WorldWideScience

Sample records for international atomic time

  1. Legal Time of the Republic of Colombia and its international traceability using the Cesium Atomic Clock - Time and Frequency National Standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Forero, Liz Catherine; Bahamón Cortés, Nelson

    2017-06-01

    Around the world, there are different providers of timestamp (mobile, radio or television operators, satellites of the GPS network, astronomical measurements, etc.), however, the source of the legal time for a country is either the national metrology institute or another designated laboratory. This activity requires a time standard based on an atomic time scale. The International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) calculates a weighted average of the time kept in more than 60 nations and produces a single international time scale, called Coordinated Universal Time (UTC). This article presents the current time scale that generates Legal Time for the Republic of Colombia produced by the Instituto Nacional de Metrología (INM) using the time and frequency national standard, a cesium atomic oscillator. It also illustrates how important it is for the academic, scientific and industrial communities, as well as the general public, to be synchronized with this time scale, which is traceable to the International System (SI) of units, through international comparisons that are made in real time.

  2. The international atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1962-12-31

    The film explains in basic terms nuclear fission, the use of nuclear power (propulsion of ships), the production and use of radioisotopes (medicine-radioactive tracers, sterilization of instruments; agriculture-fertilizers, screw-worm elimination, irradiation of food; industry). Demonstrates international co-operation and research in the nuclear field

  3. Atomic Physics 16: Sixteenth International Conference on Atomic Physics. Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baylis, W.E.; Drake, G.W.

    1999-01-01

    These proceedings represent papers presented at the 16th International Conference on Atomic Physics held in Windsor, Ontario, Canada, in August, 1998. The topics discussed included a wide array of subjects in atomic physics such as atom holography, alignment in atomic collisions, coulomb-interacting particles, muon experiments, x-rays from comets, atomic electron collisions in intense laser fields, spectroscopy of trapped ions, and Bose-Einstein condensates. This conference represents the single most important meeting world wide on fundamental advances in atomic physics. There were 30 papers presented at the conference,out of which 4 have been abstracted for the Energy, Science and Technology database

  4. The International Atomic Energy Agency's safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, W.

    2000-01-01

    A system of international safeguards has been established to provide assurance that nuclear materials in civilian use are not diverted from their peaceful purpose. The safeguards system is administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency/Department of Safeguards and devolves from treaties and other international agreements. Inspectors from the Agency verify reports from States about nuclear facilities by audits, observation, and measurements. (author)

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahim Mohd Nor

    1985-01-01

    A review on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its relation with Malaysia is given. This article also discusses the background history of IAEA, its organization and functions in the field of nuclear energy

  6. On the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eklund, S [International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1963-07-15

    The main concepts motivating the decision to establish an international agency for peaceful uses of atomic energy are presented in the paper. They consists of: 1) co-ordination in the fields of safety field, legal liability and safeguards; 2) ensuring that scientific and technical data are made freely accessible on a worldwide scale and 3) assisting the developing countries in benefiting from this new science and technology and use the atomic energy for economic and social development

  7. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, D.N. (Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Merkle, K.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l brace}222{r brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l brace}111{r brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert bar}O{vert bar}Mg{hor ellipsis} and not Cu{vert bar}Mg{vert bar}O{hor ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l brace}111{r brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1991-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1991. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency: Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, A.

    1992-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1992. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  10. PREFACE: Fourth International Symposium on Atomic Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Shigefumi

    2010-04-01

    The International Symposium on Atomic Technology (ISAT) is held every year. The 4th Symposium (ISAT-4) was held on November 18-19, 2009 at the Seaside Hotel MAIKO VILLA KOBE, Kobe City, Japan presided by the "Atomic Technology Project". The ISAT-4 symposium was intended to offer a forum for the discussion on the latest progress in the atomic technologies. The symposium was attended by 107 delegates. There were 10 invited and 6 oral presentations. The number of poster presentations was 69. From all the contributions, 22 papers selected through review process are contained in this volume. The "Atomic Technology Project" was started in 2006 as a joint project of three institutions; (1) the Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University (CAMT), (2) the Tsukuba Research Center for Interdisciplinary Materials Science, Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba (TIMS) and (3) the Polyscale Technology Research Center, Research Institute for Science and Technology, Tokyo University of Science (PTRC), each of which were independently pursuing nano-technologies and was developing atomic scale operation and diagnostics, functional materials, micro processing and device. The project is funded by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. The goal of the project is to contribute to the development of atomic-scale science and technologies such as functional molecules, biomaterials, and quantum functions of atomic-scale structures. Shigefumi Okada Conference Chair Center for Atomic and Molecular Technologies, Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita-city, Osaka 565-0871, Japan. Conference photograph Kobe photograph

  11. Atom optics in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, M.; Szriftgiser, P.; Dalibard, J.; Steane, A. M.

    1996-05-01

    Atom-optics experiments are presented using a time-modulated evanescent light wave as an atomic mirror in the trampoline configuration, i.e., perpendicular to the direction of the atomic free fall. This modulated mirror is used to accelerate cesium atoms, to focus their trajectories, and to apply a ``multiple lens'' to separately focus different velocity classes of atoms originating from a point source. We form images of a simple two-slit object to show the resolution of the device. The experiments are modelled by a general treatment analogous to classical ray optics.

  12. Atom-at-a-time chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagame, Yuichiro

    2009-01-01

    Several techniques of the analytical chemistry in 'Atom-at-a-time chemistry' for transactinide elements have been developed. In this report a representative example in these techniques is introduced with the results. The contents are the single-atom chemistry, the chemical experiments on transactinide elements, liquid phase chemistry (the ion exchange behavior of Rutherfordium), gas phase chemistry (the chemistry of atomic No.112 element), and future development. (M.H.)

  13. Report to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woznicka, U.

    1986-07-01

    The results of research done under the International Atomic Energy Agency Contract no 4121/RB: 'Measurement of the thermal neutron macroscopic absorption cross-section on small samples' at the Institut of Nuclear Physics during the period from July 1, 1985 to June 30, 1986 are presented. The research was based on the Plexiglass thermal neutron diffusion parameters and on the method of preparation of the rock samples for the measurements according to the INP method. Three rock samples delivered by the IAEA: Ottawa Sand, Royer Dolomite and Dunite Sand have been measured. (author)

  14. Atomic frequency-time-length standards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gheorghiu, O.C.; Mandache, C.

    1987-01-01

    The principles of operative of atomic frequency-time-length standards and their principle characteristics are described. The role of quartz crystal oscillators which are sloved to active or passive standards is presented. (authors)

  15. International Atomic Energy Agency activities in decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reisenweaver, D W.; )

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been addressing the safety and technical issues of decommissioning for over 20 years, but their focus has been primarily on planning. Up to know, the activities have been on an ad hoc basis and sometimes, important issues have been missed. A new Action Plan on the Decommissioning of Nuclear Facilities has recently been approved by the Agency's board of Governors which will focus the Agency's efforts and ensure that our Member States' concerns are addressed. The new initiatives associated with this Action Plan will help ensure that decommissioning activities in the future are performed in a safe and coherent manner. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been preparing safety and technical documents concerning decommissioning since the mid-1980's. There have been over 30 documents prepared that provide safety requirements, guidance and supporting technical information. Many of these documents are over 10 years old and need updating. The main focus in the past has been on planning for decommissioning. During the past five years, a set of Safety Standards have been prepared and issued to provide safety requirements and guidance to Member States. However, decommissioning was never a real priority with the Agency, but was something that had to be addressed. To illustrate this point, the first requirements documents on decommissioning were issued as part of a Safety Requirements [1] on pre-disposal management of radioactive waste. It was felt that decommissioning did not deserve its own document because it was just part of the normal waste management process. The focus was mostly on waste management. The Agency has assisted Member States with the planning process for decommissioning. Most of these activities have been focused on nuclear power plants and research reactors. Now, support for the decommissioning of other types of facilities is being requested. The Agency is currently providing technical

  16. Optical atomic phase reference and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L; Cornell, E H; Abdelrahmann, A

    2017-08-06

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10 -20 As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, Δ Φ / Φ total  ≤ 10 -20 , that could make an important impact in gravity wave science.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Optical atomic phase reference and timing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollberg, L.; Cornell, E. H.; Abdelrahmann, A.

    2017-06-01

    Atomic clocks based on laser-cooled atoms have made tremendous advances in both accuracy and stability. However, advanced clocks have not found their way into widespread use because there has been little need for such high performance in real-world/commercial applications. The drive in the commercial world favours smaller, lower-power, more robust compact atomic clocks that function well in real-world non-laboratory environments. Although the high-performance atomic frequency references are useful to test Einstein's special relativity more precisely, there are not compelling scientific arguments to expect a breakdown in special relativity. On the other hand, the dynamics of gravity, evidenced by the recent spectacular results in experimental detection of gravity waves by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration, shows dramatically that there is new physics to be seen and understood in space-time science. Those systems require strain measurements at less than or equal to 10-20. As we discuss here, cold atom optical frequency references are still many orders of magnitude away from the frequency stability that should be achievable with narrow-linewidth quantum transitions and large numbers of very cold atoms, and they may be able to achieve levels of phase stability, ΔΦ/Φtotal ≤ 10-20, that could make an important impact in gravity wave science. This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantum technology for the 21st century'.

  18. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.; Bannister, M.E.; Fuhr, J.

    1999-12-01

    The International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion is prepared by the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is distributed free of charge by the IAEA to assist in the development of fusion research and technology. In part 1, the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) is presented. In Part 2, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions and surface interactions. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references. Finally, the Author Index (part 4) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part 3

  19. Splitting the second the story of atomic time

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Tony

    2000-01-01

    Until the 1950s timekeeping was based on the apparent motion of the Sun that in turn reflected the rotation of the Earth on its axis. But the Earth does not turn smoothly. By the 1940s it was clear that the length of the day fluctuated unpredictably and with it the length of the second. Astronomers wanted to redefine the second in terms of the motions of the Moon and the planets. Physicists wanted to dispense with astronomical time altogether and define the second in terms of the fundamental properties of atoms. The physicists won. The revolution began in June 1955 with the operation of the first successful atomic clock and was complete by October 1967 when the atomic second ousted the astronomical second as the international unit of time. Splitting the Second: The Story of Atomic Time presents the story of this revolution, explaining how atomic clocks work, how more than 200 of them are used to form the world's time, and why we need leap seconds. The book illustrates how accurate time is distributed around...

  20. 5. International workshop on autoionization phenomena in atoms. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balashov, V.V.

    1995-01-01

    Summaries of the reports presented at the 5 International Workshop on Autoionization Phenomena in Atoms (Dubna, 12-14 December 1995). The main topics of these 53 reports are the following ones: photoexcitation of autoionizing states in atoms and ions, autoionization in electron-atom collisions, autoionization in heavy particle collisions, coincidence experiments in autoionization studies, investigations of autoionizing states with lasers and wave functions and decay characteristics of autoionizing states

  1. International nuclear low and atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aouinet, Nejib

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work is to put points on the codification of international law of nuclear energy and its uses in military and peaceful in the first part. The second part was devoted for the imperfection of the law of international nuclear.

  2. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  3. Time, history and international law

    CERN Document Server

    Craven, Matthew; Vogiatzi, Maria

    2006-01-01

    This book examines theoretical and practical issues concerning the relationship between international law, time and history. Problems relating to time and history are ever-present in the work of international lawyers, whether understood in terms of the role of historic practice in the doctrine of sources, the application of the principle of inter-temporal law in dispute settlement, or in gaining a coherent insight into the role that was played by international law in past events. But very little has been written about the various different ways in which international lawyers approach or unders

  4. Internal structure of reactor building for Madras Atomic Power Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit, D.P.

