinas de Pesca Responsable, AMPR) have emerged as a new model for the co-management of small-scale fisheries in Costa Rica, one that involves collaboration between fishers, government agencies, and NGOs. The primary objective of this paper is to elucidate some of the key variables that influence collective action among small-scale fishers in Tárcoles, a community in the Gulf of Nicoya. We examined collective action for the formation of a local marketing cooperative and participation in management through the AMPR. We apply the social-ecological framework as a diagnostic and organizational tool in the analysis of several types of qualitative data, including interviews with key informants, informal interviews, legal documents, and gray literature. Findings illustrate the importance of socio-economic community attributes (e.g., group size, homogeneity, previous cooperation), as well as that of social (e.g., equity) and ecological (e.g., improved stocks) outcomes perceived as favorable by actors. In addition, our work demonstrates the importance of certain kinds of external NGOs for facilitating and sustaining collective action.

  4. Evaluating dosage effects for the positive action program: How implementation impacts internalizing symptoms, aggression, school hassles, and self-esteem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smokowski, Paul R; Guo, Shenyang; Wu, Qi; Evans, Caroline B R; Cotter, Katie L; Bacallao, Martica

    2016-01-01

    Positive Action (PA) is a school-based intervention for elementary-, middle-, and high-school students that aims to decrease problem behaviors (e.g., violence, substance use) and increase positive behaviors (e.g., academic achievement, school engagement). PA has a long history of documented success achieving these aims, making it an Evidence Based Practice (EBP). Intervention research on EBP's has established the importance of implementation fidelity, especially with regard to program dosage; failure to properly implement an EBP can have negative consequences on targeted outcomes, especially if participants are exposed to a low dosage of the program (e.g., fewer lessons than specified). Much of the current research on PA has neglected to examine how program dosage impacts PA's effect on targeted outcomes. Using propensity score models, multiple imputation, and a 2-level hierarchical linear model, the current study fills this gap and examines how different dosages of PA as measured by years participating in PA and number of PA lessons, impacts adolescent internalizing symptoms, aggression, perceptions of school hassles, and self-esteem over a 3-year period. The current sample included middle school students in grades 6, 7, and 8 (N = 5,894). The findings indicate that students who received 3 years of the PA intervention and a high number of PA lessons had a significantly higher self-esteem score than those who received 0 years of PA or zero lessons. Participants who received 1 year of PA also reported significantly lower school hassle scores than those who received 0 years. Dosage had no statistically significant effects on aggression or internalizing score. Implications are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. The IMO Compendium A Collection of Problems Suggested for the International Mathematical Olympiads 1959-2004

    CERN Document Server

    Djukic, Dusan; Matic, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    The International Mathematical Olympiad (IMO) is a prestigious competition for high-school students interested in mathematics. It offers high school students a chance to measure up with students from the rest of the world. This book contains problems and solutions that appeared on the IMO over the years. It presents a grand total of 1900 problems.

  6. 78 FR 42761 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-17

    ... International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC), assessing their literacy, numeracy, and problem-solving... into the workforce and, more fundamentally, to contribute to society as functioning young adults (OMB... postsecondary education, the workforce, or the types of skills required for successful participation in adult...

  7. IV International Conference on Computer Algebra in Physical Research. Collection of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rostovtsev, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The abstracts of the reports made on IV International conference on computer algebra in physical research are presented. The capabilities of application of computers for algebraic computations in high energy physics and quantum field theory are discussed. Particular attention is paid to a software for the REDUCE computer algebra system

  8. 78 FR 64293 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-28

    ... Investment Companies. OMB Number: 1545-1010. Form Number: 1120-RIC. Abstract: Internal Revenue Code sections... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service [Form 1120-RIC] Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY...

  9. Citrus genebank collections: International collaboration opportunities between the U.S. and Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus germplasm is conserved in genebanks at sites around the world to provide genetic resources for breeding and research programs. The value of genebank collections is particularly evident as diseases and climate change threaten citrus production areas. We provide historical, inventory, and maint...

  10. Energy and environment - greenhouse effect. The international, european and national actions to control the greenhouse gases emissions: which accounting and which perspectives?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    The scientific knowledge concerning the climatic change justifies today immediate fight actions against the greenhouse reinforcement. This fight is based on an ambitious international device which must take into account more global challenges. At the european and national scale, the exploitation of the potential of greenhouse gases reduction must be reinforced and more specially the evolution of the life style. (A.L.B.)

  11. Student Perceptions of Academic Service Learning: Using Mixed Content Analysis to Examine the Effectiveness of the International Baccalaureate Creativity, Action, Service Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatziconstantis, Christos; Kolympari, Tania

    2016-01-01

    The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme for secondary education students requires the successful completion of the Creativity, Action, Service (CAS) component (more recently renamed Creativity, Activity, Service) which is based on the philosophy of experiential learning and Academic Service Learning. In this article, the technique of…

  12. Social Innovation in public elder care: the role of action research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, John; Bilfeldt, Annette

    2013-01-01

    Bidrag til: The International Handbook On Social Innovation: Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research. Moulaert, F., MacCallum, D., Mehmood, A. & Hamdouch, A. (red.). Edward Elgar Publishing, Incorporated,......Bidrag til: The International Handbook On Social Innovation: Collective Action, Social Learning and Transdisciplinary Research. Moulaert, F., MacCallum, D., Mehmood, A. & Hamdouch, A. (red.). Edward Elgar Publishing, Incorporated,...

  13. Thoughts on implementation of the recommendations of the GBIF Task Group on a Global Strategy and Action Plan for Mobilisation of Natural History Collections Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas King

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF has a mandate to facilitate free and open access to primary biodiversity data worldwide. This Special Issue of Biodiversity Informatics publishes the findings of the recent GBIF Task Group on a Global Strategy and Action Plan for Mobilisation of Natural History Collections Data (GSAP-NHC. The GSAP-NHC Task Group has made three primary recommendations dealing with discovery, capture, and publishing of natural history collections data. This overview article provides insight on various activities initiated by GBIF to date to assist with an early uptake and implementation of these recommendations. It calls for proactive participation by all relevant players and stakeholder communities. Given recent technological progress and growing recognition and attention to biodiversity science worldwide, we think rapid progress in discovery, publishing and access to large volumes of useful collection data can be achieved for the immediate benefit of science and society.

  14. Designing global collective action in population and HIV/AIDS programs, 1983-2002: has anything changed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dalen, H.P.

    2008-01-01

    The 1994 International Conference of Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo established goals for the expansion of assistance in matters of reproductive health and HIV/AIDS. This global effort marked a structural break in principle from the past, but did it also change funding behavior? Panel

  15. Events at blood collection area due to nonconforming blood bags and plateletpheresis kits: need for timely corrective and preventive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Anupam; Sachan, Deepti; Elhence, Priti; Pandey, Hem; Dubey, Anju

    2012-07-01

    Good blood banking practice requires that every effort should be made to detect any deviation or defect in blood bank products and to identify any potential risk to blood donor or recipient(s). We report the findings of an exercise that provide an insight into why feedback from the user side is crucial. Various events involving blood bags and plateletpheresis kits and the corresponding appropriate actions instituted for remedial measures were recorded. These scattered events were recorded for 6 months following the use of a new batch of improved blood bags with add-on features. Several events related to plateletpheresis kits from three different manufacturers were also recorded for 1 year. The affected blood bags were utilized with no untoward incident. The complaint was closed following satisfactory response from the blood bag manufacturing company that acted in a timely manner in addressing the root causes of the problems. However, corrective and preventive actions (CAPA) could not be implemented for plateletpheresis kits. The rate of undesirable events was higher with plateletpheresis kits as compared with whole blood bags (1.75% vs. 0.06%). As defects or deviations that trigger the need for CAPA can stem from numerous sources, it is important to clearly identify and document the problems and level of risk so that appropriate investigations can be instituted and remedial actions can be taken in a timely manner. This study demonstrates the usefulness of a quality initiative to collate and analyze blood product faults in conjunction with blood product manufacturers. © 2012 American Association of Blood Banks.

  16. International Clostridium difficile animal strain collection and large diversity of animal associated strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janezic, Sandra; Zidaric, Valerija; Pardon, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Background: Clostridium difficile is an important cause of intestinal infections in some animal species and animals might be a reservoir for community associated human infections. Here we describe a collection of animal associated C. difficile strains from 12 countries based on inclusion criteria...... of one strain (PCR ribotype) per animal species per laboratory. Results: Altogether 112 isolates were collected and distributed into 38 PCR ribotypes with agarose based approach and 50 PCR ribotypes with sequencer based approach. Four PCR ribotypes were most prevalent in terms of number of isolates...... as well as in terms of number of different host species: 078 (14.3% of isolates; 4 hosts), 014/020 (11.6%; 8 hosts); 002 (5.4%; 4 hosts) and 012 (5.4%; 5 hosts). Two animal hosts were best represented; cattle with 31 isolates (20 PCR ribotypes; 7 countries) and pigs with 31 isolates (16 PCR ribotypes; 10...

  17. Concern and Helplessness: Citizens' Assessments of Individual and Collective Action on the Provision of Environmental Public Goods in a Coastal City at Risk of Inundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyan, Sabrina; Collins, Alan; Duffy, David

    2016-09-01

    Survey data from a representative sample of 1005 households in the UK coastal city of Portsmouth are examined to discern commonalities and contrasts in their assessment of actions to address the related environmental threats of climate change and flooding. The city of Portsmouth is at risk of inundation from rising sea levels and the city has recent experience of flooding. A simple local and global public good framework is used to organize the understanding of reported attitudes and their determinants. The findings show that it is not always the same individuals who express concern about both climate change and flooding. Investigation into perceptions of helplessness in tackling climate change indicates that individuals more often perceived themselves to be helpless in tackling climate but perceived local collective action to be more effective. Individuals considered local collective action to be more effective in tackling climate change. Perceptions of individual helplessness are in turn related to reported concern. Several socioeconomic characteristics of individuals are shown to be useful in explaining the determinants of concern and perceptions of helplessness among respondents. As other cities face climate change-related challenges, the empirical findings, based upon attitudes from an alert urban population, are informative to policy design.

  18. Methods for reducing internal collective doses due to contamination of agricultural lands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prister, B.S.; Novikova, N.K.; Tkachenko, N.V.; Nagovisyna, L.I.; Berezhnaya, T.I.; Semenyuk, N.D.; Rudoj, V.M.

    1990-01-01

    Radioactive contamination of agricultural lands in 30 km vicinity of Chernobyl NPP asw well as agricultural products involved in food chains is considered. Attention is paid to population collective doses due to intake of contaminated food. It is shown that target optimization of agricultural production structure in territories where food contamination does not result in increase of population dose limit lies in achievement of minimal inclusion of radionuclides in human diet

  19. Energy Management Action Network (EMAK). A scoping study investigating the establishment and support of an international and domestic action network of energy management in industry. Information paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jollands, Nigel; Tanaka, Kanako; Gasc, Emilien

    2009-12-15

    The IEA has identified energy efficiency as essential to achieving a sustainable energy future. In order to improve energy efficiency in industry one of the priority areas for further action is the promotion of more and higher quality energy management (EM) activity. However, there are significant gaps in the current implementation of EM. One method of bridging these gaps would be the creation of an EM Action NetworK (EMAK) to bring practical support to energy managers, connect energy managers to energy policy makers, and interconnect these networks globally. The paper describes possible aims, activities, scope, structure, timelines and approaches related to EMAK and looks at specific tasks that would be important in the set-up and implementation.

  20. The big interview - Fukushima: 'Collectively, the international nuclear security system has failed'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niel, J.C.; Seillan, Hubert

    2011-01-01

    In an interview the ASN (the French Nuclear Safety Authority) manager summarizes his professional career, describes the ASN missions and outlines the independence of this institution as it is defined and practically exists, gives his opinion and analysis on the Fukushima accident, evokes the meaning of stress tests, discusses the information obtained through inspections of the French nuclear power plants, evokes the desirable evolutions at the international level, explains why terrorism has not been integrated in the stress test procedure, comments the implications of the European level on French safety studies. Some actors are briefly presented: the CEA, AREVA, EDF, the World association of nuclear operators (WANO)

  1. New insights into health financing: First results of the international data collection under the System of Health Accounts 2011 framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Michael; Morgan, David

    2017-07-01

    International comparisons of health spending and financing are most frequently carried out using datasets of international organisations based on the System of Health Accounts (SHA). This accounting framework has recently been updated and 2016 saw the first international data collection under the new SHA 2011 guidelines. In addition to reaching better comparability of health spending figures and greater country coverage, the updated framework has seen changes in the dimension of health financing leading to important consequences when analysing health financing data. This article presents the first results of health spending and financing data collected under this new framework and highlights the areas where SHA 2011 has become a more useful tool for policy analysis, by complementing data on expenditure of health financing schemes with information about their revenue streams. It describes the major conceptual changes in the scope of health financing and highlights why comprehensive analyses based on SHA 2011 can provide for a more complete description and comparison of health financing across countries, facilitate a more meaningful discussion of fiscal sustainability of health spending by also analysing the revenues of compulsory public schemes and help to clarify the role of governments in financing health care - which is generally much bigger than previously documented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Practical application of the International Safety Regime in NW Russia: experience from the Norwegian plan of action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, Malgorzata K.; Kiselev, Mikhail; Kochetkov, Oleg; Shandala, Natalya; Smith, Graham

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (NRPA) and the Federal Medical-Biological Agency (FMBA) of the Russian Federation have a collaboration programme which forms part of the Norwegian government's Plan of Action to improve radiation and nuclear safety in Northwest Russia. The programme seeks to support an efficient and effective regulatory supervision process over the management of the nuclear legacy, taking account of the Russian regulatory framework but also taking advantage of recommendations and guidance from the evolving international safety regime. This paper will present the substantial advances made within that programme, describing on-going progress within specific projects and setting out the value arising from wider involvement in the programme of other organisations such as the IAEA and NATO, as well as the technical support derived from other national agencies and technical organisations. This has been the first opportunity for such international regulatory interaction at the operational level. Specific projects are concerned with the management of the nuclear legacy in Northwest Russia. These include the remediation of previous military facilities, and related spent fuel and radioactive waste management, at the Shore Technical Bases (now designated as Sites of Temporary Storage) at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha. New regulatory guidance documents have been developed, involving major technical inputs from the State Research Centre-Institute of Biophysics, as well as review and advice on relevant good practice in other countries provided by other technical support organisations. Current projects due to complete in 2007 and to be reported upon in the full paper involve development of new regulatory guidance on Very Low-Level Waste management, specifically for the licensing and operation of new VLLW disposal facilities; optimisation of operational radiation protection during remediation, particularly in areas of high ambient radiation dose

  3. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  4. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-05-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  5. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  6. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  7. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-11-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  8. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  9. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  10. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-09-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  11. Coordination of ministerial actions regarding the use of liquefied natural gas as marine fuel. A challenge to take up collectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouffray, Jean-Francois; Erhardt, Jean-Bernard; Allais, Vincent; Ourliac, Jean-Paul

    2013-02-01

    This report is the first of a series dealing with the coordination of ministerial actions in favor of the use of liquefied natural gas (LNG) as marine fuel. Tougher sulfur oxides pollution regulations will lead to the progressive abandonment of heavy fuels in maritime propulsion. LNG can meet the future environmental imperatives but its introduction as marine fuel implies important naval and infrastructure investments. This report presents, first, a summary of the report's recommendations and the aim of this coordination study, and, then, treats more thoroughly of the different coordination aspects: 1 - ship fuels; 2 - LNG's advantages; 3 - the necessary adaptations in France for LNG development as marine fuel (infrastructures, regulation, existing examples, exemptions, European policies); 4 - economical actors involvement, industrial challenges, pilot projects, communication, investments financing and actors coordination

  12. International Consortium of Vascular Registries Consensus Recommendations for Peripheral Revascularisation Registry Data Collection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Christian-Alexander; Bertges, Daniel; Eldrup, Nikolaj

    2018-01-01

    intervention; (ix) complications; and (x) follow up. CONCLUSION: A modified Delphi study allowed 25 international vascular registry experts to achieve a consensus recommendation for a minimum core data set and an optimum data set for peripheral arterial revascularisation registries. Continued global...... via internet exchange and face to face discussions. In total, 187 different items from the various registry data forms were identified for potential inclusion in the recommended data set. Ultimately, 79 items were recommended for inclusion in minimum core data sets, including 65 items in the level 1...... data set, and an additional 14 items in the more specific level 2 and 3 recommended data sets. Data elements were broadly divided into (i) patient characteristics; (ii) comorbidities; (iii) current medications; (iv) lesion treated; (v) procedure; (vi) bypass; (vii) endarterectomy (viii) catheter based...

  13. Outreach Through Action: Using Citizen Science Pathways to Educate and Engage the Public While Collecting Real Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickline, A.

    2016-02-01

    Citizens in Lewes, DE monitor local waterways by collecting physical and chemical data and checking for harmful algal blooms since 1991 through the University of Delaware Citizen Monitoring Program (UD CMP). This effort has produced lengthy time series for some sites dating back to 1991, as well as an engaged cohort of local citizens interested in coastal and estuarine processes. Though their primary goal is to monitor for conditions that could potentially be harmful to human and aquatic health, we saw an opportunity to reach out and expand their efforts by asking these citizens to sample the zooplankton community, providing more ecological context for their data. Over the past year, we have worked to engage this group through a series of talks and trainings. We explained the basics of zooplankton dynamics in our region, recruited volunteers to collect zooplankton at their sites, and worked with them to analyze their data. This small pilot project exemplifies the dual benefits of citizen science programs: collecting credible data while provided people with non-science backgrounds a chance to learn science through a hands-on project. The interactions with researchers and opportunities to work with real data offer citizens the one of the most robust science experiences, going beyond those provided by attending lab open houses or listening to talks.

