WorldWideScience

Sample records for international chernobyl project

  1. International program on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreisel, W

    1995-05-01

    The International Program on the Health Effects of the Chernobyl Accident (IPHECA) was established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1991. Currently, the technical part of IPHECA consists of five projects addressing the following areas of priority health problems or needs: thyroid, hematology, brain damage in utero, epidemiological registry and oral health. Important findings are: 1) a significant increase of thyroid cancer in children in Belarus and Ukraine since 1989, and in Russia since 1992 though not so pronounced. A relationship between detected thyroid cancers and radiation exposure is yet to be established, 2) no increase yet in the incidence of hemoblastoses in the three States, 3) no relationship established between mental retardation and radiation exposure in utero in 4,500 children investigated. The importance of dosimetry and biological indicators of radiation damage has been recognized by IPHECA. Several methods of biological and physical dosimetry are being employed using instrumentation provided by IPHECA. Some preliminary results indicate: 1) unstable aberrations can indicate an integral exposure but it is heavily biased to recent exposures, 2) when comparing healthy persons and patients with hematological diseases in contaminated areas, there is a higher ratio of total aberrations compared to their background and that the level of stable is lower than unstable aberrations, and 3) by applying electron spin resonance (ESR) it has been shown that the individual distribution of doses approaches a log-normal one, especially for adults, and that a peak shift towards higher doses is noticeable for children.

  2. Chernobyl vis-à-vis the nuclear future: an international perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Abel J

    2007-11-01

    The paper aims to provide an international perspective on the consequences of the Chernobyl accident vis-à-vis the future development of the use of nuclear energy for peaceful purposes. It describes the major international initiatives that were undertaken over the years in order to quantify the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, and also analyzes the impact of the accident on the development of nuclear energy taking account of the perception of its consequences. The paper revisits the historical saga flowing since the fateful explosion at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in the Ukraine 20 y ago. It looks at some of the misunderstandings about the consequences of the accident and explores the worldwide nuclear stagnation that followed Chernobyl, surveying the negative public reaction and also the possibilities of a nuclear revival. It finally searches for a way forward, concluding that an effective international nuclear safety regime is urgently needed with the purpose of preventing catastrophes like Chernobyl from occurring and also that the Chernobyl consequences need to be readdressed properly. The paper concludes with an appeal to the radiation protection community to resolve once and for all the difficult issues of attributing health effects to low-level radiation exposure.

  3. The chernobyl accident 20 years on: an assessment of the health consequences and the international response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baverstock, Keith; Williams, Dillwyn

    2006-09-01

    The Chernobyl accident in 1986 caused widespread radioactive contamination and enormous concern. Twenty years later, the World Health Organization and the International Atomic Energy Authority issued a generally reassuring statement about the consequences. Accurate assessment of the consequences is important to the current debate on nuclear power. Our objectives in this study were to evaluate the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, assess the international response to the accident, and consider how to improve responses to future accidents. So far, radiation to the thyroid from radioisotopes of iodine has caused several thousand cases of thyroid cancer but very few deaths ; exposed children were most susceptible. The focus on thyroid cancer has diverted attention from possible nonthyroid effects, such as mini-satellite instability, which is potentially important. The international response to the accident was inadequate and uncoordinated, and has been unjustifiably reassuring. Accurate assessment of Chernobyl's future health effects is not currently possible in the light of dose uncertainties, current debates over radiation actions, and the lessons from the late consequences of atomic bomb exposure. Because of the uncertainties over the dose from and the consequences of the Chernobyl accident, it is essential that investigations of its effects should be broadened and supported for the long term. Because of the problems with the international response to Chernobyl, the United Nations should initiate an independent review of the actions and assignments of the agencies concerned, with recommendations for dealing with future international-scale accidents. These should involve independent scientists and ensure cooperation rather than rivalry.

  4. Chernobyl post-accident management: the ETHOS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubreuil, G H; Lochard, J; Girard, P; Guyonnet, J F; Le Cardinal, G; Lepicard, S; Livolsi, P; Monroy, M; Ollagnon, H; Pena-Vega, A; Pupin, V; Rigby, J; Rolevitch, I; Schneider, T

    1999-10-01

    ETHOS is a pilot research project supported by the radiation protection research program of the European Commission (DG XII). The project provides an alternative approach to the rehabilitation of living conditions in the contaminated territories of the CIS in the post-accident context of Chernobyl. Initiated at the beginning of 1996, this 3-y project is currently being implemented in the Republic of Belarus. The ETHOS project involves an interdisciplinary team of European researchers from the following institutions: the Centre d'etude sur l'Evaluation de la Protection dans le domaine Nucleaire CEPN (radiological protection, economics), the Institute National d'Agronomie de Paris-Grignon INAPG (agronomy, nature & life management), the Compiegne University of Technology (technological and industrial safety, social trust), and the Mutadis Research Group (sociology, social risk management), which is in charge of the scientific co-ordination of the project. The Belarussian partners in the ETHOS project include the Ministry of Emergencies of Belarus as well as the various local authorities involved with the implementation site. The ETHOS project relies on a strong involvement of the local population in the rehabilitation process. Its main goal is to create conditions for the inhabitants of the contaminated territories to reconstruct their overall quality of life. This reconstruction deals with all the day-to-day aspects that have been affected or threatened by the contamination. The project aims at creating a dynamic process whereby acceptable living conditions can be rebuilt. Radiological security is developed in the ETHOS project as part of a general improvement in the quality of life. The approach does not dissociate the social and the technical dimensions of post-accident management. This is so as to avoid radiological risk assessment and management being reduced purely to a problem for scientific experts, from which local people are excluded, and to take into

  5. First international workshop on severe accidents and their consequences. [Chernobyl Accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-07-01

    An international workshop on past severe nuclear accidents and their consequences was held in Dagomys region of Sochi, USSR on October 30--November 3, 1989. The plan of this meeting was approved by the USSR Academy of Sciences and by the USSR State Committee of the Utilization of Atomic Energy. The meeting was held under the umbrella of the ANS-SNS agreement of cooperation. Topics covered include analysis of the Chernobyl accident, safety measures for RBMK type reactors and consequences of the Chernobyl accident including analysis of the ecological, genetic and psycho-social factors. Separate reports are processed separately for the data bases. (CBS)

  6. METHODOLOGY OF INTERNAL DOSE RECONSTRUCTION FOR THE RUSSIAN POPULATION AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Balonov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents methodology of the internal dose reconstruction from I-131 and caesium radionuclides received by population of Russia after the Chernobyl accident. The direct measurements of radionuclides content in a human body were the most relevant data for internal dose reconstruction. Assessment of radionuclides intake with food products was considered as the second priority and application of radioecological models as the third priority when measurement data were absent.

  7. International Projects

    CERN Document Server

    2002-01-01

    Description of co-operation projects implemented with the help of Sweden is presented. Information on performance of Phare and IAEA Regional and National Technical Cooperation projects is provided. Phare project 'Creation of Radiation Protection Infrastructure and Development of Supporting Services' was started in 2002

  8. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namik Mammad Oglu Rashydov

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986 and Fukushima (2011. The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  9. Chernobyl seed project. Advances in the identification of differentially abundant proteins in a radio-contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashydov, Namik M; Hajduch, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Plants have the ability to grow and successfully reproduce in radio-contaminated environments, which has been highlighted by nuclear accidents at Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011). The main aim of this article is to summarize the advances of the Chernobyl seed project which has the purpose to provide proteomic characterization of plants grown in the Chernobyl area. We present a summary of comparative proteomic studies on soybean and flax seeds harvested from radio-contaminated Chernobyl areas during two successive generations. Using experimental design developed for radio-contaminated areas, altered abundances of glycine betaine, seed storage proteins, and proteins associated with carbon assimilation into fatty acids were detected. Similar studies in Fukushima radio-contaminated areas might complement these data. The results from these Chernobyl experiments can be viewed in a user-friendly format at a dedicated web-based database freely available at http://www.chernobylproteomics.sav.sk.

  10. Re-evaluation of internal exposure from the Chernobyl accident to the Czech population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malatova, I.; Skrkal, J. [National Radiation Protection Institute, Srobarova (Czech Republic)

    2006-07-01

    Doses from internal and external exposure due to the Chernobyl accident to the Czech population were estimated early in 1986. Later on, with more eimental results, doses from internal exposure were calculated more precisely. The initial predictions were rather conservative leading thus to higher doses than it appeared one year later. Monitoring of the environment, food chain and monitoring of internal contamination has been performed on the whole territory of the country since 1986 up to present time and has thus enabled reevaluation of the original estimates and also prediction of doses in future. This paper is focused mainly on evaluation of in vivo measurements of people. Use of the sophisticate software I.M.B.A. Professional Plus led to new estimation of committed effective doses and calculated inhalation intakes of radionuclides lead to estimation of content of radionuclides in the air. Ingestion intakes were also evaluated and compared with estimates from the results of measurements of food chain. Generally, the doses from the Chernobyl accident to the Czech population were low; however, as a few radionuclides have been measurable in environment, food chain and human body (137 Cs up to present), it is a unique chance for studying behaviour of radionuclides in the biosphere. Experience and conclusions which follow from the monitoring of the Chernobyl accident are unique for running and development of monitoring networks. Re evaluation of internal doses to the Czech population from the Chernobyl accident, using alternative approach, gave generally smaller doses than original estimation; still, the difference was not significant. It was shown that the doses from inhalation of 131 I and 137 Cs were greater than originally estimated, whereas doses from ingestion intake were lower than the originally estimated ones. (authors)

  11. Compendium of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory's research projects related to the Chernobyl nuclear accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volchok, H L; Chieco, N [comps.

    1986-10-01

    Following the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear reactor power station in the USSR on April 26, 1986, the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) initiated a number of research projects as follows: (1) selected sites in both the Deposition and Surface Air networks were alerted and their sampling protocols adjusted to accommodate the anticipated arrival times and activity concentrations of the Chernobyl debris; (2) a number of cooperative programs involving field work, sampling, analysis and data interpretation were set up with institutions and scientists in other countries; (3) EML's Regional Baseline Station at Chester, NJ, as well as the roof of the Laboratory in New York City, provided bases for sampling and measurements to study the radionuclide concentrations, radiation levels, physical characteristics and potential biological implications of the Chernobyl fallout on the northeastern United States; and (4) the resulting fallout from the Chernobyl accident provided an 'experiment of opportunity' in that it enabled us to study fresh fission product deposition using collection systems resurrected from the 1950's and 1960's for comparison with current state-of-the-art methodology. The 13 reports of this volume have been entered separately into the data base.

  12. International cooperation mass screening. Whole body cesium-137 measurements for the residents in Chernobyl area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshi, Masaharu [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Radiation Biology and Medicine

    1997-03-01

    The level of radiation exposure in children in the former Soviet Union area caused by the Chernobyl accident was investigated on the basis of whole body {sup 137}Cs count. The subjects were totally 87,430 (42,114 boys and 45,316 girls) in Mogilev and Gomel Belarus, Bryansk Russian Federation and Kiev and Zhitomir Ukraine. They received Chernobyl Sasakawa Health and Medical Cooperation Project Health examinations for May 1991 to December 1994 and were 5-16 y old at the time of examination. The median whole body {sup 137}Cs count per body weight varied from 20 to 50 Bq kg{sup -1} except several cases in Gomel and Bryansk oblast. (The `oblast` is the largest administrative district constituting the country.) Corresponding annual effective dose equivalents were all less than the public dose limit of 1 mSv y{sup -1}. (author)

  13. Rehabilitation of the living conditions in the contaminated territories after Chernobyl: the ETHOS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heriard-Dubreuil, Gilles [Mutadis, Paris (France); Schneider, Thierry [CEPN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2001-07-01

    European surveys undertaken in the context of the EU/CIS co-operation programme to evaluate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident (1991-1995), provided an extensive assessment of the social and psychological effects of the accident on liquidators, relocated populations and inhabitants of contaminated territories. Further investigations carried out in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia revealed strong social disturbance and stress phenomena amongst the populations of the contaminated areas. In these areas, the environmental contamination was a basic concern for most of the inhabitants and was creating a climate of widespread anxiety, focused on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident and especially that of the children. The inhabitants of the contaminated territories experienced an overall depreciation of many different types of values: social, economic, aesthetic, symbolic, ethical, political, etc. The quality of life was perceived as being irreversibly affected: some people expressed the situation by saying that 'Nothing will be the same again', when speaking about their lives 'before' and 'After' the accident. The feeling of insecurity, the lack of trust of the population in the scientific, medical and political authorities and the impression of being deprived of means to avoid radiological hazards perceived as all-pervasive in everyday life, created the general feeling of a loss of control over the situation. The ETHOS project ended in December 1998. Twelve missions representing about 600 man-days of the European participants have been performed. But the project also entailed a considerable involvement of the local population as well as from the local, regional and national authorities. The assessment of the outcomes of this project has been undertaken by the research team with its Belarussian partners. When considering globally the village of Olmany a first question was to determine to what extent some global objective changes

  14. INTERNATIONAL ASSESSMENTS OF IMPACTS OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT: THE CHERNOBYL FORUM (2003–2005 AND UNSCEAR (2005–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Balonov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiological consequences of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP were recently revisited by the UN Chernobyl Forum (2003-2005 and UNSCEAR (2005-2008. For the first time environmental impacts were considered in detail, including radioactive contamination of terrestrial and aquatic environments, application and effectiveness of countermeasures and effects on biota. Updated dosimetric data were presented for more than half a million of emergency and recovery operation workers, about 100 million inhabitants of the three most affected countries, Belarus, the Russian Federation and Ukraine, and for 500 million inhabitants of other European countries. Several hundred of the emergency workers received high radiation doses; of whom 28 persons died in 1986 due to acute radiation sickness. Children at the time of the accident, who drank milk with high levels of radioactive iodine, received high doses to the thyroid. Since early 1990s there was the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer incidence among them. Also in 1990s there was some increase of leukaemia in most exposed workers. The UN Chernobyl Forum concluded that severe social and economic depression of the affected regions and associated psychological problems of the general public and the workers had become the most significant problem. The vast majority of the population need not live in fear of serious health consequences from the Chernobyl accident.

  15. Rehabilitation of living conditions in territories contaminated by the Chernobyl accident: the ETHOS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochard, Jacques

    2007-11-01

    The ETHOS Project, supported by the radiation protection research program of the European Commission (EC), was implemented in the mid-1990's with the support of the Belarus authorities as a pilot project to initiate a new approach for the rehabilitation of living conditions in the contaminated territories of the Republic. This initiative followed a series of studies performed in the context of the EC Community of Independent States cooperation program to evaluate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident (1991-1995), which clearly brought to the fore that a salient characteristic of the situation in these territories was the progressive and general loss of control of the population on its daily life. Furthermore, due to the economic difficulties during the years following the breakdown of the USSR, the population was developing private production and, in the absence of know-how and adequate means to control the radiological quality of foodstuffs, the level of internal exposure was rising significantly. The aim of the project was primarily to involve directly the population wishing to stay in the territories in the day-to-day management of the radiological situation with the goal of improving their protection and their living conditions. It was based on clear ethical principles and implemented by an interdisciplinary team of European experts with specific skills in radiation protection, agronomy, social risk management, communication, and cooperation in complex situations, with the support of local authorities and professionals. In a first phase (1996-1999), the ETHOS Project was implemented in a village located in the Stolyn District in the southern part of Belarus. During this phase, a few tens of villagers were involved in a step-by-step evaluation of the local radiological situation to progressively regain control of their daily life. In a second phase (1999-2001), the ETHOS Project was extended to four other localities of the District with the objective to

  16. Internal dose assessment due to large area contamination: Main lessons drawn from the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrasi, A. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-03-01

    The reactor accident at Chernobyl in 1986 beside its serious and tragic consequences provided also an excellent opportunity to check, test and validate all kind of environmental models and calculation tools which were available in the emergency preparedness systems of different countries. Assessment of internal and external doses due to the accident has been carried out for the population all over Europe using different methods. Dose predictions based on environmental model calculation considering various pathways have been compared with those obtained by more direct monitoring methods. One study from Hungary and one from the TAEA is presented shortly. (orig./DG)

  17. Chernobyl 30 years on. Key remediation and safety projects are 'on track'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalton, David [NucNet, Brussels (Belgium)

    2016-06-15

    Thirty years after the accident at Chernobyl, key remediation and safety projects are on track and construction of the vital Euro 1.5 bn (US Dollars 1.6 bn) New Safe Confinement (NSC) is almost finished with commissioning scheduled for November 2017, the company in charge of construction and the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD) told NucNet. The NSC is the most high profile and expensive element of the US Dollars 2.15 bn Shelter Implementation Plan (SIP), a framework developed to overcome the consequences of the accident.

  18. Environmental monitoring data around the Chernobyl nuclear power plant used in the cooperative research project between JAERI and CHESCIR (Ukraine). Cooperative research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Takashi; Matsunaga, Takeshi; Amano, Hikaru [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Tkachenko, Yuri; Kovalyov, Alexandr; Sukhoruchkin, Andrei; Derevets, Varely [The State Enterprise for Region Monitoring of Environment and Dosimetric Control (Ukraine)

    2003-01-01

    This report is a compilation of the shared data derived from the environmental monitoring by RADEK (The state Enterprise for Region Monitoring of Environment and Dosimetric Control of Ukraine) and the record of environmental characteristics derived from field observations during a research project (1992-1999) between JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) and CHESCIR (Chernobyl Science and Technology Centre for International Research). The compiled data in this report are especially related to one particular research subject (Subject-3) of the project on the migration of radionuclides released into the terrestrial and aquatic environments after a nuclear accident. The present report shows the basis of published works concerning Subject-3. (author)

  19. Rehabilitation of the living conditions in the contaminated territories after Chernobyl: the ETHOS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heriard-Dubreuil, Gilles [Mutadis, Paris (France); Schneider, Thierry [CEPN, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France)

    2001-07-01

    European surveys undertaken in the context of the EU/CIS co-operation programme to evaluate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident (1991-1995), provided an extensive assessment of the social and psychological effects of the accident on liquidators, relocated populations and inhabitants of contaminated territories. Further investigations carried out in Ukraine, Belarus and Russia revealed strong social disturbance and stress phenomena amongst the populations of the contaminated areas. In these areas, the environmental contamination was a basic concern for most of the inhabitants and was creating a climate of widespread anxiety, focused on the health effects of the Chernobyl accident and especially that of the children. The inhabitants of the contaminated territories experienced an overall depreciation of many different types of values: social, economic, aesthetic, symbolic, ethical, political, etc. The quality of life was perceived as being irreversibly affected: some people expressed the situation by saying that 'Nothing will be the same again', when speaking about their lives 'before' and 'After' the accident. The feeling of insecurity, the lack of trust of the population in the scientific, medical and political authorities and the impression of being deprived of means to avoid radiological hazards perceived as all-pervasive in everyday life, created the general feeling of a loss of control over the situation. The ETHOS project ended in December 1998. Twelve missions representing about 600 man-days of the European participants have been performed. But the project also entailed a considerable involvement of the local population as well as from the local, regional and national authorities. The assessment of the outcomes of this project has been undertaken by the research team with its Belarussian partners. When considering globally the village of Olmany a first question was to determine to what extent some global objective changes

  20. Chernobyl bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, F. Jr.; Mahaffey, J.A.

    1989-09-01

    The purpose of the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database project is to create and maintain an information system to provide usable information for research studies related to the nuclear accident. The system is the official United States repository for information about the Chernobyl accident and its consequences, and currently includes an extensive bibliography and diverse radiological measurements with supporting information. PNL has established two resources: original (not summarized) measurement data, currently about 80,000 measurements, with ancillary information; and about 2,200 bibliographic citations, some including abstracts. Major organizations that have contributed radiological measurement data include the Washington State Department of Social and Health Services; United States Environmental Protection Agency (domestic and foreign data); United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Stone Webster; Brookhaven National Laboratory; Commissariat A L'energie Atomique in France; Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries, and Food in the United Kingdom; Japan National Institute of Radiological Sciences; and the Finnish Centre For Radiation and Nuclear Safety (STUK). Scientists in Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, China, Denmark, England, Federal Republic of Germany, Finland, France, Ireland, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, Romania, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United States, Wales, and Yugoslavia have made contributions. Bibliographic materials have been obtained from scientists in the above countries that have replied to requests. In addition, literature searches have been conducted, including a search of the DOE Energy Database. The last search was conducted in January, 1989. This document lists the bibliographic information in the DOE/OHER Chernobyl Database at the current time.

  1. Chernobyl Studies Project - working group 7.0 environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, October 1993--January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.

    1994-03-01

    The DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project was begun as part of a cooperative agreement between the US and the former USSR, (quote) To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future reactor accident (quote). Most of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus has now turned primarily to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are extensively engaged in case-control and cohort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children and in the Ukraine. A major part of the effort is providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and providing support and equipment for the medical teams. This document contains reports on progress in the following task areas: Management; External Dose; Hydrological Transport; Chromosome Painting Dosimetry; Stochastic Effects; Thyroid Studies; and Leukemia Studies.

  2. ON THE ROLE OF MUSHROOMS IN THE INTERNAL DOSE FORMATION TO THE POPULATION IN THE CHERNOBYL NPP ACCIDENT AFFECTED AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Panov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present overview describes the results of the 25-year studies devoted to the estimation of the contribution of radionuclide containing mushrooms to the internal exposure dose to the population affected by the Chernobyl NPP accident. A significant increase with the time after the accident is shown for the contribution of mushrooms to the population internal exposure dose. Factors are identified influencing variability in the estimations of radionuclide from the mushroom component contribution to the population internal exposure dose.

  3. Chernobyl, 14 years later; Tchernobyl, 14 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 14 years after the disaster. It is made up of 8 chapters whose titles are: (1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, (2) Chernobyl nuclear power plant, (3)Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, (4) The management of contaminated lands, (5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, (6) International cooperation, (7) More information about Chernobyl and (8) Glossary.

  4. Chernobyl Studies Project: Working group 7.0, Environmental transport and health effects. Progress report, March--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anspaugh, L.R.; Hendrickson, S.M. [eds.

    1994-12-01

    In April 1988, the US and the former-USSR signed a Memorandum of Cooperation (MOC) for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety; this MOC was a direct result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Unit 4 and the following efforts by the two countries to implement a joint program to improve the safety of nuclear power plants and to understand the implications of environmental releases. A Joint Coordinating Committee for Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety (JCCCNRS) was formed to implement the MOC. The JCCCNRS established many working groups; most of these were the responsibility of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, as far as the US participation was concerned. The lone exception was Working Group 7 on Environmental Transport and Health Effects, for which the US participation was the responsibility of the US Department of Energy (DOE). The purpose of Working Group 7 was succintly stated to be, ``To develop jointly methods to project rapidly the health effects of any future nuclear reactor accident.`` To implement the work DOE then formed two subworking groups: 7.1 to address Environmental Transport and 7.2 to address Health Effects. Thus, the DOE-funded Chernobyl Studies Project began. The majority of the initial tasks for this project are completed or near completion. The focus is now turned to the issue of health effects from the Chernobyl accident. Currently, we are involved in and making progress on the case-control and co-hort studies of thyroid diseases among Belarussian children. Dosimetric aspects are a fundamental part of these studies. We are currently working to implement similar studies in Ukraine. A major part of the effort of these projects is supporting these studies, both by providing methods and applications of dose reconstruction and by providing support and equipment for the medical teams.

  5. Overview of the cooperation between the Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory in Slavutych, Ukraine, and U.S. research centers between 2000 and 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Gaschak, Sergey P; Oskolkov, Boris Ya; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy; Labone, Elizabeth D

    2011-10-01

    The International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) located in Slavutych, Ukraine, was created in 1999 under the initiative of the United States Government and the Government of Ukraine in the framework of international cooperation on evaluation and minimization of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Since the time the IRL was founded, it has participated in a large number of projects, including the following: 1) study of radionuclide accumulation, distribution, and migration in components of various ecological systems of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); 2) radiation dose assessments; 3) study of the effects of radiation influence on biological systems; 4) expert analysis of isotopic and quantitative composition of radioactive contaminants; 5) development of new methods and technologies intended for radioecological research; 6) evaluation of future developments and pathways for potential remediation of the ChEZ areas; 7) assistance in provision of physical protection systems for ionizing irradiation sources at Ukrainian enterprises; 8) reviews of open Russian language publications on issues associated with consequences of the ChNPP accident, radioactive waste management, radioecological monitoring, and ChNPP decommissioning; 9) conduct of training courses on problems of radioecology, radiation safety, radioecological characterization of test sites and environmental media, and research methods; 10) conduct of on-site scientific conferences and workshops on the ChEZ and radioecology problems; participation in off-site scientific conferences and meetings; and 11) preparation of scientific and popular science publications and interactions with mass media representatives. This article provides a brief overview of the major achievements resulting from this cooperation between the IRL and U.S. research centers.

  6. OVERVIEW OF THE COOPERATION BETWEEN THE CHERNOBYL CENTER'S INTERNATIONAL RADIOECOLOGY LABORATORY IN SLAVUTYCH, UKRAINE AND U.S. RESEARCH CENTERS BETWEEN 2000-2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    The International Radioecology Laboratory (IRL) located in Slavutych, Ukraine was created in 1999 under the initiative of the United States Government and the Government of Ukraine in the framework of international cooperation on evaluation and minimization of consequences of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant (ChNPP) accident. Since the time the IRL was founded, it has participated in a large number of projects, including the following: (1) study of radionuclide accumulation, distribution, and migration in components of various ecological systems of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ); (2) radiation dose assessments; (3) study of the effects of radiation influence on biological systems; (4) expert analysis of isotopic and quantitative composition of radioactive contaminants; (5) development of new methods and technologies intended for radioecological research; (6) evaluation of future developments and pathways for potential remediation of the ChEZ areas; (7) assistance in provision of physical protection systems for ionizing irradiation sources at Ukrainian enterprises; (8) reviews of open Russian language publications on issues associated with consequences of the ChNPP accident, radioactive waste management, radioecological monitoring, and ChNPP decommissioning; (9) conduct of training courses on problems of radioecology, radiation safety, radioecological characterization of test sites and environmental media, and on research methods; (10) conduct of on-site scientific conferences and workshops on the ChEZ and radioecology problems; participation in off-site scientific conferences and meetings; and (11) preparation of scientific and popular science publications, and interactions with mass media representatives. This article provides a brief overview of the major achievements resulting from this cooperation between the IRL and U.S. research centers.

  7. Chernobyl - 20 years and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacronique, J.F. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Deconinck, F.; Govaerts, P.; Eggermont, C. [SCK-CEN - Studiecentrum voor Kernenergie, Centre d' Etude de l' Energie Nucleaire, Mol (Belgium); Cort, M. de [Institute for Environment and Sustainability, DG JRC EC (Italy); Joulia, J.P. [EuropeAid Co-operation Office, EC, Brussels (Belgium); Dal, A.H.; Balonov, M. [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna (Austria); Kenigsberg, J. [Commission on Radiation protection, council of ministry (Belarus); Hindie, E. [Universites Paris, 75 (France); Havenaar, M. [Amsterdam Univ. (Netherlands)

    2006-07-01

    In commemoration of the Chernobyl accident 20 years ago, the French society for radiation protection (S.F.R.P.) and the Belgian society for radiation protection (B.V.S.A.B.R.) organise jointly a one day colloquium in Brussels. This colloquium is divided in two parts: the first one concerns the technical and organisational aspects of the accident with the scenario and its global impact, the international environmental radioactivity information exchange through the Chernobyl experience, the European Union (E.U.) assistance to mitigate the Chernobyl accident consequences, the crisis communication and management and the lessons learned from them; the second part is devoted to the medical and humanitarian aspects through the thyroid cancers after Chernobyl accident, the health effects in the European Union (E.U.) and the psychological factors affecting health after the Chernobyl disaster. (N.C.)

  8. Thyroid cancer in Ukraine after the Chernobyl accident (in the framework of the Ukraine–US Thyroid Project)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tronko, Mykola; Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Bogdanova, Tetiana; Hatch, Maureen; Likhtarev, Ilya; Bouville, Andre; Oliynik, Valeriy; McConnell, Robert; Shpak, Viktor; Zablotska, Lydia; Tereshchenko, Valeriy; Brenner, Alina; Zamotayeva, Galyna

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, millions of residents of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine were exposed to large doses of radioactive iodine isotopes, mainly I-131. The purpose of the Ukraine–American (UkrAm) and Belarus–American (BelAm) projects are to quantify the risks of thyroid cancer in the framework of a classical cohort study, comprising subjects who were aged under 18 years at the time of the accident, had direct measurements of thyroid I-131 radioactivity taken within two months after the accident, and were residents of three heavily contaminated northern regions of Ukraine (Zhitomir, Kiev, and Chernigov regions). Four two-year screening examination cycles were implemented from 1998 until 2007 to study the risks associated with thyroid cancer due to the iodine exposure caused during the Chernobyl accident. A standardised procedure of clinical examinations included: thyroid palpation, ultrasound examination, blood collection followed by a determination of thyroid hormone levels, urinary iodine content test, and fine-needle aspiration if required. Among the 110 cases of thyroid cancer diagnosed in UkrAm as the result of four screening examinations, 104 cases (94.5%) of papillary carcinomas, five cases (4.6%) of follicular carcinomas, and one case (0.9%) of medullary carcinoma were diagnosed. PMID:22394669

  9. Internal exposure to [gamma]-rays emitted from [sup 137]Cs with a human counter caused by the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeoka, Seiji; Kitagawa, Kazue; Suga, Shinji; Maeda, Naoko; Kumamoto, Kasumi; Endo, Satoru; Tauchi, Hiroshi; Sawada, Shozo (Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Research Inst. for Nuclear Medicine and Biology); Hoshi, Masaharu

    1993-01-01

    In order to estimate internal exposure dose caused by the accident at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant, [sup 137]Cs [gamma] rays for children living in Chernobyl areas were measured with a human counter. No correlation between residential areas and internal exposure dose was found. The internal exposures for one year from only [sup 137]Cs are estimated to be 89.5 [mu]Sv y[sup -1] in maximum. The fatality probability for the [sup 137]Cs internal exposure was calculated at 5x10[sup -6] y[sup -1] based on a coefficient of the recommendation of ICRP, 1990. This probability was much smaller than that for the natural radiation exposure, 1.2x10[sup -4] y[sup -1]. (author).

  10. [Future development of radioecological investigations--new international projects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanzharova, N I

    2014-01-01

    Information is given on the future development of nuclear power engineering and the need to ensure environmental safety. The complexity of the emerging problems requires a wide international integration of scientific investigations. Also described are ecological projects that have been implemented by the IAER after the Chernobyl NPP accident, as well as a new project, MODARIA, which will pay special attention to the improvement of models for radionuclide transfer and estimation of radiation effects on both humans and biota. The strategy and agenda for the development of radioecological studies in the 21st century are described which are being realized by the nine key research centers (European Radioecology Alliance) under the EC project STAR.

  11. Evaluation of the Relationship between Current Internal 137Cs Exposure in Residents and Soil Contamination West of Chernobyl in Northern Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuko; Okubo, Yuka; Hayashida, Naomi; Takahashi, Jumpei; Gutevich, Alexander; Chorniy, Sergiy; Kudo, Takashi; Takamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    After the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident, the residents living around the Chernobyl were revealed to have been internally exposed to 137Cs through the intake of contaminated local foods. To evaluate the current situation of internal 137Cs exposure and the relationship between the 137Cs soil contamination and internal exposure in residents, we investigated the 137Cs body burden in residents who were living in 10 selected cities from the northern part of the Zhitomir region, Ukraine, and collected soil samples from three family farms and wild forests of each city to measured 137Cs concentrations. The total number of study participants was 36,862, of which 68.9% of them were female. After 2010, the annual effective doses were less than 0.1 mSv in over 90% of the residents. The 137Cs body burden was significantly higher in autumn than other seasons (p Chernobyl accident, the internal exposure doses to residents living in contaminated areas of northern Ukraine is limited but still related to 137Cs soil contamination. Furthermore, the consumption of local foods is considered to be the cause of internal exposure. PMID:26402065

  12. US Department of Energy Chernobyl accident bibliography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, R A; Mahaffey, J A; Carr, F Jr

    1992-04-01

    This bibliography has been prepared by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health and Environmental Research to provide bibliographic information in a usable format for research studies relating to the Chernobyl nuclear accident that occurred in the Ukrainian Republic, USSR in 1986. This report is a product of the Chernobyl Database Management project. The purpose of this project is to produce and maintain an information system that is the official United States repository for information related to the accident. Two related products prepared for this project are the Chernobyl Bibliographic Search System (ChernoLit{trademark}) and the Chernobyl Radiological Measurements Information System (ChernoDat). This report supersedes the original release of Chernobyl Bibliography (Carr and Mahaffey, 1989). The original report included about 2200 references. Over 4500 references and an index of authors and editors are included in this report.

  13. Project: Internal communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Lydia

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to ascertain the perceived information needs of NASA Langley employees. One hundred and twelve face-to-face interviews were conducted with a representative sample of aero-space technologists, administrative professionals, technicians. and secretarial/clerical personnel. Results of employee perceptions are analyzed and summarized using affinity diagramming. Particular strategies to maximize use of existing internal communication networks are discussed.

  14. Lessons from Chernobyl

    OpenAIRE

    Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl disaster on April 26th, 1986, led to the emission of radioactive substances such as iodine-131 and radioactive cesium. As the Soviet Union did not control food distribution and intake, residents were exposed to high levels of internal radiation, leading to the internal radiation exposure of the thyroid gland by iodine-131. As a result, the number of people who had thyroid cancer increased drastically among those who had been under 15 years old at the time of the accident. The ag...

  15. Radiation and other risk issues in Norwegian newspapers ten years after Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Aa.; Reitan, J.B.; Toennesen, A.; Waldahl, R.

    1997-09-01

    Content analysis of risk articles has been performed in 1996 for five Norwegian newspapers four weeks before and four weeks after the 10th anniversary of the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The main focus has been on radiation and/or nuclear risks. The report is part of an international project on risk perception and communication. 94 refs.

  16. The Chernobyl accident 20 years on: an assessment of the health consequences and the international response O acidente de Chernobyl 20 anos depois: avaliação das conseqüências e resposta internacional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Baverstock

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Twenty years after the Chernobyl accident the WHO and the International Atomic Energy Authority issued a reassuring statement about the consequences. Our objectives in this study were to evaluate the health impact of the Chernobyl accident, assess the international response to the accident, and consider how to improve responses to future accidents. So far, radiation to the thyroid from radioisotopes of iodine has caused several thousand cases of thyroid cancer but very few deaths; exposed children were most susceptible. The focus on thyroid cancer has diverted attention from possible nonthyroid effects. The international response to the accident was inadequate and uncoordinated, and has been unjustifiably reassuring. Accurate assessment in future health effects is not currently possible in the light of dose uncertainties, current debates over radiation actions, and the lessons from the late consequences of atomic bomb exposure. Because of the uncertainties from and the consequences of the accident, it is essential that investigations of its effects should be broadened and supported for the long term. The United Nations should initiate an independent review of the actions and assignments of the agencies concerned, with recommendations for dealing with future international-scale accidents. These should involve independent scientists and ensure cooperation rather than rivalry.Vinte anos após o acidente de Chernobyl ocorrido em 1986, a OMS e a Autoridade Internacional sobre Energia Atômica lançaram um relatório sobre as conseqüências desse desastre. Nosso objetivo neste estudo é avaliar o impacto de tal acidente sobre a saúde e a reação internacional sobre o ocorrido, além de considerar se é possível melhorar as respostas em futuros desastres. Observamos que a radiação sobre a tireóide, proveniente de radioisótopos de iodo, causou milhares de casos de câncer, mas poucas mortes; as crianças expostas foram as mais suscetíveis. O

  17. UCT physicists in international project

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Eight University of Cape Town physicists are the sole representatives from Africa in an international project to recreate a state of matter believed to have existed at the time of the creation of the universe. The team, headed by UCT's nuclear physics Professor Jean Cleymans, has been an official member of the ALICE Experiment at CERN since November 2001 (2 pages).

  18. The international marketing of professional service projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Tikkanen, Henrikki; Alajoutsijärvi, Kimmo

    2003-01-01

    Many types of commercial professional services are commonly sold as projects. Therefore this article draws on the project marketing literature to elucidate the international marketing of professional service projects. After an initial literature review, the project marketing milieu concept...

  19. Lessons from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamura, Noboru; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl disaster on April 26th, 1986, led to the emission of radioactive substances such as iodine-131 and radioactive cesium. As the Soviet Union did not control food distribution and intake, residents were exposed to high levels of internal radiation, leading to the internal radiation exposure of the thyroid gland by iodine-131. As a result, the number of people who had thyroid cancer increased drastically among those who had been under 15 years old at the time of the accident. The age predilection is about to move to 25 or older. However, there has been no scientific evidence of impacts for solid tumor other than thyroid cancer, leukemia, benign diseases, or inheritance including unborn babies. On the other hand, the accident was thought to have caused social unrest and mental damage which had far more impact than that caused by radiation exposure. In this paper, we would like to summarize the impacts on the health of the people in Chernobyl compared to those caused by the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.

  20. Integrating Research on Thyroid Cancer after Chernobyl — the Chernobyl Tissue Bank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, G.A.; Bethel, J.A.; Galpine, A.; Krznaric, M.; Unger, K.

    2011-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer after Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank was established. The project is supported by the governments of Ukraine and Russia, and financially supported (in total around US$3million) by the European Commission, the National Cancer Institute of the USA and the Sasakawa Memorial Health Foundation of Japan. The project began collecting a variety of biological samples from patients on 1 October 1988, and has supplied material to 21 research projects in Japan, the USA and Europe. The establishment of the Chernobyl Tissue Bank has facilitated cooperation between these research projects and the combination of clinical and research data provides a paradigm for cancer research in the molecular biological age. PMID:21345659

  1. International Alligator Rivers Analog Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bichard, G.F.

    1988-01-01

    The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization (ANSTO), the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, the U.K. Department of the Environment, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation of Japan are participating under the aegis of the Nuclear Energy Agency in the International Alligator Rivers Analog Project. The project has a duration of 3 yr, starting in 1988. The project has grown out of a research program on uranium ore bodies as analogs of high-level waste (HLW) repositories undertaken by ANSTO supported by the NRC. A primary objective of the project is to develop an approach to radionuclide transport model validation that may be used by the participants to support assessments of the safety of radioactive waste repositories. The approach involves integrating mathematical and physical modeling with hydrological and geochemical field and laboratory investigations of the analog site. The Koongarra uranium ore body has been chosen as the analog site because it has a secondary ore body that has formed over the past million years as a result of leaching by groundwater flowing through fractures in the primary ore body.

  2. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

    2010-06-09

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  3. Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: an international comparison of approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beresford, N A; Barnett, C L; Howard, B J [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology Lancaster, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LA1 4AP (United Kingdom); Brown, J E; Hosseini, A [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority, Department of Emergency Preparedness and Environmental Radioactivity, Grini naeringspark 13, Postbox 55, No-1332 Oesteras (Norway); Cheng, J-J; Kamboj, S; Yu, C [Argonne National Laboratory, Building 900, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4832 (United States); Copplestone, D [England and Wales Environment Agency, Richard Fairclough House, Knutsford Road, Warrington, Cheshire WA4 1HG (United Kingdom); Gaschak, S [International Radioecology Laboratory (Ukraine); Nedveckaite, T [Institute of Physics, Radiation Protection, Savanoriu Avenue 231, LT-02053 Vilnius (Lithuania); Olyslaegers, G [Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK.CEN, Radioecology Section, Radiation Protection Department, Boeretang 200, B-2400, Mol (Belgium); Smith, J T [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Portsmouth, Burnaby Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3QL (United Kingdom); Vives i Batlle, J; Vives-Lynch, S, E-mail: nab@ceh.ac.u [Westlakes Research Institute, Westlakes Scientific Consulting Ltd., The Princess Royal Building, Westlakes Science and Technology Park, Moor Row, Cumbria, CA24 3LN (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

  4. Chernobyl and after

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daglish, J.; Gittus, J.

    1986-10-01

    The paper contains two reports on the Chernobyl post-accident review meeting. The first is a factual account of the meeting, the topics discussed include: the accident, preventative action, outcome of the accident, and future interactions with the Russians on nuclear power issues. This report also describes two Accident Conventions, drawn up at the time of the meeting, which cover notification, information, and commitment of assistance in the event of a nuclear accident. The second report is by a member of the International Atomic Energy Agency, who reviews the accident, health effects, human factors, man-machine interference, positive void coefficient, and handling of the accident by the Soviet Authorities. (U.K.).

  5. Practical improvement of the radiological quality of milk produced by peasant farmers in the territories of Belarus contaminated by the Chernobyl accident. The ETHOS project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepicard, S; Dubreuil, G H

    2001-01-01

    The Chernobyl post-accident situation has highlighted how the sudden emergence of persistent radioactive contamination in the environment is severely affecting the quality of life of the inhabitants in the concerned territories. The management of this situation is complex, mainly conditioned by the ability of the inhabitants themselves to be directly involved in the process of improving their living conditions. In this process, quality of life cannot be restricted solely to the dimension of radiological risk, but needs to encompass the diverse aspects of daily living, including the social, psychological, economic, political and ethical aspects. This paper presents the experience of the involvement of a group of peasant farmers from a village in the Republic of Belarus, in the process of improving the radiological quality of privately produced milk. This experience took place in the context of the ETHOS project, funded by the radiation protection research programme of the European Commission. The principal objective was to implement a complementary approach to the rehabilitation strategies adopted so far in the contaminated territories of the Republic of Belarus. This paper retraces the process of involvement of the inhabitants in a working group. It describes the characterisation of the situation by local actors, the opening of new possible actions to improve the radiological quality of milk at the individual level and the positive consequences at the scale of the village. The ETHOS project also illustrates how the scientific knowledge accumulated over many years since the Chernobyl accident in the field of radiation protection and radioecology can enter into local practices in the form of practical tools, which can be used by the population to produce significant improvements in the radiological situation.

  6. International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) focuses on the distribution and variation of cloud radiative properties to improve the understanding of the...

  7. sup 137 Cs and sup 134 Cs human internal contamination in Italy following the 1986 Chernobyl event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tarroni, G.; Melandri, C.; Battisti, P.; Castellani, C.M.; Formignani, M. (ENEA, Bologna (Italy)); Rampa, E. (ENEA, Rome (Italy))

    1990-01-01

    A synthesis of the data concerning the distribution and behaviour over time until September 1989 of {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs human contamination derived from the accident to Unit 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station on 26 April 1986, is presented. The controls have been performed by means of two intercalibrated whole-body counters on healthy adult male and female volunteers living in different Italian regions. The main topics investigated are: the behaviour over time of the contamination in Bologna and Rome; geographic distribution in Italy in September 1987; the statistical distribution of data; the variability of the individual activity in relation to the mean activity of homogeneous groups; the intersex differences; and the effect of the element's biokinetic uncertainties on the committed effective dose equivalent evaluation. Trends are also found, mainly useful where extended contamination involves too large a fraction of the population for individual control of all the subjects concerned, thus requiring the identification of small groups of individuals representative of large population groups. (author).

  8. Cerebral basis of posttraumatic stress disorder following the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, Konstantin N; Zdanevich, Nataliya A

    2013-04-01

    Whether posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following radiation emergency has psychopathological, neurocognitive, and neurophysiological peculiarities is at issue. The goal was to explore the features and cerebral basis of "radiation" PTSD in the survivors of the Chernobyl accident. Subjects and Methods The cross-sectional study included 241 people, 219 of whom have been diagnosed with PTSD according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) criteria, among them 115 clean-up workers of the Chernobyl accident (34 with acute radiation sickness), 76 evacuees from the Chernobyl exclusion zone, 28 veterans of the war in Afghanistan, and 22 healthy unexposed individuals. Psychometric examinations, neurocognitive assessments, computerized electroencephalography, and cerebral vascular Doppler were used. "Radiation" PTSD includes "flashforward" phenomena and anticipating stress (projection of fear and danger to the future); somatoform disorders (depression, trait and state anxiety); and neurocognitive deficit (impaired memory and attention, auditory-verbal memory and learning, proactive and retroactive interference, cerebellar and stem symptoms, intellectual changes). The intima-media component, thickness of common carotid arteries, and common and left internal carotid arteries stenosis rates are increased in the liquidators. Changes of bioelectrical brain activity as a decrease of beta- and theta-power, together with an increase of alpha-power, were found in the Chernobyl accident survivors with PTSD. PTSD following radiation emergency is characterized by comorbidity of psychopathology, neurocognitive deficit, and cerebrovascular pathology with increased risk of cerebral atherosclerosis and stroke. The cerebral basis of this PTSD is proposed to be an abnormal communication between the pyramidal cells of the neocortex and the hippocampus, and deep brain structures. It is recommended that a system of emergency and long-term psychological

  9. EFFICIENCY OF PROTECTIVE MEASURES TO REDUCE INTERNAL DOSE FROM CAESIUM RADIONUCLIDES FOR THE INHABITANTS OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION AREA IN THE FIRST YEARS AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Travnikova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, we use the data on the content of caesium radionuclides in foodstuffs and in Bryansk region adult inhabitant’s body, on their food ration and its changes during the first years after the Chernobyl accident, and on the measures to protect the population from internal exposure. We calculate dynamics of 137Cs intake in the body and its contents therein, while maintaining a traditional diet and while replacing food products for radiationfree ones. The results show that the actual 137Cs content in the body is usually below the one calculated on the basis of the food ration. It was found out that individual 137Cs contents in the body correlate with the rate of meat, dairy and natural food products consumption and with factors of protection from internal exposure. The efficiency of the protective measures to reduce the intake and the content of caesium radionuclides in the body of inhabitants, as well as the average effective dose in the first years after the accident has been quantitatively assessed.

  10. On the reduction of internal radiation doses due to the ingestion of CS-137 in areas contaminated by the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, P.; Schlager, M.; Vogel, V.; Hille, R. [Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Julich (Germany); Nesterenko, A.V.; Nesterenko, V.B. [BELRAD, Minsk, (Belarus)

    2006-07-01

    After the Chernobyl reactor accident wide areas of Belarus have been contaminated with radioactive fallout. The verification and documentation of the long-term development of radiation doses is still going on. A population group of special concern are the children living in contaminated regions. Of the two million Belarussian children, approximately 80000 live in regions contaminated after the Chernobyl accident by a {sup 137}Cs deposition of more than 185 kBq/m. A German-Belarussian project is investigating radiation doses of children in those regions since several years. In a recent paper [1] it has been shown, that the annual dose limit of 1 mSv/a is still exceeded in some cases, essentially due to high body burdens of Cs -137 as indicated by screening measurements with portable incorporation monitors. Means of dose reduction such as remediation of agricultural land had been investigated in the past and generally already contribute to a reduction of food contamination. Also the use of clean food and the control of food contamination has generally proven its effectiveness and the latter is exercised by official authorities and private initiatives. In situations, where this is not sufficient, the clarification of the usefulness of additional means, such as the cure-like application of pectin preparations, makes sense. A dose lowering effect is presumed by Belarussian and Ukrainian scientists. In the framework of the present German-Belarussian project special attention is given to the cure-like application of a Belarussian pectin-preparation (Vitapect). Vitapect consists of apple pectins with added vitamins, mineral nutrients and flavour substances. It is currently in use in Belarus in accordance with legal regulations and licensed by the Belarus authorities. In a placebo-controlled double-blind study, several groups of contaminated children were treated with Vitapect for a two -week period during their stay in a sanatorium. For comparison the same number of

  11. An Introduction to International Factoring & Project Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Glinavos, Ioannis

    2002-01-01

    This work consists of two essays on law and finance in international trade. It addresses the means of raising funds for investment through receivables financing and project finance. The first essay discusses the role of receivables financing and in particular factoring in international trade. It examines the nature of factoring transactions and presents the efforts at regulation on an international level aimed at overcoming the difficulties in enforcement. The second essay discusses project f...

  12. An Introduction to International Factoring & Project Finance

    OpenAIRE

    Glinavos, Ioannis

    2002-01-01

    This work consists of two essays on law and finance in international trade. It addresses the means of raising funds for investment through receivables financing and project finance. The first essay discusses the role of receivables financing and in particular factoring in international trade. It examines the nature of factoring transactions and presents the efforts at regulation on an international level aimed at overcoming the difficulties in enforcement. The second essay discusses project f...

  13. Thyroid exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian children due to the Chernobyl accident and resulting thyroid cancer risk. Final report of BfS project StSch 4240

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, P.; Meckbach, R.; Ulanovski, A.; Schotola, C.; Proehl, G. [GSF-Institute of Radiation Protection, Neuherberg (Germany); Kenigsberg, J.; Buglova, E.; Kruk, J. [Institute of Radiation Medicine and Endocrinology, Minsk (Belarus); Likhtarev, I.; Kovgan, L.; Vavilov, S.; Chepurniy, M. [Ukrainian Radiation Protection Inst., Kyiv (Ukraine); Tronko, M.; Bogdanova, T. [Institute of Endocrinolgoy and Metabolism of the Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv (Ukraine); Shinkarev, S.; Gavrilin, Y. [All-Russian Public Organization of Invalids ' Chernobylets' , Scientific Center ' FENIX' , Moscow (Russian Federation); Demidchik, Y. [Thyroid Cancer Center, Minsk (Belarus)

    2005-07-01

    Main objectives of the BfS Project StSch4240 Thyroid Exposure of Belarusian and Ukrainian Children due to the Chernobyl Accident and Resulting Thyroid Cancer Risk were: to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968 - 1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian settlements, in which more than 10 measurements of the {sup 131}I activity in the human thyroid have been performed in May/June 1986, to explore, whether this dosimetric database can be extended to neighboring settlements, to establish improved estimates of average thyroid dose for both genders and for each birth-year cohort of the period 1968 - 1985 in Ukrainian and Belarusian oblasts (regions) and larger cities, to document the thyroid cancer incidence for the period 1986 - 2001 in Ukraine and Belarus and describe morphological characteristics of the cancer cases, to assess the contribution of the baseline incidence to the total thyroid cancer incidence in the two countries and identify regional and temporal dependencies, to perform analyses of excess risks in settlements with more than 10 measurements of the {sup 131}I activity in the human thyroid. The project has been conducted in the period 6 December 1999 to 31 March 2004. (orig.)

  14. The international marketing of professional service projects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Tikkanen, Henrikki; Alajoutsijärvi, Kimmo

    2003-01-01

    Many types of commercial professional services are commonly sold as projects. Therefore this article draws on the project marketing literature to elucidate the international marketing of professional service projects. After an initial literature review, the project marketing milieu concept......, and representations to another national milieu with similarly well-developed norms, rules, and representations, yet that there also exist global milieux. Managerial implications concerning professional service firms' preparation for entering a foreign milieu as well as subsidiary or office establishment abroad...

  15. The Chernobyl catastrophe: Consequences on human health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablokov, A.; Labunska, I.; Blokov, I.; Santillo, D.; Johnston, P.; Stringer, R.; Sadownichik, T. (eds.); Antipkin, Yu.G. [Institute of Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine); Arabskaya, L.P. [Institute of Paediatrics, Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine); Bazyka, D.A. [Research Centre for Radiation Medicine, Academy of Medical Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine)] (and others)

    2006-04-15

    This new Greenpeace report estimates that the full consequences of the Chernobyl disaster could top a quarter of a million cancers cases and nearly 100,000 fatal cancers. It reports that the report involved 52 respected scientists and includes information never before published in English. It challenges the International Atomic Energy Agency Chernobyl Forum report, which predicted 4,000 additional deaths attributable to the accident as a gross simplification of the real breadth of human suffering. Their data, based on Belarus national cancer statistics, predicts approximately 270,000 cancers and 93,000 fatal cancer cases caused by Chernobyl. The report also concludes that on the basis of demographic data, during the last 15 years, 60,000 people have additionally died in Russia because of the Chernobyl accident, and estimates of the total death toll for the Ukraine and Belarus could reach another 140,000. The report also looks into the ongoing health impacts of Chernobyl and concludes that radiation from the disaster has had a devastating effect on survivors; damaging immune and endocrine systems, leading to accelerated ageing, cardiovascular and blood illnesses, psychological illnesses, chromosomal aberrations and an increase in foetal deformations.

  16. International measures for supporting the Ukraine in decommissioning Chernobyl nuclear power plant; Internationale Massnahmen zur Unterstuetzung der Ukraine bei der Stilllegung des KKW Tschernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, J.

    2006-07-01

    The destruction of Block 4 of the Ukranian nuclear power plant in Chernobyl on 26 April 1986 was the largest and most momentous accident in the civil use of nuclear energy. Its far-reaching and lasting ecological, heath-related and economic effects confronted the then Soviet and later the Ukraine with grave problems. Particularly after the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc and the emergence of information about the safety shortcomings of RBMK-type (Chernobyl-type) reactors the Western states pressed for the decommissioning of these reactors. At the G7 summit in Naples in 1994 the Ukraine was offered an action plan of support if it were willing to close down Chernobyl nuclear power plant. This initiative led to the signing on 20 December 1995 of a Memorandum of Understanding on the Closure of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant between the G7 states, the European Commission and the Ukraine. It contained an assurance by President Kuchma that Chernobyl nuclear power plant would be closed by the year 2000.

  17. Human genetics: international projects and personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apellaniz-Ruiz, Maria; Gallego, Cristina; Ruiz-Pinto, Sara; Carracedo, Angel; Rodríguez-Antona, Cristina

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we present the progress driven by the recent technological advances and new revolutionary massive sequencing technologies in the field of human genetics. We discuss this knowledge in relation with drug response prediction, from the germline genetic variation compiled in the 1000 Genomes Project or in the Genotype-Tissue Expression project, to the phenome-genome archives, the international cancer projects, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas or the International Cancer Genome Consortium, and the epigenetic variation and its influence in gene expression, including the regulation of drug metabolism. This review is based on the lectures presented by the speakers of the Symposium "Human Genetics: International Projects & New Technologies" from the VII Conference of the Spanish Pharmacogenetics and Pharmacogenomics Society, held on the 20th and 21st of April 2015.

  18. Lessons learned from post-accident management at Chernobyl: the P.a.r.e.x. project; Retour d'experience sur la gestion post-accidentelle de Tchernobyl: le projet Parex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heriard Dubreuil, G. [Mutadis Consultants, 75 - Paris (France); Lochard, J.; Bataille, C. [CEPN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Ollagnon, H. [AgroParisTech, 75 - Paris (France); Baude, St. [Mutadis, 75 - Paris (France)

    2008-07-15

    Return of experience on Chernobyl post-accident management: the PAREX study Belarus is the country the most affected by the Chernobyl fallouts and is among the most significant experiences in the nuclear post-accident field. Despite specificities inherent to the political and social situation in Belarus, the experience of post-accidental management in this country holds a wealth of lessons in the perspective of preparation to a post-accidental situation in the French and European context. Through the PAREX project (2005-2006), the French Nuclear Safety Authority analysed the return of experience of Chernobyl post-accident management from 1986 to 2005 in order to draw its lessons in the perspective of a preparation policy. The study was led by a group of experts and involved the participation of a pluralistic group of about thirty participants (public authorities, local governments, NGOs, experts, operators). PAREX highlighted the complexity of a situation of long-lasting radioactive contamination (diversity of stakeholders and of dimensions at stake: health, environment, economy, society...). Beyond traditional public crisis management tools and frameworks, post-accident strategies also involves in the longer term a territorial and social response, which relies on local capacities of initiative. Preparation to such process requires experimenting new modes of operation that allow a diversity of local actors to take part to the response to a situation of contamination and to the surveillance system, with the support of public authorities. The conclusions of PAREX include a set of recommendations in this perspective. (authors)

  19. NEW METHODICAL APPROACH FOR CALCULATION OF THE INDIVIDUALIZED INTERNAL DOSES OF PERSONS AFFECTED DUE TO THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Drozd

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basis of methodical approach for calculation of the individualized internal doses is the con-firmed original scientific hypothesis that every group of individuals which are homogeneous on demographic characteristics (gender and age, on a curve of dose distribution that is constructed according to the data of individual measurements of Cs137 in the human body (WB measurements, has the determined location, thus, that is constant in time, i.e. percentiles of dose distribution corresponding to the average internal dose of every age group of men and women on a curve of dose distribution occupy the certain, steady in time, location. Keywords: individualized internal dose, percentile of dose distribution, stability.

  20. EXPOSURE DOSES ASSESSMENT OF POPULATION AT LONG-TERM PERIOD AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT: INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Vlasova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The study which had been conducted in the period from 1990 to 2000’s in the settlements ofGomelregion showed that the average internal exposure doses of population living in the settlements situated on territories with equal levels of contamination density were considerably different. The reasons for the difference have been revealed. It was shown that not only radiation contamination of territory but also a range of factors of non-radiation origin have influence on formation of internal exposure dose. The hypothesis has been approved that internal exposure dose of each individual and also of each family has its certain place, constant in time at a dose distribution curve. This appropriateness had been used as a methodological basis for reconstruction of subjects’ individual doses for any time period. Method for estimating the average annual effective exposure doses of inhabitants living in contaminated settlements of theBelarusRepublichad been developed. The results of the Whole Body Counter measurements had been used for direct assessment of internal exposure dose and as the basis for developing a model. Model for the dose estimation is based on the classification of settlements according to regional characteristics of soil, which cause 137Cs in taking with locally produced foodstuff. The model is also based on regression of daily 137Cs intake on the density contamination of the soil for each region. The effect of the indirect factors on the dose forming had been taken into account: the number of inhabitants and the area of forest around the settlement. According to the developed method, there had been created a Catalog of Average Annual Effective Doses of Residents of the Belarus Republic.

  1. Chinese Meridian Project and its international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guotao; Wang, Chi; Jiao, Jing; Liu, Zhengkuan

    2016-07-01

    Meridian Space Weather Monitoring Project (Meridian Project) has a Chinese multi-station chain along 120ºE longitude to monitor space environment, starting from Mohe, the most northern station in China, through Beijing, Wuhan and extended to Zhongshan station in the Antarctic. The Meridian Project consists of 15 observational stations, the instruments includes magnetometer, ionosonde, incoherent scattering radar, HF back-scattering radar, VLF receiver, LIDAR, and Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The Meridian Project has finished its construction phase in 2012, and started its running phase in 2013. Until now, more than 100 papers have been published by using Meridian Project data. The Meridian Project also provide service for Chinese space activity. The International Space Weather Meridian Circle Program (IMCP) is based upon the Meridian Project. With the international cooperation around this circle, we should take full advantage of foreign resources. The Meridian Project will be extended to Russian, though many Southeast Asia countries such as Australia, and so on. Furthermore, it will be extended to the countries located in the west hemisphere near 60° meridian. The first and only ground-based global space weather monitoring circle will be formed. Cooperation agreements for IMCP have been signed, and we will develop IMCP more deeply in the 2016 COSPAR meeting.