    1975-01-01

    The structural configuration and analysis of structural elements of the internal structure of reactor building for the Madras Atomic Power Project has been presented. Two methods of analysis of the internal structure, viz. Equivalent Plane Frame and Finite Element Method, are explained and compared with the use of bending moments obtained. (author)

  5. The International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzutti, A.A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The origens, functions and objectives of the IAEA are analysed. The application of safeguards to avoid military uses of nuclear energy is discussed. In the final section the agrement between Brazil and Germany regarding IAEA safeguards, as well as the competence for executing the brazilian program are explained. It is, then, an informative study dealing with nuclear energy and its peaceful path, the creation of International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and nonproliferation [pt

  6. The International Atomic Energy Agency's program on decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) is developing an integrated information base that will systematically cover the technical, regulatory, radiation protection, planning, and economic aspects related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D/D) of nuclear facilities. The object of this program is to assist member states in developing the required expertise, equipment, and programs so that they can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely, and cost-effective manner. In addition to providing information, the IAEA encourages research and provides technical assistance in the form of expert missions, equipment design and procurement, etc., to assist member states in implementing their D/D programs. The technology contained in some recent IAEA reports is reviewed, including the decontamination, segmentation, and demolition of concrete and steel; the recycle/reuse of components from decommissioning; and the reduction of occupational exposures in D/D and the regulatory process in decommissioning. The IAEA's future program is briefly reviewed

  7. Annual report 2003[International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three 'pillars' of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report, starting on page 9, generally follows the programme structure as it applied in 2003. The introductory chapter, seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. Additional information on specific issues can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review and Technical Co-operation Report. This material is also available on the Agency's WorldAtom web site (http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2003/). All sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to Technology are: Nuclear Power; Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Material Technologies; Analysis for Sustainable Energy Development; Nuclear Science; Food and Agriculture; Human Health; Water Resources; Protection of the Marine and Terrestrial Environments; Physical and Chemical Applications. Topics related to safety discussed in this report are: Safety of Nuclear Installations; Radiation Safety; Management of Radioactive Waste; Security of Material. Topics related to Verification are Safeguards and Verification in Iraq Pursuant to UNSC Resolutions. A separate chapter is devoted to Management of Technical Cooperation for Development.

  8. German atomic energy law in the international framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelzer, N.

    1992-01-01

    The regional conference was devoted to the legal problems that ensue from German reunification against the background of the integration of German atomic energy law within international law. The elements of national atomic energy legislation required by international law and recent developments in international nuclear liability law were discussed from different perspectives. The particular problems of the application of the German Atomic Energy Act in the 5 new Laender (the territories of the former GDR) were presented and discussed, namely: The continued validity of old licences issued by the GDR; practical legal problems connected with the construction of nuclear power plants in the 5 new Laender; the legal issues connected with the final repository for radioactive wastes at Morsleben; and the new developments in radiation protection law following from the Unification Treaty and the new ICRP recommendations. All 14 lectures have been abstracted and indexed individually. (orig.) [de

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  10. Fifty years of atomic time-keeping at VNIIFTRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domnin, Y.; Gaigerov, B.; Koshelyaevsky, N.; Poushkin, S.; Rusin, F.; Tatarenkov, V.; Yolkin, G.

    2005-01-01

    Time metrology in Russia in the second half of the twentieth century has been marked, as in other advanced countries, by the rapid development of time and frequency quantum standards and the beginning of atomic time-keeping. This brief review presents the main developments and studies in time and frequency measurement, and the improvement of accuracy and atomic time-keeping at the VNIIFTRI-the National Metrology Institute keeping primary time and frequency standards and ensuring unification of measurement. The milestones along the way have been the ammonia and hydrogen masers, primary caesium beam and fountain standards and laser frequency standards. For many years, VNIIFTRI was the only world laboratory that applied hydrogen-maser clock ensembles for time-keeping. VNIIFTRI's work on international laser standard frequency comparisons and absolute frequency measurements contributed greatly to the adoption by the CIPM of a highly accurate value for the He-Ne/CH 4 laser frequency. VNIIFTRI and the VNIIM were the first to establish a united time, frequency and length standard. (authors)

  11. Fifty years of atomic time-keeping at VNIIFTRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domnin, Y.; Gaigerov, B.; Koshelyaevsky, N.; Poushkin, S.; Rusin, F.; Tatarenkov, V.; Yolkin, G. [VNIIFTRI (Russian Federation)

    2005-06-01

    Time metrology in Russia in the second half of the twentieth century has been marked, as in other advanced countries, by the rapid development of time and frequency quantum standards and the beginning of atomic time-keeping. This brief review presents the main developments and studies in time and frequency measurement, and the improvement of accuracy and atomic time-keeping at the VNIIFTRI-the National Metrology Institute keeping primary time and frequency standards and ensuring unification of measurement. The milestones along the way have been the ammonia and hydrogen masers, primary caesium beam and fountain standards and laser frequency standards. For many years, VNIIFTRI was the only world laboratory that applied hydrogen-maser clock ensembles for time-keeping. VNIIFTRI's work on international laser standard frequency comparisons and absolute frequency measurements contributed greatly to the adoption by the CIPM of a highly accurate value for the He-Ne/CH{sub 4} laser frequency. VNIIFTRI and the VNIIM were the first to establish a united time, frequency and length standard. (authors)

  12. Fifty years of atomic time-keeping at VNIIFTRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnin, Yu; Gaigerov, B.; Koshelyaevsky, N.; Poushkin, S.; Rusin, F.; Tatarenkov, V.; Yolkin, G.

    2005-06-01

    Time metrology in Russia in the second half of the twentieth century has been marked, as in other advanced countries, by the rapid development of time and frequency quantum standards and the beginning of atomic time-keeping. This brief review presents the main developments and studies in time and frequency measurement, and the improvement of accuracy and atomic time-keeping at the VNIIFTRI—the National Metrology Institute keeping primary time and frequency standards and ensuring unification of measurement. The milestones along the way have been the ammonia and hydrogen masers, primary caesium beam and fountain standards and laser frequency standards. For many years, VNIIFTRI was the only world laboratory that applied hydrogen-maser clock ensembles for time-keeping. VNIIFTRI's work on international laser standard frequency comparisons and absolute frequency measurements contributed greatly to the adoption by the CIPM of a highly accurate value for the He-Ne/CH4 laser frequency. VNIIFTRI and the VNIIM were the first to establish a united time, frequency and length standard.

  13. Role of International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.

    1986-01-01

    About 10 years ago, the IAEA formulated guidelines for mutual emergency assistance in case of accidents. These guidelines have been revised periodically and updated, with the latest revision prepared in 1984. As a response to Chernobyl, two new conventions have been produced: (1) the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, and (2) the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. It is important to emphasize that points of contact and a focal point within the IAEA shall be available continuously for the implementation of the Conventions. A total of 58 and 57 Member States have signed Conventions 1 and 2, respectively, as of October 27, 1987. It is expected that these numbers will increase significantly in the near future. According to the INSAG Summary Report, the following areas have been recommended as top priority: epidemiology study; problems of skin lesions, problem of biological dosimetry in selected cohorts of the population; and medical literature. The IAEA has been designated to take the lead in these areas in close collaboration with WHO and other international organizations

  14. Internal conversion theory of gamma radiation in unfilled atomic shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, Eh.M.; Trusov, V.F.; Ehglajs, M.O.

    1980-01-01

    The internal conversion theory of gamma radiation in unfilled shells, when the atom is in a state with certain energy and momentum, is considered. A formula for the conversion coefficient between the atom and ion levels is obtained. This coefficient turns to be dependent on genealogic characteristics of the atom. It is discussed when the conversion coefficients are proportional to the numbers of filling subshells in the atom. Exact calculations have been carried out in the multiconfigurational approximation taking into account intermediate coupling for the d-shell of the Fe atom Single-electron radial wave functions have been calculated on the basis of the relativistic method of the Hartree-Fock-Dirak self-consistent field. Conversion coefficients on certain subshells as well as submatrix elements of the production operator are calculated. The electric coefficient of internal conversion (CIC) in the calculation for one electron does not depend on spin orientation. That is why the electric CIC from the level will not depend on filling number distribution by subshells. For magnetic CIC the dependence on the atom state is significant. Using multiconfiguration basis for calculating energy matrix and its succeeding diagonalization means the account of the intermediate coupling type, which takes place for the unfilled shells

  15. 24. International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids ICACS-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    This Book contains the abstracts of invited and contributed talks submitted for presentation at the 24 th International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids - ICACS-24. Out of nearly 200 submitted abstracts the International Programme Committee selected 46 oral and 89 poster contributions. Furthermore, 15 plenary invited lectures and the honorary Lindhard lecture are included in the scientific program. An additional tutorial day with 4 tutorial lectures is organised on Sunday prior to the Conference.

  16. Environment. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment issued during the period 1980-1993. The major subjects covered include: effect of agrochemical residues on soils and aquatic ecosystems, application of radioisotopes in conservation of the environment, siting of nuclear power plants, environmental isotope data and environmental contamination due to nuclear accidents

  17. Radiation therapy. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Radiation Therapy, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  18. The 25th anniversary of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osztrovszki, Gy.

    1982-01-01

    The leader of the Hungarian delegation at the 26th General Assembly of the International Atomic Energy (IAEA) held in Vienna in September, 1982, on the occasion of the IAEA's 25th anniversary, presented a short review of the IAEA's activities during its existence, the Hungarian participation in them and Hungary's efforts in the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy. (A.L.)

  19. Environment. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered important have also been included. The catalogue is in CD-ROM format

  1. Atoms for peace - the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, J.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which is situated in Vienna. The aims of the IAEA and its work are described. The safeguards system; promotional work; technical cooperation programme; and nuclear safety work concerned with basic safety standards for radiation protection; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Proceedings of the international seminar on atomic processes in plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Takako; Murakami, Izumi [eds.

    2000-01-01

    The International Seminar on Atomic Processes in Plasmas (ISAPP), a satellite meeting to the ICPEAC was held July 28-29 at the National Institute for Fusion Science in Toki, Gifu, Japan. About 110 scientists attended the ISAPP meeting and discussed atomic processes and atomic data required for fusion research. This Proceedings book includes the papers of the talks, posters and panel discussion given at the meeting. The invited talks described the super configuration array method for complex spectra, near-LTE atomic kinetics, R-matrix calculations, the binary-encounter dipole model for electron-impact ionization of molecules, other calculations of molecular processes, the ADAS project and the NIFS atomic data-base, and a survey of the role of molecular processes in divertor plasmas. On the experimental side crossed-beam ion-ion collision-experiments for charge transfer, and storage-ring and EBIT measurements of ionization, excitation and dielectronic recombination cross-sections were presented, and atomic processes important for x-ray laser experiments and x-ray spectroscopy of astrophysical plasmas were described. The new method of plasma polarization spectroscopy was outlined. There was also a spectroscopic study of particle transport in JT-60U, new results for detached plasmas, and a sketch of the first hot plasma experiments with the Large Helical Device recently completed at NIFS. The 63 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  3. International human cooperation in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiba, Koreyuki; Kaieda, Keisuke; Makuuchi, Keizo; Takada, Kazuo; Nomura, Masayuki

    1997-01-01

    Rearing of talented persons in the area of nuclear energy is one of the important works in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. In this report, the present situations and future schedules of international human cooperation in this area wsere summarized. First, the recent activities of International Nuclear Technology Center were outlined in respect of international human cooperation. A study and training course which was started in cooperation with JICA and IAEA from the middle of eighties and the international nuclear safety seminar aiming at advancing the nuclear safety level of the world are now being put into practice. In addition, a study and training for rearing talented persons was started from 1996 to improve the nuclear safety level of the neighbouring countries. The activities of the nuclear research interchange system by Science and Technology Agency established in 1985 and Bilateral Co-operation Agreement from 1984 were explained and also various difficulties in the international cooperation were pointed out. (M.N.)