  14. Development of a Web-based tool to collect and display water system customer service areas for public health action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Michelle; Wolff, Craig; Collins, Natalie; Guo, Liang; Meltzer, Dan; English, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Significant illness is associated with biological contaminants in drinking water, but little is known about health effects from low levels of chemical contamination in drinking water. To examine these effects in epidemiological studies, the sources of drinking water of study populations need to be known. The California Environmental Health Tracking Program developed an online application that would collect data on the geographic location of public water system (PWS) customer service areas in California, which then could be linked to demographic and drinking water quality data. We deployed the Water Boundary Tool (WBT), a Web-based geospatial crowdsourcing application that can manage customer service boundary data for each PWS in California and can track changes over time. We also conducted a needs assessment for expansion to other states. The WBT was designed for water system operators, local and state regulatory agencies, and government entities. Since its public launch in 2012, the WBT has collected service area boundaries for about 2300 individual PWS, serving more than 90% of the California population. Results of the needs assessment suggest interest and utility for deploying such a tool among states lacking statewide PWS service area boundary data. Although the WBT data set is incomplete, it has already been used for a variety of applications, including fulfilling legislatively mandated reporting requirements and linking customer service areas to drinking water quality data to better understand local water quality issues. Development of this tool holds promise to assist with outbreak investigations and prevention, environmental health monitoring, and emergency preparedness and response.

  15. The art of collecting experimental data internationally: EXFOR, CINDA and the NRDC network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksson, H.; Schwerer, O.; Rochman, D.; Mikhaylyukova, M.V.; Otuka, N.

    2008-01-01

    The world-wide network of nuclear reaction data centres (NRDC) has, for about 40 years, provided data services to the scientific community. This network covers all types of nuclear reaction data, including neutron-induced, charged-particle-induced, and photonuclear data, used in a wide range of applications, such as fission reactors, accelerator driven systems, fusion facilities, nuclear medicine, materials analysis, environmental monitoring, and basic research. The now 13 nuclear data centres included in the NRDC are dividing the efforts of compilation and distribution for particular types of reactions and/or geographic regions all over the world. A central activity of the network is the collection and compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data and the related bibliographic information in the EXFOR and CINDA databases. Many of the individual data centres also distribute other types of nuclear data information, including evaluated data libraries, nuclear structure and decay data, and nuclear data reports. The network today ensures the world-wide transfer of information and coordinated evolution of an important source of nuclear data for current and future nuclear applications. (authors)

  16. THE ART OF COLLECTING EXPERIMENTAL DATA INTERNATIONALLY: EXFOR, CINDA AND THE NRDC NETWORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HENRIKSSON, H.; SCHWERER, O.; ROCHMAN, D.; MIKHAYLYUKOVA, M.V.; OTUKA, N.

    2007-01-01

    The world-wide network of nuclear reaction data centers (NRDC) has, for about 40 years, provided data services to the scientific community. This network covers all types of nuclear reaction data, including neutron-induced, charged-particle-induced, and photonuclear data, used in a wide range of applications, such as fission reactors, accelerator driven systems, fusion facilities, nuclear medicine, materials analysis, environmental monitoring, and basic research. The now 13 nuclear data centers included in the NRDC are dividing the efforts of compilation and distribution for particular types of reactions and/or geographic regions all over the world. A central activity of the network is the collection and compilation of experimental nuclear reaction data and the related bibliographic information in the EXFOR and CINDA databases. Many of the individual data centers also distribute other types of nuclear data information, including evaluated data libraries, nuclear structure and decay data, and nuclear data reports. The network today ensures the world-wide transfer of information and coordinated evolution of an important source of nuclear data for current and future nuclear applications

  17. Turning education into action: Impact of a collective social education approach to improve nurses' ability to recognize and accurately assess delirium in hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Catherine; Henderson, Amanda; Graham, Fred; Beattie, Elizabeth

    2018-03-01

    Although cognitive impairment including dementia and delirium is common in older hospital patients, it is not well recognized or managed by hospital staff, potentially resulting in adverse events. This paper describes, and reports on the impact of a collective social education approach to improving both nurses' knowledge of, and screening for delirium. Thirty-four experienced nurses from six hospital wards, became Cognition Champions (CogChamps) to lead their wards in a collective social education process about cognitive impairment and the assessment of delirium. At the outset, the CogChamps were provided with comprehensive education about dementia and delirium from a multidisciplinary team of clinicians. Their knowledge was assessed to ascertain they had the requisite understanding to engage in education as a collective social process, namely, with each other and their local teams. Following this, they developed ward specific Action Plans in collaboration with their teams aimed at educating and evaluating ward nurses' ability to accurately assess and care for patients for delirium. The plans were implemented over five months. The broader nursing teams' knowledge was assessed, together with their ability to accurately assess patients for delirium. Each ward implemented their Action Plan to varying degrees and key achievements included the education of a majority of ward nurses about delirium and the certification of the majority as competent to assess patients for delirium using the Confusion Assessment Method. Two wards collected pre-and post-audit data that demonstrated a substantial improvement in delirium screening rates. The education process led by CogChamps and supported by educators and clinical experts provides an example of successfully educating nurses about delirium and improving screening rates of patients for delirium. ACTRN 12617000563369. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Action Research as a tool for the Strengthening of the Small Businesses Collective (Copec in Salto, Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marisabina Minteguiaga

    2018-01-01

    up of commercial units whose economic function is linked, or better said, integrated, to the family structure function. This work is preceded by work done at the Universidad Cenur Litoral Norte between 2014 and 2015 with a group of about 15 entrepreneur units. On the whole, their location and influence area are neighborhoods; their importance lies in the relevance they have for the livelihood of the family. The family-business unit is seen as an integrality that broadly surpasses the economic factor; it is a family lifestyle with a specific identity that responds to a new production scenario. During 2016, a new experience with another group of seventeen business units took place, after reformulating the project’s objectives based on the previous experience. This time the participation methodology proposed by Tomás Rodríguez Villasante and the Citizens’ Network and Sustainable Environment (Cimas, acronym in Spanish was adopted and as Rodriquez states in his book, through the incorporation of specificities of the process itself. In this participatory work dynamic, the actors themselves participated in the path to be taken by the small business collective of Salto through the generation of systematic training and exchange scenarios. Within this framework, this text presents this experience which seeks the creation and strengthening of the collective actor, highlighting the actors of the social and economic reality of the city of Salto.

  19. Collective Order within Family; An Axial Phenomenon regarding the Effect of Islamic Teachings on the ‎Economic Action of Family: A Study Based on the Grounded Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ‎ V. Arshadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present article aims to identify the intermediate factors regarding the effect of Islamic teachings on family economic action through an interpretative and multifactorial approach. The method is qualitative and is based on grounded theory method”. Due to the interdisciplinary nature of the matter, a semi-structured interview with 16 experts on Islamic economy, Muslim consumer behavior, educational sciences, psychology and sociology and the issue of values and actions has served as the main research tool. The samples were selected through purposive sampling and snowball method, and interviews were conducted to the point of theoretical saturation. Findings of data analysis in this three steps show that factors such as the synergy of the high quality of transfer of teachings from formal and informal education institutes, high quality of the perception of teachings by family members, high quality of family income resources, and faith and belief in the accountability in the Hereafter can create collective order within family based on the subjective value of Islamic economic teaching. The collective order is influenced by "underlying" and "structural" factors and leads to discretion behavior. This paper is also innovative in terms of its profound look into the formation of economic behavior within the family.

  20. Evaluation of International Observe the Moon Night: Outcomes, Challenges, and Lessons Learned from Six Years of Data Collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buxner, S.; Wenger, M.; Joseph, E.; Jones, A. P.; Bleacher, L.; Shaner, A. J.; Day, B. H.

    2015-12-01

    Evaluation of large public STEM events poses many challenges including data collection of moving crowds, representative sampling, and collecting sufficient data with available resources. International Observe the Moon Night (InOMN) is a yearly event held around the world on a single day coordinated by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter with support from partners around the globe. Each year hundreds of events are held across the United States and in over 50 countries across the world. This distributed event poses even more challenges in its evaluation due to the fact that events vary widely in their implementation and that it is impossible for evaluators to collect data at any more than a small fraction of the events. We present findings of six years of evaluation at InOMN events that implemented varying data collection techniques, incentives, and target outcomes as the event has evolved. Through analysis of these years of data, we have found that InOMN events are hosted by a variety of public and private institutions all over the world including museums, planetaria, schools, universities, observatories, parks, and private businesses and families, over half of which have hosted events for more than one year. Telescopes are present at a majority of the events and lunar science and exploration is often highlighted. Visitors who have been surveyed or interviewed often report being regular attendees at science related events but many were new to InOMN. Many of those surveyed report that they attended with friends and family making their participation a social event. Visitors also reported an increase in knowledge and excitement to learn more about the Moon as a result of their participation in an event. Overall, InOMN events have met both organizers and facilitators' goals. We will discuss the different data collection techniques, challenges encountered and overcome, and lessons learned through this ongoing evaluation effort.

  1. A Longitudinal Evaluation of the Positive Action Program in a Low-Income, Racially Diverse, Rural County: Effects on Self-Esteem, School Hassles, Aggression, and Internalizing Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shenyang; Wu, Qi; Smokowski, Paul R; Bacallao, Martica; Evans, Caroline B R; Cotter, Katie L

    2015-12-01

    Positive Action is a school-based program that aims to decrease problem behaviors (e.g., violence, substance use) and increase positive behaviors (e.g., school engagement, academic achievement). Although a number of studies have shown that Positive Action successfully achieves these goals, few studies have evaluated the program's effectiveness in rural schools. Given that rural youth are at an increased risk for risky behaviors (e.g., violence, substance use), this is a critical gap in the existing Positive Action research base. The current study assesses the impact of Positive Action on change rates of self-esteem, school hassles, aggression, and internalizing symptoms in a group (N = 1246, 52% female) of ethnically/racially diverse (27% White, 23% African American, 12% mixed race/other, 8% Latino, 30% as American Indian) middle school youth (age range 9-20) located in two violent, low-income rural counties in North Carolina. One county engaged in Positive Action over the 3-year study window while the other county did not. Following multiple imputation and propensity score analysis, 4 two-level hierarchical linear models were run using each of the outcome measures as dependent variables. The results indicate that the program generates statistically significant beneficial effects for youth from the intervention county on self-esteem scores and school hassles scores. Although the program generates beneficial effects for intervention youth on the change in aggression scores, the finding is not statistically significant. The finding on the change in internalizing scores shows a non-significant detrimental effect: the youth from the comparison county have lower internalizing scores than those from the intervention county. Implications are discussed.

  2. 76 FR 66035 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application for Insular Watch and Jewelry...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application for Insular Watch and Jewelry Program Benefits AGENCY: International Trade Administration. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to reduce...

  3. The international Genome sample resource (IGSR): A worldwide collection of genome variation incorporating the 1000 Genomes Project data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura; Fairley, Susan; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Streeter, Ian; Perry, Emily; Lowy, Ernesto; Tassé, Anne-Marie; Flicek, Paul

    2017-01-04

    The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR; http://www.internationalgenome.org) expands in data type and population diversity the resources from the 1000 Genomes Project. IGSR represents the largest open collection of human variation data and provides easy access to these resources. IGSR was established in 2015 to maintain and extend the 1000 Genomes Project data, which has been widely used as a reference set of human variation and by researchers developing analysis methods. IGSR has mapped all of the 1000 Genomes sequence to the newest human reference (GRCh38), and will release updated variant calls to ensure maximal usefulness of the existing data. IGSR is collecting new structural variation data on the 1000 Genomes samples from long read sequencing and other technologies, and will collect relevant functional data into a single comprehensive resource. IGSR is extending coverage with new populations sequenced by collaborating groups. Here, we present the new data and analysis that IGSR has made available. We have also introduced a new data portal that increases discoverability of our data-previously only browseable through our FTP site-by focusing on particular samples, populations or data sets of interest. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Guidelines and policies on collection of biological specimens in the Philippines. Philippine Congress, International Convention on Biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madulid, D A

    1996-04-01

    In October, 1993, 16 months after the United Nations approved the International Convention on Biodiversity held in Rio de Janeiro, June, 1992, the Philippine Congress ratified and adopted the Convention. This is a manifestation of the full support of the Philippines for the principles and policies adopted by the UN body on the conservation of biodiversity, sustainable development of biological resources and equitable sharing of benefits between users and owners of biodiversity resources. The Philippine scientific community has long recognized the need for and importance of a national guideline and policy with regard to the collection of plants and animals in the Philippines for scientific or commercial purposes. A series of consultative meetings were held by representatives of government agencies, non-government organizations, private organizations, academic and private persons concerned with biodiversity conservation to formulate national guidelines that regulate the collection of plant and animal specimens in the country. Guidelines were unanimously adopted by various government agencies and academia and a Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) was signed on September 28, 1990. Very recently a new document was drafted, specifically to serve as a guideline for those who desire to undertake sample collecting in the Philippines for biodiversity prospecting. The document is now being reviewed by government departments and agencies and will be presented to the President of the Philippines for signing as an Executive Order (EO). Once signed, this EO will serve as a national policy for bioprospecting in the country. The Philippines is one of the countries in Southeast Asia that has endorsed the adoption of regional guidelines on the collection of plant and animal organisms for drug development. The ASEAN Agreement on the Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources (1985). The Manila Declaration (1992) and lately, the Melaka Accord (1994), all of which were signed by various

  5. Intentions of Chiropractic Interns Regarding use of Health Promotion in Practice: Applying Theory of Reasoned Action to Identify Attitudes, Beliefs, and Influencing Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marion W.; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The theory of reasoned action is a health behavioral theory that has been used to predict personal health behaviors and intentions as well as those of providers delivering health care. The purpose of this study was to determine interns' future practices regarding the use of health promotion using this model to develop survey questions and to determine attitudes and perceived influences on their prospective behaviors in general, toward the use of health promotion once in practice. Methods: Across the course of one year, all graduating interns at a chiropractic college were queried with a 20 question survey designed using the theory of reasoned action. Frequencies and inferential statistics were performed including prediction modeling using logistic regression. Results: A majority (>85%) of interns indicated they would use health promotion in practice. Differences were noted based on perceived skill levels, perception of educational emphasis, various normative beliefs, and gender. Conclusion: Most interns will use some form of health promotion in practice. Normative influences including those seen as key influencers are as powerful a predictor as perceived education or skill levels on future practice of health promotion. PMID:19390679

  6. Intentions of Chiropractic Interns Regarding use of Health Promotion in Practice: Applying Theory of Reasoned Action to Identify Attitudes, Beliefs, and Influencing Factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Marion W; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald D

    2009-01-01

    The theory of reasoned action is a health behavioral theory that has been used to predict personal health behaviors and intentions as well as those of providers delivering health care. The purpose of this study was to determine interns' future practices regarding the use of health promotion using this model to develop survey questions and to determine attitudes and perceived influences on their prospective behaviors in general, toward the use of health promotion once in practice. Across the course of one year, all graduating interns at a chiropractic college were queried with a 20 question survey designed using the theory of reasoned action. Frequencies and inferential statistics were performed including prediction modeling using logistic regression. A majority (>85%) of interns indicated they would use health promotion in practice. Differences were noted based on perceived skill levels, perception of educational emphasis, various normative beliefs, and gender. Most interns will use some form of health promotion in practice. Normative influences including those seen as key influencers are as powerful a predictor as perceived education or skill levels on future practice of health promotion.

  7. Orbital rotation without orbital angular momentum: mechanical action of the spin part of the internal energy flow in light beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2012-01-01

    flow upon tight focusing of the beam, usually applied for energy flow detection by means of the mechanical action upon probe particles. We propose a two-beam interference technique that results in an appreciable level of spin flow in moderately focused beams and detection of the orbital motion of probe...... particles within a field where the transverse energy circulation is associated exclusively with the spin flow. This result can be treated as the first demonstration of mechanical action of the spin flow of a light field....

  8. Measurement of radon exhalation rates in some soil samples collected near the international monument Taj Mahal, Agra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, Jyoti; Kumar, Rupesh; Indolia, R.S.; Swarup, R.; Mahur, A.K.; Singh, Hargyan; Sonkawade, R.G.

    2011-01-01

    Human beings are exposed to ionizing radiation from natural sources due to the occurrence of natural radioactive elements in solids, rocks, sand, soil etc. used as building construction materials and to the internal exposure from radioactive elements through good, water and air. Radon exhalation rate is of prime importance for the estimation of radiation risk from various materials. In the present study soil samples collected near the Tajmahal Agra. Sealed Can Technique was adopted for radon exhalation measurements. All the soil samples collected were grinded, dried and sieved through a 100 mesh sieve. Equal amount of each sieved (100μm grain size) sample (100 gm) was placed at the base of the Cans of 7.5 cm height and 7.0 cm diameter similar to those used in the calibration experiment (Singh et al., 1997). LR-115 type II plastic track detector (2 cm x 2 cm) was fixed on the top inside of the cylindrical Can. Radon exhalation rate varies from 529 mBqm -2 h -1 to 1254 mBqm -2 h -1 . The results will be presented. (author)

  9. A framework to promote collective action within the One Health community of practice: Using participatory modelling to enable interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral and multi-level integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurelie Binot

    2015-12-01

    The implementation of a One Health (OH approach in this context calls for improved integration among disciplines and improved cross-sectoral collaboration, involving stakeholders at different levels. For sure, such integration is not achieved spontaneously, implies methodological guidelines and has transaction costs. We explore pathways for implementing such collaboration in SEA context, highlighting the main challenges to be faced by researchers and other target groups involved in OH actions. On this basis, we propose a conceptual framework of OH integration. Throughout 3 components (field-based data management, professional training workshops and higher education, we suggest to develop a new culture of networking involving actors from various disciplines, sectors and levels (from the municipality to the Ministries through a participatory modelling process, fostering synergies and cooperation. This framework could stimulate long-term dialogue process, based on the combination of case studies implementation and capacity building. It aims for implementing both institutional OH dynamics (multi-stakeholders and cross-sectoral and research approaches promoting systems thinking and involving social sciences to follow-up and strengthen collective action.