  2. Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project manual. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbaugh, E.H.; Bihl, D.E.; MacLellan, J.A.; Long, M.P.

    1994-07-01

    This document describes the Hanford Internal Dosimetry Project, as it is administered by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy and its Hanford contractors. Project services include administrating the bioassay monitoring program, evaluating and documenting assessment of potential intakes and internal dose, ensuring that analytical laboratories conform to requirements, selecting and applying appropriate models and procedures for evaluating radionuclide deposition and the resulting dose, and technically guiding and supporting Hanford contractors in matters regarding internal dosimetry. Specific chapters deal with the following subjects: practices of the project, including interpretation of applicable DOE Orders, regulations, and guidance into criteria for assessment, documentation, and reporting of doses; assessment of internal dose, including summary explanations of when and how assessments are performed; recording and reporting practices for internal dose; selection of workers for bioassay monitoring and establishment of type and frequency of bioassay measurements; capability and scheduling of bioassay monitoring services; recommended dosimetry response to potential internal exposure incidents; quality control and quality assurance provisions of the program.

  3. International Project: Education, Industry, and Government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Herschel P.; Bekkum, Victor A.

    A project that trained four Egyptian graduates of agricultural engineering and mechanization in the field of local manufacturing processes in Iowa is described. With support from the U.S. Agency for International Development, training was conducted by Iowa State University and ALMACO (a small manufacturer of agricultural machines). Training…

  4. Innovative project management techniques : major international pipeline project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, R.G.; Galatiuk, R.; Mensik, M. [TransCanada International, Calgary, AB (Canada)

    2000-07-01

    The project management techniques used to manage the challenges of constructing the Gasoducto del Pacifico Pipeline from Argentina to Chile was discussed. The 543 km natural gas pipeline relied on experience of the GasAndes Pipeline Project to execute it in one year, from October 1998 to October 1999. The project management team met with success by using innovative techniques designed specifically to the following challenges: (1) fast track nature of the project, (2) contractual obligations imposed by the project management agreement between GasPacifico and TransCanada International which had the responsibility for the right-of-way acquisition, applying for regulatory approvals, design and construction of the project, (3) environmental constraints of a route through a national park in Chile and areas of high erosion and instability through the imposing Andes mountain range, (4) seasonal constraints, (5) two countries with two sets of laws and strict regulatory requirements, and (6) procurement and importation of major equipment, materials and pipe. The initial capacity of the pipeline without the addition of compression facilities was 3.7 million cubic metres per day. Total investment was in the order of $321 million US. It was emphasized that the risk associated with meeting the projects goals were minimized by critically evaluating all prospective bidders on the project. 1 ref., 7 figs.

  5. Chernobyl record. The definitive history of the Chernobyl catastrophe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mould, R.F

    2000-07-01

    The contents of Chernobyl Record have taken 14 years to compile and this period of time was necessary to enable information to be released from Soviet sources, measurements to be made in the environment, for estimation of radiation doses and for follow-up of the health of population groups which had been exposed. This time frame also includes the 10th anniversary conferences and the completion of joint projects of the European Commission, Ukraine, Belarus and the Russian Federation. It has also enabled me to visit the power plant site, Chernobyl town and Pripyat relatively soon after the accident and also some 10 years later: December 1987 and June 1998. Without such visits some of the photographs in this Record could not have been obtained. Information is also contained in these pages of comparisons of various aspects of the Chernobyl accident with data from the Three Mile Island accident in the USA in 1979, the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombs, the highly contaminated Techa river area in the Urals in Russia and the accident in Tokaimura, Japan in 1999. The first two chapters are introductory in that they describe terminology which is necessary for an understanding of the remaining chapters. Chapters 3-6 describes the early events: including those leading up to the explosion and then what followed in the immediate aftermath. Chapters 7-8 describe the Sarcophagus and the past and future of nuclear power for electricity generation, including the future of the Chernobyl power station. Chapters 9-11 consider the radiation doses received by various populations, including liquidators, evacuees and those living on contaminated territories: and the contamination of milk by {sup 131}I, and the contamination of other parts of the food chain by {sup 137}Cs. Chapters 12-14 describe the environmental impact of the accident, as does chapter 11. Chapters 15-18 detail the long-term effects on health, including not only the incidence of cancer, but also of non

  6. Chernobyl - state of the art; Chernobyl - o estado da arte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Daiane C.B. de; Vicente, Roberto; Rostelato, Maria Elisa C.M.; Borges, Jessica F.; Tiezzi, Rodrigo; Peleias Junior, Fernando S.; Souza, Carla D.; Rodrigues, Bruna T.; Benega, Marcos A.G.; Souza, Anderson S. de; Silva, Thais H. da, E-mail: dcsouza@ipen.br, E-mail: rvicente@ipen.br, E-mail: elisaros@ipen.br, E-mail: rtiezzi@ipen.br, E-mail: carladdsouza@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: marcosagbenega@ipen.br, E-mail: bteigarodrigues@gmail.com, E-mail: thaishunk@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This article aims to analyze what has been done so far in relation to damage caused by the accident and the state of art in Chernobyl, as well as the impact on radiation protection applied safety nuclear power plants. In the first part of the work a data survey was done through a bibliographic review and the in the second part data was collected during a visit, in June 2013 at the crash site, when was observed dose values in the affected areas and the works of repairs that have been made in the sarcophagus and surroundings as well as in official reports available through active international bodies. The main results indicate significant improvements in radiation protection systems.

  7. Governance of the International Linear Collider Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foster, B.; /Oxford U.; Barish, B.; /Caltech; Delahaye, J.P.; /CERN; Dosselli, U.; /INFN, Padua; Elsen, E.; /DESY; Harrison, M.; /Brookhaven; Mnich, J.; /DESY; Paterson, J.M.; /SLAC; Richard, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Stapnes, S.; /CERN; Suzuki, A.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Wormser, G.; /Orsay, LAL; Yamada, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba

    2012-05-31

    Governance models for the International Linear Collider Project are examined in the light of experience from similar international projects around the world. Recommendations for one path which could be followed to realize the ILC successfully are outlined. The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a unique endeavour in particle physics; fully international from the outset, it has no 'host laboratory' to provide infrastructure and support. The realization of this project therefore presents unique challenges, in scientific, technical and political arenas. This document outlines the main questions that need to be answered if the ILC is to become a reality. It describes the methodology used to harness the wisdom displayed and lessons learned from current and previous large international projects. From this basis, it suggests both general principles and outlines a specific model to realize the ILC. It recognizes that there is no unique model for such a laboratory and that there are often several solutions to a particular problem. Nevertheless it proposes concrete solutions that the authors believe are currently the best choices in order to stimulate discussion and catalyze proposals as to how to bring the ILC project to fruition. The ILC Laboratory would be set up by international treaty and be governed by a strong Council to whom a Director General and an associated Directorate would report. Council would empower the Director General to give strong management to the project. It would take its decisions in a timely manner, giving appropriate weight to the financial contributions of the member states. The ILC Laboratory would be set up for a fixed term, capable of extension by agreement of all the partners. The construction of the machine would be based on a Work Breakdown Structure and value engineering and would have a common cash fund sufficiently large to allow the management flexibility to optimize the project's construction. Appropriate contingency

  8. International Project Management Leadership in Complex Environments

    CERN Document Server

    Grisham, Thomas W

    2011-01-01

    The theory, practice, and example projects of international project management A Singaporean corporation builds a manufacturing facility in Cambodia, with a Chinese partner, a Cambodian government agency, and value chain organizations in Germany, Morocco, Vietnam, and Brazil. A Russian charity operates in the Balkans and the Persian Gulf. Pharmaceuticals and food come from ten different countries, physicians are from the EU and Russia, and donations are from Central Asia and the subcontinent. A transnational organization markets through divisions in eighty-two countries. The products are desig

  9. International Project Management Committee: Overview and Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Edward

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation discusses the purpose and composition of the International Project Management Committee (IMPC). The IMPC was established by members of 15 space agencies, companies and professional organizations. The goal of the committee is to establish a means to share experiences and best practices with space project/program management practitioners at the global level. The space agencies that are involved are: AEB, DLR, ESA, ISRO, JAXA, KARI, and NASA. The industrial and professional organizational members are Comau, COSPAR, PMI, and Thales Alenia Space.

  10. The International HapMap Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-12-18

    The goal of the International HapMap Project is to determine the common patterns of DNA sequence variation in the human genome and to make this information freely available in the public domain. An international consortium is developing a map of these patterns across the genome by determining the genotypes of one million or more sequence variants, their frequencies and the degree of association between them, in DNA samples from populations with ancestry from parts of Africa, Asia and Europe. The HapMap will allow the discovery of sequence variants that affect common disease, will facilitate development of diagnostic tools, and will enhance our ability to choose targets for therapeutic intervention.

  11. The legacy of Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojcun, M.

    1991-04-20

    This article looks at daily life in the Northern Ukraine, where the fallout effects from the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident were felt most keenly. High levels of radioactive iodine 131, strontium 90 and caesium 137 are still present five years on and the health of the population, including those evacuated from the exclusion zones, is at risk from leukaemia and thyroid problems, especially among children. Other worrying reports suggest the occurence of a new disease, ''Chernobyl AIDs'', in which sufferers' immune systems are depressed. Other major outstanding problems include the integrity of the concrete sarcophagus enclosing the damaged reactor, and the continued consumption of locally grown contaminated food due to government inadequacies in supplying ''clean'' equivalents. (UK).

  12. Accidents - Chernobyl accident; Accidents - accident de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This file is devoted to the Chernobyl accident. It is divided in four parts. The first part concerns the accident itself and its technical management. The second part is relative to the radiation doses and the different contaminations. The third part reports the sanitary effects, the determinists ones and the stochastic ones. The fourth and last part relates the consequences for the other European countries with the case of France. Through the different parts a point is tackled with the measures taken after the accident by the other countries to manage an accident, the cooperation between the different countries and the groups of research and studies about the reactors safety, and also with the international medical cooperation, specially for the children, everything in relation with the Chernobyl accident. (N.C.)

  13. Comparisons on International Approaches of Business and Project Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Carmen ENE

    2005-01-01

    In this article we intend to present a comparative approach between three recognized international methodologies for risk management: RISKMAN, Project Management Institute Methodology-PMBoK and Project Risk Analysis and Management Guide (produced by Association for Project Management).

  14. Comparisons on International Approaches of Business and Project Risk Management

    OpenAIRE

    Nadia Carmen ENE

    2005-01-01

    In this article we intend to present a comparative approach between three recognized international methodologies for risk management: RISKMAN, Project Management Institute Methodology-PMBoK and Project Risk Analysis and Management Guide (produced by Association for Project Management).

  15. The Chernobyl Catastrophe. Consequences on Human Health

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablokov, A.; Labunska, I.; Blokov, I. (eds.)

    2006-04-15

    of estimates of excess mortality resulting from the Chernobyl accident spans an extremely wide range depending upon precisely what is taken into account. The most recent epidemiological evidence, published under the auspices of the Russian Academy of Sciences, suggests that the scale of the problems could be very much greater than predicted by studies published to date. For example, the 2005 IAEA report predicted that 4000 additional deaths would result from the Chernobyl accident. The most recently published figures indicate that in Belarus, Russia and the Ukraine alone the accident resulted in an estimated 200,000 additional deaths between 1990 and 2004. Overall, the available data reveal a considerable range in estimated excess mortalities resulting from the Chernobyl accident, serving to underline the huge uncertainties attached to knowledge of the full impacts of the Chernobyl accident. This report includes some data, which have not been published before in the international arena. In combination with the extensive body of literature which has been published to date, these data indicate that 'official' figures (e.g. the IAEA 2005 evaluation) for morbidity (incidence of disease) and death arising as a direct result of the radioactive contamination released from Chernobyl may grossly underestimate both the local and international impact of the incident. Four population groups appear to have experienced the most severe health effects: (1) accident clean-up workers, or 'liquidators', including civilian and the military personnel drafted to carry out clean-up activities and construct the protective cover for the reactor; (2) evacuees from dangerously contaminated territories inside the 30-km zone around the power plant; (3) residents of the less (but still dangerously) contaminated territories; and (4) children born into the families from all of the above three groups.

  16. International project marketing: an introduction to the INPM approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Tikkanen, Henrikki

    2003-01-01

    Projects are often sold and procured. Therefore this paper reviews recent contributions of the International Network for Project Marketing and Systems Selling (INPM), emphasising the connection between the business relationships of individual projects and the wider environment in which project ma...... that project-selling firms can adopt in relation to their marketing activities. Finally, we make some suggestions for practitioners responsible for marketing projects and discuss avenues for future academic work in project marketing.......Projects are often sold and procured. Therefore this paper reviews recent contributions of the International Network for Project Marketing and Systems Selling (INPM), emphasising the connection between the business relationships of individual projects and the wider environment in which project...... marketing takes place. First, we discuss various definitions of projects and project marketing. Second, we consider the implications of three specific features of project business--discontinuity, uniqueness, and complexity--over multiple projects. Third, we assess three overlapping types of postures...

  17. Chernobyl: an unbelievable failure to help.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertell, Rosalie

    2008-01-01

    The disaster at the Chernobyl power reactor near Kiev, which began on April 26, 1986, was one of the world's worst industrial accidents. Yet the global community, usually most generous in its aid to a stricken community, has been slow to understand the scope of the disaster and reach out to the most devastated people of Ukraine, Belarus, and Russia. This article probes the causes of this confusion of perception and failure of response; clearly the problem is one of communication. Has the International Atomic Energy Agency betrayed the victims of the Chernobyl disaster because of its plans to promote the "peaceful atom" nuclear program in the developing world? Has the World Health Organization failed to provide clear, reliable information on the health effects resulting from the disaster? Are other historical problems or actors interfering with reasonable handling of the late effects of a nuclear disaster? Most importantly, what can be done to remedy this situation, to assist those most hurt by the late effects of Chernobyl and prevent such injustice in future? With the current promotion of nuclear energy as a "solution" to global climate change, we need to take a sober second look at the nuclear energy experiment and management of its hazards.

  18. Chernobyl: the facts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanbridge, R. (Stockholm Univ. (Sweden) Dept. of Journalism, Media and Communication Studies)

    1993-08-01

    In these Search Strategies, searchers from different countries and professions are given a question to answer, a budget of Pounds 50 and a time in which to produce their report. We hope that these blow-by-blow accounts, together with the hints and tips picked up along the way, will help readers to develop their own search strategies. Journalists are more and more coming to use online services and here the author gives a journalist's account of tracking down the elusive facts surrounding the Chernobyl disaster. (author).

  19. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl. Programme 3 study of the health effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, S.; Kellerer, A.; Pott-Born, R. [Munich Univ., Radiobiological Institute (Germany); Gagniere, B. [CIRE Ouest, 35 - Rennes (France); Mansoux, H.; Rutschkowsky, N.; Valenty, M.; Calmont, I.; Brun-Yaba, Ch. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Verger, P. [ORS PACA, 13 - Marseille (France); Franc, B. [Hopital Ambroise-Pare, 92 - Boulogne (France); Robert-Gnansia, E. [European Instituteof Genomutations, 69 - Lyon (France); Briend, A. [Scientific and Technical Institute of Nutrition and Alimentation/CNAM, 75 - Paris (France)

    2006-03-15

    The results of the French-German Initiative Health Effects project, conducted over a period of four years, were presented to the international authorities at a congress held in October 2004 in Kiev and are summarised below. Thyroid cancer increase in children and young adults seems clearly related to exposure at young ages in 1986. For the other cancers sites, the observed results do not add any decisive elements that would make it possible to quantify the impact of post-Chernobyl irradiation: the trend observed in time is similar in both exposed and non-exposed areas in most situations. These observations do not exclude the fact that an increase of leukaemia may exist for those exposed as children; it may be too low to be detectable in a statistically significant way. Similarly, the higher rate of congenital malformations observed during recent years cannot be attributed to radiation, because the same trend over time is observed both in contaminated and non-contaminated areas in Belarus. Reliable and up-to-date knowledge has been collected in a H.E.D.A.C. database, it should facilitate communication concerning the health impact of the Chernobyl accident. The main results published at national or international level, will be made available to the public and the international scientific community via modern distribution methods and will contribute to the development of a necessary cohesion between international research programmes and work carried out locally. Contact the web site: www.fgi.icc.gov.ua For detailed information, final reports are available: contact with mentioned investigators is proposed (see authors of final reports) or contact scientific coordinator M. Tirmarche at I.R.S.N. (France) D. Bazyka at R.C.R.M., Kiev in charge of the database and communication of scientific results at Chernobyl Center.

  20. Comparison of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents: A review of the environmental impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinhauser, Georg, E-mail: georg.steinhauser@colostate.edu; Brandl, Alexander; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2014-02-01

    The environmental impacts of the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima are compared. In almost every respect, the consequences of the Chernobyl accident clearly exceeded those of the Fukushima accident. In both accidents, most of the radioactivity released was due to volatile radionuclides (noble gases, iodine, cesium, tellurium). However, the amount of refractory elements (including actinides) emitted in the course of the Chernobyl accident was approximately four orders of magnitude higher than during the Fukushima accident. For Chernobyl, a total release of 5300 PBq (excluding noble gases) has been established as the most cited source term. For Fukushima, we estimated a total source term of 520 (340–800) PBq. In the course of the Fukushima accident, the majority of the radionuclides (more than 80%) was transported offshore and deposited in the Pacific Ocean. Monitoring campaigns after both accidents reveal that the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident was much greater than of the Fukushima accident. Both the highly contaminated areas and the evacuated areas are smaller around Fukushima and the projected health effects in Japan are significantly lower than after the Chernobyl accident. This is mainly due to the fact that food safety campaigns and evacuations worked quickly and efficiently after the Fukushima accident. In contrast to Chernobyl, no fatalities due to acute radiation effects occurred in Fukushima. - Highlights: • The environmental effects of Chernobyl and Fukushima are compared. • Releases of radionuclides from Chernobyl exceeded Fukushima by an order of magnitude. • Chernobyl caused more severe radiation-related health effects. • Overall, Chernobyl was a much more severe nuclear accident than Fukushima. • Psychological effects are neglected but important consequences of nuclear accidents.

  1. Chernobyl accident and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1987-06-01

    The paper concerns the Chernobyl reactor accident, with emphasis on the design of the RBMK reactor and nuclear safety. A description is given of the Chernobyl nuclear power plant, including details of the RMBK reactor and safety systems. Comments on the design of the RBMK by UK experts prior to the accident are summarized, along with post-accident design changes to improve RBMK safety. Events of the Chernobyl accident are described, as well as design deficiencies highlighted by the accident. Differences between the USSR and UK approaches to nuclear safety are commented on. Finally source terms, release periods and environmental consequences are briefly discussed.

  2. [Health effects of the Chernobyl disaster. Fifteen years afterwards].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra Anta, M A; Amor Cabrera, M A; Díaz Mier, F; Cámara Moraño, C

    2002-04-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear accident of 1986 released large quantities of radioactive material causing heavy contamination in widespread areas of the former Soviet Union. Each summer, several hundred children visit Spain from Chernobyl. In this article we describe the accident, the environmental contamination, the mechanisms of radiation injury and the dose-response relationships. We review the health effects of exposure to ionizing radiation and the health impact of the Chernobyl catastrophe. We propose guidelines for the medical management and evaluation of children on temporary visits. The health status of adults and especially that of children in Belarus, Ukraine and the Russian Federation has been adversely affected. According to present knowledge, Chernobyl has given rise to a marked increase in the incidence of papillary thyroid cancer, psychological consequences and socioeconomic disruption. Many studies report that the incidence of other diseases has increased, but not all health problems seen after the nuclear accident can be attributed to radiation. Given the long latency period for diseases induced by radiation exposure, long-term follow-up of all potentially affected individuals is important. Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident the international community is still learning scientific, medical and humanitarian lessons.

  3. Radioecological transfer of {sup 137}Cs from ground deposition to man from Chernobyl debris and from nuclear weapons fallout in different Swedish populations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raeaef, C.L. [Malmoe Univ. Hospital, Lund Univ., Dept. of Radiation Physics, Malmoe (Sweden)

    2005-07-01

    A comparison of the estimated committed effective dose per unit activity deposition on ground was made between different critical groups in Sweden. The time-integrated aggregate transfer of {sup 137}Cs for the global fallout was 2-3 times higher than from Chernobyl debris for Swedish urban populations. For reindeer herders this difference is even more marked, with a factor of three to four higher time-integrated transfer factor of nuclear weapons fallout. Considering the transfer of Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs debris the time-integrated transfer factor appears to be more than 25 times higher for reindeer herders in Sweden than for the urban reference groups. An even more pronounced relative difference between the time integrated aggregate transfer was observed between reindeer herders and urban reference populations for the pre-Chernobyl fallout (a factor of 30). The projected committed effective dose from internal contamination of Chernobyl {sup 137}Cs per unit activity deposition is observed to be 2030 {mu}Sv/kBq m{sup -2}. The highest values in Sweden are obtained for reindeer herders with an estimated radioecological transfer of 0.5 mSv/kBq m{sup -2}. (au)

  4. RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE - 25 YEARS SINCE THE CHERNOBYL NUCLEAR POWER PLANT ACCIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities of the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, and in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program. The brief overview of the radioactive waste issues in the ChEZ presented in this article demonstrates that management of radioactive waste resulting from a beyond-designbasis accident at a nuclear power plant becomes the most challenging and the costliest effort during the mitigation and remediation activities. The costs of these activities are so high that the provision of radioactive waste final disposal facilities compliant with existing radiation safety requirements becomes an intolerable burden for the current generation of a single country, Ukraine. The nuclear accident at the Fukushima-1 NPP strongly indicates that accidents at nuclear sites may occur in any, even in a most technologically advanced country, and the Chernobyl experience shows that the scope of the radioactive waste management activities associated with the mitigation of such accidents may exceed the capabilities of a single country. Development of a special international program for broad international cooperation in accident related radioactive waste management activities is required to handle these issues. It would also be reasonable to consider establishment of a dedicated international fund for mitigation of accidents at nuclear sites, specifically, for handling radioactive waste problems in the ChEZ. The experience of handling Chernobyl radioactive waste management issues, including large volumes of radioactive soils and complex structures

  5. Thermal Data Exchange Using International Standards Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecraft projects today consist of many different cooperating companies and institutions. The project members typically use different thermal design analysis...

  6. International medical cooperation project for State of Libya using international medical tourism system in Thailand

    OpenAIRE

    奥寺, 敬; 坂本, 美重

    2013-01-01

    International medical cooperation project for State of Libya is reported. The concept of this project is to treat Libyan injured people using international medical tourism system in Thailand. Management of patient, including evaluation, domestic and international transportation arrangement of hospital, is supported by Normeca International Co., Ltd, (Pattaya, Thailand). Treatment of Libyan patient in two international hospitals (Bangpakok 9 Hospital and Navamin 9 Hopsital) in Bangkok was succ...

  7. Project communication in a strategic internal perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Line B.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose - The purpose of this paper is to discus the concept of project communication. What is currently understood by project communication? How and to what degree is it being discussed within the field of corporate communication and project management? And finally, what is the potential...... of interpersonal project communication? Design/methodology/approach - Based on a literature review of the two above mentioned fields of research the discussion of the potential of interpersonal project communication is put in relation to concepts of power relations in an organisation, use of networks...... communication there is no mentioning of project communication. Despite the acknowledged need to focus on communication as a whole in projects there is no indication in the literature that any collaboration exists between the field of corporate communication and the field of project management - creating a gap...

  8. Project communication in an internal strategic perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Line B.

    2009-01-01

    of interpersonal project communication? Design/methodology/approach - Based on a literature review of the two above mentioned fields of research the discussion of the potential of interpersonal project communication  is put in relation to concepts of power relations in an organisation, use of networks...... of the two fields of research. Research limitations/implications - Given the early stage of this project, the empirical data collection has not yet taken place. Practical implications - Using interpersonal project communication to strengthen project communication by integrating know-how and principles from...... corporate communication. Originality/value - By challenging the use of the term 'project communication' and extending the concept by defining the aspect of interpersonal project communication and its potential in creating synthesis between the research fields corporate communication and project managment....

  9. Project communication in an internal strategic perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsing, Line B.

    2009-01-01

    of the two fields of research. Research limitations/implications - Given the early stage of this project, the empirical data collection has not yet taken place. Practical implications - Using interpersonal project communication to strengthen project communication by integrating know-how and principles from...

  10. International environmental issues and requirements for new power projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, J.R. [Golder Associates Inc., Gainesville, FL (United States); Maltby, J.H. [Golder Associates Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The purpose of this presentation was to discuss the emerging role of financial entities in determining environmental requirements for international power projects. The paper outlines the following: emerging conditions; examples of announced privatization energy projects by country; types of government and international financial entity sources; problems for IPPs; similarity and differences between the World Bank and the USEPA; comparison of the international standards and regulations for power plants; recent trends/issues involving international power project approval; and recommendations for understanding/expediting the financial entities` environmental approval process and how to expedite this process.

  11. Bayesian Probabilistic Projection of International Migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azose, Jonathan J; Raftery, Adrian E

    2015-10-01

    We propose a method for obtaining joint probabilistic projections of migration for all countries, broken down by age and sex. Joint trajectories for all countries are constrained to satisfy the requirement of zero global net migration. We evaluate our model using out-of-sample validation and compare point projections to the projected migration rates from a persistence model similar to the method used in the United Nations' World Population Prospects, and also to a state-of-the-art gravity model.

  12. International project marketing: an introduction to the INPM approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne; Tikkanen, Henrikki

    2003-01-01

    Projects are often sold and procured. Therefore this paper reviews recent contributions of the International Network for Project Marketing and Systems Selling (INPM), emphasising the connection between the business relationships of individual projects and the wider environment in which project...... marketing takes place. First, we discuss various definitions of projects and project marketing. Second, we consider the implications of three specific features of project business--discontinuity, uniqueness, and complexity--over multiple projects. Third, we assess three overlapping types of postures...... that project-selling firms can adopt in relation to their marketing activities. Finally, we make some suggestions for practitioners responsible for marketing projects and discuss avenues for future academic work in project marketing....

  13. Comparison of the Chernobyl and Fukushima nuclear accidents: a review of the environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhauser, Georg; Brandl, Alexander; Johnson, Thomas E

    2014-02-01

    The environmental impacts of the nuclear accidents of Chernobyl and Fukushima are compared. In almost every respect, the consequences of the Chernobyl accident clearly exceeded those of the Fukushima accident. In both accidents, most of the radioactivity released was due to volatile radionuclides (noble gases, iodine, cesium, tellurium). However, the amount of refractory elements (including actinides) emitted in the course of the Chernobyl accident was approximately four orders of magnitude higher than during the Fukushima accident. For Chernobyl, a total release of 5,300 PBq (excluding noble gases) has been established as the most cited source term. For Fukushima, we estimated a total source term of 520 (340-800) PBq. In the course of the Fukushima accident, the majority of the radionuclides (more than 80%) was transported offshore and deposited in the Pacific Ocean. Monitoring campaigns after both accidents reveal that the environmental impact of the Chernobyl accident was much greater than of the Fukushima accident. Both the highly contaminated areas and the evacuated areas are smaller around Fukushima and the projected health effects in Japan are significantly lower than after the Chernobyl accident. This is mainly due to the fact that food safety campaigns and evacuations worked quickly and efficiently after the Fukushima accident. In contrast to Chernobyl, no fatalities due to acute radiation effects occurred in Fukushima. © 2013.

  14. The International Project 1992 Update Including "Microfilming Projects Abroad."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutimann, Hans

    1993-01-01

    Describes microfilming projects in 30 countries collected from questionnaire responses. Additional topics discussed include cooperative programs for preservation and access; an overview of national programs; mass deacidification; new technologies, such as digital preservation; microfilming projects abroad; and future priorities. (Contains 10…

  15. 18th International Congress on Project Management and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, José; Capuz-Rizo, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    This volume features papers from the 18th International Congress on Project Management and Engineering, held by the University of Zaragoza in collaboration with the Spanish Association of Project Management and Engineering (AEIPRO). It illustrates the state of the art in this emerging area. Readers will discover ways to increase the effectiveness of project engineering as well as the efficiency of project management. The papers, written by international researchers and professionals, cover civil engineering and urban planning, product and process engineering, environmental engineering, energy efficiency and renewable energies, rural development, safety, labor risks and ergonomics, and training in project engineering. Overall, this book contributes to the improvement of project engineering research and enhances the transfer of results to the job of project engineers and project managers around the world. It will appeal to all professionals in the field as well as researchers and teachers involved in the traini...

  16. Observations on the Chernobyl Disaster and LNT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-28

    The Chernobyl accident was probably the worst possible catastrophe of a nuclear power station. It was the only such catastrophe since the advent of nuclear power 55 years ago. It resulted in a total meltdown of the reactor core, a vast emission of radionuclides, and early deaths of only 31 persons. Its enormous political, economic, social and psychological impact was mainly due to deeply rooted fear of radiation induced by the linear non-threshold hypothesis (LNT) assumption. It was a historic event that provided invaluable lessons for nuclear industry and risk philosophy. One of them is demonstration that counted per electricity units produced, early Chernobyl fatalities amounted to 0.86 death/GWe-year), and they were 47 times lower than from hydroelectric stations ( approximately 40 deaths/GWe-year). The accident demonstrated that using the LNT assumption as a basis for protection measures and radiation dose limitations was counterproductive, and lead to sufferings and pauperization of millions of inhabitants of contaminated areas. The projections of thousands of late cancer deaths based on LNT, are in conflict with observations that in comparison with general population of Russia, a 15% to 30% deficit of solid cancer mortality was found among the Russian emergency workers, and a 5% deficit solid cancer incidence among the population of most contaminated areas.

  17. On protecting the inexperienced reader from Chernobyl myths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balonov, M I

    2012-06-01

    The health and environmental consequences of the Chernobyl accident continue to attract the attention of experts, decision-makers and the general public, and now these consequences have been given added relevance by the similar accident in 2011 at the Fukushima-1 nuclear power plant (NPP) in Japan. Expert analysis of radiation levels and effects has been conducted by international bodies--UNSCEAR in 2008 and the Chernobyl Forum during 2003-5. At the same time, three Russian and Belarusian scientists, Yablokov, Nesterenko and Nesterenko (2009 Chernobyl. Consequences of the Catastrophe for People and the Environment (New York: Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences)) published both in Russian and English a substantial review of the consequences of Chernobyl based mostly on Russian-language papers. In this book, they suggested a departure from analytical epidemiological studies in favour of ecological ones. This erroneous approach resulted in the overestimation of the number of accident victims by more than 800 000 deaths during 1987-2004. This paper investigates the mistakes in methodology made by Yablokov et al and concludes that these errors led to a clear exaggeration of radiation-induced health effects. Should similar mistakes be made following the 2011 accident at Fukushima-1 NPP this could lead quite unnecessarily to a panic reaction by the public about possible health effects and to erroneous decisions by the authorities in Japan.

  18. International Document Delivery: The ADONIS Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Barrie; Campbell, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Describes the development of a project to test whether publishers can gain copyright revenue by supplying their journals in machine readable form for document delivery centers. Areas discussed include technical considerations; document delivery centers involved; workstation development; and statistical analyses to be reported at the end of the…

  19. Federal Workplace Literacy Project. Internal Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszak, David J.

    This report describes the following components of the Nestle Workplace Literacy Project: six job task analyses, curricula for six workplace basic skills training programs, delivery of courses using these curricula, and evaluation of the process. These six job categories were targeted for training: forklift loader/checker, BB's processing systems…

  20. International network of cancer genome projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hudson, Thomas J.; Anderson, Warwick; Aretz, Axel; Barker, Anna D.; Bell, Cindy; Bernabe, Rosa R.; Bhan, M. K.; Calvo, Fabien; Eerola, Iiro; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Guttmacher, Alan; Guyer, Mark; Hemsley, Fiona M.; Jennings, Jennifer L.; Kerr, David; Klatt, Peter; Kolar, Patrik; Kusuda, Jun; Lane, David P.; Laplace, Frank; Lu, Youyong; Nettekoven, Gerd; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Rao, T. S.; Remacle, Jacques; Schafer, Alan J.; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Stratton, Michael R.; Vockley, Joseph G.; Watanabe, Koichi; Yang, Huanming; Yuen, Matthew M. F.; Knoppers, M.; Bobrow, Martin; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Dressler, Lynn G.; Dyke, Stephanie O. M.; Joly, Yann; Kato, Kazuto; Kennedy, Karen L.; Nicolas, Pilar; Parker, Michael J.; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M.; Shaw, Kenna M.; Wallace, Susan; Wiesner, Georgia L.; Zeps, Nikolajs; Lichter, Peter; Biankin, Andrew V.; Chabannon, Christian; Chin, Lynda; Clement, Bruno; de Alava, Enrique; Degos, Francoise; Ferguson, Martin L.; Geary, Peter; Hayes, D. Neil; Johns, Amber L.; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Penny, Robert; Piris, Miguel A.; Sarin, Rajiv; Scarpa, Aldo; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; van de Vijver, Marc; Futreal, P. Andrew; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Bayes, Monica; Bowtell, David D. L.; Campbell, Peter J.; Estivill, Xavier; Grimmond, Sean M.; Gut, Ivo; Hirst, Martin; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Majumder, Partha; Marra, Marco; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Ning, Zemin; Puente, Xose S.; Ruan, Yijun; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Stratton, Michael R.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Swerdlow, Harold; Velculescu, Victor E.; Wilson, Richard K.; Xue, Hong H.; Yang, Liu; Spellman, Paul T.; Bader, Gary D.; Boutros, Paul C.; Campbell, Peter J.; Flicek, Paul; Getz, Gad; Guigo, Roderic; Guo, Guangwu; Haussler, David; Heath, Simon; Hubbard, Tim J.; Jiang, Tao; Jones, Steven M.; Li, Qibin; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Luo, Ruibang; Pearson, John V.; Puente, Xose S.; Quesada, Victor; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Sander, Chris; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Speed, Terence P.; Stuart, Joshua M.; Teague, Jon W.; Totoki, Yasushi; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Valencia, Alfonso; Wheeler, David A.; Wu, Honglong; Zhao, Shancen; Zhou, Guangyu; Stein, Lincoln D.; Guigo, Roderic; Hubbard, Tim J.; Joly, Yann; Jones, Steven M.; Lathrop, Mark; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Ouellette, B. F. Francis; Spellman, Paul T.; Teague, Jon W.; Thomas, Gilles; Valencia, Alfonso; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Kennedy, Karen L.; Axton, Myles; Dyke, Stephanie O. M.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Gunter, Chris; Guyer, Mark; McPherson, John D.; Miller, Linda J.; Ozenberger, Brad; Kasprzyk, Arek; Zhang, Junjun; Haider, Syed A.; Wang, Jianxin; Yung, Christina K.; Cross, Anthony; Liang, Yong; Gnaneshan, Saravanamuttu; Guberman, Jonathan; Hsu, Jack; Bobrow, Martin; Chalmers, Don R. C.; Hasel, Karl W.; Joly, Yann; Kaan, Terry S. H.; Kennedy, Karen L.; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lowrance, William W.; Masui, Tohru; Nicolas, Pilar; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Rodriguez, Laura Lyman; Vergely, Catherine; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Grimmond, Sean M.; Biankin, Andrew V.; Bowtell, David D. L.; Cloonan, Nicole; Defazio, Anna; Eshleman, James R.; Etemadmoghadam, Dariush; Gardiner, Brooke A.; Kench, James G.; Scarpa, Aldo; Sutherland, Robert L.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Waddell, Nicola J.; Wilson, Peter J.; Gallinger, Steve; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Shaw, Patricia A.; Petersen, Gloria M.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Chin, Lynda; DePinho, Ronald A.; Thayer, Sarah; Muthuswamy, Lakshmi; Shazand, Kamran; Beck, Timothy; Sam, Michelle; Timms, Lee; Ballin, Vanessa; Lu, Youyong; Ji, Jiafu; Zhang, Xiuqing; Chen, Feng; Hu, Xueda; Zhou, Guangyu; Yang, Qi; Tian, Geng; Zhang, Lianhai; Xing, Xiaofang; Li, Xianghong; Zhu, Zhenggang; Yu, Yingyan; Yu, Jun; Yang, Huanming; Lathrop, Mark; Tost, Joerg; Brennan, Paul; Holcatova, Ivana; Zaridze, David; Brazma, Alvis; Egevad, Lars; Prokhortchouk, Egor; Banks, Rosamonde Elizabeth; Uhlen, Mathias; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Viksna, Juris; Ponten, Fredrik; Skryabin, Konstantin; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Birney, Ewan; Borg, Ake; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Foekens, John A.; Martin, Sancha; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Sotiriou, Christos; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Thomas, Gilles; van de Vijver, Marc; van't Veer, Laura; Birnbaum, Daniel; Blanche, Helene; Boucher, Pascal; Boyault, Sandrine; Chabannon, Christian; Gut, Ivo; Masson-Jacquemier, Jocelyne D.; Lathrop, Mark; Pauporte, Iris; Pivot, Xavier; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Tabone, Eric; Theillet, Charles; Thomas, Gilles; Tost, Joerg; Treilleux, Isabelle; Bioulac-Sage, Paulette; Clement, Bruno; Decaens, Thomas; Degos, Francoise; Franco, Dominique; Gut, Ivo; Gut, Marta; Heath, Simon; Lathrop, Mark; Samuel, Didier; Thomas, Gilles; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Lichter, Peter; Eils, Roland; Brors, Benedikt; Korbel, Jan O.; Korshunov, Andrey; Landgraf, Pablo; Lehrach, Hans; Pfister, Stefan; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Reifenberger, Guido; Taylor, Michael D.; von Kalle, Christof; Majumder, Partha P.; Sarin, Rajiv; Scarpa, Aldo; Pederzoli, Paolo; Lawlor, Rita T.; Delledonne, Massimo; Bardelli, Alberto; Biankin, Andrew V.; Grimmond, Sean M.; Gress, Thomas; Klimstra, David; Zamboni, Giuseppe; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Hidewaki; Kusuda, Jun; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Miyano, Satoru; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuto; Fujimoto, Akihiro; Yoshida, Teruhiko; Campo, Elias; Lopez-Otin, Carlos; Estivill, Xavier; Guigo, Roderic; de Sanjose, Silvia; Piris, Miguel A.; Montserrat, Emili; Gonzalez-Diaz, Marcos; Puente, Xose S.; Jares, Pedro; Valencia, Alfonso; Himmelbaue, Heinz; Quesada, Victor; Bea, Silvia; Stratton, Michael R.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Campbell, Peter J.; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Richardson, Andrea L.; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.; van de Vijver, Marc; Thomas, Gilles; Masson-Jacquemier, Jocelyne D.; Aparicio, Samuel; Borg, Ake; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Caldas, Carlos; Foekens, John A.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; van't Veer, Laura; Easton, Douglas F.; Spellman, Paul T.; Martin, Sancha; Chin, Lynda; Collins, Francis S.; Compton, Carolyn C.; Ferguson, Martin L.; Getz, Gad; Gunter, Chris; Guyer, Mark; Hayes, D. Neil; Lander, Eric S.; Ozenberger, Brad; Penny, Robert; Peterson, Jane; Sander, Chris; Speed, Terence P.; Spellman, Paul T.; Wheeler, David A.; Wilson, Richard K.; Chin, Lynda; Knoppers, Bartha M.; Lander, Eric S.; Lichter, Peter; Stratton, Michael R.; Bobrow, Martin; Burke, Wylie; Collins, Francis S.; DePinho, Ronald A.; Easton, Douglas F.; Futreal, P. Andrew; Green, Anthony R.; Guyer, Mark; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Hubbard, Tim J.; Kallioniemi, Olli P.; Kennedy, Karen L.; Ley, Timothy J.; Liu, Edison T.; Lu, Youyong; Majumder, Partha; Marra, Marco; Ozenberger, Brad; Peterson, Jane; Schafer, Alan J.; Spellman, Paul T.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Wainwright, Brandon J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Yang, Huanming

    2010-01-01

    The International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) was launched to coordinate large-scale cancer genome studies in tumours from 50 different cancer types and/or subtypes that are of clinical and societal importance across the globe. Systematic studies of more than 25,000 cancer genomes at the genomic

  1. Teaching International Business via Social Media Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Ilan; Herath, Ruwanthi Kumari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of an experiential learning technique coupled with social media in an international marketing course. It was conducted among 155 students placed in groups that were assigned to develop a YouTube video for use as a country branding marketing tool. Measured evaluations of the students'…

  2. Teaching International Business via Social Media Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alon, Ilan; Herath, Ruwanthi Kumari

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of an experiential learning technique coupled with social media in an international marketing course. It was conducted among 155 students placed in groups that were assigned to develop a YouTube video for use as a country branding marketing tool. Measured evaluations of the students'…

  3. The Development of International Guidelines on Test Use: The International Test Commission Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartram, Dave

    2001-01-01

    Describes the development of the International Guidelines for Test Use through the International Test Commission (ITC) project. These guidelines are designed to provide an international view of areas in which there is consensus on what constitutes good practice in testing. Describes why such guidelines are needed, and discusses their use. (SLD)

  4. International Group Heterogeneity and Students' Business Project Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Ning; Bosker, Roel J.; Xu, Xiaoyan; Rugers, Lucie; van Heugten, Petra PAM

    2015-01-01

    In business higher education, group project work plays an essential role. The purpose of the present study is to explore the relationship between the group heterogeneity of students' business project groups and their academic achievements at both group and individual levels. The sample consists of 536 freshmen from an International Business School…

  5. International Projects Development: From Decision Cycle to Overseas Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Gaston J.

    The major elements of the industry-based planning process can be successfully applied to the development and implementation of international projects in educational institutions. International education programs share the following fundamental structural elements with business and industry: they compete in the market place, and exist by managing…

  6. International Projects Development: From Decision Cycle to Overseas Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklyn, Gaston J.

    The major elements of the industry-based planning process can be successfully applied to the development and implementation of international projects in educational institutions. International education programs share the following fundamental structural elements with business and industry: they compete in the market place, and exist by managing…

  7. Sample Log For International Mudlogging Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Xinghua; Yang Haibo; Andrew Romolliwa

    2000-01-01

    Accurate sample logging is very essential part of mud logging at wellsite. During the logging work of the foreign cooperation mudlogging projects, the description of drillling cuttings (sample) required by the foreign companies is quite different from what we did at home.This paper is intended to give some ideas of description of sample at wellsite with the reference of the guidance of standards of several foreign companies and the working experiences of the author, also some problems that the geologists should pay attention to during the description of sample at wellsite.

  8. Comparative International Communication Projects: Overcoming the Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Esser

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 10-20 years, comparative research in the feld of communication has almost become fashionable. Many factors are responsible for this, for example: an increased awareness of globalisation as a communication-driven process; an awareness of increased transnational conglomerization of media organizations; and the increasing use of the Internet which facilitates easier access to information around the world. But the big question is how to organize collaborative international communication research efectively? Which models of cooperation are available to us, and what are their advantages and disadvantages? In this article, I analyze fve ways of doing collaborative researches and their respective challenges.

  9. CONTRIBUTON OF DIFFERENT FOODSTUFFS TО THE INTERNAL EXPOSURE OF THE RURAL INHABITANTS OF THE BRYANSK REGION IN RUSSIA AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Travnikova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a large village Veprin of the Bryanskregion of Russiacontaminated with radionuclides as a result of the Chernobylaccident, 137Сs concentration in food products of agricultural produce and natural origin was regularly measured, local inhabitants were polled on the composition of their food ration, and 137Сs content in their bodies was at the same time measured. These results were used as the basis for calculation of annual effective doses of internal exposure to inhabitants and for reconstruction of the dose during the entire period after the accident. It will be divided into two stages: 1986–1996 yy and 1997–2012 yy. In this paper devoted to the first period (1986–1996, internal dose was reconstructed for 11 years after the accident, and the efficiency of countermeasures performed for reduction of the internal dose was assessed. The internal dose to inhabitants during the past 11 years after the accident was shown to be reduced almost twice, namely down to 35 mSv instead of the expected 70 mSv. The dose of external gamma radiation during the same time period is close to the obtained dose of internal exposure. The presence of peat and water-meadow soils in the vicinity of this village that are characterised by high transfer factors for radionuclides from soil to vegetation causes high contribution of internal exposure in the total dose of population exposure. Contribution of natural products to the internal dose grew from 6% in 1987 up to 25% in 1996. Individual content of 137Сs in the body of inhabitants reliably correlates with the consumption of milk in the early period after the accident and with consumption of forest mushrooms in the remote period.

  10. Research on bidding quotation game of international project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tao; Xu, Xin

    2017-04-01

    Bidding competition of international projects is more and more fierce currently. However, China started late relatively in the field, it is still lack of experience in the aspect of participation in bidding of international projects, and more effective bidding quotation system is not formed till present. Therefore, China can not win through systemic bidding quotation methods compared with many powerful bidding enterprises in the international field. Research on the field is also focused by many aspects as a result. It is urgent to solve related problems. Game theory is combined for analyzing the effectiveness and operability of bidding quotation models mainly based on current situation of bidding market in China international projects during research process in the paper. The research starts with the perspective of bidders for analyzing their game with tenderers and other bidders. The results have operational value aiming at bidders.

  11. Alligator rivers analogue project an OECD/NEA international project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duerden, P.; Airey, P. [ANSTO, Menai (Australia); Pescatore, C. [OECD/NEA Issy-les-Moulineaux (France)

    1994-12-31

    The Koongarra uranium deposit in the Alligator Rivers Region of the Northern Territory of Australia was studied as a natural analogue of the far field behaviour of high level waste repositories following groundwater ingress. A number of mathematical modelling approaches were developed for processes as diverse as groundwater transport, host rock weathering, radionuclide sorption, evolution of the uranium dispersion fan and the distribution of uranium series nuclides between mineral assemblages in weathered host rock. Some of these models are relevant to performance assessment at the level of individual processes and subsystem performance. Through the project, new insights into the application of the natural analogue approach to the assessment of potential waste repository sites were obtained.

  12. New international developments in oil sands projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vercoe, J. [Fasken Martineau DuMoulin LLP, London (United Kingdom)

    2008-09-15

    Governments and oil companies from a variety of different countries are now working to create alternative oil and gas operations and the policies required to enable their financial success. The Africa Energy Commission was developed to coordinate policy and act as a framework for the African energy sector. Several large oil and gas operators have become involved in the creation of new contracts to develop training and human resources policies for the petroleum industry in Congo. Issues related to national oil companies and value creation in African countries are currently being studied by the World Bank. A biofuel alliance was recently signed between Congo and Brazil, and a Congo Forest Fund has also been created to help the inhabitants of the Congolese rainforest protect their environment. Congo is also offering opportunities for international companies to implement greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction programs to trade emission credits when requirements are satisfied. It was concluded that several African countries are suitable candidates for oil sands development. 1 fig.

  13. Leukemia following the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Geoffrey R

    2007-11-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine in 1986 led to a substantial increase of thyroid cancer among those exposed as children. The other cancer that is the most sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation is leukemia, and this paper evaluates the evidence relating exposure to Chernobyl radioactivity and leukemia risk. Two types of objectives are identified, namely, scientific evidence and public health, and two approaches to addressing such objectives are discussed. Empirical studies in affected populations are summarized, and it is concluded that, possibly apart from Russian cleanup workers, no meaningful evidence of any statistical association between exposure and leukemia risk as yet exists. However, it is important to carry on with such studies to satisfy various public health objectives.

  14. 19th International Congress on Project Management and Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Blanco, José; Capuz-Rizo, Salvador

    2017-01-01

    This book gathers the best papers presented at the 19th International Congress on Project Management and Engineering, which was held in Granada, Spain in July 2015. It covers a range of project management and engineering contexts, including: civil engineering and urban planning, product and process engineering, environmental engineering, energy efficiency and renewable energies, rural development, information and communication technologies, safety, labour risks and ergonomics, and training in project engineering. Project management and engineering is taking on increasing importance as projects continue to grow in size, more stakeholders become involved, and environmental, organisational and technological issues become more complex. As such, this book offers a valuable resource for all professionals seeking the latest material on the changing face of project management.

  15. International cooperation with Islamabad Children's Hospital, Pakistan: the JICA project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, F; Urabe, D; Ito, H; Kondo, S; Hanawa, Y

    1993-12-01

    The experience gained during 7 years of cooperation between the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) and the Islamabad Children's Hospital (JICA-ICH project, July 1986-June 1993) is described. Islamabad Children's Hospital achieved the goals of the project and became a centre for excellence in health care, education and research for children, fulfilling the objectives of the project. This achievement was evaluated as one of the most successful projects in medical cooperation ever performed by JICA by a third party evaluation team. The problems arising and the lessons experienced through the process are discussed. The importance of the role which should be undertaken by pediatricians in international cooperation with developing countries is emphasized.

  16. Experience of international projects implementation at Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavialov, L.A. [Leningrad Nuclear Power Plant ' Rosenergoatom' , Leningrad Region, 188540, Sosnovy Bor (Russian Federation)

    2008-07-01

    During the period of 1992-2007 more than 60 different projects of different specificity and budget have been successfully implemented in frames of Technical Assistance for the Commonwealth of Independent States (TACIS) Program, Project financed by European Bank for Reconstruction and Development (EBRD), as well as in frames of Agreements on Cooperation between Leningrad NPP and Radiation and Nuclear safety Authority of Finland (STUK) and Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, International Co-operation Program SKI-ICP(SIP). All these projects were directed to the safety increasing of the Leningrad NPP reactor, type RBMK-1000. Implementation of the technical aid projects has been performed by different foreign companies such as Aarsleff Oy, (Finland), SGN (France), Nukem (Germany), Jergo AB (Sweden), SABAROS (Switzerland), Westinghouse (USA), Nordion (Canada), Bruel and Kjer (Denmark), Data System and Solutions (UK), SVT Braundshuz (Germany) WICOTEC (Sweden), Studsvik (Sweden) and etc. which has enough technical and organizational experience in implementation of such projects, as well as all necessary certificates and licenses for works performance. Selection of a Contractor/Supplier for a joined work performance has been carried out in accordance with the tender procedure, technical specification and a planned budget. Project financing was covered by foreign Consolidated Funds and Authorities interested in increasing of Leningrad NPP safety, which have valid intergovernmental agreements with Russian Federation on the technical assistance to be provided to the NPPs. At present time all joined international projects implemented at Leningrad NPP are financed jointly with LNPP. All projects can be divided into technical aid projects connected with development and turnkey implementation of systems and complexes and projects for supply of equipment which has no analogues in Russia but successfully used all over the world. Positive experience of the joined projects

  17. Wormwood forest: a natural history of Chernobyl

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mycio, Mary

    2005-01-01

    ... of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data Mycio, Mary. Wormwood forest : a natural history of Chernobyl / Mary Mycio. p. cm. Includes index. ISBN 0-309-09430-5 (cloth) 1. Radioisotopes- Environmental aspects- Ukraine- Chornobyl Region. 2. Chernobyl Nuclear Accident, Chornobyl, Ukraine, 1986- Environmental aspects. 3. Radioisotopes- Health asp...

  18. Fallout from Chernobyl [Letters to the editor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, E.D. (Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Cambridge (United Kingdom)); Abelin, T.; Egger, M. (Bern Univ. (Switzerland)) (and others)

    1994-11-12

    Six brief letters discuss the possible health effects of fallout from the Chernobyl reactor accident including an increase in thyroid cancer in children in Belarus, chromosomal abnormalities in workers from Latvia who cleared up the Chernobyl accident site, an increased trisomy 21 in Berlin but a lack of increased childhood leukaemia incidence in Greece. (UK).

  19. Do International Online Collaborative Learning Projects Impact Ethnocentrism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehm, Diane; Kurthen, Hermann; Aniola-Jedrzejek, Lilianna

    2010-01-01

    Preparing students for success in a globalized world invites new approaches. Online collaboration between students from different countries via globally networked learning environments (GNLEs) is one such approach. This article presents the results of a six-semester study beginning in 2006 of international online project collaborations between…

  20. Exploring International Investment through a Classroom Portfolio Simulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Yur-Austin, Jasmine

    2013-01-01

    A rapid integration of financial markets has prevailed during the last three decades. Investors are able to diversify investment beyond national markets to mitigate return volatility of a "pure domestic portfolio." This article discusses a simulation project through which students learn the role of international investment by managing…

  1. Exploring International Investment through a Classroom Portfolio Simulation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoying; Yur-Austin, Jasmine

    2013-01-01

    A rapid integration of financial markets has prevailed during the last three decades. Investors are able to diversify investment beyond national markets to mitigate return volatility of a "pure domestic portfolio." This article discusses a simulation project through which students learn the role of international investment by managing…

  2. Nursing faculty roles in international service-learning projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlbry, Pamela; Daugherty, JoAnn

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe faculty roles related to the design and implementation of an international nursing service-learning project. The impetus for this project was the 2008 American Association of Colleges of Nursing (AACN) recommendations for using service-learning and immersion of students in diverse communities to improve nursing education in the area of cultural competency (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 2008a). We define service-learning as a learning experience engaging students in meeting community needs in an international setting so as to offer a different perspective into community health practices and to promote cultural competency. Based on our experience with service-learning, we identified four faculty roles in developing these types of projects. We define these roles as initiator, collaborator, facilitator, and advocate. This article will discuss the application of these faculty roles in developing service-learning opportunities with students. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Chernobyl, 12 years later; Tchernobyl, douze ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-04-01

    This report draws an account of the consequences of Chernobyl accident 12 years after the disaster. It is made up of 7 chapters whose titles are: (1) Some figures about Chernobyl accident, (2) The Chernobyl nuclear power plant, (3) Sanitary consequences of Chernobyl accident, (4) The management of contaminated lands, (5) The impact in France of Chernobyl fallout, (6) The Franco-German cooperation, and (7) Glossary.

  4. Chernobyl, 25 years later... Fukushima: what future for nuclear energy?; Tchernobyl, 25 ans apres... Fukushima: Quel avenir pour le nucleaire?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chouha, M.; Reuss, P.

    2011-07-01

    Starting from a precise analysis of the Chernobyl accident and of its consequences, this book follows with a general analysis of: the present day worldwide energy context and of its projections, the physical and technical aspects of nuclear energy, the place it can share with the other energy sources and its perspectives of development. Content: Introduction; man and energy; nuclear energy; RBMK-type reactors; the Chernobyl accident; the nuclear energy renaissance; conclusion. (J.S.)

  5. Chernobyl accident and its consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.; Bonell, P.G.; Hicks, D.

    1987-01-01

    The USSR power reactor programme is first described. The reasons for the accident at the Chernobyl-4 RBMK nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986, the sequence of events that took place, and the immediate and long-term consequences are considered. A description of the RBMK-type reactors is given and the design changes resulting from the experience of the accident are explained. The source terms describing the details of the radioactivity release associated with the accident and the environmental consequences are covered in the last two sections of the report. Throughout the text comments referring to the UK Nuclear Installations Inspectorate Safety assessment principles have been inserted. (U.K.).

  6. INTEGRAL BENCHMARKS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE INTERNATIONAL REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECT AND THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY BENCHMARK EVALUATION PROJECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Enrico Sartori; Yolanda Rugama

    2008-09-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) continue to expand their efforts and broaden their scope to identify, evaluate, and provide integral benchmark data for method and data validation. Benchmark model specifications provided by these two projects are used heavily by the international reactor physics, nuclear data, and criticality safety communities. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. The status of the IRPhEP and ICSBEP is discussed in this paper, and the future of the two projects is outlined and discussed. Selected benchmarks that have been added to the IRPhEP and ICSBEP handbooks since PHYSOR’06 are highlighted, and the future of the two projects is discussed.

  7. Gene signature of the post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handkiewicz-Junak, Daria; Rusinek, Dagmara; Oczko-Wojciechowska, Malgorzata; Kowalska, Malgorzata; Jarzab, Barbara [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Swierniak, Michal [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Endocrine Oncology, Gliwice (Poland); Medical University of Warsaw, Genomic Medicine, Department of General, Transplant and Liver Surgery, Warsaw (Poland); Dom, Genevieve; Maenhaut, Carine; Detours, Vincent [Universite libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Institute of Interdisciplinary Research, Bruxelles (Belgium); Unger, Kristian [Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital, Human Cancer Studies Group, Division of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Helmholtz-Zentrum, Research Unit Radiation Cytogenetics, Munich (Germany); Bogdanova, Tetiana [Institute of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Kiev (Ukraine); Thomas, Geraldine [Imperial College London Hammersmith Hospital, Human Cancer Studies Group, Division of Surgery and Cancer, London (United Kingdom); Likhtarov, Ilya [Academy of Technological Sciences of Ukraine, Radiation Protection Institute, Kiev (Ukraine); Jaksik, Roman [Silesian University of Technology, Systems Engineering Group, Faculty of Automatic Control, Electronics and Informatics, Gliwice (Poland); Chmielik, Ewa [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Department of Tumour Pathology, Gliwice (Poland); Jarzab, Michal [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, IIIrd Department of Radiation Therapy, Gliwice (Poland); Swierniak, Andrzej [Silesian University of Technology, Department of Automatic Control, Gliwice (Poland)

    2016-07-15

    Following the nuclear accidents in Chernobyl and later in Fukushima, the nuclear community has been faced with important issues concerning how to search for and diagnose biological consequences of low-dose internal radiation contamination. Although after the Chernobyl accident an increase in childhood papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) was observed, it is still not clear whether the molecular biology of PTCs associated with low-dose radiation exposure differs from that of sporadic PTC. We investigated tissue samples from 65 children/young adults with PTC using DNA microarray (Affymetrix, Human Genome U133 2.0 Plus) with the aim of identifying molecular differences between radiation-induced (exposed to Chernobyl radiation, ECR) and sporadic PTC. All participants were resident in the same region so that confounding factors related to genetics or environment were minimized. There were small but significant differences in the gene expression profiles between ECR and non-ECR PTC (global test, p < 0.01), with 300 differently expressed probe sets (p < 0.001) corresponding to 239 genes. Multifactorial analysis of variance showed that besides radiation exposure history, the BRAF mutation exhibited independent effects on the PTC expression profile; the histological subset and patient age at diagnosis had negligible effects. Ten genes (PPME1, HDAC11, SOCS7, CIC, THRA, ERBB2, PPP1R9A, HDGF, RAD51AP1, and CDK1) from the 19 investigated with quantitative RT-PCR were confirmed as being associated with radiation exposure in an independent, validation set of samples. Significant, but subtle, differences in gene expression in the post-Chernobyl PTC are associated with previous low-dose radiation exposure. (orig.)