  4. Environment, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Environment and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  5. Earth sciences. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 May 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as A for Arabic, C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number

  6. Analytical quality control services of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suschny, O.

    1986-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency provides quality control services to analytical laboratories. These services which include the provision of reference materials and the organisation of intercomparisons are rendered for the purpose of assisting laboratories in determining the accuracy of their analytical work. The following classes of materials are presently available: nuclear materials, environmental materials, animal and plant materials, materials for biomedical studies and materials of marine origin. (orig.) [de

  7. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  8. Accessing photon number via an atomic time interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camparo, J.C.; Coffer, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    We show that Rabi resonances can be used to assess field strength in terms of time at the atomic level. Rabi resonances are enhancements in the amplitude of atomic population oscillations when the Rabi frequency, Ω, 'matches' a field-modulation frequency, ω m . We demonstrate that Ω=2κω m and find that κ=1.03±0.05. Since Ω is defined by field strength (i.e., photon number) through atomic constants, and ω m may be referenced to an atomic clock, our work shows that Rabi resonances provide a connection between time and photon number

  9. Direct experimental determination of the atomic structure at internal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Browning, N.D. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Illinois Univ., Chicago, IL (United States); Pennycook, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-07-01

    A crucial first step in understanding the effect that internal interfaces have on the properties of materials is the ability to determine the atomic structure at the interface. As interfaces can contain atomic disorder, dislocations, segregated impurities and interphases, sensitivity to all of these features is essential for complete experimental characterization. By combining Z-contrast imaging and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a dedicated scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), the ability to probe the structure, bonding and composition at interfaces with the necessary atomic resolution has been obtained. Experimental conditions can be controlled to provide, simultaneously, both incoherent imaging and spectroscopy. This enables interface structures observed in the image to be interpreted intuitively and the bonding in a specified atomic column to be probed directly by EELS. The bonding and structure information can then be correlated using bond-valence sum analysis to produce structural models. This technique is demonstrated for 25{degrees}, 36{degrees} and 67{degrees} symmetric and 45{degrees} and 25{degrees} asymmetric [001] tilt grain boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3} The structures of both types of boundary were found to contain partially occupied columns in the boundary plane. From these experimental results, a series of structural units were identified which could be combined, using continuity of gain boundary structure principles, to construct all [001] tilt boundaries in SrTiO{sub 3}. Using these models, the ability of this technique to address the issues of vacancies and dopant segregation at grain boundaries in electroceramics is discussed.

  10. PREFACE: XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orel, Ann; Starace, Anthony F.; Nikolić, Dragan; Berrah, Nora; Gorczyca, Thomas W.; Kamber, Emanuel Y.; Tanis, John A.

    2009-12-01

    The XXVIth International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions was held on the campus of Western Michigan University (WMU) in Kalamazoo during 22-28 July 2009. Kalamazoo, the home of a major state university amid pleasant surroundings, was a delightful place for the conference. The 473 scientific participants, 111 of whom were students, had many fruitful discussions and exchanges that contributed to the success of the conference. Participants from 43 countries made the conference truly international in scope. The 590 abstracts that were presented on the first four days formed the heart of the conference and provided ample opportunity for discussion. This change, allowing the conference to end with invited talks, was a departure from the format used at previous ICPEAC gatherings in which the conferences ended with a poster session. The abstracts were split almost equally between the three main conference areas, i.e., photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions, and the posters were distributed across the days of the conference so that approximately equal numbers of abstracts in the different areas were scheduled for each day. Of the total number of presented abstracts, 517 of these are included in this proceedings volume, the first time that abstracts have been published by ICPEAC. There were 5 plenary lectures covering the different areas of the conference: Paul Corkum (University of Ottawa) talked on attosecond physics with atoms and molecules, Serge Haroche (Collège de France) on non-destructive photon counting, Toshiyuki Azuma (Tokyo Metropolitan University) on resonant coherent excitation of highly-charged ions in crystals, Eva Lindroth (Stockholm University) on atomic structure effects, and Alfred Müller (Justus Liebig University) on resonance phenomena in electron- and photon-ion collisions. Two speakers gave very illuminating public lectures that drew many people from the local area, as well as conference participants: Patricia Dehmer

  11. Safeguards and legal matters 1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all currently valid sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards: Challenge and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Leonard S.

    2017-11-01

    This article provides a critical review of the nuclear accounting and inspection system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), known as "IAEA safeguards." The article focuses on the multiple challenges the Agency confronts in verifying that all nuclear activities in the countries under its safeguards system are being pursued for exclusively peaceful purposes. The principal challenges noted are those posed by: undeclared facilities, the development of enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, illicit procurement activities, denial of inspector access, difficulties in verifying absence of weaponization activities, and difficulties in establishing that all nuclear-relevant activities in a state are peaceful. The article is in the form of annotated PowerPoint briefing slides.

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number

  14. Earth sciences 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences issued during the period 1969-1994. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  15. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldschmidt, B [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, International Relations (France)

    1977-08-15

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA.

  16. The origins of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, B.

    1977-01-01

    On 23 October 1956 in New York, 81 member countries of the United Nations Organization or of its specialized agencies adopted the Statute of the International Atomic Energy Agency, which was to go into formal operation before the end of 1957. A major step towards world-wide control of nuclear energy thus came to be taken more than ten years after the idea of establishing such control had been launched - the first tentative efforts, from 1946 to 1948, having ended in failure. The account follows in an attempt to retrace this 'prehistory' of the IAEA

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities. September 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the most important activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency during the period September 1992 - September 1993, in particular in the following areas: (i) nuclear power; (ii) nuclear fuel cycle; (iii) radioactive waste management; (iv) comparative assessment of energy sources; (v) IAEA laboratory activities; (vi) nuclear applications in the food industry and in agriculture; (vii) human health applications of nuclear techniques, especially in the treatment and prevention of diseases and in the analysis of health problems related to the environment; (viii) industry and earth sciences; (ix) physical and chemical sciences; (x) radiation protection; (xi) safety of nuclear installations; (xii) safeguards and non-proliferation activities; (xiii) activities in the area of public and technical information such as the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and other IAEA computerized databases and reference systems, the publication Nuclear Fusion, a monthly scientific journal of articles on thermonuclear fusion research and development, and the organization of meetings on atomic energy; and (xiv) a description of the Agency's technical assistance activities, including financial data

  18. Nuclear energy and non proliferation. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooley, J.; Rauf, T.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in the prevention of the spread of nuclear weapons. The IAEA verifies States compliance with their non-proliferation commitments through the application of safeguards on their civilian nuclear programmes to ensure that they are being used solely for peaceful purposes. The IAEA safeguards have evolved in the course of five decades and have become an integral part of the international non-proliferation regime and the global security system. To continue to serve the international community, they need to continue to move with the times, especially in light of the renewed interest in nuclear energy. (Author)

  19. TRIGA International - History of Training Research Isotope production General Atomics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    TRIGA conceived at GA in 1956 by a distinguished group of scientists including Edward Teller and Freeman Dyson. First TRIGA reactor Mk-1 was commissioned on 3 may 1958 at G.A. Characteristic feature of TRIGA reactors is inherent safety: Sitting can be confinement or conventional building. TRIGA reactors are the most prevalent in the world: 67 reactors in 24 countries. Steady state powers up to 14 MWt, pulsing up to 22,000 MWt. To enlarge the scope of its manufactured products, CERCA engaged in a Joint Venture with General Atomics, and in July 1995 a new Company was founded: TRIGA INTERNATIONAL SAS (50% GA, 50% CERCA; Head Office: Paris (France); Sales offices: GA San Diego (Ca, USA) and CERCA Lyon (France); Manufacturing plant: CERCA Romans. General Atomics ID: founded in 1955 at San Diego, California, by General Dynamics; status: Privately held corporation; owners: Neal and Linden Blue; business: High technology research, design, manufacturing, and production for industry and Government in the U.S. and overseas; locations: U.S., Germany, Japan, Australia, Thailand, Morocco; employees: 5,000. TRIGA's ID: CERCA is a subsidiary of AREVA, born in November 05, 1957. Activities: fuel manufacture for research reactor, equipment and components for high-energy physics, radioactive sources and reference sources; plants locations: Romans and Pierrelatte (France); total strength: 180. Since the last five years TRIGA has manufactured and delivered more than 800 fuel elements with a door to door service. TRIGA International has the experience to manufacture all types of TRIGA fuel: standard fuel elements, instrumented fuel elements, fuel followed control rods, geometry: 37.3 mm (1.47 in.), 35.8 mm (1.4 in), 13 mm (0.5 in), chemical Composition: U w% 8.5, 12, 20, 30 and 45 w/o, erbium and no erbium. TRIGA International is on INL's approved vendor list (ISO 9000/NQA) and is ready to meet any TRIGA fuel needs either in the US or worldwide

  20. The fission time scale measured with an atomic clock

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kravchuk, VL; Wilschut, HW; Hunyadi, M; Kopecky, S; Lohner, H; Rogachevskiy, A; Siemssen, RH; Krasznahorkay, A; Hamilton, JH; Ramayya, AV; Carter, HK

    2003-01-01

    We present a new direct method of measuring the fission absolute time scale using an atomic clock based on the lifetime of a vacancy in the atomic K-shell. We studied the reaction Ne-20 + Th-232 -> O-16 + U-236* at 30 MeV/u. The excitation energy of about 115 MeV in such a reaction is in the range

  1. Ninth international symposium on hot atom chemistry. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    Abstracts of the papers presented at the Symposium are compiled. The topics considered were chemical dynamics of high energy reactions, hot atom chemistry in organic compounds of tritium, nitrogen, oxygen, and halogens, theory and chemical dynamics of hot atom reactions as determined by beam studies, solid state reactions of recoil atoms and implanted ions, hot atom chemistry in energy-related research, hot atom chemistry in inorganic compounds of oxygen and tritium, hot positronium chemistry, applied hot atom chemistry in labelling, chemical effects of radioactive decay, decay-induced reactions and excitation labelling, physical methods in hot atom chemistry, and hot atom reactions in radiation and stratospheric chemistry

  2. The international law and the pacific uses of the atomic energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mora, A.; Gutierrez, I.; Vargas, N.M.