  10. EL PAPEL DE LAS COMPETENCIAS INDIVIDUALES Y COLECTIVAS EN LOS SISTEMAS DE ACCIÓN THE ROLE OF INDIVIDUAL AND COLLECTIVE COMPETENCES IN ACTION SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Climént Bonilla Juan B.

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:El principal propósito de este artículo, producto de un extensa revisión de términos y conceptos relacionados con educación y capacitación basadas en competencias, es aclarar el papel de las competencias individuales y colectivas en el contexto de los sistemas de acción, donde ambos tipos se complementan —como instrumentos de la formación de individuos y grupos— en la solución de problemas y necesidades que afectan a las personas en distintos espacios de participación e intervención social. Con el mismo propósito, se examinan varias de las diferencias y puntos de encuentro, entre competencias individuales y colectivas, especialmente en lo que concierne a los componentes primarios y las funciones sustantivas de los sistemas de acción. Finalmente, se advierte sobre los efectos adversos que pueden tener las competencias falsas o desnaturalizadas, en el funcionamiento y la sustentabilidad de dichos sistemas.Abstract:The main purpose of this article, product of an extensive revision of terms and concepts related to competence -based education and training, is to clarify the role of individual and collective competences in the context of action systems, where both types complement each other —as individual and group professional development instruments— in the solution of problems and needs that affect individuals in various spaces of social participation and intervention. With the same purpose, several differences and communalities, between individualand collective competences, are examined, specially in relation to action systems' primary components and substantive functions. Finally, it is made notice about the adverse effects that false or denaturalized competences may have in such systems functioning and sustainability.

  11. The Role of Study-Abroad Students in Cultural Diplomacy: Toward an International Education as Soft Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akli, Madalina

    2012-01-01

    This paper argues that study-abroad students should be at the center of cultural diplomacy. It recognizes that students can engage in soft action to establish intercultural dialogue. They develop and sustain relationships with people from host countries through cultural immersion and education. Study-abroad students are encouraged to proactively…

  12. Coordinated international action to accelerate genome-to-phenome with FAANG, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes project : open letter

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bottema, C.D.; Brauning, R.; Burgess, S.C.; Burt, D.W.; Casas, E.; Cheng, H.H.; Clarke, L.; Couldrey, C.; Dalrymple, B.P.; Elsik, C.G.; Foissac, S.; Giuffra, E.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Hayes, B.J.; Huang, L.S.; Khatib, H.; Kijas, J.W.; Kim, H.; Lunney, J.K.; McCarthy, F.M.; McEwan, J.; Moore, S.; Nanduri, B.; Notredame, C.; Palti, Y.; Plastow, G.S.; Reecy, J.M.; Rohrer, G.; Sarropoulou, E.; Schmidt, C.J.; Silverstein, J.; Tellam, R.L.; Tixier-Boichard, M.; Tosser-klopp, G.; Tuggle, C.K.; Vilkki, J.; White, S.N.; Zhao, S.; Zhou, H.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the organization of a nascent international effort, the Functional Annotation of Animal Genomes (FAANG) project, whose aim is to produce comprehensive maps of functional elements in the genomes of domesticated animal species.

  13. You're it! How to psychologically survive an internal investigation, disciplinary proceeding, or legal action in the police, fire, medical, mental health, legal, or emergency services professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Rightly or wrongly, law enforcement, public safety, medical, mental health, legal, and emergency services professionals may have to face internal investigation, disciplinary measures, license suspension, criminal prosecution, civil lawsuits, and/or personal life disruption related to actions taken in the course of their work. This article describes the main categories of misconduct--or simply mistakes--that can cause different types of professionals to be investigated, charged, prosecuted, and/or sued. It next discusses the kinds of psychological reactions commonly seen in workers who face these kinds of proceedings. Finally, the article offers a set of practical psychological coping strategies and procedural recommendations for dealing with the stresses of an investigation, administrative action, or litigation, and for mitigating their effects on one's life and career.

  14. Deliberating collective action and identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønlev, Rasmus

    2011-01-01

    I Lunds Universitets database - hvor redaktøren sidder - er udgivelsesåret angivet til 2011: http://www.lunduniversity.lu.se/o.o.i.s?id=24732&postid=2295559. Så det tænker jeg er bedst at holde fast i....

  15. 78 FR 66424 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service [IA-33-92] Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... Project Number: IA-33-92. Abstract: Section 6050H of the Internal Revenue Code relates to the information...

  16. 76 FR 74117 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... Number: 1545-0817. Regulation Project Number: EE-28-78 (TD 7845). Abstract: Internal Revenue Code section...

  17. 78 FR 28703 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... requirements that must be met for an investment to qualify under Internal Revenue code section 936(d)(4) as an... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments...

  18. 75 FR 28331 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... that must be met for an investment to qualify under Internal Revenue code section 936(d)(4) as an... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service [INTL-955-86] Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and...

  19. Intended Learning and Learning in Action: Understanding how a Competency Framework for International Business is Construed by Students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Heugten, Petronella; Heijne-Penninga, Marjolein; Robbe, Patricia; Wolfensberger, Marca; Jaarsma, Alexandra

    Undergraduate international business (IB) education aims to prepare students with the competencies that meet the demands of the workplace. However, graduates’ skills and those required for employment do not always align and this may be due to the lack of common language used by professionals,

  20. The Impact of Internal and External Resources, and Strategic Actions in Business Networks on Firm Performance in the Software Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anggraeni, E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the variance in firm performance has been an important topic in the strategic management literature. In the last two decades it has become particularly interesting as business networks increasingly have become an integrated part of a firm's environment. Besides the internal resources,

  1. 'REDD' at the Convergence of the Environment and Development Debates - International Incentives for National Action on Avoided Deforestation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippa Venning

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Developing countries would be more likely to participate in any new international climate change agreement if they could earn and trade carbon credits from avoided deforestation, also known as 'REDD'. This paper argues that REDD should be included in any new agreement but, unlike the Clean Development Mechanism, its credits should be accounted for at a national-level, rather than on a project-basis. Experience with the Kyoto Protocol and development assistance over many decades shows that to have effective and sustainable environmental and development benefits, a national-based approach to REDD would be needed to transmit international financial incentives into national development planning. Indonesia is used as an example to show how a national-based approach to REDD could be effectively implemented in the country with the highest deforestation rate in the world. After a brief discussion of REDD and its status in the international climate change regime post-Copenhagen in Part I, Part II examines the different approaches to the scale of REDD being mooted in the negotiations for a new international agreement. Part III shows that many arguments against including REDD could be addressed with a national-approach. For remaining issues, particularly challenges in transferring profits from the sale of REDD-generated credits to local level incentives to protect forests, development lessons internationally and from Indonesia show that such transfers could be structured in an effective way not only to achieve environmental benefits, but also to achieve broader development and poverty reduction aims. These lessons, discussed in Part IV, further bolster the case for any post-2012 agreement to incorporate a national-based approach to REDD, integrated into national development plans.

  2. A framework to promote collective action within the One Health community of practice: Using participatory modelling to enable interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral and multi-level integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binot, Aurelie; Duboz, Raphaël; Promburom, Panomsak; Phimpraphai, Waraphon; Cappelle, Julien; Lajaunie, Claire; Goutard, Flavie Luce; Pinyopummintr, Tanu; Figuié, Muriel; Roger, François Louis

    2015-12-01

    As Southeast Asia (SEA) is characterized by high human and domestic animal densities, growing intensification of trade, drastic land use changes and biodiversity erosion, this region appears to be a hotspot to study complex dynamics of zoonoses emergence and health issues at the Animal-Human-Environment interface. Zoonotic diseases and environmental health issues can have devastating socioeconomic and wellbeing impacts. Assessing and managing the related risks implies to take into account ecological and social dynamics at play, in link with epidemiological patterns. The implementation of a One Health ( OH ) approach in this context calls for improved integration among disciplines and improved cross-sectoral collaboration, involving stakeholders at different levels. For sure, such integration is not achieved spontaneously, implies methodological guidelines and has transaction costs. We explore pathways for implementing such collaboration in SEA context, highlighting the main challenges to be faced by researchers and other target groups involved in OH actions. On this basis, we propose a conceptual framework of OH integration. Throughout 3 components (field-based data management, professional training workshops and higher education), we suggest to develop a new culture of networking involving actors from various disciplines, sectors and levels (from the municipality to the Ministries) through a participatory modelling process, fostering synergies and cooperation. This framework could stimulate long-term dialogue process, based on the combination of case studies implementation and capacity building. It aims for implementing both institutional OH dynamics (multi-stakeholders and cross-sectoral) and research approaches promoting systems thinking and involving social sciences to follow-up and strengthen collective action.

  3. Policiais Militares em greve: oportunidades e restrições à ação coletiva (Military Police officers on strike: opportunities and restrictions to collective action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônia Jesuíta de Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resumo: Este artigo objetiva discutir, a partir do estudo exploratório e doaporte teórico de Sidney Tarrow, o movimento paredista dos cabos e soldados da Polícia Militar do Piauí, ocorrido em 1997. Proibidos constitucionalmente de atuação grevista, esses profi ssionais se mobilizaram e reivindicaram aumento salarial e direito de participação nas decisões da instituição e colocaram em discussão o confl ito entre o direito e a norma. A especifi cidade do movimento suscitou questões relativas à sua dinâmica e às variáveis que favoreceram a sua emergência. Tarrow (2009 defende a tese de que a existência de oportunidades políticas é o fator decisivo para o surgimento de ação coletiva de confronto,entendendo oportunidades como elementos variáveis, não necessariamente formais, permanentes ou racionais para a ação coletiva.Abstract: The present paper resorts to an exploratory research and to the theoretical contribution of Sidney Tarrow to discuss the strike movement – known as “movimento paredista” – of the corporals and privates of the Military Police of the state of Piauí occurred in 1997. Constitutionally prohibited to go on strike, these professionals organized themselves to demand salary increase and the right to participate in decisions of the institution, and also called attention to the conflict between law and norm. The specificity of the movement has raised questions concerning the dynamics and variables that favored its emergence. Tarrow (2009 argues in favor of the thesis that the existence of political opportunities is the decisive factor for the emergence of confrontational collective action, understanding opportunities as variable elements of this form of action, although not necessarily formal, permanent or rational.

  4. International tax planning by multinationals: Simulating a tax-minimising intercompany response to the OECD's recommendation on BEPS Action 4

    OpenAIRE

    Kayis-Kumar, Ann

    2016-01-01

    In October 2015, the OECD/G20 presented their final report on the Base Erosion and Profit Shifting (BEPS) Project. This article presents a unique analysis of the OECD/G20’s recommendation on Action 4 by utilising tax optimisation modelling to simulate and examine a hypothetical multinational enterprise’s (MNE’s) behavioural response to this recommendation. The literature to date has primarily focused on the “debt bias”, which arises from the distortion in the tax treatment between debt an...

  5. Describing Peripancreatic Collections According to the Revised Atlanta Classification of Acute Pancreatitis: An International Interobserver Agreement Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwense, Stefan A; van Brunschot, Sandra; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C; Besselink, Marc G; Bollen, Thomas L; Bakker, Olaf J; Banks, Peter A; Boermeester, Marja A; Cappendijk, Vincent C; Carter, Ross; Charnley, Richard; van Eijck, Casper H; Freeny, Patrick C; Hermans, John J; Hough, David M; Johnson, Colin D; Laméris, Johan S; Lerch, Markus M; Mayerle, Julia; Mortele, Koenraad J; Sarr, Michael G; Stedman, Brian; Vege, Santhi Swaroop; Werner, Jens; Dijkgraaf, Marcel G; Gooszen, Hein G; Horvath, Karen D

    2017-08-01

    Severe acute pancreatitis is associated with peripancreatic morphologic changes as seen on imaging. Uniform communication regarding these morphologic findings is crucial for accurate diagnosis and treatment. For the original 1992 Atlanta classification, interobserver agreement is poor. We hypothesized that for the revised Atlanta classification, interobserver agreement will be better. An international, interobserver agreement study was performed among expert and nonexpert radiologists (n = 14), surgeons (n = 15), and gastroenterologists (n = 8). Representative computed tomographies of all stages of acute pancreatitis were selected from 55 patients and were assessed according to the revised Atlanta classification. The interobserver agreement was calculated among all reviewers and subgroups, that is, expert and nonexpert reviewers; interobserver agreement was defined as poor (≤0.20), fair (0.21-0.40), moderate (0.41-0.60), good (0.61-0.80), or very good (0.81-1.00). Interobserver agreement among all reviewers was good (0.75 [standard deviation, 0.21]) for describing the type of acute pancreatitis and good (0.62 [standard deviation, 0.19]) for the type of peripancreatic collection. Expert radiologists showed the best and nonexpert clinicians the lowest interobserver agreement. Interobserver agreement was good for the revised Atlanta classification, supporting the importance for widespread adaption of this revised classification for clinical and research communications.

  6. Usefulness of a centralized system of data collection for the development of an international multicentre registry of spondyloarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiotis, Ruxandra; Font, Pilar; Zarco, Pedro; Almodovar, Raquel; Gratacós, Jordi; Mulero, Juan; Juanola, Xavier; Montilla, Carlos; Moreno, Estefanía; Ariza Ariza, Rafael; Collantes-Estevez, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To present the usefulness of a centralized system of data collection for the development of an international multicentre registry of SpA. Method. The originality of this registry consists in the creation of a virtual network of researchers in a computerized Internet database. From its conception, the registry was meant to be a dynamic acquiring system. Results. REGISPONSER has two developing phases (Conception and Universalization) and gathers several evolving secondary projects (REGISPONSER-EARLY, REGISPONSER-AS, ESPERANZA and RESPONDIA). Each sub-project answered the necessity of having more specific and complete data of the patients even from the onset of the disease so, in the end, obtaining a well-defined picture of SpAs spectrum in the Spanish population. Conclusion. REGISPONSER is the first dynamic SpA database composed of cohorts with a significant number of patients distributed by specific diagnosis, which provides basic specific information of the sub-cohorts useful for patients’ evaluation in rheumatology ambulatory consulting. PMID:20823095

  7. ITSoneDB: a comprehensive collection of eukaryotic ribosomal RNA Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Monica; Fosso, Bruno; Licciulli, Flavio; Balech, Bachir; Larini, Ilaria; Grillo, Giorgio; De Caro, Giorgio; Liuni, Sabino; Pesole, Graziano

    2018-01-04

    A holistic understanding of environmental communities is the new challenge of metagenomics. Accordingly, the amplicon-based or metabarcoding approach, largely applied to investigate bacterial microbiomes, is moving to the eukaryotic world too. Indeed, the analysis of metabarcoding data may provide a comprehensive assessment of both bacterial and eukaryotic composition in a variety of environments, including human body. In this respect, whereas hypervariable regions of the 16S rRNA are the de facto standard barcode for bacteria, the Internal Transcribed Spacer 1 (ITS1) of ribosomal RNA gene cluster has shown a high potential in discriminating eukaryotes at deep taxonomic levels. As metabarcoding data analysis rely on the availability of a well-curated barcode reference resource, a comprehensive collection of ITS1 sequences supplied with robust taxonomies, is highly needed. To address this issue, we created ITSoneDB (available at http://itsonedb.cloud.ba.infn.it/) which in its current version hosts 985 240 ITS1 sequences spanning over 134 000 eukaryotic species. Each ITS1 is mapped on the NCBI reference taxonomy with its start and end positions precisely annotated. ITSoneDB has been developed in agreement to the FAIR guidelines by enabling the users to query and download its content through a simple web-interface and access relevant metadata by cross-linking to European Nucleotide Archive. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Collective action and symbolic capital in the artisanal fisheries: An analysis of the Local Food Systems of Reloncaví Estuary (Los Lagos, Chile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saavedra Gallo, Gonzalo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In a post-industrial economy, it is as important to understand “material” productive processes in the local community as the processes through which global value chains “expropriate” or “co-opt” common immaterial assets. However, the literature on collective action and the management of common goods generally focuses on matters of the control and governance of material resources. The article commences with an analysis of the relations between the production of value, collective action and the rentier nature of contemporary capitalism and its entrepreneurial ideology. Then, we present a detailed analysis of the case of mytilid seed capture in the Reloncaví Estuary (Los Lagos Region, Chile. This case shows us the failure of modernisation policies which are based on converting local producers into modern entrepreneurs. To adopt a successful value strategy, a very different problem must be addressed, namely the difficulties of local communities in managing successfully their own common immaterial values. Faced with the dichotomous logic of neoliberalism, communities must reunite these immaterial values and the associated common material resources, and modulate the friction between them.En una economía postindustrial, es importante comprender los procesos productivos “materiales” en la comunidad local como procesos a través de los cuales las cadenas globales de valor “expropian” o “cooptan” los activos inmateriales comunes. Sin embargo, la literatura sobre acción colectiva y gestión de los bienes comunes generalmente se focaliza en el control y la gobernanza de los recursos materiales. Este artículo comienza con un análisis de las relaciones entre la producción del valor, la acción colectiva y la naturaleza rentista de capitalismo contemporáneo y su ideología emprendedora. A continuación, presentamos un análisis detallado del caso del cultivo de semillas de mitílidos en el Estuario de Reloncaví (Los Lagos, Chile

  9. Gender and water from a human rights perspective : The role of context in translating international norms into local action

    OpenAIRE

    SINGH, Nandita; Åström, Karsten; Wickenberg, Per; Hydén, Håkan

    2008-01-01

    An important area in the discourse on gender and water is water supply where women are seen as the key actors and beneficiaries. A human rights approach to development has been adopted with access to safe water explicitly recognized as a basic human right. This right places a legal obligation upon governments to translate the international norms into practice. But does explicitly acknowledging the human right to water make a practical difference in women's lives? Using an actor-oriented persp...

  10. The Impact of Internal and External Resources, and Strategic Actions in Business Networks on Firm Performance in the Software Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Anggraeni, E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the variance in firm performance has been an important topic in the strategic management literature. In the last two decades it has become particularly interesting as business networks increasingly have become an integrated part of a firm's environment. Besides the internal resources, the less-controlled external resources in the firm’s business networks to affect its performance too. The uncertainty associated with the lower levels of control over external resources implies tha...