  8. The Chernobyl reactor accident, ten years on. Teaching projects for mathematics instruction in interdisciplinary working groups; 10 Jahre nach Tschernobyl. Unterrichtsprojekte fuer den Mathematikunterricht in faecheruebergreifenden Kooperationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boer, H. [comp.; Delle, E. [comp.; Mies, K. [comp.; Warmeling, A. [comp.

    1996-10-01

    The booklet presents background information and addresses the following aspects: ionizing radiation and radiation effects; safety of German nuclear power plants; statistical evidence of radiation injuries; short-lived and long-lived ionizing radiation; radioactive waste; CO{sub 2} emissions as an argument in favour of nuclear power generation. The material presented is intended for use by a school project team interested in the subjects, or as a basis for collaborative, interdisciplinary teaching in working groups, and it offers information and problems for mathematics teaching. (HP) [Deutsch] Neben vielen Informationen behandelt die Broschuere: Strahlen und Strahlenwirkungen; Sicherheit deutscher Kernkraftwerke; statistischer Nachweis von Strahlenschaeden; Kurz- und Langfestigkeit der Strahlenbelastung; radioaktiver Abfall; CO{sub 2}-Problematik als Argument fuer die Kernenergie. Die Broschuere ist gedacht z.B. fuer eine Projektgruppe, einen Projekttag, fuer eine Lerngruppe in faecheruebergreifender Kooperation. Die Materialien sind ausgearbeitet fuer die Themembearbeitung im Mathematikunterricht mit Uebungsaufgaben. (HP)

  9. Designing a process for executing projects under an international agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, S. N.

    2003-01-01

    Projects executed under an international agreement require special arrangements in order to operate within confines of regulations issued by the State Department and the Commerce Department. In order to communicate enterprise-level guidance and procedural information uniformly to projects based on interpretations that carry the weight of institutional authority, a process was developed. This paper provides a script for designing processes in general, using this particular process for context. While the context is incidental, the method described is applicable to any process in general. The paper will expound on novel features utilized for dissemination of the procedural details over the Internet following such process design.

  10. The International HapMap Project Web site

    OpenAIRE

    2005-01-01

    The HapMap Web site at http://www.hapmap.org is the primary portal to genotype data produced as part of the International Haplotype Map Project. In phase I of the project, >1.1 million SNPs were genotyped in 270 individuals from four worldwide populations. The HapMap Web site provides researchers with a number of tools that allow them to analyze the data as well as download data for local analyses. This paper presents step-by-step guides to using those tools, including guides for retrieving g...

  11. Natural and man-made radioactivity: Chernobyl soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Flowers, Alan

    2014-05-01

    In 1986 a reactor at the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant suffered a large explosion. The result had wide-ranging impacts. 31 severely exposed emergency workers died from acute radiation syndrome and 19 more later died from different causes. The perhaps controversial prediction by some authors is that around 4,000 will eventually die as a result of the increased cancer risk. A 19-mile restriction zone exists around the former reactor, but during the past 25 years radiation levels have fallen and it is now possible to take part in conducted tours of the deserted city of Pripyat, and the Chernobyl reactor site. Soil levels, however, remain highly radioactive, particularly in the restricted area. Kingston University holds:- • Soil profile sets from 3 locations in Belarus, with repeats at same location 1996 and 2000. • Lake sediment core samples. • Soil profiles at forestry sites. • Surface samples in a region suspected to have actinide content at 200km from Chernobyl. In addition to the above the impact of naturally occurring radon on human health around Chernobyl should not be ignored. About 23 per cent of homes in Ukraine are estimated to have radon levels above 100 Bq m-3, whilst concentrations of 10,000 Bq m-3 or more are known to exist in public water supplies. Some researchers have also suggested that mean annual doses of irradiation of the population caused by radon and it's progeny in air in buildings exceeds the doses received now by inhabitants of settlements located in the territories polluted by Chernobyl-derived nuclides in the Mogilev and Gomel regions in Belarus. This project incorporates a temporal comparison of transport results in undisturbed soils variously over a number of years, demonstrating relative measurements using both the original and new samples. This project will also focus on lake sediments from Southern Belarus and is a 'work in progress'. However, what we can say at this stage is that it is notable that the long lived isotopes of Cs-137

  12. Identifying and managing risk in international construction projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin Kerur

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, major construction projects have increasingly arisen in countries or regions that lack specialist, expert construction contractors, suppliers and consultants. Steps are being taken by governments in the Middle East, Eastern Europe, China, India and developing markets to address national infrastructure deficits, and by so doing, are creating new regions of booming construction demand. When coupled with anaemic growth in developed markets such as the United Kingdom, the USA and Western Europe, foreign markets present attractive opportunities to the global construction industry. However, foreign markets are littered with the cautionary tales of international contractors and consultants that have failed to grasp the intricacies and risks of operating in a new environment and have failed to capitalise on the opportunities available. By identifying the classes of risks, and undertaking detailed analysis, ranking and mitigation of relevant jurisdictional risks, participants in international construction projects will increase the likelihood of project success and commercial longevity in the new jurisdiction. Risk identification and assessment is not a science but an art, and while there are many potential approaches to the issue, we propose that our strategies for identifying, assessing, ranking and mitigating jurisdictional risks offer new international players a good chance of commercial success.

  13. Barriers and Solutions to Conducting Large International, Interdisciplinary Research Projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pischke, Erin C; Knowlton, Jessie L; Phifer, Colin C; Gutierrez Lopez, Jose; Propato, Tamara S; Eastmond, Amarella; de Souza, Tatiana Martins; Kuhlberg, Mark; Picasso Risso, Valentin; Veron, Santiago R; Garcia, Carlos; Chiappe, Marta; Halvorsen, Kathleen E

    2017-09-18

    Global environmental problems such as climate change are not bounded by national borders or scientific disciplines, and therefore require international, interdisciplinary teamwork to develop understandings of their causes and solutions. Interdisciplinary scientific work is difficult enough, but these challenges are often magnified when teams also work across national boundaries. The literature on the challenges of interdisciplinary research is extensive. However, research on international, interdisciplinary teams is nearly non-existent. Our objective is to fill this gap by reporting on results from a study of a large interdisciplinary, international National Science Foundation Partnerships for International Research and Education (NSF-PIRE) research project across the Americas. We administered a structured questionnaire to team members about challenges they faced while working together across disciplines and outside of their home countries in Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Analysis of the responses indicated five major types of barriers to conducting interdisciplinary, international research: integration, language, fieldwork logistics, personnel and relationships, and time commitment. We discuss the causes and recommended solutions to the most common barriers. Our findings can help other interdisciplinary, international research teams anticipate challenges, and develop effective solutions to minimize the negative impacts of these barriers to their research.

  14. Radiation Exposure and Thyroid Cancer Risk After the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant Accident in Comparison with the Chernobyl Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, S; Takamura, N; Ohtsuru, A; Suzuki, S

    2016-09-01

    The actual implementation of the epidemiological study on human health risk from low dose and low-dose rate radiation exposure and the comprehensive long-term radiation health effects survey are important especially after radiological and nuclear accidents because of public fear and concern about the long-term health effects of low-dose radiation exposure have increased considerably. Since the Great East Japan earthquake and the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident in Japan, Fukushima Prefecture has started the Fukushima Health Management Survey Project for the purpose of long-term health care administration and medical early diagnosis/treatment for the prefectural residents. Especially on a basis of the lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident, both thyroid examination and mental health care are critically important irrespective of the level of radiation exposure. There are considerable differences between Chernobyl and Fukushima regarding radiation dose to the public, and it is very difficult to estimate retrospectively internal exposure dose from the short-lived radioactive iodines. Therefore, the necessity of thyroid ultrasound examination in Fukushima and the intermediate results of this survey targeting children will be reviewed and discussed in order to avoid any misunderstanding or misinterpretation of the high detection rate of childhood thyroid cancer.

  15. Radiation-induced effects on plants and animals: findings of the United Nations Chernobyl Forum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Thomas G; Alexakhin, Rudolph; Balonov, Mikhail; Gentner, Norman; Hendry, Jolyn; Prister, Boris; Strand, Per; Woodhead, Dennis

    2007-11-01

    Several United Nations organizations sought to dispel the uncertainties and controversy that still exist concerning the effects of the Chernobyl accident. A Chernobyl Forum of international expertise was established to reach consensus on the environmental consequences and health effects attributable to radiation exposure arising from the accident. This review is a synopsis of the subgroup that examined the radiological effects to nonhuman biota within the 30-km Exclusion Zone. The response of biota to Chernobyl irradiation was a complex interaction among radiation dose, dose rate, temporal and spatial variation, varying radiation sensitivities of the different taxons, and indirect effects from other events. The radiation-induced effects to plants and animals within the 30-km Exclusion Zone around Chernobyl can be framed in three broad time periods relative to the accident: an intense exposure period during the first 30 d following the accident of 26 April 1986; a second phase that extended through the first year of exposure during which time the short-lived radionuclides decayed and longer-lived radionuclides were transported to different components of the environment by physical, chemical and biological processes; and the third and continuing long-term phase of chronic exposure with dose ratesChernobyl area, are placed in context of what was known about radioecological effects prior to the accident.

  16. International Infrastructure for Planetary Sciences: Universal Planetary Database Development Project 'the International Planetary Data Alliance'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Crichton, D.; Capria, M. T.; Beebe, R.; Zender, J.

    2009-09-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), formed under COSPAR in 2008, is a joint international effort to enable global access and exchange of high quality planetary science data, and to establish archive standards that make it easier to share data across international boundaries. In June - July 2009, we held the 4th Steering Committee meeting. Thanks to the many players from several agencies and institutions in the world, we got fruitful results in 6 projects: (1) Inter-operable Planetary Data Access Protocol (PDAP) implementations [led by J. Salgado@ESA], (2) Small bodies interoperability [led by I. Shinohara@JAXA & N. Hirata@U. Aizu], (3) PDAP assessment [led by Y. Yamamoto@JAXA], (4) Architecture and standards definition [led by D. Crichton@NASA], (5) Information model and data dictionary [led by S. Hughes@NASA], and (6) Venus Express Interoperability [led by N. Chanover@NMSU]. The projects demonstrated the feasibility of sharing data and emphasized the importance of developing common data standards to ensure world-wide access to international planetary archives. The Venus Express Interoperability project leveraged standards and technology efforts from both the Planetary Data System (PDS) and IPDA in order to deliver a new capability for data sharing between NASA/PDS and ESA/PSA. This project demonstrated a model and framework for linking compliant planetary archive systems for future international missions. The next step for IPDA, during the 2009-2010 period, will be to work with NASA/PDS to review and participate in an upgrade of its standards to improve both the consistency of the standards to build compliant international archives as well as improve long-term usability of the science data products. This paper presents the achievements and plans, which will be summarized in the paper which will appear in 'Space Research Today' in December 2009.

  17. Increased leukemia risk in Chernobyl cleanup workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new study found a significantly elevated risk for chronic lymphocytic leukemia among workers who were engaged in recovery and clean-up activities following the Chernobyl power plant accident in 1986.

  18. Occupational emerging risks affecting international virtual project Team Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumitraşcu-Băldău Iulia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of internet access, high-speed connection services, collaborative work platforms and tools, allowed employees to interact virtually offering companies the possibility to develop projects around the world, reducing operational costs and gain competitive advantage. Realizing the advantages and disadvantages of developing a project team in an international virtual work environment, requires adopting specific strategies to construct an effective team and ensure the project success. One of the most important disadvantages that we identified is that the new work environment brings new risks for both team members and managers. So, it becomes mandatory to identify and analyze the occupational emerging risks and their impact on the productivity of virtual team members, in order to prevent them efficiently and to ensure the safety and health of employees in a virtual working environment. This paper aims to highlight the necessity for project managers and organizations, to include in their specific project strategies, an efficient occupational risks management in the virtual workplace, to obtain a continuously improved virtual working environment, so to achieve a high performance from virtual employees.

  19. Chernobyl operators: criminals or victims?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munipov, V M

    1992-10-01

    The blame for the 1986 Chernobyl disaster has been variously attributed to the operating personnel, the plant management, the design of the reactor, and the lack of adequate safety information in the Soviet nuclear industry. This paper considers a number of design faults, operational shortcomings and human errors that combined in the accident. It examines the sequence of events leading up to the accident, design problems in the reactor and cooling rods, and the course of the accident itself. It considers the ergonomics aspects, and expresses the view that the main cause of the accident was inadequate human-machine interaction. Finally, it stresses the continuing inadequacies of the Soviet nuclear system, and emphasizes that unless the ergonomics lessons are fully learned, a similar disaster could still occur.

  20. Scheme major international and regional cooperative projects and double-bases projects for overseas scholars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ In 2005, 34 major international cooperative projects involved in multiple disciplines as Mathematical and Physical Sciences, Life Sciences, Engineering and Materials Sciences, Information Sciences, Earth Sciences,Chemical Sciences, and Management Sciences etc., were ratified with a total funding of 32.03 million RMB.

  1. International Energy Outlook 2016 With Projections to 2040

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conti, John [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Petroleum, Natural Gas, and Biofuels Analysis; Holtberg, Paul [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States). Analysis Integration Team; Diefenderfer, Jim [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Electricity, Coal, Nuclear, and Renewables Analysis; LaRose, Angelina [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Integrated and International Energy Analysis; Turnure, James T. [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Analysis; Westfall, Lynn [USDOE Energy Information Administration (EIA), Washington, DC (United States). Office of Energy Markets and Financial Analysis

    2016-05-01

    The International Energy Outlook 2016 (IEO2016) presents an assessment by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the outlook for international energy markets through 2040. U.S. projections appearing in IEO2016 are consistent with those published in EIA’s Annual Energy Outlook 2015 (AEO2015). IEO2016 is provided as a service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projections are used by international agencies, federal and state governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 205(c). The IEO2016 energy consumption projections are divided according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development members (OECD) and nonmembers (non-OECD). OECD members are divided into three basic country groupings: OECD Americas (United States, Canada, and Mexico/Chile), OECD Europe, and OECD Asia (Japan, South Korea, and Australia/New Zealand). Non-OECD countries are divided into five separate regional subgroups: non-OECD Europe and Eurasia (which includes Russia); non-OECD Asia (which includes China and India); Middle East; Africa; and non-OECD Americas (which includes Brazil). In some instances, the IEO2016 energy production models have different regional aggregations to reflect important production sources (for example, Middle East OPEC is a key region in the projections for liquids production). Complete regional definitions are listed in Appendix M. IEO2016 focuses exclusively on marketed energy. Nonmarketed energy sources, which continue to play an important role in some developing countries, are not included in the estimates. The IEO2016 projections are based on existing U.S. and foreign government laws and regulations. In general, IEO2016 reflects the effects of current policies—often stated through regulations—within the projections. EIA analysts attempt to interpret the

  2. Evolution of project management research: a bibliometric study of International Journal of Project Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Cocchi da Silva Eiras

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades, the project management field has evolved and consolidated. Facing this growth, this research aims to identify the main trends of research in the area, as well as providing an overview of publications, identifying new issues, changes in approaches and the development of knowledge areas. To do so, a systematic review of the literature was performed with the use of bibliometric study in the papers of the International Journal of Project Management (IJPM, included in SCOPUS, from its first volume to 2015, covering a period of more than 30 years. It was found that developing countries are increasingly concerned in developing research into the field of project management, especially in mega infrastructure projects and public-private partnerships. The risk is a central topic in all periods of analysis, however, the strategic topics such as success in project and portfolio management are among the fastest growing. Issues related to the soft side of project management as skills, culture, and knowledge management have emerged in recent periods. According to the industry, construction projects and projects in information technology are the most studied along the period analysed.

  3. The International HapMap Project Web site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorisson, Gudmundur A; Smith, Albert V; Krishnan, Lalitha; Stein, Lincoln D

    2005-11-01

    The HapMap Web site at http://www.hapmap.org is the primary portal to genotype data produced as part of the International Haplotype Map Project. In phase I of the project, >1.1 million SNPs were genotyped in 270 individuals from four worldwide populations. The HapMap Web site provides researchers with a number of tools that allow them to analyze the data as well as download data for local analyses. This paper presents step-by-step guides to using those tools, including guides for retrieving genotype and frequency data, picking tag-SNPs for use in association studies, viewing haplotypes graphically, and examining marker-to-marker LD patterns.

  4. A role for NGOs in international renewable energy project development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholf, T.R.

    1997-12-01

    An NGO is an international term for non-government organizations, often it is used in connection with non-profit, community-based and/or voluntary business activities. To be successful in supporting energy projects, these organizations generally exhibit certain characteristics: they are familiar with the end-use requirements; they are typically neutral to the technology; they emphasize training; they do not carry a large bureacratic structure, at home or in the field; they typically can adapt to do numerous functions; they can often attract other support. The author discusses several examples of such organizations who have been highly successful. The author sees a continuing role for such groups in developing renewable energy sources in the rural setting to include: continued development of new activity in rural areas; development of institutional framework for future market activity; an increased role in managing international development activities; more direct involvement with for-profit technical and financial organizations.

  5. Antibiotic stewardship through the EU project "ABS International".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allerberger, Franz; Frank, Annegret; Gareis, Roland

    2008-01-01

    The increasing problem of antimicrobial resistance requires implementation of antibiotic stewardship (ABS) programs. The project "ABS International--implementing antibiotic strategies for appropriate use of antibiotics in hospitals in member states of the European Union" was started in September 2006 in Austria, Belgium, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Slovenia and Slovakia. A training program for national ABS trainers was prepared and standard templates for ABS tools (antibiotic list, guides for antibiotic treatment and surgical prophylaxis, antibiotic-related organization) and valid process measures, as well as quality indicators for antibiotic use were developed. Specific ABS tools are being implemented in up to five healthcare facilities in each country. Although ABS International clearly focuses on healthcare institutions, future antimicrobial stewardship programs must also cover public education and antibiotic prescribing in primary care.

  6. RADIOLOGICAL AND MEDICAL CONSEQUENCES OF THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. G. Bebeshko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available From the position of a 25-years’ experience to overcome the health effects of Chernobyl the dynamics of the radiation environment, the first summarizing at the international level (1988, the results of completed research and practical monitoring are analyzed. Cohort of acute radiation syndrome (ARS survivors under medical observation at the S.I. "Research Center for Radiation Medicine of the National Academy of Medical Sciences of Ukraine" is the largest. Within the 25 years the functional state of the major organs and body systems, and metabolic homeostasis for this category of persons were studied, a comprehensive assessment of their health, mental and physical performance were given, and risk factors and peculiarities of stochastic and non-stochastic pathology courses were identified, as well as a system of rehabilitation patients after ARS was developed. ARS survivors are suffering from chronic diseases of internal organs and systems (from 5-7 to 10-12 diagnoses at the same time. A correlation between acute radiation effects and specific HLA phenotypes were revealed. The dynamics of the immune system recovery after irradiation was studied. The role and prognostic value of telomere length and programmed cell death of lymphocytes in the formation of the cellular effects of ionizing radiation were determined for the first time. Differences between spontaneous and radiation-induced acute myeloid leukemias were found. Dose-dependent neuropsychiatric, neurophysiological, neuropsychological and neuroimaging deviations were identified after irradiation at doses above 0.3 Sv. It was shown that the lymphocytes of Chernobyl clean-up workers with doses 350 – 690 mGy can induce "the bystander effect" in the non-irradiated cells even after 19 years after exposure. The rates of cancer incidence and mortality of victims, the lessons and key problems to be solved in the third decade after the Chernobyl accident are considered.

  7. Radiation monitoring systems as a tool for assessment of accidental releases at the Chernobyl and Fukushima NPPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shershakov, Vjacheslav; Bulgakov, Vladimir

    2013-04-01

    The experience gained during mitigation of the consequences of the accidents at the Chernobyl and Fukushima NPPs has shown that what makes different the decision-making in case of nuclear accidents is that the greatest benefit from decision-making can be achieved in the early phase of an accident. Support to such process can be provided only by a real-time decision-making support system. In case of a nuclear accident the analysis of the situation and decision-making is not feasible without an operational radiation monitoring system, international data exchange and automated data processing, and the use of computerized decision-making support systems. With this in mind, in the framework of different international programs on the Chernobyl-related issues numerous projects were undertaken to study and develop a set of methods, algorithms and programs providing effective support to emergency response decision-making, starting from accident occurrence to decision-making regarding countermeasures to mitigate effects of radioactive contamination of the environment. The presentation focuses results of the analysis of radiation monitoring data and, on this basis, refining or, for many short-lived radionuclides, reconstructing the source term, modeling dispersion of radioactivity in the environment and assessing its impacts. The obtained results allowed adding and refining the existing estimates and in some cases reconstructing doses for the public on the territories contaminated as a result of the Chernobyl accident. The activities were implemented in two stages. In the first stage, several scenarios for dispersion of Chernobyl-related radioactivity were developed. For each scenario cesium-137 dispersion was estimated and these estimates were compared with measurement data. In the second stage, the scenario which showed the best agreement of calculations and measurements was used for modeling the dispersion of iodine-131and other short-lived radionuclides. The described

  8. Radioactive waste management in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: 25 years since the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oskolkov, Boris Y; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Zinkevich, Lubov I; Proskura, Nikolai I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    Radioactive waste management is an important component of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mitigation and remediation activities in the so-called Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. This article describes the localization and characteristics of the radioactive waste present in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and summarizes the pathways and strategy for handling the radioactive waste-related problems in Ukraine and the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone and, in particular, the pathways and strategies stipulated by the National Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  9. Via GeoAlpina - an international project of IYPE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, Werner E.

    2010-05-01

    Mountainous areas show earth science features in a very conspicuous, frequently even in a spectacular way. Because of the general perception of the beauty of mountains many mountainous regions are well developed in terms of trails and touristic infrastructure. Therefore, mountains are a key area to bring earth sciences closer to people. In many mountain chains all over the world (e.g., Alps, Pyrenees, Andes, Rocky Mountains) far-ranging walking and hiking trails are developed to serve a broad audience. To provide this audience with basic information in geological phenomena along such trails the project "Via Geo..." was born as an international activity within the International Year of Planet Earth. The Alps have been selected to act as a pilot project with six Alpine nations participating: Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Switzerland. Many well maintained trails exist bridging the Alps from the Adriatic Sea in Trieste (Italy) to Monte Carlo (Monaco) in the Western Mediterranean. Some of these trails are included in the project "Via Alpina". The idea of Via GeoAlpina is to point at geological attractions along the trails of Via Alpina or in their vicinity and offer simple but striking information. Various earth science fields will be covered, such as geology, geophysics, paleontology, mineralogy, hydrogeology, pedology, climatology, and geomorphology. The trail descriptions can be accessed and downloaded from the Via GeoAlpina website. In 2009 every country inaugurated Via GeoAlpina on a national base with a particular opening event in the presence of local authorities and local and national media. These events were accompanied with the distribution of flyers, by offering guided tours and by installation of panels in the field. These activities, however, should be followed by even more actions in the following years. These follow-ups should attract local and regional authorities at state, county or village level and will ideally be financed by private

  10. Near-surface final repository for the NPP Chernobyl, Ukraine; Oberflaechennahes Endlager fuer das KKW Tschernobyl, Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eichhorn, Heiko [NUKEM Technologies GmbH (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    NUKEM Technologies has realized the project of near-surface final radioactive waste storage at the site of the NPP Chernobyl. The complex includes facilities for treatment and processing of solid wastes, interim storage facilities for high-level waste and a near-surface final repository for conditioned radioactive waste. The project is funded by the European Union in the frame of TACIS.

  11. Chernobyl birds have smaller brains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andea; Rudolfsen, Geir; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2011-02-04

    Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5% across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals implies that there was significant directional selection on brain size with individuals with larger brains experiencing a viability advantage.

  12. The consequences of Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Chioșilă

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available These days marks 30 years since the Chernobyl nuclear accident, followed by massive radioactive contamination of the environment and human in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia, and resulted in many deaths among people who intervened to decrease the effects of the nuclear disaster. The 26 April 1986 nuclear accident contaminated all European countries, but at a much lower level, without highlighted consequences on human health. In special laboratories, the main radionuclides (I-131, Cs-137, Cs-134 and Sr-90 were also analyzed in Romania from environmental samples, food, even human subjects. These radionuclides caused the population to receive a low dose of about 1 mSv in 1986 that is half of the dose of the natural background radiation (2.4 mSv per year. As in all European countries (excluding Ukraine, Belarus and Russia this dose of about 1 mSv fell rapidly by 1990, reaching levels close to ones before the accident at the nuclear tests.

  13. Medical consequences of Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galstyan I.A.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: to study the long-term effects of acute radiation syndrome (ARS, developed at the victims of the Chernobyl accident. Material and Methods. 237 people were exposed during the accident, 134 of them were diagnosed with ARS. Dynamic observation implies a thorough annual examination in a hospital. Results. In the first 1.5-2 years after the ARS mean group indices of peripheral blood have returned to normal. However, many patients had transient expressed moderate cytopenias. Granulocytopenia, thrombocytopenia, lymphopenia and erythropenia were the most frequently observed things during the first 5 years after the accident. After 5 years their occurences lowered. In 11 patients the radiation cataract was detected. A threshold dose for its development is a dose of 3.2 Gy Long-term effects of local radiation lesions (LRL range from mild skin figure smoothing to a distinct fibrous scarring, contractures, persistently recurrent late radiation ulcers. During all years of observation we found 8 solid tumors, including 2 thyroid cancers. 5 hematologic diseases were found. During 29 years 26 ARS survivors died of various causes. Conclusion. The health of ones with long-term ARS effects is determined by the evolution of the LRL effects on skin, radiation cataracts, hema-tological diseases and the accession of of various somatic diseases, not caused by radiation.

  14. Dose estimates from the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lange, R.; Dickerson, M.H.; Gudiksen, P.H.

    1987-11-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) responded to the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident in the Soviet Union by utilizing long-range atmospheric dispersion modeling to estimate the amount of radioactivity released (source term) and the radiation dose distribution due to exposure to the radioactive cloud over Europe and the Northern Hemisphere. In later assessments, after the release of data on the accident by the Soviet Union, the ARAC team used their mesoscale to regional scale model to focus in on the radiation dose distribution within the Soviet Union and the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant. 22 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Project FALSIRE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney-Walker, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

    1993-06-01

    This report summarizes the recently completed Phase I of the Project for Fracture Analysis of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (Project FALSIRE). Project FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of Principal Working Group No. 3 (PWG/3) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency`s (NEA`s) Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI). Motivation for the project was derived from recognition by the CSNI-PWG/3 that inconsistencies were being revealed in predictive capabilities of a variety of fracture assessment methods, especially in ductile fracture applications. As a consequence, the CSNI/FAG was formed to evaluate fracture prediction capabilities currently used in safety assessments of nuclear components. Members are from laboratories and research organizations in Western Europe, Japan, and the United States of America (USA). On behalf of the CSNI/FAG, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC`s) Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen--und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS), Koeln, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) had responsibility for organization arrangements related to Project FALSIRE. The group is chaired by H. Schulz from GRS, Koeln, FRG.

  16. The ALTCRISS project on board the International Space Station

    CERN Document Server

    Casolino, M; Minori, M; Picozza, P; Fuglesang, C; Galper, A; Popov, A; Benghin, V; Petrov, V M; Nagamatsu, A; Berger, T; Reitz, G; Durante, M; Pugliese, M; Roca, V; Cucinotta, L Sihver F; Semones, E; Shavers, M; Guarnieri, V; Lobascio, C; Castagnolo, D; Fortezza, R

    2007-01-01

    The Altcriss project aims to perform a long term survey of the radiation environment on board the International Space Station. Measurements are being performed with active and passive devices in different locations and orientations of the Russian segment of the station. The goal is to perform a detailed evaluation of the differences in particle fluence and nuclear composition due to different shielding material and attitude of the station. The Sileye-3/Alteino detector is used to identify nuclei up to Iron in the energy range above 60 MeV/n. Several passive dosimeters (TLDs, CR39) are also placed in the same location of Sileye-3 detector. Polyethylene shielding is periodically interposed in front of the detectors to evaluate the effectiveness of shielding on the nuclear component of the cosmic radiation. The project was submitted to ESA in reply to the AO in the Life and Physical Science of 2004 and data taking began in December 2005. Dosimeters and data cards are rotated every six months: up to now three lau...

  17. [Morphological verification problems of Chernobyl factor influence on the prostate of coalminers of Donbas--liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Iu V; Motkov, K V; Shevchenko, T I

    2013-12-01

    Problem of a diagnostic of Chernobyl factor influences on different organs and systems of Chernobyl accident liquidators are remain actually until now. Though morbidly background which development at unfavorable work conditions in underground coalminers prevents from objective identification features of Chernobyl factor influences. The qualitative and quantitative histological and immunohistochemical law of morphogenesis changes in prostate of Donbas's coalminer-non-liquidators Chernobyl accident in comparison with the group of Donbas's coalminers-liquidators Chernobyl accident which we were stationed non determined problem. This reason stipulates to development and practical use of mathematical model of morphogenesis of a prostatic gland changes.

  18. [Morphological verification problems of Chernobyl factor influence on the testis of coal miners of Donbas-liquidators of Chernobyl accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danylov, Iu V; Motkov, K V; Shevchenko, T I

    2013-01-01

    Problem of a diagnostic of Chernobyl factor influences on different organs and systems of Chernobyl accident liquidators are remain actually until now. Though morbidly background which development at unfavorable work conditions in underground coalminers prevents from objective identification features of Chernobyl factor influences. The qualitative and quantitative histological and immunohistochemical law of morphogenesis changes in testis of Donbas's coalminer - non-liquidators Chernobyl accident in comparison with the group of Donbas's coalminers-liquidators Chernobyl accident, which we were stationed non determined problem. This reason stipulates to development and practical use of mathematical model of morphogenesis of a testis changes.

  19. The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Enrico Sartori; Lori Scott

    2006-09-01

    Since the beginning of the Nuclear Power industry, numerous experiments concerned with nuclear energy and technology have been performed at different research laboratories, worldwide. These experiments required a large investment in terms of infrastructure, expertise, and cost; however, many were performed without a high degree of attention to archival of results for future use. The degree and quality of documentation varies greatly. There is an urgent need to preserve integral reactor physics experimental data, including measurement methods, techniques, and separate or special effects data for nuclear energy and technology applications and the knowledge and competence contained therein. If the data are compromised, it is unlikely that any of these experiments will be repeated again in the future. The International Reactor Physics Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated, as a pilot activity in 1999 by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. A short history of the IRPhEP is presented and its purposes are discussed in this paper. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP, including the first publication of the IRPhEP Handbook, are highlighted and the future of the project outlined.

  20. Via GeoAlpina - an international project of IYPE (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piller, W. E.

    2009-12-01

    Mountainous areas show geological features in a very conspicuous, frequently even in a spectacular way. Because of the general perception of the beauty of mountains many mountainous regions are well developed in terms of touristic infrastructure and accessibility. Therefore, mountains are a key area to bring earth sciences closer to people. In many mountain chains all over the world (e.g., Alps, Pyrenees, Andes, Rocky Mountains, Himalayas) far-ranging walking and hiking trails are developed to serve a broad spectrum of activists. To supply this audience with basic information about geological phenomena and processes along such trails the project “Via Geo...” was born as an international activity within the International Year of Planet Earth. This approach may and should be applied in different parts of the world. The Alps have been selected to act in a pilot project with six Alpine nations participating in “Via GeoAlpina”: Austria, France, Germany, Italy, Slovenia, and Switzerland. This is due to the fact that a wealth of well maintained trails and touristic infrastructure exists all over the Alps. Some of these are included in the project “Via Alpina” bridging the entire mountain system from the Adriatic Sea at Trieste (Italy) to Monte Carlo (Monaco) in the Western Mediterranean. The idea of Via GeoAlpina is to point at geological attractions along the trails of Via Alpina or in their vicinity and to offer simple but clear-cut information on these features. Various earth science fields will be covered, such as geology, geophysics, paleontology, mineralogy, hydrogeology, pedology, climatology, and geomorphology. In addition, particular topics on applied earth science aspects, e.g, mineral recourses and geological hazards, which are of particular importance for society, will be addressed. This information is primarily web-based and trail descriptions can be accessed and downloaded from the Via GeoAlpina website (http://www.viageoalpina.org). In 2009

  1. The Chernobyl experience in the area of retrospective dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumak, Vadim V

    2012-03-01

    The Chernobyl accident, which occurred on 26 April 1986 at a nuclear power plant located less than 150 km north of Kiev, was the largest nuclear accident to date. The unprecedented scale of the accident was determined not only by the amount of released activity, but also by the number of workers and of the general public involved, and therefore exposed to increased doses of ionising radiation. Due to the unexpected and large scale of the accident, dosimetry techniques and practices were far from the optimum; personal dosimetry of cleanup workers (liquidators) was not complete, and there were no direct measurements of the exposures of members of the public. As a result, an acute need for retrospective dose assessment was dictated by radiation protection and research considerations. In response, substantial efforts have been made to reconstruct doses for the main exposed cohorts, using a broad variety of newly developed methods: analytical, biological and physical (electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of teeth, thermoluminescence of quartz) and modelling. This paper reviews the extensive experience gained by the National Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Academy of Medical Sciences, Ukraine in the field of retrospective dosimetry of large cohorts of exposed population and professionals. These dose reconstruction projects were implemented, in particular, in the framework of epidemiological studies, designed to follow-up the medical consequences of the Chernobyl accident and study health effects of ionizing radiation, particularly Ukrainian-American studies of cataracts and leukaemia among liquidators.

  2. Chernobyl birds have smaller brains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Pape Møller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Animals living in areas contaminated by radioactive material from Chernobyl suffer from increased oxidative stress and low levels of antioxidants. Therefore, normal development of the nervous system is jeopardized as reflected by high frequencies of developmental errors, reduced brain size and impaired cognitive abilities in humans. Alternatively, associations between psychological effects and radiation have been attributed to post-traumatic stress in humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Here we used an extensive sample of 550 birds belonging to 48 species to test the prediction that even in the absence of post-traumatic stress, there is a negative association between relative brain size and level of background radiation. We found a negative association between brain size as reflected by external head volume and level of background radiation, independent of structural body size and body mass. The observed reduction in brain size in relation to background radiation amounted to 5% across the range of almost a factor 5,000 in radiation level. Species differed significantly in reduction in brain size with increasing background radiation, and brain size was the only morphological character that showed a negative relationship with radiation. Brain size was significantly smaller in yearlings than in older individuals. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Low dose radiation can have significant effects on normal brain development as reflected by brain size and therefore potentially cognitive ability. The fact that brain size was smaller in yearlings than in older individuals implies that there was significant directional selection on brain size with individuals with larger brains experiencing a viability advantage.

  3. Chernobyl radionuclide distribution and migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izrael, Yury A

    2007-11-01

    The accident at Unit No. 4 of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant on 26 April 1986 presented severe challenges in radiation protection. Early activity measurements defined the contaminated areas in order to determine what persons should be evacuated on the basis of the exposure limit at that time of 100 mSv (10 rem) for accidents. The immediate definition of these areas was accomplished with specially equipped aircraft capable of measuring external gamma-exposure rate and radionuclide spectra. Over time, maps of 137Cs contamination (the most important long-lived radionuclide) have become more and more sophisticated and have been used for further determinations of the control of the consequences of the accident. About 70% of the total release of 137Cs was deposited in Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine; but there was also widespread deposition throughout the countries of Western Europe. Two atlases of contamination throughout Europe were prepared, and the Russian atlas included data on other radionuclides and on external gamma-exposure rates. The radiocesiums behaved as volatile radionuclides because of the volatility of cesium. In contrast to the typical pattern after nuclear weapons tests, 90Sr behaved only as a refractory element, as its volatile precursors krypton and rubidium had already decayed within the reactor. Nearly all of the refractory elements (strontium, plutonium, etc.) released by the accident were confined to the 30-km zone around the reactor. A proposal is made to develop a more complete atlas of 137Cs deposition from the accident that would include the entire Northern Hemisphere. Water was not an important vector of exposure to human beings following the accident.

  4. 8. Atmospheric, water, and soil contamination after Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablokov, Alexey V; Nesterenko, Vassily B; Nesterenko, Alexey V

    2009-11-01

    Air particulate activity over all of the Northern Hemisphere reached its highest levels since the termination of nuclear weapons testing--sometimes up to 1 million times higher than before the Chernobyl contamination. There were essential changes in the ionic, aerosol, and gas structure of the surface air in the heavily contaminated territories, as measured by electroconductivity and air radiolysis. Many years after the catastrophe aerosols from forest fires have dispersed hundreds of kilometers away. The Chernobyl radionuclides concentrate in sediments, water, plants, and animals, sometimes 100,000 times more than the local background level. The consequences of such a shock on aquatic ecosystems is largely unclear. Secondary contamination of freshwater ecosystems occurs as a result of Cs-137 and Sr-90 washout by the high waters of spring. The speed of vertical migration of different radionuclides in floodplains, lowland moors, peat bogs, etc., is about 2-4 cm/year. As a result of this vertical migration of radionuclides in soil, plants with deep root systems absorb them and carry the ones that are buried to the surface again. This transfer is one of the important mechanisms, observed in recent years, that leads to increased doses of internal irradiation among people in the contaminated territories.

  5. Has fallout from the Chernobyl accident caused childhood leukaemia in Europe? An update on epidemiologic evidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoffmann, W. [Bremen Inst. for Prevention Research and Social Medicine (BIPS), Bremen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Background: According to radiation risk estimates uniformly adopted by various official organizations, exposure to Chernobyl fallout is unlikely to have caused any measurable health risk in central Europe. Methods and Results: A reevaluation of ECLIS (European Childhood Leukaemia and Lymphoma Incidence Study), a large IARC-coordinated project revealed a slightly higher leukaemia incidence in the most contaminated European regions, and an increasing trend with estimated cumulative excess radiation dose. The excess corresponds to 20 cases of childhood leukaemia in the study area until 1991. Recent evidence from Greece and Germany indicate significantly higher risks in the cohort of children in utero at the time of the initial fallout. In Greece, a positive trend was observed over three regions of increasing average fallout contamination (p=0.005). Conclusion: Chernobyl fallout could well have caused a small, but significant excess of childhood leukaemia cases in Europe. The etiologic mechanism might include an induction of chromosome aberrations in early pregnancy. Increased risks in the birth cohort exposed in utero correspond to 11 excess cases in Greece and another 11.4 excess cases in Germany alone. Exposure misclassification and underascertainment of incident cases render post-Chernobyl risk estimates probably too low. If indeed Chernobyl fallout has caused childhood leukaemia cases in Europe, we would also expect an increased incidence for other childhood cancers and excess malignancies in adults as well as non-malignant diseases of all ages. Neither of these endpoints have as yet been systematically studied. (orig.)

  6. Radiation ecology issues associated with murine rodents and shrews in the Chernobyl exclusion zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaschak, Sergey P; Maklyuk, Yulia A; Maksimenko, Andrey M; Bondarkov, Mikhail D; Jannik, G Timothy; Farfán, Eduardo B

    2011-10-01

    This article describes major studies performed by the Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory (Slavutich, Ukraine) on radioecology of murine rodents and shrews inhabiting the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. The article addresses the long-term (1986-2005) and seasonal dynamics of radioactive contamination of animals and reviews interspecies differences in radionuclide accumulations and factors affecting the radionuclide accumulations. It is shown that bioavailability of radionuclides in the "soil-to-plant" chain and a trophic specialization of animals play key roles in determining their actual contamination levels. The total absorbed dose rates in small mammals significantly reduced during the years following the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In 1986, the absorbed dose rate reached 1.3-6.0 Gy h(-1) in the central areas of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (the "Red Forest"). In 1988 and 1990, the total absorbed dose rates were 1.3 and 0.42 Gy h(-1), respectively. In 1995, 2000, and 2005, according to the present study, the total absorbed dose rates rarely exceeded 0.00023, 0.00018, and 0.00015 Gy h(-1), respectively. Contributions of individual radiation sources into the total absorbed dose are described.

  7. RADIATION ECOLOGY ISSUES ASSOCIATED WITH MURINE RODENTS AND SHREWS IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    This article describes major studies performed by the Chernobyl Center's International Radioecology Laboratory (Slavutich, Ukraine) on radioecology of murine rodents and shrews inhabiting the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. The article addresses the long-term (1986-2005) and seasonal dynamics of radioactive contamination of animals, and reviews interspecies differences in radionuclide accumulations and factors affecting the radionuclide accumulations. It is shown that bioavailability of radionuclides in the 'soil-to-plant' chain and a trophic specialization of animals play key roles in determining their actual contamination levels. The total absorbed dose rates in small mammals significantly reduced during the years following the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident. In 1986, the absorbed dose rate reached 1.3-6.0 Gy hr{sup -1} in the central areas of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (the 'Red Forest'). In 1988 and 1990, the total absorbed dose rates were 1.3 and 0.42 Gy hr{sup -1}, respectively. In 1995, 2000, and 2005, according to the present study, the total absorbed dose rates rarely exceeded 0.00023, 0.00018, and 0.00015 Gy hr{sup -1}, respectively. Contributions of individual radiation sources into the total absorbed dose are described.

  8. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl: programme 3: Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tirmarche, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire (IRSN), Radiological Protection and Human Health Div. (DRPH), Radiobiology and Epidemiology Dept., 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Kellerer, A.M. [Munchen Univ., Strahlenbiologisches Institut (Germany); Bazyka, D. [Chornobyl Center (CC), Kiev regoin (Ukraine)

    2006-07-01

    difference in the trends when comparing exposed and unexposed oblasts. - Potential effects of prenatal irradiation on the brain: Intelligence Assessment of Ukrainian children is measured by an adapted and normalised tool: the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children, WISC (the verbal, performance and full scale IQs). There are significant (p<0.001) differences on intelligence scale of exposed children: the full scale IQ and verbal IQ are lower in exposed versus non exposed children. Differences on performance IQ are non significant (p>0.05). - General conclusions: At present stage, not all the possible effects of the Chernobyl accident have been studied: some of them may arise after a long latency period.The basic data that are supporting our present descriptive analyses are stored in our common HEDAC database. Final reports of all the sub-projects are available and most of our results are presented in our CD summarizing the workshop in Kiev on October 5 and 6, 2004. (authors)

  9. Chernobyl accident. [Radiation monitoring in UK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1986-07-01

    A brief report is given of the implications for the UK from the radioactivity released during the Chernobyl accident. Results of radio-activity monitoring around the UK are given and the additional radiation doses to the UK population are evaluated.

  10. Species richness and abundance of forest birds in relation to radiation at Chernobyl

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A.P Møller; T.A Mousseau

    2007-01-01

    .... Recent conclusions from the UN Chernobyl forum and reports in the popular media concerning the effects of radiation from Chernobyl on animals have left the impression that the Chernobyl exclusion...

  11. Enhancing capacity for intern training in the emergency department: the MoLIE project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazil, Victoria A; Greenslade, Jaimi H; Brown, Anthony F

    2011-02-21

    To evaluate an intern educational project, the More Learning for Interns in Emergency (MoLIE) project, designed to increase intern placements in the emergency department (ED). The study was conducted in the ED of the Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Queensland, in 2008. As well as the usual direct contact with patients, interns had 8 hours per week of "off the floor" structured learning time supervised by consultants. This allowed for an increased number of interns to complete a term in the ED over a 1-year period. The study was evaluated by an intern exit feedback survey and a senior staff survey. Numbers of intern placements in the ED; intern satisfaction with the project; senior medical staff satisfaction with interns' skills and performance assessments. The number of interns completing a term in the ED increased from 65 in 2007 to 90 in 2008. Overall, the 90 interns surveyed were highly satisfied with their training. Most agreed or strongly agreed that the sessions were relevant and covered the right mix of clinical and professional issues. Most of the 12 senior staff surveyed felt that the participating interns performed slightly or much better than interns in previous years, and that their experience as supervisors and overall patient care were improved. The project successfully combined increased intern numbers with educational outcomes that were well perceived by interns and senior staff, without adversely affecting service delivery or supervision workload in the ED.

  12. THE PREVENTION PROGRAMS OF PHYSICAL REHABILITATION FOR CHERNOBYL DISASTER SURVIVORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korobeynikov G.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study: approbation of the prevention program of physical rehabilitation for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects. Sixty persons who were disaster survivors and workers of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant aged 32-60 have rehabilitation during 21 days. The complex of training prevention programs of physical and psycho-emotional rehabilitation methods was elaborated. The study of efficacy of training prevention programs among Chernobyl disaster survivors. The results showed the improvement of psycho-emotional status and normalization of cardiovascular vegetative regulation after training prevention programs in Chernobyl disasters survivors. The studies show that the preventive programs for Chernobyl disaster survivors in lifestyle aspects had the high effect. This displays the decrease of tempo of aging and the improving of physical and psychological health status of Chernobyl disaster survivors during preventive course.

  13. A Mathematical Model Based on Supply Chain Optimization for International Petrochemical Engineering Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gao Ning; Sun Wei

    2015-01-01

    Based on the study of supply chain (SC) and SC optimization in engineering projects, a mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) optimization model is developed to minimize the total SC cost for international petrochemical en-gineering projects. A steam cracking project is selected and analyzed, from which typical SC characteristics in international engineering projects in the area of petrochemical industry are summarized. The MINLP model is therefore developed and applied to projects with detailed data. The optimization results are analyzed and compared by the MINLP model, indicat-ing that they are appropriate to SC management practice in engineering projects, and are consistent with the optimal price-effective strategy in procurement. As a result, the model could provide useful guidance to SC optimization of international engineering projects in petrochemical industry, and improve SC management by selecting more reliable and qualiifed part-ner enterprises in SC for the project.

  14. Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auvinen, A.; Salomaa, S. [eds.] [Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority, Helsinki (Finland); Rahu, M.; Veidebaum, T.; Tekkel, M. [eds.] [Inst. of Experimental and Clinical Medicine, Tallinn (Estonia); Hakulinen, T. [ed.] [Finnish Cancer Registry, Helsinki (Finland); Boice, J.D. Jr. [ed.] [Int. Epidemiology Inst., MD (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The report describes the development and summarizes the results of the project Cancer incidence and thyroid disease among Estonian Chernobyl clean-up workers. One of the goals of the report is to give research protocols and questionnaires for researchers involved in other studies. Eight previously published articles are also included summarizing the results. The development of the collaboration work of the project is described in the introduction of the report. Epidemiological methods are described in an article complemented by the protocol and English version of the questionnaire administered to all cleanup workers, as well as the data collection form of the thyroid study. The results from biological biodosimetry using both glycophorin A and FISH methods have shown that the radiation doses received by the Chernobyl cleanup workers were relatively low. Thyroid nodularity was not associated with any radiation exposure characteristic in the thyroid screening study. Estonian Chernobyl cleanup workers were followed up for cancer incidence through the Estonian Cancer Registry. No cases of leukemia or thyroid cancer were observed by the end of 1993. It is too early to observe possible effect on other types of cancer. However, mortality from suicides was increased compared with general population. Further follow-up and the extension to other Baltic countries in the future will undoubtedly strengthen the study. There are also plans for future projects covering areas from psychosocial factors to radiation biology

  15. Chernobyl: the effects on public health?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A. [Hopital Pitie-Salpetriere, Dept. Nucleaire Medecine, 75 - Paris (France)

    2003-07-01

    Because of its public health, ecological and industrial consequences, the Chernobyl accident has become a myth which serves as the focus of many fears, justified or not. no one can question the seriousness of the event, but after fifteen years there is still no agreement about the effect it has had or will have on public health. For example, the total number of deaths attributed to Chernobyl varies from less than a hundred to several millions and congenital malformations from negligible to cataclysmic. Effects on public health may be calculated from data on contamination, from the dose received and from the risk, all three of which are likely to be very roughly known; or they may be evaluated on the spot, either by epidemiological studies or by examining medical registers. This report makes an inventory of the different risks and takes stock on them. (N.C.)

  16. The lesson of the Chernobyl disaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milhaud, G. (Hopital Saint-Antoine, 75 Paris (FR))

    1991-01-01

    On april 26, 1986 a major nuclear disaster took place at 1 h 24 min local time, destroying the fourth reactor of the Chernobyl plant. Five years later the consequences of the disaster are still not fully known. Nevertheless the long term future of nuclear energy in the world is uncertain. Questions need to be answered by observing hard facts if emotional attitudes are not to prevail over reality. The reactor and its core were destroyed by an explosion, causing two radioactive jet emissions of iodine 131, followed by caesium 137. Both elements are mainly incorporated in the body via food. The Chernobyl disaster was a consequence of inadequate safety regulations and human error. Enforcement of strict regulations are likely to be highly effective in preventing a further catastrophe. However, governments should consider another possibility. What would be the consequences for public health if a terroristic act deliberately destroyed a nuclear power station.

  17. THE THREAT OF CROSS-CULTURAL CLASH: LESSONS LEARNT FROM INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Carmen-Laura ZARZU; Scarlat, Cezar; Sorin STROE

    2014-01-01

    The article is based on both literature review and authors’ experience related to about forty international projects – over more than a decade. Besides their creative potential based on the opportunity to exchange cross-cultural knowledge, the international projects have their negative side as well: if not timely identified, and properly managed, the cross-cultural clash might be a threat for the successful completion of the project. The authors investigate engineering, development and techni...

  18. Health effects resulting from the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, David

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews the health effects of the Chernobyl accident. The clearest effect to be seen to date is the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in children. The evidence for increased leukaemia is less clear, but there are indications of increased leukaemia incidence in Russian clean-up workers. There is also evidence of increases in breast cancer, cataract and cardiovascular disease. However, to date the largest public health problem caused by the accident is the mental health impact.

  19. Post-Chernobyl fallout in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osvath, I.; Dovlete, C. [Inst. of Environmental Research and Engineering, Environmental Radioactivity Laboratory, Bucharest (Romania)

    1992-07-01

    As part of the Romanian environmental radioactivity monitoring programme, fallout samples have been systematically collected and analyzed for gamma emitters. Chernobyl fallout space-time patterns. radionuclide concentration ratios and deposition velocities have been determined. The resuspension process has been studied, environmental half-lives for {sup 137}Cs and resuspension factors have been evaluated. Hot particles have been identified in some of the deposition samples. (author)

  20. Airborne Chernobyl radioactivity in College Park, Maryland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitto, M.E. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA) New York State Dept. of Health, Wadsworth Center for Laboratories and Research, Albany, NY (USA)); Faller, S.H. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA) Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab., U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (USA)); Anderson, D.L. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA) Food and Drug Administration Lab., National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (USA)); McCarthy, L.E. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (USA) Gerghty and Miller, Inc., Plainview, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Atmospheric concentrations of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides collected on filters in College Park, Maryland during May, 1986 have been determined by gamma-ray analysis. Measurements indicate that following an extensive wash-out of radioactivity, {sup 103}Ru was enriched in the upper atmosphere relative to {sup 137}Cs and {sup 131}I. Absolute concentrations of particulate and gas-phase radionuclides and the observed enrichment of {sup 103}Ru are in agreement with other studies. (orig.).

  1. Preliminary dose assessment of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, A.P.

    1987-01-01

    From the major accident at Unit 4 of the Chernobyl nuclear power station, a plume of airborne radioactive fission products was initially carried northwesterly toward Poland, thence toward Scandinavia and into Central Europe. Reports of the levels of radioactivity in a variety of media and of external radiation levels were collected in the Department of Energy's Emergency Operations Center and compiled into a data bank. Portions of these and other data which were obtained directly from published and official reports were utilized to make a preliminary assessment of the extent and magnitude of the external dose to individuals downwind from Chernobyl. Radioactive /sup 131/I was the predominant fission product. The time of arrival of the plume and the maximum concentrations of /sup 131/I in air, vegetation and milk and the maximum reported depositions and external radiation levels have been tabulated country by country. A large amount of the total activity in the release was apparently carried to a significant elevation. The data suggest that in areas where rainfall occurred, deposition levels were from ten to one-hundred times those observed in nearby ''dry'' locations. Sufficient spectral data were obtained to establish average release fractions and to establish a reference spectra of the other nuclides in the release. Preliminary calculations indicated that the collective dose equivalent to the population in Scandinavia and Central Europe during the first year after the Chernobyl accident would be about 8 x 10/sup 6/ person-rem. From the Soviet report, it appears that a first year population dose of about 2 x 10/sup 7/ person-rem (2 x 10/sup 5/ Sv) will be received by the population who were downwind of Chernobyl within the U.S.S.R. during the accident and its subsequent releases over the following week. 32 refs., 14 figs., 20 tabs.

  2. 75 FR 59049 - International Education Programs Service; Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-24

    ... the Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad (GPA) Program administered by the International Education... Education Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program; Notices #0;#0;Federal Register / Vol. 75 , No. 185... Service; Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program AGENCY: Office of Postsecondary...

  3. Chernobyl lessons learned review of N Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, E.T.; McNeece, J.P.; Omberg, R.P.; Stepnewski, D.D.; Lutz, R.J.; Henry, R.E.; Bonser, K.D.; Miller, N.R.

    1987-10-01

    A broad-base review of the N Reactor plant, design characteristics, administrative controls and responses unique to upset conditions has been completed. The review was keyed to Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-defined issues associated with the Chernobyl accident. Physical features of N Reactor that preclude an accident like Chernobyl include: lack of autocatalytic reactivity insertion (i.e., negative coolant void and power coefficents) and two separate, fast-acting scram systems. Administrative controls in place at N Reactor would effectively protect against the operator errors and safety violations that set up the Chernobyl accident. Several items were identified where further near-term action is appropriate to ensure effectiveness of existing safety features: Resolve a question concerning the exact point at which Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) activation by manual actions should be implemented or deferred if automatic ECCS trip fails. Ensure appropriate revision of the Emergency Response Guides and full communication of the correct procedure to all Operations, Safety and cognizant Technology staff. Train reactor operators in the currently recognized significance of the Graphite and Shield Cooling System (GSCS) in severe accident situations and cover this appropriately in the Emergency Response Guides. Complete reviews which establish an independent verification that pressure tube rupture will not propagate to other tubes. 15 refs., 3 tabs.

  4. Trauma management: Chernobyl in Belarus and Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, Ekatherina

    2016-06-01

    Although the Chernobyl nuclear disaster happened in the Soviet Union in 1986, we still do not know how the most affected states - Ukraine and Belarus - have managed this tragedy since independence. Drawing on the concept of cultural trauma, this article compares Chernobyl narratives in Belarus and Ukraine over the past 28 years. It shows that national narratives of Chernobyl differ, representing the varying ways in which the state overcomes trauma. Our understanding of post-communist transformations can be improved by analysing trauma management narratives and their importance for new national identity construction. These narratives also bring new insights to our vision of cultural trauma by linking it to ontological insecurity. The article demonstrates how the state can become an arena of trauma process as it commands material and symbolic resources to deal with trauma. In general, it contributes to a better understanding of how the same traumatic event can become a source of solidarity in one community, but a source of hostility in another.

  5. Academic Librarians and Project Management: An International Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Silvia Cobo; Avilés, Rosario Arquero

    2016-01-01

    Because information and documentation units in libraries have responsibility for an ever-increasing number of projects, this paper aims at analyzing the discipline of project management in library and information science (LIS) from a professional perspective. To that end, the researchers employed quantitative and qualitative methodology based on a…

  6. Canada-India Institutional Cooperation Project: International Partnerships in Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Alix

    The Canada-India Institutional Cooperation Project (CIICP) is a joint venture by the Association of Canadian Community Colleges and the governments of India and Canada designed to contribute to human resource development in India's polytechnic system. Specifically, the project seeks to develop replicable models of institutional development in 13…

  7. Will we ever know for Chernobyl?; Saura-t-on un jour pour Tchernobyl?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinger, C.

    2012-01-15

    Millions of people have been living near the Chernobyl power plant and as a consequence have been submitted to low radiation doses for 26 years principally through food ingestion. A recent survey of scientific studies about the radiation effects shows that most research work is dedicated to thyroid while the long-term follow-up of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki survivors have shown that other organs are likely to be concerned with an increase of different cancers and of no-cancerous pathologies like cardio-vascular diseases. The European project ARCH (Agenda for Research on Chernobyl Health) recommends to perform a broader range of studies than focusing on the thyroid and to set a collaborative platform to assure the financing and the coordination of these new topics of research. (A.C.)

  8. An arch to deal with Chernobyl; Une arche pour liquider Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-10-15

    The preliminary works for the construction of a giant arch to cover the old sarcophagus of Chernobyl's ex-reactor No.4 are in progress. This building will have two functions: a safety barrier around the sarcophagus and a protection against bad weather in order to prepare the future dismantling of the inside using robots. The main contractor of the project is Novarka, a Bouygues-Vinci consortium who won the contract on September 18, 2007 in front of the US CH2M Hill. The end of the works is planned to March 31, 2012. 430 million euros have been invested for the improvement of Chernobyl's site safety. (J.S.)

  9. Sustainable Relations in International Development Cooperation Projects: The Role of Organizational Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Cosimo Rota; Cesare Zanasi

    2011-01-01

     The importance of the human side of project management to assess the success of international development project has not been fully considered yet. An analysis of the literature on the project success definition, focused on the success criteria and success factors, was carried out. The organization’s effectiveness, in terms of Relations Sustainability, emerged as a criteria integrating the "time, cost, performance" approach to define a project success. Based on previous research ...

  10. Sustainable Relations in International Development Cooperation Projects: The Role of Human Resource Management and Organizational Climate

    OpenAIRE

    Zanasi, Cesare; Rota, Cosimo

    2010-01-01

    The importance of organizational issues to assess the success of international development project has not been fully considered yet. An analysis of the literature on the project success definition, focused on the success criteria and success factors, was carried out by surveying the contribution of different authors and approaches. Traditionally projects were perceived as successful when they met time, budget and performance goals, assuming a basic similarity among projects (universalistic a...

  11. IPDA PDS4 Project: Towards an International Planetary Data Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Santa; Roatsch, Thomas; Capria, Maria Teresa; Heather, David; Yamamoto, Yukio; Hughes, Steven; Stein, Thomas; Cecconi, Baptiste; Prashar, Ajay; Batanov, Oleg; Gopala Krishna, Barla

    2016-07-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) is an international collaboration of space agencies with the main objective of facilitating discovery, access and use of planetary data managed across international boundaries. For this purpose, the IPDA has adopted the NASA's Planetary Data System (PDS) standard as the de-facto archiving standard, and is working towards the internationalisation of the new generation of the standards, called PDS4. PDS4 is the largest upgrade in the history of the PDS, and is a significant step towards an online, distributed, model-driven and service-oriented architecture international archive. Following the successful deployment of PDS4 to support NASA's LADEE and MAVEN missions, PDS4 was endorsed by IPDA in 2014. This has led to the adoption of PDS4 by a number of international space agencies (ESA, JAXA, ISRO and Roscosmos, among others) for their upcoming missions. In order to closely follow the development of the PDS4 standards and to coordinate the international contribution and participation in its evolution, a group of experts from each international agency is dedicated to review different aspects of the standards and to capture recommendations and requirements to ensure the international needs are met. The activities performed by this group cover the assessment and implementation of all aspects of PDS4, including its use, documentation, tools, validation strategies and information model. This contribution will present the activities carried out by this group and how this partnership between PDS and IPDA provides an excellent foundation towards an international platform for planetary science research.