    1992-01-01

    Contains information about: fundamental aspects of atomic energy; International Atomic Energy Agency; pacific uses of nuclear energy at national and international level; regulation for some risky activities in the pacific uses of radioactive materials; United Nations system for the secure use of atomic energy with pacific purposes; nuclear accidents; responsibility as fundamental element of nuclear law. 207 refs

  3. The International Atomic Energy Agency's activities in radiation medicine and cancer: promoting global health through diplomacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deatsch-Kratochvil, Amanda N; Pascual, Thomas Neil; Kesner, Adam; Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Chhem, Rethy K

    2013-02-01

    Global health has been an issue of seemingly low political importance in comparison with issues that have direct bearing on countries' national security. Recently, health has experienced a "political revolution" or a rise in political importance. Today, we face substantial global health challenges, from the spread of infectious disease, gaps in basic maternal and child health care, to the globalization of cancer. A recent estimate states that the "overall lifetime risk of developing cancer (both sexes) is expected to rise from more than one in three to one in two by 2015." These issues pose significant threats to international health security. To successfully combat these grave challenges, the international community must embrace and engage in global health diplomacy, defined by scholars Thomas Novotny and Vicanne Adams as a political activity aimed at improving global health, while at the same time maintaining and strengthening international relations. The IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) is an international organization with a unique mandate to "accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity throughout the world." This article discusses global health diplomacy, reviews the IAEA's program activities in human health by focusing on radiation medicine and cancer, and the peaceful applications of atomic energy within the context of global health diplomacy. Copyright © 2013 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. 7. International symposium. Ural atomic, Ural industrial. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    Books of abstracts of 7. International ecological symposium: Ural atomic, Ural industrial are presented in this collection. The reports are devoted to the real problems over the next directions: consequences of radiation accidents for environment and human population, problems of atomic industry and energetics, radiation monitoring, radiation protection on natural radioactivity. There are criteria for estimation of ecological and social systems state, factors formed human health, risks in this publication. The methods of systems analysis in ecology, medicine and social sphere, as well as methodology, ecological examination and reason of projects and objects are taken into account, complex analysis of condition or quality of territories, industrial centers and regions (ecology, health, economy, standard and quality of living) are made. The works of the Ural research institutes of Russian Academy of Sciences in decision of ecological problems are shown. Certain materials obtained during realization of contract: Estimation of priorities on prevention of environmental contamination on Middle Urals, financed by European Community (project ISTC-500-98) are exhibited in this publication [ru

  5. Proposal for the International Atomic Energy Agency Training Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Site has hosted similar activities, including both Hanford Summits I and II. The Hanford Summits were two-day televised events to discuss the commitment of the current Presidential administration to the environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. Public involvement and strategic issues established from Hanford Summit I include: Regulatory issues, training and education, economic development and partnership, and technology transfer. Hanford Summit II provided a summary of how Secretary of Energy O'Leary is proceeding on the above strategic issues. The DOE and Westinghouse School for Environmental Excellence frequently offers a six-week course for environmental professionals and workers. Approximately thirty to forty individuals attend the training course, which provides training in environmental regulation compliance. The Hanford Site has hosted two previous International Atomic Energy Agency training courses. The courses lasted two weeks and had approximately eight to ten participants. Nuclear Material Management and Neutron Monitoring were the courses hosted by the Hanford Site

  6. Atomics International environmental monitoring and facility effluent annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.D.

    1977-01-01

    Environmental and facility effluent radioactivity monitoring at Atomics International (AI) is performend by the Radiation and Nuclear Safety Unit of the Health, Safety, and Radiation Services Department. Soil, vegetation, and surface water are routinely sampled to a distance of 10 miles from AI sites. Continuous ambient air sampling and thermoluminescent dosimetry are performed on site for monitoring airborne radioactivity and site ambient radiation levels. Radioactivity in effluents discharged to the atmosphere from AI facilities is continuously sampled and monitored to ensure that levels released to unrestricted areas are within appropriate limits, and to identify processes which may require additional engineering safeguards to minimize radioactivity levels in such effluents. In addition, selected nonradioactive constituents in surface water discharged to unrestricted areas are determined. This report summarizes and discusses monitoring results for 1976. The results of a special soil plutonium survey performed during the year are also summarized

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language.

  8. Optimal allocation of International Atomic Energy Agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-12-01

    The Safeguards Department of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to assure the peaceful use of a state's nuclear materials and facilities. Because of limited resources for conducting inspections, the careful disposition of inspection effort among these facilities is essential if the IAEA is to attain its safeguards goals. This report describes an optimization procedure for assigning an inspection effort to maximize attainment of IAEA goals. The procedure does not require quantitative estimates of safeguards effectiveness, material value, or facility importance. Instead, the optimization is based on qualitative, relative prioritizations of inspection activities and materials to be safeguarded. This allocation framework is applicable to an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  9. Safeguards and legal matters 1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters issued during the period 1970-1994. Most publications are published in English, through some are also available in French, Russian and Spanish. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language

  11. Atomic Stretch: Optimally bounded real-time stretching and beyond

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rasmus Ramsbøl; Nielsen, Jannik Boll

    2016-01-01

    Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color-modification, co......Atomic Stretch is a plugin for your preferred Adobe video editing tool, allowing real-time smooth and optimally bounded retarget-ting from and to any aspect ratio. The plugin allows preserving of high interest pixels through a protected region, attention redirection through color...

  12. International Nuclear Information System. 1988-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications and products of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 July 2002. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as E for English, F for French, G for German, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number. Some INIS Reference Series publications are available in electronic form from the INIS Clearinghouse. For more details on the INIS publications programme, please visit the INIS web site mentioned above

  13. Parity and time-reversal violation in nuclei and atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelberger, E.G.

    1986-01-01

    Two topics are briefly reviewed: the parity (P)-violating NN interaction and the time-reversal (T) and P-violating electric moments (EDM's) of atoms. The ΔI = 1 P-violating NN amplitude dominated by weak π +- exchange is found to be appreciably smaller than bag-model predictions. This may be a dynamical symmetry of flavor-conserving hadronic weak processes reminiscent of the ΔI = 1/2 rule in flavor-changing decays. General principles of experimental searches for atomic EDM's are discussed. Atomic EDM's are sensitive to electronic or nuclear EDM's and to a P-and-T-violating electron-quark interaction. Even though the experimental precision is still ∼10 4 times worse than counting statistics, the recent results have reached a sensitivity to nuclear EDM's which rivals that of the neutron EDM data. Further significant improvements can be expected

  14. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  15. Time reversal violating nuclear polarizability and atomic electric dipole moment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginges, J.S.M.; Flambaum, V.V.; Mititelu, G.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: We propose a nuclear mechanism which can induce an atomic electric dipole moment (EDM). The interaction of external electric E and magnetic H fields with nuclear electric and magnetic dipole moments, d and ,u, gives rise to an energy shift, U= -β ik E i H k , where β ik is the nuclear polarizability. Parity and time invariance violating (P,T-odd) nuclear forces generate a mixed P,T-odd nuclear polarizability, whereψ 0 and ψ n are P,T-odd perturbed ground and excited nuclear states, respectively. In the case of a heavy spherical nucleus with a single unpaired nucleon, the perturbed wavefunctions are U = -β ik E i H k , where ξis a constant proportional to the strength of the nuclear P,T-odd interaction, σ is the nuclear spin operator, and ψ n is an unperturbed wavefunction. There are both scalar and tensor contributions to the nuclear P,T-odd polarizability. An atomic EDM is induced by the interaction of the fields of an unpaired electron in an atom with the P,T-odd perturbed atomic nucleus. An estimate for the value of this EDM has been made. The measurements of atomic EDMs can provide information about P,T-odd nuclear forces and test models of CP-violation

  16. Optimal allocation of international atomic energy agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Each year the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to confirm that nuclear materials and facilities are employed for peaceful purposes. Because of limited inspection resources, however, the IAEA cannot fully attain its safeguards goals either quantitatively as measured by the inspection effort negotiated in the facility attachments or qualitatively as measured by the IAEA criteria for evaluating attainment of safeguards goals. Under current IAEA procedures the allocation of inspection resources assigns essentially equal inspection effort to facilities of the same type. An alternative approach would incorporate consideration of all material categories and facilities to be assigned inspection resources when allocating effort to a particular facility. One such method for allocating inspection resources is based on the IAEA criteria. The criteria provide a framework for allocating inspection effort that includes a ranking of material types according to their safeguards importance, an implicit definition of inspection activities for each material and facility type, and criteria for judging the attainment of safeguards goals in terms of the quality and frequency of these inspection activities. This framework is applicable to resource allocation for an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  17. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 59

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.; Bannister, M.E.; Fuhr, J.; Gilbody, H.B.

    2001-03-01

    The International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion is prepared by the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is distributed free of charge by the IAEA to assist in the development of fusion research and technology. In part 1, the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) is presented. In Part 2, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions and surface interactions. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references. Finally, the Author Index (part 4) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part 3

  18. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 58

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.; Bannister, M.E.; Fuhr, J.; Gilbody, H.B.

    2000-06-01

    The International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion is prepared by the Atomic and Molecular Data Unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency. It is distributed free of charge by the IAEA to assist in the development of fusion research and technology. In part 1, the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) is presented. In Part 2, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions and surface interactions. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references. Finally, the Author Index (part 4) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part 3

  19. A calculation of internal kinetic energy and polarizability of compressed argon from the statistical atom model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Seldam, C.A. ten; Groot, S.R. de

    1952-01-01

    From Jensen's and Gombás' modification of the statistical Thomas-Fermi atom model, a theory for compressed atoms is developed by changing the boundary conditions. Internal kinetic energy and polarizability of argon are calculated as functions of pressure. At 1000 atm. an internal kinetic energy of

  20. The Atomics International (AI) prototype large breeder reactor (PLBR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, J.S.; Campise, A.V.; Brunings, J.

    1978-01-01

    The AI-PLBR breeder plant design prepared for ERDA and EPRI is of 1000 MWe size, utilizing a loop-type sodium system configuration and producing 2200 psig/850 0 F steam. A 'bullseye' core geometry type sodium system configuration and is employed with Pu0 2 -UO 2 fuel and UO 2 fertile material. The reactor outlet coolant temperature is 930 0 F. A modified 'A'-frame refueling system is employed, which is capable of handling 1/3 of a core loading in 12 days. An inducer-type mechanical pump is used in the primary circuit because of its excellent NPSH characteristics. Hockey sticks steam generators are used to produce near-fossil steam conditions at the turbine throttle. The balance of plant (BOP) design was developed by the architectural-engineering firm of Burns and Roe. It includes Allis-Chalmers - KWU 1800-rpm tandem-compound turbine, selected with high-,intermediate-, and two double-flow low-pressure cylinders equipped with two moisture separator cyclones. A design feature to enhance the licensability of the reference design is the three-level Decay Heat Removal System (DHRS), which consists of normal, backup, and diverse decay heat removal paths. The Atomics International PLBR design illustrated the technical soundness of the LMFBR system for meeting the world's long-term electrical energy supply needs. The design includes design features to assure licensability and innovative engineering features to enhance reliability, constructability, economics, and U.S. utility grid compatibility. The design concept provides a sound basis for the future detailed design of a prototype plant and subsequent development of larger LMFBR plants. (author)

  1. International Nuclear Information System 1983-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). INIS was established in 1969 to announced the scientific literature published worldwide on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. All books are published in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 21 x 30 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated. In addition all books in this catalogue, except for the INIS Input Training Kit, are available on microfiche. For information on the microfiche versions, contact the INIS Clearinghouse of the IAEA

  2. Clean Floquet Time Crystals: Models and Realizations in Cold Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Biao; Wu, Ying-Hai; Liu, W. Vincent

    2018-03-01

    Time crystals, a phase showing spontaneous breaking of time-translation symmetry, has been an intriguing subject for systems far away from equilibrium. Recent experiments found such a phase in both the presence and the absence of localization, while in theories localization by disorder is usually assumed a priori. In this work, we point out that time crystals can generally exist in systems without disorder. A series of clean quasi-one-dimensional models under Floquet driving are proposed to demonstrate this unexpected result in principle. Robust time crystalline orders are found in the strongly interacting regime along with the emergent integrals of motion in the dynamical system, which can be characterized by level statistics and the out-of-time-ordered correlators. We propose two cold atom experimental schemes to realize the clean Floquet time crystals, one by making use of dipolar gases and another by synthetic dimensions.

  3. Topography and Mechanical Property Mapping of International Simple Glass Surfaces with Atomic Force Microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierce, Eric M [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative Nanomechanical Peak Force (PF-QNM) TappingModeTM atomic force microscopy measurements are presented for the first time on polished glass surfaces. The PF-QNM technique allows for topography and mechanical property information to be measured simultaneously at each pixel. Results for the international simple glass which represents a simplified version of SON68 glass suggests an average Young s modulus of 78.8 15.1 GPa is within the experimental error of the modulus measured for SON68 glass (83.6 2 GPa) with conventional approaches. Application of the PF-QNM technique will be extended to in situ glass corrosion experiments with the goal of gaining atomic-scale insights into altered layer development by exploiting the mechanical property differences that exist between silica gel (e.g., altered layer) and pristine glass surface.