  11. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regularory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program

  12. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-04-01

    The Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program

  13. Immunities of International Organizations before Domestic Courts : Reflections on the Collective Labour Case against the European Patent Organization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryngaert, C.M.J.

    2016-01-01

    The Netherlands is home to a substantial number of international organizations, which on the basis of international agreements are entitled to immunity from jurisdiction and enforcement before Dutch courts. This immunity grant has not stopped claimants from suing international organizations in The

  14. Culture, corporation and collective action: The Department of Energy's American Indian consultation program on the Nevada Test Site in political ecological perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmo, David Brian

    In the western United States, Numic-speaking Indian peoples wield more power today than ever before. Following centuries of depopulation, land and resource loss, and directed change interventions aimed at assimilating them into mainstream society, they are revitalizing traditional culture and renewing their claims to lands and resources by demanding equal participation in national-level activities that affect land and resources that were once under their control. In 1994, representatives of Numic Indian tribes representing three ethnic groups involved in consultation with the U.S. Department of Energy on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) decided by consensus to "incorporate" themselves as the Consolidated Group of Tribes and Organizations (CGTO) to defend their common interests in and claims to NTS lands and resources. What caused 16 distinct, autonomous, sovereign American Indian tribal entities to incorporate themselves as a corporate organization? Using a political ecology perspective, this study examines the social, cultural and political processes operating at multiple levels of analysis and applies social and cultural theories of (1) ethnic cultural persistence, (2) the emergence and evolution of collective action groups for defending cultural interests in "common property," (3) the role of corporate and organizational structure and culture in the articulation of social relations between contending groups, and (4) the related shifts or changes in the distribution of structural power as a result of changing policy environments to a case study-based ethnographic analysis of an ongoing program of American Indian consultation.

  15. Summary of the half-day internal review of LHC performance limitations (linked to transverse collective effects) during run II (CERN, 29/11/2016)

    CERN Document Server

    Metral, Elias; Biancacci, Nicolo; Buffat, Xavier; Carver, Lee Robert; Iadarola, Giovanni; Li, Kevin Shing Bruce; Persson, Tobias Hakan Bjorn; Romano, Annalisa; Schenk, Michael; Tambasco, Claudia; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2017-01-01

    In this note the half-day internal review of LHC performance limitations (linked to transverse collective effects) during run II (2015-2016), which took place at CERN on 29/11/2016 (https://indico.cern.ch/event/589625/), is summarised and the next steps are discussed.

  16. Crafts and Craft Education as Expressions of Cultural Heritage: Individual Experiences and Collective Values among an International Group of Women University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokko, Sirpa; Dillon, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This paper explores relationships between crafts, craft education and cultural heritage as reflected in the individual experiences and collective values of fifteen female university students of different nationalities. The students (all trainee teachers) were following a course in crafts and craft education as part of an International Study…

  17. Early nongenomic events in aldosterone action in renal collecting duct cells: PKCalpha activation, mineralocorticoid receptor phosphorylation, and cross-talk with the genomic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moëllic, Cathy; Ouvrard-Pascaud, Antoine; Capurro, Claudia; Cluzeaud, Francoise; Fay, Michel; Jaisser, Frederic; Farman, Nicolette; Blot-Chabaud, Marcel

    2004-05-01

    Effects of aldosterone on its target cells have long been considered to be mediated exclusively through the genomic pathway; however, evidence has been provided for rapid effects of the hormone that may involve nongenomic mechanisms. Whether an interaction exists between these two signaling pathways is not yet established. In this study, the authors show that aldosterone triggers both early nongenomic and late genomic increase in sodium transport in the RCCD(2) rat cortical collecting duct cell line. In these cells, the early (up to 2.5 h) aldosterone-induced increase in short-circuit current (Isc) is not blocked by the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) antagonist RU26752, it does not require mRNA or protein synthesis, and it involves the PKCalpha signaling pathway. In addition, this early response is reproduced by aldosterone-BSA, which acts at the cell surface and presumably does not enter the cells (aldo-BSA is unable to trigger the late response). The authors also show that MR is rapidly phosphorylated on serine and threonine residues by aldosterone or aldosterone-BSA. In contrast, the late (4 to 24 h) aldosterone-induced increase in ion transport occurs through activation of the MR and requires mRNA and protein synthesis. Interestingly, nongenomic and genomic aldosterone actions appear to be interdependent. Blocking the PKCalpha pathway results in the inhibition of the late genomic response to aldosterone, as demonstrated by the suppression of aldosterone-induced increase in MR transactivation activity, alpha1 Na(+)/K(+)/ATPase mRNA, and Isc. These data suggest cross-talk between the nongenomic and genomic responses to aldosterone in renal cells and suggest that the aldosterone-MR mediated increase in mRNA/protein synthesis and ion transport depends, at least in part, upon PKCalpha activation. E-mail: marcel.blot-chabaud@pharmacie.univ-mrs.fr

  18. P2Y12 Receptor Localizes in the Renal Collecting Duct and Its Blockade Augments Arginine Vasopressin Action and Alleviates Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Müller, Christa E; Carlson, Noel G; Baqi, Younis; Strasburg, David L; Heiney, Kristina M; Villanueva, Karie; Kohan, Donald E; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12-R) signaling is mediated through Gi, ultimately reducing cellular cAMP levels. Because cAMP is a central modulator of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced water transport in the renal collecting duct (CD), we hypothesized that if expressed in the CD, P2Y12-R may play a role in renal handling of water in health and in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We found P2Y12-R mRNA expression in rat kidney, and immunolocalized its protein and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in CD principal cells. Administration of clopidogrel bisulfate, an irreversible inhibitor of P2Y12-R, significantly increased urine concentration and AQP2 protein in the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats. Notably, clopidogrel did not alter urine concentration in Brattleboro rats that lack AVP. Clopidogrel administration also significantly ameliorated lithium-induced polyuria, improved urine concentrating ability and AQP2 protein abundance, and reversed the lithium-induced increase in free-water excretion, without decreasing blood or kidney tissue lithium levels. Clopidogrel administration also augmented the lithium-induced increase in urinary AVP excretion and suppressed the lithium-induced increase in urinary nitrates/nitrites (nitric oxide production) and 8-isoprostane (oxidative stress). Furthermore, selective blockade of P2Y12-R by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 in primary cultures of rat inner medullary CD cells potentiated the expression of AQP2 and AQP3 mRNA, and cAMP production induced by dDAVP (desmopressin). In conclusion, pharmacologic blockade of renal P2Y12-R increases urinary concentrating ability by augmenting the effect of AVP on the kidney and ameliorates lithium-induced NDI by potentiating the action of AVP on the CD. This strategy may offer a novel and effective therapy for lithium-induced NDI. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  19. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  20. Diminished internalization and action of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 in dermal fibroblasts cultured from New World primates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, J.S.; Gacad, M.A.; Baker, A.J.; Kheun, G.; Rude, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated the occurrence of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3]-resistant osteomalacia in the New World primate colony of Saguinus imperator at the Los Angeles Zoo. The mean serum concentration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 was elevated 5-fold in the New World primates compared to that in their Old World counterparts. The specific internalization of 0.6 nM [ 3 H]1,25-(OH)2D3 by cultured dermal fibroblasts from New World primates was reduced 75% compared to that by cells from Old World primates or man. The decrease in hormone uptake resulted from a decrease in the number of high affinity intracellular binding sites for 1,25-(OH)2D3 and apparently caused a 90-95% reduction in 1,25-(OH)2D3-induced 25-hydroxyvitamin-D3-24-hydroxylase activity. There was no alteration in the capacity or avidity of New World primate serum for 1,25-(OH)2D3 compared to that of serum from Old World primates. These data suggest that the occurrence of vitamin D-resistant osteomalacia in New World primates is the result of decreased high affinity, receptor-mediated uptake of 1,25-(OH)2D3 by the target cell

  1. Post-remedial-action survey report for Kinetic Experiment Water Boiler Reactor Facility, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.

    1981-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous federally-funded contracted projects involving the use of radioactive materials. Among these was the Kinetics Experiment Water Boiler (KEWB) Reactor which was operated under the auspices of the US Atomic Energy Commission (AEC). The KEWB Reactor was last operated in 1966. The facility was subsequently declared excess and decontamination and decommissioning operations were conducted during the first half of calendar year 1975. The facility was completely dismantled and the site graded to blend with the surrounding terrain. During October 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of the KEWB site was conducted on the behalf of the US Department of Energy by the Radiological Survey Group (RSG) of the Occupational Health and Safety Division's Health Physics Section (OHS/HP) of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The survey confirmed that the site was free from contamination and could be released for unrestricted use

  2. Diuron-induced rat urinary bladder carcinogenesis: mode of action and human relevance evaluations using the International Programme on Chemical Safety framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli Sanches; Arnold, Lora L; De Oliveira, Maria Luiza Cotrim Sartor; Catalano, Shadia M Ihlaseh; Cardoso, Ana Paula Ferragut; Pontes, Merielen G N; Ferrucio, Bianca; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Cohen, Samuel M; De Camargo, João Lauro V

    2014-05-01

    Diuron, a high volume substituted urea herbicide, induced high incidences of urinary bladder carcinomas and low incidences of kidney pelvis papillomas and carcinomas in rats exposed to high doses (2500 ppm) in a 2-year bioassay. Diuron is registered for both occupational and residential uses and is used worldwide for more than 30 different crops. The proposed rat urothelial mode of action (MOA) for this herbicide consists of metabolic activation to metabolites that are excreted and concentrated in the urine, leading to cytotoxicity, urothelial cell necrosis and exfoliation, regenerative hyperplasia, and eventually tumors. We show evidence for this MOA for diuron using the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS) conceptual framework for evaluating an MOA for chemical carcinogens, and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) and IPCS framework for assessing human relevance.

  3. Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological 'hot spots' in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

  4. Post remedial action survey report for Building 003, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California, October 1981; April 1982. Surplus Facilities Management Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Justus, A.L.; Flynn, K.F.

    1983-10-01

    Rockwell International's Santa Susana Laboratories in Ventura County, California, have been the site of numerous Federally-funded projects involving the use of radioactive materials. One such project was the System for Nuclear Auxiliary Power (SNAP) Program. Building 003 on the Santa Susana site was used in conjunction with the SNAP Program and contained a highly shielded area designed for remote manipulation of radioactive materials. Such facilities are commonly referred to as hot caves. During the SNAP Program, fuel burnup samples were analyzed and irradiation experiments were evaluated in the Building 003 hot cave. Use of the hot cave facility ended when the SNAP Program was terminated in 1973. Subsequently, the Building 003 facilities were declared excess and were decontaminaed and decommissioned during the first half of calendar year 1975. At that time, the building was given a preliminary release. In 1981, a post-remedial-action (certification) survey of Building 003 was conducted at the request of the Department of Energy. Significant levels of residual contamination were found in various parts of the building. Consequently, additional decontamination was conducted by Rockwell International. A final post-remedial-action survey was conducted during April 1982, and those areas in Building 003 that had been found contaminated in 1981 were now found to be free of detectable radioactive contamination. Sludge samples taken from the sewer sump showed elevated levels of enriched uranium contaminant. Hence, all sewer lines within Building 003 were removed. This permitted unconditional release of the building for unrestricted use. However, the sewer lines exterior to the building, which remain in place, must be considered potentially contaminated and, therefore, subject to restricted use

  5. Intersectionality and gender mainstreaming in international health: using a feminist participatory action research process to analyse voices and debates from the global south and north.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Rachel; Leach, Beryl; Price, Janet; Robinson, Jude; Ettore, Elizabeth; Scott-Samuel, Alex; Kilonzo, Nduku; Sabuni, Louis P; Robertson, Steve; Kapilashrami, Anuj; Bristow, Katie; Lang, Raymond; Romao, Francelina; Theobald, Sally

    2012-06-01

    Critiques of gender mainstreaming (GM) as the officially agreed strategy to promote gender equity in health internationally have reached a critical mass. There has been a notable lack of dialogue between gender advocates in the global north and south, from policy and practice, governments and non-governmental organisations (NGOs). This paper contributes to the debate on the shape of future action for gender equity in health, by uniquely bringing together the voices of disparate actors, first heard in a series of four seminars held during 2008 and 2009, involving almost 200 participants from 15 different country contexts. The series used (Feminist) Participatory Action Research (FPAR) methodology to create a productive dialogue on the developing theory around GM and the at times disconnected empirical experience of policy and practice. We analyse the debates and experiences shared at the seminar series using concrete, context specific examples from research, advocacy, policy and programme development perspectives, as presented by participants from southern and northern settings, including Kenya, Mozambique, India, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Canada and Australia. Focussing on key discussions around sexualities and (dis)ability and their interactions with gender, we explore issues around intersectionality across the five key themes for research and action identified by participants: (1) Addressing the disconnect between gender mainstreaming praxis and contemporary feminist theory; (2) Developing appropriate analysis methodologies; (3) Developing a coherent theory of change; (4) Seeking resolution to the dilemmas and uncertainties around the 'place' of men and boys in GM as a feminist project; and (5) Developing a politics of intersectionality. We conclude that there needs to be a coherent and inclusive strategic direction to improve policy and practice for promoting gender equity in health which requires the full and equal participation of practitioners and

  6. Europe's Share of the Climate Challenge. Domestic Actions and International Obligations to Protect the Planet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaps, Charles; Erickson, Peter; Kartha, Sivan; Kemp-Benedict, Eric

    2009-11-15

    Firstly, we analyse how Europe can embark on a transition to a low GHG future - enabling it to achieve large emission reductions on a rapid timescale. We present a detailed sector-by-sector mitigation scenario for all 27 EU countries that can achieve GHG emissions reductions of 40 per cent in 2020 and 90 per cent in 2050 relative to 1990 levels. This scenario achieves these cuts by a combination of radical improvements in energy efficiency, the accelerated retirement of fossil fuels and a dramatic shift toward various types of renewable energy, including wind, solar, wave, geothermal and biomass-based combined heat and power (CHP). Secondly, we assess Europe's international obligations for assisting the world's developing nations make a transition to a low-GHG future. We estimate Europe's fair share to be between Euro 150 billion and Euro 450 billion in 2020 depending on the assumed average cost of mitigation, which translates into approximately 1.1 per cent and 3.3 per cent of the EU's projected 2020 GDP of Euro 13.6 trillion, respectively. This analysis is designed to explore whether the specified levels of emissions reductions can be met without resorting to certain potentially significant mitigation options. In particular, we assume no new nuclear power, the phase out of existing nuclear power facilities, no carbon capture and storage (CCS) for fossil-based electricity generation and no biofuels (often referred to as agrofuels), whether produced within the EU or imported. Even without these mitigation options, Europe is still able to fully meet its 2020 target of 40 per cent solely through domestic options, i.e., with no international offsets. In addition to the scenario's technical measures we also examine the role of sufficiency and equity in helping promote the needed transition to a low carbon future. In our mitigation scenario, GDP grows by a factor of 'only' 1.6 between 2008 and 2050 versus the 1.8 times growth seen in

  7. A collection of research reporting, theoretical analysis, and practical applications in science education: Examining qualitative research methods, action research, educator-researcher partnerships, and constructivist learning theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartle, R. Todd

    2007-12-01

    Educator-researcher partnerships are increasingly being used to improve the teaching of science. Chapter 1 provides a summary of the literature concerning partnerships, and examines the justification of qualitative methods in studying these relationships. It also justifies the use of Participatory Action Research (PAR). Empirically-based studies of educator-researcher partnership relationships are rare despite investments in their implementation by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and others. Chapter 2 describes a qualitative research project in which participants in an NSF GK-12 fellowship program were studied using informal observations, focus groups, personal interviews, and journals to identify and characterize the cultural factors that influenced the relationships between the educators and researchers. These factors were organized into ten critical axes encompassing a range of attitudes, behaviors, or values defined by two stereotypical extremes. These axes were: (1) Task Dictates Context vs. Context Dictates Task; (2) Introspection vs. Extroversion; (3) Internal vs. External Source of Success; (4) Prior Planning vs. Implementation Flexibility; (5) Flexible vs. Rigid Time Sense; (6) Focused Time vs. Multi-tasking; (7) Specific Details vs. General Ideas; (8) Critical Feedback vs. Encouragement; (9) Short Procedural vs. Long Content Repetition; and (10) Methods vs. Outcomes are Well Defined. Another ten important stereotypical characteristics, which did not fit the structure of an axis, were identified and characterized. The educator stereotypes were: (1) Rapport/Empathy; (2) Like Kids; (3) People Management; (4) Communication Skills; and (5) Entertaining. The researcher stereotypes were: (1) Community Collaboration; (2) Focus Intensity; (3) Persistent; (4) Pattern Seekers; and (5) Curiosity/Skeptical. Chapter 3 summarizes the research presented in chapter 2 into a practical guide for participants and administrators of educator-researcher partnerships

  8. International, Multicenter Standardization of Acute Graft-versus-Host Disease Clinical Data Collection: A Report from the Mount Sinai Acute GVHD International Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Andrew C; Young, Rachel; Devine, Steven; Hogan, William J; Ayuk, Francis; Bunworasate, Udomsak; Chanswangphuwana, Chantiya; Efebera, Yvonne A; Holler, Ernst; Litzow, Mark; Ordemann, Rainer; Qayed, Muna; Renteria, Anne S; Reshef, Ran; Wölfl, Matthias; Chen, Yi-Bin; Goldstein, Steven; Jagasia, Madan; Locatelli, Franco; Mielke, Stephan; Porter, David; Schechter, Tal; Shekhovtsova, Zhanna; Ferrara, James L M; Levine, John E

    2016-01-01

    Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) remains a leading cause of morbidity and nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. The clinical staging of GVHD varies greatly between transplant centers and is frequently not agreed on by independent reviewers. The lack of standardized approaches to handle common sources of discrepancy in GVHD grading likely contributes to why promising GVHD treatments reported from single centers have failed to show benefit in randomized multicenter clinical trials. We developed guidelines through international expert consensus opinion to standardize the diagnosis and clinical staging of GVHD for use in a large international GVHD research consortium. During the first year of use, the guidance followed discussion of complex clinical phenotypes by experienced transplant physicians and data managers. These guidelines increase the uniformity of GVHD symptom capture, which may improve the reproducibility of GVHD clinical trials after further prospective validation. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I, EQUALANT II, and EQUALANT III projects from 1963-02-15 to 1964-07-09 (NODC Accession 0071432)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Zooplankton biomass (displacement and settled volume) data collected during the International Cooperative Investigations of the Tropical Atlantic EQUALANT I,...