  12. Lessons from Chernobyl and prognosis for Fukushima: radiological consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Victor K

    2012-03-01

    The following are considered: results of large-scale radiation epidemiological studies of the health effects of the Chernobyl accident, radiation risks for emergency workers and the affected population; and verification of ICRP risk models taking into account data on the Chernobyl accident and preliminary prognostic estimates of potential radiological consequences of the Fukushima disaster.

  13. Reporting on Radiation: A Content Analysis of Chernobyl Coverage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Sharon M.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Evaluates how well the media guided readers and viewers through the Chernobyl disaster. Concludes that the press and television did not provide enough radiation and risk information in their coverage of the Chernobyl accident, but what was provided was appropriate, even-handed, and conservative. (NKA)

  14. Logistics Management of International EPC Project%国际EPC项目物流管理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆华

    2015-01-01

    In the current, the international EPC project has gradually become the main way of international engineering contracting. As the company's core competencies, international project logistics has a profound impact on the international competitiveness of international engineering firm industry. Corresponding somehow the international project logistics directly restricts the specific progress and service quality of international projects, at the same time, the cost of managing international project logistics has gradually transformed into an important source of profit for international engineering companies.%当前国际EPC项目渐渐成为了国际工程承包的主要方式,作为企业的核心能力国际工程物流对国际工程企业的行业国际竞争力有着深远的影响。与之对应的国际工程物流也在某种程度上直接制约了国际工程项目的具体进度和服务质量,同时,国际工程物流的成本管理也逐步转变成国际工程企业的重要利润来源之一。

  15. T3: an international project for teacher training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Manca

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of T3, a project funded by the European Commission that focuses on providing distance training for teachers of mathematics, science, environmental education and foreign languages.

  16. Project Hetura: Reflections on an International Local Government Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Gheller

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to provide an overview of the Townsville/Port Moresby partnership activities and explore the challenges and benefits to both Councils from the perspective of a Townsville City Council employee associated with the program. Since 2002, Townsville City Council has been engaged in a capacity building project with the National Capital District Commission (NCDC in Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. The project, named Hetura, means mateship or friendship in Moto, the predominant language group in Port Moresby. Project Hetura is coordinated through the Commonwealth Local Government Forum’ (CLGF Good Practice Scheme with funding from AusAID. Townsville City Council provides in-kind support through the contribution of staff time and participation while the National Capital District Commission provides a budget allocation for the project. The overarching goal of Project Hetura is to strengthen management, planning, and governance within the NCDC and to improve the capacity of the organisation to deliver efficient, responsive, accountable services to the community. Rather than engaging in a traditional consultancy, the approach by participants of Project Hetura has been that of a partnership built through a relationship of trust and good-will developed over time between the two organisations. Within this partnership, the skills and contributions of all parties are valued, and team members work together to develop sustainable solutions to identified problems.

  17. Identifying and managing risk in international construction projects

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marshall, William; Kerur, Sachin

    2012-01-01

    .... However, foreign markets are littered with the cautionary tales of international contractors and consultants that have failed to grasp the intricacies and risks of operating in a new environment...

  18. An Investigation into Cultural Dimensions of Construction Professionals Working for International Projects in Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byung Gyoo Kang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available International construction projects involve multinational participants with different nationalities and cultural backgrounds. To execute international projects, construction companies easily face significant risks which hinder the capability to create profits and degrade company credibility. One of the major risk factors affecting project performance and success is cultural characteristics of project participants, especially expatriates, working in international construction projects. This research investigates the cultural dimensions of Indian, Sri Lankan and British construction professionals working for international projects in Oman. Cultural dimensions have been surveyed by a quantitative approach. The outcomes indicate that even though these professionals are working in the same construction industry and currently in similar working environments, their cultural dimensions are mainly influenced by national culture. Further Asian participants of the survey showed lower Power Distance Index (PDI and Uncertainty Avoidance Index (UAI than their national cultural dimensions. This is a reflection of westernization of their companies in the international construction markets. Also lower Long Term Orientation (LTO indicates the temporary tendency of employment in international construction projects. Further research will need to focus on the relationship between corporate culture and national culture to complete the entire picture of culture in construction.

  19. Determining Success Criteria and Success Factors for International Construction Projects for Malaysian Contractors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Mohammed Alashwal

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of international construction projects is fraught with various challenges such as competitiveness, lack of resources, versatile global economy, and specific conditions in the host country. Malaysian contractors have been venturing into global construction market since early 1980s. However, their venturing was not successful all the time. The number of international projects awarded to Malaysian contractors has reduced drastically during the past decade. Taking advantage of this experience, this paper aims to identify the success criteria and success factors of international construction projects. The data was collected from 120 respondents using a questionnaire survey and analysed using principal component analysis and regression analysis. The results revealed three principal criteria of project success namely, Management Success, Functional Success, and Organisation Success. The main components of success factors include Team Power and Skills, Resource Availability, External Environment, Organisation Capability, Project Support, and Project Organisation. Further analysis emphasized the importance of strong financing capacity of contractors, project social environment, and competence of the project manager in achieving project success. The results of this paper can serve as a guideline for contractors and project managers to achieve success in this context. Future studies may provide in-depth analysis of success criteria and success factors specific for construction project type and host-country location.

  20. Enhancing International Research and Development-Project Activity on University Campuses: Insights from U.S. Senior International Officers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Peter H.; Deardorff, Darla K.; Bolognese, Kerry D.

    2011-01-01

    In the interconnected world of the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development, the ability of higher-education institutions to contribute to and benefit from international research undertakings, sustainable-development-project activity, and capacity-building endeavors requires transnational involvement. While the potential benefits are…

  1. Field Plot Points for Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The classification of vegetation project was conducted to support an international effort to produce the first park-wide vegetation map for the Waterton-Glacier...

  2. International Computer Conferencing for Professional Development: The Bangkok Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Terry; Mason, Robin

    1993-01-01

    Describes the Bangkok Project, a successful application of electronic mail and computer conferencing networks to support professional development in the field of distance education. The development of the computer conference to supplement a face-to-face conference in Bangkok is explained, and conference format and nature of interactions are…

  3. Mapping International Cancer Activities – Global Cancer Project Map Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    CGH’s Dr. Sudha Sivaram, Dr. Makeda Williams, and Ms. Kalina Duncan have partnered with Drs. Ami Bhatt and Franklin Huang at Global Oncology, Inc. (GO) to develop the Global Cancer Project Map - a web-based tool designed to facilitate cancer research and control activity planning.

  4. Learning Effects of an International Group Competition Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Murat; del Campo, Cristina; Eryarsoy, Enes

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of collaboration and competition on students' learning performance in a course of business statistics. The collaboration involved a simultaneously organised group competition project with analysis of real-life business problems among students. Students from the following schools participated: JAMK University of…

  5. The Chernobyl Tissue Bank — A Repository for Biomaterial and Data Used in Integrative and Systems Biology Modeling the Human Response to Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Geraldine; Unger, Kristian; Krznaric, Marko; Galpine, Angela; Bethel, Jackie; Tomlinson, Christopher; Woodbridge, Mark; Butcher, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    The only unequivocal radiological effect of the Chernobyl accident on human health is the increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed in childhood or early adolescence. In response to the scientific interest in studying the molecular biology of thyroid cancer post Chernobyl, the Chernobyl Tissue Bank (CTB: www.chernobyltissuebank.com) was established in 1998. Thus far it is has collected biological samples from 3,861 individuals, and provided 27 research projects with 11,254 samples. The CTB was designed from its outset as a resource to promote the integration of research and clinical data to facilitate a systems biology approach to radiation related thyroid cancer. The project has therefore developed as a multidisciplinary collaboration between clinicians, dosimetrists, molecular biologists and bioinformaticians and serves as a paradigm for tissue banking in the omics era. PMID:24704918

  6. Cultural Analysis of Designing in International Contraction Projects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王尚雪

    2011-01-01

    In this paper,the author takes personal experience as an example to analyze the cultural differences and their influencesin designing phrase of international contraction projecm,which are the main differences in the translation of design codes and esthetic requirements.

  7. Risk of hematological malignancies among Chernobyl liquidators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesminiene, Ausrele; Evrard, Anne-Sophie; Ivanov, Viktor K.; Malakhova, Irina V.; Kurtinaitis, Juozas; Stengrevics, Aivars; Tekkel, Mare; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Bouville, André; Chekin, Sergei; Chumak, Vadim V.; Drozdovitch, Vladimir; Gapanovich, Vladimir; Golovanov, Ivan; Hubert, Phillip; Illichev, Sergei V.; Khait, Svetlana E.; Krjuchkov, Viktor P.; Maceika, Evaldas; Maksyoutov, Marat; Mirkhaidarov, Anatoly K.; Polyakov, Semion; Shchukina, Natalia; Tenet, Vanessa; Tserakhovich, Tatyana I.; Tsykalo, Aleksandr; Tukov, Aleksandr R.; Cardis, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    A case-control study of hematological malignancies was conducted among Chernobyl liquidators (accident recovery workers) from Belarus, Russia and Baltic countries in order to assess the effect of low-to-medium dose protracted radiation exposures on the relative risk of these diseases. The study was nested within cohorts of liquidators who had worked in 1986–87 around the Chernobyl plant. 117 cases (69 leukemia, 34 non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL) and 14 other malignancies of lymphoid and hematopoietic tissue) and 481 matched controls were included in the study. Individual dose to the bone marrow and uncertainties were estimated for each subject. The main analyses were restricted to 70 cases (40 leukemia, 20 NHL and 10 other) and their 287 matched controls with reliable information on work in the Chernobyl area. Most subjects received very low doses (median 13 mGy). For all diagnoses combined, a significantly elevated OR was seen at doses of 200 mGy and above. The Excess Relative Risk (ERR) per 100 mGy was 0.60 (90% confidence interval (CI): −0.02, 2.35). The corresponding estimate for leukemia excluding chronic lymphoid leukemia (CLL) was 0.50 (90%CI −0.38, 5.7). It is slightly higher than, but statistically compatible with, those estimated from a-bomb survivors and recent low dose-rate studies. Although sensitivity analyses showed generally similar results, we cannot rule out the possibility that biases and uncertainties could have led to over or underestimation of the risk in this study. PMID:19138033

  8. TRAC laboratory monitoring of Chernobyl radioactive debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sigg, R.A.

    1986-06-09

    A severe accident occurred at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant number 4 in the Soviet Union on April 25, 1986. An explosion released large amounts of radioactive debris, primarily fission products, to the atmosphere. As winds carried debris from the Soviet Union, scientists in Europe and the United States reported detecting fission product activities in air samples. Monitoring by the Tracking Radioactive Atmospheric Contaminants (TRAC) mobile laboratory showed concentrations in the Southeastern United States were well below those considered hazardous. This document provides details of this monitoring effort.

  9. The mental health of clean-up workers 18 years after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganovsky, K; Havenaar, J M; Tintle, N L; Guey, L T; Kotov, R; Bromet, E J

    2008-04-01

    The psychological aftermath of the Chernobyl accident is regarded as the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident to date. Yet the mental health of the clean-up workers, who faced the greatest radiation exposure and threat to life, has not been systematically evaluated. This study describes the long-term psychological effects of Chernobyl in a sample of clean-up workers in Ukraine. The cohorts were 295 male clean-up workers sent to Chernobyl between 1986 and 1990 interviewed 18 years after the accident (71% participation rate) and 397 geographically matched controls interviewed as part of the Ukraine World Mental Health (WMS) Survey 16 years after the accident. The World Health Organization (WHO) Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was administered. We examined group differences in common psychiatric disorders, suicide ideation and severe headaches, differential effects of disorder on days lost from work, and in the clean-up workers, the relationship of exposure severity to disorder and current trauma and somatic symptoms. Analyses were adjusted for age in 1986 and mental health prior to the accident. Relatively more clean-up workers than controls experienced depression (18.0% v. 13.1%) and suicide ideation (9.2% v. 4.1%) after the accident. In the year preceding interview, the rates of depression (14.9% v. 7.1%), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (4.1% v. 1.0%) and headaches (69.2% v. 12.4%) were elevated. Affected workers lost more work days than affected controls. Exposure level was associated with current somatic and PTSD symptom severity. Long-term mental health consequences of Chernobyl were observed in clean-up workers.

  10. UNESCO and the Associated Schools Project: Symbolic Affirmation of World Community, International Understanding, and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David F.; Ramirez, Francisco O.; Koo, Jeong-Woo

    2009-01-01

    The UNESCO Associated Schools Project emphasizes world community, human rights, and international understanding. This article investigates the emergence and global diffusion of the project from 1953 to 2001, estimating the influence of national, regional, and world characteristics on the likelihood of a country adopting a UNESCO school. It also…

  11. The International Pulsar Timing Array project: using pulsars as a gravitational wave detector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbs, G.; Archibald, A.; Arzoumanian, Z.; Backer, D.; Bailes, M.; Bhat, N.D.R.; Burgay, M.; Burke-Spolaor, S.; Champion, D.; Cognard, I.; Coles, W.; Cordes, J.; Demorest, P.; Desvignes, G.; Ferdman, R.D.; Finn, L.; Freire, P.; Gonzalez, M.; Hessels, J.; Hotan, A.; Janssen, G.; Jenet, F.; Jessner, A.; Jordan, C.; Kaspi, V.; Kramer, M.; Kondratiev, V.; Lazio, J.; Lazaridis, K.; Lee, K.J.; Levin, Y.; Lommen, A.; Lorimer, D.; Lynch, R.; Lyne, A.; Manchester, R.; McLaughlin, M.; Nice, D.; Oslowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Possenti, A.; Purver, M.; Ransom, S.; Reynolds, J.; Sanidas, S.; Sarkissian, J.; Sesana, A.; Shannon, R.; Siemens, X.; Stairs, I.; Stappers, B.; Stinebring, D.; Theureau, G.; van Haasteren, R.; van Straten, W.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Yardley, D.R.B.; You, X.P.

    2010-01-01

    The International Pulsar Timing Array project combines observations of pulsars from both northern and southern hemisphere observatories with the main aim of detecting ultra-low frequency (similar to 10(-9)-10(-8) Hz) gravitational waves. Here we introduce the project, review the methods used to sear

  12. Evaluating the Investment Benefit of Multinational Enterprises' International Projects Based on Risk Adjustment: Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the international risks faced by multinational enterprises to understand their impact on the evaluation of investment projects. Moreover, it establishes a 'three-dimensional' theoretical framework of risk identification to analyse the composition of international risk indicators of multinational enterprises based on the theory…

  13. Evaluating the Investment Benefit of Multinational Enterprises' International Projects Based on Risk Adjustment: Evidence from China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the international risks faced by multinational enterprises to understand their impact on the evaluation of investment projects. Moreover, it establishes a 'three-dimensional' theoretical framework of risk identification to analyse the composition of international risk indicators of multinational enterprises based on the theory…

  14. Protection and Effective Functioning of International Organizations. Final Report International Institutional Law; Secure Haven project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikker Hupkes, S.D.

    2009-01-01

    This report deals with the legal relationship between International Organizations and their host states. It focuses on the ways in which the effective functioning of those International Organizations is ensured in the relevant seat agreements and multilateral treaties. The report deals specifically

  15. The International Data Sharing Challenge: Realities and Lessons Learned from International Field Projects and Data Analysis Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, S. F.; Moore, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    One of the major challenges facing science in general is how foster trust and cooperation between nations that then allows the free and open exchange of data. The rich data coming from many nations conducting Arctic research must be allowed to be brought together to understand and assess the huge changes now underway in the Arctic regions. The NCAR Earth Observing Laboratory has been supporting a variety of international field process studies and WCRP sponsored international projects that require international data collection and exchange in order to be successful. Some of the programs include the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic (SHEBA) International Tundra Experiment (ITEX), the Arctic Climate Systems Study (ACSYS), the Distributed Biological Observatory (DBO), and the Coordinated Energy and water-cycle Observations Project (CEOP) to name a few. EOL played a major role in the data management of these projects, but the CEOP effort in particular involved coordinating common site documentation and data formatting across a global network (28 sites). All these unique projects occurred over 25 years but had similar challenges in the international collection, archival, and access to the rich datasets that are their legacy. The Belmont Forum offers as its main challenge to deliver knowledge needed for action to avoid or adapt to environmental change. One of their major themes is related to the study of these changes in the Arctic. The development of capable e-infrastructure (technologies and groups supporting international collaborative environments networks and data centers) to allow access to large diverse data collections is key to meeting this challenge. The reality of meeting this challenge, however, is something much more difficult. The authors will provide several specific examples of successes and failures when trying to meet the needs of an international community of researchers specifically related to Belmont Forum Work Package Themes regarding standards of

  16. Is a Clean Development Mechanism project economically justified? Case study of an International Carbon Sequestration Project in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katircioglu, Salih; Dalir, Sara; Olya, Hossein G

    2016-01-01

    The present study evaluates a carbon sequestration project for the three plant species in arid and semiarid regions of Iran. Results show that Haloxylon performed appropriately in the carbon sequestration process during the 6 years of the International Carbon Sequestration Project (ICSP). In addition to a high degree of carbon dioxide sequestration, Haloxylon shows high compatibility with severe environmental conditions and low maintenance costs. Financial and economic analysis demonstrated that the ICSP was justified from an economic perspective. The financial assessment showed that net present value (NPV) (US$1,098,022.70), internal rate of return (IRR) (21.53%), and payback period (6 years) were in an acceptable range. The results of the economic analysis suggested an NPV of US$4,407,805.15 and an IRR of 50.63%. Therefore, results of this study suggest that there are sufficient incentives for investors to participate in such kind of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects.

  17. Technology transfer significance of the International Safeguards Project Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.; Wallgura, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    The safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are of major importance to the non-proliferation objectives of the United States of America and other nations of the world. Assurance of safeguards effectiveness is mandatory to continued peaceful use of nuclear power. To enhance the ability of the IAEA to apply safeguards effectively, and to ensure that the IAEA does not lack technical assistance in critical areas, the U.S. Congress has made available a special authorization for a Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS). In expediting the program full use is made of existing DOE laboratory resources.

  18. Chernobyl fallout and cancer incidence in Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auvinen, Anssi; Seppä, Karri; Pasanen, Kari; Kurttio, Päivi; Patama, Toni; Pukkala, Eero; Heinävaara, Sirpa; Arvela, Hannu; Verkasalo, Pia; Hakulinen, Timo

    2014-05-01

    Twenty-five years have passed since the Chernobyl accident, but its health consequences remain to be well established. Finland was one of the most heavily affected countries by the radioactive fallout outside the former Soviet Union. We analyzed the relation of the estimated external radiation exposure from the fallout to cancer incidence in Finland in 1988-2007. The study cohort comprised all ∼ 3.8 million Finns who had lived in the same dwelling for 12 months following the accident (May 1986-April 1987). Radiation exposure was estimated using data from an extensive mobile dose rate survey. Cancer incidence data were obtained for the cohort divided into four exposure categories (the lowest with the first-year committed dose effect was observed for men, or other cancer sites. Our analysis of a large cohort over two decades did not reveal an increase in cancer incidence following the Chernobyl accident, with the possible exception of colon cancer among women. The largely null findings are consistent with extrapolation from previous studies suggesting that the effect is likely to remain too small to be empirically detectable and of little public health impact.

  19. 5. Nonmalignant diseases after the Chernobyl catastrophe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablokov, Alexey V

    2009-11-01

    This section describes the spectrum and the scale of the nonmalignant diseases that have been found among exposed populations. Adverse effects as a result of Chernobyl irradiation have been found in every group that has been studied. Brain damage has been found in individuals directly exposed--liquidators and those living in the contaminated territories, as well as in their offspring. Premature cataracts; tooth and mouth abnormalities; and blood, lymphatic, heart, lung, gastrointestinal, urologic, bone, and skin diseases afflict and impair people, young and old alike. Endocrine dysfunction, particularly thyroid disease, is far more common than might be expected, with some 1,000 cases of thyroid dysfunction for every case of thyroid cancer, a marked increase after the catastrophe. There are genetic damage and birth defects especially in children of liquidators and in children born in areas with high levels of radioisotope contamination. Immunological abnormalities and increases in viral, bacterial, and parasitic diseases are rife among individuals in the heavily contaminated areas. For more than 20 years, overall morbidity has remained high in those exposed to the irradiation released by Chernobyl. One cannot give credence to the explanation that these numbers are due solely to socioeconomic factors. The negative health consequences of the catastrophe are amply documented in this chapter and concern millions of people.

  20. Sustainable Relations in International Development Cooperation Projects: The Role of Organizational Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cosimo Rota

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available  The importance of the human side of project management to assess the success of international development project has not been fully considered yet. An analysis of the literature on the project success definition, focused on the success criteria and success factors, was carried out. The organization’s effectiveness, in terms of Relations Sustainability, emerged as a criteria integrating the "time, cost, performance" approach to define a project success. Based on previous research contributions on the factors influencing the organization’s effectiveness, the paper expands the analysis of the influence of Organizational Climate on the Relation Sustainability between project manager and project team involved in international cooperation for development. The statistical methods used include confirmatory factors analysis and structural equation modeling. The results carry implications for project management identifying five dimensions of Organizational Climate (trust, innovation, social cohesion, communication and job challenge influencing Relations Sustainability. This finding suggests that Organizational Climate contributes to project success by creating trust, stimulating commitment and generating satisfaction to overcome conflicts between project manager and project team.

  1. Norway: Some lessons from a international project on CCS communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torvatn, Hans; Tvedt, Sturle D.; Naess, Robert

    2010-07-01

    Full text: Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) has been part of the Norwegian debate on energy and possible solutions to the climate problems for more than a decade. One prime ministers fell from power on this issue, another first promised a 'Norwegian moon landing', then postponed the whole thing for several years. The debate has been heated several times, but little is known about what the public knows and thinks. The present paper presents some findings from six national surveys on knowledge and attitudes on CCS as part of the FENCO-ERA project 'Scrutinizing the impact of CCS communication on the general and local public (Impact of communication)'. Representative national surveys (N=61000) were conducted in six European countries: Germany, Greece, the Netherlands, Norway, Romania and the UK. Main topics covered: Sociodemographics, Attitudes towards energy issues, Media preferences, Trust, Knowledge on global warming and energy issues including CCS, initial attitudes towards CCS. The surveys also included an information experiment, testing the effect of positive and negative information on general acceptance of CCS. The paper will focus on the results from Norway using the other countries as illuminating contrasts. In Norway we will discuss four major findings: i) The majority of the Norwegian population are aware of CCS ii) There is a positive support for CCS demonstration plant, however, the support is unevenly distributed in the population iii) Information on CCS effects attitudes, however, source is less important than content iv) The project asked respondents to evaluate both risks and benefits. In Norway the effect of the benefit evaluation was stronger than the risk evaluation. Implications for CCS communication with the public as well as future research are discussed. (Author)

  2. Technology transfer significance of the International Safeguards Project Office

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.; Waligura, A.J.

    1988-06-01

    The safeguards implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) are of major importance to the non-proliferation objectives of the United States of America and other nations of the world. Assurance of safeguards effectiveness is mandatory to continued peaceful use of nuclear power. To enhance the ability of the IAEA to apply safeguards effectively, and to ensure that the IAEA does not lack technical assistance in critical areas, the US Congress has made available a special authorization for a Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS). This substantial program of technology transfer was initiated in 1976. The United States Departments of State and Energy, the Arms control and Disarmament Agency and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission have each accepted responsibility for parts of the Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards. Funding is provided by state through the Foreign Assistance Act. This report provides a discussion of this program.

  3. Electronics and Software Engineer for Robotics Project Intern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teijeiro, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    I was assigned to mentor high school students for the 2017 First Robotics Competition. Using a team based approach, I worked with the students to program the robot and applied my electrical background to build the robot from start to finish. I worked with students who had an interest in electrical engineering to teach them about voltage, current, pulse width modulation, solenoids, electromagnets, relays, DC motors, DC motor controllers, crimping and soldering electrical components, Java programming, and robotic simulation. For the simulation, we worked together to generate graphics files, write simulator description format code, operate Linux, and operate SOLIDWORKS. Upon completion of the FRC season, I transitioned over to providing full time support for the LCS hardware team. During this phase of my internship I helped my co-intern write test steps for two networking hardware DVTs , as well as run cables and update cable running lists.

  4. The Tomato Sequencing Project, the first cornerstone of the International Solanaceae Project (SOL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mueller, L.A.; Tanksley, S.D.; Giovannoni, J.J.; Eck, van J.; Stack, S.; Choi, D.; Dong Kim, B.; Chen, M.; Cheng, Z.; Li, C.; Ling, H.; Xue, Y.; Seymour, G.B.; Bishop, G.; Bryan, G.J.; Sharma, R.; Khurana, J.; Tyagi, A.; Chattopadhyay, D.; Singh, N.K.; Stiekema, W.; Lindhout, P.; Jesse, T.; Klein Lankhorst, R.M.; Bouzayen, M.; Shibata, D.; Tabata, S.; Granell, A.; Botella, M.A.; Giuliano, G.; Frusciante, L.; Causse, M.; Zamir, D.

    2005-01-01

    The genome of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is being sequenced by an international consortium of 10 countries (Korea, China, the United Kingdom, India, The Netherlands, France, Japan, Spain, Italy and the United States) as part of a larger initiative called the International Solanaceae Genome Projec

  5. Condition, Reproduction and Survival of Barn Swallows from Chernobyl

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    A. P. Møller; T. A. Mousseau; G. Milinevsky; A. Peklo; E. Pysanets; T. Szép

    2005-01-01

    1. We investigated the relationship between radiation arising from the fall-out due to the explosion of the nuclear reactor at Chernobyl, Ukraine, and body condition, rate of reproduction and survival...

  6. Mobile Air Quality Studies (MAQS-an international project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudik Claudia

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to an increasing awareness of the potential hazardousness of air pollutants, new laws, rules and guidelines have recently been implemented globally. In this respect, numerous studies have addressed traffic-related exposure to particulate matter using stationary technology so far. By contrast, only few studies used the advanced technology of mobile exposure analysis. The Mobile Air Quality Study (MAQS addresses the issue of air pollutant exposure by combining advanced high-granularity spatial-temporal analysis with vehicle-mounted, person-mounted and roadside sensors. The MAQS-platform will be used by international collaborators in order 1 to assess air pollutant exposure in relation to road structure, 2 to assess air pollutant exposure in relation to traffic density, 3 to assess air pollutant exposure in relation to weather conditions, 4 to compare exposure within vehicles between front and back seat (children positions, and 5 to evaluate "traffic zone"-exposure in relation to non-"traffic zone"-exposure. Primarily, the MAQS-platform will focus on particulate matter. With the establishment of advanced mobile analysis tools, it is planed to extend the analysis to other pollutants including NO2, SO2, nanoparticles and ozone.

  7. Application of the Exergy UCG technology in international UCG projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blinderman, M. S.

    2017-07-01

    Underground Coal Gasification is a subject of continuing global interest in the energy sector. While the international scenario in UCG is promising, it is deeply desirable that advances in this area are seen in India as well. This is particularly so with the Paris Climate Agreement bringing in more stringent challenges for clean energy development. India has many potential coal basins which may be suitable for UCG deployment. India is in dire need of indigenous source of gaseous and liquid hydrocarbons that could compete with imported products. It is also the country with exceptionally large and diverse coal and lignite resources, large part of which could not be mined due to geological complexity and prohibitive cost. Thus, there is a rationale that the εUCG™ technology plays a decisive role in realizing the potential of Indian coal resources for the benefit of Indian industry and population. This article has been adapted by Dr. Ajay K. Singh from a lecture delivered at the “Workshop on Challenges and Opportunities of Underground Coal Gasification”, Vigyan Bhawan, New Delhi on 14 February 2017.

  8. Mobile Air Quality Studies (MAQS)-an international project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg, David A; Scutaru, Cristian; Lauks, Mathias; Takemura, Masaya; Fischer, Tanja C; Kölzow, Silvana; van Mark, Anke; Uibel, Stefanie; Wagner, Ulrich; Vitzthum, Karin; Beck, Fabian; Mache, Stefanie; Kreiter, Carolin; Kusma, Bianca; Friedebold, Annika; Zell, Hanna; Gerber, Alexander; Bock, Johanna; Al-Mutawakl, Khaled; Donat, Johannes; Geier, Maria Victoria; Pilzner, Carolin; Welker, Pia; Joachim, Ricarda; Bias, Harald; Götting, Michael; Sakr, Mohannad; Addicks, Johann P; Börger, Julia-Annik; Jensen, Anna-Maria; Grajewski, Sonja; Shami, Awfa; Neye, Niko; Kröger, Stefan; Hoffmann, Sarah; Kloss, Lisa; Mayer, Sebastian; Puk, Clemens; Henkel, Ulrich; Rospino, Robert; Schilling, Ute; Krieger, Evelyn; Westphal, Gesa; Meyer-Falcke, Andreas; Hupperts, Hagen; de Roux, Andrés; Tropp, Salome; Weiland, Marco; Mühlbach, Janette; Steinberg, Johannes; Szerwinski, Anne; Falahkohan, Sepiede; Sudik, Claudia; Bircks, Anna; Noga, Oliver; Dickgreber, Nicolas; Dinh, Q Thai; Golpon, Heiko; Kloft, Beatrix; Groneberg, Rafael Neill B; Witt, Christian; Wicker, Sabine; Zhang, Li; Springer, Jochen; Kütting, Birgitta; Mingomataj, Ervin C; Fischer, Axel; Schöffel, Norman; Unger, Volker; Quarcoo, David

    2010-04-09

    Due to an increasing awareness of the potential hazardousness of air pollutants, new laws, rules and guidelines have recently been implemented globally. In this respect, numerous studies have addressed traffic-related exposure to particulate matter using stationary technology so far. By contrast, only few studies used the advanced technology of mobile exposure analysis. The Mobile Air Quality Study (MAQS) addresses the issue of air pollutant exposure by combining advanced high-granularity spatial-temporal analysis with vehicle-mounted, person-mounted and roadside sensors. The MAQS-platform will be used by international collaborators in order 1) to assess air pollutant exposure in relation to road structure, 2) to assess air pollutant exposure in relation to traffic density, 3) to assess air pollutant exposure in relation to weather conditions, 4) to compare exposure within vehicles between front and back seat (children) positions, and 5) to evaluate "traffic zone"-exposure in relation to non-"traffic zone"-exposure.Primarily, the MAQS-platform will focus on particulate matter. With the establishment of advanced mobile analysis tools, it is planed to extend the analysis to other pollutants including NO2, SO2, nanoparticles and ozone.

  9. Web Services and Handle Infrastructure - WDCC's Contributions to International Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Föll, G.; Weigelt, T.; Kindermann, S.; Lautenschlager, M.; Toussaint, F.

    2012-04-01

    Climate science demands on data management are growing rapidly as climate models grow in the precision with which they depict spatial structures and in the completeness with which they describe a vast range of physical processes. The ExArch project is exploring the challenges of developing a software management infrastructure which will scale to the multi-exabyte archives of climate data which are likely to be crucial to major policy decisions in by the end of the decade. The ExArch approach to future integration of exascale climate archives is based on one hand on a distributed web service architecture providing data analysis and quality control functionality across archvies. On the other hand a consistent persistent identifier infrastructure is deployed to support distributed data management and data replication. Distributed data analysis functionality is based on the CDO climate data operators' package. The CDO-Tool is used for processing of the archived data and metadata. CDO is a collection of command line Operators to manipulate and analyse Climate and forecast model Data. A range of formats is supported and over 500 operators are provided. CDO presently is designed to work in a scripting environment with local files. ExArch will extend the tool to support efficient usage in an exascale archive with distributed data and computational resources by providing flexible scheduling capabilities. Quality control will become increasingly important in an exascale computing context. Researchers will be dealing with millions of data files from multiple sources and will need to know whether the files satisfy a range of basic quality criterea. Hence ExArch will provide a flexible and extensible quality control system. The data will be held at more than 30 computing centres and data archives around the world, but for users it will appear as a single archive due to a standardized ExArch Web Processing Service. Data infrastructures such as the one built by ExArch can greatly

  10. Developing Systems Engineering Skills Through NASA Summer Intern Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, Kul; Barritt, Brian; Golden, Bert; Knoblock, Eric; Matthews, Seth; Warner, Joe

    2010-01-01

    During the Formulation phases of the NASA Project Life Cycle, communication systems engineers are responsible for designing space communication links and analyzing their performance to ensure that the proposed communication architecture is capable of satisfying high-level mission requirements. Senior engineers with extensive experience in communications systems perform these activities. However, the increasing complexity of space systems coupled with the current shortage of communications systems engineers has led to an urgent need for expedited training of new systems engineers. A pilot program, in which college-bound high school and undergraduate students studying various engineering disciplines are immersed in NASA s systems engineering practices, was conceived out of this need. This rapid summerlong training approach is feasible because of the availability of advanced software and technology tools and the students inherent ability to operate such tools. During this pilot internship program, a team of college-level and recently-hired engineers configured and utilized various software applications in the design and analysis of communication links for a plausible lunar sortie mission. The approach taken was to first design the direct-to-Earth communication links for the lunar mission elements, then to design the links between lunar surface and lunar orbital elements. Based on the data obtained from these software applications, an integrated communication system design was realized and the students gained valuable systems engineering knowledge. This paper describes this approach to rapidly training college-bound high school and undergraduate engineering students from various disciplines in NASA s systems engineering practices and tools. A summary of the potential use of NASA s emerging systems engineering internship program in broader applications is also described.

  11. About Chernobyl - Twenty Years Later; Propos sur Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tubiana, M

    2006-07-01

    The author discusses the reactor accident of Chernobyl, the information on its consequences so contradictory in the former USSR countries, the status of the effects observed, the forecasting concerning the onset of cancers in the coming years among the populations that were exposed to radiations, the public opinion facing the pessimists. He concludes on the lessons which can be drawn from Chernobyl. (A.L.B.)

  12. Marine dispersion of caesium 137 released from Sellafield and Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prandle, D.; Beechey, J.

    1991-09-01

    This modelling study examines the dispersion within the shelf seas surrounding the UK, of 137Cs discharged from Sellafield between 1969 and 1988 together with the atmospheric deposition following Chernobyl (April 1986). The close agreement obtained between computed and observed distributions lends confidence to estimates of flushing times-fundamental parameters in determining pollutant concentrations. Moreover, this study confirms, to first-order, the estimates of Chernobyl fall-out provided by atmospheric dispersion models.

  13. The project De Caldas International Project: An example of a large-scale radwaste isolation natural analogue study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shea, M. [TerraCon, Inc., Chicago, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01

    The proper isolation of radioactive waste is one of today`s most pressing environmental issues. Research is being carried out by many countries around the world in order to answer critical and perplexing questions regarding the safe disposal of radioactive waste. Natural analogue studies are an increasingly important facet of this international research effort. The Pocos de Caldas Project represents a major effort of the international technical and scientific community towards addressing one of modern civilization`s most critical environmental issues - radioactive waste isolation.

  14. International differences in project planning and organizational project planning support in Sweden, Japan, Israel, and Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Amy, Chin Mei Yen; Pulatov, Bakhtier

    2008-01-01

    The study of the cultures has been a primary focus of sociology, psychology and anthropology since their inception. Increasing globalization has brought the attention of academics and practitioners to the study of national cultures and their differences into the management area. Likewise, the parallel trend towards running some business through projects has brought broader perspectives such as national cultures into the project management field. Recent academic literature demonstrated that na...

  15. Project Adopsys as an example of international collaboration in the field of photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoric, Nenad; Livshits, Irina; Urbach, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Tendencies of international cooperation in engineering education became very visible during recent years. We demonstrate this statement on one currently running EU project ADOPSYS in the field of optical design, which is an important part of engineering education in photonics. This example shows the importance of the input from different countries and organizations - both from industry and academia. Seven universities and eight optical companies are involved in the project ADOPSYS. Sharing experience of Academia education activity we provide new international type of education "free-of borders". We are going to discuss the key enable technology - PHOTONICS, which is widely used in modern society. Engineering science became very international. For communicating between people from different countries the English language is now used almost exclusively. For a fruitful collaboration between people from different nations, in multi-national projects, tolerance and respect are required between people of different political, cultural, educational backgrounds.

  16. Geomechanical/Geochemical Modeling Studies Conducted within theInternational DECOVALEX Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkholzer, J.T.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.L.; Barr, D.; Chijimatsu, M.; Kolditz, O.; Liu, Q.; Oda, Y.; Wang, W.; Xie, M.; Zhang, C.

    2005-10-19

    The DECOVALEX project is an international cooperative project initiated by SKI, the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, with participation of about 10 international organizations. The general goal of this project is to encourage multidisciplinary interactive and cooperative research on modeling coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in geologic formations in support of the performance assessment for underground storage of radioactive waste. One of the research tasks, initiated in 2004 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), addresses the long-term impact of geomechanical and geochemical processes on the flow conditions near waste emplacement tunnels. Within this task, four international research teams conduct predictive analysis of the coupled processes in two generic repositories, using multiple approaches and different computer codes. Below, we give an overview of the research task and report its current status.

  17. Genetic and ecological studies of animals in Chernobyl and Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic and ecological studies of wild animal populations in Chernobyl and Fukushima have demonstrated significant genetic, physiological, developmental, and fitness effects stemming from exposure to radioactive contaminants. The few genetic studies that have been conducted in Chernobyl generally show elevated rates of genetic damage and mutation rates. All major taxonomic groups investigated (i.e., birds, bees, butterflies, grasshoppers, dragonflies, spiders, mammals) displayed reduced population sizes in highly radioactive parts of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. In Fukushima, population censuses of birds, butterflies, and cicadas suggested that abundances were negatively impacted by exposure to radioactive contaminants, while other groups (e.g., dragonflies, grasshoppers, bees, spiders) showed no significant declines, at least during the first summer following the disaster. Insufficient information exists for groups other than insects and birds to assess effects on life history at this time. The differences observed between Fukushima and Chernobyl may reflect the different times of exposure and the significance of multigenerational mutation accumulation in Chernobyl compared to Fukushima. There was considerable variation among taxa in their apparent sensitivity to radiation and this reflects in part life history, physiology, behavior, and evolutionary history. Interestingly, for birds, population declines in Chernobyl can be predicted by historical mitochondrial DNA base-pair substitution rates that may reflect intrinsic DNA repair ability. © The American Genetic Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Validity of thyroid cancer incidence data following the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jargin, Sergei V

    2011-12-01

    The only clearly demonstrated cancer incidence increase that can be attributed to radiation from the Chernobyl accident is thyroid carcinoma in patients exposed during childhood or adolescence. Significant increases in thyroid disease were observed as soon as 4 y after the accident. The solid/follicular subtype of papillary carcinoma predominated in the early period after the accident. Morphological diagnosis of cancer in such cases, if no infiltrative growth is clearly visible, depends mainly on the nuclear criteria. Outdated equipment and insufficient quality of histological specimens impeded reliable evaluation of the nuclear criteria. Access to foreign professional literature has always been limited in the former Soviet Union. The great number of advanced tumors observed shortly after the accident can be explained by the screening effect (detection of previously neglected cancers) and by the fact that many patients were brought from non-contaminated areas and registered as Chernobyl victims. It is also worth noting that exaggeration of the Chernobyl cancer statistics facilitated the writing of dissertations, financing of research, and assistance from outside the former Soviet Union. "Chernobyl hysteria" impeded nuclear energy production in some countries, thus contributing to higher prices for fossil fuel. The concluding point is that since post-Chernobyl cancers tend on average to be in a later stage of tumor progression, some published data on molecular or immunohistochemical characteristics of Chernobyl-related cancers require reevaluation.

  19. Psychosocial effects of the Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    The psychological factors surrounding the Chernobyl disaster include the sudden trauma of evacuation, long-term effects of being a refugee, disruption of social networks, illness, separation and its effects on families, children's perception and effects on their development and the threat of a long-term consequence with an endless future. Added to this was the breakdown of the Soviet Union with consequent collapse of health services, increasing poverty and malnutrition. These complexities made necessary new individual and social treatment methods developed in UNESCO Community Centres, within which some positives have resulted, such as the development of individual and group self help and the professions of counselling, social work and community development, practices which did not previously exist in the Soviet Union.

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF ADDRESS REHABILITATION STRATEGY FOR THE RURAL TERRITORIES AFFECTED BY THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Panov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A methodological approach for the justification of rational countermeasure options in agricultural production in the long term after the Chernobyl NPP accident is presented. Settlements and collective farms located on the contaminated territory were divided categories based on the contamination density of 137Cs and in the first case on annual internal doses and on risk of the overestimation of standards, restricting the use of agricultural products (in the second case. For each category of the farms the ranking of rehabilitation options and the time periods when their application would be of importance were justified and estimated.

  1. Mental health consequences of the Chernobyl disaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bromet, Evelyn J

    2012-03-01

    The psychosocial consequences of disasters have been studied for more than 100 years. The most common mental health consequences are depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, medically unexplained somatic symptoms, and stigma. The excess morbidity rate of psychiatric disorders in the first year after a disaster is in the order of 20%. Disasters involving radiation are particularly pernicious because the exposure is invisible and universally dreaded, and can pose a long-term threat to health. After the Chernobyl disaster, studies of clean-up workers (liquidators) and adults from contaminated areas found a two-fold increase in post-traumatic stress and other mood and anxiety disorders and significantly poorer subjective ratings of health. Among liquidators, the most important risk factor was severity of exposure. In general population samples, the major risk factor was perceived exposure to harmful levels of radiation. These findings are consistent with results from A-bomb survivors and populations studied after the Three Mile Island nuclear power plant accident. With regard to children, apart from findings from ecological studies that lack direct data on radiation or other teratologic exposures and local studies in Kiev, the epidemiologic evidence suggests that neither radiation exposure nor the stress of growing up in the shadow of the accident was associated with emotional disorders, cognitive dysfunction, or impaired academic performance. Thus, based on the studies of adults, the Chernobyl Forum concluded that mental health was the largest public health problem unleashed by the accident. Since mental health is a leading cause of disability, physical morbidity, and mortality, health monitoring after radiation accidents like Fukushima should include standard measures of well-being. Moreover, given the comorbidity of mental and physical health, the findings support the value of training non-psychiatrist physicians in recognizing and treating common mental

  2. Introduction of the World Health Organization project of the International Classification of Traditional Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng-fei; Watanabe, Kenji

    2011-11-01

    The World Health Organization plans to incorporate "traditional medicine" into the next revision of its International Classification of Diseases-Version 11 (ICD-11). If traditional medicine is included in ICD-11, it is definitely an epoch-making issue. The expected result is the International Classification of Traditional Medicine, China, Japan and Korea Version (ICTM-CJK). The intention of the ICTM project is not only beneficial for traditional medical components, but also might be beneficial for Western biomedicine. For this shared purpose, China, Japan and Korea must understand the meaning of this project and collaborate to develop it.

  3. Cultural differences and process adaptation in international R&D project management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xing; Li, J. Z.

    2009-01-01

    process can be effectively tuned to align with local cultural environment through a new generation stage-gate process model. The overseas company's branch has recognized the need to make its process both faster and more effective for telecommunication software development, and has gained remarkable...... project success. At the same time, lessons and recommendations on the adaptability to Chinese style business and management interactions will be drawn from the case study for international companies that locate R&D projects in China....

  4. Quality Management in Project Management Consulting. A Case Study in an International Consulting Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard-Gabriel Ceptureanu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present paper addresses quality management from the specific perspective of project management consulting service providers, in the framework of large infrastructure projects. Because of their supposed superiority in knowledge and experience, project management consultants have an ultimate responsibility for the proper implementing of the project. Therefore, quality management in consulting organizations should focus on critical success factors. As there is no consensus yet regarding the most important aspects of the consulting activity on which depend the achievement of the project aims, there is scope for further investigating this subject. Here, the case of a project management consulting organization involved in large infrastructure projects in Romania, Bulgaria, Moldova, Ukraine and Serbia is analyzed. Data collected through a questionnaire-based survey among international consultants and support personnel suggest that factors related to leadership style and communication skills are more closely tied to the success of the project than more technical aspects. The results constitute an empirical evidence of main success factors for specialized consulting services in project management and can be useful in improving business and project performance and achieving business excellence.

  5. Chernobyl, 13 years after; Tchernobyl, 13 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regniault-Lacharme, Mireille; Metivier, Henri [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1999-04-01

    This is an annual report, regularly issued by IPSN, that presents the ecological and health consequences of the Chernobyl Nuclear Accident. The present status of the Chernobyl Nuclear Plant, which Ukraine engaged to stop definitively in year 2000, is summarized. The only reactor unit now in operation is Chernobylsk-3 Reactor which poses two safety questions: evolution of cracks in part of the tubing and behaviour of the pressure tubes. Although, some improvements in the RBMK reactor types were introduced, problems remain that make IPSN to stress the requirement of stopping this NPP completely. In the contaminated territories surrounding Chernobyl incidence rate of infant thyroid cancers continues to grow, reaching values 10 to 100 times higher than the natural rate. In France the IPSN analyzed 60,000 records carried out in 17 sites during May 1986 and April 1989. It was estimated that the individual dose received during 60 years (1986-2046) by the inhabitants of the most affected zone (eastern France) is lower than 1.5 mSv, a value lower than 1% of the natural cosmic and telluric radioactivity exposure for the same period. For the persons assumed to live in the most attacked forests (from eastern France) and nourishing daily with venison and mushrooms the highest estimate is 1 mSv a year. Concerning the 'hot spots', identified in mountains by IPSN and CRIIRAD, the doses received by excursionists are around 0.015 mSv. For an average inhabitant of the country the dose piled up in the thyroid due to iodine-131 fallout is estimated to 0.5-2 mSv for an adult and 6.5-16 mSv for an infant. These doses are 100 to 1000 times lower than the ones to which the infants living in the neighbourhood of Chernobyl are exposed to. The contents of the report is displayed in the following six chapters: 1. Chernobyl in some figures; 2. The 'sarcophagus' and the reactors of the Chernobyl NPP; 3. Health consequences of the Chernobyl accident;. 4. The impact of

  6. Springfield/L-COG Energy Plan Implementation Program, Internal Energy Management Project: Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane Council of Governments (Or.); Tumidaj, Les

    1985-09-01

    The Internal Energy Management Project was developed as a component of the Springfield/L-COG Energy Plan Implementation Program. The project also took advantage of the ground work laid by the Lane Council of Governments through the Lane County Electric Energy Planning Program. This program, conducted in 1982 and 1983, developed detailed recommendations for Lane County cities concerning energy management and planning. Based on these recommendations, many jurisdictions committed themselves to implement energy management programs. Initially, the participating cities included Springfield, Veneta, Oakridge, Creswell, and Lowell. Two other local governments - Florence and Lane County - requested assistance once the project commenced.

  7. Project-based learning with international collaboration for training biomedical engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Shankar

    2011-01-01

    Training biomedical engineers while effectively keeping up with the fast paced scientific breakthroughs and the growth in technical innovations poses arduous challenges for educators. Traditional pedagogical methods are employed for coping with the increasing demands in biomedical engineering (BME) training and continuous improvements have been attempted with some success. Project-based learning (PBL) is an academic effort that challenges students by making them carry out interdisciplinary projects aimed at accomplishing a wide range of student learning outcomes. PBL has been shown to be effective in the medical field and has been adopted by other fields including engineering. The impact of globalization in healthcare appears to be steadily increasing which necessitates the inclusion of awareness of relevant international activities in the curriculum. Numerous difficulties are encountered when the formation of a collaborative team is tried, and additional difficulties occur as the collaboration team is extended to international partners. Understanding and agreement of responsibilities becomes somewhat complex and hence the collaborative project has to be planned and executed with clear understanding by all partners and participants. A model for training BME students by adopting PBL with international collaboration is proposed. The results of previous BME project work with international collaboration fit partially into the model. There were many logistic issues and constraints; however, the collaborative projects themselves greatly enhanced the student learning outcomes. This PBL type of learning experience tends to promote long term retention of multidisciplinary material and foster high-order cognitive activities such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. In addition to introducing the students to experiences encountered in the real-life workforce, the proposed approach enhances developing professional contracts and global networking. In conclusion, despite

  8. Forecasting International Relations: Some Views on the Relevancy of the Dimensionality of Nations Project to Policy Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Dimensionality of Nations Project (DON) is basic research on international relations attempting to determine the major patterns in the behavior...nature and direction of international relations . The paper gives a brief overview of the project itself, lists the problems associated with prediction in... international relations , and lays out the approaches to prediction and time series analysis employed on the Project. The final section discusses the relationship of DON to foreign and defense policies. (Author)

  9. REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS IN А FIELD OF HUMAN MICROBIAL ECOLOGY AND CONSTRUCTION OF PROBIOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Starovoitova

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern huge and world-wide known projects concerning studying of human microbial ecology and construction of probiotics, particularly: Society for Microbial Ecology and Disease, Probiotics & Health Targeted Initiative of International Science and Technology Center (TI PROBIO ISTC, Human Microbiome Project of National Institutes of Health, MetaHIT Project (Metagenomics of the Human Intestinal Tract of European Commission, Human Metabolome Project of Canadian University of Alberta and some more else were characterized in the article. Brief historical information and reference to official sites of every discussed project were given. Main goals and tasks of every project were described. Short characteristic of discussed projects and also modern accessible results of researches were given. Importance of every examined project for widening scientific knowledge in the field of human microbial ecology and also for improvement and/or for construction of modern effective probiotics on basis of human normal intestinal microflora were paid attention. Close interaction of scientific data received by realization of every discussed project was shown.

  10. Developing Intercultural Competence of Teachers of English as a Foreign Language through an International Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strugielska, Ariadna; Piatkowska, Katarzyna

    2016-01-01

    This paper reports an international project which took place at Nicolaus Copernicus University, where students and teachers from four European universities met for a two-week summer school. The main objective was to develop intercultural competence of teachers of English as a foreign language and their ability to demonstrate this skill during an…

  11. EFL Learners' Intercultural Competence Development in an International Web Collaboration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázár, Ildikó

    2015-01-01

    This article is based on an analysis of a small sample of data from an international web collaboration project between four classes of English as a foreign language (EFL) learners guided by their English teachers in four different countries in Europe. As few studies have been published about intercultural communication in blended learning EFL…

  12. An Assessment of Experiential Learning of Global Poverty Issues through International Service Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Quan V.; Raven, Peter V.

    2015-01-01

    Service learning has been used to supplement a standard business curriculum, but not typically in an international business context. We report the results of two short-term study abroad programs in which we incorporated service learning projects, one in Cambodia and the other in Vietnam. Our objective is to assess how we organized and delivered…

  13. On the use of hydrogen in confined spaces: Results from the internal project InsHyde

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Venetsanos, A.G.; Adams, P.; Azkarate, I.; Bengaouer, A.; Brett, L.; Carcassi, M.N.; Engebø, A.; Gallego, E.; Gavrikov, A.I.; Hansen, O.R.; Hawksworth, S.; Jordan, T.; Kessler, A.; Kumar, S.; Molkov, V.; Nilsen, S.; Reinecke, E.; Stöcklin, M.; Schmidtchen, U.; Teodorczyk, A.; Tigreat, D.; Versloot, N.H.A.

    2011-01-01

    The paper presents an overview of the main achievements of the internal project InsHyde of the HySafe NoE. The scope of InsHyde was to investigate realistic small-medium indoor hydrogen leaks and provide recommendations for the safe use/storage of indoor hydrogen systems. Additionally, InsHyde serve

  14. Quality in E-Learning--A Conceptual Framework Based on Experiences from Three International Benchmarking Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossiannilsson, E.; Landgren, L.

    2012-01-01

    Between 2008 and 2010, Lund University took part in three international benchmarking projects, "E-xcellence+," the "eLearning Benchmarking Exercise 2009," and the "First Dual-Mode Distance Learning Benchmarking Club." A comparison of these models revealed a rather high level of correspondence. From this finding and…

  15. Background and Rationale of the Conceptual Frame: The OECD/CERI International Indicators Project. Draft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delfau, Isabelle

    The exploratory and secondary phases of the "Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) project to develop a set of international indicators based on comparable educational data is described in this report. Voluntary networks in 24 OECD member countries are developing a cohesive conceptual framework based on a review of…

  16. Creating International Community Service Learning Experiences in a Capstone Marketing-Projects Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Lynn E.

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the development of a project-based capstone marketing course, specifically designed to provide marketing students with an international community service learning experience. It differs significantly from previous studies, which focus on integrating service learning into existing marketing courses and on helping local…

  17. Student Identities and the Tourist Gaze in International Service-Learning: A University Project in Belize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Esther; Webster, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study explores how 11 university students in a U.S. service-learning course in Belize understood and represented their identities during the project, particularly their use of "the tourist" as a construct to interpret their experiences. Drawing on literature in international service-learning (ISL) and tourism studies,…

  18. Creating International Community Service Learning Experiences in a Capstone Marketing-Projects Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalf, Lynn E.

    2010-01-01

    This article outlines the development of a project-based capstone marketing course, specifically designed to provide marketing students with an international community service learning experience. It differs significantly from previous studies, which focus on integrating service learning into existing marketing courses and on helping local…

  19. The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident: ecotoxicological update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisler, R.; Hoffman, David J.; Rattner, Barnett A.; Burton, G. Allen; Cairns, John=

    2003-01-01

    The accident at the Chernobyl, Ukraine, nuclear reactor on 26 April 1986 released large amounts of radiocesium and other radionuclides into the environment, contaminating much of the northern hemisphere, especially Europe. In the vicinity of Chernobyl, at least 30 people died, more than 115,000 others were evacuated, and consumption of milk and other foods was banned because of radiocontamination. At least 14,000 human cancer deaths are expected in Russia, Belarus, and the Ukraine as a direct result of Chernobyl. The most sensitive local ecosystems, as judged by survival, were the soil fauna, pine forest communities, and certain populations of rodents. Elsewhere, fallout from Chernobyl significantly contaminated freshwater and terrestrial ecosystems and flesh and milk of domestic livestock; in many cases, radionuclide concentrations in biological samples exceeded current radiation protection guidelines. Reindeer (Rangifer tarandus) in Scandinavia were among the most seriously afflicted by Chernobyl fallout, probably because their main food during winter (lichens) is an efficient absorber of airborne particles containing radiocesium. Some reindeer calves contaminated with 137Cs from Chernobyl showed 137Cs-dependent decreases in survival and increases in frequency of chromosomal aberrations. Although radiation levels in the biosphere are declining with time, latent effects of initial exposure--including an increased frequency of thyroid and other cancers--are now measurable. The full effect of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident on natural resources will probably not be known for at least several decades because of gaps in data on long-term genetic and reproductive effects and on radiocesium cycling and toxicokinetics.

  20. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the “International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments” have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy

  1. The Chernobyl – Thirty Years After The Post – Accidental Radiological – Hygienic and Medical Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Onishchenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As the result of the Chernobyl NPP accident more than 200 thousand square kilometers of the European territories were contaminated by Cs-137 in the amount of above 37 kBq/m2 (1 Ci/km2 . Belorussia, Russia and Ukraine amount up to 70% of this entire affected area. More than 600 000 people were engaged in the accidental cleanup operations, 340000 were evacuated or relocated within 1986-1991. The early stage evacuation efficacy is confirmed by the absence of acute radiation syndrome among the population and by the prevented collective dose which amounts to no less than 10 000 man/Sv. The effective measure to reduce the internal radiation dose to the population at the early accidental stage was introduction of maximum tentative permissive levels of radionuclide content in the foodstuffs.Among the identified post -accident medical consequences of the Chernobyl is the radiation syndrome found in 134 emergency cleanup workers within the first 24 hours of the accident’s development. Out of that number, 28 people died within the first four months, 19 people died before 2006. The accident’s liquidators developed radiation -induced leukemia ( the attributive risk value is 45-60% . People exposed to high radiation doses display the statistically significant 18% morbidity increase of all types of solid cancers at the doses above 150 mSv. There is the statistically significant information indicating the increased amount of thyroid cancer morbidity among those who were just children and teenagers at the time of the accident. The adverse psychological consequences are accounted for not just the fear of overexposure but also for the disturbance of the habitual lifestyle especially mindful of the forced relocation.The longterm protection measures, radionuclide decay and selfcleaning of the contaminated areas resulted in the drastic reduction of the population dose in the radioactively contaminated territories. In 2015, only in some settlements of the Briansk

  2. Case Study: Managing Undergraduate Interns in the Context of Multidisciplinary Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luebke, J. P.; Gentry, D.

    2016-12-01

    Internship opportunities can be immensely beneficial to both the students who pursue them and the labs that employ them. However, optimal results for all stakeholders can be uncertain. Several factors compound this issue. In this case study, the highly multidisciplinary nature of the BioEngineering Instrumentation Group at NASA Ames Research Center has made productively integrating short-term summer interns challenging. In general, taking on more undergraduate interns during a given time period can lead to diminishing returns, particularly if those interns are primarily short-time interns with few long-term senior students present. Introducing a level of industry-style project management processes can help. On the one hand, extreme formality can reduce the enthusiasm that students can bring; also, time constraints on internships make extensive training in formal process an investment with comparatively little return. On the other hand, lack of process can result in many forms of wastage. A moderate, "lightweight" level of process - i.e., simple processes with high payoff to time invested ratios, including processes to effectively handle multidisciplinary issues - can yield both a far more efficient lab, and a richer educational experience for the interns. In this case study, we implemented simple processes such as brief weekly stand-up meetings, a standard action item / bug tracking process, and deadline-based scheduling with prudent reserves and critical path tracking. To evaluate these steps, several parameters were considered: the number of projects the lab could successfully pursue, the number of interns that could be successfully integrated onto each project, diversity of student intern educational backgrounds, student satisfaction, student understanding of expectations, and student preparation for industry-standard work. Generally, outcomes were enhanced across the board, even with imperfectly implemented processes. "Lightweight" process implementation is

  3. Contribution of the Japan International Cooperation Agency health-related projects to health system strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Motoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Imada, Mihoko

    2013-09-22

    The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has focused its attention on appraising health development assistance projects and redirecting efforts towards health system strengthening. This study aimed to describe the type of project and targets of interest, and assess the contribution of JICA health-related projects to strengthening health systems worldwide. We collected a web-based Project Design Matrix (PDM) of 105 JICA projects implemented between January 2005 and December 2009. We developed an analytical matrix based on the World Health Organization (WHO) health system framework to examine the PDM data and thereby assess the projects' contributions to health system strengthening. The majority of JICA projects had prioritized workforce development, and improvements in governance and service delivery. Conversely, there was little assistance for finance or medical product development. The vast majority (87.6%) of JICA projects addressed public health issues, for example programs to improve maternal and child health, and the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Nearly 90% of JICA technical healthcare assistance directly focused on improving governance as the most critical means of accomplishing its goals. Our study confirmed that JICA projects met the goals of bilateral cooperation by developing workforce capacity and governance. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that JICA assistance could be used to support financial aspects of healthcare systems, which is an area of increasing concern. We also showed that the analytical matrix methodology is an effective means of examining the component of health system strengthening to which the activity and output of a project contributes. This may help policy makers and practitioners focus future projects on priority areas.