  4. The Brazilian time and frequency atomic standards program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtaq Ahmed

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cesium atomic beam clocks have been the workhorse for many demanding applications in science and technology for the past four decades. Tests of the fundamental laws of physics and the search for minute changes in fundamental constants, the synchronization of telecommunication networks, and realization of the satellite-based global positioning system would not be possible without atomic clocks. The adoption of optical cooling and trapping techniques, has produced a major advance in atomic clock precision. Cold-atom fountain and compact cold-atom clocks have also been developed. Measurement precision of a few parts in 10(15 has been demonstrated for a cold-atom fountain clock. We present here an overview of the time and frequency metrology program based on cesium atoms under development at USP São Carlos. This activity consists of construction and characterization of atomic-beam, and several variations of cold-atom clocks. We discuss the basic working principles, construction, evaluation, and important applications of atomic clocks in the Brazilian program.Relógios atômicos de feixe de Césio têm sido a base para diversas aplicações em ciência e tecnologia nas últimas quatro décadas. Testes de leis fundamentais de física, buscas por mínimas variações em constantes fundamentais, sincronização de redes de telecomunicações e o funcionamento do sistema de posicionamento global, baseado em satélites de navegação, não seriam possíveis sem os relógios atômicos. A adoção de técnicas de aprisionamento e resfriamento ópticos tem permitido um grande avanço na precisão dos relógios atômicos. Chafarizes de átomos frios e relógios compactos de átomos frios também têm sido desenvolvidos. Precisões de medida de algumas partes em 1015 foram demonstradas para relógios do tipo chafariz de átomos frios. Apresentamos uma visão geral do programa de metrologia de tempo e freqüência baseado em átomos de césio, em

  5. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  6. Time-resolved production and detection of reactive atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.W.; Hurst, G.S.

    1977-09-01

    Cesium iodide in the presence of a buffer gas was dissociated with a pulsed ultraviolet laser, which will be referred to as the source laser. This created a population of atoms at a well defined time and in a compact, well defined volume. A second pulsed laser, with a beam that completely surrounded that of the first, photoionized the cesium after a known time delay. This laser will be referred to as the detector laser. It was determined that for short time delays, all of the cesium atoms were easily ionized. When focused, the source laser generated an extremely intense fluence. By accounting for the beam intensity profile it was shown that all of the molecules in the central portion of the beam can be dissociated and detected. Besides proving the feasibility of single-molecule detection, this enabled a determination of the absolute photodissociation cross section as a function of wavelength. Initial studies of the time decay of the cesium signal at low argon pressures indicated a non-exponential decay. This was consistent with a diffusion mechanism transporting cesium atoms out of the laser beam. Therefore, it was desired to conduct further experiments using a tightly focused source beam, passing along the axis of the detector beam. The theoretical behavior of this simple geometry accounting for diffusion and reaction is easily calculated. A diffusion coefficient can then be extracted by data fitting. If reactive decay is due to impurities constituting a fixed percentage of the buffer gas, then two-body reaction rates will scale linearly with pressure and three-body reaction rates will scale quadratically. Also, the diffusion coefficient will scale inversely with pressure. At low pressures it is conceivable that decay due to diffusion would be sufficiently rapid that all other processes can be neglected. Extraction of a diffusion coefficient would then be quite direct. Finally, study of the reaction of cesium and oxygen was undertaken

  7. An interface between the nuclear physics and the atomic physics; how to measure nuclear times observing atomic transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinho, A.G. de

    1985-01-01

    Recent observations are related in which processes resulting from the ionization in ion-atom collisions are observed in coincidence with nuclear processes (where the incidence ion nucleus hits the target atom nucleus). The delay introduced by the nuclear reaction contaminates the results of the atomic collision and manifest itself either in the X rays (positrons) emitted in the joined atom system or in the X rays (Auger electrons) emitted by separeted atoms, after the collision. Both effects serve to obtain information on the reaction times (in general much less then 10 -16 sec). Following this line, other experimental possibilities are discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  8. EON: software for long time simulations of atomic scale systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chill, Samuel T.; Welborn, Matthew; Terrell, Rye; Zhang, Liang; Berthet, Jean-Claude; Pedersen, Andreas; Jónsson, Hannes; Henkelman, Graeme

    2014-07-01

    The EON software is designed for simulations of the state-to-state evolution of atomic scale systems over timescales greatly exceeding that of direct classical dynamics. States are defined as collections of atomic configurations from which a minimization of the potential energy gives the same inherent structure. The time evolution is assumed to be governed by rare events, where transitions between states are uncorrelated and infrequent compared with the timescale of atomic vibrations. Several methods for calculating the state-to-state evolution have been implemented in EON, including parallel replica dynamics, hyperdynamics and adaptive kinetic Monte Carlo. Global optimization methods, including simulated annealing, basin hopping and minima hopping are also implemented. The software has a client/server architecture where the computationally intensive evaluations of the interatomic interactions are calculated on the client-side and the state-to-state evolution is managed by the server. The client supports optimization for different computer architectures to maximize computational efficiency. The server is written in Python so that developers have access to the high-level functionality without delving into the computationally intensive components. Communication between the server and clients is abstracted so that calculations can be deployed on a single machine, clusters using a queuing system, large parallel computers using a message passing interface, or within a distributed computing environment. A generic interface to the evaluation of the interatomic interactions is defined so that empirical potentials, such as in LAMMPS, and density functional theory as implemented in VASP and GPAW can be used interchangeably. Examples are given to demonstrate the range of systems that can be modeled, including surface diffusion and island ripening of adsorbed atoms on metal surfaces, molecular diffusion on the surface of ice and global structural optimization of nanoparticles.

  9. Some time dependent aspects of fast neutron induced atomic cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1976-01-01

    Analytical results are obtained for the time-energy distribution of neutrons and the associated displaced atoms slowing down in an amorphous medium according to a general force law. Explicit results are given for the inverse power law, and applications to hard-sphere and Coulomb scattering are discussed. Complete results are obtained for the steady state energy distribution of particles arising from a primary knock-on, and from a neutron initiated cascade. The speed of the slowing down process is assessed by calculating the slowing down time of particles. Two different concepts of slowing down time are discussed, one based upon a density average and the other on a slowing down density average. It is shown that the latter definition is physically more realistic and mathematically simpler. (author)

  10. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    1997-11-01

    The International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion is presented in four parts: 1) The Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA; 2) the indexed papers listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions; 3) all bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references; 4) the Author Index refers to the bibliographic references contained in Part 3

  11. International Work-Conference on Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Pomares, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents selected peer-reviewed contributions from The International Work-Conference on Time Series, ITISE 2015, held in Granada, Spain, July 1-3, 2015. It discusses topics in time series analysis and forecasting, advanced methods and online learning in time series, high-dimensional and complex/big data time series as well as forecasting in real problems. The International Work-Conferences on Time Series (ITISE) provide a forum for scientists, engineers, educators and students to discuss the latest ideas and implementations in the foundations, theory, models and applications in the field of time series analysis and forecasting. It focuses on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary research encompassing the disciplines of computer science, mathematics, statistics and econometrics.

  12. 12th international hot atom chemistry symposium, Balatonfuered, Hungary, 23-28 September 1984. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-08-01

    This proceedings contains the abstracts of 91 papers presented at the symposium. The majority of papers discusses various hot atom reactions and decay processes. A list of previous 11 international hot atom chemistry symposia from 1959 to 1982 is also given. One paper published in full length presents an overview of them (A.P. Wolf p. 89-89/b). (R.P.)

  13. The atom in international co-operation. Peace and progress through co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1965-01-01

    This issue describes the role of the IAEA in the context of international cooperation in bringing the benefits of atoms or nuclear energy in energy production, public health, water resources management and agriculture

  14. International Work-Conference on Time Series

    CERN Document Server

    Pomares, Héctor; Valenzuela, Olga

    2017-01-01

    This volume of selected and peer-reviewed contributions on the latest developments in time series analysis and forecasting updates the reader on topics such as analysis of irregularly sampled time series, multi-scale analysis of univariate and multivariate time series, linear and non-linear time series models, advanced time series forecasting methods, applications in time series analysis and forecasting, advanced methods and online learning in time series and high-dimensional and complex/big data time series. The contributions were originally presented at the International Work-Conference on Time Series, ITISE 2016, held in Granada, Spain, June 27-29, 2016. The series of ITISE conferences provides a forum for scientists, engineers, educators and students to discuss the latest ideas and implementations in the foundations, theory, models and applications in the field of time series analysis and forecasting.  It focuses on interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary rese arch encompassing the disciplines of comput...

  15. The influence of atomizer internal design and liquid physical properties on effervescent atomizing of coal-water slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Meng; Duan, Yufeng [Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China). Inst. of Thermal Engineering

    2013-07-01

    This study investigated the dependence of effervescent atomizing of coal-water slurry (CWS) on atomizer internal design and fluid properties. Results demonstrate that internal design of atomizer and fluid properties directly affect the two-phase flow pattern inside the atomizer which consequently affects the spray quality. The influence of mixing chamber length on spray quality is not significant at the ALR of 0.15 except for spray 0.75 glycerol/0.248 water/0.002 xanthan mixture. The same trend also found in the effect of angle of aeration holes at ALR of 0.15. Large diameter of the inclined aeration holes shows small SMD for water. The consistency index of fluids has no effect on the spray quality and Sauter Mean Diameter (SMD) increases when polymer additions were added to the glycerin-water mixture. The radial profile of SMD for spray water are almost flat, however, the largest SMD can be obtained at the edge of spray for three other fluids.

  16. Atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuchs, Alain; Villani, Cedric; Guthleben, Denis; Leduc, Michele; Brenner, Anastasios; Pouthas, Joel; Perrin, Jean

    2014-01-01

    Completed by recent contributions on various topics (atoms and the Brownian motion, the career of Jean Perrin, the evolution of atomic physics since Jean Perrin, relationship between scientific atomism and philosophical atomism), this book is a reprint of a book published at the beginning of the twentieth century in which the author addressed the relationship between atomic theory and chemistry (molecules, atoms, the Avogadro hypothesis, molecule structures, solutes, upper limits of molecular quantities), molecular agitation (molecule velocity, molecule rotation or vibration, molecular free range), the Brownian motion and emulsions (history and general features, statistical equilibrium of emulsions), the laws of the Brownian motion (Einstein's theory, experimental control), fluctuations (the theory of Smoluchowski), light and quanta (black body, extension of quantum theory), the electricity atom, the atom genesis and destruction (transmutations, atom counting)

  17. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 54-55

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    1998-12-01

    This bulletin is published by the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. In the first part the indexed papers are listed separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, polarizabilities, electric moments, interatomic potentials), (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions, electron collisions, heavy-particle collisions), and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering, chemical reactions, trapping and detrapping, adsorption, desorption, reflection, and secondary electron emission). There are also chapters with beam-matter interactions and data on interactions of atomic particles with fields. In the second Part contains the bibliographic data, essentially for the above listed topics

  18. The fifth international symposium ''atomic cluster collisions''. ISACC 2011. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Fifth International Symposium ''Atomic Cluster Collisions'' (ISACC 2011) will take place in July 21-25, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The venue of the meeting will be the St.-Michaels-Heim a lovely place located within a garden area of Berlin-Grunewald. The ISACC 2011 is organized by the Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max- Planck Society along with the King Saud University, Rhiyadh and by the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ISACC started as the international symposium on atomic cluster collisions in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2003. The second ISACC was held at the GSI, Darmstadt, Germany in 2007. Both first and second symposia were satellites of the International Conferences on Photonic Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC). The third ISACC has returned to St. Petersburg, Russia in 2008. The last ISACC took place in Ann Arbor, again as a satellite meeting of the ICPEAC. Initially the symposium was mainly focused on dynamics of atomic clusters, especially in atomic cluster collisions, but since then its scope has been widened significantly to include dynamics of nanosystems, biomolecules, and macromolecules with the emphasis on the similarity of numerous essential clustering phenomena arising in different branches of physics, chemistry, and biology. After the four ISACC meetings it has become clear that there is a need for an interdisciplinary conference covering a broad range of topics related to the Dynamics of Systems on a Nanoscale. Therefore in 2010 it was decided to expand upon this series of meetings with a new conference organized under the new title ''Dynamics of Systems on the Nanoscale'', the DySoN Conference, since this title better reflects the interdisciplinary character of the earlier ISACC meetings embracing all the topics of interest under a common theme. The first DySoN Conference took place in Rome, Italy in 2010. The fifth ISACC symposium will be again a satellite of the ICPEAC. The ISACC 2011 will

  19. Charge conjugation and internal space time symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavsic, M.; Recami, E.