  10. Collective Training and Fielding Opportunities for the Objective Force Maneuver Systems at the Unit of Action Level in a Unit Manning/Unit Replacement Personnel System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Courts, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The introduction of Objective Force formations, beginning with the first Unit of Action, will fundamentally change existing organizational structures, training requirements and operational constructs for the U.S. Army...

  11. Evaluation of carrier collection probability in bifacial interdigitated-back-contact crystalline silicon solar cells by the internal quantum efficiency mapping method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Tomihisa; Tanahashi, Katsuto; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Shirasawa, Katsuhiko; Takato, Hidetaka

    2018-04-01

    Bifacial interdigitated-back-contact (IBC) silicon solar cells with a high bifaciality of 0.91 were fabricated. Screen printing and firing technology were used to reduce the production cost. For the first time, the relationship between the rear side structure and carrier collection probability was evaluated using internal quantum efficiency (IQE) mapping. The measurement results showed that the screen-printed electrode and back surface field (BSF) area led to low IQE. The low carrier collection probability by BSF area can be explained by electrical shading effects. Thus, it is clear that the IQE mapping system is useful to evaluate the IBC cell.

  12. The Action Observation System when Observing Hand Actions in Autism and Typical Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Jennifer J; Hatt, Naomi V; Colombi, Costanza; Vivanti, Giacomo; Rogers, Sally J; Rivera, Susan M

    2015-06-01

    Social impairments in individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) may be in part due to difficulty perceiving and recognizing the actions of others. Evidence from imitation studies, which involves both observation and execution of an action, suggests differences, in individuals with ASD, between the ability to imitate goal-directed actions involving objects (transitive actions) and the ability to imitate actions that do not involve objects (intransitive actions). In the present study, we examined whether there were differences in how ASD adolescents encoded transitive and intransitive actions compared to typically developing (TD) adolescents, by having participants view videos of a hand reaching across a screen toward an object or to where an object would be while functional magnetic resonance images were collected. Analyses focused on areas within the action observation network (AON), which is activated during the observation of actions performed by others. We hypothesized that the AON would differentiate transitive from intransitive actions only in the ASD group. However, results revealed that object presence modulated activity in the right inferior frontal gyrus and supramarginal gyrus of the TD group, a differentiation that was not seen in the ASD group. Furthermore, there were no significant group differences between the TD and ASD groups in any of the conditions. This suggests that there is not a global deficit of the AON in individuals with ASD while observing transitive and intransitive actions. © 2015 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. 78 FR 26694 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-07

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of the Treasury, as part of its continuing effort to reduce paperwork and...

  14. 78 FR 39830 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... the Ozone Layer and on Products Containing Such Chemicals. OMB Number: 1545-1153. Regulation Project...

  15. 78 FR 70100 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-22

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... Nuclear Power Plant. OMB Number: 1545-1378. Regulation Project Number: TD 8580. Abstract: This regulation...

  16. 78 FR 76893 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments.... Regulation Project Number: REG-209626-93 (TD 8796). Abstract: These regulations provide guidance concerning...

  17. 78 FR 45614 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... GST Deemed Allocations. OMB Number: 1545-1892. Regulation Project Number: REG-153841-02 (TD 9208...

  18. 78 FR 66423 - Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service [TD 9057, TD 9154, TD 9187] Proposed Collection: Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION... Rules. OMB Number: 1545-1774. Regulation Project Number: TD 9057, TD 9154, and TD 9187. Abstract: The...

  19. 75 FR 2932 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service [REG-116664-01] RIN 1545-BC15 Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION.... OMB Number: 1545-1868. Regulation Project Number: REG-116664-01 (TD 9300 (final)). Abstract: This...

  20. 78 FR 76892 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments... Liabilities for Pension Funding Purposes. OMB Number: 1545-2095. Regulation Project Number: REG-139236-07 (TD...

  1. 75 FR 2930 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service [REG-106446-98] Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Regulation Project AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... From Joint and Several Liability. OMB Number: 1545-1719. Regulation Project Number: REG-106446-98...

  2. 78 FR 29205 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 4952

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 4952 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY... 4952, Investment Interest Expense Deduction. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before...

  3. 78 FR 45616 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8960

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-29

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8960 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY... 8960, Net Investment Income Tax-Individuals, Estates, and Trusts. DATES: Written comments should be...

  4. 75 FR 33380 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 4952

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-11

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 4952 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY... 4952, Investment Interest Expense Deduction. DATES: Written comments should be received on or before...

  5. 78 FR 24814 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY... 8612, Return of Excise Tax on Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. DATES: Written...

  6. 75 FR 33887 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Form 8612 AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS), Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY... 8612, Return of Excise Tax on Undistributed Income of Real Estate Investment Trusts. DATES: Written...

  7. 'Action 2016': AREVA's strategic action plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Patricia; Briand, Pauline; Floquet-Daubigeon, Fleur; Michaut, Maxime; De Scorbiac, Marie; Du Repaire, Philippine

    2011-01-01

    On December 13, 2011, Luc Oursel, CEO, and Pierre Aubouin, Chief Financial Officer presented the group's strategic plan for the period 2012-2016. The plan has been drawn up collectively and is based on a thorough-going analysis and a realistic assessment of perspectives for all group activities and associated resources. Development of nuclear and renewable energies: the fundamentals are unchanged. In this context, the German decision remains an isolated case and the great majority of nuclear programs around the world have been confirmed. More conservative in its projections than the International Energy Agency, the group expects growth of 2.2% annually, reaching 583 GW of installed nuclear capacity by 2030, against 378 GW today. However, the Fukushima accident will lead to delays in launching new programs. 'Action 2016' plan aims to consolidate AREVA's leadership in nuclear energy and become a leading player in renewable energy. The group's strategic action plan 'Action 2016' is based on the following strategic choices: - commercial priority given to value creation, - selectivity in investments, - strengthening of the financial structure. These demand an improvement in the group's performance by 2015. This plan makes nuclear safety a strategic priority for the industrial and commercial performance of the group. This ambitious performance plan for the period 2012-2016 will give the group the wherewithal to withstand a temporary slowdown in the market resulting from the Fukushima accident and to deliver safe and sustainable growth of the business. The plan sets out the strategic direction for the group's employees for the years ahead: taking advantage of the expected growth in nuclear and renewable energies, targeted investment programs, and return to self-financing as of 2014

  8. 77 FR 33774 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Comment Request; Education and Human Resources Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... and Human Resources Project Monitoring Clearance AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice...). SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Title of Collection: Education and Human Resources Project Monitoring Clearance. OMB... States and internationally. The Directorate for Education and Human Resources (EHR), a unit within NSF...

  9. Comparison of local International Sensitivity Index calibration and 'Direct INR' methods in correction of locally reported International Normalized Ratios: an international study. On behalf of the European Action of Anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poller, L; Keown, M; Ibrahim, S

    2007-01-01

    collaborative study at 77 centers has compared local INR correction using the two alternative methods recommended in the Scientific and Standardization Committee of the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis guidelines: local ISI calibration and 'Direct INR'. METHODS: Success of INR correction...

  10. Educación para la ciudadanía desde la acción colectiva (Civic education through collective actions(Education à la citoyenneté à partir de l′action collective(Educação para a cidadania a partir da ação coletiva

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Delgado-Salazar

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available ResumenEl texto presenta los planteamientos expuestos en el evento Pensar en Público: homenaje al pen- samiento del maestro Guillermo Hoyos-Vásquez. Se pregunta por la educación para la ciudada- nía en y desde los movimientos sociales. Lo que supone asumir los movimientos sociales como espacios educativos con capacidad de construc- ción de nuevas realidades sociales y de subjeti- vidades emergentes. Abordar qué significa que los movimientos sociales se conviertan en un sujeto educativo que contribuyen a la construc- ción de ciudadanía, conlleva reconocer algunas dimensiones constitutivas del potencial formati- vo de la acción colectiva: a la capacidad de re- flexividad para proponer y crear criterios morales para juzgar y valorar situaciones de dominación y exclusión arraigadas y naturalizadas por los sis- temas sociales de poder, como hechos injustos que cuestionan lo políticamente correcto; b es- tablecer la facultad que tienen las colectividades sociales para narrar y comunicar experiencias significativas para la construcción de la memoria colectiva; c indagar la posibilidad de configurar identidades politizadas; d destacar los reperto- rios emocionales que movilizan por medio de sus expresiones de lucha y de resistencia, y e asumir los antagonismos y los disensos como dimensio- nes políticas de la acción colectiva.AbstractThis text introduces the issues discus- sed during the event Public thinking: a tribute to Guillermo Hoyos-Vásquez. The bottom line is the problem of civic education in social movements, which implies considering social movements as platforms for education that are capable of constructing new social realities and emerging subjectivities. This approach to social movements as actors in civic education brings along some funda- mental characteristics of the potential of collective actions: a the reflexive capacity in order to put forward moral criteria to judge and value situations of domination and exclusion

  11. Internal jugular vein adrenocorticotropic hormone estimation for diagnosis of adrenocorticotropic hormone-dependent Cushing′s syndrome: Ultrasound-guided direct jugular vein sample collection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Prakash Sahoo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of Study: To assess the utility of internal jugular vein (IJV / peripheral adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH gradient in determining the etiology of ACTH- dependent Cushing′s syndrome. Materials and Methods: Patients with ACTH-dependent Cushing′s syndrome, (except children less than 12 years, had IJV blood collection under ultrasound guidance using a linear 7 MHZ probe. Blood was collected with a 21 G needle at the level of mandible with the patient in supine position. Six ml of blood was collected sequentially from right and left internal jugular veins for ACTH and prolactin estimation. Peripheral blood for ACTH and prolactin was taken from a previously placed IV cannula in the antecubital vein. Results: Thirty patients (20 F, 10 M, age 14 to 50 yrs were enrolled for this study. Source of ACTH excess was pituitary in 22, ectopic ACTH in 4, and unknown in 4 cases. Using an IJV: Peripheral ACTH ratio of ≥ 1.6, 15 out of 22 Cushing′s disease patients were correctly identified. However, 1 out of 4 ectopic Cushing also had IJV: Peripheral ratio ≥ 1.6. Overall, it had sensitivity of 68% with specificity of 75% while MRI pituitary and HDDST had sensitivity of 86% and 59%, respectively, with specificity of 100% each. Conclusion: IJV: Peripheral ACTH gradient was observed in 68% of patients with Cushing′s disease. Simultaneous IJV and peripheral sample collection with CRH stimulation may improve sensitivity and specificity of this test.

  12. A Study of Social Cognitive Theory: The Relationship between Professional Learning Communities and Collective Teacher Efficacy in International School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, James

    2010-01-01

    In "Self-Efficacy: The Exercise of Control" (1997), Albert Bandura writes, "Teachers operate collectively within an interactive social system rather than as isolates" (p. 243). Bandura's attention to the existence of the communal systems that exist in schools is an appreciation shared by many educational reformers, especially those who advocate…

  13. Collection of proceedings of the international conference on programming and mathematical methods for solution of physical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Traditional International Conference on programming and mathematical methods for solution of physical problems took place in Dubna in Jun, 14-19, 1993. More than 160 scientists from 14 countries participated in the Conference. They presented about 120 reports, the range of problems including computerized information complexes, experimental data acquisition and processing systems, mathematical simulation and calculation experiment in physics, analytical and numerical methods for solution of physical problems

  14. Bioerosion Issue of Ichnos - Collection of Papers from the 4th International Bioerosion Workshop (Prague, August 30-September 3, 2004)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikuláš, Radek

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2006), s. 97-97 ISSN 1042-0940. [International Bioerosion Workshop /4./. Prague, 30.08.2004-03.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30130516 Keywords : bioerosion * conference papers * editorial Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy http://rzblx1.uni-regensburg.de/ezeit/detail.phtml?bibid=CASCR& colors =7&lang=en&jour_id=41560

  15. Summary of Recommendations of the GBIF Task Group on the Global Strategy and Action Plan for the Digitisation of Natural History Collections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter G. Berendsohn

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Global Biodiversity Information Facility’s Task Group has formulated three basic recommendations to the GBIF Governing Board in order to increase the rate of the digitization of natural history collections and improve the usage of this information resource: (i GBIF must facilitate access to information about non-digitized collection resources by publicizing the research potential of collections through metadata and assessing the number of non-digitized specimens; (ii GBIF must work with collections to continue to increase the efficiency of specimen data capture and to enhance data quality by means of technical measures, by means of ensuring attribution and professional credit and influencing institutional priorities, and by engaging with funding agencies; (iii GBIF must continue to improve and promote the global infrastructure used to mobilize digitized collection data through technical measures, outreach activities and political measures.

  16. The use of physical and virtual infrastructures for the validation of algal cryopreservation methods in international culture collections

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Day, J. G.; Lorenz, M.; Wilding, T.A.; Friedl, T.; Harding, K.; Pröschold, T.; Brennan, D.; Müller, J.; Santos, L. M. A.; Santos, M. F.; Osório, H.C.; Amaral, R.; Lukešová, Alena; Hrouzek, Pavel; Lukeš, Martin; Elster, Josef; Lukavský, Jaromír; Probert, I.; Ryan, M.J.; Benson, E. E.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5 (2007), s. 359-376 ISSN 0143-2044 Grant - others:Evropská unie(XE) QLRT-2000-01645 (Cobra) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60660521; CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : cryopreservation * storage * culture collections Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 1.141, year: 2007

  17. Civic Action and Play: Examples from Maori, Aboriginal Australian and Latino Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adair, Jennifer Keys; Phillips, Louise; Ritchie, Jenny; Sachdeva, Shubhi

    2017-01-01

    Using data from an international, comparative study of civic action in preschools in New Zealand, Australia and the US, we consider some of the types of civic action that are possible when time and space are offered for children to use their agency to initiate, work together and collectively pursue ideas and things that are important to the group.…

  18. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, Number 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-03-01

    This document is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program

  19. Balance between automation and human actions in nuclear power plant operation. Results of international cooperation; Equilibre entre automatisation et action humaine dans la conduite des centrale nucleaires, resultats de la cooperation internationale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, B [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Dept. d' Analyse de Surete; Bastl, W [Gesellschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit m.b.H. (GRS), Garching (Germany); Olmstead, R [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd, Mississauga (Canada); Oudiz, A [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States); Jenkinson, J [Nuclear Electric PLC, Gloucester (United Kingdom); Kossilov, A [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1990-07-01

    Automation has long been an established feature of power plants. In some applications, the use of automation has been the significant factor which has enabled plant technology to progress to its current state. Societal demands for increased levels of safety have led to greater use of redundancy and diversity and this, in turn, has increased levels of automation. However, possibly the greatest contributory factor in increased automation has resulted from improvements in information technology. Much recent attention has been focused on the concept of inherently safe reactors, which may simplify safety system requirements and information and control system complexity. The allocation of tasks between man and machine may be one of the most critical activity in the design of new nuclear plants and major retro-fits and it therefore warrants a design approach which is commensurate in quality with the high levels of safety and production performance sought from nuclear plants. Facing this climate, in 1989 the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) formed an advisory group from member countries with extensive experience in nuclear power plant automation. The task of this group was to advise on the appropriate balance between manual and automatic actions in plant operation. (author) [French] L'automatisation a longtemps ete une caracteristique bien etablie des centrales nucleaires. Dans certaines applications, l'utilisation de l'automatisation a ete le facteur decisif qui a permis a la technologie des centrales de progresser jusqu'a son etat actuel. Les exigences de l'opinion publique en matiere de securite renforcee ont conduit a l'utilisation d'une plus grande redondance et a une plus grande diversification et ceci, en retour, a encore accru le niveau d'automatisation. Toutefois, il est possible que le facteur preponderant de cet accroissement de l'automatisation soit constitue par les progres effectues dans la technologie de l'information. Plus recemment, l'attention s

  20. 4. All-Russian (international) scientific conference. Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules. Collection of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.Yu.; Kolesnikov, Yu.A.

    1999-01-01

    The reports of the 4. All-Russian (international) scientific conference: Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules, are presented. The conference took place in Zvenigorod, 4-8 October, 1999. Contents of the reports are the following: laser isotope separation of molecules and atoms; isotopic selection of molecules and atoms in the field of centrifugal forces; selection of molecules by means of rectification and isotopic exchange methods; separation of isotopes by ion cyclotron-resonance method, in electric discharge and electromagnetic field; change in physical properties of substances which variation of their natural isotopic composition; use of isotopes in pharmacy preparation; status of experimental and diagnostic technique; certain promising methods of selection of atoms and molecules. The problems of laser separation of uranium isotopes, separation of carbon isotopes by multi-photon selective dissociation are discussed. The procedures permitting production of isotopes with high concentration and efficiency are developed [ru

  1. 5. All-Russian (international) scientific conference. Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules. Collection of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.Yu.; Kolesnikov, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    The materials of the 5. All-Russian (international) scientific conference: Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules, are presented. The conference took place in Zvenigorod, 2-6 October, 2000. A wide range of items connected with uranium enrichment, selection of atoms and molecules by isotopic composition: laser methods, ion cyclotron-resonance method, are discussed. The selection of molecules and atoms by rectification and chemical isotopic exchange methods, the selection in the field of centrifugal forces are treated. The questions of search for the new advanced methods for selection of atoms and molecules were discussed at the conference, the problems of radioisotope production were represented. The subject matter of the use of stable isotopes and radionuclides is demonstrated widely. The subjects connected with experimental and engineering equipment for selection of atoms and molecules are embodied in the paper [ru

  2. Energy and environment - greenhouse effect. The international, european and national actions to control the greenhouse gases emissions: which accounting and which perspectives?; Energie et environnement - effet de serre. Les actions internationales, europeennes et nationales pour maitriser les emissions de gaz a effet de serre: quel bilan et quelles perspectives?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-15

    The scientific knowledge concerning the climatic change justifies today immediate fight actions against the greenhouse reinforcement. This fight is based on an ambitious international device which must take into account more global challenges. At the european and national scale, the exploitation of the potential of greenhouse gases reduction must be reinforced and more specially the evolution of the life style. (A.L.B.)