  4. RADIATION CONDITIONS IN KALUGA REGION 30 YEARS AFTER CHERNOBYL NPP ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Ashitko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article describes radiation conditions in the Kaluga region 30 years after the Chernobyl NPP accident. The Chernobyl NPP accident caused radioactive contamination of nine Kaluga region territories: Duminichsky, Zhizdrinsky, Kuibyshevsky, Kirovsky, Kozelsky, Ludinovsky, Meshchovsky, Ulyanovsky and Hvastovichsky districts. Radioactive fallout was the strongest in three southern districts: Zhizdrinsky, Ulyanovsky and Hvastovichsky, over there cesium-137 contamination density is from 1 to 15Ci/km. According to the Russian Federation Government Order in 2015 there are 300 settlements (S in the radioactive contamination zone, including 14 settlements with caesium-137 soil contamination density from 5 to 15 Ci/ km2 and 286 settlements with the contamination density ranging from 1 to 5 Ci/km2. In the first years after the Chernobyl NPP accident in Kaluga region territories, contaminated with caesium-137, there were introduced restrictive land usage, were carried out agrochemical activities (ploughing, mineral fertilizer dressing, there was toughened laboratory radiation control over the main doze-forming foodstuff. All these measures facilitated considerable decrease of caesium-137 content in local agricultural produce. Proceeding from the achieved result, in 2002 there took place the transition to more tough requirements SanPiN 2.3.2.1078-01. Analysis of investigated samples from Zhizdrinsky, Ulyanovsky and Hvastovichsky districts demonstrated that since 2005 meat samples didn’t exceed the standard values, same for milk samples since 2007. Till the present time, the use of wild-growing mushrooms, berries and wild animals meat involves radiation issues. It was demonstrated that average specific activity of caesium-137 in milk samples keeps decreasing year after year. Long after the Chernobyl NPP accident, the main products forming internal irradiation doses in population are the wild-growing mushrooms and berries. Population average annual

  5. International evaluation of Swedish research projects on the environmental impacts of wood fuel harvesting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornung, M. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology, Grange-over-Sands (United Kingdom); Kellomaeki, S. [Joensuu Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Forestry; Larsen, J.B. [Royal Veterinary Univ., Fredriksberg (Denmark). Dept. of Economics and Natural Resources

    1995-12-31

    The purpose of this evaluation was to inform NUTEK of the scientific quality of the research projects, as seen in an international context. The projects were therefore the main elements considered in the evaluation. The main basis of the evaluation was the scientific quality of the research and its relevance to NUTEK`s aims in the application of industrial research and development. The present report is based on the information contained in the written reports submitted by the grant holders, site visits and discussions between the grant holders and the Committee. The report first gives an overview and general recommendations concerning the overall programme on the Environmental Impacts of Wood Fuel Harvest. Thereafter, the projects are evaluated separately. The Committee was unanimous in its conclusions. Evaluated projects: Whole tree harvesting effects on forest soil; Whole tree utilization - forest yield; Nature conservation/Forest energy; Utilizing hardwoods from first thinnings of spruce as fuel wood

  6. Validation of biokinetic models for strontium. Analysis of the Techa River and Chernobyl data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tolstykh, E.I.; Degteva, M.O.; Kozheurov, V.P. [Urals Research Center for Radiation Medicine, Chelyabinsk (Russian Federation); Repin, V.S.; Novak, N.Y.; Berkovski, V.; Nosske, D.

    2000-05-01

    The ICRP models used in radiation protection to estimate doses resulting from internal irradiation are based on biokinetic models for different radionuclides. Strontium-90 was one of the main sources of environmental contamination due to accidents in the ''Mayak'' plutonium production complex (Southern Urals, 1949-1956) and the Chernobyl accident (1986). Over 800 measurements of bone-autopsy, and 31,000 Whole body Counter {sup 90}Sr measurements for Techa River population were made at URCRM (Chelyabinsk). Measurements of {sup 90}Sr contents in skeleton were performed for residents of the area contaminated due to Chernobyl accident (RPI, Kiev). These unique data allowed to validate the predictions of {sup 90}Sr biokinetic models at different times after ingestion, and in the case of complicated rate of intake. Model validation can be considered as best approach for quantifying the reliability of the model's predictions. Available data on {sup 90}Sr content in human skeleton were analyzed. {sup 90}Sr measurements cover the long period after start of intake: from 2 to 45 years after contamination (Techa River data). Model predictions for all age groups were compared with Techa River and Chernobyl data. For adult persons calculated and measured values of {sup 90}Sr body content were found to be very close, especially over the first 15 years after the major intake. After the majority of measured people had attained the age of 45 years and changes of calcium metabolism resulted in a significant increase of strontium elimination rate. The particularities of bone mineral turnover in old persons are not considered in the framework of the ICRP model. The latter feature resulted in a divergence between the model curve and the results of {sup 90}Sr measurements for old persons. For children and adolescents the differences between calculated values and measured {sup 90}Sr body contents are more significant. The comparison of different strontium

  7. The REEME project: a cooperative model for sharing international medical education materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iserson, Kenneth V

    2008-07-01

    Although the Internet has become an excellent source of medical education materials, in many specialties, including Emergency Medicine (EM), most of the information is in English. Few international EM practitioners can attend costly specialty conferences, importing foreign experts to teach at these conferences is costly and, even then, these experts are available for a limited time to relatively few people. Countries with minimal health care or medical education budgets find providing even basic materials for professional medical education difficult. An exciting international project now freely distributes Spanish language educational programs to health care professionals on topics relating to EM. The Recursos Educacionales en Español para Medicina de Emergencia (REEME; Educational Resources in Spanish for EM) Project (www.reeme.arizona.edu) was developed to overcome some of these problems by providing language-specific specialty information and widespread international availability, and by promoting international cooperation among professional health care educators. It also provides a ready source of Spanish medical vocabulary for those trying to learn the language. With computer support from the University of Arizona's Learning and Technology Center, REEME first went "live" on November 1, 2004. Three years later, as of November 1, 2007, the site had 575 programs from 411 donors representing 19 countries and the United Nations. There are currently about 645 downloads per month to users in 73 countries. The REEME Project demonstrates the power of the Internet as a means to achieve international cooperation in medical education, and can serve as a model for similar projects in other specialties and languages.

  8. Reconsidering Health Consequences of the Chernobyl Accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Socol, Yehoshua

    2015-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident led to major human suffering caused by the evacuation and other counter-measures. However, the direct health consequences of the accident-related radiation exposures, besides the acute effects and small number of thyroid cancers, have not been observed. This absence is challenged by some influential groups affecting public policies who claim that the true extent of radiogenic health consequences is covered up. We consider such claims. The most conservative (in this case - overestimating) linear no-threshold hypothesis was used to calculate excess cancer expectations for cleanup workers, the population of the contaminated areas and the global population. Statistical estimations were performed to verify whether such expected excess was detectable. The calculated cancer excess for each group is much less than uncertainties in number of cancer cases in epidemiological studies. Therefore the absence of detected radiation carcinogenesis is in full correspondence with the most conservative a priori expectations. Regarding the cover-up claims, rational choice analysis was performed. Such analysis shows that these claims are ill-founded. The present overcautious attitude to radiological hazards should be corrected in order to mitigate the present suffering and to avoid such suffering in the future.

  9. Chernobyl fallout measurements in some Mediterranean biotas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barci, G; Dalmasso, J; Ardisson, G

    1988-03-01

    The radioactivity of various terrestrial vegetation leaves characteristic of Mediterranean countries has been measured after the Chernobyl accident. In addition, we paid particular attention to lichens and seaweed which are considered as bioindicators of radioactive contamination. Most measurements were performed non-destructively using both coaxial and planar HPGe detectors. For odd mass radionuclides having low energy lines, such as 125Sb or 141Ce the sensitivity of the planar HPGe detector is better than the coaxial detector. The concentration of long-lived fission nuclides remaining three months after the accident were found to be enhanced in needle form leaves and in lichens. The seaweed Sphaerococcus exhibits a strong specific activity for iodine and ruthenium elements and poor concentration for caesium nuclides. The activity ratios of different isotopes of the same element measured in vegetation samples agree well with values found in airborne aerosols by other authors. The activation nuclide 110mAg is found in all samples with the same ratio 110mAg/137Cs = (1.0 +/- 0.2).10(-2) as in the soil deposition.

  10. Radiation damage aspects of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parmentier, N.; Nenot, J.C. (CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire)

    1989-01-01

    During the night of 25 to 26 April 1986, the most severe nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power stations. It resulted in the irradiation of 237 workers at dose levels justifying medical care. The most severe cases (115) were hospitalized in Moscow, with 20 patients with doses higher than 6 Gy. In most cases, the treatment was classical, based on transfusion of red cells and platelets, and heavy supportive therapy. For 19 patients with severe aplasia, transplantations of bone marrow (13) or foetal liver (6) were decided. Of these patients only one survived, which justifies the statement from U.S.S.R. physicians: after an accident the indications of grafting are limited and its risks may not justify its use. Most of the complications were related to radiation burns which involved 56 victims and resulted in fatal outcomes in at least 19 patients. The population was evacuated from a 30 km zone around the site; based on direct measurements and calculations, the collective dose was evaluated at 1.6 x 10{sup 4} man Sv, with an individual average lower than 250 mSv. The European part of U.S.S.R. with 75 million persons is supposed to have received a collective dose likely to increase the natural mortality by less than 0.1%. The numbers with cancer in the Northern Hemisphere might increase by 0.004% over the next 50 years.

  11. Radiation damage aspects of the chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmentier, N.; Nenot, J. C.

    During the night of 25 to 26 April 1986, the most severe nuclear accident occurred at the Chernobyl power station, about 150km north of Kiev, in the Ukraine. It resulted in the irradiation of 237 workers at dose levels justifying medical care. The most severe cases (115) were hospitalized in Moscow, with 20 patients with doses higher than 6 Gy. In most cases, the treatment was classical, based on transfusion of red cells and platelets, and heavy supportive therapy. For 19 patients with severe aplasia, transplantations of bone marrow (13) or foetal liver (6) were decided. Of these patients only one survived, which justifies the statement from U.S.S.R. physicians: after an accident the indications of grafting are limited and its risks may not justify its use. Most of the complications were related to radiation burns which involved 56 victims and resulted in fatal outcomes in at least 19 patients. The population was evacuated from a 30 km zone around the site; based on direct measurements and calculations, the collective dose was evaluated at 1.6 × 10 4 man Sv, with an individual average lower than 250 mSv. The European part of U.S.S.R. with 75 million persons is supposed to have received a collective dose likely to increase the natural mortality by less than 0.1%. The numbers with cancer in the Northern Hemisphere might increase by 0.004% over the next 50 years.

  12. Project-based faculty development by international health professions educators: practical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennin, Stewart; Kalishman, Summers; Eklund, Mary Ann; Friedman, Stacey; Morahan, Page S; Burdick, William

    2013-01-01

    Project design and implementation, applied to real life situations, is emerging as an educational strategy for application of health professions faculty development learning within a supportive environment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of project evolution to identify common experiences, challenges, and successful strategies of 54 mid-career faculty members from 18 developing countries who attended the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research Institute between 2001 and 2006 and designed, conducted, and evaluated education innovations at their home institutions. Chronological analysis of the evolution of 54 projects over the initial 16-18 months of the 2-year Fellowship was based on an iterative qualitative analysis of 324 reports and individual interview transcripts collected over 6 years. Useful skill areas for project implementation included educational methods, leadership and management, and relationships/collaboration. Common challenges included competing responsibilities, lack of protected time, and limited resources. Themes identified with the evolution and success of education innovation projects included leadership and organization, collaboration, personal professional growth, and awareness of the relevant societal context. Common challenges and success factors in project-based faculty development were identified. Twelve practical strategies to promote successful project-based faculty development emerged that can be generalized for faculty development.

  13. Long-Term Internal Variability Effects on Centennial Dynamic Sea Level Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi Bordbar, Mohammad; Martin, Thomas; Park, Wonsun; Latif, Mojib

    2015-04-01

    The Earth's surface is warming in response to anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO2). Sea level rise is one of the most pressing aspects of global warming with far-reaching consequences for coastal societies. However, sea level rise did and will strongly vary from coast to coast. Here we investigate the long-term internal variability effects on centennial projections of dynamic sea level (DSL), the local departure from the globally averaged sea level. A large ensemble of global warming integrations was conducted with a climate model, where each ensemble member was forced by identical CO2-increase but started from different atmospheric and oceanic initial conditions taken from an unforced millennial control run. In large parts of the mid- and high latitudes, the ensemble spread of the projected centennial DSL trends is of the same order of magnitude as the globally averaged steric sea level rise, suggesting internal variability cannot be ignored when assessing 21st century DSL changes. This conclusion is also supported by analyzing projections with other climate models. The ensemble spread is strongly reduced in the mid- to high latitudes if only the atmospheric initial conditions are perturbed; suggesting uncertainty in the projected centennial DSL trends there is largely due to the lack of ocean information. Thus climate model projections of regional sea level would benefit from ocean initialization.

  14. Partitioning uncertainty in ocean carbon uptake projections: Internal variability, emission scenario, and model structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovenduski, Nicole S.; McKinley, Galen A.; Fay, Amanda R.; Lindsay, Keith; Long, Matthew C.

    2016-09-01

    We quantify and isolate the sources of projection uncertainty in annual-mean sea-air CO2 flux over the period 2006-2080 on global and regional scales using output from two sets of ensembles with the Community Earth System Model (CESM) and models participating in the 5th Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5). For annual-mean, globally-integrated sea-air CO2 flux, uncertainty grows with prediction lead time and is primarily attributed to uncertainty in emission scenario. At the regional scale of the California Current System, we observe relatively high uncertainty that is nearly constant for all prediction lead times, and is dominated by internal climate variability and model structure, respectively in the CESM and CMIP5 model suites. Analysis of CO2 flux projections over 17 biogeographical biomes reveals a spatially heterogenous pattern of projection uncertainty. On the biome scale, uncertainty is driven by a combination of internal climate variability and model structure, with emission scenario emerging as the dominant source for long projection lead times in both modeling suites.

  15. The impact of Chernobyl on health and labour market performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Hartmut; Wadsworth, Jonathan

    2011-09-01

    Using longitudinal data from Ukraine we examine the extent of any long-lasting effects of exposure to the Chernobyl disaster on the health and labour market performance of the adult workforce. Variation in the local area level of radiation fallout from the Chernobyl accident is considered as a random exogenous shock with which to try to establish its causal impact on poor health, labour force participation, hours worked and wages. There appears to be a significant positive association between local area-level radiation dosage and perception of poor health, though much weaker associations between local area-level dosage and other specific self-reported health conditions. There is also some evidence to suggest that those who lived in areas more exposed to Chernobyl-induced radiation have significantly lower levels of labour market performance 20 years on. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Elevated frequency of abnormalities in barn swallows from Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Mousseau, T A; de Lope, F; Saino, N

    2007-08-22

    Ever since the Chernobyl accident in 1986, that contaminated vast areas in surrounding countries with radiation, abnormalities and birth defects have been reported in human populations. Recently, several studies suggested that the elevated frequency of such abnormalities can be attributed to poverty and stress in affected human populations. Here, we present long-term results for a free-living population of barn swallows, Hirundo rustica, demonstrating the presence of 11 morphological abnormalities in populations around Chernobyl, but much less frequently in an uncontaminated Ukrainian control population and three more distant control populations. The presence of these abnormalities in barn swallows is associated with reduced viability. These findings demonstrate a link between morphological abnormalities and radiation in an animal population that cannot be attributed to poverty and stress. The most parsimonious hypothesis for abnormalities in animal and human populations alike is that the effects are caused by the same underlying cause, viz. radiation derived from the Chernobyl accident.

  17. Aspermy, sperm quality and radiation in Chernobyl birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Bonisoli-Alquati, Andrea; Mousseau, Timothy A; Rudolfsen, Geir

    2014-01-01

    Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, large amounts of radionuclides were emitted and spread in the environment. Animals living in such contaminated areas are predicted to suffer fitness costs including reductions in the quality and quantity of gametes. We studied whether aspermy and sperm quality were affected by radioactive contamination by examining ejaculates from wild caught birds breeding in areas varying in background radiation level by more than three orders of magnitude around Chernobyl, Ukraine. The frequency of males with aspermy increased logarithmically with radiation level. While 18.4% of males from contaminated areas had no sperm that was only the case for 3.0% of males from uncontaminated control areas. Furthermore, there were negative relationships between sperm quality as reflected by reduced sperm velocity and motility, respectively, and radiation. Our results suggest that radioactive contamination around Chernobyl affects sperm production and quality. We are the first to report an interspecific difference in sperm quality in relation to radioactive contamination.

  18. A combined AHP-GP model to allocate internal auditing time to projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HA Kruger

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The optimal allocation of internal auditing time among competing projects is a multi-criteria problem that includes both qualitative and quantitative factors. This paper discusses an integrated approach where the analytic hierarchy process (AHP is used to deal with qualitative risk assessments and a goal programming (GP model to distribute available hours in such a way that risk is minimised. Additional considerations, such as maximum and minimum allowable project hours, risk reducing factors and risk levels, are also taken into account. Following a description of the models and framework, a brief case study is presented in which the framework was empirically evaluated.

  19. Modular projects and 'mean questions': best practices for advising an International Genetically Engineered Machines team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Jennifer; Meyer, Anne S

    2016-07-01

    In the yearly Internationally Genetically Engineered Machines (iGEM) competition, teams of Bachelor's and Master's students design and build an engineered biological system using DNA technologies. Advising an iGEM team poses unique challenges due to the inherent difficulties of mounting and completing a new biological project from scratch over the course of a single academic year; the challenges in obtaining financial and structural resources for a project that will likely not be fully realized; and conflicts between educational and competition-based goals. This article shares tips and best practices for iGEM team advisors, from two team advisors with very different experiences with the iGEM competition.

  20. UK's Brexit battle casts shadow over funding for international fusion projects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepherd, John [nuclear 24, Redditch (United Kingdom)

    2017-04-15

    The ramifications of Brexit - the UK's decision to leave the European Union - have continued to send shockwaves through the nuclear energy community, since I explained in this column recently that the move also means withdrawing from the Euratom Treaty. Now the UK's divorce from the EU is posing a threat that could deal a major blow to international efforts in fusion research. In fact, confusing signals from the UK have cast doubt on future funding and support for two key areas of world fusion cooperation: the Oxfordshire-based Joint European Torus (Jet) programme and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (Iter) project at Cadarache in France.

  1. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the

  2. Evaluation of the long-rang dispersion of radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, K.S.; Jeong, H.J.; Kim, E.H.; Hwang, W.T.; Han, M.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI), Nuclear Environmental Research Div., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    The atmospheric dispersion models have been developed to predict and minimize the radiological damage for the surrounding environment since the Chernobyl accident. There are many nuclear power plants in the region of Northeast Asia. It is necessary to develop a long-range atmospheric dispersion model for the radiological emergency preparedness against a nuclear accident. From this viewpoint, a Lagrangian particle model named L.A.D.A.S.(Long-range Accident Dose Assessment System) was initially developed for the evaluation the long-range dispersion in Korea since 2001. The model designed to estimate air concentrations and dry deposition as well as wet deposition at distances up to some thousands of kilometers from the source point in a horizontal direction. The validation study of the model was firstly performed by comparing the measured values of E.T.E.X. exercise. The developed model was also applied to simulate the movements of the radioactive materials at the Chernobyl accident. An intercomparison and validation study among the long-range models was performed through the A.T.M.E.S.(Atmospheric Transport Model Evaluation Study) project under auspices of the IAEA/W.M.O. (world meteorological organization) in 1992. As a consequence of A.T.M.E.S., it was observed that in a real emergency case, under conditions of urgency and stress, many of the models would have had different results. So, one of the main recommendations was the launch of a long-range atmospheric tracer experiment in conditions as close as possible to those which could be found in a real emergency case, with the advantage of a complete knowledge of the source term. In this study, numerical simulations were carried out to estimate the concentration distributions of {sup 137}Cs. The calculated results agreed well with them by Chernobyl accident. In conclusion, a three dimensional Lagrangian particle model named L.A.D.A.S. was developed to evaluate the characteristics of a long-range atmospheric

  3. STUDENT SERVICES EFFICIENCY PROBLEMS IN UKRAINE: EXPERIENCE OF INTERNATIONAL TEMPUS IMPRESS PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Chernyak

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of the implementation of the international project Tempus “IMPRESS” – “improving the efficiency of student services. The main aim of the project is to create modern Centers of student support services at the leading classical universities of Ukraine. One of the outcomes was the creation of the latest training course “Soft Skills” developed up to the modern international academic standards. In its framework, students will gain knowledge and skills that will facilitate their full adaptation to study at the University, and to the future professional activity. The course is designed to provide students with additional preference in employment, promote in their self-presentation skills, effective team work and decision making, enhance reflection ability and develop critical thinking.

  4. Chernobyl, 16 years later; Tchernobyl, 16 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-04-01

    This document on the Chernobyl site evolution is constituted around four main questions. What about the future of the Chernobyl site, the damaged reactor and the ''sarcophagus'' constructed around the reactor? What about the sanitary consequences of the accident on the liquidators asked to blot out the radiation and the around people exposed to radiation? What about the contaminated land around the power plant and their management? Concerning the France, what were the ''radioactive cloud'' sanitary consequences? (A.L.B.)

  5. [Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident and Tokaimura criticality accident].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Jun

    2012-03-01

    It is clear from inspection of historical incidents that the scale of disasters in a nuclear power plant accident is quite low level overwhelmingly compared with a nuclear explosion in nuclear war. Two cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were destroyed by nuclear blast with about 20 kt TNT equivalent and then approximately 100,000 people have died respectively. On the other hand, the number of acute death is 30 in the Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident. In this chapter, we review health hazards and doses in two historical nuclear incidents of Chernobyl and Tokaimura criticality accident and then understand the feature of the radiation accident in peaceful utilization of nuclear power.

  6. International collaboration on prevention of shaken baby syndrome - an ongoing project/intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley, Sue; Kovács, Zsuzsanna; Rose, Jenny; Lamb, Robyn; Tolliday, Fran; Simons-Coghill, Martine; Stephens, Amanda; Scheiber, Dóra; Toma, Andrea; Asbóth, Katalin; Kassai, Tamás; Agathonos, Helen; Lopes, Nahara R L; Williams, Lúcia C A; Sahin, Figen; Tasar, Aysin; Sarten, Terry

    2013-11-01

    Caring for young infants can be stressful. Non-accidental brain or head injury (shaken baby syndrome) is a result of parental stress, and a lack of knowledge of how to respond to a crying infant and the dangers of shaking a child. This article demonstrates the value of international collaboration in projects to prevent child maltreatment. It includes reports of prevention of shaken baby syndrome programmes in Australia, Hungary, Greece, Brazil and Turkey.

  7. Chronic irradiation of Scots pine trees (Pinus sylvestris) in the Chernobyl exclusion zone: dosimetry and radiobiological effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoschenko, Vasyl I; Kashparov, Valery A; Melnychuk, Maxim D; Levchuk, Svjatoslav E; Bondar, Yulia O; Lazarev, Mykola; Yoschenko, Maria I; Farfán, Eduardo B; Jannik, G Timothy

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 y old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y(-1)) to approximately 7 Gy y(-1) in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified, and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

  8. CHRONIC IRRADIATION OF SCOTS PINE TREES (PINUS SYLVESTRIS) IN THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE: DOSIMETRY AND RADIOBIOLOGICAL EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To identify effects of chronic internal and external radiation exposure for components of terrestrial ecosystems, a comprehensive study of Scots pine trees in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone was performed. The experimental plan included over 1,100 young trees (up to 20 years old) selected from areas with varying levels of radioactive contamination. These pine trees were planted after the 1986 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident mainly to prevent radionuclide resuspension and soil erosion. For each tree, the major morphological parameters and radioactive contamination values were identified. Cytological analyses were performed for selected trees representing all dose rate ranges. A specially developed dosimetric model capable of taking into account radiation from the incorporated radionuclides in the trees was developed for the apical meristem. The calculated dose rates for the trees in the study varied within three orders of magnitude, from close to background values in the control area (about 5 mGy y{sup -1}) to approximately 7 Gy y{sup -1} in the Red Forest area located in the immediate vicinity of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant site. Dose rate/effect relationships for morphological changes and cytogenetic defects were identified and correlations for radiation effects occurring on the morphological and cellular level were established.

  9. International evaluation of Swedish research projects in the field of short rotation forestry for energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawson, W.M. [N.I. Horticulture and Plant Breeding Station, Armagh (Ireland); Isebrands, J. [USDA Forest Service, North Central Forest Experiment Station, Rhinelander, WI (United States); Namkoong, G. [Univ. of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Forest Sciences; Tahvanainen, J. [Univ. of Joensuu (Finland). Dept. of Biology

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this evaluation was to inform NUTEK of the scientific quality of the research projects, as seen in an international context. The projects were therefore the main elements considered in the evaluation. The main basis of the evaluation was the scientific quality of the research and its relevance to NUTEK`s aims in the application of industrial research and development. The present report is based on the information contained in the written reports submitted by the grant holders, site visits and discussions between the grant holders and the Committee. The report first gives an overview and general recommendations concerning the overall programme in the field of Short Rotation Forestry for Energy. Thereafter, the 16 projects are evaluated separately

  10. A Model of Successful School Leadership from the International Successful School Principalship Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Gurr

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The International Successful School Principalship Project (ISSPP has been actively conducting research about the work of successful principals since 2001. Findings from four project books and eight models derived from this project are synthesised into a model of successful school leadership. Building on Gurr, Drysdale and Mulford’s earlier model, the work of school leaders is described as engaging within the school context to influence student and school outcomes through interventions in teaching and learning, school capacity building, and the wider context. The qualities a leader brings to their role, a portfolio approach to using leadership ideas, constructing networks, collaborations and partnerships, and utilising accountability and evaluation for evidence-informed improvement, are important additional elements. The model is applicable to all in leadership roles in schools.

  11. The French-German initiative for Chernobyl. Programme 1 safety state of the sarcophagus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pretzsch, G.; Roloff, R.; Roloff, R.; Artmann, A. [Gesellschaft fur Anlagenund Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) (Germany); Lhomme, V. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Berberich, G. [Erftstadt-Gymnich (Germany); Selesnew, A

    2005-07-01

    The data collected and processed within the framework of the French-German Initiative are an excellent basis for the intended specialist application at the Chernobyl Centre as well as for an extended use in connection with the restoration of the Sarcophagus as part of the 'Shelter Implementation Plan' performed under the auspices of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development. The major goals of the S.I.P. are the stabilisation of the existing Sarcophagus and the erection of a New Safe Confinement (N.S.C.) around the already existing Sarcophagus, the degasifier wing and the turbine building.This N.S.C. is to safely confine the radioactive materials for at least 100 years and is to allow their retrieval from inside if need be as well as the dismantling of the old structure.In addition, the database can be used for obtaining information needed for project descriptions, safety analysis reports, etc. The Ukrainian safety authority S.N.R.C.U. (State Nuclear Regulatory Committee of Ukraine) and its technical safety organisation, the State Scientific-Technical Center (S.S.T.C.), have also signaled their interest in using the database.Further information on the F.G.I. and on the 'Radioecology and Health Programmes' can be found at: www.fgi1-chernobyl.de.vu; www.grs.de, www.irsn.fr; www.fgi.icc.gov.ua. (N.C.)

  12. Software for improving the quality of project management, a case study: international manufacture of electrical equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preradović, D. M.; Mićić, Lj S.; Barz, C.

    2017-05-01

    Production conditions in today’s world require software support at every stage of production and development of new products, for quality assurance and compliance with ISO standards. In addition to ISO standards such as usual metrics of quality, companies today are focused on other optional standards, such as CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integrated) or prescribing they own standards. However, while there is intensive progress being made in the PM (project management), there is still a significant number of projects, at the global level, that are failures. These have failed to achieve their goals, within budget or timeframe. This paper focuses on checking the role of software tools through the rate of success in projects implemented in the case of internationally manufactured electrical equipment. The results of this research show the level of contribution of the project management software used to manage and develop new products to improve PM processes and PM functions, and how selection of the software tools affects the quality of PM processes and successfully completed projects.

  13. SOME HEALTH INDEXES OF CHERNOBYL LIQUIDATORS (DELAYED EFFECTS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    O. V. Baranova; T. M. Koroleva; V. M. Shubik

    2012-01-01

    .... Disorders of immunity and health of the liquidators in the remote period after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant is due to the combined effect of low radiation doses, psychological stress and other factors of non-radiation nature.

  14. How mobile robots have helped at Chernobyl and other accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meieran, H.B.

    1988-04-01

    The use of mobile robots at several recent accidents including Chernobyl is described. The robots assumed, with varying degrees of success, many of the tasks and missions that are normally conducted by the emergency response team. Lessons learned from the experiences, together with operational and performance problems are discussed. (U.K.).

  15. Recent trends of the tropical hydrological cycle inferred from Global Precipitation Climatology Project and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y. P.; Xu, Kuan-Man; Sud, Y. C.; Betts, A. K.

    2011-05-01

    Scores of modeling studies have shown that increasing greenhouse gases in the atmosphere impact the global hydrologic cycle; however, disagreements on regional scales are large, and thus the simulated trends of such impacts, even for regions as large as the tropics, remain uncertain. The present investigation attempts to examine such trends in the observations using satellite data products comprising Global Precipitation Climatology Project precipitation and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project cloud and radiation. Specifically, evolving trends of the tropical hydrological cycle over the last 20-30 years were identified and analyzed. The results show (1) intensification of tropical precipitation in the rising regions of the Walker and Hadley circulations and weakening over the sinking regions of the associated overturning circulation; (2) poleward shift of the subtropical dry zones (up to 2° decade-1 in June-July-August (JJA) in the Northern Hemisphere and 0.3-0.7° decade-1 in June-July-August and September-October-November in the Southern Hemisphere) consistent with an overall broadening of the Hadley circulation; and (3) significant poleward migration (0.9-1.7° decade-1) of cloud boundaries of Hadley cell and plausible narrowing of the high cloudiness in the Intertropical Convergence Zone region in some seasons. These results support findings of some of the previous studies that showed strengthening of the tropical hydrological cycle and expansion of the Hadley cell that are potentially related to the recent global warming trends.

  16. International shock-wave database project : report of the requirements workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aidun, John Bahram (Institute of Problems of chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences); Lomonosov, Igor V. (Institute of Problems of chemical Physics of Russian Academy of Sciences); Levashov, Pavel R. (Joint Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences)

    2012-03-01

    We report on the requirements workshop for a new project, the International Shock-Wave database (ISWdb), which was held October 31 - November 2, 2011, at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. Participants considered the idea of this database, its structure, technical requirements, content, and principles of operation. This report presents the consensus conclusions from the workshop, key discussion points, and the goals and plan for near-term and intermediate-term development of the ISWdb. The main points of consensus from the workshop were: (1) This international database is of interest and of practical use for the shock-wave and high pressure physics communities; (2) Intermediate state information and off-Hugoniot information is important and should be included in ISWdb; (3) Other relevant high pressure and auxiliary data should be included to the database, in the future; (4) Information on the ISWdb needs to be communicated, broadly, to the research community; and (5) Operating structure will consist of an Advisory Board, subject-matter expert Moderators to vet submitted data, and the database Project Team. This brief report is intended to inform the shock-wave research community and interested funding agencies about the project, as its success, ultimately, depends on both of these groups finding sufficient value in the database to use it, contribute to it, and support it.

  17. Mechanisms of Region Construction: the Case of International Projects in the Baltic Sea Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sologub Anastasiya Petrovna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes the processes of regional construction and their specific features in the Baltic Sea region. The article provides insights into main approaches to defining the notion of the Baltic Sea Region, its geography, rationales and preconditions of the Baltic Sea Region construction. The author makes conclusion that currently the construction process is being continued, and it involves a wide range of actors: NGOs, local and regional authorities, scientific organizations, higher education institutions, business structures, international organizations. All these actors use different tools and act in different spheres. Although there is no clear answer to the question “Who and how constructs the Baltic Sea Region?”, it is concluded that the cooperation played a significant role in this process, for example, by determining the geography of the region and creating communication networks. Projects, in turn, become a widespread form of cooperation which are used by large Baltic interregional organizations, such as the Northern Dimension, Interregional programmes, the Council of the Baltic Sea States. International project activity of the described above actors, being the point of pooled resources application and also narratives on the regional issues, became one of the mechanisms of the region construction. The article proves that a wide variety of projects in various fields with the participation of different actors creates a picture of the Baltic Sea region building some of its features and providing common identity and responsibility ideas.

  18. FOREIGN JUDGMENTS PROJECT OF HAGUE CONFERENCE: FOR A GLOBAL REGIME OF INTERNATIONAL CIRCULATION OF JUDGMENTS ON CIVIL AND COMMERCIAL SUBJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia de Araujo

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Hague Conference on Private International Law is promoting the adoption of rules designed to circumvent usual obstacles to the international circulation of judgments. The Judgments Project initiated in the nineties aims at mitigating uncertainties and risks associated with the international commerce by setting forth a simple and safe system according to which foreign judgments may circulate from country to country. The purpose of this article is to preserve the historical moment of the negotiations taking place at the Hague, as well as to pinpoint some technical issues raised in the course of the project that may be of general interest to those involved in the subject of international jurisdiction.

  19. 15. Consequences of the Chernobyl catastrophe for public health and the environment 23 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yablokov, Alexey V; Nesterenko, Vassily B; Nesterenko, Alexey V

    2009-11-01

    More than 50% of Chernobyl's radionuclides were dispersed outside of Belarus, Ukraine, and European Russia and caused fallout as far away as North America. In 1986 nearly 400 million people lived in areas radioactively contaminated at a level higher than 4 kBq/m(2) and nearly 5 million individuals are still being exposed to dangerous contamination. The increase in morbidity, premature aging, and mutations is seen in all the contaminated territories that have been studied. The increase in the rates of total mortality for the first 17 years in European Russia was up to 3.75% and in Ukraine it was up to 4.0%. Levels of internal irradiation are increasing owing to plants absorbing and recycling Cs-137, Sr-90, Pu, and Am. During recent years, where internal levels of Cs-137 have exceeded 1 mSv/year, which is considered "safe," it must be lowered to 50 Bq/kg in children and to 75 Bq/kg in adults. Useful practices to accomplish this include applying mineral fertilizers on agricultural lands, K and organosoluble lignin on forestlands, and regular individual consumption of natural pectin enterosorbents. Extensive international help is needed to provide radiation protection for children, especially in Belarus, where over the next 25 to 30 years radionuclides will continue to contaminate plants through the root layers in the soil. Irradiated populations of plants and animals exhibit a variety of morphological deformities and have significantly higher levels of mutations that were rare prior to 1986. The Chernobyl zone is a "black hole": some species may persist there only via immigration from uncontaminated areas.

  20. DECOVALEX - an International Cooperative Research Project on Coupled Thermo-hydro-mechanical Processes in Fractured Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, C. F.

    2003-12-01

    The international cooperative project DECOVALEX (acronym for DEvelopment of COupled THM models and their VALidation against EXperiments) was established in 1992 by national agencies involved in nuclear waste disposal. The aim of this project is to develop and test models capable of simulating coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes. Over the last ten years, about 16 research teams from 10 countries have participated in this joint effort. The project objectives include: a. support development of computer simulators for THM modeling; b. investigate and implement suitable algorithms for THM modeling; c. compare model calculations with results from field and laboratory experiments; d. design new experiments to support code development; e. study the application of THM modeling to performance and safety assessment. A large number of benchmark tests (BMT) and test cases (TC) have been studied within the project. BMTs are hypothetical problems used for investigating the behavior of individual coupled THM processes, using alternative conceptual and numerical models by different teams. TCs are laboratory and field experiments that were analyzed to advance our understanding of THM processes and whose data were used to test computer models. A number of large-scale, multiyear experiments have been studied within the project, including: a. multiple borehole tests for shaft excavation design at Sellafield, UK; b. THM experiment on the bentonite-rock system at Kamaishi Mine, Japan; c. full scale bentonite-rock test (FEBEX) at Grimsel Underground Research Laboratory, Switzerland; d. Drift Scale Heater Test (DST) in the Exploratory Studies Facility at Yucca Mountain, USA. The talk will present an overview of the ten-year project by highlighting a few of the main results and lessons learned.

  1. Time-Gated Optical Projection Tomography Allows Visualization of Adult Zebrafish Internal Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foglia, Efrem Alessandro; Pistocchi, Anna; D'Andrea, Cosimo; Valentini, Gianluca; Cubeddu, Rinaldo; De Silvestri, Sandro; Cerullo, Giulio; Cotelli, Franco

    2012-01-01

    Optical imaging through biological samples is compromised by tissue scattering and currently various approaches aim to overcome this limitation. In this paper we demonstrate that an all optical technique, based on non-linear upconversion of infrared ultrashort laser pulses and on multiple view acquisition, allows the reduction of scattering effects in tomographic imaging. This technique, namely Time-Gated Optical Projection Tomography (TGOPT), is used to reconstruct three dimensionally the internal structure of adult zebrafish without staining or clearing agents. This method extends the use of Optical Projection Tomography to optically diffusive samples yielding reconstructions with reduced artifacts, increased contrast and improved resolution with respect to those obtained with non-gated techniques. The paper shows that TGOPT is particularly suited for imaging the skeletal system and nervous structures of adult zebrafish. PMID:23185643

  2. International Remote Monitoring Project Embalse Nuclear Power Station, Argentina Embalse Remote Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sigfried L.; Glidewell, Donnie D.; Bonino, Anibal; Bosler, Gene; Mercer, David; Maxey, Curt; Vones, Jaromir; Martelle, Guy; Busse, James; Kadner, Steve; White, Mike; Rovere, Luis

    1999-07-21

    The Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina (ARN), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ABACC, the US Department of Energy, and the US Support Program POTAS, cooperated in the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. This system was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station last year to evaluate the feasibility of using radiation sensors in monitoring the transfer of spent fuel from the spent fuel pond to dry storage. The key element in this process is to maintain continuity of knowledge throughout the entire transfer process. This project evaluated the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguard efficiency. New technology has been developed to enhance the design of the system to include storage capability on board sensor platforms. This evaluation has led to design enhancements that will assure that no data loss will occur during loss of RF transmission of the sensors.

  3. Corruption and compliance: preventive legislations and policies in international business projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh PATHAK

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This article seeks to provide an insight on the international phenomenon of corruption, dealing with its existence, and whether compliance is higher with Anti-Corruption laws or with corruption itself, resulting in anti-corruption laws being much less effective than the legislators intended it to be and the reasons for increasing demand worldwide for new governance standards and higher compliance controls and other effective anti-corruption laws and policies in light of rapid increase in corruption every year. This article further deals with the diagnosis and measures to deal with the cause of corruption – the short-comings in anti-corruption law – the reasons why corporations are willing to face continuing legal risks and adverse publicity but still indulge in corrupt practices and the extent of negative impact the prevailing levels of corruption ultimately have on international business and trade. Strict compliance controls are being introduced with increasing enforcement of anti-corruption laws internationally and nations have also started to focus on individual and corporate liability in cases of violation of anti-corruption laws, for both government and private organisations. In this context of far-reaching developments, whether European and South-east Asian Countries like India and International Business Organisations can act in ignorance or buck up and accept this trend, slowly and steadily moving towards a less corrupt nation and International business projects – if not towards a totally corruption free one, keeping in mind the growth of international trade and Commerce and its sustainability.

  4. Current status of the international DECOVALEX project: thermal-hydraulic-mechanical couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, C. H.; Hwang, Y. S.; Kim, J

    1998-01-01

    THM coupling is an important issue to assess the safety of the HLW repositories. In this art report the current status of the international DECOVALEX project was reviewed to understand the most updated R and D direction on the groundwater flow assessment coupled with the decay heat and mechanical stress around a repository. Important progresses of DECOVALEX I, II, III and 2 were studied. Results show that even though there are good agreements on the predictions of stress and temperature, still the prediction of flow in discrete fracture network is incomplete. (author). 21 refs., 28 tabs., 33 figs

  5. The ecotourism project management market, oriented to the international market, which impacts regional development through the application of PMBOK standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Alberto Romero Infante

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rev.esc.adm.neg This article describes the application of project management practices in the ecotourism sector of Colombia, which is oriented to the international market and which impacts considerably regional development. Different processes of the Project Management Institute International Standards (PMI have been applied during this project which aims at identifying and validating sustainable methods of ecotourism trading services in protected areas of high ecological and cultural value. An exploration methodology was used, based on the review and interpretation of literature about the best international practices of project management. From the above, we have developed a structural frame that could be applied to different projects involving the Colombian ecotourism sector, aiming at improving the management of such interventions.

  6. ACCOUNTING STANDARD SETTING IN THE INTERNATIONAL ARENA: UPDATE ON THE CONVERGENCE PROJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bonaci Carmen Giorgiana

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Our paper contributes to the literature on international accounting by focusing on the standard setting process. As documented by research literature, accounting regulation can enhance corporate governance (Melis and Carta, 2010, corporate reporting being expected to reduce information asymmetry. Based on accounting research and trade literature we first synthesize recent evolutions in the international accounting arena. We therefore position our study within current realities significantly marked by uncertainty in relation to the world wide globalization process. The objective of our paper is to perform an analysis that would help assess further developments of the convergence project. This is done by looking at the current status of the projects being developed under the IASB –FASB collaboration, as well as by developing a comparison between IFRS and US GAAP. The employed research methodology relies on analyzing data provided through the IASB and the FASB’s websites, as well as other official documents being issued by the two Boards. The assessment of the projects was done by reviewing exposure documents and monitoring the Boards’ deliberations, while the developed comparison requires accounting regulations content analysis. Concluding upon the Boards’ ongoing projects, we might identify areas in which convergence seems to be quite close (such as revenue recognition and leasing, but also areas in which convergence becomes even more challenging (such as financial instruments or the particular case of offsetting. Similar to other studies being developed within accounting research and trade literature (SEC 2011: 8 we may conclude that, generally, US GAAP present more detailed, specific requirements than IFRS.

  7. Benchmark Data Through The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPHEP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Enrico Sartori

    2005-09-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiments Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency’s (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) in June of 2002. The IRPhEP focus is on the derivation of internationally peer reviewed benchmark models for several types of integral measurements, in addition to the critical configuration. While the benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP are of primary interest to the Reactor Physics Community, many of the benchmarks can be of significant value to the Criticality Safety and Nuclear Data Communities. Benchmarks that support the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), for example, also support fuel manufacture, handling, transportation, and storage activities and could challenge current analytical methods. The IRPhEP is patterned after the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and is closely coordinated with the ICSBEP. This paper highlights the benchmarks that are currently being prepared by the IRPhEP that are also of interest to the Criticality Safety Community. The different types of measurements and associated benchmarks that can be expected in the first publication and beyond are described. The protocol for inclusion of IRPhEP benchmarks as ICSBEP benchmarks and for inclusion of ICSBEP benchmarks as IRPhEP benchmarks is detailed. The format for IRPhEP benchmark evaluations is described as an extension of the ICSBEP format. Benchmarks produced by the IRPhEP add new dimension to criticality safety benchmarking efforts and expand the collection of available integral benchmarks for nuclear data testing. The first publication of the "International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments" is scheduled for January of 2006.

  8. Application of TREECS (trademark) to Strontium 90 for Borschi Watershed near Chernobyl, Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    fission product resulting from the accident in 1986, poses a health concern around and down-gradient from Chernobyl due to its high specific...Res., Spec. Issue 1, 48-56. Freed, R., Smith, L., and Bugai, D. 2004. The effective source areas of 90Sr a stream near Chernobyl , Ukraine. J...near Chernobyl , Ukraine by Mark S. Dortch PURPOSE: The Training Range Environmental Evaluation and Characterization System (TREECS™) (http

  9. [Remote effects of the Chernobyl accident: evaluation of the maxillodental status of the children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevbitov, A V

    2004-01-01

    Examinations of children exposed to the Chernobyl factor showed deterioration of the maxillodental status, presenting as a decrease in the incidence of normal-for-age status in comparison with children from the control group. The incidence of dental abnormalities in children whose parents participated in the Chernobyl accident aftermath is increased by 240,09%. The determination of remote effects of the Chernobyl accident for the health status of Russian children requires a differentiated approach and deserves a special study.

  10. A Quantitative and Qualitative Evaluation of Student Participants' Contribution to Carrying out an Online International Collaborative Project on Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Chizuko; Ishida, Kenichi; Yoshihara, Shota; Schultheis, Klaudia; Riedhammer, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluates an international collaborative project developed and practiced on the internet, as a form of SNS, focusing on how much university students from six countries worldwide participated in the project, from the viewpoint of the participants' contribution to the forum discussion of their own group's topic on education. The 66…

  11. Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management at Chernobyle Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahner, S.; Fomin, V. V.

    2002-02-26

    In the framework of the preparation for the decommissioning of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) an Industrial Complex for Solid Radwaste Management (ICSRM) will be built under the EC TACIS Program in the vicinity of ChNPP. The paper will present the proposed concepts and their integration into existing buildings and installations. Further, the paper will consider the safety cases, as well as the integration of Western and Ukrainian Organizations into a cohesive project team and the requirement to guarantee the fulfillment of both Western standards and Ukrainian regulations and licensing requirements. The paper will provide information on the status of the interim design and the effects of value engineering on the output of basic design phase. The paper therefor summarizes the design results of the involved design engineers of the Design and Process Providers BNFL (LOT 1), RWE NUKEM GmbH (LOT 2 and General) and INITEC (LOT 3).

  12. International Collaboration and Academic Exchange of the CHAIN Project in this Three Years (Period)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, Satoru; Shibata, Kazunari; Morita, Satoshi; Kimura, Goichi; Asai, Ayumi; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako; Nakatani, Yoshikazu; Masashi, Yamaguchi; et al.

    2014-02-01

    We will introduce contents of international collaboration and academic exchange of the CHAIN project in recent three years (ISWI period). After April of 2010, we have not obtained any enough budget for new instruments. Therefore, we have not been able to install new Flare Monitoring Telescopes (FMT) in new countries, such as Algeria. On the other hand, however, we have continued international academic exchange through scientific and educational collaboration with mainly Peru, such as data-analysis training, holding scientific workshops etc. Additionally, in this year, King Saudi University of Saudi Arabia and CRAAG of Algeria have planned to build a new FMT in their university by their own budget. Therefore, we have started some collaboration in the field of technical advices of instruments and scientific themes etc. Moreover, Pakistan Space and Upper Atmosphere Research Commission (SUPARCO) also offered us participation in the CHAIN-project. We would like to continue to consider the possibility of academic collaboration with such new positive developing nations, too.

  13. Partitioning internal variability and model uncertainty components in a multireplicate multimodel ensemble of hydrometeorological future projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingray, Benoit; Saïd, Mériem; Lafaysse, Matthieu; Gailhlard, Joël; Mezghani, Abdelkader

    2014-05-01

    A simple and robust framework was proposed by Hingray and Mériem (2013) for the partitioning of the different components of internal variability and model uncertainty in a multireplicate multimodel ensemble (MRMME) of climate projections obtained for a suite of statistical downscaling models (SDMs) and global climate models (GCMs). It is based on the quasi-ergodic assumption for transient climate simulations. Model uncertainty components are estimated from the noise-free signals of each modeling chain using a two-way ANOVA framework. The residuals from the noise-free signal are used to estimate the large and small scale internal variability (IV) components associated with each considered GCM/SDM configuration. This framework makes it possible to take into account all runs and replicates available from any climate ensemble of opportunity. This quasi-ergodic ANOVA framework was applied to the MRMME of hydrometeorological simulations produced for the Upper Durance River basin (French Alps) over the 1860-2100 period within the RIWER2030 research project (http://www.lthe.fr/RIWER2030/). The different uncertainty sources were quantified as a function of lead time for projected changes in temperature, precipitation, evaporation losses, snow cover and discharges (Lafaysse et al., 2013). For temperature, GCM uncertainty prevails and, as opposed to IV, SDM uncertainty is non-negligible. Significant warming and in turn significant changes are predicted for evaporation, snow cover and seasonality of discharges. For precipitation, GCM and SDM uncertainty components are of the same order. Despite high model uncertainty, the non-zero climate change response of simulation chains is significant and annual precipitation is expected to decrease. However, high values are obtained for the large and small scale components of IV, inherited respectively from the GCMs and the different replicates of a given SDM. The same applies for annual discharge. The uncertainty in values that could

  14. Terrestrial invertebrate population studies in the Chernobyl exclusion zone, Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, D.; Stone, D.M. [Enviros, 61 The Shore, Leith, Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Copplestone, D.; Gilhen, M.C. [Liverpool Univ., Environmental Research and Consultancy (United Kingdom)

    2004-07-01

    The Chernobyl reactor accident in April 1986 caused the release to atmosphere of substantial amounts of radioactivity. Precise estimates of the release vary. The USSR State Committee presented information to a meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency in August 1986 indicating a release of some 2.9x10{sup 5} TBq {sup 137}Cs and 2x10{sup 5} TBq {sup 90}Sr, with a total fission/activation product release of 1.7x10{sup 6} TBq. Other commentators suggest that up to double this amount may have been released. Estimates of deposition likewise vary, although it is probable that about half the released activity was deposited within 20 km of the release point, predominantly following two plume trajectories to the north and west. This resulted in the death of pine trees over 400 ha, the abandonment of 100,000 to 150,000 ha of agricultural land and the establishment of an exclusion zone extending to 30 km from the site. High levels of radionuclide contamination continue to prevail within the exclusion zone. Nonetheless, over the past fifteen years, re-colonisation has been widespread. Mixed deciduous woodlands, with a high proportion of birch (Betula spp.) and willow (Salix spp.), have become established in the forest areas, while agricultural land has succeeded to tall grassland and scrub. Field sites established in this study exhibited external gamma dose rates varying from 0.1 {mu}Sv h{sup -1} to 140 {mu}Sv h{sup -1}. Corresponding mean concentrations of {sup 137}Cs in the top 20 cm of soil varied from about 6.10{sup 2} to 3.10{sup 6} Bq kg{sup -1} dw. This study summarises observations over the period 2001 to 2004. Sub-surface activity, as measured by bait lamina penetration, appears to be inversely correlated with concentrations of {sup 137}Cs and {sup 90}Sr in soil. Likewise, at the very highest levels of contamination, there is some loss of invertebrate diversity; although little associated change in overall biomass. Between years, population densities and

  15. Projected Population Size and Age Structure for Canada and Provinces: With and Without International Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loh, Shirley

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available EnglishThis paper examines the effect of net international migration on prospectivepopulation growth and age structure in Canada for the next 50 years. It alsoexamines the impact of international migration on provincial growth anddistribution. The procedure used in this study is by comparing two projectedpopulation scenarios, one with international migration and the other withoutinternational migration, based on the latest 2005-based population projections.The analysis of the scenarios shows that the assumed level of internationalmigration which is higher than the current level contributes to a continuousincrease in population over the next 50 years, but has limited effect to prevent oroffset the overall aging trend.FrenchCe document examine l’effet de la migration internationale sur la croissanceprospective de la population et la structure par âge au Canada pour les 50prochaines années. Il examine aussi l’impact de la migration internationale surla croissance et la distribution provinciales. La démarche utilisée dans cetteétude est de comparer les deux scénarios de population projetée l’un avecmigration internationale et l’autre sans migration internationale, selon lesdernières projections de population de 2005. L’analyse des scénarios démontreque le niveau présumé de migration internationale, plus élevé que le niveauactuel, contribue à une croissance continuelle de la population au cours des 50prochaines années, mais a peu d’effet quand à la prévention ou la tendance auvieillissement.

  16. Recent Insights from the International Common-Cause Failure Data Exchange Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Kreuser

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Common-cause failure (CCF events can significantly impact the availability of safety systems of nuclear power plants. For this reason, the International Common Cause Data Exchange (ICDE project was initiated by several countries in 1994. Since 1997 it has been operated within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA framework and has successfully been operated over six consecutive terms (the current term being 2015–2017. The ICDE project allows multiple countries to collaborate and exchange CCF data to enhance the quality of risk analyses, which include CCF modeling. As CCF events are typically rare, most countries do not experience enough CCF events to perform meaningful analyses. Data combined from several countries, however, have yielded sufficient data for more rigorous analyses. The ICDE project has meanwhile published 11 reports on the collection and analysis of CCF events of specific component types (centrifugal pumps, emergency diesel generators, motor operated valves, safety and relief valves, check valves, circuit breakers, level measurement, control rod drive assemblies, and heat exchangers and two topical reports. This paper presents recent activities and lessons learnt from the data collection and the results of topical analysis on emergency diesel generator CCF impacting entire exposed population.

  17. Recent insights from the international common-cause failure data exchange project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreuser, Albert [Gesellschaft fur Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) gGmbH, Cologne (Germany); Johanson, Gunner [AF Industry, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-03-15

    Common-cause failure (CCF) events can significantly impact the availability of safety systems of nuclear power plants. For this reason, the International Common Cause Data Exchange (ICDE) project was initiated by several countries in 1994. Since 1997 it has been operated within the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)/Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) framework and has successfully been operated over six consecutive terms (the current term being 2015–2017). The ICDE project allows multiple countries to collaborate and exchange CCF data to enhance the quality of risk analyses, which include CCF modeling. As CCF events are typically rare, most countries do not experience enough CCF events to perform meaningful analyses. Data combined from several countries, however, have yielded sufficient data for more rigorous analyses. The ICDE project has meanwhile published 11 reports on the collection and analysis of CCF events of specific component types (centrifugal pumps, emergency diesel generators, motor operated valves, safety and relief valves, check valves, circuit breakers, level measurement, control rod drive assemblies, and heat exchangers) and two topical reports. This paper presents recent activities and lessons learnt from the data collection and the results of topical analysis on emergency diesel generator CCF impacting entire exposed population.

  18. SOME HEALTH INDEXES OF CHERNOBYL LIQUIDATORS (DELAYED EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Baranova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve to twenty years after the Chernobyl accident, liquidators that have been exposed to a wide range of doses (200-890 mSv show radiophobia. The achieved level of adaptation to life is associated with overstrain in emotional and somatic spheres. At relatively higher exposure levels, morbidity is increased, specially pathology of the cardiovascular system. Growth in the number of cataracts is absent, but involutional changes of retina vessels are increased. Suppression of innate and acquired humoral and cellular immunity and autoallergic shifts play significant role in the identified health problems. Disorders of immunity and health of the liquidators in the remote period after the accident at the Chernobyl nuclear power plant is due to the combined effect of low radiation doses, psychological stress and other factors of non-radiation nature.

  19. 15 years after Chernobyl. Nuclear power and climate change?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, M

    2001-04-01

    Fifteen years after two massive explosions and a subsequent fire released a giant radioactive cloud into the atmosphere over the Chernobyl nuclear power plant located in what used to be the USSR, 388 farms with 230,000 sheep in Wales, England and Scotland are still subject to restriction orders. The contamination levels stand at several hundred Becquerels of cesium per kilogram of meat, too much to be consumed by human beings. The sheep have to be moved for some time to low or non-contaminated pastures in order to allow the bodies to loose some of their radioactivity before they can be slaughtered. For many countries the 1986 Chernobyl catastrophe came a public turning point for the future of nuclear energy. (author)

  20. Chernobyl: what sanitary consequences?; Tchernobyl: quelles consequences sanitaires?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aurengo, A. [Assistance Publique, Hopitaux de Parix (AP-HP), 75 - Paris (France)

    2001-11-01

    Because of its public health, ecological and industrial consequences, the Chernobyl accident has become a myth which serves as the focus of many fears, justified or not. no one can question the seriousness of the event, but after fifteen years there is still no agreement about the effect it has had or will have on public health. For example, the total number of deaths attributed to Chernobyl varies from less than a hundred to several millions and congenital malformations from negligible to cataclysmic. Effects on public health may be calculated from data on contamination, from the dose received and from the risk, all three of which are likely to be very roughly known; or they may be evaluated on the spot, either by epidemiological studies or by examining medical registers. This report makes an inventory of the different risks and takes stock on them. (N.C.)

  1. Screening for 137Cs body burden due to the Chernobyl accident in Korosten City, Zhitomir, Ukraine: 1996-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashida, Naomi; Sekitani, Yui; Kozlovsky, Alexander; Rafalsky, Ruslan; Gutevich, Alexander; Daniliuk, Valery; Yamashita, Shunichi; Takamura, Noboru

    2011-01-01

    During the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident on 26 April 1986, large amounts of radionuclides were released and spread to vast areas. Inhabitants residing around CNPP have been exposed to external and internal irradiation due to the long half-life of (137)Cs (30 years). In this study, we screened for internal whole-body (137)Cs concentration using a whole-body counter in the Zhitomir state of Ukraine. The total number of participants was 144,972 (96,149 females and 48,823 males). The median body burden of (137)Cs per body weight decreased from 1996 to 2008. In particular, after 2003, more than half of subjects had internal exposure doses below the detectable level. A weak seasonal effect was found in measurement data from 1997 to 1999, but no such effects were observed in later years. We also calculated annual dose for each year and confirmed that doses have been decreasing gradually. In particular, after 2003, the annual effective dose decreased to 0.1 mSv y(-1) for 95% of the participants. Only two persons were found to have received more than 5 mSv y(-1) since 2007. Although the health effects of (137)Cs body burden due to the Chernobyl accident remain uncertain, further screening is needed to monitor the health status and to allay the anxiety of inhabitants in the contaminated areas around CNPP.