    1982-01-01

    The relativistic framework in which fundamental particles are regarded as extended objects is adopted. Then it is shown than the geometrical operation which reflects the internal space time particle is equivalent to the operation C which inverts the sign of all its additive charges

  20. PREFACE: XXVIII International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC 2013)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Guoqing; Cai, Xiaohong; Ding, Dajun; Ma, Xinwen; Zhao, Yongtao

    2014-04-01

    The 28th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXVIII ICPEAC) was held by the Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (IMP) on 24-30 July, 2013 in Lanzhou, China. The 444 conference participants came from 37 countries and/or regions. Five plenary lectures, more than 80 progress reports and special reports had been arranged according to the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Meanwhile, more than 650 abstracts were selected as poster presentations. Before the conference, three highly distinguished scientists, Professor Joachim Burgdöorfer, Professor Hossein Sadeghpour and Professor Yasunori Yamazaki, presented tutorial lectures with the support of the IMP Branch of Youth Innovation Promotion Association, CAS (IMP-YIPA). During the conference, Professor Jianwei Pan from University of Sciences and Technology in China presented an enlightening public lecture on quantum communication. Furthermore, 2013 IUPAP Young Scientist Prize was awarded to Dr T Jahnke from Johann Wolfgang Goethe University of Germany. The Sheldon Datz Prize for an Outstanding Young Scientist Attending ICPEAC was awarded to Dr Diogo Almeida from University of Fribourg of Switzerland. As a biannual academic conference, ICPEAC is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, atomic, ionic, molecular, cluster collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to China for the very first time. IMP has been preparing the conference six years before, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXVIII ICPEAC in Lanzhou. This proceedings includes the papers of the two plenary lectures, 40 progress reports, 17 special reports and 337 posters, which were reviewed and revised according to the comments of the referees. The Local Organizing Committee would like to

  1. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1997-12-31

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs.

  2. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A

    1998-12-31

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs.

  3. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs

  4. The polarized atomic-beam target for the EDDA experiment and the time-reversal invariance test at COSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eversheim, P.D.; Altmeier, M.; Felden, O.

    1996-01-01

    For the the EDDA experiment, which was set up to measure the p-vector - p-vector excitation function during the acceleration ramp of the cooler synchrotron COSY at Juelich, a polarized atomic-beam target was designed regarding the restrictions imposed by the geometry of the EDDA detector. Later, when the time-reversal invariance experiment is to be performed, the EDDA detector will serve as efficient internal polarimeter and the source has to deliver tensor polarized deuterons. The modular design of this polarized atomic-beam target that allows to meet these conditions are discussed in comparison to other existing polarized atomic-beam targets. (orig.)

  5. The polarized atomic-beam target for the EDDA experiment and the time-reversal invariance test at COSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eversheim, P. D.; Altmeier, M.; Felden, O.

    1997-02-01

    For the the EDDA experiment, which was set up to measure the p¯-p¯ excitation function during the acceleration ramp of the cooler synchrotron COSY at Jülich, a polarized atomic-beam target was designed regarding the restrictions imposed by the geometry of the EDDA detector. Later, when the time-reversal invariance experiment is to be performed, the EDDA detector will serve as efficient internal polarimeter and the source has to deliver tensor polarized deuterons. The modular design of this polarized atomic-beam target that allows to meet these conditions will be discussed in comparison to other existing polarized atomic-beam targets.

  6. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero, J.

    1993-06-01

    The bulletin is published by the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. In Part I the indexed papers are listed separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths; transition probabilities, oscillator strengths; interatomic potentials); (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions; electron collisions; heavy-particle collisions; homonuclear sequences; isoelectronic sequences), and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering; chemical reactions; trapping and detrapping; surface damage; blistering, flaking; secondary electron emission). Part II contains the bibliographic data for the above listed topics and for high energy laser- and beam-matter interaction; interaction of atomic particles with fields. The atomic and molecular data needs in fusion research, as identified during the IAEA Consultants' Meeting on 'Atomic and Molecular Database for Hydrogen Recycling and Helium Exhaust from Fusion Reactors', June 1992, Vienna, are listed, covering (i) atomic and molecular collision processes, (ii) particle-surface interaction processes, and (iii) the status of data bases on atomic and molecular data and plasma-surface interactions. News on the ALADDIN (A labelled Atomic Data INterface) system is provided. Finally, a list of evaluated atomic and molecular data bases is provided

  7. Recent developments at the atomic and molecular data unit of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, R.E.H.; )

    2002-01-01

    The Atomic and Molecular (A+M) Data Unit of the IAEA main purpose is to establish and maintain databases in support of nuclear fusion energy research. This encompasses a very large number of processes in atomic, molecular, and plasma - material interaction physics. Recent improvements and additions to these databases are presented. A prototype search engine, which searches five different sites for radiative data and two sites for electron impact excitation and ionization data is introduced. It is available at the IAEA, Weizmann Institute and GAPHYOR web sites. Data on erosion materials produced by the Co-ordinated research project (CRP) 'Plasma-interaction induced erosion of fusion reactor materials' was evaluated, fitted to physically realistic forms for angle and energy dependence and the resulting fits were added to the online electronic database. In a CRP on radiative power losses in plasmas, many lenghtly modelling calculations were carried out. In addition to providing the calculated radiated power, effective ionisation and recombination rate coefficients were derived. These data were stored along with the populations of the ion stages as well as the total radiation from each ion stage. Thus, it is possible to use these data to interpolate in temperature and electron density to obtain the radiated power at an arbitrary temperature and density. A preliminary version of a new interface to the bibliographic database at the A+M Data unit was developed, it allows the user to search by author and/or keyword. The resulting references are displayed along with a link to the home page of the journal where possible. A code for calculation electron impact excitation cross sections using the so-called 'average approximation' and a version of the Hartree-Fock atomic structure code were installed in the unit and can be run through an interface at the web page. (nevyjel)

  8. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the field of nuclear power safety is growing. In the period since the Three Mile Island accident, a significant expansion in its nuclear safety programme has taken place. To assure an acceptable safety level world-wide, new emphasis is being placed on the major effort to establish and foster the use of a comprehensive set of internationally agreed safety standards for nuclear power plants. New initiatives are in progress to intensify international co-operative safety efforts through the exchange of information on safety-related operating occurrences, and through a more open sharing of safety research results. Emergency accident assistance lends itself to international co-operation and steps are being taken to establish an emergency assistance programme so the Agency can aid in co-ordinating a timely response to provide, at short notice, help and advice in case of a nuclear power accident. There has been some strengthening of those advisory services which involve missions of international experts primarily to countries with less developed nuclear power programmes, and in conjunction with the Technical Assistance Programme there is a co-ordinated programme for developing countries, involving safety training courses and assistance aimed at promoting an effective national regulatory programme in all countries using nuclear power. This paper discusses the major features of the IAEA activities in nuclear power plant safety. An understanding of the programme and its limitations is essential to its more effective use. Additional initiatives may still be proposed, but the possibilities for international and regional co-operation to assure an adequate level of safety world-wide already exist. (author)

  9. PREFACE: International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces (MPS2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancarani, Lorenzo Ugo

    2015-04-01

    This volume contains a collection of contributions from the invited speakers at the 2014 edition of the International Conference on Many Particle Spectroscopy of Atoms, Molecules, Clusters and Surfaces held in Metz, France, from 15th to 18th July 2014. This biennial conference alternates with the ICPEAC satellite International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics, and is concerned with experimental and theoretical studies of radiation interactions with matter. These include many-body and electron-electron correlation effects in excitation, and in single and multiple ionization of atoms, molecules, clusters and surfaces with various projectiles: electrons, photons and ions. More than 80 scientists, from 19 different countries around the world, came together to discuss the most recent progress on these topics. The scientific programme included 28 invited talks and a poster session extending over the three days of the meeting. Amongst the 51 posters, 11 have been selected and were advertised through short talks. Besides, Professor Nora Berrah gave a talk in memory of Professor Uwe Becker who sadly passed away shortly after co-chairing the previous edition of this conference. Financial support from the Institut Jean Barriol, Laboratoire SRSMC, Groupement de Recherche THEMS (CNRS), Ville de Metz, Metz Métropole, Conseil Général de la Moselle and Région Lorraine is gratefully acknowledged. Finally, I would like to thank the members of the local committee and the staff of the Université de Lorraine for making the conference run smoothly, the International Advisory Board for building up the scientific programme, the sessions chairpersons, those who gave their valuable time in carefully refereeing the articles of this volume and last, but not least, all participants for contributing to lively and fruitful discussions throughout the meeting.

  10. The International Atomic Energy Agency: activities and relationship with Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abud Osuna, Javier.

    1987-01-01

    Legal and political studies on the activities of the IAEA infer that the pacific uses of nuclear energy become more significant every day in the ambit of international relationships. The studies analyze as a whole relationships among member states. The first part is divided into four chapters, starting with the background and creation of the agency, its structure, statutes, amendments and the performance of its main organisms. It continues to describe mechanisms and programmes carried out, including cooperation agreements between the IAEA and other specialized organizations in the United Nations. It ends up with the IAEA performance resulting from different treaties. The second part examines Mexican norms on nuclear matter as well as relationships between Mexico and the IAEA. It demonstrates that achievements in the Agency have been possible because of the establishment of an international cooperation basis, which avoids duplicity of actions. The conclusions recommend joint efforts from both the developed and the developing countries in the following: a) to imbue public opinion with the goodness of nuclear energy; b) to discourage the construction and operation of nuclear installations; c) to unify national standards on nuclear safety and control; d) to decrease export restrictions, based on safeguards; e) to promote internal nuclear research in Mexico or throught regional integration agreements, with technical assistance and support from the IAEA. (author)

  11. FOREWORD: 4th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leckrone, David S.; Sugar, Jack

    1993-01-01

    In 1983 the Atomic Spectroscopy Group at the University of Lund organized a conference at Lund the purpose of which was to establish a dialogue between scientists whose research made use of basic atomic data, and scientists whose research produced such data. The data in question include complete descriptions of atomic and ionic spectra, accurate transition wavelengths and relative intensities, energy levels, lifetimes, oscillator strengths, line shapes, and nuclear effects (hyperfine structure and isotope shifts). The "consumers" in urgent need of new or improved atomic data included astrophysicsts, laboratory plasma physicists, and spectrochemists. The synergism between these specialists and the theoretical and experimental atomic physicists resulted in a highly successful meeting, attended by approximately 70 people. The rapid advances foreseen at that time in all of these areas of observational, experimental and theoretical science stimulated planning for a second conference on this subject in 1986 at the University of Toledo, and subsequently a third meeting was held at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences in Amsterdam in 1989. Again attendance at the latter two meetings totaled approximately 70 researchers. The participants in Amsterdam agreed to re-convene at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, in 1992, maintaining the frequency of these conferences at one every three years. The present Topical Issue of Physica Scripta consists of 31 invited reviews given at the Gaithersburg meeting. Extended abstracts of 63 poster papers from the meeting are being published in NIST Special Publication SP850. Approximately 170 scientists attended the Gaithersburg conference, representing a substantial growth in the size of meetings in this series. One session of the conference was devoted to an informal workshop, at which any participant could give a brief oral statement about his or her most immediate data need