  3. Proceedings of the international workshop on reliability data collection in support of PSA, maintenance and life-assurance programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The utilisation of data to support Probabilistic Safety Assessments, Maintenance Activities and Life-Assurance Programmes is becoming more widely recognized as these areas become more and more developed throughout the nuclear industry. Almost every member country of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency uses PSA in one way or another in their assessment of nuclear power plant safety. A majority of utilities and licensees have completed or are in the process of planning plant specific PSAs. Operability costs associated with maintenance activities and life assurance programmes are highly dependent upon the data and how it is utilized. Considering these statements and the various suggestions made, the Workshop addressed the following topics concerning reliability data collection: data compilation systems; data bases development and management; data application; parameter estimation; common cause failure and dependent failure data

  4. Proceedings of the international workshop on reliability data collection in support of PSA, maintenance and life-assurance programmes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The utilisation of data to support Probabilistic Safety Assessments, Maintenance Activities and Life-Assurance Programmes is becoming more widely recognized as these areas become more and more developed throughout the nuclear industry. Almost every member country of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency uses PSA in one way or another in their assessment of nuclear power plant safety. A majority of utilities and licensees have completed or are in the process of planning plant specific PSAs. Operability costs associated with maintenance activities and life assurance programmes are highly dependent upon the data and how it is utilized. Considering these statements and the various suggestions made, the Workshop addressed the following topics concerning reliability data collection: data compilation systems; data bases development and management; data application; parameter estimation; common cause failure and dependent failure data

  5. The influence of external and internal factors on the quality of semen collection and qualitative indicators of semen in the dog (Canis familiaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie Vágenknechtová

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of external and internal factors on the course of semen collection and quality of ejaculate has been evaluated in this work. This observation included 30 dogs of various breeds, each of which we collected 3 ejaculates from within one week (first, third and fifth day. The internal factors included the weight of the dog, order of semen collection and the age of the dog. The external factors included type of housing, utilization of the dog, point of the collection and type of nutrition. Average length of preparation of a dog for a collection and onset of sexual reflex was 95.7 sec. The observations showed that none of the evaluated internal factors had any influence on the length of preparation for the semen collection. The largest volume of ejaculate was collected from the first collection (10.5cm3, at the second collection it was 8.9 cm3 and the third one the volume was the smallest – with only 6.6 cm3. The average volume of 8.7 cm3 was found in the whole set of observed dogs. No statistically conclusive difference was found among groups. The average activity of sperm in the observed set was 68.8%. Activity declined from the first to the third collection from 73% to 65.5%. The difference in sperm activity was not statistically conclusive in any indicator. Sperm concentration in whole set of dogs was 143.6 103.mm−3 and was not significantly affected by any monitored internal factors.The longest preparation for the collection was found in dogs housed in pens (134.4 sec, dogs living in households (84.7 sec and the shortest preparation was needed in dogs with freedom of movement. The longest onset of sexual reflexes was found in Police forces dogs, then family dogs and sport dogs (130.0 sec, 97.8 sec and 68.3 sec. In dogs collected in laboratory, the emergence of sexual reflex was longer (110.7 sec than in dogs collected in their own natural environment (80.7 sec. The average length of the whole ejaculation was 396.0 sec in

  6. Espousing Democratic Leadership Practices: A Study of Values in Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereaux, Lorraine

    2003-01-01

    This article examines principals' espoused values and their values in action. It provides a reanalysis of previously collected data through a values lens. The original research study was an international quantitative and qualitative investigation of principals' leadership approaches that was based in 15 schools. This particular excerpt of the…

  7. Actions of radiation protection in the collection of discarded radioactive material; Ações de proteção radiológica no recolhimento de material radioativo descartado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neri, E.P.M.; Silva, F.C.A. da, E-mail: dasilva@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioproteção e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Riode Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    Brazil has approximately 2000 radiative facilities that use radiation sources in their processes and are controlled by The Brazilian Nuclear Energy Commission - CNEN through standards, authorizations and inspections. These radioactive materials, whether in the form of waste or radioactive source, used in medical, industrial, research, etc. are sometimes discarded and found in inappropriate places, such as garbage dumps, industrial waste, streets, squares, etc. found by urban cleaning professionals without the proper knowledge of them. The work presents the radiation protection actions required for the safe collection of radioactive material to be performed by these professionals. According to the type of radioactive material the main actions of radiation protection are, among others: recognition of a radioactive material; correct use of personal protective equipment to contain possible radiation contamination; implementation of an area control etc. In order for the actions of recognition and collection of discarded radioactive material to be effective, there is a need to implement a training program in radiation protection for urban cleaning professionals.

  8. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1989-01-01

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 x 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform ''conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  9. 36 CFR 1201.15 - What will the notice tell me regarding collection actions that might be taken if the debt is not...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What will the notice tell me..., and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES COLLECTION OF CLAIMS... (see subpart F of this part); or (h) By liquidation of security or collateral. NARA has the right to...

  10. Configurations of Activity: From the Coupling of Individual Actions to the Emergence of Collective Activity. A Study of Mathematics Teaching Situation in Primary School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veyrunes, Philippe; Gal-Petitfaux, Nathalie; Durand, Marc

    2009-01-01

    This article presents and uses the notion of configuration of activity, which extends the Norbert Elias's original concept of social configuration based on the study and analysis of individual and collective activity. Although this concept embraces all types of social activities, in the present study the authors used it to describe and analyse…

  11. Survey of heavy metals in internal tissues of Great cormorant collected from southern wetlands of Caspian Sea, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aazami, Jaber; KianiMehr, Naser

    2017-12-29

    The level of mercury, iron, copper, and zinc was measured in 18 Great cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) collected from Anzali and Gomishan wetlands in the south of the Caspian Sea. The mean level of metals in dried tissues of the muscle, liver, and kidney was 2.26, 5.71, 3.79-Hg; 943.54, 379.97, 348.05-Fe; 42.64, 14.78, 60.79-Cu, and 71.97, 134.63, 77.82-Zn, respectively (mg/kg). There was no significant different between genders in terms of accumulation of metals, except for copper in the kidney. The results of Pearson correlation showed a positive and strong relationship between the fat in the liver and mercury (r = 0.95, R 2  = 0.90). Also, there was a significant difference between the values of all metals with the allowable limits presented in EPA, WHO, and CCME, where all of values were above standard levels. Thus, as the muscles of the bird are sometimes eaten by humans, this result is a serious warning. Nevertheless, the relatively high levels of heavy metals accumulated in different tissues of Great cormorant at that time are a result of their high weight and nourishment they have at the terminal days of their migration due to lack of natural physical activity. Regarding to the importance of heavy metals in birds, we suggest the same study to be conducted on the species in other seasons and wetlands.

  12. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1993, Part II, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1993-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  13. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1998, Part 2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Bacic, S.; Plecas, I.

    1998-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  14. Radiation protection at the RA Reactor in 1995, Part -2, Annex 2, Decontamination and actions, collection of liquid effluents and solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandic, M.; Vukovic, Z.; Lazic, S.; Plecas, I.; Voko, A.

    1995-01-01

    Certain amount of solid waste results from RA reactor operation, the mean quantity of which depends on the duration of reactor operation and related activities. During repair, when reactor is not operated as well under accidental conditions, the quantity of waste is higher, dependent on the type of repair and comprehensiveness of decontamination of the working surface, contaminated tools and components. The waste is sorted and packed on the spot where they appeared according to the existing regulations and principles of radiation protection with aim to minimize unnecessary exposure of the radiation protection personnel who deals with control, transport, radioactive waste treatment and decontamination. During exceptional operations (decontamination, repair, bigger volume of contaminated material, etc.) professional staff of the Radiation protection department gives recommendations and helps in planning the actions related to repair, sorting and packaging of radioactive waste in special containers, identification of the contaminants, etc. [sr

  15. PTTSA Action Plan Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    The Pre-Tiger Team Self-Assessment (PTTSA) Report identified findings with respect to the way Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Albuquerque, (including Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and Kauai Test Facility (KTF)) conducts its environment, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) activities. It presented Action Plan Requirements (APR) addressing these findings. The purpose of this PTTSA Action Plan Report is to assist in managing these action plan requirements by collecting, prioritizing, and estimating required resources. The specific objectives addressed by this report include: collection of requirements for the resolution of the findings presented in the PTTSA Report; consolidation of proposed Action Plan Requirements into logical Action Plan groupings for efficiency of resolution; categorization of Action Plans according to severity of the hazards represented by the findings; provision of a basis for long-range planning and issues management; documentation of the status of the proposed corrective actions; establishment of traceability of the corrective action to the original problem or issue; and integration of these plans into the existing ES ampersand H structure. The Action Plans in this report are an intermediate step between the identification of a problem or a finding in the PTTSA Report and the execution of the solution. They consist of requirements for solution, proposed actions, and an estimate of the time and (where applicable) resources required to develop the solution. This report is an input to the process of planning, resource commitment, development, testing, implementation, and maintenance of problem resolution. 2 figs

  16. Viewing speech in action: speech articulation videos in the public domain that demonstrate the sounds of the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA)

    OpenAIRE

    Nakai, S.; Beavan, D.; Lawson, E.; Leplâtre, G.; Scobbie, J. M.; Stuart-Smith, J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we introduce recently released, publicly available resources, which allow users to watch videos of hidden articulators (e.g. the tongue) during the production of various types of sounds found in the world’s languages. The articulation videos on these resources are linked to a clickable International Phonetic Alphabet chart ([International Phonetic Association. 1999. Handbook of the International Phonetic Association: A Guide to the Use of the International Phonetic Alphabet. ...

  17. External and Internal Citation Analyses Can Provide Insight into Serial/Monograph Ratios when Refining Collection Development Strategies in Selected STEM Disciplines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie Krueger

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A Review of: Kelly, M. (2015. Citation patterns of engineering, statistics, and computer science researchers: An internal and external citation analysis across multiple engineering subfields. College and Research Libraries, 76(7, 859-882. http://doi.org/10.5860/crl.76.7.859 Objective – To determine internal and external citation analysis methods and their potential applicability to the refinement of collection development strategies at both the institutional and cross-institutional levels for selected science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM subfields. Design – Multidimensional citation analysis; specifically, analysis of citations from 1 key scholarly journals in selected STEM subfields (external analysis compared to those from 2 local doctoral dissertations in similar subfields (internal analysis. Setting – Medium-sized, STEM-dominant public research university in the United States of America. Subjects – Two citation datasets: 1 14,149 external citations from16 journals (i.e., 2 journals per subfield; citations from 2012 volumes representing bioengineering, civil engineering, computer science (CS, electrical engineering, environmental engineering, operations research, statistics (STAT, and systems engineering; and 2 8,494 internal citations from 99 doctoral dissertations (18-22 per subfield published between 2008-–2012 from CS, electrical and computer engineering (ECE, and applied information technology (AIT and published between 2005-–2012 for systems engineering and operations research (SEOR and STAT. Methods – Citations, including titles and publication dates, were harvested from source materials and stored in Excel and then manually categorized according to format (book, book chapter, journal, conference proceeding, website, and several others. To analyze citations, percentages of occurrence by subfield were calculated for variables including format, age (years since date cited, journal distribution, and the

  18. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Volume 5, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-08-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Resource Management. This summary report is published for internal NRC use in managing the Operating Reactors Licensing Actions Program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  19. Operating reactors licensing actions summary. Vol. 3, No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-07-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis. This summary report is published primarily for internal NRC use in managing the operating reactors licensing actions program. Its content will change based on NRC management informational requirements

  20. How the Alliance for Climate Education engages national and local partners to achieve collective impact in climate literacy and action (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappe, M.; Gonzalez, R.; Shanley Hope, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Alliance for Climate Education (ACE) has a mission to educate and inspire young people to break through the challenge of climate change. ACE believes that achieving a safe and stable climate in our lifetime requires the ideas, action and influence of young people. Since 2009, ACE has reached almost 2 million teens in 2,200 schools in over 20 states across the US. In order to support these young people to become leaders in their schools and communities, ACE works closely with local and national partners. In this presentation, ACE will discuss strategic partnerships that have yielded measurable impact and explore how nonprofits, universities, school districts, private companies and government agencies can more effectively align efforts to achieve shared goals. Examples of successful partnerships discussed will include PG&E, Chicago Public Schools, Monterey Bay Aquarium, DC Public Schools, the Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network, NOAA, The Next Generation, Los Angeles Public Schools and research universities. ACE will also discuss how research in the field of transformational leadership informs our partnership strategy.

  1. Culture collections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David

    2012-01-01

    Culture collections no matter their size, form, or institutional objectives play a role in underpinning microbiology, supplying the resources for study, innovation, and discovery. Their basic roles include providing a mechanism for ex situ conservation of organisms; they are repositories for strains subject to publication, taking in safe, confidential, and patent deposits from researchers. They supply strains for use; therefore, the microorganisms provided must be authentic and preserved well, and any associated information must be valid and sufficient to facilitate the confirmation of their identity and to facilitate their use. The organisms must be collected in compliance with international conventions, international and national legislation and distributed to users indicating clearly the terms and conditions under which they are received and can be used. Collections are harmonizing approaches and characterizing strains to meet user needs. No one single collection can carry out this task alone, and therefore, it is important that output and strategy are coordinated to ensure culture collections deliver the basic resources and services microbiological innovation requires. This chapter describes the types of collection and how they can implement quality management systems and operate to deliver their basic functions. The links to information sources given not only provide support for the practitioners within collections but also provide guidance to users on accessing the huge resource available and how they can help ensure microbiology has the resources and a solid platform for future development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Users in Persistant Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, John K.; Gasparin, Marta; Varnes, Claus J.

    2012-01-01

    of the hybrid collective to include the press and distribution channels to want it back. All actors in collective actions can become lead users when supported by establishing alliances. This perspective is different from Von Hippel (1986) who is claiming that the trend needs to be defined before the lead users...

  3. Collective Responsibility for Oppression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stahl, Titus

    2017-01-01

    Many contemporary forms of oppression are not primarily the result of formally organized collective action nor are they an unintended outcome of a combination of individual actions. This raises the question of collective responsibility. I argue that we can only determine who is responsible for

  4. Search Results | Page 9 | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Results 81 - 90 of 220 ... Canadian development report 2011 : global challenges; multilateral solutions ... Scaling up the international impact of action research : SAS phase 3; final ... provide scientific validation of medicinal plants; promote inclusion of traditional ... system for collection and analysis of medical field survey data.

  5. Coordination of ministry actions related to the use of liquefied natural gas for marine fuel - A maritime challenge to face collectively

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jouffray, Jean-Francois; Erhardt, Jean-Bernard; Allais, Vincent

    2013-02-01

    As France remained apart from a movement of adoption of liquefied natural gas (LNG) in maritime applications, this report first discusses the different fuels used by ships (conventional fuels, LNG, fuel energy efficiency, LNG engines and tanks). Then, after having recalled international constraints related to atmospheric emissions by ships (MARPOL convention, European legal framework) and noticed the possible transfer to other transport mode in case of change of fuel, the authors discuss the possible solutions and show that LNG allows environmental objectives to be met whereas other conventional fuels present several drawbacks. They comment the results of some European studies on the use of LNG, propose an overview of LNG resources, availability and prices, and indicate current projects in the world. They study the implications of introduction of LNG for ships in France in terms of infrastructures, of regulation, and of compliance with different European policies. They discuss different aspects related to the creation of the associated market, the commitment of economic stakeholders, industrial stakes, pilot projects and the issue of investment financing

  6. Acción colectiva de las organizaciones de población desplazada en Medellín: Ciclos, contextos, repertorios y perspectivas The Collective Action of the Organizations of Displaced Populations in Medellín: Cycles, Contexts, Repertoires and Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Gilberto Granada Vahos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available El presente artículo ubica, como asunto de preocupación académica y social, el papel activo que los desplazados internos han jugado como sujetos colectivos en la lucha por la garantía y el restablecimiento de sus derechos. Retomando la teoría sobre los movimientos sociales construida por Sidney Tarrow, se reflexiona acerca de dos ciclos de acción colectiva: 1996-2003 y 2004-2009. En ellos se muestra el aumento y diferenciación de las acciones llevadas a cabo por la población desplazada que se asienta en el municipio de Medellín; se referencian las estructuras de contexto que incentivaron, abrieron oportunidades o limitaron la puesta en marcha de las acciones colectivas; se analizan los repertorios para la acción y las diversas formas de interacción entre los sujetos afectados y la administración municipal. Con esto se busca constatar, en el último ciclo, que aparecen formas re-creadas de acción y participación de la población desplazada, tanto a la hora de relacionarse con las instancias e instituciones encargadas de la política, como en el fragor de las acciones de hecho, y que ambas son formas de acción que llaman la atención sobre la garantía de sus derechos conculcados, lo cual se constituye, sin duda, como un reto para la Mesa de Organizaciones de Población Desplazada en Medellín.The present article locates, as a matter of social and academic concern, the active role that internal displaced persons have played as collective subjects in the fight to guarantee the re-establishment of their rights. Using the theory on the social movements proposed by Sidney Tarrow, the article reflects on two cycles of collective action, carried out between 1996-2003 and 2004-2009. In them, one finds the increase and differentiation of the actions carried out by the population of displaced person that have settled in the municipality of Medellín; it references the context structures that encouraged, opened opportunities or limited the

  7. Collective Security

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galster, Kjeld

    in worldwide market conditions left perceptible ripples in Danish economy, budget discussions grew in importance over this period. The pacifist stance entailed disinclination to accept that the collective security concept and international treaties and accords signed by Denmark should necessitate credible...... and other international treaties provided arguments for adjusting the foreign and security policy ambitions, and since the general flux in worldwide market conditions left perceptible ripples in Danish economy, budget discussions grew in importance over this period. The pacifist stance entailed......Collective Security: National Egotism (Abstract) In Danish pre-World War I defence debate the notion of collective security is missing. During the early years of the 19th century, the political work is influenced by a pervasive feeling of rising tension and danger on the continent of Europe...