  2. COOP+ project: Promoting the cooperation among international Research Infrastructures to address global environmental challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonet-García, Francisco; Materia, Paola; Kutsch, Werner; de Lucas, Jesús Marco; Tjulin, Anders

    2016-04-01

    During the Anthropocene, mankind will face several global environmental challenges. One of the first and more successful responses provided by Science to these challenges is the collecting of long-term series of biophysical variables in order to improve our knowledge of natural systems. The huge amount of information gathered during the last decades by Research Infrastructures (RIs) has helped to understand the structure and functioning of natural systems at local and regional scales. But how can we address the global cross-scale and cross-disciplinary challenges posed by the global environment change? We believe that it will be necessary to observe, model better and understand the whole biosphere using long term data generated by international RIs. RIs play a key role on many of the last advances and discoveries in science, from the observation of the Higgs Boson at CERN to the exploration of the Universe by the telescopes of the European Southern Observatory in Chile. The scale of complexity, instrumentation, computing resources, technological advances, and also of the investments, and the size of research collaborations, do not have precedents in Science. RIs in environmental field are developing fast, but the corresponding communities need yet to further reflect the need for a wider global collaboration because the challenges to tackle are in essence of global nature. This contribution describes how COOP+ project (EU Horizon 2020 Coordination and Support Action) will promote the cooperation among RIs at a global scale to address global environmental challenges. Our project evolves from the experience of the sucessful FP7 COOPEUS project (see http://www.coopeus.eu), which explored the use and access to data from RIs in environmental research in Europe and USA. The general goal of COOP+ is to strengthen the links and coordination of the ESFRI RIs related to Marine Science (EMSO), Arctic and Atmospheric Research (EISCAT), Carbon Observation (ICOS) and Biodiversity

  3. Trees as Filters of Radioactive Fallout from the Chernobyl Accident

    CERN Document Server

    Brownridge, James D

    2011-01-01

    This paper is a copy of an unpublished study of the filtering effect of red maple trees (acer rubrum) on fission product fallout near Binghamton, NY, USA following the 1986 Chernobyl accident. The conclusions of this work may offer some insight into what is happening in the forests exposed to fallout from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant accident. This posting is in memory of Noel K. Yeh.

  4. Consequences and countermeasures in a nuclear power accident: Chernobyl experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirichenko, Vladimir A; Kirichenko, Alexander V; Werts, Day E

    2012-09-01

    Despite the tragic accidents in Fukushima and Chernobyl, the nuclear power industry will continue to contribute to the production of electric energy worldwide until there are efficient and sustainable alternative sources of energy. The Chernobyl nuclear accident, which occurred 26 years ago in the former Soviet Union, released an immense amount of radioactivity over vast territories of Belarus, Ukraine, and the Russian Federation, extending into northern Europe, and became the most severe accident in the history of the nuclear industry. This disaster was a result of numerous factors including inadequate nuclear power plant design, human errors, and violation of safety measures. The lessons learned from nuclear accidents will continue to strengthen the safety design of new reactor installations, but with more than 400 active nuclear power stations worldwide and 104 reactors in the Unites States, it is essential to reassess fundamental issues related to the Chernobyl experience as it continues to evolve. This article summarizes early and late events of the incident, the impact on thyroid health, and attempts to reduce agricultural radioactive contamination.

  5. Aspermy, sperm quality and radiation in Chernobyl birds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders Pape Møller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Following the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident, large amounts of radionuclides were emitted and spread in the environment. Animals living in such contaminated areas are predicted to suffer fitness costs including reductions in the quality and quantity of gametes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied whether aspermy and sperm quality were affected by radioactive contamination by examining ejaculates from wild caught birds breeding in areas varying in background radiation level by more than three orders of magnitude around Chernobyl, Ukraine. The frequency of males with aspermy increased logarithmically with radiation level. While 18.4% of males from contaminated areas had no sperm that was only the case for 3.0% of males from uncontaminated control areas. Furthermore, there were negative relationships between sperm quality as reflected by reduced sperm velocity and motility, respectively, and radiation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results suggest that radioactive contamination around Chernobyl affects sperm production and quality. We are the first to report an interspecific difference in sperm quality in relation to radioactive contamination.

  6. Experiences using laser Doppler vibrometers at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarovoi, Leonid K.; Robur, Lubomir I.; Siegmund, Georg; Tushev, Dmitry

    2000-05-01

    The implementation of laser vibrometers into various branches of industry solves complex technical problems as well as raising the authority of laser vibrometry as unique measurement tool. From this point of view, the nuclear industry is an interesting and attractive application field with specific and rigorous exploitation conditions of measuring systems. The objective of this work was to evaluate all advantages and disadvantages of the laser Doppler vibrometry with respect to nuclear power plant (NPP) equipment examination. The Chernobyl NPP is the ideal place for these purposes. The diagnostic ability on different Chernobyl NPP systems (e.g. third power unit main circulators, bearing shaft of fifth turbo-generator and various pipelines) has been demonstrated using laser Doppler vibrometers. The measurements performed by laser vibrometers were checked by standard Chernobyl NPP vibration measurement tools. The laser Doppler vibrometers (CLV, Polytec GmbH and LDV, Kiev University) have been tested and have shown full functionality in NPP zone at 0.5 sievert/hour radiation levels, high electromagnetic fields (magnetic component up to 5 kA/m) and significant vibrations.

  7. Specificity of Cs-137 redistribution in toposequence of arable soils cultivated after the Chernobyl accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobova, Elena; Romanov, Sergey; Baranchukov, Vladimir; Berezkin, Victor; Moiseenko, Fedor; Kirov, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    Investigations performed after the Chernobyl accident showed high spatial variation of radionuclide contamination of the soil cover in elementary landscape geochemical systems (ELGS) that characterize catena's structure. Our studies of Cs-137 distribution along and cross the slopes of local ridges in natural forested key site revealed a cyclic character of variation of the radionuclide surface activity along the studied transections (Korobova et al, 2008; Korobova, Romanov, 2009; 2011). We hypothesized that the observed pattern reflects a specific secondary migration of Cs-137 with water, and that this process could have taken place in any ELGS. To test this hypothesis a detailed field measurement of Cs-137 surface activity was performed in ELGS in agricultural area cultivated after the Chernobyl accident but later withdrawn from land-use. In situ measurements carried out by field gamma-spectrometry were accompanied by soil core sampling at the selected points. Soil samples were taken in increments of 2 cm down to 20 cm and of 5 cm down to 40 cm. The samples were analyzed for Cs-137 in laboratory using Canberra gamma-spectrometer with HP-Ge detector. Obtained results confirmed the fact of area cultivation down to 20 cm that was clearly traced by Cs-137 profile in soil columns. At the same time, the measurements also showed a cyclic character of Cs-137 variation in a sequence of ELGS from watershed to the local depression similar to that found in woodland key site. This proved that the observed pattern is a natural process typical for matter migration in ELGS independently of the vegetation type and ploughing. Therefore, spatial aspect is believed to be an important issue for development of adequate technique for a forecast of contamination of agricultural production and remediation of the soil cover on the local scale within the contaminated areas. References Korobova, E.M., Romanov, S.L., 2009. A Chernobyl 137Cs contamination study as an example for the spatial

  8. Prioritization of Delay Factors for NPP Construction Risk in International Project by Using AHP Methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossen, Muhammed Mufazzal; Kang, Sunkoo; Kim, Jonghyun [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    It is crucial for the nuclear power plant project decision makers and management personnel to identify the actual factors of construction delay and their ranking in order to take preventive actions. NPP project is complex in nature and the construction phase is one of the most key phase which is subject to many factors result from many sources. From experience, nuclear projects have faced challenges similar to other complex mega projects with additional nuclear specific issues and life time cost of nuclear reactor is concentrated upfront as capital cost, and therefore delays in construction may become intolerable in terms of both lost revenues and interest on the capital. Budget over-runs and delays on next generation new build nuclear projects in recent years clearly demonstrate that the nuclear industry continues to repeat its failed management and project control processes of the past. Similar to major infra-structure projects, actual completion times can vary substantially from initial estimates but this uncertainty is too crucial to the nuclear industry due to high levels of capital at risk, for every year a project is delayed the levelized cost of electricity increases by approximately 8-10%. causes of delay, to develop a generalized AHP model for delay factors, and to prioritize the risk in different factors in various levels of construction phase in international turnkey NPP project. This paper describes and prioritizes Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) construction schedule delay factor for turnkey international project. This study also determines the different party's importance in percentage behind the construction schedule delay of NPP which constitutes main contractor (28.4%), regulatory authority (27.3%), financial and country factor (23.5%), and utility (20.8%). Decision makers of nuclear industry can understand the significance of different factors on NPP construction phase and they can apply risk informed decision making to avoid unexpected

  9. Normalization and calibration of geostationary satellite radiances for the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desormeaux, Yves; Rossow, William B.; Brest, Christopher L.; Campbell, G. G.

    1993-01-01

    Procedures are described for normalizing the radiometric calibration of image radiances obtained from geostationary weather satellites that contributed data to the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The key step is comparison of coincident and collocated measurements made by each satellite and the concurrent AVHRR on the 'afternoon' NOAA polar-orbiting weather satellite at the same viewing geometry. The results of this comparison allow transfer of the AVHRR absolute calibration, which has been established over the whole series, to the radiometers on the geostationary satellites. Results are given for Meteosat-2, 3, and 4, for GOES-5, 6, and 7, for GMS-2, 3, and 4 and for Insat-1B. The relative stability of the calibrations of these radiance data is estimated to be within +/- 3 percent; the uncertainty of the absolute calibrations is estimated to be less than 10 percent. The remaining uncertainties are at least two times smaller than for the original radiance data.

  10. The economics of tobacco control: evidence from the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Policy Evaluation Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauras, John A; Chaloupka, Frank J; Quah, Anne Chiew Kin; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2014-03-01

    Over the past few decades, the importance of economic research in advancing tobacco control policies has become increasingly clear. Extensive research has demonstrated that increasing tobacco taxes and prices is the single most cost-effective tobacco control measure. The research contained in this supplement adds to this evidence and provides new insights into how smokers respond to tax and price changes using the rich data on purchase behaviours, brand choices, tax avoidance and evasion, and tobacco use collected systematically and consistently across countries and over time by the International Tobacco Control (ITC) Project. The findings from this research will help inform policymakers, public health professionals, advocates, and others seeking to maximise the public health and economic benefits from higher taxes.

  11. Updating irradiated graphite disposal: Project 'GRAPA' and the international decommissioning network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wickham, Anthony; Steinmetz, Hans-Jürgen; O'Sullivan, Patrick; Ojovan, Michael I

    2017-05-01

    Demonstrating competence in planning and executing the disposal of radioactive wastes is a key factor in the public perception of the nuclear power industry and must be demonstrated when making the case for new nuclear build. This work addresses the particular waste stream of irradiated graphite, mostly derived from reactor moderators and amounting to more than 250,000 tonnes world-wide. Use may be made of its unique chemical and physical properties to consider possible processing and disposal options outside the normal simple classifications and repository options for mixed low or intermediate-level wastes. The IAEA has an obvious involvement in radioactive waste disposal and has established a new project 'GRAPA' - Irradiated Graphite Processing Approaches - to encourage an international debate and collaborative work aimed at optimising and facilitating the treatment of irradiated graphite. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Countermeasures to the Chernobyl accident in the Nordic countries: Public reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoeberg, L.; Rundmo, T.; Eraenen, L.; Ekstroem, H

    1998-01-01

    In Sweden the TMI accident was the direct cause to a decision to hold a national referendum on nuclear power on March 23, 1980. The referendum and the subsequent political decision to phase out nuclear power by 2010 to some extent neutralized the issue and nuclear attitudes returned to a mildly positive state. However, the Chernobyl accident in 1986 again changed the scene. Just as the TMI accident had been something of a surprise to many, the Chernobyl accident and its consequences in Scandinavia were not anticipated. Attitudes to nuclear power became quite negative immediately after the accident but they soon resumed their initial mildly positive position again. Even if the radioactive fall-out never reached truly alarming levels authorities in Finland, Norway and Sweden took measures to counteract the effects of radioactivity and to protect the population. This was done in a very heated atmosphere and intense attention was paid by the mass media. Trust in authorities and governments was put to a stringent test during these days 10 years ago. Several psychologists, sociologists and mass media researchers were active from the very beginning to document the events taking place, e.g. by means of surveys of the public opinion. The reports they wrote were usually in local languages and much of this material was never published in print but remained as project reports. It is the purpose of the present project to localize these report and to summarize and interpret their contents, and to give bibliographical information about where the sources can be located. Different experiences and conditions in the three countries account for somewhat different approaches of the three country chapters. There is no doubt that Chernobyl was a very significant social and psychological event in the three countries discussed in the present report. It was also regarded by many as a significant threat to public health, although radiation experts assured the public that the direct effects

  13. Development of derived investigation levels for use in internal dosimetry at the West Valley Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, P. [Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The objective was to determine if the routine intemal dosimetry program at the West Valley Demonstration Project is capable of meeting the performance objective of 1 mSv annual effective dose equivalent due to internal contamination. With the use of the computer code REMedy the annual effective dose equivalent is calculated. Some of the radionuclides of concern result in an annual effective dose equivalent that exceeds the performance objective. Although the results exceed the performance objective, in all but two cases they do not exceed the US DOE regulatory limits. In these instances the Th-232 and Am-241 were determined to exceed the committed dose equivalent limit to their limiting tissue. In order to document the potential missed dose for regulatory compliance, Sr-90 is used as an indicator for Th-232. For Am-241 an investigation as to whether or not the minimum detectable amount can be lowered is performed. The derived investigation levels as a result of this project are 4.9E3 Bq/lung count for Co-60, 2.2E4 Bq/lung count for Cs-137, 1.9 Bq/1 for Sr-90 and for radionuclides other than Sr-90 any value greater than or equal to three standard deviations above their net count is considered to require further investigation.

  14. Canada's International Development Research Centre's eco-health projects with Latin Americans: origins, development and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Donald C; Crissman, Charles C; Orozco, A Fadya

    2006-01-01

    Since its founding in 1970, Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) has supported research by concerned Latin American researchers on environments and human health relationships. Framing of such relationships has changed through different periods. Participant observation, bibliographic searches, document review, and interviews with key IDRC staff. From the early years of multiple different projects, IDRC developed more focussed interest in tropical diseases, pesticides, agriculture and human health in the 1980s. The United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development in the early 1990s gave impetus to examination of links between ecosystems and human health or "EcoHealth". Projects in Latin America built on earlier work but extended it in methods (transdisciplinarity, community participation, gendered approach) and scope (broader land use and development paradigm issues tackled). A key IDRC-funded activity in Latin America was "EcoSalud", an Ecuadorian effort, which has worked with farming communities, agricultural researchers, health practitioners and local politicians to advance integrated pest management, better recognize and treat poisonings and improve pesticide-related policies. ONGOING CHALLENGES INCLUDE: mobilizing sufficient resources for the primary prevention focus of EcoHealth activities when primary care infrastructure remains stretched, promoting micro-level change in diverse communities and ecosystems, and addressing power structures at the global level that profoundly affect environmental change.

  15. StarPals International Young Astronomers' Network Collaborative Projects for IYA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingan, Jessi

    2008-09-01

    StarPals is a nascent non-profit organization with the goal of providing opportunities for international collaboration between students of all ages within space science research. We believe that by encouraging an interest in the cosmos, the one thing that is truly Universal, from a young age, students will not only further their knowledge of and interest in science but will learn valuable teamwork and life skills. The goal is to foster respect, understanding and appreciation of cultural diversity among all StarPals participants, whether students, teachers, or mentors. StarPals aims to inspire students by providing opportunities in which, more than simply visualizing themselves as research scientists, they can actually become one. The technologies of robotic telescopes, videoconferencing, and online classrooms are expanding the possibilities like never before. In honor of IYA2009, StarPals would like to encourage 400 schools to participate on a global scale in astronomy/cosmology research on various concurrent projects. We will offer in-person or online workshops and training sessions to teach the teachers. We will be seeking publication in scientific journals for some student research. For our current project, the Double Stars Challenge, students use the robotic telescopes to take a series of four images of one of 30 double stars from a list furnished by the US Naval Observatory and then use MPO Canopus software to take distance and position angle measurements. StarPals provides students with hands-on training, telescope time, and software to complete the imaging and measuring. A paper will be drafted from our research data and submitted to the Journal of Double Star Observations. The kids who participate in this project may potentially be the youngest contributors to an article in a vetted scientific journal. Kids rapidly adapt and improve their computer skills operating these telescopes and discover for themselves that science is COOL!

  16. Increase of regional total cancer incidence in north Sweden due to the Chernobyl accident?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tondel, Martin; Hjalmarsson, Peter; Hardell, Lennart; Carlsson, Göran; Axelson, Olav

    2004-12-01

    Is there any epidemiologically visible influence on the cancer incidence after the Chernobyl fallout in Sweden? A cohort study was focused on the fallout of caesium-137 in relation to cancer incidence 1988-1996. In northern Sweden, affected by the Chernobyl accident in 1986, 450 parishes were categorised by caesium-137 deposition: accident.

  17. Dark Skies Awareness Cornerstone Project for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Iya Dark Skies Awareness Working Group

    2010-12-01

    Programs that were part of the International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) Dark Skies Awareness (DSA) Cornerstone Project have been successfully implemented around the world to promote social awareness of the effects of light pollution on public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security, nightscape aesthetics and especially astronomy. In developing the programs, DSA Cornerstone Project found that to influence cultural change effectively — to make people literally look up and see the light — we must make children a main focus, use approaches that offer involvement on many levels, from cursory to committed, and offer involvement via many venues. We must make the programs and resources as turn-key as possible, especially for educators — and provide ways to visualize the problem with simple, easily grasped demonstrations. The programs spanned a wide range; from new media technology for the younger generation, to an event in the arts, to various types of educational materials, to the promotion of dark skies communities, to national and international events and to global citizen science programs. The DSA Cornerstone Project is continuing most all of these programs beyond IYA2009. The International Dark-Sky Association as well as the Starlight Initiative is endorsing and helping to continue with some of the most successful programs from the DSA. The GLOBE at Night campaign is adding a research component that examines light pollution’s affects on wildlife. Dark Skies Rangers activities are being implemented in Europe through the Galileo Teacher Training Program. The new “One Star at a Time” will engage people to protect the night sky through personal pledges and registration of public stargazing areas or StarParks, like the newest one in Italy. The Starlight Initiative’s World Night in Defence of the Starlight will take place on the Vernal Equinox. DSA will again oversee the Dark Skies portion of Global

  18. HYGIENIC STANDARDS FOR CS-137 AND SR-90 IN THE FOODSTUFFS: EXPERIENCE OF BELARUS AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Kenigsberg

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of analysis for development and implementation of the national permissible levels for Cs-137 and Sr-90 contamination of the foodstuff and water. These permissible levels were introduced in Belarus after the accident at the Chernobyl NPP as a protective measure to limit the doses of internal exposure. The article also contains comparison between numerical values of permissible levels introduced in Belarus, Ukraine and Russian as well as between the potential doses of internal exposure which could be formed while consuming the contaminated foodstuff with the levels of contamination equal to the permissible levels. The possibilities for harmonization of the permissible levels in three countries are discussed. The expediency of establishing quotes for doses of internal and external exposure is considered.

  19. Is the Alma Ata vision of comprehensive primary health care viable? Findings from an international project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Labonté

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The 4-year (2007–2011 Revitalizing Health for All international research program (http://www.globalhealthequity.ca/projects/proj_revitalizing/index.shtml supported 20 research teams located in 15 low- and middle-income countries to explore the strengths and weaknesses of comprehensive primary health care (CPHC initiatives at their local or national levels. Teams were organized in a triad comprised of a senior researcher, a new researcher, and a ‘research user’ from government, health services, or other organizations with the authority or capacity to apply the research findings. Multiple regional and global team capacity-enhancement meetings were organized to refine methods and to discuss and assess cross-case findings. Objective: Most research projects used mixed methods, incorporating analyses of qualitative data (interviews and focus groups, secondary data, and key policy and program documents. Some incorporated historical case study analyses, and a few undertook new surveys. The synthesis of findings in this report was derived through qualitative analysis of final project reports undertaken by three different reviewers. Results: Evidence of comprehensiveness (defined in this research program as efforts to improve equity in access, community empowerment and participation, social and environmental health determinants, and intersectoral action was found in many of the cases. Conclusions: Despite the important contextual differences amongst the different country studies, the similarity of many of their findings, often generated using mixed methods, attests to certain transferable health systems characteristics to create and sustain CPHC practices. These include: 1. Well-trained and supported community health workers (CHWs able to work effectively with marginalized communities 2. Effective mechanisms for community participation, both informal (through participation in projects and programs, and meaningful consultation and formal

  20. The Sky Polarization Observatory (SPOrt): a project to measure the diffused sky polarization from the International Space Station Alpha (ISSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortiglioni, S.

    1999-07-01

    The Sky Polarization Observatory (SPOrt), a project to measure the diffused sky polarization in the frequency range of 22-90 GHz from the International Space Station, is described in its current configuration. Some preliminary considerations about the general topic of polarization in radiometric observations are made, in order to introduce the importance of polarimetric measurements in the more general context of Cosmic Microwave Background observations. The International Space Station is also introduced as a quite good opportunity to address such problematics.

  1. After Chernobyl. Psychological factors affecting health after a nuclear disaster

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havenaar, J.M.

    1996-04-23

    During his stay in Belarus, Ukraine and Russia the author learned much about the medical and psychological consequences of the Chernobyl accident, and about the rapidly changing societies of the former Soviet Union. The chapters of this dissertation may be regarded as being stations along the way in this learning process. Chapter 1 describes his first impressions and the accounts he heard about the events that followed the catastrophe. It summarizes the current knowledge about the radiological consequences of the disaster. Chapter 2 presents a review of the literature about the psychological impact of disasters, such as Chernobyl, Bhopal and Three Mile Island, events that are characterized by the release of potentially harmful quantities of toxic substances into the environment. Chapters 3 and 4 describe the painstaking process of obtaining the necessary reliable research instruments, which were totally lacking in the Russian language. Without such instruments no valid epidemiological research is possible. Furthermore, these research instruments were to provide a tool to assist the Byelorussian physicians in their daily practice, helping them to assess the presence of psychosocial and psychiatric problems in their patients in a more reliable fashion. Chapter 5 describes the mental health situation in the region and analyses the presence of high-risk groups towards whom special intervention programmes. Chapter 6 investigates the question to what extent the high levels of psychopathology in Gomel can be attributed to the impact of the Chernobyl disaster, even more than six years after the event. In chapter 7 the perspective is widened. The field of mental health is left behind and the domain of public health is addressed. This chapter describes the relationship between subjective health and illness behaviour in relation to objective clinical parameters of physical and mental health. Finally, in chapter 8, the findings from these studies are critically reviewed and

  2. Psychosomatic health status of children exposed to the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korol, N. [Scientific Center for Radiation Medicine, Kiev (Ukraine); Shibata, Yoshisada; Nakane, Yoshibumi

    1998-12-01

    Childhood victims were investigated focussing on the psychosomatic disorders. The subjects were some of the 3834 children who evacuated from the Chernobyl zone to Kiev (evacuees) and 200 children who have been living in Kiev since prior to the accident (comparison group). A psychological test administered to 504 evacuees aged 12-14 years at the time of the accident and the comparison group indicated that the frequencies of neutroticism, high level of anxiety and conflicts were significantly higher in the evacuees than in the comparison group (p<0.001). Another psychological test administered at puberty to the 504 evacuees and 200 other evacuees exposed to the accident at 4-6 years of age indicated that the psycho-emotional portrait of evacuated teenagers significantly changed with time since the accident. The effects of the Chernobyl accident on the health of the vegetative dystonia observed in 1987-1990 and 1990-1995 were higher in the evacuees than in the comparison group, although they were not statistically significant. Furthermore, a significant (p<0.001) association of the vegetative dystonia with peptic and cardiovascular disorders was observed. The present study indicates that the vegetative dystonia is still highly prevalent among childhood victims and deems to support that the vegetative dystonia may be a precursor of several diseases such as cardiovascular and peptic disorders. It should be emphasized that a health promotion program to produce a change in psychological and social problems after the Chernobyl accident is necessary to decrease the health impact among Ukrainian people. (author)

  3. Report of the US Department of Energy's team analyses of the Chernobyl-4 Atomic Energy Station accident sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-11-01

    In an effort to better understand the Chernobyl-4 accident of April 26, 1986, the US Department of Energy (DOE) formed a team of experts from the National Laboratories including Argonne National Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The DOE Team provided the analytical support to the US delegation for the August meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and to subsequent international meetings. The DOE Team has analyzed the accident in detail, assessed the plausibility and completeness of the information provided by the Soviets, and performed studies relevant to understanding the accident. The results of these studies are presented in this report.

  4. Airborne Gamma-ray Measurements in the Chernobyl Plume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grasty, R. L.; Hovgaard, Jens; Multala, J.

    1997-01-01

    On 29 April 1986, the Geological Survey of Finland (GSF) survey aircraft with a gamma ray spectrometer flew through a radioactive plume from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. The aircraft became contaminated and the gamma spectrometer measured radioactivity in the plume as well as radioactivity...... on the aircraft. By using simple assumptions on the build-up of contamination it has been possible to separate the signals from contamination and from plume. The analysis further showed that even a detector/spectrometer with low energy resolution is able to identify a contamination with iodine....

  5. THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT AND HEALTH (TWO POINTS OF VIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Shubik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents two alternative points of view on the relationship of health malfunctions after the Chernobyl accident with radiation effect or with the factors of non-radiation nature (social, stress, nutrition peculiarities, etc.. An analysis of literature data and results of author’s own research of radiosensitive indicators of immunity condition, having essential value for the immediate and long term consequences of radiation effect was done. Possible correlation between health malfunctions of the population living in the regions, contaminated by the radionuclides, and combined effect of radiation and factors of non-radiation nature is shown.

  6. Chernobyl radioactivity in surface air over Washington D. C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, S.H.; Kuroda, P.K. (Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.); Krask, D.J. (District of Columbia Dept. of Consumer, and Regulatory Affairs, Washington, DC (USA). Air Monitoring Section)

    1991-01-01

    Concentrations of Chernobyl-derived radionuclides in airborne particulate matter over Washington D.C. have been determined by gamma-ray analysis of air filter samples collected during the months of May, June, and July 1986. The results indicate that long-lived nuclides were present in levels comparable to those measured previously at other eastern locations. Extensive washout of radioactivity occurred apparently as a result of heavy rainfall on May 20, and was followed by the arrival of airborne debris with elevated {sup 103}Ru/{sup 137}Cs and {sup 106}Ru/{sup 137}Cs activity ratios. (orig.).

  7. Radiophobia: long-term psychological consequences of Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastel, Ross H

    2002-02-01

    The primary health effect of Chernobyl has been widespread psychological distress in liquidators (workers brought in for cleanup), evacuees, residents of contaminated areas, and residents of adjacent noncontaminated areas. Several psychoneurological syndromes characterized by multiple unexplained physical symptoms including fatigue, sleep and mood disturbances, impaired memory and concentration, and muscle and/or joint pain have been reported in the Russian literature. These syndromes, which resemble chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, are probably not due to direct effects of radiation because they do not appear to be dose related to radiation exposure and because they occur in areas of both high and low contamination.

  8. Chernobyl, fifteen years after; Tchernobyl, 15 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-04-01

    This work has been constituted around four questions: the future of the Chernobyl site, the damaged reactor, and the sarcophagus around it; the health consequences of the accident on the persons that have worked on the damaged reactor and on the population in the countries the most exposed to fallout,; the situation of contaminated territories around the power plant and their management today; the last question concerns especially the France with the consequences of the radioactive cloud and what we know about the health risks induced by this event. (N.C.)

  9. How Project Management Tools Aid in Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International Maintenance of Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cann, Cynthia W.; Brumagim, Alan L.

    2008-01-01

    The authors present the case of one business college's use of project management techniques as tools for accomplishing Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) International maintenance of accreditation. Using these techniques provides an efficient and effective method of organizing maintenance efforts. In addition, using…

  10. Procedural Influence on Internal and External Assessment Scores of Undergraduate Vocational and Technical Education Research Projects in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. C., John; Manabete, S. S.

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to determine the procedural influence on internal and external assessment scores of undergraduate research projects in vocational and technical education programmes in the university under study. A survey research design was used for the conduct of this study. The population consisted of 130 lecturers and 1,847 students in the…

  11. Who gains? allocation of freight transport user benefits from international infrastructure projects in multicountry cost-benefit analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosgerau, Mogens; Kristensen, Niels Buus

    2005-01-01

    A public decision by several countries on whether to cofinance an international infrastructure project is the subject of a cost-benefit analysis (CBA). The CBA elements are broken out and analyzed for each country. The issue of freight user benefits is discussed, and results are derived from...

  12. Building international experiences into an engineering curriculum - a design project-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor; Castillo, Luciano; Carbajal, Gerardo; Hajela, Prabhat

    2014-07-01

    This paper is a descriptive account of how short-term international and multicultural experiences can be integrated into early design experiences in an aerospace engineering curriculum. Such approaches are considered as important not only in fostering a student's interest in the engineering curriculum, but also exposing them to a multicultural setting that they are likely to encounter in their professional careers. In the broader sense, this programme is described as a model that can be duplicated in other engineering disciplines as a first-year experience. In this study, undergraduate students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Universidad del Turabo (UT) in Puerto Rico collaborated on a substantial design project consisting of designing, fabricating, and flight-testing radio-controlled model aircraft as a capstone experience in a semester-long course on Fundamentals of Flight. The two-week long experience in Puerto Rico was organised into academic and cultural components designed with the following objectives: (i) to integrate students in a multicultural team-based academic and social environment, (ii) to practise team-building skills and develop students' critical thinking and analytical skills, and finally (iii) to excite students about their engineering major through practical applications of aeronautics and help them decide if it is a right fit for them.

  13. Impact of International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence among Occupational Therapy Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Sood OTD, OTR/L

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Occupational therapy (OT educators recognize a need to ensure that OT students are culturally competent. The researchers developed the International Collaborative Project on Cultural Competence (ICPCC to help students understand the impact of cultural context on client care. Entry-level MOT students from a university in the US (N = 18 collaborated with BOT students (N = 4 and advanced MOT students (N = 9 from two universities in India using an online course management system WebCT. The study explored the impact of the ICPCC on OT students’ cultural competence and discusses students’ perceptions of culture on the OT process. The Inventory for Assessing the Process of Cultural Competence Among Health Care Professionals Revised© measured students’ cultural competence at baseline and immediately after participation in the ICPCC. Qualitative data was collected using a Self-Reflection Form. There was an increase in the cultural competence scores among all three groups of students after participating in the ICPCC at p value < .05. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data analysis: meaning of the term culture, impact of cultural on client- centered practice, and impact of cultural on OT outcomes. OT students recognized the role that cultural differences play in OT evaluation and intervention.

  14. The International Remote Monitoring Project -- First results of the Argentina nuclear power station field trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, A.; Pizarro, L.; Perez, A. [Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schoeneman, J.L.; Dupree, S.A.; Martinez, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maxey, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As part of the International Remote Monitoring Project field trials, during the month of March, 1995 a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. This system monitors the status of four typical Candu spent fuel dry storage silos. The monitoring equipment for each silo consists of analog temperature and gamma radiation sensors and digital motion and electronic fiber-optic seals connected to a wireless Authenticate Item Monitoring System (AIMS). All sensor data are authenticated and transmitted via RF link to Receiver Processor Units (RPU) coupled to Remote Monitoring System equipment located in a nearby IAEA/ENREN inspector office. One of these RPUs is connected to Remote Monitoring equipment capable of information transmission (via commercial telephone links) to Data Review Stations (DRS) at ENREN laboratories in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The other RPU is used for on-site data storage and analysis. It is anticipated that this information will soon be transmitted to a DRS at the ABACC facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. During these trials site data will be collected and analyzed periodically from Buenos Aires, Albuquerque, and Rio de Janeiro. Installation detail and data analysis will be presented in this paper.

  15. The Role of Current Sheets in Solar Eruptive Events: An ISSI International Team Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Steven T.; Poletto, Giannina

    2006-01-01

    Current sheets (CSs) are a prerequisite for magnetic reconnection. An International Space Science Institute (ISSI, of Bern, Switzerland) research team will work to empirically define current sheet properties in the solar atmosphere and their signatures in the interplanetary medium, and to understand their role in the development of solar eruptive events. The project was inspired by recently acquired ground and space based observations that reveal CS signatures at the time of flares and Coronal Mass Ejections (CMEs), in the chromosphere, in the corona and in the interplanetary medium. At the same time, theoretical studies predict the formation of CSs in different models and configurations, but theories and observational results have not yet developed an interaction efficient enough to allow us to construct a unified scenario. The team will generate synergy between observers, data analysts, and theoreticians, so as to enable a significant advance in understanding of current sheet behavior and properties. A further motivation for studying CSs is related to the expected electric fields in CSs that may be the source of solar energetic particles (SEPs). The team has 14 members from Europe and the US. The first meeting is in October 2006 and the second is late in 2007.

  16. International Joint Project of Engineering Design Education among Three Institutions in Japan, U.S. and Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuishi, Masakatsu; Takemata, Kazuya; Furukawa, Tetsuro; Sanders, Wayne; Loo, Chin Non

    An international joint program of Engineering Design has started in 2004 between Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Singapore Polytechnic in Singapore, and Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology in the United States. Students from the three institutions worked on the same engineering design project, the main theme of which was, “Bus Transportation/Urban Transportation System in the 21st Century”. Student teams chose their own project themes from specific design areas, which were related to the main theme. Their achievements were unique in their solutions due to the differences in society and culture in Japan, the United States and Singapore, although all the design teams followed the same engineering design procedures. In this paper, the international joint project is discussed in details.

  17. [Introducing formative portfolio as a tool for Internal Medicine residents mentoring: review of a pilot project, 2005-2006].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnau I Figueras, J; Torán Monserrat, P; Martínez-Carretero, J M; Forteza-Rey, J; Pinilla Llorente, B; Brailovsky, C A

    2008-10-01

    Recent educational projects in our country have been trying to introduce professional portfolios as assessment/learning tools on the undergraduate and specialized post-graduate education levels. The approval of a new formative program for the Internal Medicine specialty in an effort to adapt to the present health care needs offers an opportunity to apply these formative and evaluative methodologies in the learning process of future internists. During the 2005-2006 academic year, the Formative Work Group of the Spanish Internal Medicine Society (SEMI) developed a pilot study on portfolio application as a tool for formative assessment and mentoring. This article describes the project of designing, developing, applying and assessing an electronic portfolio for first year Internal Medicine residents. It presents an analysis of the SEMI Portfolio strengths and weaknesses and finally makes suggestions for future development.

  18. The evidence of radiation effects in embryos and fetuses exposed to Chernobyl fallout and the question of dose response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Chris; Lengfelder, Edmund; Pflugbeil, Sebastian; Schmitz-Feuerhake, Inge

    2009-01-01

    Current legal frameworks for radiation exposure limits are based on the risk models of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In Publication 90 (2003), ICRP presents a safe (threshold) dose range of up to 100 mSv for radiogenic effects resulting from in utero exposure and bases this conclusion on the findings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. However, a variety of observations of congenital malformations, fetal loss, stillbirths and infant deaths, as well as of Down's syndrome and other health defects in children after the Chernobyl accident exposures suggest that the A-bomb survivor data are incomplete. The Chernobyl findings are generally marginalized or even denied because of the low values of the estimated human exposures and the inconsistency of the results with the accepted risk models. One explanation for the observations is that physical dosimetric models have underestimated the effective exposure. This possibility is supported by biological dosimetry in the contaminated regions. The assumptions about effects after in utero exposure by incorporated radionuclides need to be revised.

  19. Investigations on Health Conditions of Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Accident Recovery Workers from Latvia in Late Period after Disaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reste Jeļena

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper summarises the main findings on Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP accident recovery workers from Latvia and their health disturbances, which have been studied by the authors during the last two decades. Approximately 6000 persons from Latvia participated in CNPP clean-up works in 1986–1991. During their work period in Chernobyl they were exposed to external as well as to internal irradiation, but since their return to Latvia they were living in a relatively uncontaminated area. Regular careful medical examinations and clinical studies of CNPP clean-up workers have been conducted during the 25 years after disaster, gathering knowledge on radiation late effects. The aim of the present review is to summarise the most important information about Latvian CNPP clean-up worker health revealed by thorough follow-up and research conducted in the period of 25 years after the accident. This paper reviews data of the Latvian State Register of Persons Exposed to Radiation due to CNPP Accident and gives insight in main health effects found by the researchers from the Centre of Occupational and Radiological Medicine (Pauls Stradiņš Clinical University Hospital and Rīga Stradiņš University in a number of epidemiological, clinical, biochemical, immunological, and physiological studies. Latvian research data on health condition of CNPP clean-up workers in the late period after disaster indicate that ionising radiation might cause premature ageing and severe polymorbidity in humans.

  20. Consequences of the Chernobyl accident for reindeer husbandry in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustaf Åhman

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Large parts of the reindeer hearding area in Sweden were contaminated with radioactive caesium from the Chernobyl fallout. During the first year after the accident no food with activity concentrations exceeding 300 Bq/kg was allowed to be sold in Sweden. This meant that about 75% of all reindeer meat produced in Sweden during the autumn and winter 1986/87 were rejected because of too high caesium activités. In May 1987 the maximum level for Cs-137 in reindeer, game and fresh-water fish was raised to 1500 Bq/kg. During the last two year, 1987/88 and 1988/89, about 25% of the slaughtered reindeer has had activities exceeding this limit. The effective long-time halflife or radiocaesium in reindeer after the nuclear weapon tests in the sixties was about 7 years. If this halflife is correct also for the Chernobyl fallout it will take about 35 years before most of the reinder in Sweden are below the current limit 1500 Bq/kg in the winter. However, by feeding the animals uncontaminated food for about two months, many reindeer can be saved for human consumption.

  1. Historical mutation rates predict susceptibility to radiation in Chernobyl birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, A P; Erritzøe, J; Karadas, F; Mousseau, T A

    2010-10-01

    Extreme environmental perturbations are rare, but may have important evolutionary consequences. Responses to current perturbations may provide important information about the ability of living organisms to cope with similar conditions in the evolutionary past. Radioactive contamination from Chernobyl constitutes one such extreme perturbation, with significant but highly variable impact on local population density and mutation rates of different species of animals and plants. We explicitly tested the hypothesis that species with strong impacts of radiation on abundance were those with high rates of historical mutation accumulation as reflected by cytochrome b mitochondrial DNA base-pair substitution rates during past environmental perturbations. Using a dataset of 32 species of birds, we show higher historical mitochondrial substitution rates in species with the strongest negative impact of local levels of radiation on local population density. These effects were robust to different estimates of impact of radiation on abundance, weighting of estimates of abundance by sample size, statistical control for similarity in the response among species because of common phylogenetic descent, and effects of population size and longevity. Therefore, species that respond strongly to the impact of radiation from Chernobyl are also the species that in the past have been most susceptible to factors that have caused high substitution rates in mitochondrial DNA. © 2010 The Authors. Journal Compilation © 2010 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  2. Chernobyl fallout in a Swedish spruce forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGee, E.J.; Synnott, H.J.; Johanson, K.J.; Fawaris, B.H.; Nielsen, S.P.; Horrill, A.D.; Kennedy, V.H.; Barbayiannis, N.; Veresoglou, D.S.; Dawson, D.E.; Colgan, P.A.; McGarry, A.T

    2000-03-01

    An assessment of the distribution of Chernobyl fallout in a Swedish forest was carried out and showed more than 95% of the {sup 137}Cs in the system to be of Chernobyl origin. The data show that approximately 87% of total fallout is found in soils, 6% in the bryophyte layer and 7% in standing biomass of trees. The mean deposition of {sup 137}Cs in the system (including soils, bryophytes, understorey vegetation, fungi, trees, moose and roe deer) was 54 kBq m{sup -2}. Fungi, understorey vegetation and ruminant populations collectively contained approximately 1% of total radiocaesium in the system. However, actual concentrations in these sample types were higher than in any other category, mostly exceeding the limit of 1500 Bq kg{sup -1} for consumption of wild produce in Sweden. These categories represent the principal foodstuffs responsible for radiation transfer to man from the system and though negligible in total biomass there is potential for significant dose transfer to individuals who are regular consumers of wild forest produce.

  3. Ionizing radiation from Chernobyl affects development of wild carrot plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boratyński, Zbyszek; Arias, Javi Miranda; Garcia, Cristina; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; Møller, Anders P.; Pajares, Antonio Jesús Muñoz; Piwczyński, Marcin; Tukalenko, Eugene

    2016-12-01

    Radioactivity released from disasters like Chernobyl and Fukushima is a global hazard and a threat to exposed biota. To minimize the deleterious effects of stressors organisms adopt various strategies. Plants, for example, may delay germination or stay dormant during stressful periods. However, an intense stress may halt germination or heavily affect various developmental stages and select for life history changes. Here, we test for the consequence of exposure to ionizing radiation on plant development. We conducted a common garden experiment in an uncontaminated greenhouse using 660 seeds originating from 33 wild carrots (Daucus carota) collected near the Chernobyl nuclear power plant. These maternal plants had been exposed to radiation levels that varied by three orders of magnitude. We found strong negative effects of elevated radiation on the timing and rates of seed germination. In addition, later stages of development and the timing of emergence of consecutive leaves were delayed by exposure to radiation. We hypothesize that low quality of resources stored in seeds, damaged DNA, or both, delayed development and halted germination of seeds from plants exposed to elevated levels of ionizing radiation. We propose that high levels of spatial heterogeneity in background radiation may hamper adaptive life history responses.

  4. Chernobyl-what do we need to know?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    Following a succession of technical malfunctions and human errors, reactor No.4 of Chernobyl nuclear power plant explodes on April 26, 1986. Radioactive dust, aerosols, and gases (including iodine and caesium) are ejected into the atmosphere. The regions worst hit are in the immediate vicinity of the plant (Belarus, Ukraine) but deposits are very uneven, producing a 'leopard spot' type of pattern (Russian Federation). In Europe, propelled by easterly winds, the radioactive cloud disperses increasingly, scattering deposits over the whole Europe. At the beginning of May, the cloud arrives over France. The eastern portion of the country is most strongly affected. For the contamination, ground, water, and agriculture are contaminated by caesium deposits in Belarus, Ukraine and Russian Federation. In France, ground contamination is slight, fourteen years later, however, it is still detectable. It is hard to assess the impact on health in the vicinity of the Chernobyl plant; among children in southern Belarus, the number of thyroid cancers has risen one hundred-fold. The doses delivered in France represent generally less than 1% of the average annual dose from radioactivity of natural origin. But some of the doses received were higher. Today, the protective sarcophagus covering the damaged reactor is fragile. Reactor No.3, still in operation, continues to pose a risk but the shutdown is provide for december 2000. (N.C.)

  5. Post-Chernobyl surveys of radiocaesium in soil, vegetation, wildlife and fungi in Great Britain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaplow, J.S.; Beresford, N.A.; Barnett, C.L. [Lancaster Environment Centre, Lancaster (United Kingdom). Centre for Ecology and Hydrology,

    2015-07-01

    The data set ''Post Chernobyl surveys of radiocaesium in soil, vegetation, wildlife and fungi in Great Britain'' was developed to enable data collected by the Natural Environment Research Council after the Chernobyl accident to be made publicly available. Data for samples collected between May 1986 (immediately after Chernobyl) to spring 1997 are presented. Additional data to radiocaesium concentrations are presented where available. The data have value in trying to assess the contribution of new sources of radiocaesium in the environment, providing baseline data for future planned releases and to aid the development and testing of models.

  6. CHERNOBYL HEALTH RADIOLOGICAL EFFECTS ON THE POPULATION OF RUSSIA: DATA OF THE NATIONAL REGISTRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. K. Ivanov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Summarized radiation-epidemiological data on health effects of the accident at the Chernobyl NPP registered in the follow-up period 1986-2006 on the Russian population are reported. Two groups of population: Chernobyl Emergency accident workers and residents of the most contaminated with radionuclides territories are examined. Impact of radiation-associated risk of solid cancers and leukaemia in these groups is assessed. Prognostic estimates of health effects of the Chernobyl accident on the Russian population are offered in the article.

  7. Cytogenetic study in lymphocytes from children exposed to ionizing radiation after Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Padovani, L.; Mauro, F. [ENEA, Casaccia (Italy). Area Energia Ambiente e Salute; Caporossi, D.; Tedeschi, B.; Vernole, P.; Nicoletti, B. [Rome-2 Univ. (Italy)

    1993-12-31

    This study concerns the monitoring of children from the Byelorussian, Ukrainian and Russian republics exposed to the fall-out of the Chernobyl accident. Cytogenetic analyses were performed on 41 children coming from different areas and exhibiting varying amounts of {sup 137}Cs internal contamination, as evaluated by whole body counter (WBC) analysis. It was found that on a total of 28,670 metaphases scored, radiation-induced chromosome damage is still present, although at a very low frequency. Due to the very low fraction of dicentrics, because of the time elapsed from the accident and the relatively low doses of exposure, radiobiological dosimetry is not possible for these children. However, considering that the WBC data indicate that the children are still exposed to {sup 137}Cs contamination, the observed occurrence of stable chromosome rearrangements and breaks may represent the persisting effect of continuous low doses of radiation. The study also indicates that the parallel use of internal contamination dosimetry and cytogenetics could be usefully employed to monitor individual exposure to radiation and to define further management measures.

  8. The consequences of Chernobyl. Challenges and problem solutions; Die Folgen von Tschernobyl. Herausforderungen und Auswege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moltmann, B. [ed.; Sahm, A. [ed.; Sapper, M. [ed.

    1994-12-31

    International environmental policy requires three kinds of competency: adequate expert knowledge in matters of reactor safety, environmental and health hazards, economic competency, and competency in the social and political sciences, which place issues in their social context and investigate how wills are formed and decision processes are made; finally the desire to draw conclusions from insight gained. But the example of Chernobyl shows that the boundary conditions of environmental policy in eastern Europe are distinct from the ones in western industrial societies. The papers that make up this book document the dialogue between natural science experts, technical experts, social and political science, and active politics. Experts heard are from Germany, Russia and Belarus, as well as from international organizations. (orig./HP) [Deutsch] Internationale Umweltpolitik erfordert dreierlei Kompetenz: die Faehigkeit der Fachwissenschaft fuer Reaktorsicherheit, Umwelt und Gesundheitsbelastungen, Energiewirtschaft, dann aber auch die Kenntnisse der Sozial- und Politikwissenschaft, die die Sachprobleme gesellschaftlich vermitteln und Willensbildung und Entscheidungsprozesse untersuchen, und schliesslich den Willen, aus gewonnenen Einsichten auch Schlussfolgerungen zu ziehen. Dabei zeigt das Beispiel Tschernobyl, dass Umweltpolitik in Osteuropa unter anderen Rahmenbedingungen als in den westlichen Industriegesellschaften stattfindet. Die Beitraege in diesem Buch dokumentieren den Dialog zwischen natur- und technikwissenschaftlichen Experten, Sozial- und Politikwissenschaft, aber auch der politischen Praxis. Dabei kommen Fachleute aus Deutschland, Russland und Belarus sowie Angehoerige internationaler Organisationen zu Wort. (orig./HP)

  9. Community Connections to Enhance Undergraduate International Business Education: An Example of Business Consulting Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annavarjula, Madan; Trifts, Jack W.

    2012-01-01

    Practical project experience as a means of augmenting traditional classroom learning has long been viewed as a value adding curricular exercise. While students participating in the projects gain valuable skills that will enhance their personal marketability, successful projects also benefit the client companies involved and help enhance the image…

  10. Krafla Magma Testbed: An International Project Crossing The Scientific Frontier From Geothermal System Into Magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Dingwell, D. B.; Ludden, J. N.; Mandeville, C. W.; Markusson, S.; Papale, P.; Sigmundsson, F.

    2016-12-01

    Few Earth regimes are subject to as much inference and as little direct knowledge as magma. Among the most important mysteries is the transition from hydrothermal to magmatic, i.e. from aqueous fluid-present to silicate melt-present, regimes. Because solid rock is ductile at near-solidus temperature, fractures should have fleeting existence and therefore heat transfer should be by conduction. Heat and mass transport across this zone influences evolution of magma bodies. The hydrothermal regime influences eruptive behavior when magma intrudes it and propagation of the transition zone toward magma is demonstrated by physical and chemical evidence. Both drilling observations and heat-balance considerations indicate that the melt- and fluid-absent transition zone is thin. Drilling of Iceland Deep Drilling Project's IDDP-1, 2 km into Krafla Caldera, showed that the transition from deep-solidus fine-grained granite to liquidus rhyolite is less than 30 m thick, probably much less. For the first time, we have the opportunity to interrogate an entire system of heat and mass transport, from magmatic source through the hydrothermal zone to surface volcanism, and in so doing unite the disciplines of volcanology and geothermal energy. With support from industry, national geoscience agencies, community stakeholders, and the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program (ICDP), we are developing a broad program to push the limits of knowledge and technology in extremely hot Earth. We use the term "testbed" for two reasons: Surface and borehole observations used in volcano monitoring and geothermal exploration will be tested and reinterpreted in light of the first "ground-truth" about magma. More than "observing", magma and the transition zone will be manipulated through fluid injection and extraction to understand time-dependent behavior. Sensor technology will be pushed to measure magmatic conditions directly. Payoffs are in fundamental planetary science, volcano

  11. Cigarette tax avoidance and evasion: findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindon, G. Emmanuel; Driezen, Pete; Chaloupka, Frank J.; Fong, Geoffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Background Decades of research have produced overwhelming evidence that tobacco taxes reduce tobacco use and increase government tax revenue. The magnitude and effectiveness of taxes at reducing tobacco use provide an incentive for tobacco users, manufacturers and others, most notably criminal networks, to devise ways to avoid or evade tobacco taxes. Consequently, tobacco tax avoidance and tax evasion can reduce the public health and fiscal benefit of tobacco taxes. Objectives First, this study aims to document, using data from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC), levels and trends in cigarette users’ tax avoidance and tax evasion behaviour in a sample of sixteen low-, middle- and high-income countries. Second, this study explores factors associated with cigarette tax avoidance and evasion. Methods We use data from ITC surveys conducted in 16 countries to estimate the extent and the type of cigarette tax avoidance/evasion between countries and across time. We use self-reported information about the source of a smoker’s last purchase of cigarettes or self-reported packaging information, or similar information gathered by the interviewers during face-to-face interviews to measure tax avoidance/evasion behaviours. We use generalized estimating equations (GEE) to explore individual-level factors that may affect the likelihood of cigarette tax avoidance or evasion in Canada, United States, United Kingdom and France. Findings We find prevalence estimates of cigarette tax avoidance/evasion vary substantially between countries and across time. In Canada, France and the United Kingdom, more than 10% of smokers report last purchasing cigarettes from low or untaxed sources while in Malaysia, some prevalence estimates suggest substantial cigarette tax avoidance/evasion. We also find important associations between household income and education and the likelihood to engage in tax avoidance/evasion. These associations, however, vary both in

  12. Cigarette tax avoidance and evasion: findings from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation (ITC) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guindon, G Emmanuel; Driezen, Pete; Chaloupka, Frank J; Fong, Geoffrey T

    2014-03-01

    Decades of research have produced overwhelming evidence that tobacco taxes reduce tobacco use and increase government tax revenue. The magnitude and effectiveness of taxes in reducing tobacco use provide an incentive for tobacco users, manufacturers and others, most notably criminal networks, to devise ways to avoid or evade tobacco taxes. Consequently, tobacco tax avoidance and tax evasion can reduce the public health and fiscal benefit of tobacco taxes. First, this study aims to document, using data from the International Tobacco Control Policy Evaluation Project (ITC), levels and trends in cigarette users' tax avoidance and tax evasion behaviour in a sample of 16 low-, middle- and high-income countries. Second, this study explores factors associated with cigarette tax avoidance and evasion. We used data from ITC surveys conducted in 16 countries to estimate the extent and type of cigarette tax avoidance/evasion between countries and across time. We used self-reported information about the source of a smoker's last purchase of cigarettes or self-reported packaging information, or similar information gathered by the interviewers during face-to-face interviews to measure tax avoidance/evasion behaviours. We used generalised estimating equations to explore individual-level factors that may affect the likelihood of cigarette tax avoidance or evasion in Canada, the USA, the UK and France. We found prevalence estimates of cigarette tax avoidance/evasion vary substantially between countries and across time. In Canada, France and the UK, more than 10% of smokers reported last purchasing cigarettes from low or untaxed sources, while in Malaysia some prevalence estimates suggested substantial cigarette tax avoidance/evasion. We also found important associations between household income and education and the likelihood to engage in tax avoidance/evasion. These associations, however, varied both in direction and magnitude across countries.

  13. Technology Outlook for International Schools in Asia, 2014. An NMC Horizon Project Regional Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L.; Adams Becker, S.; Cummins, M.; Estrada, V.

    2014-01-01

    This report is a collaborative research effort between the New Media Consortium (NMC), Concordia International School Shanghai, and NIST International School in Bangkok, Thailand, to help inform international school leaders in Asia about significant developments in technologies supporting teaching, learning, and creative inquiry in primary and…

  14. The Thirty Years’ Results of Radiation Hygienic Monitoring of Tula Region territories contaminated due to the Chernobyl NPP accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Boldyreva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Over 50% of Tula Region areas were contaminated after the Chernobyl NPP accident. The article provides the thirty years’ results of radiation hygienic monitoring of the Chernobyl accidental fallout - affected areas in Tula Region. The radiation situation is assessed at the initial accidental period and at the current stage. The initial levels of gamma - radiation dose intensity (up to 35 mcSv/hr are identified for the period of the “iodine” hazard along with the tabular data on the dose intensity relative stabilization by the beginning of August 1986 due to iodine-131 decay. The information is presented regarding iodine-131 tentative maximum permissible level exceedance in the dairy products of the two most contaminated regional areas - Plavskoye and Arsenievskoye. The article also provides the laboratory data on the total beta - activity in the foodstuffs in 1986-1987 and cesium-137 maximum permissible level exceedence in 1986. The radionuclide maximum permissible level exceedances in foodstuffs were registered only in 1986 due to the plants surface contamination whereas in the forest mushrooms those exceedances were repeatedly found until 2004. The black earths and grey forest soils had a benign impact upon the intensity of the radionuclide transfer into plants which resulted in the formation of internal radiation doses.At the current stage, the content of cesium-137 and strontium- 90 in the foodstuffs can only be quantified by a radiochemical method. The table covers all the districts within the boundaries of radiation contaminated zones. The radiochemical studies indicate the main dose - forming products. The article contains the table of internal and external radiation doses of the population in Plavsk town over 1986-1990 and displays the factors impacting population’s internal and external exposure. The Chernobyl - affected exposure dose of the population is mostly attributed to the external radiation and, for over twenty years, it

  15. The Italian debate on nuclear energy in the post Chernobyl age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantone, M.C. [Milano Univ., Dipt. di Fisica and INFN (Italy); Sturloni, G. [SISSA, Innovations in the Communication of Science, Trieste (Italy)

    2006-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Italy entered with enthusiasm into the production of nuclear energy for civil use at the end of 50. By 1966 - with an overall output of 3.9 billions kWh - Italy had become the fourth world producer of electricity generated by nuclear reactions, the second one in Europe after Great Britain. Chernobyl's 1986 disaster, which so much shook public opinion all over Europe, had particularly important economic and political consequences in Italy. In a controversial referendum, held in November 1987, Italian citizens voted for the repeal of three laws which promoted the installation of nuclear power plants on the Italian soil and the participation of ENEL (National Institution for the Electrical Energy) to plant constructions abroad. The 1987 referendum was interpreted by the Italian government as an opposition to nuclear power generation - the following year, the four Italian plants (Garigliano, Latina, Trino Vercellese, Caorso) ceased their activity and plans to build new plants were abandoned. This decision marked the ruin of Italian research on nuclear energy, that in the 30 had known a glorious era thanks to Enrico Fermi works. As the 20. Anniversary of Chernobyl's accident is drawing near, the University of Milan and ICS-research group (Innovations in Communication of Science) at SISSA, Trieste, have decided to analyse jointly the reasons which brought Italy to give up its nuclear energy production. In the present scenario of controversies concerning the development of science and technology, in which European countries exchange experiences of best practice to involve the public in decision making processes, Italy reaction to Chernobyl accident can indeed be considered paradigmatic in that it anticipated crucial risks governance issues in today relationship between science and society. The research project draws on methodologies used in media studies and on socio linguistic analysis, as developed by risk perception and risk

  16. Use of a virtual world computer environment for international distance education: lessons from a pilot project using Second Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoonheim, Marloes; Heyden, Robin; Wiecha, John M

    2014-02-21

    Virtual worlds (VWs), in which participants navigate as avatars through three-dimensional, computer-generated, realistic-looking environments, are emerging as important new technologies for distance health education. However, there is relatively little documented experience using VWs for international healthcare training. The Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research (GFMER) conducted a VW training for healthcare professionals enrolled in a GFMER training course. This paper describes the development, delivery, and results of a pilot project undertaken to explore the potential of VWs as an environment for distance healthcare education for an international audience that has generally limited access to conventionally delivered education.

  17. [The effect of Chernobyl accident on the development of non malignant diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonenberg, Anna; Leoniak, Marcin; Zarzycki, Wiesław

    2006-01-01

    The early medical complications of Chernobyl accident include post radiation disease, which were diagnosed in 134 subjects affected by ionizing radiation. 28 persons died during the first 100 days after the event. The increase occurrence of coronary heart disease, endocrine, haematological, dermatological and other diseases were observed after disaster in the contaminated territories. We also discussed the impact of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl accident on pregnancy and congenital defects occurrence. Changes following the Chernobyl accident, as the inhabitants migration from contaminated regions, political and economic conversions, led to depression, anxiety, and even to "epidemic" of mental diseases. Increased suicide rate, car accidents, alcohol and drug abuse have been observed in this population. Nowadays vegetative neurosis is more often diagnosed in Ukrainian children. Epidemiological studies were conducted on the ionising radiation effect on the health and on the dose of received radiation after Chernobyl accident face numerous problems as the absence of reliable data regarding diseases in the contaminated territories.

  18. WDC-A Meteorological and Oceanographic Data from Chernobyl for 1986

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — WDCA Chernobyl Data consists of digital data set DSI-9681, archived at the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI). World Data Center for Meteorology...

  19. Chernobyl. Answers to your questions; Tchernobyl. Des reponses a vos questions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident, this document takes stock on the existing information and enhance the elements which can be set with certainty. The accident is recalled and the environmental and biological effects are presented. (A.L.B.)