  12. Development of an atomic clock on an atom chip: Optimisation of the coherence time and preliminary characterisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacroute, Clement

    2010-01-01

    We describe the construction and preliminary characterization of an atomic clock on an atom chip. A sample of magnetically trapped 87 Rb atoms is cooled below 1 μK, close to Bose- Einstein condensation temperature. The trapped states |F = 1; m F = -1> and |F = 2;m F = 1> define our two-photon clock transition. Atoms are trapped around a field B0 = 3.23 G, where the clock frequency is first-order insensitive to magnetic field fluctuations. We have designed an atom chip that includes a microwave coplanar waveguide which drives the 6.835 GHz transition. The whole clock cycle is performed in the vicinity of the chip surface, making the physics package compact (5 cm) 3 . We first describe the experimental setup of the clock, and the optical bench that has been developed and characterized during this thesis. We then give the results obtained for atom cooling, which led to obtaining a 3 10 4 atoms Bose-Einstein condensate. We finally present the results obtained by Ramsey spectroscopy of the clock transition. We measure coherence times exceeding 10 seconds with our setup, dominated by atom losses. A preliminary measurement shows that the clock relative frequency stability is of 6 10 -12 at 1 s, limited by technical noise. Our goal is to reach a stability in the low 10 -13 at 1 s, i.e. better than commercial clocks and competitive with today's best compact clocks. (author)

  13. Specifications of the International Atomic Energy Agency's international project on safety assessment driven radioactive waste management solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghannadi, M.; Asgharizadeh, F.; Assadi, M. R.

    2008-01-01

    Radioactive waste is produced in the generation of nuclear power and the production and use of radioactive materials in the industry, research, and medicine. The nuclear waste management facilities need to perform a safety assessment in order to ensure the safety of a facility. Nuclear safety assessment is a structured and systematic way of examining a proposed facility, process, operation and activity. In nuclear waste management point of view, safety assessment is a process which is used to evaluate the safety of radioactive waste management and disposal facilities. In this regard the International Atomic Energy Agency is planed to implement an international project with cooperation of some member states. The Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions Project is an international programme of work to examine international approaches to safety assessment in aspects of p redisposal r adioactive waste management, including waste conditioning and storage. This study is described the rationale, common aspects, scope, objectives, work plan and anticipated outcomes of the project with refer to International Atomic Energy Agency's documents, such as International Atomic Energy Agency's Safety Standards, as well as the Safety Assessment Driving Radioactive Waste Management Solutions project reports

  14. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 42-45

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero, J.

    1991-01-01

    The bulletin is published by the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. In Part I the indexed papers are listed separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths; transition probabilities, oscillator strengths; polarizabilities, electric moments; interatomic potentials); (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions; electro collisions; heavy-particle collisions; homonuclear sequences), and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering; trapping, detrapping; adsorption, desorption; surface damage; blistering, flaking; chemical reactions). Part II contains the bibliographic data for the above listed topics and for plasma composition and impurities; plasma heating, cooling and fuelling; fusion research of general interest; high energy laser- and beam-matter interaction; interaction of atomic particles with fields. A list of evaluated data bases on atomic and molecular collisions and on particle-surface interactions is also given

  15. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Rumble, J. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. The bulletin contains a list of references the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics for 1979. It contains an index to the contributed papers presented at the 11th International Conference on the Physics of Electronics and Atomic Collision (ICPEAC) held in Kyoto (Japan) in summer 1979

  16. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 52

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, J A [ed.

    1997-08-01

    This bulletin is published by the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. In part 1 the indexed papers are listed separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, interatomic potentials); (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions, electron collisions, heavy-particle collisions); and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering, chemical reactions, trapping and detrapping, adsorption, desorption, reflection, and secondary electron emission). Part 2 contains the bibliographic data, essentially for the above listed topics.

  17. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. Nos. 50-51

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero, J.; Stephens, J.A.

    1996-10-01

    This bulletin is published by the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. In part 1 the indexed papers are listed separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, polarizabilities, electric moments, interatomic potentials); (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions, electron collisions, heavy-particle collisions); and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering, chemical reactions, trapping and detrapping, adsorption, desorption, reflection, and secondary electron emission). Part 2 contains the bibliographic data, essentially for the above listed topics

  18. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.

    1997-08-01

    This bulletin is published by the International Atomic Energy Agency to provide atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. In part 1 the indexed papers are listed separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths, transition probabilities, oscillator strengths, interatomic potentials); (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions, electron collisions, heavy-particle collisions); and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering, chemical reactions, trapping and detrapping, adsorption, desorption, reflection, and secondary electron emission). Part 2 contains the bibliographic data, essentially for the above listed topics

  19. Atomic structures and compositions of internal interfaces. Progress report, September 1, 1991--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidman, D.N. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Merkle, K.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1992-03-01

    This research program addresses fundamental questions concerning the relationships between atomic structures and chemical compositions of metal/ceramic heterophase interfaces. The chemical composition profile across a Cu/MgO {l_brace}111{r_brace}-type heterophase interface, produced by the internal oxidation of a Cu(Mg) single phase alloy, is measured via atom-probe field-ion microscopy with a spatial resolution of 0.121 nm; this resolution is equal to the interplanar space of the {l_brace}222{r_brace} MgO planes. In particular, we demonstrate for the first time that the bonding across a Cu/MgO {l_brace}111{r_brace}-type heterophase interface, along a <111> direction common to both the Cu matrix and an MgO precipitate, has the sequence Cu{vert_bar}O{vert_bar}Mg{hor_ellipsis} and not Cu{vert_bar}Mg{vert_bar}O{hor_ellipsis}; this result is achieved without any deconvolution of the experimental data. Before determining this chemical sequence it was established, via high resolution electron microscopy, that the morphology of an MgO precipitate in a Cu matrix is an octahedron faceted on {l_brace}111{r_brace} planes with a cube-on-cube relationship between a precipitate and the matrix. First results are also presented for the Ni/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} interface; for this system selected area atom probe microscopy was used to analyze this interface; Cr{sub 2}O{sub 4} precipitates are located in a field-ion microscope tip and a precipitate is brought into the tip region via a highly controlled electropolishing technique.

  20. TimeSet: A computer program that accesses five atomic time services on two continents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakis, P. L.

    1993-01-01

    TimeSet is a shareware program for accessing digital time services by telephone. At its initial release, it was capable of capturing time signals only from the U.S. Naval Observatory to set a computer's clock. Later the ability to synchronize with the National Institute of Standards and Technology was added. Now, in Version 7.10, TimeSet is able to access three additional telephone time services in Europe - in Sweden, Austria, and Italy - making a total of five official services addressable by the program. A companion program, TimeGen, allows yet another source of telephone time data strings for callers equipped with TimeSet version 7.10. TimeGen synthesizes UTC time data strings in the Naval Observatory's format from an accurately set and maintained DOS computer clock, and transmits them to callers. This allows an unlimited number of 'freelance' time generating stations to be created. Timesetting from TimeGen is made feasible by the advent of Becker's RighTime, a shareware program that learns the drift characteristics of a computer's clock and continuously applies a correction to keep it accurate, and also brings .01 second resolution to the DOS clock. With clock regulation by RighTime and periodic update calls by the TimeGen station to an official time source via TimeSet, TimeGen offers the same degree of accuracy within the resolution of the computer clock as any official atomic time source.

  1. Neutron data compilation at the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Attree, P.M.; Byer, T.A.; Good, W.M.; Hjaerne, L.; Konshin, V.A.; Lorens, A.

    1968-03-01

    The paper describes the present status of the neutron data compilation center of the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, which is now in full operation. An outline i s given of the principles and objectives, the working routines, and the services available within the two-fold functions of the Unit: a) to promote cooperation and international neutron data exchange between the four major centers at Brookhaven, Saclay, Obninsk and Vienna, which share responsibilities in a geographical distribution of labour; b) to collect systematically the neutron data arising from countries in East Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, South and Central America and to offer certain services to these countries. A brief description of DASTAR, the DAta STorage And Retrieval system, and of CINDU, the data Catalog of the JAEA Nuclear Data Unit, is given. (author)

  2. Neutron data compilation at the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemmel, H D; Attree, P M; Byer, T A; Good, W M; Hjaerne, L; Konshin, V A; Lorens, A [Nuclear Data Unit, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    1968-03-15

    The paper describes the present status of the neutron data compilation center of the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, which is now in full operation. An outline i s given of the principles and objectives, the working routines, and the services available within the two-fold functions of the Unit: a) to promote cooperation and international neutron data exchange between the four major centers at Brookhaven, Saclay, Obninsk and Vienna, which share responsibilities in a geographical distribution of labour; b) to collect systematically the neutron data arising from countries in East Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, South and Central America and to offer certain services to these countries. A brief description of DASTAR, the DAta STorage And Retrieval system, and of CINDU, the data Catalog of the JAEA Nuclear Data Unit, is given. (author)

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Russian Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Chinese Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [French Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Arabic Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  7. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Spanish Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  8. Atom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auffray, J.P.

    1997-01-01

    The atom through centuries, has been imagined, described, explored, then accelerated, combined...But what happens truly inside the atom? And what are mechanisms who allow its stability? Physicist and historian of sciences, Jean-Paul Auffray explains that these questions are to the heart of the modern physics and it brings them a new lighting. (N.C.)

  9. The international atom: evolution of radiation control programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, F J

    2002-07-01

    Under the Atoms for Peace program, Turkey received a one MWt swimming pool reactor in 1962 that initiated a health physics program for the reactor and a Radiation Control Program (RCP) for the country's use of ionizing radiation. Today, over 13,000 radiation workers, concentrated in the medical field, provide improved medical care with 6,200 x-ray units, including 494 CAT scanners, 222 radioimmunoassay (RIA) labs and 42 radiotherapy centers. Industry has a large stake in the safe use of ionizing radiation with over 1,200 x-ray and gamma radiography and fluoroscopic units, 2,500 gauges in automated process control and five irradiators. A 48-person RCP staff oversees this expanded radiation use. One incident involving a spent 3.3 TBq (88 Ci) 60Co source resulted in 10 overexposures but no fatalities. Taiwan received a 1.6 MWt swimming pool reactor in 1961 and rapidly applied nuclear technology to the medical and industrial fields. Today, there are approximately 24,000 licensed radiation workers in nuclear power field, industry, medicine and academia. Four BWRs and two PWRs supply about 25% of the island's electrical power needs. One traumatic event galvanized the RCP when an undetermined amount of 60Co was accidentally incorporated into reinforcing bars, which in turn were incorporated into residential and commercial buildings. Public exposures were estimated to range up to 15 mSv (1.3 rem) per annum. There were no reported ill effects, except possibly psychological, to date. The RCP now has instituted stringent control measures to ensure radiation-free dwellings and work places. Albania's RCP is described as it evolved since 1972. Regulations were promulgated which followed the IAEA Basic Safety Standards of that era. With 525 licenses and 600 radiation workers, the problem was not in the regulations per se but in their enforcement. The IAEA helped to upgrade the RCP as the economy evolved from one that was centrally planned economy to a free market economy. As this

  10. PREFACE: XXIX International Conference on Photonic, Electronic, and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, C.; Rabadán, I.; García, G.; Méndez, L.; Martín, F.