  8. The interaction of several fields of knowledge for the articulation of collective oral health actions: the mapping of a family health team

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Silveira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper maps the experience of a family health team (FHT in the creation of a knowledge and responsibility field to practice Oral Health (OH. Institutional analysis was used to establish the theoretical and methodological framework, supported by the concept analyzers, implication analysis, territorialization and deterritorialization. Cartography was used to monitor the procedures and the order of events and to facilitate understanding. The subjects were members of an FHT in a training context. Data production took place during the FHT meetings on administrative and family discussion matters. The case study presented here was one of the research analyzers. As results, the process of building the case study was identified, which revealed how the FHT took the family into care; the movements broadening the perspective of care, finding ways for disciplinary interactions in order to construct a collective OH approach, which emerged from the day-to-day tensions of the FHT work process. The conclusion reached is that this case study revealed the stresses involved in the process of deconstruction of dental assistance and the movement towards the interaction of several fields of knowledge and practices for the production of care from the perspective of OH attention.

  9. 2012 best practices for repositories collection, storage, retrieval, and distribution of biological materials for research international society for biological and environmental repositories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Third Edition [Formula: see text] [Box: see text] Printed with permission from the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER) © 2011 ISBER All Rights Reserved Editor-in-Chief Lori D. Campbell, PhD Associate Editors Fay Betsou, PhD Debra Leiolani Garcia, MPA Judith G. Giri, PhD Karen E. Pitt, PhD Rebecca S. Pugh, MS Katherine C. Sexton, MBA Amy P.N. Skubitz, PhD Stella B. Somiari, PhD Individual Contributors to the Third Edition Jonas Astrin, Susan Baker, Thomas J. Barr, Erica Benson, Mark Cada, Lori Campbell, Antonio Hugo Jose Froes Marques Campos, David Carpentieri, Omoshile Clement, Domenico Coppola, Yvonne De Souza, Paul Fearn, Kelly Feil, Debra Garcia, Judith Giri, William E. Grizzle, Kathleen Groover, Keith Harding, Edward Kaercher, Joseph Kessler, Sarah Loud, Hannah Maynor, Kevin McCluskey, Kevin Meagher, Cheryl Michels, Lisa Miranda, Judy Muller-Cohn, Rolf Muller, James O'Sullivan, Karen Pitt, Rebecca Pugh, Rivka Ravid, Katherine Sexton, Ricardo Luis A. Silva, Frank Simione, Amy Skubitz, Stella Somiari, Frans van der Horst, Gavin Welch, Andy Zaayenga 2012 Best Practices for Repositories: Collection, Storage, Retrieval and Distribution of Biological Materials for Research INTERNATIONAL SOCIETY FOR BIOLOGICAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL REPOSITORIES (ISBER) INTRODUCTION T he availability of high quality biological and environmental specimens for research purposes requires the development of standardized methods for collection, long-term storage, retrieval and distribution of specimens that will enable their future use. Sharing successful strategies for accomplishing this goal is one of the driving forces for the International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories (ISBER). For more information about ISBER see www.isber.org . ISBER's Best Practices for Repositories (Best Practices) reflect the collective experience of its members and has received broad input from other repository professionals. Throughout this document

  10. Who takes precautionary action in the face of the new H1N1 influenza? Prediction of who collects a free hand sanitizer using a health behavior model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Reuter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In order to fight the spread of the novel H1N1 influenza, health authorities worldwide called for a change in hygiene behavior. Within a longitudinal study, we examined who collected a free bottle of hand sanitizer towards the end of the first swine flu pandemic wave in December 2009. METHODS: 629 participants took part in a longitudinal study assessing perceived likelihood and severity of an H1N1 infection, and H1N1 influenza related negative affect (i.e., feelings of threat, concern, and worry at T1 (October 2009, week 43-44 and T2 (December 2009, week 51-52. Importantly, all participants received a voucher for a bottle of hand sanitizer at T2 which could be redeemed in a university office newly established for this occasion at T3 (ranging between 1-4 days after T2. RESULTS: Both a sequential longitudinal model (M2 as well as a change score model (M3 showed that greater perceived likelihood and severity at T1 (M2 or changes in perceived likelihood and severity between T1 and T2 (M3 did not directly drive protective behavior (T3, but showed a significant indirect impact on behavior through H1N1 influenza related negative affect. Specifically, increases in perceived likelihood (β = .12, severity (β = .24 and their interaction (β = .13 were associated with a more pronounced change in negative affect (M3. The more threatened, concerned and worried people felt (T2, the more likely they were to redeem the voucher at T3 (OR = 1.20. CONCLUSIONS: Affective components need to be considered in health behavior models. Perceived likelihood and severity of an influenza infection represent necessary but not sufficient self-referential knowledge for paving the way for preventive behaviors.

  11. Who takes precautionary action in the face of the new H1N1 influenza? Prediction of who collects a free hand sanitizer using a health behavior model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Tabea; Renner, Britta

    2011-01-01

    In order to fight the spread of the novel H1N1 influenza, health authorities worldwide called for a change in hygiene behavior. Within a longitudinal study, we examined who collected a free bottle of hand sanitizer towards the end of the first swine flu pandemic wave in December 2009. 629 participants took part in a longitudinal study assessing perceived likelihood and severity of an H1N1 infection, and H1N1 influenza related negative affect (i.e., feelings of threat, concern, and worry) at T1 (October 2009, week 43-44) and T2 (December 2009, week 51-52). Importantly, all participants received a voucher for a bottle of hand sanitizer at T2 which could be redeemed in a university office newly established for this occasion at T3 (ranging between 1-4 days after T2). Both a sequential longitudinal model (M2) as well as a change score model (M3) showed that greater perceived likelihood and severity at T1 (M2) or changes in perceived likelihood and severity between T1 and T2 (M3) did not directly drive protective behavior (T3), but showed a significant indirect impact on behavior through H1N1 influenza related negative affect. Specifically, increases in perceived likelihood (β = .12), severity (β = .24) and their interaction (β = .13) were associated with a more pronounced change in negative affect (M3). The more threatened, concerned and worried people felt (T2), the more likely they were to redeem the voucher at T3 (OR = 1.20). Affective components need to be considered in health behavior models. Perceived likelihood and severity of an influenza infection represent necessary but not sufficient self-referential knowledge for paving the way for preventive behaviors.

  12. An international cross-sectional survey on the Quality and Costs of Primary Care (QUALICO-PC): recruitment and data collection of places delivering primary care across Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Sabrina T; Chau, Leena W; Hogg, William; Teare, Gary F; Miedema, Baukje; Breton, Mylaine; Aubrey-Bassler, Kris; Katz, Alan; Burge, Fred; Boivin, Antoine; Cooke, Tim; Francoeur, Danièle; Wodchis, Walter P

    2015-02-18

    Performance reporting in primary health care in Canada is challenging because of the dearth of concise and synthesized information. The paucity of information occurs, in part, because the majority of primary health care in Canada is delivered through a multitude of privately owned small businesses with no mechanism or incentives to provide information about their performance. The purpose of this paper is to report the methods used to recruit family physicians and their patients across 10 provinces to provide self-reported information about primary care and how this information could be used in recruitment and data collection for future large scale pan-Canadian and other cross-country studies. Canada participated in an international large scale study-the QUALICO-PC (Quality and Costs of Primary Care) study. A set of four surveys, designed to collect in-depth information regarding primary care activities was collected from: practices, providers, and patients (experiences and values). Invitations (telephone, electronic or mailed) were sent to family physicians. Eligible participants were sent a package of surveys. Provincial teams kept records on the number of: invitation emails/letters sent, physicians who registered, practices that were sent surveys, and practices returning completed surveys. Response and cooperation rates were calculated. Invitations to participate were sent to approximately 23,000 family physicians across Canada. A total of 792 physicians and 8,332 patients from 772 primary care practices completed the surveys, including 1,160 participants completing a Patient Values survey and 7,172 participants completing a Patient Experience survey. Overall, the response rate was very low ranging from 2% (British Columbia) to 21% (Nova Scotia). However, the participation rate was high, ranging from 72% (Ontario) to 100% (New Brunswick/Prince Edward Island and Newfoundland & Labrador). The difficulties obtaining acceptable response rates by family physicians for

  13. Ação coletiva no âmbito da economia solidária e da autogestão Collective action in the realm of solidarity economics and self-management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Monteiro Castanheira

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Este ensaio traz reflexões sobre as motivações que conduzem a ação coletiva no âmbito da economia solidária e da autogestão, partindo do pressuposto de que, nestas esferas, a ação coletiva se diferencia daquela que se desenvolve nos domínios do capitalismo e daquela que se desenvolve no contexto social das relações tradicionais. Neste sentido, o objetivo deste ensaio é explorar as especificidades teóricas da ação coletiva orientada pelos princípios da economia solidária e da autogestão, tendo como enfoque analítico a teoria da dádiva. Para tanto, procurou-se, de forma articulada e seqüencial, problematizar a economia solidária, evidenciar os elementos constitutivos da autogestão e o aporte teórico da teoria da dádiva. Acredita-se que tais ponderações indicam um campo a ser explorado empiricamente, podendo contribuir para a elaboração de novos estudos e pesquisas sobre este tema.This essay reflects on the motivations that lead to collective action in the realm of solidarity economics and self-management, based on the presumption that, in these spheres, collective action is different from that which takes places in the domains of capitalism and that which develops in the social context of traditional relations. In this sense, the purpose of this essay is to explore the theoretical specificities of collective action guided by the principles of solidarity economics and self-management, with an analytical focus on the theory of donation. To do so, it sought to analyze solidarity economics in an articulated and sequential manner, to reveal the constituent elements of self management and the theoretical support for the theory of donation. These considerations indicate that there is much empirical research to do in this field, and such research can contribute to the elaboration of new studies and research about this issue.

  14. The emergence and outcomes of collective action: an institutional and ecosystem approach A emergência e os resultados da ação coletiva: uma abordagem institucional e ecossistêmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Célia Futtema

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Participation in collective action is frequently studied through a community-based analysis, with focus on the social features of the participants and on the ecological features of the managed system. This study addresses the importance of scaling down to household level to understand different individual incentives to collaborate (or not as well as scaling up to the landscape level to evaluate the ecological outcome of the local forms of collective action. A study of a riparian community of 33 households in the Lower Amazon located between two distinct ecosystems -a privately owned upland forest and a communally owned floodplain- reveals that household-based analysis uncovers how heterogeneity within the community leads to different incentives for participation in the communal floodplain, while systemic analysis reveals that interconnection between the managed ecosystem and adjacent ecosystem influences the decisions to participate as well as the ecological outcomes of the collective actions.A participação numa ação coletiva é estudada com freqüência por meio de uma análise baseada nas comunidades e enfocada nas características sociais dos participantes e nas características ecológicas do sistema manejado. Este estudo refere-se à importância de se limitar a análise ao nível das famílias para compreender os diferentes incentivos individuais que colaboram (ou não, assim como de se ampliar a análise ao nível da esfera territorial a fim de se avaliar o resultado ecológico das formas locais de ação coletiva. Um estudo feito numa comunidade costeira de 33 famílias na Baixa Amazonia situada entre dois ecosistemas diferentes -uma mata/floresta de propriedade privada situada em terras altas e uma planície pluvial pertencente a uma comunidade- revela que a análise baseada nas famílias mostra que a heterogeneidade dentro da comunidade conduz a diferentes incentivos para participar das atividades na planície pluvial. A an

  15. Collecting Taxes Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — The Collecting Taxes Database contains performance and structural indicators about national tax systems. The database contains quantitative revenue performance...

  16. The action of France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    After a favorable period for the weapons mastership, the disarmament and the non-proliferation, the conditions of international safety and the strategical context revealed recently worrying developments. The France is decided to continue its action in favor of the disarmament and the non-proliferation in the continuity of its political engagements. (A.L.B.)

  17. Critical-Service Learning as a Revolutionary Pedagogy: An International Project of Student Agency in Action. Critical Constructions: Studies on Education and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porfilio, Bradley, Ed.; Hickman, Heather, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This volume will be a valuable resource to instructors who teach in the fields of teacher education, social studies, educational leadership, social work, social, cultural and philosophical foundations of education, sociology, political science, and global studies as well as their students. Due to the volume's international focus, the authors also…

  18. Self-Organization for Collective Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Putterman, Louis; Tyran, Jean-Robert Karl

    2014-01-01

    the surplus it makes possible, as predicted by standard economic theory, or instead opt for the use of informal sanctions or no sanctions. Our subjects choose, and succeed in using, informal sanctions surprisingly often, their voting decisions being responsive to the cost of formal sanctions. Adoption...

  19. Designing a climate change policy for the international maritime transport sector: Market-based measures and technological options for global and regional policy actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miola, A.; Marra, M.; Ciuffo, B.

    2011-01-01

    The international maritime transport sector has a significant abatement potential and some technical improvements that reduce GHG emissions would already be profitable without any policy in place. This paper analyses in-depth the limits and opportunities of policy options currently under consideration at the international level to stimulate the sector to reduce its GHG emissions. In particular, in order for the maritime transport sector to become more environmentally friendly, the flexible nature of international market-based measures and the European Union Emission Trading Scheme provide a definite window of opportunity without placing unnecessary high burden on the sector. However, the development of a regional policy, such as at European level, for the international maritime transport sector faces several obstacles: allocation of emissions, carbon leakage, permit allocation, treatment of the great variety in ship type, size and usage, and transaction cost. Global market-based policies could overcome most of these challenges. This paper provides an in-depth analysis of the policy instruments currently under discussion to reduce the sector's burden on the environment, and focuses on economic theory, legal principles, technological options, and the political framework that together make up the basis of decision-making regarding the international maritime transport sector's climate change policies. - Highlights: → Technologies for a more environmental friendly maritime transport sector and their cost-effectiveness. → How to combine ambitious CO 2 reduction goals with a sector-wide market-based policy. → Permits should be auctioned frequently and small emitters have to be excluded. → Inclusion of shipping in the EU ETS causes carbon leakage, so the policy should aim at expansion.

  20. Negotiating action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    After years of working towards a climate accord, the Paris Agreement of 2015 marked the shift from negotiating to reach consensus on climate action to implementation of such action. The challenge now is to ensure transparency in the processes and identify the details of what is required.

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October - December 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July - September 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. Also included are a number of enforcement actions that had been previously resolved but not published in this NUREG. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  5. Políticas de promoção internacional da língua portuguesa: ações na américa latina Language policies for international promotion of portuguese language: actions in latin america

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone da Costa Carvalho

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo traçar um panorama de ações na área de políticas linguísticas relacionadas à promoção e ao ensino do português como língua adicional no Brasil e fora do país, bem como refletir sobre alguns de seus impactos. Primeiramente, são apresentados o conceito de política linguística (COOPER, 1989 e as noções de valor e de mercado linguístico a partir da Nova Economia (OLIVEIRA, 2010. A seguir, apresenta-se um panorama de ações políticas de promoção internacional da língua portuguesa, focalizando naquelas desenvolvidas nos âmbitos do Mercosul e da América Latina. Conclui-se fazendo uma reflexão sobre possíveis implicações dessas ações no ensino e aprendizagem de português como língua adicional, bem como na difusão internacional da língua portuguesa.This paper aims at drawing an overview of actions in the field of language policies related to Portuguese promotion and teaching, as an additional language, in Brazil and abroad, as well as reflecting about some of the impacts of that. First of all, the concept of language planning (COOPER, 1989 will be presented, as well as the notion of value and linguistic market based on the New Economy (OLIVEIRA, 2010. Next, an overview of politic actions for promoting Portuguese Language internationally will be presented, specially the ones developed in Mercosul and Latin America contexts. In the end, possible implications of these actions for the teaching and learning and international promotion of Portuguese as an additional language are discussed.