  20. Chernobyl fallout in the uppermost (0-3 cm) humus layer of forest soil in Finland, North East Russia and the Baltic countries in 2000--2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ylipieti, J; Rissanen, K; Kostiainen, E; Salminen, R; Tomilina, O; Täht, K; Gilucis, A; Gregorauskiene, V

    2008-12-15

    The situation resulting from the Chernobyl fallout in 1987 was compared to that in 2000--2001 in Finland and NW Russia and that in 2003 in the Baltic countries. 786 humus (0-3 cm layer) samples were collected during 2000--2001 in the Barents Ecogeochemistry Project, and 177 samples in the Baltic countries in 2003. Nuclides emitting gamma-radiation in the 0-3 cm humus layer were measured by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority-STUK in Finland. In 1987 the project area was classified by the European Commission into four different fallout classes. 137Cs inventory Bg/m2 levels measured in 2000--2003 were compared to the EU's class ranges. Fitting over the whole project area was implemented by generalizing the results for samples from the Baltic countries, for which Bq/m2 inventories could be calculated. A rough estimation was made by comparing the mass of organic matter and humus with 137Cs concentrations in these two areas. Changes in 137Cs concentration levels are illustrated in both thematic maps and tables. Radionuclide 137Cs concentrations (Bq/kg d.w.) were detected in the humus layer at all the 988 sampling sites. 134Cs was still present in 198 sites 15 years after the nuclear accident in Chernobyl. No other anthropogenic nuclides emitting gamma-radiation were detected, but low levels of 60Co, 125Sb and 154Eu isotopes were found in 14 sites. Fifteen years after the Chernobyl accident, the radioactive nuclide 137Cs was and still is the most significant fallout radionuclide in the environment and in food chains. The results show that the fallout can still be detected in the uppermost humus layer in North East Europe.

  1. Genetic consequences of the Chernobyl accident for Belarus republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lazjuk, G.; Nikolaev, D.; Novikova, I. [Belarus Institute for Hereditary Diseases, Minsk (Belarus); Satow, Yukio

    1998-03-01

    Numerous studies have shown that a great number of residents in Belarus, Russia and the Ukraine were exposed to radiation due to radioactive nuclides ejected from the Chernobyl reactor, which increased genetic load, manifested in particular, as chromosome aberrations. The increase was registered for unstable and stable, chromatid and chromosome types of aberrations. Proceeding from the findings that the number of dicentric and ring chromosomes (which are the main indicator of radiation mutagenesis at chromosome level) was increasing simultaneously with the increase of other aberrations which are common for chemical mutagenesis and from the fact that actual mutation incidences exceeded the calculated figures for the doses obtained, one can not exclude the possibility that chromosome aberrations found in the population affected by the Chernobyl disaster are caused not only by ionizing radiation but also by various mutagens, and the doses based on physical dosimetry could be underestimated. It is quite obvious that the level of chromosome aberrations can be used as a biological indicator of harmful mutagenic effects on the organism. However, the method is not yet capable of (or only partially suited for) detecting the actual genetic risk even in the cases when aberrations are found in gametes, not in peripheral blood lymphocytes as usually done. The study of the dynamics of genetic losses, as spontaneous abortions and perinatal death due to inherited anomalies, and the study of the dynamics of malformed children births are probably the most reliable methods to determine genetic risk due to any mutagenic factor affecting the population, including ionizing radiation. This is related to the fact that there are a great sequence of events (gamete selection, preimplantation and embryonal death) occurring between gamete mutations (to say nothing about a somatic one) and births of children with congenital diseases. It is nearly impossible to count them and this leads to

  2. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-12-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by (137)Cesium ((137)Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as (132)Te-(132)I, (131)I, (134)Cs and (137)Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h(-1) per initial (137)Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2), whereas it was 100 μGy h(-1) around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m(-2) for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums ((134)Cs + (137)Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  3. Comparison of the accident process, radioactivity release and ground contamination between Chernobyl and Fukushima-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Hayashi, Gohei; Endo, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    In this report, we have reviewed the basic features of the accident processes and radioactivity releases that occurred in the Chernobyl accident (1986) and in the Fukushima-1 accident (2011). The Chernobyl accident was a power-surge accident that was caused by a failure of control of a fission chain reaction, which instantaneously destroyed the reactor and building, whereas the Fukushima-1 accident was a loss-of-coolant accident in which the reactor cores of three units were melted by decay heat after losing the electricity supply. Although the quantity of radioactive noble gases released from Fukushima-1 exceeded the amount released from Chernobyl, the size of land area severely contaminated by 137Cesium (137Cs) was 10 times smaller around Fukushima-1 compared with around Chernobyl. The differences in the accident process are reflected in the composition of the discharged radioactivity as well as in the composition of the ground contamination. Volatile radionuclides (such as 132Te-132I, 131I, 134Cs and 137Cs) contributed to the gamma-ray exposure from the ground contamination around Fukishima-1, whereas a greater variety of radionuclides contributed significantly around Chernobyl. When radioactivity deposition occurred, the radiation exposure rate near Chernobyl is estimated to have been 770 μGy h−1 per initial 137Cs deposition of 1000 kBq m−2, whereas it was 100 μGy h−1 around Fukushima-1. Estimates of the cumulative exposure for 30 years are 970 and 570 mGy per initial deposition of 1000 kBq m−2 for Chernobyl and Fukusima-1, respectively. Of these exposures, 49 and 98% were contributed by radiocesiums (134Cs + 137Cs) around Chernobyl and Fukushima-1, respectively. PMID:26568603

  4. Simulation studies for a high resolution time projection chamber at the international linear collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muennich, A.

    2007-03-26

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is planned to be the next large accelerator. The ILC will be able to perform high precision measurements only possible at the clean environment of electron positron collisions. In order to reach this high accuracy, the requirements for the detector performance are challenging. Several detector concepts are currently under study. The understanding of the detector and its performance will be crucial to extract the desired physics results from the data. To optimise the detector design, simulation studies are needed. Simulation packages like GEANT4 allow to model the detector geometry and simulate the energy deposit in the different materials. However, the detector response taking into account the transportation of the produced charge to the readout devices and the effects ofthe readout electronics cannot be described in detail. These processes in the detector will change the measured position of the energy deposit relative to the point of origin. The determination of this detector response is the task of detailed simulation studies, which have to be carried out for each subdetector. A high resolution Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with gas amplification based on micro pattern gas detectors, is one of the options for the main tracking system at the ILC. In the present thesis a detailed simulation tool to study the performance of a TPC was developed. Its goal is to find the optimal settings to reach an excellent momentum and spatial resolution. After an introduction to the present status of particle physics and the ILC project with special focus on the TPC as central tracker, the simulation framework is presented. The basic simulation methods and implemented processes are introduced. Within this stand-alone simulation framework each electron produced by primary ionisation is transferred through the gas volume and amplified using Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs). The output format of the simulation is identical to the raw data from a

  5. New idea of geomagnetic monitoring through ENA detection from the International Space Station: ENAMISS project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milillo, Anna; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Orsini, Stefano; Rubini, Alda; Evangelista, Yuri; Mura, Alessandro; Rispoli, Rosanna; Vertolli, Nello; Carrubba, Elisa; Donati, Alessandro; Di Lellis, Andrea Maria; Plainaki, Christina; Lazzarotto, Francesco

    2016-04-01

    Remote sensing of Energetic Neutral Atoms (ENA) in the Earth's environment has been proven to be a successful technique able to provide detailed information on the ring current plasma population at energies below 100 keV. Indeed, the existing space weather databases usually include a good coverage of Sun and solar wind monitoring. The global imaging of the Earth's magnetosphere/ ionosphere is usually obtained by the high-latitudes monitoring of aurorae, ground magnetic field variations and high-latitude radio emissions. The equatorial magnetic field variations on ground, from which the geomagnetic indices like Dst, Sym-H and Asym-H are derived, include the effects of all current systems (i.e. ring current, Chapman -Ferraro current, tails currents, etc...) providing a kind of global information. Nevertheless, the specific information related to the ring current cannot be easily derived from such indices. Only occasional local plasma data are available by orbiting spacecraft. ENA detection is the only way to globally view the ring current populations. Up-to-now this technique has been used mainly from dedicated high altitude polar orbiting spacecraft, which do not allow a continuous and systematic monitoring, and a discrimination of the particle latitude distribution. The Energetic Neutral Atoms Monitor on the International space Station (ENAMISS) project intends to develop an ENA imager and install it on the ISS for continuous monitoring of the spatially distributed ring current plasma population. ISS is the ideal platform to perform continuous ENA monitoring since its particular low altitude and medium/low latitude orbit allows wide-field ENA images of various magnetospheric regions. The calibrated ENA data, the deconvolved ion distributions and ad-hoc ENA-based new geomagnetic indices will be freely distributed to the space weather community. Furthermore, new services based on plasma circulation models, spacecraft surface charging models and radiation dose models

  6. The global rainforest mapping project JERS-1: a paradigm of international collaboration for monitoring land cover change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The Global Rainforest Mapping (GRFM) project was initiated in 1995 and, through a dedicated data acquisition policy by the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA), data acquisitions could be completed within a 1.5-year period, resulting in a spatially and temporally homogeneous coverage to contain the entire Amazon Basin from the Atlantic to the Pacific; Central America up to the Yucatan Peninsular in Mexico; equatorial Africa from Madagascar and Kenya in the east to Sierra Leone in the west; and Southeast Asia, including Papua New Guinea. To some extent, GRFM project is an international endeavor led by NASDA, with the goal of producing spatially and temporally contiguous Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data sets over the tropical belt on the Earth by use of the JERS-1 L-band SAR, through the generation of semi-continental, 100m resolution, image mosaics. The GRFM project relies on extensive collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the Joint Research Center of the European Commission (JRC) and the Japanese Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) for data acquisition, processing, validation and product generation. A science program is underway in parallel with product generation. This involves the agencies mentioned above, as well as a large number of international organizations, universities and individuals to perform field activities and data analysis at different levels.

  7. 30 years life with Chernobyl, 5 years life with Fukushima. Health consequences of the nuclear catastrophes of Chernobyl and Fukushima; 30 Jahre Leben mit Tschernobyl, 5 Jahre Leben mit Fukushima. Gesundheitliche Folgen der Atomkatastrophen von Tschernobyl und Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claussen, Angelika; Rosen, Alex

    2016-02-15

    The IPPNW report on health consequences of the nuclear catastrophes of Chernobyl and Fukushima covers the following issues: Part.: 30 years life with Chernobyl: Summarized consequences of Chernobyl, the accident progression, basic data of the catastrophe, estimation of health hazards as a consequence of the severe accident of Chernobyl, health consequences for the liquidators, health consequences for the contaminated population, mutagenic and teratogenic effects. Part B: 5 years life with Fukushima: The start of the nuclear catastrophe, emissions and contamination, consequences of the nuclear catastrophe on human health, thyroid surveys in the prefecture Fukushima, consequences of the nuclear catastrophe on the ecosystem, outlook.

  8. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  9. The Small Helm Project: an academic activity addressing international corruption for undergraduate civil engineering and construction management students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzley, Steven E

    2006-04-01

    This paper presents an academic project that addresses the issue of international corruption in the engineering and construction industry, in a manner that effectively incorporates several learning experiences. The major objectives of the project are to provide the students a learning activity that will 1) make a meaningful contribution within the disciplines being studied; 2) teach by experience a significant principle that can be valuable in numerous situations during an individual's career, and 3) engage the minds, experiences, and enthusiasm of the participants in a real ethical challenge that is prevalent in all of their chosen professional fields. The paper describes the full details of the project, the actual implementation of it during Winter Semester 2005, the experiences gained during the initial trial, and the modifications and improvements incorporated for future implementation.

  10. Chernobyl: 25 years later; Tchernobyl: 25 ans apres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo, Carlos

    2011-11-24

    On April 26, 1986, the reactor no.4 of the Chernobyl power plant exploded. The power plant is located in northern Ukraine at 3 km of Pripyat (the 'atom town'), a new city which counted 50.000 habitants at the time of the accident. The evacuation of the city was decided on April 27 only and finally 250.000 people from Bielorussia, Russia and Ukraine were relocated between April and December 1986 with no return back for most of them. This book is a collection of pictures taken in the Pripyat area, in buildings of a ghost town abandoned for 25 years and left to the wear of time and to pillaging. (J.S.)

  11. The Chernobyl accident: EPR dosimetry on dental enamel of children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gualtieri, G. E-mail: gianni@fismedw2.univaq.it; Colacicchi, S.; Sgattoni, R.; Giannoni, M

    2001-07-01

    The radiation dose on tooth enamel of children living close to Chernobyl has been evaluated by EPR. The sample preparation was reduced to a minimum of mechanical steps to remove a piece of enamel. A standard X-ray tube at low energy was used for additive irradiation. The filtration effect of facial soft tissue was taken into account. The radiation dose for a group of teeth slightly exceeds the annual dose, whereas for another group the dose very much exceeds the annual dose. Since the higher dose is found in teeth whose enamel have much lower EPR sensitivity to the radiation, it can be suggested that for these teeth the native signal could alter the evaluation of the smaller radiation signal.

  12. Unusual nuclide concentrations in air after the 1986 Chernobyl event

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faller, S.H.; Kuroda, P.K. (Environmental Protection Agency, Las Vegas, NV (USA). Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Concentrations of 1.0-year {sup 106}Ru, 2.8-year {sup 125}Sb, 2.1-year {sup 134}Cs, and 30-year {sup 137}Cs were measured for a total of 39 air filter samples collected at Chico, California, and Reno, Nevada, during the month of May 1986. Radioactive debris in which {sup 106}Ru, {sup 125}Sb, and {sup 134}Cs were enriched relative to {sup 137}Cs reached the west coast of the United States during the first week of May 1986. The air mass that carried this debris seems to have circled the world and reached the west coast for the second time 3 weeks later during the last week of May 1986. Results obtained in this study indicate that the initial release of nuclear debris from the Chernobyl reactor took place in a manner similar to the atmospheric injection of radionuclides from a nuclear weapon's test. (orig.).

  13. The Chernobyl accident: EPR dosimetry on dental enamel of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualtieri, G; Colacicchi, S; Sgattoni, R; Giannoni, M

    2001-07-01

    The radiation dose on tooth enamel of children living close to Chernobyl has been evaluated by EPR. The sample preparation was reduced to a minimum of mechanical steps to remove a piece of enamel. A standard X-ray tube at low energy was used for additive irradiation. The filtration effect of facial soft tissue was taken into account. The radiation dose for a group of teeth slightly exceeds the annual dose, whereas for another group the dose very much exceeds the annual dose. Since the higher dose is found in teeth whose enamel have much lower EPR sensitivity to the radiation, it can be suggested that for these teeth the native signal could alter the evaluation of the smaller radiation signal.

  14. An International Teacher Training Project: Integrating Subject Content, Communicative and Digital Competences in Didactic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra, Lina; Martin, Piedad

    2012-01-01

    The European intTT project "An Integral Teacher Training for Developing Digital and Communicative Competences and Subject Content Learning at Schools" deals with initial teacher training in primary and secondary School. The general objective of the project is to train future school teachers in order to improve the development of…

  15. An Analysis of Internally Funded Learning and Teaching Project Evaluation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Elaine; Harvey, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the higher education sector, the evaluation of learning and teaching projects is assuming a role as a quality and accountability indicator. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning and teaching project evaluation is approached and critiques alignment between evaluation theory and practice. Design/Methodology/Approach:…

  16. Student- Directed Projects: An International Case Study for Social Work Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowa, Gina A.; Ansong, David

    2010-01-01

    Student-directed projects are increasingly becoming a common phenomenon in schools of social work across the United States. Students acquire a great learning experience from these projects, which sharpen their skills in leadership, innovation, and practice. Social work practitioners who go through such a process emerge having acquired knowledge…

  17. The CERI INSET Project: A Description and a Preliminary Evaluation of International Co-development Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Euan S.

    1982-01-01

    Between 1975 and 1980, the Organization for European Cooperation and Development's Centre for Educational Research and Innovation engaged in a project to enable member countries to share innovative approaches to inservice teacher education. Several aspects of the inservice education for teachers (INSET) project are discussed. (CJ)

  18. An Analysis of Internally Funded Learning and Teaching Project Evaluation in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Elaine; Harvey, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In the higher education sector, the evaluation of learning and teaching projects is assuming a role as a quality and accountability indicator. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how learning and teaching project evaluation is approached and critiques alignment between evaluation theory and practice. Design/Methodology/Approach:…

  19. Importance of Document Control in Project Management of International EPC Project%国际EPC项目管理中文件控制的重要性

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贺玉娟

    2013-01-01

    在工程管理观念日趋国际化的发展趋势下,文件控制的在国际 EPC 项目管理中的作用越发凸显,本文通过分析文件控制在项目管理三大板块(设计、采购和施工)中的作用,阐述了文控工作的重要性。%In the engineering management concepts under the development trend of internationalization, document control in the international EPC project management plays a more promi-nent role, this paper through the analysis on the role of docum-ent contro in project management (three plate design, procure-ment and construction), expounds the importance of the docu-ment control work.

  20. Current state of epidemiological studies in Belarus about Chernobyl sufferers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsko, V.P. [Institute of Radiobiology, Academy Sciences of Belarus, Minsk (Belarus)

    1998-03-01

    The present paper is an analysis of the results of epidemiological studies in Belarus about the after-effects of the accident at the Chernobyl atomic power station (ChAPS), based on published data at scientific institutes, organs and institutions of Ministry of Health. In the last years the affected population showed thereby more significant - as compared with republican indices - growth of incidence in the majority of diseases (first of all: digestion, urogenital, nervous, endocrine systems, diseases of ear, throat, nose both among adults and among children). Aggravation of health state continues in the participants of liquidation of the ChAPS accident consequences and the evacuees from the alienation zone which have obtained considerable radiation load to organism (rise of incidence of diseases of endocrine, cardiovascular, nervous system etc.). Considerable growth of thyroid cancer incidence is registered in Belarus children and adolescents, especially in the Gomel and Brest regions. This is conditioned by dose commitments on thyroid gland due to iodine radionuclides in first period after the accident, incorrect iodine prophylaxy, and goitre endemic. The rise of hereditary pathology is registered too. An expressed increase of oncological diseases is observed therewith mainly in the Gomel region, especially in the districts with high level of radiocontamination and, consequently, significant radiation load. First of all, this relates to the growth of incidence of cancer of lungs, mammary gland, bladder. The analysis of epidemiological studies performed in Belarus after the ChAPS catastrophe and comparison of them with data obtained in the pre-Chernobyl period testify to the aggravation of health state of Belarus population. The specialists unambiguously recognize the direct influence of radioactive pollution in the environment on rise of thyroid pathologies, hereditary and congenial diseases, and cancers of different localizations. There is no unique opinion

  1. Estimated long term health effects of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardis, E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

    1996-07-01

    Apart from the dramatic increase in thyroid cancer in those exposed as children, there is no evidence to date of a major public health impact as a result of radiation exposure due to the Chernobyl accident in the three most affected countries (Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine). Although some increases in the frequency of cancer in exposed populations have been reported ,these results are difficult to interpret, mainly because of differences in the intensity and method of follow-up between exposed populations and the general population with which they are compared. If the experience of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Japan and of other exposed populations is applicable, the major radiological impact of the accident will be cases of cancer. The total lifetime numbers of excess cancers will be greatest among the `liquidators` (emergency and recovery workers) and among the residents of `contaminated` territories, of the order of 2000 to 2500 among each group (the size of the exposed populations is 200,000 liquidators and 3,700,000 residents of `contaminated` areas). These increases would be difficult to detect epidemiologically against an expected background number of 41500 and 433000 cases of cancer respectively among the two groups. The exposures for populations due to the Chernobyl accident are different in type and pattern from those of the survivors of the atomic bombing of Japan. Thus predictions derived from studies of these populations are uncertain. The extent of the incidence of thyroid cancer was not envisaged. Since only ten years have lapsed since the accident, continued monitoring of the health of the population is essential to assess the public health impact.

  2. THE DYNAMICS OF FOOD RATIONS OF BRYANSK REGION POPULATION LIVING IN THE TERRITORIESCONTAMINATED AFTER THE CHERNOBYL ACCIDENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. G. Travnikova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available During the years passed after the Chernobyl accident we are carrying out monitoring of the radiation situation in the Sough-Western territories of the Bryansk region, contaminated with the long-living radionuclides which includes 137Сs concentration measurements in agricultural and natural foodstuffs, surveys of local populations on the structure and composition of the diet accompanied with 137Сs content measurements in the human body. In the article the obtained data is systematized on the food rations of the adult population of theBryansk region, on food rations dynamics in the first and following years after the accident, which is necessary for the correct estimation of internal exposure doses of the population living on the contaminated territories.

  3. Mapping of caesium fallout from the Chernobyl accident in the Jotunheimen area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranwal, Vikas C.; Ofstad, Frode; Roenning, Jan S.; Watson, Robin J.

    2011-07-01

    As a consequence of the Chernobyl accident, several areas in Norway received radioactive fallout. One of these areas is the eastern part of Jotunheimen in central Norway. Immediately after the accident in 1986, the Geological Survey of Norway (NGU) performed airborne gamma-ray spectroscopy in central Norway. At that time, it was not possible to calculate reliable radionuclide concentrations, and the data were presented as total counts per second. Several man-made radionuclides were present in the initial fallout, but due to short half-lives, most of these have now disintegrated into stable isotopes. 137Cs, with a half-life of 11.000 days ({approx} 30 years) is still present in the environment in significant quantities, leading to high radioactivity levels in meat from reindeer and sheep. To obtain a detailed map of the caesium fallout concentration in Jotunheimen, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometry (AGRS) survey was carried out, focussing on reindeer grazing areas. This project was a cooperation between Reindeer Husbandry Administration, Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority and the Geological Survey of Norway. (auth)

  4. A Case Study in Project-Based Learning: An International Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Rachel Korfhage

    2010-01-01

    As our world becomes more integrated, international business students should develop skills that match corporations' needs. Moreover, students need hands-on, problem-solving, team-based, critical-thinking skills that companies demand. Students need international business experience but many of them lack the funds or support to study or intern…

  5. Promoting Health Behaviors Using Peer Education: A Demonstration Project between International and American College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zi; Finn, Kevin; Cardinal, Bradley J.; Bent, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peer education has the potential to promote health behaviors and cultural competence for both international and domestic college students. Purpose: The present study examined a peer education program aimed at promoting cultural competence and health behaviors among international and American students in a university setting. Methods:…

  6. [Influence of nuclear reactor accident at Chernobyl' on the environmental radioactivity in Toyama].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, M; Shoji, M; Honda, T; Sakanoue, M

    1987-06-01

    The environmental radioactivity caused by the reactor accident at Chernobyl' was investigated from May 7 to May 31 of 1986 in Toyama. Measurement of radioactivities in airborne particles, rain water, drinking water, milk, and mugwort are carried out by gamma-ray spectrometry (pure Ge detector; ORTEC GMX-23195). Ten different nuclides (103Ru, 106Ru, 131I, 132Te-I, 134Cs, 136Cs, 137Cs, 140Ba-La) are identified from samples of airborne particles. In the air samples, a maximum radioactivity concentration of each nuclide is observed on 13th May 1986. The time of the reactor shut-down and the flux of thermal neutron at the reactor were calculated from 131I/132I and 137Cs/134Cs ratio. The exposure dose in Toyama by this accident is given as follows: internal exposure; [thyroid] adult-59 microSv, child-140 microSv, baby-130 microSv, [total body] adult-0.2 microSv, child, baby-0.4 microSv, external exposure; 7 microSv, effective dose equivalent; adult-9 microSv, child-12 Sv, baby-11 microSv.

  7. Health effects in those with acute radiation sickness from the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, Fred A; Gus'kova, Angelina K; Gusev, Igor

    2007-11-01

    The Chernobyl accident resulted in almost one-third of the reported cases of acute radiation sickness (ARS) reported worldwide. Cases occurred among the plant employees and first responders but not among the evacuated populations or general population. The diagnosis of ARS was initially considered for 237 persons based on symptoms of nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. Ultimately, the diagnosis of ARS was confirmed in 134 persons. There were 28 short term deaths of which 95% occurred at whole body doses in excess of 6.5 Gy. Underlying bone marrow failure was the main contributor to all deaths during the first 2 mo. Allogenic bone marrow transplantation was performed on 13 patients and an additional six received human fetal liver cells. All of these patients died except one individual who later was discovered to have recovered his own marrow and rejected the transplant. Two or three patients were felt to have died as a result of transplant complications. Skin doses exceeded bone marrow doses by a factor of 10-30, and at least 19 of the deaths were felt to be primarily due to infection from large area beta burns. Internal contamination was of relatively minor importance in treatment. By the end of 2001, an additional 14 ARS survivors died from various causes. Long term treatment has included therapy for beta burn fibrosis and skin atrophy as well as for cataracts.

  8. Further evidence for elevated human minisatellite mutation rate in Belarus eight years after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrova, Yuri E.; Buard, Jerome; Jeffreys, Alec J. [Department of Genetics, University of Leicester, Adrian Building, University Road, Leicester (United Kingdom); Nesterov, Valeri N.; Krouchinsky, Nicolay G.; Ostapenko, Vladislav A. [Research Institute for Radiation Medicine, Mogilev (Belarus); Vergnaud, Gilles; Giraudeau, Fabienne [Laboratoire de Recherche en Genetique des Especes, Institut de Biologie, Nantes (France)

    1997-11-28

    Analysis of germline mutation rate at human minisatellites among children born in areas of the Mogilev district of Belarus heavily polluted after the Chernobyl accident has been extended, both by recruiting more families from the affected region and by using five additional minisatellite probes, including multi-locus probe 33.6 and four hypervariable single-locus probes. These additional data confirmed a twofold higher mutation rate in exposed families compared with non-irradiated families from the United Kingdom. An elevated rate was seen at all three independent sets of minisatellites (detected separately by multi-locus probes 33.15, 33.6 and six single-locus probes), indicating a generalised increase in minisatellite germline mutation rate in the Belarus families. Within the Belarus cohort, mutation rate was significantly greater in families with higher parental radiation dose estimated for chronic external and internal exposure to caesium-137, consistent with radiation induction of germline mutation. The spectra of mutation seen in the unexposed and exposed families were indistinguishable, suggesting that increased mutation observed over multiple loci arises indirectly by some mechanism that enhances spontaneous minisatellite mutation.

  9. Biological concentration of radionuclides in plants and animals after Chernobyl catastrophe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Hiroo; Ryo, Haruko; Nomura, Taisei [Osaka Univ., Suita (Japan). Graduate School of Medicine; Yamaguchi, Yoshiaki; Saito, Tadashi; Yeliseeva, K.G.; Piskunov, V.S.; Krupnova, E.V.; Voitovich, A.M.

    2000-07-01

    The {sup 137}Cs radioactivity and its distribution in plants (trees, mushrooms, berries, duckweed, and etc.) and animals (insects, mice, fish, and etc.) were measured in contaminated areas of southern Belarus, which was highly polluted by radionuclides as a result of the Chernobyl catastrophe in Ukraine in 1986. Gamma spectrometry of {sup 137}Cs was carried out, and a computer graphic imaging analysis was performed to visualize the distribution of radioactive nuclides in the organisms. The specimen was placed on the imaging plate, the plate was exposed for 20 h. High {sup 137}Cs radioactivity was detected in both the animals (mice, moles, dragonflies, grasshoppers, and fish) and the plants (pine trees, oak leaves, mushrooms, berries, duckweed). The {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in the organisms was proportional to the radioactivity in the soil. Assessment of its distribution showed that {sup 137}Cs was highly concentrated in muscle, but there were no substantial differences in {sup 137}Cs radioactivity according to organ or species. Computer graphic imaging analysis clearly revealed non-uniform distribution of {sup 137}Cs radioactivity in the animals and plants. In pine trees, the highest level of radioactivity was found in the bark, and it decreased toward the center of the tree. In conclusion, the authors suggest that self-cleaning of the soil will require a very long time and that the biological concentrations will persist and increase in higher animals for a long time, resulting in accumulation of both external and internal radiation exposure in animals. (K.H.)

  10. A View on a Successful International Educational Project in Software Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoran Budimac

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a successful and fruitful joint project will be presented. The project joins participants from 9 countries and from 15 universities. Since it started in 2001, this project entitled “Software Engineering: Computer Science Education and Research Cooperation” helped participants to gain excellent, up to date educational material, apply modern teaching methods, exchange experiences with other participants, and work jointly on the further development of lectures, case-studies, assignments, examination questions, and other necessary elements of a course. Project works under auspices of Stability Pact of South-Eastern Europe, and is supported by DAAD. The project started with the creation of a common beginning course in “Software Engineering”, but over time it grew and the number of other courses was developed. Finished almost completely are the courses in “Object-oriented programming”, “Software Project Management”, “Advanced Compiler Construction”, and “Data Structures and Algorithms”, and some other courses are under development. Aside from the educational collaboration, project members also developed good scientific cooperation, and published several research papers.

  11. The IASLC Mesothelioma Staging Project: Improving Staging of a Rare Disease Through International Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pass, Harvey; Giroux, Dorothy; Kennedy, Catherine; Ruffini, Enrico; Cangir, Ayten K; Rice, David; Asamura, Hisao; Waller, David; Edwards, John; Weder, Walter; Hoffmann, Hans; van Meerbeeck, Jan P; Nowak, Anna; Rusch, Valerie W

    2016-12-01

    For nearly 40 years, there was no generally accepted staging system for malignant pleural mesothelioma. In 1994, members of the International Mesothelioma Interest Group, in collaboration with the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, proposed a TNM staging system based on analyses of outcomes in retrospective surgical series and small clinical trials. Subsequently accepted by the American Joint Commission on Cancer and the Union for International Cancer Control for the sixth editions of their staging manuals, this system has since been the international staging standard. However, it has significant limitations, particularly with respect to clinical staging and to the categories for lymph node staging. Here we provide an overview of the development of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer malignant pleural mesothelioma staging database, which was designed to address these limitations through the development of a large international data set. Analyses of this database, described in papers linked to this overview, are being used to inform revisions in the eighth editions of the American Joint Commission on Cancer and Union for International Cancer Control staging systems.

  12. Recent trends of the tropical hydrological cycle inferred from Global Precipitation Climatology Project and International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sud, Y. C.; Zhou, Y.; Xu, K.; Betts, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Among the greenhouse gases induced climate change projections, tropical hydrological cycle changes can be expected to cause significant deficit or excess of precipitation in many regions, and that in turn would impact all life on earth. We have examined decadal trends of the tropical hydrological cycle in the GPCP precipitation and ISCCP cloud and radiation datasets to determine if such trends can provide an observation-based benchmark for model predictions of the ongoing climate change. The observations data show (1) intensifications of tropical precipitation in the rising regions of the Walker and Hadley circulations and weakening over the sinking regions - showcasing the "wet-getting-wetter, dry-getting-dryer" phenomena; (2) a discernible poleward shift of the subtropical dry zones (up to 2° decade-1 in June-July-August (JJA) in the Northern Hemisphere and 0.3-0.7° decade-1 in JJA and September-October-November (SON) in the Southern Hemisphere consistent with an overall broadening of the Hadley circulation; and (3) some poleward migration of cloud boundaries within Hadley cell and plausible narrowing of the high cloudiness in the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) region in some seasons. These trends indicate a strengthening of the tropical hydrological cycle with intensification of dry and wet extremes.

  13. Climate and pollution agency #En Dash# International projects and partnerships 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-01

    The report describes the agency's work with partners, mainly authorities in other countries, to implement regional and bilateral programs and projects that reduce the impacts on the environment.(Author)

  14. AN INTERNATIONAL APPROACH TO ASSESSMENT ANDFEEDBACK WITHIN COLLABORATIVE DIGITAL MEDIA PROJECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Sutter, Robert; Nyström, Tommie; Westbomke, Jörg

    2012-01-01

    BackgroundThe Intercultural Design Camp (ICDC) is a collaboration between the Schools of Creative Practice offour European higher education institutions: Linköping University, Sweden; The University of the Westof Scotland; Stuttgart Media University, Germany and Artevelde University College Ghent, Belgium.Emerging from the development of a joint post-graduate proposal, the ICDC project has grown. Pilotedin 2009 in Muensingen, Germany as a one-week summer school, the focus of the project wasin...

  15. NASA's International Lunar Network Anchor Nodes and Robotic Lunar Lander Project Update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Barbara A.; Bassler, Julie A.; Ballard, Benjamin; Chavers, Greg; Eng, Doug S.; Hammond, Monica S.; Hill, Larry A.; Harris, Danny W.; Hollaway, Todd A.; Kubota, Sanae; Morse, Brian J.; Mulac, Brian D.; Reed, Cheryl L.

    2010-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory have been conducting mission studies and performing risk reduction activities for NASA's robotic lunar lander flight projects. Additional mission studies have been conducted to support other objectives of the lunar science and exploration community and extensive risk reduction design and testing has been performed to advance the design of the lander system and reduce development risk for flight projects.

  16. Polyimide Nanocomposite Circuit Board Materials to Mitigate Internal Electrostatic Discharge Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Sub-topic T8.02, NASA has identified a need for improved circuit boards to mitigate the hazards of internal electrostatic discharge (IESD) on missions where high...

  17. NCDC International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) Project, Version 3

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Best Track Archive for Climate Stewardship (IBTrACS) dataset was developed by the NOAA National Climatic Data Center, which took the initial step...

  18. Conceptualizing the cross-cultural gaps in managing international aid: HIV/AIDS and TB project delivery in Southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Terence

    2011-01-01

    There appears to be a gap between the billions of dollars inputted into fighting HIV/AIDS and TB and outcomes. This in part can be attributed to the lack of attention in International Development to managing programmes and projects within complex levels of cross-cultural interactions. International Development often ignores management issues, yet Management Studies is left wanting through a lack of engagement with development issues including the fight against disease and poverty. This paper attempts to link these two disciplines towards mutual benefit, through a critical cross-cultural approach. It provides contextualization of international development policies/strategies; conceptualization of dominant paradigms; structural analysis of how a programme/project fits into the global governance structure; analysis of complexities and levels of cross-cultural interaction and their consequences and the process and implications of knowledge transfer across cultural distances. It concludes with implications for policy and practice, as well as what is needed from cross-disciplinary research. This includes how feedback loops can be strengthened from local to global, how indigenous knowledge may be better understood and integrated, how power relations within the global governance structure could be managed, how cross-cultural interaction could be better understood, and how knowledge transfer/sharing should be critically managed.

  19. ROMANIA’S FACTS ABOUT INTERNAL CONTROL ENVIRONMENT OF EUROPEAN SOCIAL FUND FINANCED PROJECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dogar Cristian

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The malfunctioning of internal control system of European Social Fund (ESF financed interventions may prejudice the sound financial management principle. Incorporating COSO principles in the beneficiary’s internal control systems may provide some warranties about compliance to the above mentioned principle as described in the EC Regulation 1605-2002. This study aims to explore some facts in actual internal control environment, as a base for future improvements of Romanian ESF beneficiary’s internal control systems ESF financed interventions covers a large range of costs for implementing labor market related services. But supporting costs according to the sound financial management principle calls for best value for money in real and legal operations. Without some specifics from the donor or a mutual accepted best practice model, most of the ESF beneficiaries are reporting their efforts to actual researches and specialized literature regarding internal control system implementation in services. This study was realized in April 2012 by applying an investigation instrument, an on-line questionnaire collecting both opinions and factual data as well to a number of 962 members of a practice community for ESF interventions implementation. This technique was used to test hypotheses regarding the premises existence for a future improvement of the existing internal control system model. 100 members of this community: managers, accountants, auditors financial responsible and other team members answered anonymously, revealing a real concern for internal control, providing as well a different side image for this. Analyzing all stakeholder answers, we may consider that our hypothesis is correct and there is a real need for internal control environment improvements. This study is a part of a larger research “New models of the accounting and internal control systems of ESF financed interventions in Romania”, addressing a qualitative

  20. The international charter for space and major disasters--project manager training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Regional Project Managers for the Charter are developed through training courses, which typically last between 3 and 5 days and are held in a central location for participants. These courses have resulted in increased activations and broader use of Charter data and information by local emergency management authorities. Project Managers are nominated according to either their regional affiliation or their specific areas of expertise. A normal activation takes 2 to 3 weeks to complete, with all related expenses the responsibility of the PM's home agency.

  1. Perceived risks and risk attitudes in southern Russia in the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drottz-Sjoeberg, B.M. [Stockholm School of Economics (Sweden). Center for Risk Research; Rumyantseva, G.M.; Martyvshov, A.N. [The Serbsky Research Institute, Moscow, (Russian Federation)

    1993-10-01

    The present study was conducted within the framework of the Joint Study Project 2 (JSP2), a research project involving the European Community and the Commonwealth of Independent States. The task involved the investigation of public reactions to radioactive contamination due to the Chernobyl accident in 1986. The here presented field-work was designed as a pilot investigation in a series of studies aimed at contributing to the understanding of social and psychological factors relevant to the design of countermeasures in the case of a future nuclear accident. The report presents questionnaire data collected from people living in Novozybkov and its surroundings in Russia, in the summer of 1992. The chosen areas had an overall surface contamination level of 15-40 Ci/km{sup 2}. The results showed that the respondents recalled the date of the accident surprisingly well. They often indicated that they had heard the first news of the accident via TV, radio or rumors. They often reported the content of that information to have been related to an explosion or a fire at a nuclear plant. They indicated that they at the time had a rather modest reaction to the news. Current worries especially concerned health risks due to the radioactive contamination, although the respondents also emphasized that ordinary life was filled with worries. Middle-aged persons and parents often indicated the highest personal worry. Risk ratings related to radiation and radioactive contamination were high. Ratings of perceived change in risk level since the accident of a variety of hazards showed an overall increase. 27 refs, 23 figs, 23 tabs.

  2. 75 FR 26945 - International Education Programs Service-Fulbright-Hays Group Projects Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... teachers at the Kindergarten-grade 12 (K-12) level with skills in a second language and knowledge of other... projects abroad. The first priority helps give pre-service teachers a deeper knowledge of languages and... length designed to increase the linguistic or cultural competency of U.S. students and educators...

  3. Power Distance and Group Dynamics of an International Project Team: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulus, Trena M.; Bichelmeyer, Barbara; Malopinsky, Larissa; Pereira, Maura; Rastogi, Polly

    2005-01-01

    Project-based team activities are commonly used in higher education. Teams comprised of members from different national cultures can be faced with unique challenges during the creative process. Hofstede's (1991) cultural dimension of power distance was used to examine one such design team's intra- and inter-group interactions in a graduate-level…

  4. An International Collaboration in Engineering Project Design and Curriculum Development: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Sohail; Favier, Patrick; Ravalitera, Guy

    This paper describes a collaboration in engineering project design and curriculum development between the Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) housed in the Bethune campus of Universite d'Artois in France and the Altoona College of The Pennsylvania State University (Penn State Altoona). This collaboration embraces engineering design…

  5. GRIN-Global: An International Project to Develop a Global Plant Genebank Information Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    The mission of the GRIN-Global Project is to create a new, scalable version of the Germplasm Resource Information System (GRIN) to provide the world’s crop genebanks with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use plant genetic resource (PGR) information management system. The system will help safeguard PGR ...

  6. Networks in International Co-operation: The Experience of Project Columbus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoilovich, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    Project Columbus, a program linking European and Latin American universities for technology-based economic development, has involved 90 institutions in 29 countries in a range of activities since 1987. It illustrates effective networking based on common concerns especially in the management of scarce resources and communication across cultural…

  7. Applying of interactive methods for astronomy education in a school project "International space colony TANHGRA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radeva, Veselka S.

    Several interactive methods, applied in the astronomy education during creation of the project about a colony in the Space, are presented. The methods Pyramid, Brainstorm, Snow-slip (Snowball) and Aquarium give the opportunity for schooler to understand and learn well a large packet of astronomical knowledge.

  8. Greening international shipping through private governance: A case study of the Clean Shipping Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wuisan, L.; Leeuwen, van J.; Koppen, van C.S.A.

    2012-01-01

    This article aims to generate insights into both private governance and partnerships within the shipping industry, but also tries to improve understanding of the complex process of institutionalisation. This is achieved through acase study of the Clean Shipping Project, a public/private partnership

  9. How Much Uranium? an Account of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (Iurep Compte rendu sur le Projet International d'Évolution des Ressources en Uranium (IUREP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor D. M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Since August 1962, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA - from 1967 onwards in conjunction with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA - has periodically published report on uranium resources and demand. It had been recognised for some time that the uranium resource estimates given in these reports did not constitute a complete appraisal of the world's uranium resources and therefore a major study, possibly the first of its kind, was undertaken by an international group of experts on uranium resources to try to define the possible extent and location of undiscovered uranium resources. This paper is an account of this project. Depuis le mois d'août 1965, l'Agence pour l'Énergie Nucléaire (AEN de l'OCDE - et, à partir de 1967, de concert avec l'Agence Internationale de l'Énergie Atomique (AIEA - a publié périodiquement des rapports sur les ressources et la demande en uranium. Les estimations des ressources en uranium fournies dans ces rapports, comme on l'a reconnu depuis, n'ont pas correspondu à une estimation complète des ressources mondiales en uranium et, par conséquent, une étude plus importante - peut-être la première de son espèce - a été entreprise par un groupe international d'experts pour essayer de définir l'importance et la localisation éventuelles de ces ressources en uranium qui n'étaient pas encore trouvées. Le contenu de cette communication est un historique de ce projet.

  10. International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Weyburn-Midale CO₂ Monitoring and Storage Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacuta, Norm [Petroleum Technology Research Centre Incorporated, Saskatchewan (Canada); Young, Aleana [Petroleum Technology Research Centre Incorporated, Saskatchewan (Canada); Worth, Kyle [Petroleum Technology Research Centre Incorporated, Saskatchewan (Canada)

    2015-12-22

    The IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO₂ Monitoring and Storage Project (WMP) began in 2000 with the first four years of research that confirmed the suitability of the containment complex of the Weyburn oil field in southeastern Saskatchewan as a storage location for CO₂ injected as part of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. The first half of this report covers research conducted from 2010 to 2012, under the funding of the United States Department of Energy (contract DEFE0002697), the Government of Canada, and various other governmental and industry sponsors. The work includes more in-depth analysis of various components of a measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) program through investigation of data on site characterization and geological integrity, wellbore integrity, storage monitoring (geophysical and geochemical), and performance/risk assessment. These results then led to the development of a Best Practices Manual (BPM) providing oilfield and project operators with guidance on CO₂ storage and CO₂-EOR. In 2013, the USDOE and Government of Saskatchewan exercised an optional phase of the same project to further develop and deploy applied research tools, technologies, and methodologies to the data and research at Weyburn with the aim of assisting regulators and operators in transitioning CO₂-EOR operations into permanent storage. This work, detailed in the second half of this report, involves seven targeted research projects – evaluating the minimum dataset for confirming secure storage; additional overburden monitoring; passive seismic monitoring; history-matched modelling; developing proper wellbore design; casing corrosion evaluation; and assessment of post CO₂-injected core samples. The results from the final and optional phases of the Weyburn-Midale Project confirm the suitability of CO₂-EOR fields for the injection of CO₂, and further, highlight the necessary MMV and follow-up monitoring required for these operations to be considered

  11. Cross-Cultural Communication and Collaboration: Case of an International e-Learning Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toprak, Elif; Genc-Kumtepe, Evrim

    2014-01-01

    Communication is an indispensable part of international cooperation and it requires managing different cultures. Being prepared to see and understand different values, trying to understand contrasting views in a consortium, can decrease the potential of misperception which otherwise may act as a real barrier to cooperation. This is why…

  12. Promoting Intercultural Contact on Campus: A Project to Connect and Engage International and Host Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nittaya

    2012-01-01

    International students' adjustment to living in an unfamiliar cultural environment and studying in a different educational system and language has been a topic of much research. Literature has shown that support from the host community could be the difference between a smooth transition and one fraught with problems and difficulties. This article…

  13. NASA Human Research Program (HRP). International Space Station Medical Project (ISSMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the various flight investigations performed on the International Space Station as part of the NASA Human Research Program (HRP). The evaluations include: 1) Stability; 2) Periodic Fitness Evaluation with Oxygen Uptake Measurement; 3) Nutrition; 4) CCISS; 5) Sleep; 6) Braslet; 7) Integrated Immune; 8) Epstein Barr; 9) Biophosphonates; 10) Integrated cardiovascular; and 11) VO2 max.

  14. Just Footprints in the Sand? Questioning Sustainability of an IRA International Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis-Spector, Jill; Richardson, Judy S.; Janusheva, Violeta

    2011-01-01

    Volunteers from the International Reading Association (IRA) participated in the teacher education component of Macedonia's Secondary Education Activity, an initiative to reform vocational/technical education (VET), funded from 2004 to 2008 by USAID. Volunteers offered professional development to VET teachers using a trainer-of-trainers model,…

  15. Modeling the early-phase redistribution of radiocesium fallouts in an evergreen coniferous forest after Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calmon, P.; Gonze, M.-A.; Mourlon, Ch.

    2015-10-01

    Following the Chernobyl accident, the scientific community gained numerous data on the transfer of radiocesium in European forest ecosystems, including information regarding the short-term redistribution of atmospheric fallout onto forest canopies. In the course of international programs, the French Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) developed a forest model, named TREE4 (Transfer of Radionuclides and External Exposure in FORest systems), 15 years ago. Recently published papers on a Japanese evergreen coniferous forest contaminated by Fukushima radiocesium fallout provide interesting and quantitative data on radioactive mass fluxes measured within the forest in the months following the accident. The present study determined whether the approach adopted in the TREE4 model provides satisfactory results for Japanese forests or whether it requires adjustments. This study focused on the interception of airborne radiocesium by forest canopy, and the subsequent transfer to the forest floor through processes such as litterfall, throughfall, and stemflow, in the months following the accident. We demonstrated that TREE4 quite satisfactorily predicted the interception fraction (20%) and the canopy-to-soil transfer (70% of the total deposit in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest. This dynamics was similar to that observed in the Höglwald spruce forest. However, the unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall (31% in 5 months) in the Tochigi forest could not be reproduced in our simulations (2.5%). Possible reasons for this discrepancy are discussed; and sensitivity of the results to uncertainty in deposition conditions was analyzed. - Highlights: • Transfer of radiocesium atmospheric fallout in evergreen forests was modeled. • The model was tested using observations from Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents. • Model predictions of canopy interception and depuration agree with measurements. • Unexpectedly high contribution of litterfall for the

  16. Species richness and abundance of forest birds in relation to radiation at Chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller, A P; Mousseau, T A

    2007-10-22

    The effects of low-level radiation on the abundance of animals are poorly known, as are the effects on ecosystems and their functioning. Recent conclusions from the UN Chernobyl forum and reports in the popular media concerning the effects of radiation from Chernobyl on animals have left the impression that the Chernobyl exclusion zone is a thriving ecosystem, filled with an increasing number of rare species. Surprisingly, there are no standardized censuses of common animals in relation to radiation, leaving the question about the ecological effects of radiation unresolved. We conducted standardized point counts of breeding birds at forest sites around Chernobyl differing in level of background radiation by over three orders of magnitude. Species richness, abundance and population density of breeding birds decreased with increasing level of radiation, even after controlling statistically for the effects of potentially confounding factors such as soil type, habitat and height of the vegetation. This effect was differential for birds eating soil invertebrates living in the most contaminated top soil layer. These results imply that the ecological effects of Chernobyl on animals are considerably greater than previously assumed.

  17. A probabilistic dispersion model applied to the long-range transport of radionuclides from the Chernobyl accident

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauritzen, B.; Mikkelsen, T.

    1999-01-01

    . A corresponding effective deposition length for caesium, R-Cs, defined las the effective distance from Chernobyl to where the aerosols have been deposited, is found to be R-Cs approximate to 1000 km. From the observations of the regional variability of the Chernobyl fallout a simple probabilistic assessment...

  18. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLintock, C; Pabinger, I; Bauer, K A; Laffan, M; Angchaisuksiri, P; Rezende, S M; Middeldorp, S; Ross, M

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional curricula. Core curriculum informs and links to a variety of ISTH educational materials. Background The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) identified the need for an international core curriculum on thrombosis and hemostasis for its society members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community. Aims The current research sought consensus on the core competencies required by medical doctors who are ready to practise as independent clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis with the aim of developing a core clinical curriculum for specialists in the field. Method A draft list of competencies was developed by the Working Group and formed the basis of an online survey. ISTH members and the larger thrombosis and hemostasis community were asked to rate the importance of each competency, on a Likert scale, for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis. Results There were a total of 644 responses to the online survey with broad geographical representation. There was general agreement on what level of competency would be required for clinical specialists in thrombosis and hemostasis at the specified level of training. Conclusions Using the survey to gain consensus on the level of competency required by clinical specialists in the field of thrombosis and hemostasis enabled the development of a core clinical curriculum that has been endorsed by the ISTH Council. The curriculum will offer a framework and international reference that will be used by the society, by national and regional organizations, and for further research. © 2015 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  19. Gardening as a Learning Environment: A Study of Children's Perceptions and Understanding of School Gardens as Part of an International Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowker, Rob; Tearle, Penni

    2007-01-01

    This article considers the impact of the early stages of an international project, Gardens for Life (GfL), on children's perceptions of school gardening and on their learning. The project involved 67 schools in England, Kenya and India and focused on the growing of crops, recognising the importance of both the process and product of this activity…

  20. Export Odyssey: An Exposition and Analytical Review of Literature Concerning an Undergraduate Student Project in International Marketing on Key Teaching-Learning Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Nicholas C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes Export Odyssey (EO), a structured, Internet-intensive, team-based undergraduate student project in international marketing. Presents an analytical review of articles in the literature that relate to three key teaching-learning dimensions of student projects (experiential versus non-experiential active learning, team-based versus…

  1. Radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France; Consequences radioecologiques et dosimetriques de l'accident de Tchernobyl en France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renaud, Ph.; Beaugelin, K.; Maubert, H.; Ledenvic, Ph. [Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire, CEA Centre d' Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France)

    1997-11-01

    This study has as objective a survey of the radioecological and dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France, as well as a prognosis for the years to come. It was requested by the Direction of Nuclear Installation Safety (DSIN) in relation to different organisms which effected measurements after this accident. It is based on the use of combined results of measurements and modelling by means of the code ASTRAL developed at IPSN. Various measurements obtained from five authorities and institutions, were made available, such as: activity of air and water, soil, processed food, agricultural and natural products. However, to achieve the survey still a modelling is needed. ASTRAL is a code for evaluating the ecological consequences of an accident. It allows establishing the correspondence between the soil Remnant Surface Activities (RSA, in Bq.m{sup -2}), the activity concentration of the agricultural production and the individual and collective doses resulting from external and internal exposures (due to inhalation and ingestion of contaminated nurture). The results of principal synthesis documents on the Chernobyl accident and its consequences were also used. The report is structured in nine sections, as follows: 1.Introduction; 2.Objective and methodology; 3.Characterization of radioactive depositions; 4;Remnant surface activities; 5.Contamination of agricultural products and foods; 6.Contamination of natural, semi-natural products and of drinking water; 7.Dosimetric evaluations; 8.Proposals for the environmental surveillance; 9.Conclusion. Finally, after ten years, one concludes that at presentthe dosimetric consequences of the Chernobyl accident in France were rather limited. For the period 1986-2046 the average individual effective dose estimated for the most struck zone is lower than 1500 {mu}Sv, which represents almost 1% of the average natural exposure for the same period. At present, the cesium 137 levels are at often inferior to those recorded

  2. Simulation of ¹³⁷Cs transport and deposition after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident and radiological doses over the Anatolian peninsula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, V; Pozzoli, L; Unal, A; Kindap, T; Karaca, M

    2014-11-15

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident occurred on April 26 of 1986, it is still an episode of interest, due to the large amount of radionuclides dispersed in the atmosphere. Caesium-137 ((137)Cs) is one of the main radionuclides emitted during the Chernobyl accident, with a half-life of 30years, which can be accumulated in humans and animals, and for this reason the impacts on population are still monitored today. One of the main parameters in order to estimate the exposure of population to (137)Cs is the concentration in the air, during the days after the accident, and the deposition at surface. The transport and deposition of (137)Cs over Europe occurred after the CNPP accident has been simulated using the WRF-HYSPLIT modeling system. Four different vertical and temporal emission rate profiles have been simulated, as well as two different dry deposition velocities. The model simulations could reproduce fairly well the observations of (137)Cs concentrations and deposition, which were used to generate the 'Atlas of Caesium deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl accident' and published in 1998. An additional focus was given on (137)Cs deposition and air concentrations over Turkey, which was one of the main affected countries, but not included in the results of the Atlas. We estimated a total deposition of 2-3.5 PBq over Turkey, with 2 main regions affected, East Turkey and Central Black Sea coast until Central Anatolia, with values between 10 kBq m(-2) and 100 kBq m(-2). Mean radiological effective doses from simulated air concentrations and deposition has been estimated for Turkey reaching 0.15 mSv/year in the North Eastern part of Turkey, even if the contribution from ingestion of contaminated food and water is not considered, the estimated levels are largely below the 1 mSv limit indicated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pontine Reticulospinal Projections in the Neonatal Mouse: Internal Organization and Axon Trajectories

    OpenAIRE

    Sivertsen, Magne Sand; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C.

    2015-01-01

    We recently characterized physiologically a pontine reticulospinal (pRS) projection in the neonatal mouse that mediates synaptic effects on spinal motoneurons via parallel uncrossed and crossed pathways (Sivertsen et al. [2014] J Neurophysiol 112:1628–1643). Here we characterize the origins, anatomical organization, and supraspinal axon trajectories of these pathways via retrograde tracing from the high cervical spinal cord. The two pathways derive from segregated populations of ipsilaterally...

  4. International SUSMIN-project aims at sustainable gold mining in EU

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backnäs, Soile; Neitola, Raisa; Turunen, Kaisa; Lima, Alexandre; Fiúza, António; Szlachta, Malgorzata; Wójtowicz, Patryk; Maftei, Raluca; Munteanu, Marian; Alakangas, Lena; Baciu, Calin; Fernández, Dámaris

    2015-04-01

    Although the gold demand has been constantly increasing in past years, the commodity findings have been decreasing and the extraction of gold has complicated due to increasing complexity and decreasing grade of the ores. Additionally, even gold mining could increase economical development, it has also challenges in eco-efficiency and extraction methods (e.g. cyanide). Thus, the novel energy and resource-efficient methods and technologies for mineral processing should be developed to concentrate selectively different gold bearing minerals. Furthermore, technologies for efficient treatment of mine waters, sustainable management of wastes, and methods to diminish environmental and social impacts of mining are needed. These problems will be addressed by the three year long project SUSMIN. The SUSMIN-project identifies and evaluates environmental impacts and economical challenges of gold mining within EU. The objective of the project is to increase the transnational cooperation and to support environmentally, socially and economically sustainable viable gold production. The focus is to develop and test geophysical techniques for gold exploration, eco-efficient ore beneficiation methods and alternatives for cyanide leaching. Additionally, the research will improve treatment methods for mine waters by the development and testing of advanced adsorbents. The research on socio-economic issues pursues to develop tools for enhancing the mechanisms of the corporate social responsibility as well as community engagement and management of the relations with the stakeholders. Moreover, with the environmental risk assessment and better knowledge of the geochemistry and long-term transformation of the contaminants in mining wastes and mine waters, the mining companies are able to predict and prevent the impacts to the surrounding environment, resulting in an improved environmental management solution. The SUSMIN consortium led by Geological Survey of Finland (GTK) includes seven

  5. Use of international data sets to evaluate and validate pathway assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities. Progress report, August 1993--January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, S.M. [ed.] [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffman, F.O. [Senes Oak Ridge, Inc., TN (United States). Center for Risk Analysis

    1994-03-01

    This project, ``Use of International Data Sets to Evaluate and Validate Pathway Assessment Models Applicable to Exposure and Dose Reconstruction at DOE Facilities,`` grew out of several activities being conducted by the Principal Investigator Dr. F Owen Hoffman. One activity was originally part of the Chernobyl Studies Project and began as Task 7.1D, ``Internal Dose From Direct Contamination of Terrestrial Food Sources.`` The objective of Task 7.1D was to (1) establish a collaborative US USSR effort to improve and validate our methods of forecasting doses and dose commitments from the direct contamination of food sources, and (2) perform experiments and validation studies to improve our ability to predict rapidly and accurately the long-term internal dose from the contamination of agricultural soil. The latter was to include the consideration of remedial measures to block contamination of food grown on contaminated soil. The current objective of this project is to evaluate and validate pathway-assessment models applicable to exposure and dose reconstruction at DOE facilities through use of international data sets. This project incorporates the activity of Task 7.1D into a multinational effort to evaluate data used for the prediction of radionuclide transfer through agricultural and aquatic systems to humans. It also includes participation in two multinational studies, BIOMOVS (BIOspheric MOdel Validation Study) with the Swedish National Institute for Radiation Protection and VAMP (VAlidation of Model Predictions) with the International Atomic Energy Agency, that address testing the performance of models of radionuclide transport through foodchains.

  6. Corruption and compliance: preventive legislations and policies in international business projects

    OpenAIRE

    Pathak, Harsh

    2013-01-01

    This article seeks to provide an insight on the international phenomenon of corruption, dealing with its existence, and whether compliance is higher with Anti-Corruption laws or with corruption itself, resulting in anti-corruption laws being much less effective than the legislators intended it to be and the reasons for increasing demand worldwide for new governance standards and higher compliance controls and other effective anti-corruption laws and policies in light of rapid increase in corr...

  7. A comparison of cataloged variation between International HapMap Consortium and 1000 Genomes Project data

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Background Since publication of the human genome in 2003, geneticists have been interested in risk variant associations to resolve the etiology of traits and complex diseases. The International HapMap Consortium undertook an effort to catalog all common variation across the genome (variants with a minor allele frequency (MAF) of at least 5% in one or more ethnic groups). HapMap along with advances in genotyping technology led to genome-wide association studies which have identified common var...

  8. The Bioinformatics of Integrative Medical Insights: Proposals for an International PsychoSocial and Cultural Bioinformatics Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernest Rossi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the formation of an International PsychoSocial and Cultural Bioinformatics Project (IPCBP to explore the research foundations of Integrative Medical Insights (IMI on all levels from the molecular-genomic to the psychological, cultural, social, and spiritual. Just as The Human Genome Project identified the molecular foundations of modern medicine with the new technology of sequencing DNA during the past decade, the IPCBP would extend and integrate this neuroscience knowledge base with the technology of gene expression via DNA/proteomic microarray research and brain imaging in development, stress, healing, rehabilitation, and the psychotherapeutic facilitation of existentional wellness. We anticipate that the IPCBP will require a unique international collaboration of, academic institutions, researchers, and clinical practioners for the creation of a new neuroscience of mind-body communication, brain plasticity, memory, learning, and creative processing during optimal experiential states of art, beauty, and truth. We illustrate this emerging integration of bioinformatics with medicine with a videotape of the classical 4-stage creative process in a neuroscience approach to psychotherapy.

  9. Achievements and challenges of the World Bank Loan/Department for International Development grant-assisted Tuberculosis Control Project in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Peng; Jiang, Xu; Zhang, Ben; Jiang, Shi-wen; Liu, Bo

    2011-07-01

    In March 2002, the government of China launched the World Bank Loan/ Department for International Development-supported Tuberculosis (TB) Control Project to reduce the prevalence and mortality of TB. The project generated promising results in policy development, strengthening of TB control systems, patient treatment success, funds management, and the introduction of legislation. In light of the global TB epidemic and control environment, it is useful to review the TB control priorities of the project, summarize the achievements and experiences around its implementation.

  10. Lifelong education and mental health – the milestones of the international project dedicated to innovations in the sphere of education of the aged

    OpenAIRE

    Rozanov Vsevolod Anatolyevich; Rejtarova Tatyana Evgenyevna; Soldatova Svetlana Aleksandrovna; Malceva Juliya Sergeevna; Lobanov Nikolay Andreevich; Wasserman Danuta; Dubko Anna Vladimirovna

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes the main milestones and achievements of the international project “From the Baltic to the Black Sea – life-long learning and mental health promotion”. The project unites several universities and non-governmental organizations from the Russian Federation, Sweden and Ukraine. The main goal of the project is to support education for seniors by involvement of young teachers on the basis of knowledge about mental health and cognitive capacity.

  11. A compartmental model for post-Chernobyl resuspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovlete, C. [Institute of Environmental Research and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania); Osvath, I. [Institute of Environmental Research and Engineering, Bucharest (Romania)

    1993-12-31

    A simple compartmental model is proposed to describe the transfer of Cs-137 between the lower (boundary) layer of the atmosphere and the ground for short and long term. The experimental basis for the evaluation of the model parameters (the exchange rates between the compartments), consists of the monthly deposition data sequences between 1986 - 1992 for 16 sampling stations on Romanian territory, as well as the data regarding the immediate impact (May 1986) of the Chernobyl accident on the atmosphere in Romania As a result of fitting the experimental data, the model parameters have been estimated and an analytical expression has been found for Cs-137 concentration in air as a function of these parameters and time. The site dependence of each parameter (exchange rate) has been studied. As a conclusion a new analytic expression for the resuspension factor is proposed, containing its dependence on initial conditions and the exchange rates between the model compartments. The theoretical predictions regarding the resuspension factor are in good agreement with the experimental results obtained using air concentration data from the respective sites. (orig.)

  12. Mechanical decontamination tests in areas affected by the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roed, J.; Andersson, K.G.; Barkovsky, A.N.; Fogh, C.L.; Mishine, A.S.; Olsen, S.K.; Ponamarjov, A.V.; Prip, H.; Ramzaev, V.P.; Vorobiev, B.F

    1998-08-01

    Decontamination was carried out around three houses in Novo Bobovichi, Russia, in the summer of 1997. It was demonstrated that significant reductions in the dose rate both indoor (DRF = 0.27) and outdoor (DRF = 0.17) can be achieved when a careful cleaning is undertaken. This report describes the decontamination work carried out and the results obtained. The roof of one of the houses was replaced with a new roof. This reduced the Chernobyl related dose rate by 10% at the ground floor and by 27% at the first floor. The soil around the houses was removed by a bobcat, while carefully monitoring the ground for residual contamination with handheld dose meters. By monitoring the decline in the dose rate during the different stages of the work the dose reducing effect of each action has been estimated. This report also describes a test of a skim-and-burial plough developed especially for treatment of contaminated land. In the appendices of the report the measurement data is available for further analysis. (au) 24 tabs., 75 ills., 33 refs.

  13. Strong effects of ionizing radiation from Chernobyl on mutation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A.

    2015-02-01

    In this paper we use a meta-analysis to examine the relationship between radiation and mutation rates in Chernobyl across 45 published studies, covering 30 species. Overall effect size of radiation on mutation rates estimated as Pearson's product-moment correlation coefficient was very large (E = 0.67; 95% confidence intervals (CI) 0.59 to 0.73), accounting for 44.3% of the total variance in an unstructured random-effects model. Fail-safe calculations reflecting the number of unpublished null results needed to eliminate this average effect size showed the extreme robustness of this finding (Rosenberg's method: 4135 at p = 0.05). Indirect tests did not provide any evidence of publication bias. The effect of radiation on mutations varied among taxa, with plants showing a larger effect than animals. Humans were shown to have intermediate sensitivity of mutations to radiation compared to other species. Effect size did not decrease over time, providing no evidence for an improvement in environmental conditions. The surprisingly high mean effect size suggests a strong impact of radioactive contamination on individual fitness in current and future generations, with potentially significant population-level consequences, even beyond the area contaminated with radioactive material.

  14. Radioactivity: lessons learned from Chernobyl; Radioactivite: les lecons de Tchernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hertel, O.; Rouat, S.; Mulot, R.; Chauveau, L.; Khalatbari, A.; Riou-Milliot, S.

    2011-05-15

    A set of articles draws lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident and indicates how they can be applied to the Fukushima accident. Notably, it describes contamination mechanisms and how food, milk, vegetables, water organisms become hazardous. It highlights the influence of the initial contamination concentration. Then, it addresses soil contamination where caesium 137 reveals itself not much mobile and concentrated in surface layers. As far as oceans are concerned, they are said to be able to absorb radioactivity: 60 years of anthropic radioactive releases apparently did not have any obvious negative impact on sea environment. Underground waters are affected with some delay, and radioactive dusts which are present in the atmosphere fall with the rain and may appear again later in case of forest fires as it has been noticed. A brief article presents the French radioactivity detection network. The lack of knowledge on the effect of low doses is also commented. The technological aspect is addressed, with the development of automatic means of intervention. A last article gives an overview of the situation in the Fukushima area, indicates and comments contamination levels

  15. Radiocesium in lichens and reindeer after the Chernobyl accident

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Rissanen

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available After the Chernobyl accident the sampling and measuring program of the Finnish Centre for Radiation and Nuclear Safety was intensified both for surveillance and research purposes. The deposition pattern of radionuclides was more complicated than from the global fallout after the nuclear weapons tests. The radioactive deposition was very unevenly distributed in Lapland, as also in the rest of Finland. Fortunately, the amounts of deposition in Lapland were only about one-tenth of the corresponding amount of deposition in southern Finland. In 1986-87 the mean concentration of Cs-137 in lichens and in reindeer meat increased to about the same level as in 1972-73 or to about 30 per cent of the maximum levels found in 1964-65 after the nuclear weapons tests. The activity concentrations in reindeer tissues vary according to season. In winter, reindeer eat considerable amounts of lichens with high radiocesium concentrations. In summer, lichens are replaced by other forage such as leaves from trees, green plants, etc. The ratio of Cs-137 concentration in reindeer meat between summer and winter is about 0.2. The mean concentration of Cs-137 in meat for consumption from the slaughtering period 1986-87 was 720 Bq/kg fresh weight. After that time concentrations started decreasing since no new fallout was deposited.

  16. Pontine reticulospinal projections in the neonatal mouse: Internal organization and axon trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivertsen, Magne S; Perreault, Marie-Claude; Glover, Joel C

    2016-04-15

    We recently characterized physiologically a pontine reticulospinal (pRS) projection in the neonatal mouse that mediates synaptic effects on spinal motoneurons via parallel uncrossed and crossed pathways (Sivertsen et al. [2014] J Neurophysiol 112:1628-1643). Here we characterize the origins, anatomical organization, and supraspinal axon trajectories of these pathways via retrograde tracing from the high cervical spinal cord. The two pathways derive from segregated populations of ipsilaterally and contralaterally projecting pRS neurons with characteristic locations within the pontine reticular formation (PRF). We obtained estimates of relative neuron numbers by counting from sections, digitally generated neuron position maps, and 3D reconstructions. Ipsilateral pRS neurons outnumber contralateral pRS neurons by threefold and are distributed about equally in rostral and caudal regions of the PRF, whereas contralateral pRS neurons are concentrated in the rostral PRF. Ipsilateral pRS neuron somata are on average larger than contralateral. No pRS neurons are positive in transgenic mice that report the expression of GAD, suggesting that they are predominantly excitatory. Putative GABAergic interneurons are interspersed among the pRS neurons, however. Ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons have distinctly different trajectories within the brainstem. Their initial spinal funicular trajectories also differ, with ipsilateral and contralateral pRS axons more highly concentrated medially and laterally, respectively. The larger size and greater number of ipsilateral vs. contralateral pRS neurons is compatible with our previous finding that the uncrossed projection transmits more reliably to spinal motoneurons. The information about supraspinal and initial spinal pRS axon trajectories should facilitate future physiological assessment of synaptic connections between pRS neurons and spinal neurons.

  17. Overview of the ion projection lithography European MEDEA and international program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaesmaier, Rainer; Loeschner, Hans

    2000-07-01

    Ion Projection Lithography (IPL) follows the same principle as optical wafer steppers when using hydrogen or helium ions for the reduction printing of stencil mask patterns to wafer substrates: (1) DUV resists can be used with ion beam exposure; (2) well established optical wafer alignment techniques are used; (3) the mask is stable during exposure. IPL is the only NGL technique where the mask is not scanned during exposure. Because of the very small particle wavelength (5 * 10-5 nm for 100 keV He+ ions there is the possibility of using electrostatic ion-optics with very small numerical aperture (NA approximately equals 10-5). The ion-optics is based on aluminum lens electrode and standard insulator materials. Mechanical tolerances on lens electrode manufacturing and adjustment are in the micrometer range because of in-situ electronic column fine adjustment possibilities. Wafer stage movements with micrometer precision is sufficient through feedback from precise laser interferometer stage position measurements to electronic image placement of the ion image projected to the wafer with on-line 'pattern lock' control. As part of the MEDEA project an IPL process development tool (PDT) is being integrated by IMS with the target to achieve 50 nm resolution within a 12.5 mm exposure field. The IPL production stepper will be based on a similar but more compact ion-optical column, exposing large (e.g. 25 mm) chip fields by stitching of 12.5 mm fields. A 300 mm wafer throughput of 30 WPH is feasible also for the 50 nm node. IPL has the potential of achieving the lowest NGL cost of ownership with the longest multi-generational life time. The practical resolution limit of the IPL technique is below 35 nm.

  18. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single

  19. Design, Evaluation and Validation, and Analysis of a Five-Dimensional Leadership Questionnaire for a Project Leader in an International Scientific Research Environment

    CERN Document Server

    Wilfinger, Roman

    2008-01-01

    The basic goal of the study is to develop a five dimensional leadership questionnaire for a project leader in an international scientific research laboratory and to verify statistically the independency of the individual questions from each other to ensure low overlap in content and meaning by achieving low correlation coefficients. This leadership questionnaire is designed to examine the behavior, personality, and character attributes of a project or experiment team leader in an international scientific research laboratory as perceived by her/his team members during the planning, design, implementation, and execution of the project itself. The leadership questionnaire is applied to a sample of about 40 participants from different international scientific research laboratories. This sample should represent in age, rank, and profession the whole population of employees and team members currently working in different international scientific research laboratories dealing with physics, informatics, and engineeri...

  20. Simulation of {sup 137}Cs transport and deposition after the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident and radiological doses over the Anatolian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simsek, V.; Pozzoli, L.; Unal, A.; Kindap, T., E-mail: kindap@itu.edu.tr; Karaca, M.

    2014-11-15

    The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (CNPP) accident occurred on April 26 of 1986, it is still an episode of interest, due to the large amount of radionuclides dispersed in the atmosphere. Caesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) is one of the main radionuclides emitted during the Chernobyl accident, with a half-life of 30 years, which can be accumulated in humans and animals, and for this reason the impacts on population are still monitored today. One of the main parameters in order to estimate the exposure of population to {sup 137}Cs is the concentration in the air, during the days after the accident, and the deposition at surface. The transport and deposition of {sup 137}Cs over Europe occurred after the CNPP accident has been simulated using the WRF-HYSPLIT modeling system. Four different vertical and temporal emission rate profiles have been simulated, as well as two different dry deposition velocities. The model simulations could reproduce fairly well the observations of {sup 137}Cs concentrations and deposition, which were used to generate the ‘Atlas of Caesium deposition on Europe after the Chernobyl accident’ and published in 1998. An additional focus was given on {sup 137}Cs deposition and air concentrations over Turkey, which was one of the main affected countries, but not included in the results of the Atlas. We estimated a total deposition of 2–3.5 PBq over Turkey, with 2 main regions affected, East Turkey and Central Black Sea coast until Central Anatolia, with values between 10 kBq m{sup −2} and 100 kBq m{sup −2}. Mean radiological effective doses from simulated air concentrations and deposition has been estimated for Turkey reaching 0.15 mSv/year in the North Eastern part of Turkey, even if the contribution from ingestion of contaminated food and water is not considered, the estimated levels are largely below the 1 mSv limit indicated by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. - Highlights: • Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident

  1. Project n.4: local strategies for decontamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hubert, Ph. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Fontenay-aux-Roses, 92 (France). Inst. de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire; Ramzaev, V. [Branch of Institute of Radiation Hygiene, Karchovka, Bryandk (Russian Federation); Antsypov, G. [Chernobyl State Committee of the Republic of Belarus, (Belarus); Sobotovich, E. [Institute of Geochemistry, Mineralogy and Ore formation, Kiev (Ukraine); Anisimova, L. [EMERCOM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The efficiencies of a great number of techniques for decontamination or dose reduction in contaminated areas have been investigated by several teams of E.C. and CIS scientists (ECP4 project). Modelling, laboratory and field experiments, and a return from experience from the area contaminated by the Chernobyl accident allowed to assess radiological efficiencies and requirements for the operation of numerous practical solutions. Then those data were supplemented with data on cost and waste generation in order to elaborate all the information for the optimisation of decontamination strategies. Results are presented for about 70 techniques. However, a technique cannot be compared to another from a generic point of view. Rather it is designed for a specific target and the best technology depends on the objectives. It has been decided to implement decision analyses on case studies and the local conditions and objectives have been investigated. Individual doses ranged from 1 to 5 mSv, with the contrasted contributions of internal and external doses. The desire to restore a normal activity in a partially depopulated settlement and concerns about the recent increase in internal doses were typical incentives for action. The decision aiding analysis illustrated that actions can be usually recommended. Results are outlined. (authors). 23 refs.

  2. Nuclear power debate and public opinion in Belarus: From Chernobyl to Ostrovets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikau, Aliaksandr

    2016-05-05

    The Belarusian government's decision of the last decade to build a nuclear power plant near the city of Ostrovets, in northern Belarus, has proven to be controversial, resulting in a great deal of debate about nuclear energy in the country. The debate was inevitably shaped by the traumatic event that affected Belarus - the Chernobyl nuclear accident of 1986. The Belarusian authorities have consistently promoted a positive view of nuclear energy to the population in order to overcome the so-called 'Chernobyl syndrome' and deliberately shaped nuclear risk communication. As a result, the issue of trust remains crucial in all nuclear debates in Belarus.

  3. Reduced abundance of insects and spiders linked to radiation at Chernobyl 20 years after the accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Møller, Anders Pape; Mousseau, Timothy A

    2009-06-23

    Effects of low-level radiation on abundance of animals are poorly known. We conducted standardized point counts and line transects of bumble-bees, butterflies, grasshoppers, dragonflies and spider webs at forest sites around Chernobyl differing in background radiation by over four orders of magnitude. Abundance of invertebrates decreased with increasing radiation, even after controlling for factors such as soil type, habitat and height of vegetation. These effects were stronger when comparing plots differing in radiation within rather than among sites, implying that the ecological effects of radiation from Chernobyl on animals are greater than previously assumed.

  4. Twenty years' application of agricultural countermeasures following the Chernobyl accident: lessons learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fesenko, S V [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Alexakhin, R M [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Balonov, M I [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Bogdevich, I M [Research Institute for Soil Science and Agrochemistry, Minsk (Belarus); Howard, B J [Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, Lancaster Environment Centre, Library Avenue, Bailrigg, Lancaster LAI 4AP (United Kingdom); Kashparov, V A [Ukrainian Institute of Agricultural Radiology (UIAR), Mashinostroiteley Street 7, Chabany, Kiev Region 08162 (Ukraine); Sanzharova, N I [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Panov, A V [Russian Institute of Agricultural Radiology and Agroecology, 249020 Obninsk (Russian Federation); Voigt, G [International Atomic Energy Agency, 1400 Vienna (Austria); Zhuchenka, Yu M [Research Institute of Radiology, 246000 Gomel (Belarus)

    2006-12-15

    The accident at the Chernobyl NPP (nuclear power plant) was the most serious ever to have occurred in the history of nuclear energy. The consumption of contaminated foodstuffs in affected areas was a significant source of irradiation for the population. A wide range of different countermeasures have been used to reduce exposure of people and to mitigate the consequences of the Chernobyl accident for agriculture in affected regions in Belarus, Russia and Ukraine. This paper for the first time summarises key data on countermeasure application over twenty years for all three countries and describes key lessons learnt from this experience. (review)

  5. Chernobyl nuclear accident revealed from the 7010 m Muztagata ice core record

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN LiDe; YAO TanDong; WU GuangJian; LI Zhen; XU BaiQing; LI YueFang

    2007-01-01

    The total activity variation with depth from a 41.6 m Muztagata ice core drilled at 7010 m,recorded not only the 1963 radioactive layer due to the thermonuclear test,but also clearly the radioactive peak released by the Chernobyl accident in 1986.This finding indicates that the Chernobyl nuclear accident was clearly recorded in alpine glaciers in the Pamirs of west China,and the layer can be potentially used for ice core dating in other high alpine glaciers in the surrounding regions.

  6. Chernobyl. Tsjernobyl; Sluttrapport fra NINA's radiooekologiprogram 1986-1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaare, E.; Jonsson, B.; Skogland, T. (eds.)

    1991-04-01

    Due to southeasterly wind and rainfall during the critical days after the Chernobyl accident, Norway got a substantial part of the cesium isotopes released. The radioactive fallout followed closely the rainfall and was mainly concentrated to some thin populated areas in the central parts of the country. This report summerize the results from a post-Chernobyl research program on aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems in contaminated areas. Pathways, processes and factors determining the Cs-137 concentration in soil, plant, water, fish and wild animal were investigated. 84 refs., 40 figs., 20 tabs.

  7. Increase in Total Joint Arthroplasty Projected from 2014 to 2046 in Australia: A Conservative Local Model With International Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inacio, Maria C S; Graves, Stephen E; Pratt, Nicole L; Roughead, Elizabeth E; Nemes, Szilard

    2017-08-01

    The incidence of joint arthroplasty is increasing worldwide. International estimates of future demand for joint arthroplasty have used models that propose either an exponential future increase, despite obvious system constraints, or static increases, which do not account for past trends. Country-specific projection estimates that address limitations of past projections are necessary. In Australia, a high-income country with the 7th highest incidence of TKA and 15th highest incidence of THA of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries, the volume of TKAs and THAs increased 198% between 1994 and 2014. To determine the projected incidence and volume of primary TKAs and THAs from 2014 to 2046 in the Australian population older than 40 years. Australian State and Territory Health Department data were used to identify TKAs and THAs performed between 1994 and 1995 and 2013 and 2014. The Australian Bureau of Statistics was the source of the population estimates for the same periods and population-projected estimates until 2046. The incidence rate (IR), 95% CI, and prediction interval (PI) of TKAs and THAs per 100,000 Australian citizens older than 40 years were calculated. Future IRs were estimated using a logistic model, and volume was calculated from projected IR and population. The logistic growth model assumes the existence of an upper limit of the TKA and THA incidences and a growth rate directly related to this incidence. At the beginning, when the observed incidence is much lower than the asymptote, the increase is exponential, but it decreases as it approaches the upper limit. A 66% increase in the IR of primary THAs between 2013 and 2046 is projected for Australia (2013: IR = 307 per 100,000, [95% CI, 262-329 per 100,000] compared with 2046: IR= 510 per 100,000, [95% PI, 98-567 per 100,000]), which translates to a 219% increase in the volume during this period. For TKAs the IR is expected to increase by 26% by 2046 (IR = 575 per

  8. Pulmonary fibrosis in youth treated with radioiodine for juvenile thyroid cancer and lung metastases after Chernobyl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebestreit, Helge; Burkhardt, Antje [University Children' s Hospital, Wuerzburg (Germany); Biko, Johannes; Reiners, Christoph [University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Wuerzburg (Germany); Drozd, Valentina [International Belarussian-German Foundation, Minsk (Belarus); Demidchik, Yuri [Thyroid Cancer Centre, Minsk (Belarus); Trusen, Andreas [Klinik fuer Radiologie, Johanniter-Krankenhaus, Genthin-Stendal gGmbH, Stendal (Germany); Beer, Meinrad [University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2011-09-15

    The objective of this project was to systematically determine the prevalence and consequences of pulmonary fibrosis in youth with thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases from Belarus who were treated with radioiodine ({sup 131}I). A total of 69 patients treated for juvenile thyroid carcinoma and lung metastasis with {sup 131}I were assessed. A group of 29 patients without lung metastases and prior {sup 131}I treatment served as controls. The assessments included a CT scan of the lungs, extensive pulmonary function testing and an incremental cycle test to volitional fatigue with measurements of oxygen uptake (V. O{sub 2}), oxygen saturation and alveolar-arterial difference in oxygen partial pressure ({delta}aaO{sub 2}). Five patients with lung metastases showed advanced pulmonary fibrosis on CT scans and also had poorer lung functions compared with the 62 patients with none or minor signs of fibrosis and the 29 controls. Furthermore, these five patients showed lower peak V.O{sub 2}, lower oxygen saturation at peak exercise and higher exercise {delta}aaO{sub 2}. They were younger at the time of cancer diagnosis and had received chemotherapy more frequently than youth with pulmonary metastases who did not develop fibrosis. One of the five patients subsequently died from pulmonary fibrosis. Following the Chernobyl catastrophe, about 7% of children treated with radioiodine for thyroid carcinoma and lung metastases displayed pulmonary fibrosis which was associated with functional impairments. Based on the characteristics of affected individuals, the number of radioiodine courses may have to be limited, especially in young children, and chemotherapy should be avoided. (orig.)

  9. Transgenerational accumulation of radiation damage in small mammals chronically exposed to Chernobyl fallout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryabokon, Nadezhda I; Goncharova, R I

    2006-09-01

    The purpose of this investigation has been the analysis of the long-term development of biological damage in natural populations of a model mammalian species, the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareolus, Schreber), which were chronically exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation over 22 animal generations within 10 years following the Chernobyl accident. The time course of the biological end-points (chromosome aberrations in bone marrow cells and embryonic lethality) was compared with the time course of the whole-body absorbed dose rate from external and internal exposure in the studied populations inhabiting monitoring sites in Belarus with different ground deposition of radionuclides. The yield of chromosome aberrations and, in lesser degree, embryonic lethality was associated with the radionuclide contamination of the monitoring areas in a dose-dependent manner. As a main feature of the long-term development of biological damage under low dose rate irradiation, permanently elevated levels of chromosome aberrations and an increasing frequency of embryonic lethality have developed over 22 animal generations. This contrasts with the assumption that the biological damage would gradually disappear since in the same period of time the whole-body absorbed dose rate decreased exponentially with a half-value time of about 2.5-3 years. Furthermore, gravid females were captured, and their offspring, born and grown up under contamination-free laboratory conditions, showed the same enhanced level of chromosome aberrations. Therefore the authors suggest that, along with the biological damage attributable to the individual exposure of each animal, the observed cellular and systemic effects reflect the transgenerational transmission and accumulation, via genetic and/or epigenetic pathways, of damage attributable to the chronic low-dose rate exposure of the preceding generations of animals. They also suggest that the level of the accumulated transmissible damage in the investigated

  10. Management tools for R&D engineering projects: Coordination perspective for large international consortium (NeXOS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Ayoze; Memè, Simone; Quevedo, Eduardo; Waldmann, Christoph; Pearlman, Jay; Delory, Eric; Llinás, Octavio

    2017-04-01

    NeXOS is a cross-functional and multidisciplinary project funded under the EU FP7 Program, which involves 21 organizations from six different European countries. They all have different backgrounds, interests, business models and perspectives. To be successful, NeXOS applied an international recognized management methodology tailored to the specific project's environment and conditions, with an explicit structure based on defined roles and responsibilities for the people involved in the project and a means for effective communication between them (Fig.1). The project, divided in four different stages of requirements, design, integration, validation and demonstration, allows a clearer monitor of its progress, a comparison of the level of achievement in accordance with the plan and an earlier detection of problems/issues, leading to implementation of less disruptive, but still effective corrective actions. NeXOS is following an ambitious plan to develop innovative sensor systems with a high degree of modularity and interoperability, starting with requirements definition through validation and demonstration phase. To make this integrative approach possible, a management development strategy has been used incorporating systems engineering methods (Fig.2). Although this is standard practice in software development and large scale systems such as aircraft production, it is still new in the ocean hardware business and therefore NeXOS was a test case for this development concept. The question is one of scale as ocean observation systems are typically built on the scale of a few with co-located teams. With a system of diverse technologies (optical, acoustic, platform interfaces), there are cultural differences that must be bridged. The greatest challenge is in the implementation and the willingness of different teams to work with an engineering process, which may help ultimate system integration, but may place additional burdens on individual participants. This presentation

  11. Overcoming Dietary Assessment Challenges in Low-Income Countries: Technological Solutions Proposed by the International Dietary Data Expansion (INDDEX) Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Jennifer C; Colaiezzi, Brooke A; Bell, Winnie; Charrondiere, U Ruth; Leclercq, Catherine

    2017-03-16

    An increasing number of low-income countries (LICs) exhibit high rates of malnutrition coincident with rising rates of overweight and obesity. Individual-level dietary data are needed to inform effective responses, yet dietary data from large-scale surveys conducted in LICs remain extremely limited. This discussion paper first seeks to highlight the barriers to collection and use of individual-level dietary data in LICs. Second, it introduces readers to new technological developments and research initiatives to remedy this situation, led by the International Dietary Data Expansion (INDDEX) Project. Constraints to conducting large-scale dietary assessments include significant costs, time burden, technical complexity, and limited investment in dietary research infrastructure, including the necessary tools and databases required to collect individual-level dietary data in large surveys. To address existing bottlenecks, the INDDEX Project is developing a dietary assessment platform for LICs, called INDDEX24, consisting of a mobile application integrated with a web database application, which is expected to facilitate seamless data collection and processing. These tools will be subject to rigorous testing including feasibility, validation, and cost studies. To scale up dietary data collection and use in LICs, the INDDEX Project will also invest in food composition databases, an individual-level dietary data dissemination platform, and capacity development activities. Although the INDDEX Project activities are expected to improve the ability of researchers and policymakers in low-income countries to collect, process, and use dietary data, the global nutrition community is urged to commit further significant investments in order to adequately address the range and scope of challenges described in this paper.

  12. Measuring the speed of light using Jupiter's moons: a global citizen science project for International Year of Light 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendry, Martin A.; Hammond, Giles; Simmons, Mike

    2015-08-01

    2015 represents both the centenary of General Relativity and International Year of Light - the latter marking the 150th anniversary of James Clerk Maxwell's ground-breaking paper on "A dynamical theory of the electromagnetic field". These landmark dates provide an exciting opportunity to set up a global citizen science project that re-enacts the seminal 1675 experiment of Ole Romer: to measure the speed of light by observing the time eclipses of the satellites of Jupiter. This project - which has been set up by astronomers at the University of Glasgow, UK in partnership with Astronomers without Borders - is an ideal platform for engaging the amateur astronomy community, schools and the wider public across the globe. It requires only simple observations, with a small spotting scope or telescope, and can be carried out straightforwardly in both cities and dark-sky locations. It highlights a fascinating chapter in astronomical history, as well as the ongoing importance of accurate astrometry, orbital motion, the concept of longitude and knowing one's position on the Earth. In the context of the GR centenary, it also links strongly to the science behind GPS satellites and a range of important topics in the high school curriculum - from the electromagnetic spectrum to the more general principles of the scientific method.In this presentation we present an overview of our global citizen science project for IYL2015: its scope and motivation, the total number and global distribution of its participants to date and how astronomers around the world can get involved. We also describe the intended legacy of the project: a extensive database of observations that can provide future astronomy educators with an accessible and historically important context in which to explore key principles for analysing large astronomical datasets.

  13. Overcoming Dietary Assessment Challenges in Low-Income Countries: Technological Solutions Proposed by the International Dietary Data Expansion (INDDEX) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Jennifer C.; Colaiezzi, Brooke A.; Bell, Winnie; Charrondiere, U. Ruth; Leclercq, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    An increasing number of low-income countries (LICs) exhibit high rates of malnutrition coincident with rising rates of overweight and obesity. Individual-level dietary data are needed to inform effective responses, yet dietary data from large-scale surveys conducted in LICs remain extremely limited. This discussion paper first seeks to highlight the barriers to collection and use of individual-level dietary data in LICs. Second, it introduces readers to new technological developments and research initiatives to remedy this situation, led by the International Dietary Data Expansion (INDDEX) Project. Constraints to conducting large-scale dietary assessments include significant costs, time burden, technical complexity, and limited investment in dietary research infrastructure, including the necessary tools and databases required to collect individual-level dietary data in large surveys. To address existing bottlenecks, the INDDEX Project is developing a dietary assessment platform for LICs, called INDDEX24, consisting of a mobile application integrated with a web database application, which is expected to facilitate seamless data collection and processing. These tools will be subject to rigorous testing including feasibility, validation, and cost studies. To scale up dietary data collection and use in LICs, the INDDEX Project will also invest in food composition databases, an individual-level dietary data dissemination platform, and capacity development activities. Although the INDDEX Project activities are expected to improve the ability of researchers and policymakers in low-income countries to collect, process, and use dietary data, the global nutrition community is urged to commit further significant investments in order to adequately address the range and scope of challenges described in this paper. PMID:28300759

  14. IMPROVING CLIENT INTERNAL CAPABILITY TO MONITOR PUBLIC-PRIVATE PARTNERSHIPS PROJECTS: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullahi Ahmed Umar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Public-Private Partnerships (PPP or Private Finance Initiatives (PFI are increasingly becoming very popular with governments across the globe for the provision of public infrastructure and services. When contracted, the public sector client believing the private sector will act in accordance with ‘bounded rationality’, ignores the constant monitoring and review process which is an integral part of any project. However, the failures of some of these partnerships and the social and economic costs incurred due to laxity in monitoring reminds us of the need to develop the permanent bureaucratic machinery of government, who share the government’s unique objectives of end-users satisfaction rather than shareholders’, to perform the monitoring of these projects. Though the public sector has been delivering projcets for dacades, the complexities associated with the PFI strategy has opened up new challenges for its staff. Most failures and moral harzards are only discovered after scandals evoke investigations like the case of Enron or when public criticisms force the government to reverse their decision as in the case of the Skye toll bridge by which time a lot of damage would have be done. Literature has shown that when employees are trained and engaged in organisational decisions and policy planning they make policy executions easier. Therefore, considering the Theoretical ideology behind the PFI of the asset being returned to the Public sector at the end of the concession, it becomes pertinent for proper training of the public sector staff. Public sector officials, if adequately trained and motivated can perform the tasks being contracted out to private consultants thereby re-affirming government’s commitment to its Value for Money (VFM proposition. Though the public sector staff strength has been depleted due to the adoption of New Public Management (NPM, however the remaining qualified staff can be pooled to create an

  15. Discussion on International EPC Projects in Steel and Iron Industry%钢铁行业国际总承包工程项目浅谈

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金国

    2015-01-01

    Though EPC projects in steel and iron industry in China are very common, experience of undertaking international EPC projects is rather limited. With the example of Concentrate Expansion Project of Shougang Hierro Peru S.A.A,the advantages of Chinese steel and iron industry in undertaking international EPC Projects as well as the differences in executing domestic and overseas EPC projects are discussed.%针对国内钢铁行业以工程总承包模式进行的项目虽然比较普遍,但开展国际总承包的经验少的情况,结合首钢秘鲁项目,探讨我国钢铁行业进行国际总承包工程项目的优势及国内外工程总承包的差别。

  16. Freedom is an international partnership. [foreign contributions to NASA Space Station project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohrs, Richard H.

    1990-01-01

    The NASA Space Station Freedom (SSF) project initiated in 1984 is a collaborative one among the U.S., Japan, Canada, and the 10 nations participating in ESA. The SSF partners have over the last six years defined user requirements, decided on the hardware to be manufactured, and constructed a framework for long-term cooperation. SSF will be composed of user elements furnished by the foreign partners and a U.S.-supplied infrastructure encompassing the truss assembly, electrical power system, and crew living quarters. The U.S. will also furnish a lab and a polar-orbit platform; ESA, a second lab and the coorbiting Free-Flying Laboratory, as well as a second polar platform. Japan's Japanese Experiment Module shall include an Exposed Facility and an Experimental Logistics module. Canada will contribute the Mobile Servicing System robotic assembler/maintainer for the whole of SFF.

  17. An International Project on Indoor Air Quality Design and Control in Low Energy Residential Buildings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rode, Carsten; Abadie, Marc; Qin, Menghao

    2016-01-01

    comfortable and healthy indoor environments. New paradigms for demand control of ventilation will be investigated, which consider the pollution loads and occupancy in buildings. As well, the thermal and moisture conditions of such advanced building shall be considered because of interactions between...... focal points to limiting energy consumption for thermally conditioning the indoor environment will be to possibly reducing the ventilation rate, or making it in a new way demand controlled. However, this must be done such that it does not have adverse effects on indoor air quality (IAQ). Annex 68...... the hygrothermal parameters, the chemical conditions, ventilation and the wellbeing of occupants. The project is divided into the five subtasks: 1. Defining the metrics. 2. Pollutant loads in residential buildings. 3. Modeling. 4. Strategies for design and control of buildings. 5. Field measurements and case...

  18. The Impact of Culture on International Management: A Survey of Project Communications in Singapore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun Tran

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the results of an exploratory survey of construction industry managersin Singapore to isolate some of the common effects of national and organisational culture,together with the personal characteristics of managers, on the efficacy of project communication.By examination of significant correlation coefficients, the various types of influencesare identified. The results of the research suggest that the managers’ attitude andbehaviours toward communication may be guided to large extent by their level of competence.The study also provides evidence to suggest that the individuals’ understanding ofthe communication process and its barriers, the way they behave with other individualsand expect to be treated, varies according to national cultures.

  19. The research project Winter In Northern Europe (WINE) of the international Middle Atmosphere Program (MAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vonzahn, U.

    1983-06-01

    The MAP/WINE study of the structure and dynamics of the middle atmosphere above northern Europe during winter is outlined. The project measures the morphology of small scale dynamic features, in order to study the control exerted by gravity waves and tides on the mean flow in the mesosphere, and to develop improved parameterizations of the interactions of small scale dynamic processes with mesospheric temperature, structure, and mean flow. Sudden stratospheric warmings, their cause, the time history of their large scale spatial structures, and their effect on the mesosphere temperature and dynamics are investigated. The effects of dynamics and temperature structure on the distribution of minor constituents, including ionospheric plasma, in the middle atmosphere are examined. Remote sensing and in-situ techniques for measuring mesospheric parameters are compared.

  20. Radiation protection planning for the international FAIR project; Strahlenschutzplanung fuer das internationale FAIR-Projekt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fehrenbacher, G. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); FAIR - Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research in Europe GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Belousov, A.; Conrad, I. [GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); and others

    2015-07-01

    FAIR (=Facility for AntiProton and Ion Research) is an international accelerator facility which will be built near the GSI site in Darmstadt, where protons and heavy ion beams can be accelerated in a synchrotron to energies up to 30 GeV/nucleon with intensities partially up to 1E13/sec. The accelerated particles will be used for experiments in atomic, nuclear and plasma physics as well as for radiation biology and medicine and materials research. The radiation protection planning focuses on the estimation of radiation fields produced by heavy ions and its shielding. As examples, the radiation protection planning for the heavy ion synchrotron SIS100 as well as for two experiment caves are presented. Moreover, further important topics in this radiation protection planning are the estimation of the distribution and production of radionuclides in media and the handling before disposal.

  1. Community engagement and informed consent in the International HapMap project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotimi, Charles; Leppert, Mark; Matsuda, Ichiro; Zeng, Changqing; Zhang, Houcan; Adebamowo, Clement; Ajayi, Ike; Aniagwu, Toyin; Dixon, Missy; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Macer, Darryl; Marshall, Patricia; Nkwodimmah, Chibuzor; Peiffer, Andy; Royal, Charmaine; Suda, Eiko; Zhao, Hui; Wang, Vivian Ota; McEwen, Jean

    2007-01-01

    The International HapMap Consortium has developed the HapMap, a resource that describes the common patterns of human genetic variation (haplotypes). Processes of community/public consultation and individual informed consent were implemented in each locality where samples were collected to understand and attempt to address both individual and group concerns. Perceptions about the research varied, but we detected no critical opposition to the research. Incorporating community input and responding to concerns raised was challenging. However, the experience suggests that approaching genetic variation research in a spirit of openness can help investigators better appreciate the views of the communities whose samples they seek to study and help communities become more engaged in the science.

  2. GEOSAF Part II. Demonstration of the operational and long-term safety of geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste. IAEA international intercomparison and harmonization project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumano, Yumiko; Bruno, Gerard [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria). Vienna International Centre; Tichauer, Michael [IRSN, Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Hedberg, Bengt [Swedish Radiation Safety Authority, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2015-07-01

    International intercomparison and harmonization projects are one of the mechanisms developed by the IAEA for examining the application and use of safety standards, with a view to ensuring their effectiveness and working towards harmonization of approaches to the safety of radioactive waste management. The IAEA has organized a number of international projects on the safety of radioactive waste management; in particular on the issues related to safety demonstration for radioactive waste management facilities. In 2008, GEOSAF, Demonstration of The Operational and Long-Term Safety of Geological Disposal Facilities for Radioactive Waste, project was initiated. This project was completed in 2011 by delivering a project report focusing on the safety case for geological disposal facilities, a concept that has gained in recent years considerable prominence in the waste management area and is addressed in several international safety standards. During the course of the project, it was recognized that little work was undertaken internationally to develop a common view on the safety approach related to the operational phase of a geological disposal although long-term safety of disposal facility has been discussed for several decades. Upon completion of the first part of the GEOSAF project, it was decided to commence a follow-up project aiming at harmonizing approaches on the safety of geological disposal facilities for radioactive waste through the development of an integrated safety case covering both operational and long-term safety. The new project was named as GEOSAF Part II, which was initiated in 2012 initially as 2-year project, involving regulators and operators. GEOSAF Part II provides a forum to exchange ideas and experience on the development and review of an integrated operational and post-closure safety case for geological disposal facilities. It also aims at providing a platform for knowledge transfer. The project is of particular interest to regulatory

  3. Atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides. Model testing using Chernobyl data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garger, E.; Lev, T.; Talerko, N. [Inst. of Radioecology UAAS, Kiev (Ukraine); Galeriu, D. [Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest (Romania); Garland, J. [Consultant (United Kingdom); Hoffman, O.; Nair, S.; Thiessen, K. [SENES, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Miller, C. [Centre for Disease Control, Atlanta, GA (United States); Mueller, H. [GSF - Inst. fuer Strahlenschultz, Neuherberg (Germany); Kryshev, A. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)

    1996-10-01

    Resuspension can be an important secondary source of contamination after a release has stopped, as well as a source of contamination for people and areas not exposed to the original release. The inhalation of resuspended radionuclides contributes to the overall dose received by exposed individuals. Based on measurements collected after the Chernobyl accident, Scenario R was developed to provide an opportunity to test existing mathematical models of contamination resuspension. In particular, this scenario provided the opportunity to examine data and test models for atmospheric resuspension of radionuclides at several different locations from the release, to investigate resuspension processes on both local and regional scales, and to investigate the importance of seasonal variations of these processes. Participants in the test exercise were provided with information for three different types of locations: (1) within the 30-km zone, where local resuspension processes are expected to dominate; (2) a large urban location (Kiev) 120 km from the release site, where vehicular traffic is expected to be the dominant mechanism for resuspension; and (3) an agricultural area 40-60 km from the release site, where highly contaminated upwind 'hot spots' are expected to be important. Input information included characteristics of the ground contamination around specific sites, climatological data for the sites, characteristics of the terrain and topography, and locations of the sampling sites. Participants were requested to predict the average (quarterly and yearly) concentrations of 137 Cs in air at specified locations due to resuspension of Chernobyl fallout; predictions for 90 Sr and 239 + 240 Pu were also requested for one location and time point. Predictions for specified resuspension factors and rates were also requested. Most participants used empirical models for the resuspension factor as a function of time K(t), as opposed to process-based models. While many of

  4. Elevated frequency of cataracts in birds from chernobyl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Alexander Mousseau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804, which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials.

  5. Elevated frequency of cataracts in birds from chernobyl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Møller, Anders Pape

    2013-01-01

    Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804), which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials.

  6. [Clinical and morphological features of papillary thyroid cancer in children and adolescents in the Republic of Belarus: analysis of 936 post-Chernobyl carcinomas].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fridman, M V; Man'kovskaia, S V; Kras'ko, O V; Demidchik, Iu E

    2014-01-01

    There is presented clinical and morphological characteristics of post-Chernobyl papillary thyroid cancer in 936 children and adolescents. In general, carcinoma of these patients featured by locally advanced growth - 57.4% (387 of 674 patients with this sign could be assessed), metastases in regional lymph nodes - 73,7% (N1b in 40.7%) and internal organs - 11.1%. The mean duration of follow-up was 12,4 +/- 3,5 years (range 4.3 to 19.6 years) including children 14,6 +/- 2,7 years (range 8.8 to 19.6 years) and adolescents - 10,1 +/- 3,1 years (range 4.3 to 18.8 years). Overall survival for the 20-year period was 96,6% +/- 1,2%. The causes of death were suicide (7), injuries and accidents (5), secondary malignancies (1), somatic diseases (2). Only in two patients the death was related to the main disease - lung metastases. Free-recurrence survival for the cohort of post-Chernobyl carcinomas was 92,7% +/- 1,0%.

  7. The 'NUCLEIDE' database for decay data and the 'International Decay Data Evaluation Project'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Be, Marie-Martine; Chiste, Vanessa [BNM-LNHB, CEA Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Helmer, Richard [INEEL, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2002-08-01

    A database and an application, known as 'NUCLEIDE', have been developed with the aim of offering users easy access to nuclear and atomic decay data simply by clicking on buttons. The aim of this table is to provide recommended data for nuclides of special interest for metrology or practical applications, such as nuclear medicine, monitoring and reactor shielding, etc. Primary recommended data comprise half-lives, decay modes, branching fractions and their uncertainties and the energies and emission intensities for X- and gamma-rays, electron emissions and alpha particles. In order to update the data and regularly add new evaluations, a new international collaboration has been formed, the Decay Data Evaluation Project (DDEP), comprising evaluators from France, Russia, Germany, United Kingdom, Spain and the United States. Its objective is to provide carefully recommended values which may eventually become standard data. The results of this work are available on CD-ROM or in print. (author)

  8. CSNI Project for Fracture Analyses of Large-Scale International Reference Experiments (FALSIRE II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.; Keeney, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schulz, H.; Sievers, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit (GRS) mbH, Koeln (Gemany)

    1996-11-01

    A summary of Phase II of the Project for FALSIRE is presented. FALSIRE was created by the Fracture Assessment Group (FAG) of the OECD/NEA`s Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CNSI) Principal Working Group No. 3. FALSIRE I in 1988 assessed fracture methods through interpretive analyses of 6 large-scale fracture experiments in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels under pressurized- thermal-shock (PTS) loading. In FALSIRE II, experiments examined cleavage fracture in RPV steels for a wide range of materials, crack geometries, and constraint and loading conditions. The cracks were relatively shallow, in the transition temperature region. Included were cracks showing either unstable extension or two stages of extensions under transient thermal and mechanical loads. Crack initiation was also investigated in connection with clad surfaces and with biaxial load. Within FALSIRE II, comparative assessments were performed for 7 reference fracture experiments based on 45 analyses received from 22 organizations representing 12 countries. Temperature distributions in thermal shock loaded samples were approximated with high accuracy and small scatter bands. Structural response was predicted reasonably well; discrepancies could usually be traced to the assumed material models and approximated material properties. Almost all participants elected to use the finite element method.

  9. International collaborative project to compare and track the nutritional composition of fast foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic diseases are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the world with over-nutrition a primary cause of diet-related ill health. Excess quantities of energy, saturated fat, sugar and salt derived from fast foods contribute importantly to this disease burden. Our objective is to collate and compare nutrient composition data for fast foods as a means of supporting improvements in product formulation. Methods/design Surveys of fast foods will be done in each participating country each year. Information on the nutrient composition for each product will be sought either through direct chemical analysis, from fast food companies, in-store materials or from company websites. Foods will be categorized into major groups for the primary analyses which will compare mean levels of saturated fat, sugar, sodium, energy and serving size at baseline and over time. Countries currently involved include Australia, New Zealand, France, UK, USA, India, Spain, China and Canada, with more anticipated to follow. Discussion This collaborative approach to the collation and sharing of data will enable low-cost tracking of fast food composition around the world. This project represents a significant step forward in the objective and transparent monitoring of industry and government commitments to improve the quality of fast foods.

  10. [The Bilbao declaration: international meeting on the law concerning the human genome project].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The Bilbao statement was the result of a work meeting, held the day before the closing session by a group of representative experts, formed by general chairmen and meeting organizers. The compelled and necessary consent gave rise to the document that was read and communicated to the world's public opinion during the closing act on may 26, 1993. Notwithstanding, the working group considered that the divulged version was provisory and committed to continue the task of re-elaborating the statement. The aim was to complete and improve it, taking the greatest advantage of the important meeting achievements. The document that is next reproduced is the definitive integral version of the Bilbao Statement. The expert group that takes the responsibility of this Statement is Jean Dausset, Nobel Prize of Medicine (1980); Carleton Gajdusek, Nobel Prize of Medicine (1976); Santiago Grisolía president of UNESCO committee for the Genome Project; Michael Kirby, President of the Court of Appeal of the Supreme Court of New South Wales, Australia; Aaron Klug, member of the Constitutional Council, Paris, France; Rafael Mendizábal, Judge of the Constitutional Court, Madrid, Spain; Juan Bautista Pardo, President of the Superior Court of Justice of the Basque Country and Carlos María Romeo Casabona, Director of the Chair of Law and Human Genome of the University of Deusto (Bilbao).

  11. Track distortion in the Large prototype of a Time Projection Chamber for the International Linear Collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar Bhattacharya, Deb; Bhattacharya, Purba; Mukhopadhyay, Supratik; Majumdar, Nayana; Bhattacharya, Sudeb; Sarkar, Sandip; Colas, Paul; Attie, David; Ganjour, Serguei; Bhattacharya, Aparajita

    2016-10-01

    A Micromegas (MM) based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) can meet the ILC requirements of continuous 3-D tracking, excellent spatial resolution and efficient pattern recognition. Seven MM modules which are commissioned on the end-plate of a Large Prototype TPC (LPTPC) at DESY, have been tested with a 5 GeV electron beam, under a 1 T magnetic field. Due to the grounded peripheral frame of the MM modules, at short drift, the electric field near the detector edge remain no longer parallel to the TPC axis. This causes signal loss along the boundaries of the MM modules as well as distortion in the reconstructed track. In presence of magnetic field, the distorted electric field introduces E×B effect. A detailed numerical study has been accomplished to understand the features of this distortion. Four Micromegas modules have been simulated resembling the experimental setup. The field lines, drift line of electrons considering diffusion in gas, nature of track distortion, residuals are numerically calculated in presence and in absence of magnetic field. The E×B effect has been simulated as well. Simulated results follow the experimental observations.

  12. The Unification of Space Qualified Integrated Circuits by Example of International Space Project GAMMA-400

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkov, S. G.; Serdin, O. V.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Suchkov, S. I.; Topchiev, N. P.

    The problem of electronic component unification at the different levels (circuits, interfaces, hardware and software) used in space industry is considered. The task of computer systems for space purposes developing is discussed by example of scientific data acquisition system for space project GAMMA-400. The basic characteristics of high reliable and fault tolerant chips developed by SRISA RAS for space applicable computational systems are given. To reduce power consumption and enhance data reliability, embedded system interconnect made hierarchical: upper level is Serial RapidIO 1x or 4x with rate transfer 1.25 Gbaud; next level - SpaceWire with rate transfer up to 400 Mbaud and lower level - MIL-STD-1553B and RS232/RS485. The Ethernet 10/100 is technology interface and provided connection with the previously released modules too. Systems interconnection allows creating different redundancy systems. Designers can develop heterogeneous systems that employ the peer-to-peer networking performance of Serial RapidIO using multiprocessor clusters interconnected by SpaceWire.

  13. The Cognitive Behavioral Assessment (CBA Project: Presentation and Proposal for International Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezio Sanavio

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Aims: The main aim of this paper is to describe almost 30 years of work on psychological assessment using CBA, a research team, and to propose collaboration with Latin countries. Methods: The acronym CBA stands for Cognitive Behavioural Assessment and indicates both an overall approach to clinical assessment and a series of tests. Five general principles formed the basis on which the team developed their questionnaires: (1 assessment is not a passive collection of information, but an active process similar to problem-solving; (2 horizontal integration of questionnaires with other assessment methods; (3 vertical integration and hierarchical structure of assessment questionnaires; (4 idiographic perspective; (5 computer support. Results: The paper briefly presents the most important tests: CBA-2.0, a broad-spectrum Battery for patients who need counselling and/or psychotherapy; CBA-H (Hospital for both in-patients and out-patients suffering from physical illnesses; CBA-SPORT for professional athletes; CBA-Y (young people for adolescents and young adults; CBD-VE (treatment benefits to assess the effectiveness of psychological treatment. Conclusion: These questionnaires have produced over 100 research works, published in Italian journals or presented in conferences. In the near future, we expect important, radical changes and hope to create an international research milieu.

  14. New quality and quantity indices in science (NewQIS: the study protocol of an international project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scutaru Cristian

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Benchmarking systems are important features for the implementation of efficacy in basic and applied sciences. These systems are urgently needed for many fields of science since there is an imbalance present between funding policies and research evaluation. Here, a new approach is presented with an international study project that uses visualisation techniques for benchmarking processes. The project is entitled New Quality and Quantity Indices in Science (NewQIS. The juxtaposition of classical scientometric tools and novel visualisation techniques can be used to assess quality and quantity in science. In specific, the tools can be used to assess quality and quantity of research activity for distinct areas of science, for single institutions, for countries, for single time periods, or for single scientists. Also, NewQIS may be used to compare different fields, institutions, countries, or scientists for their scientific output. Thus, decision making for funding allocation can be made more transparent. Since governmental bodies that supervise funding policies and allocation processes are often not equipped with an in depth expertise in this area, special attention is given to data visualisation techniques that allow to visualize mapping of research activity and quality.

  15. Project to promote exchange of international information on environmental technologies; Kankyo gijutsu kokusai joho koryu sokushin jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    Mutual information exchange at international levels is important for practical application of global environment preservation technologies, whereas the APEC Virtual Center was established in fiscal 1997. Fiscal 1998 has discussed the future functions of the Virtual Center, and carried out the following matters to improve the functions and achieve its stable operation. Discussions were given on common use with the centers of other countries and regions of the specifications of classification systems for information areas and provided information that are provided by the Virtual Center. Visits were made to sub-managing countries and regions for smooth operation of the study groups, and opinions were exchanged. Visits were made to coordinators and contact points established in each country and region when the Center was founded in fiscal 1997. A visit was made to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to exchange opinions on coordination measures with the Cleaner Production Strategy of the U.S.A. being a project similar to the subject project. In order to strengthen the Japan's Center, attempts were made to expand the linking information to wider scope. Special pages publishing concentratedly the items of information that the users are interested were prepared as part of the information provision. (NEDO)

  16. New quality and quantity indices in science (NewQIS): the study protocol of an international project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groneberg-Kloft, Beatrix; Fischer, Tanja C; Quarcoo, David; Scutaru, Cristian

    2009-06-26

    Benchmarking systems are important features for the implementation of efficacy in basic and applied sciences. These systems are urgently needed for many fields of science since there is an imbalance present between funding policies and research evaluation. Here, a new approach is presented with an international study project that uses visualisation techniques for benchmarking processes. The project is entitled New Quality and Quantity Indices in Science (NewQIS). The juxtaposition of classical scientometric tools and novel visualisation techniques can be used to assess quality and quantity in science. In specific, the tools can be used to assess quality and quantity of research activity for distinct areas of science, for single institutions, for countries, for single time periods, or for single scientists. Also, NewQIS may be used to compare different fields, institutions, countries, or scientists for their scientific output. Thus, decision making for funding allocation can be made more transparent. Since governmental bodies that supervise funding policies and allocation processes are often not equipped with an in depth expertise in this area, special attention is given to data visualisation techniques that allow to visualize mapping of research activity and quality.

  17. Supporting project on international education and training in cooperated program for Radiation Technology with World Nuclear University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Byung Duk; Nam, Y. M.; Noh, S. P.; Shin, J. Y. [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    The objective is promote national status and potential of Nuclear radiation industry, and take a world-wide leading role in radiation industry, by developing and hosting the first WNU Radiation Technology School. RI School (World Nuclear University Radioisotope School) is the three-week program designed to develop and inspire future international leaders in the field of radioisotope for the first time. The project would enable promote abilities of radioactive isotopes professions, and to build the human network with future leaders in the world-wide nuclear and radiation field. Especially by offering opportunity to construct human networks between worldwide radiation field leaders of next generation, intangible assets and pro-Korean human networks are secured among international radiation industry personnel. This might enhance the power and the status of Korean radiation industries, and establish the fundamental base for exporting of radiation technology and its products. We developed the performance measurement method for the school. This shows that 2010 WNU RI School was the first training program focusing on the radioisotope and very useful program for the participants in view of knowledge management and strengthening personal abilities. Especially, the experiences and a human network with world-wide future-leaders in radiation field are most valuable asset. It is expected that the participants could this experience and network developed in the program as a stepping stone toward the development of Korea's nuclear and radiation industry.

  18. Prognostics and health management (PHM) for astronauts: a collaboration project on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Alexandre; Fink, Wolfgang; Hess, Andrew

    2016-05-01

    Long-duration missions bring numerous risks that must be understood and mitigated in order to keep astronauts healthy, rather than treat a diagnosed health disorder. Having a limited medical support from mission control center on space exploration missions, crew members need a personal health-tracking tool to predict and assess his/her health risks if no preventive measures are taken. This paper refines a concept employing technologies from Prognostics and Health Management (PHM) for systems, namely real-time health monitoring and condition-based health maintenance with predictive diagnostics capabilities. Mapping particular PHM-based solutions to some Human Health and Performance (HH&P) technology candidates, namely by NASA designation, the Autonomous Medical Decision technology and the Integrated Biomedical Informatics technology, this conceptual paper emphasize key points that make the concept different from that of both current conventional medicine and telemedicine including space medicine. The primary benefit of the technologies development for the HH&P domain is the ability to successfully achieve affordable human space missions to Low Earth Orbit (LEO) and beyond. Space missions on the International Space Station (ISS) program directly contribute to the knowledge base and advancements in the HH&P domain, thanks to continued operations on the ISS, a unique human-tended test platform and the only test bed within the space environment. The concept is to be validated on the ISS, the only "test bed" on which to prepare for future manned exploration missions. The paper authors believe that early self-diagnostic coupled with autonomous identification of proper preventive responses on negative trends are critical in order to keep astronauts healthy.

  19. Projects for People: An International Exchange Focused on Drinking Water Quality in Rural Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, T. S.; Tarazona Vasquez, F.; Bailey, E.; Duong, V.; Gonzales Vera, R.; LaPorte, D.; Rojas Cala, B.; Torres Atencia, S.; Vasquez Auqui, J.

    2016-12-01

    The integration of human-centered design with technical engineering in a classroom setting can be challenging but immensely rewarding if coupled with a community-focused experience. Undergraduate students participated in an international exchange to address drinking water quality in the community of Huamancaca, located in the Junin region of Peru. Technical research and experimentation often comes easily to students in undergraduate engineering programs, however, implementation within a community requires a social license to operate. The objectives of this study were to address the technical challenges of designing a sustainable and effective water filtration system while also ensuring community support and education, coupled with user ownership of the process. In tandem with filter media experimentation with biochar and activated carbon produced using locally available agricultural waste from potatoes and carrots, we visited the people of Huamancaca to understand their needs and concerns. This direct communication with the community was invaluable; we observed that many of the residents' water quality problems could be solved with education. For example, proper sanitation techniques and appropriate addition of bleach or sufficient boiling time may make up for inconsistent water quality provided by the local distribution system. An education plan may also be developed for water treatment plant operators covering chlorine dosage for effective residual treatment within the distribution network in addition to filtration. Upon site visitation and sample collection, we realized that open communication with city officials, operators, business owners, and residents in both technical and social settings is essential for continued collaboration within this community. Solving a tangible problem or designing a product that can be effectively adopted is not a concept that is rigorously addressed in undergraduate education, however the setbacks, challenges, and triumphs

  20. Validity aspects in Chernobyl at twenty years of the accident; Aspectos vigentes en Chernobyl a veinte anos del accidente

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arredondo, C. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. e-mail: cas@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    For April 25, 1986 the annual stop of the unit 4 of the nuclear power plant of Chernobyl was programmed, in order to carry out maintenance tasks. This unit was equipped with a reactor of 1000 MW, type RBMK, developed in the former Soviet Union, this type of reactors uses graphite like moderator, the core is refrigerated with common water in boil, and the fuel is uranium enriched to 2%. Also it had been programmed to carry out, before stopping the operation of the power station, a test with one of the two turbogenerators, which would not affect to the reactor. However, the intrinsic characteristics of the design of the reactor and the fact that the operators disconnected intentionally several systems of security that had stopped the reactor automatically, caused a decontrolled increase of the power (a factor 1000 in 4 seconds), with the consequent fusion of the fuel and the generation of a shock wave, produced by the fast evaporation of the refrigeration water and caused by the interaction of the fuel fused with the same one. It broke the core in pieces and destroy the structure of the reactor building that was not resistant to the pressure. When being exposed to the air, the graphite of the moderator entered in combustion, while the radioactive material was dispersed in the environment. The radionuclides liberation was prolong during 10 days, and only it was stopped by means of the one poured from helicopters, of some 5000 tons of absorbent materials on the destroyed reactor, as long as tunnels were dug to carry out the cooling of the core with liquid nitrogen. Later on, the whole building of the damaged reactor was contained inside a concrete building. The immediate consequence of the accident was the death of 31 people, between operators of the nuclear power station and firemen. One of people died as consequence of the explosion and 30 died by cause of the irradiation, with dose of the order of 16 Gy. The liberated radioactive material was the entirety of the