  6. Citizens' action group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andritzky, W.

    1978-01-01

    For the first empirical study of citizens' action groups 331 such groups were consulted. Important information was collected on the following aspects of these groups: their self-image, areas and forms of activities, objectives and their extent, how long the group has existed, successes and failures and their forms of organisation. (orig.) [de

  7. Transversalidades no estudo sobre jovens no Brasil: educação, ação coletiva e cultura Transversalities in the study on young people in Brazil: education, collective action, and culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marilia Pontes Sposito

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available O artigo examina as possibilidades de análise das ações coletivas de jovens, particularmente aquelas que derivam de práticas culturais, no interior de uma perspectiva que procura resgatar orientações do pensamento sociológico brasileiro que recusa uma segmentação estanque dos campos de estudo. A partir de balanço realizado da produção discente na Pós-Graduação nas Ciências Sociais, Educação e Serviço Social, é possível delinear novos desafios para a pesquisa sobre jovens e suas práticas coletivas. Um conjunto de estudos realizados a partir de meados dos anos 1990 oferece um quadro importante das manifestações derivadas dos denominados grupos de estilos e culturas juvenis, sobretudo no campo da música. Darks, punks, rappers foram os principais estilos investigados e, em menor escala, a cultura funk. A compreensão adensada das presenças diversificadas dos jovens nos espaços públicos em seus coletivos remete a uma necessária trans-versalidade que demanda não desconsiderar na análise outras dimensões da experiência juvenil. As transformações decorrentes da intensa expansão dos sistemas de ensino nas últimas décadas no Brasil, as novas configurações do mundo do trabalho e as significativas formas de apropriação do espaço urbano que articula novas formas de sociabilidade são aspectos importantes a serem considerados nas análises das denominadas culturas juvenis e suas formas de ação coletiva.This article examines the possibilities of analyzing collective action by young people, especially that which derives from cultural practices within a perspective that tries to recall the guiding lines of the Brazilian sociological thought which denies a rigid segmentation of study fields. Starting from a survey on student production in Post-Graduation programs in Social Sciences, Education, and Social Work, it is possible to delineate new challenges for the research on young people and their collective practices. A

  8. CALCULATION AND EXPERIMENTAL ESTIMATION OF RESULTS OF ELECTRO-THERMAL ACTION OF RATIONED BY THE INTERNATIONAL STANDARD IEC 62305-1-2010 IMPULSE CURRENT OF SHORT BLOW OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHTNING ON THE THIN-WALLED COVERAGE FROM STAINLESS STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Baranov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Calculation and experimental researches of electro-thermal resistibility of the pre-production thin-walled sheet models of outward roof of height technical buildings from stainless steel are easily soiled 12Х18Н10Т to direct action on them rationed by the International Standard IEC 62305-1-2010 aperiodic impulse of current of short bow of artificial lightning of temporal form 10/350 μs with the proper admittances on his peak-temporal parameters (PTP. Methodology. Electrophysics bases of technique of high voltage and large impulsive currents (LIC, and also scientific and technical bases of planning of high-voltage impulsive devices and measuring methods in them LIC with followings below extreme PTP: amplitude of impulse of current of ImL=200 кА (with admittance ±10 %; integral of action of impulse of current of JL=10·106 A2·s (with admittance ±35 %; %; duration of wavefront current of T1=10 μs (with admittance ±20 %; time, proper amplitude of impulse of current of ImL, tmL≤24 μs (with admittance ±20 %; duration of flowing of impulse of current of T2=350 μs (with admittance ±10 %. Results. The results of evaluation calculation and experimental researches of electro-thermal resistibility of the indicated pre-production sheet models are resulted measuring in the plan of 0,5 x 0,5 m from stainless steel are easily soiled the 12Х18Н10Т thickness of 1 mm to action on them of aperiodic impulse of current of short blow of artificial lightning with rationed PTP on the requirements of the International Standard IEC 62305-1-2010. In high current experiments amplitude of ImL of the aperiodic rationed impulse of current of artificial lightning of temporal form of T1/T2=15 μs/315 μs changed in the range of (100-184 кА. The integral of action of JL of impulse of current for I-IV of levels of protection of lightning of technical objects (TO numeral made from 2,32·106 А2·s to 7,88·106 А2·s, and the flowing through the

  9. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  10. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  11. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1990) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  12. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  13. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  14. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-08-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  15. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April--June 1990) and includes copies of letters, notices, and orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  16. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-06-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  17. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (January--March 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  18. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1993) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  19. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1992) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  20. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (April-June 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  1. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-11-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  2. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-03-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (October--December 1991) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  3. Enforcement actions: Significant actions resolved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    This compilation summarizes significant enforcement actions that have been resolved during one quarterly period (July--September 1989) and includes copies of letters, Notices, and Orders sent by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to licensees with respect to these enforcement actions. It is anticipated that the information in this publication will be widely disseminated to managers and employees engaged in activities licensed by the NRC, so that actions can be taken to improve safety by avoiding future violations similar to those described in this publication

  4. Surplus Facilities Management Program. Post remedial action survey report for the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) facility, Santa Susana Field Laboratories, Rockwell International, Ventura County, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wynveen, R.A.; Smith, W.H.; Sholeen, C.M.; Flynn, K.F.; Justus, A.L.

    1984-02-01

    Decontamination of the Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) began in 1976 and was completed in 1982. In view of the concurrent and post-remedial-action surveys, the following conclusions can be stated. All the buildings and areas included in this decommissioning project have been decontaminated to below the limits specified in the draft ANSI Standard N13.12 and the NRC Guidelines for Decontamination of Facilities and Equipment Prior to Release for Unrestricted Use or Termination of Licenses for By-Product, Source, or Special Nuclear Material, dated July 1982. Radioactive contamination was found in appropriate access points of the sanitary sewer and storm drain systems included within the boundaries of this decommissioning project. One sample indicated a 90 Sr concentration dissolved in the water of approximately half the recommended water concentration for controlled areas and approximately 15 times the recommended water concentration for uncontrolled areas as stated in DOE-5480.1 Chg. 6, Chapter XI. Therefore, the interior inaccessible surfaces of these systems must be considered contaminated in accordance with statements found in the NRC Regulatory Guidelines issued in July 1982. Effluent from the outfall of this drain system must also be considered as being potentially contaminated. 1 reference, 32 figures, 8 tables

  5. The international climate regime: towards consolidation collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berthaud, P.; Cavard, D.; Criqui, P.

    2003-10-01

    This article deals with the different modalities that exist to manage a problem of collective action in the field of climate negotiation. It uses two concepts of the International Political Economy (IPE): the concept of International Regime (IR) and the concept of Hegemony and / or Leadership. The course the international negotiation has taken between 1992 (Rio Convention) and march 2001 (the US rejection of the Kyoto Protocol of 1997) leads us, first, to question the conditions of existence as well as the viability of a non-hegemonic International Regime (Part One). Then, we discuss the perspectives for the 'post - Kyoto' era. After having examined the preferences of the three most active actors in the negotiation (USA, Europe, G77 + China) combined with the leadership capacities they possess, we identify three scenarios for the future: i) anarchy, ii) an international regime under the American hegemony, iii) an international regime under the European leadership (Part Two). (author)

  6. 76 FR 72446 - Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-23

    ... recipient cash management policies and procedures identified issues concerning the methods that recipients... OFFICE OF MANAGEMENT AND BUDGET Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request AGENCY: Office of Federal Financial Management, Office of Management and Budget. ACTION: Notice...

  7. InterAction Database (IADB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The InterAction Database includes demographic and prescription information for more than 500,000 patients in the northern and middle Netherlands and has been integrated with other systems to enhance data collection and analysis.

  8. The IAEA Inspections: Creating a Collective Security System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Guelte, Georges

    2003-01-01

    Through their successes, their achievements and the hopes they raised of a world where the law would replace the arbitrary, but also through the failures imputed to them and the fragility of their action, the inspections of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) have become a symbol of the capacities, the limits, and the weaknesses of the international system founded in 1945 by the UN Charter. Originally, their objective was much more limited. Historical developments - the Cold War, in particular - have turned the inspections into the major instrument of a unique mechanism of collective security, that is recovering its full significance in the current international context

  9. Action Research Empowers School Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Successful school library programs occur through careful planning and reflection. This reflective process is improved when it is applied in a systematic way through action research. The action research described in this paper enabled school librarians to reflect based on evidence, using data they had collected. This study presents examples of the…

  10. Operating reactors licensing actions summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-04-01

    The operating reactors licensing actions summary is designed to provide the management of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) with an overview of licensing actions dealing with operating power and nonpower reactors. These reports utilize data collected from the Division of Licensing in the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation and are prepared by the Office of Management and Program Analysis

  11. Dialogic action in climate change discussions: An international study of high school students in China, New Zealand, Norway and the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana J. Arya

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Global efforts to prepare young developing minds for solving current and future challenges of climate change have advocated interdisciplinary, issues-based instructional approaches in order to transform traditional models of science education as delivering conceptual facts (UNESCO, 2014. This study is an exploration of the online interactions in an international social network of high school students residing in Norway, China, New Zealand and the United States (N=141. Students participated in classroom-based and asynchronous online discussions about adapted versions of seminal scientific studies with facilitative support from seven scientists across various fields. Grounded in a language-in-use frame for investigating facilitation and demonstrations of problem-based and evidence-based reasoning (Kelly & Chen, 1999, we traced the varied questions, assertions, and evidentiary sources within student-led online discussions. We found that questions from scientific experts in the form of unconstrained, open-ended invitations for exploration were followed by students’ acknowledgement and consideration of complex and, at times, conflicting sociopolitical and economic positions about climate change issues. These findings suggest that broadening science classroom discussions to include socially relevant, unsolved issues like climate change could open potential entry points for a dialogic approach that fosters a scientific community in the classroom.

  12. Scholars in International Relations Cite Books More Frequently than Journals: More Research is Needed to Better Understand Research Behaviour and Use. A Review of: Zhang, Li. ʺCitation Analysis for Collection Development: A Study of International Relations Journal Literature.ʺ Library Collections, Acquisitions, and Technical Services 31.3‐4 (2007: 195‐207.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan von Isenburg

    2009-09-01

    representing quantitative research were randomly selected from each of the three journals for each of the six years. Subsequently, five citations from each of the resulting pool of 72 articles were randomly selected to create a sample of 360 citations. These citations were analyzed by material type and age of source.Main Results – Analysis of the citation data showed that books (including monographs, edited books, book chapters and dictionaries made up 48.2% of the total citations; journals (including scholarly and non‐scholarly titles made up 38.4% of the citations; and government publications made up 4.5% of the citations. Electronic resources, which primarily refer to Web sites and digital collections in this study, represented 1.7% of the citations. Other sources of citations included magazines (1.1%, newspapers (1.1%, working papers (1.1%, theses (0.9%, conference papers not yet published as articles (0.6%, and a miscellaneous category, which included items such as committee minutes, radio broadcasts, unpublished materials and personal communications (2.5%. The average age of book citations was 14.3 years and the median age was 8 years. Foreign language citations represented 3.7% of the 651 total citations. The top ranked foreign languages were German (7, French (5, Russian (4, Spanish (3, Korean (2 and Swedish (number not given. Subject analysis of the citations revealed that 38% of all citations were from international relations and two related disciplines, political science, political theory, and public administration. Subject areas outside international relations included social sciences (23.4% ‐ including economics, commerce, industries and finance, history (16.3%, sociology (6.2%, and law (5.9%. Citations from philosophy, psychology, military science and general works together made up 7.3% of the total citations. Citations from science, linguistics, literature, geography and medicine made up less than 2% of the total.Authors of qualitative research articles

  13. EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCHES OF ELECTRO-THERMAL RESISTIBILITY OF SEND-OFFS AND CABLES TO ACTION RATIONED ON THE INTERNATIONAL STANDARD OF IEC 62305-1-2010 OF APERIODIC IMPULSE OF CURRENT OF ARTIFICIAL LIGHTNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.I. Baranov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Experimental researches of electro-thermal resistibility of cable-explorer products, applied in the power electric circuits of objects of electric-power industry, to action on its copper and aluminum parts bearings a current rationed on the International Standard of IEC 62305-1-2010 aperiodic impulse 10/350 μs of current of artificial lightning. Methodology. Electrophysics bases of technique of high tensions and high pulsed currents (HPC, and also scientific and technical bases of planning of devices of high-voltage impulsive technique and measuring HPC in them. Results. Experimental a way the quantitative levels of maximal values maximum of possible and critical closenesses of aperiodic impulse 10/350 μs of current of artificial lightning with rationed on the international standard of IEC 62305-1-2010 peak-temporal parameters and admittances on them in copper (aluminum parts bearings a current of send-offs and cables with a polyethylene (PET and polyvinylchloride (PVCH isolation. Originality. First in world practice on the unique powerful high-voltage generator of HPC of artificial lightning experimental researches of resistibility to lightning of pre-production models of send-offs (cables are conducted with copper (aluminum tendons, PET and PVCH by an isolation, in-use in power electric circuits of electric-power industry objects. Practical value. The use in practice of protecting from lightning of the got results will allow substantially to promote functional and fire-prevention safety of engineering communications of objects of industrial electroenergy in the conditions of action on them of short shots of linear lightning.

  14. Action Refinement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorrieri, R.; Rensink, Arend; Bergstra, J.A.; Ponse, A.; Smolka, S.A.

    2001-01-01

    In this chapter, we give a comprehensive overview of the research results in the field of action refinement during the past 12 years. The different approaches that have been followed are outlined in detail and contrasted to each other in a uniform framework. We use two running examples to discuss

  15. Social order, subjectivity and collective action. Notes for the study of the social movements Orden social, subjetividad y acción colectiva. Notas para el estudio de los movimientos sociales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martín Retamozo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article uses the concept of subjectivity to illuminate the study of social movements. Subjectivity can be seen as a mediator between social sructure and collective action. The article explores how the concept of subjectivity can be useful in the study of those social movements that question the established social order.

    El artículo presenta la categoría de subjetividad colectiva como herramienta para indagar en la constitución de los movimientos sociales. La concepción de subjetividad como un proceso de articulación de sentidos frente situaciones específicas nos conduce a plantear una serie de asuntos ligados a su lógica de conformación y su funcionamiento como una instancia de mediación entre la estructuración del orden social y la acción colecita. El artículo explora, además, algunos campos que se vinculan a la subjetividad y que sirven para una investigación de los movimientos que disputan la conformación del oren social., tales como la voluntad colectiva, los proyectos, los imaginarios y las demandas sociales.

     

     

     

     

  16. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigutti, Sara; Gerbino, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Fantoni & Gerbino (2014) showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP), they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015) would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification) task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions), in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top-down effect on

  17. Bodily action penetrates affective perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlo Fantoni

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fantoni & Gerbino (2014 showed that subtle postural shifts associated with reaching can have a strong hedonic impact and affect how actors experience facial expressions of emotion. Using a novel Motor Action Mood Induction Procedure (MAMIP, they found consistent congruency effects in participants who performed a facial emotion identification task after a sequence of visually-guided reaches: a face perceived as neutral in a baseline condition appeared slightly happy after comfortable actions and slightly angry after uncomfortable actions. However, skeptics about the penetrability of perception (Zeimbekis & Raftopoulos, 2015 would consider such evidence insufficient to demonstrate that observer’s internal states induced by action comfort/discomfort affect perception in a top-down fashion. The action-modulated mood might have produced a back-end memory effect capable of affecting post-perceptual and decision processing, but not front-end perception. Here, we present evidence that performing a facial emotion detection (not identification task after MAMIP exhibits systematic mood-congruent sensitivity changes, rather than response bias changes attributable to cognitive set shifts; i.e., we show that observer’s internal states induced by bodily action can modulate affective perception. The detection threshold for happiness was lower after fifty comfortable than uncomfortable reaches; while the detection threshold for anger was lower after fifty uncomfortable than comfortable reaches. Action valence induced an overall sensitivity improvement in detecting subtle variations of congruent facial expressions (happiness after positive comfortable actions, anger after negative uncomfortable actions, in the absence of significant response bias shifts. Notably, both comfortable and uncomfortable reaches impact sensitivity in an approximately symmetric way relative to a baseline inaction condition. All of these constitute compelling evidence of a genuine top

  18. Comparison of the binding and internalization properties of 12 DOTA-coupled and {sup 111}In-labelled CCK2/gastrin receptor binding peptides: a collaborative project under COST Action BM0607

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aloj, Luigi; Aurilio, Michela; Rinaldi, Valentina; D' Ambrosio, Laura [Istituto Nazionale Tumori, Fondazione ' ' G. Pascale' ' , AF Medicina Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Tesauro, Diego [Universita ' ' Federico II' ' , CIRPeB, Naples (Italy); Peitl, Petra Kolenc [University Medical Centre Ljubljana, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ljubljana (Slovenia); Maina, Theodosia [National Center for Scientific Research Demokritos, Molecular Radiopharmacy, Institute of Radioisotopes-Radiodiagnostic Products, Athens (Greece); Mansi, Rosalba [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany); Guggenberg, Elisabeth von [Innsbruck Medical University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Innsbruck (Austria); Joosten, Lieke [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Institute of Cancer, Barts and the London Queen Mary' s School of Medicine and Dentistry, Centre for Molecular Oncology and Imaging, London (United Kingdom); Breeman, W.A.P.; Blois, Erik de; Koelewijn, Stuart; Melis, Marleen; Jong, Marion de [Erasmus MC, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Waser, Beatrice; Beetschen, Karin; Reubi, Jean Claude [University of Berne, Berne (Switzerland)

    2011-08-15

    Specific overexpression of cholecystokinin 2 (CCK2)/gastrin receptors has been demonstrated in several tumours of neuroendocrine origin. In some of these cancer types, such as medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), a sensitive diagnostic modality is still unavailable and therapeutic options for inoperable lesions are needed. Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may be a viable therapeutic strategy in the management of these patients. Several CCK2R-targeted radiopharmaceuticals have been described in recent years. As part of the European Union COST Action BM0607 we studied the in vitro and in vivo characteristics of 12 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA)-conjugated CCK2R binding peptides. In the present study, we analysed binding and internalization characteristics. Stability, biodistribution and imaging studies have been performed in parallel by other centres involved in the project. Determination of IC{sub 50} values was performed using autoradiography, with DOTA-peptides displacing {sup 125}I-CCK from receptors on tissue sections from human tumours. Saturation binding and internalization experiments were performed using {sup 111}In-labelled peptides. The rat AR42J cell line and the human A431-CCK2R transfected cell line were utilized for in vitro experiments; dissociation constants (K{sub d}) and apparent number of binding sites (B{sub max}) were determined. Internalization was determined in receptor-expressing cells by incubating with tracer amounts of peptide at 37 and 4 C for different times up to 120 min. Surface-bound peptide was then stripped either by acid wash or subsequent incubation with 1 {mu}M unlabelled peptide at 4 C. All peptides showed high receptor affinity with IC{sub 50} values ranging from 0.2 to 3.4 nM. Saturation experiments also showed high affinity with K{sub d} values in the 10{sup -9}-10{sup -8} M range. B{sub max} values estimated in A431-CCK2R cells ranged from 0.6 to 2.2 x 10{sup 6} per cell. All peptides

  19. Inferring Action Structure and Causal Relationships in Continuous Sequences of Human Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    and MySQL . However, all participants participated from in-lab computers. Results Figure 6 shows the distribution of participants’ raw key presses... Java program to present video of action sequences and collect ratings. The program presented all 12 actions, non-actions, and part-actions

  20. 78 FR 18988 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-28

    ... techniques or other forms of information technology to minimize the information collection burden. Information Collection Request Title: The Health Education Assistance Loan (HEAL) Program: Physician's... Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In compliance...