    2015-09-01

    The 29th International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (XXIX ICPEAC) was held at the Palacio de Congresos ''El Greco'', Toledo, Spain, on 22-28 July, 2015, and was organized by the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM) and the Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC). ICPEAC is held biannually and is one of the most important international conferences on atomic and molecular physics. The topic of the conference covers the recent progresses in photonic, electronic, and atomic collisions with matter. With a history back to 1958, ICPEAC came to Spain in 2015 for the very first time. UAM and CSIC had been preparing the conference for six years, ever since the ICPEAC International General Committee made the decision to hold the XXIX ICPEAC in Toledo. The conference gathered 670 participants from 52 countries and attracted 854 contributed papers for presentation in poster sessions. Among the latter, 754 are presented in issues 2-12 of this volume of the Journal of Physics Conference Series. In addition, five plenary lectures, including the opening one by the Nobel laureate Prof. Ahmed H. Zewail and the lectures by Prof. Maciej Lewenstein, Prof. Paul Scheier, Prof. Philip H. Bucksbaum, and Prof. Stephen J. Buckman, 62 progress reports and 26 special reports were presented following the decision of the ICPEAC International General Committee. Detailed write-ups of most of the latter are presented in issue 1 of this volume, constituting a comprehensive tangible record of the meeting. On the occasion of the International Year of Light (IYL2015) and with the support of the Fundación Española para la Ciencia y la Tecnología (FECYT), the program was completed with two public lectures delivered by the Nobel laureate Prof. Serge Haroche and the Príncipe de Asturias laureate Prof. Pedro M. Echenique on, respectively, ''Fifty years of laser revolutions in physics'rquot; and ''The sublime usefulness of useless science''. Also a

  11. Internal Spin Control, Squeezing and Decoherence in Ensembles of Alkali Atomic Spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Leigh Morgan

    Large atomic ensembles interacting with light are one of the most promising platforms for quantum information processing. In the past decade, novel applications for these systems have emerged in quantum communication, quantum computing, and metrology. Essential to all of these applications is the controllability of the atomic ensemble, which is facilitated by a strong coupling between the atoms and light. Non-classical spin squeezed states are a crucial step in attaining greater ensemble control. The degree of entanglement present in these states, furthermore, serves as a benchmark for the strength of the atom-light interaction. Outside the broader context of quantum information processing with atomic ensembles, spin squeezed states have applications in metrology, where their quantum correlations can be harnessed to improve the precision of magnetometers and atomic clocks. This dissertation focuses upon the production of spin squeezed states in large ensembles of cold trapped alkali atoms interacting with optical fields. While most treatments of spin squeezing consider only the case in which the ensemble is composed of two level systems or qubits, we utilize the entire ground manifold of an alkali atom with hyperfine spin f greater than or equal to 1/2, a qudit. Spin squeezing requires non-classical correlations between the constituent atomic spins, which are generated through the atoms' collective coupling to the light. Either through measurement or multiple interactions with the atoms, the light mediates an entangling interaction that produces quantum correlations. Because the spin squeezing treated in this dissertation ultimately originates from the coupling between the light and atoms, conventional approaches of improving this squeezing have focused on increasing the optical density of the ensemble. The greater number of internal degrees of freedom and the controllability of the spin-f ground hyperfine manifold enable novel methods of enhancing squeezing. In

  12. New dimensions in nonproliferation -- An International Atomic Energy Agency view

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelland, B.

    1994-01-01

    Four years ago, Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait with the intention of annexing it as Iraq's 19th state. The disclosure of the Iraqi nuclear weapons program in the aftermath of the Gulf War--through the IAEA inspections--signaled the end of one proliferation era and the start of the next. In the author's remarks here, he has found it useful to identify four distinct proliferation eras, each with different features, each calling for different emphasis in international nonproliferation efforts. They provide a convenient way to look at the history of nonproliferation, and to look into the future and to the new dimensions in nonproliferation that are slowly emerging. Since the Gulf War, the nuclear world experienced a series of events of fundamental significance that changed the nature of nonproliferation, forcing changes in the mission of the IAEA and its methods. Certainly some of these events came in the form of unpleasant surprises, such as in Iraq, but very positive progress was also made on other fronts. He would like to share some perceptions of the events creating the present situation, and some views anticipating the requirements most likely to emerge in the coming years

  13. Agreements registered with the International Atomic Energy Agency. 11 ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The eleventh edition of Legal Series No. 3 contains agreements registered up to 31 December 1993. The book is divided into three parts. Part I consists of a chronological list, by date of entry into force, of all agreements registered with the Agency. Part II of the booked is devoted to six major multilateral agreements for which the Agency is depository. All these agreements are listed in Part I in the appropriate chronological order, but information relating to signatories and parties appears in Part II. Since this listing reflects the current, not historical, situations, it does not reflect countries which are no longer parties. Part III is the Country Annex, with an additional section including international organizations and other parties with whom the Agency has agreements. It gives a tabular, alphabetical presentation of information set out in Parts I and II, which may serve as an index to specific agreements and an overview of the types of agreements to which particular countries are party. For historical purposes, Part III reflects all countries, even those no longer existing, which were or are party to a specific agreement

  14. Time profile of harmonics generated by a single atom in a strong electromagnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoine, P.; Piraux, B.; Maquet, A.

    1995-01-01

    We show that the time profile of the harmonics emitted by a single atom exposed to a strong electromagnetic field may be obtained through a wavelet or a Gabor analysis of the acceleration of the atomic dipole. This analysis is extremely sensitive to the details of the dynamics and sheds some light on the competition between the atomic excitation or ionization processes and photon emission. For illustration we study the interaction of atomic hydrogen with an intense laser pulse

  15. PREFACE: 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Jim F.; Buckman, Steve; Bieske, Evan J.

    2009-09-01

    These proceedings arose from the 8th Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP) which was held at the University of Western Australia 24-28 November 2008. The history of AISAMP (Takayanagi and Matsuzawa 2002) recognizes its origin from the Japan-China meeting of 1985, and the first use of the name 'The First Asian International Seminar on Atomic and Molecular Physics (AISAMP)' in 1992. The initial attendees, Japan and China, were joined subsequently by scientists from Korea, Taiwan, India, Australia and recently by Malaysia, Thailand, Vietnam, Turkey Iran, UK and USA. The main purpose of the biennial AISAMP series is to create a wide forum for exchanging ideas and information among atomic and molecular scientists and to promote international collaboration. The scope of the AISAMP8 meeting included pure, strategic and applied research involving atomic and molecular structure and processes in all forms of matter and antimatter. For 2008 the AISAMP conference incorporated the Australian Atomic and Molecular Physics and Quantum Chemistry meeting. The topics for AISAMP8 embraced themes from earlier AISAMP meetings and reflected new interests, in atomic and molecular structures, spectroscopy and collisions; atomic and molecular physics with laser or synchrotron radiation; quantum information processing using atoms and molecules; atoms and molecules in surface physics, nanotechnology, biophysics, atmospheric physics and other interdisciplinary studies. The implementation of the AISAMP themes, as well as the international representation of research interests, is indicated both in the contents list of these published manuscripts as well as in the program for the meeting. Altogether, 184 presentations were made at the 8th AISAMP, including Invited Talks and Contributed Poster Presentations, of which 60 appear in the present Proceedings after review by expert referees in accordance with the usual practice of Journal of Physics: Conference Series of

  16. Effect of injector geometry on the performance of an internally mixed liquid atomizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kushari, A.

    2010-11-15

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the effect of injector's geometry on the performance of an internally mixed, air-assisted, liquid injector. In this type of injector a small amount of air is injected into a liquid stream within the injector. The interaction of the liquid with the atomizing air inside the injector induces atomization. The results presented in this paper show that the size of the droplets produced by the investigated injector decreases with a decrease in the air injection area. This is due to the increase in atomizing air injection velocity that accompanies the decrease in the air injection area, which improves atomization. This study also shows that the droplet sizes decrease with an increase in the injector's length, which is attributed to the increase in total interactive force. (author)

  17. 76 FR 58049 - Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Honeywell International, Inc.; Metropolis Works Uranium...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-19

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [Docket No. 40-3392-MLA; ASLBP No. 11-910-01-MLA-BD01] Atomic Safety and Licensing Board; Honeywell International, Inc.; Metropolis Works Uranium Conversion Facility... assurance for its Metropolis Works uranium conversion facility in Metropolis, Illinois. \\1\\ LBP-11-19, 74...

  18. The role of international atomic energy agency in maintaining nuclear safety competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.; Mazour, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides information how International Atomic Energy Agency can assist Member States in maintaining and developing nuclear safety competence. The topics covered include the development of safety standards, organisation of nuclear safety related conferences, provision of safety reviews, organisation of training courses and topical workshops and publication of training related documents. Usefulness of these activities for competence development is discussed. (author)

  19. Transport of radioactive material. 1994-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This document lists all sales publications, IAEA-TECDOC Series, Training Course Series and National Competent Authorities Lists of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the transport of radioactive materials during the period 1994-2002. It gives a short abstract and contents of these issues along with their costs in EURO

  20. Internationally Safeguarded Atomic Fuel Exchange Center for the Asian Pacific Basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selvaduray, G.; Anderson, R.N.; Goldstein, M.K.

    1979-01-01

    The concept of an Internationally Safeguarded Atomic Fuel Exchange Center (ISAFE) for the Asia-Pacific Basin is examined. The geography and nuclear capabilitiy of the countries that comprise the Asia-Pacific Basin is described in full length. The incentives and the limitations for the establishment of the ISAFE center in the Asia-Pacific Basin are discussed in detail. 34 refs

  1. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Food And Agriculture during the period 1980-1994. The major subjects covered include: food irradiation, insect and pest control, mutation plant breeding, plant biotechnology, soil fertility and irrigation, agrochemicals animal production and health

  2. Nuclear power. Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    This document lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, issued during the period 1990-2002. It gives a short abstract of these publications along with contents and their costs

  3. Interpretive Internalism In The Time Of Technoscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Ginev

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that scientific inquiry (1 creates its own cognitive autonomy within the interplay of research practices and possibilities for doing research, and (2 discloses, meaningfully articulates, and procedurally objectifies reality in a unique manner. Taken together, both claims characterize the position of hermeneutic realism which lays foundations for the radically anti-foundationalist hermeneutic philosophy of science. Claim (1 opens a subject of meta-epistemological studies aiming at a complementarity between a hermeneutic theory of the facticity of scientific inquiry as a mode of being and an epistemological theory that works out in its own terms the conditions for having science’s cognitive specificity, whereas claim (2 is a necessary presupposition for studying how reality becomes meaningfully articulated within scientific practices. The position of hermeneutic realism is on a par with the thesis of interpretive internalism stating that the cognitive autonomy of scientific inquiry is achieved through the openness of inquiry to its milieus. This openness consists in a selective assimilation of external themes, goals, tasks, and other items. The paper also deals with some socio-political consequences from the thesis of interpretive internalism. It is argued that only scientific inquiry freed from social monitoring and political control is able to serve societal needs, preventing at the same time a politically initiated scientification of societies, i.e. a scientification guided by dubious economic and political interests, and accomplished through sciences that are not able to preserve their cognitive autonomy, thereby becoming exposed to manipulation and misuse.

  4. Compact, Low-Power Atomic Time and Frequency Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    2007). This is consistent with other reports of survival of CSAC devices with thin polymide tethers to 500g ( Lutwak et al., 2007). • Humidity...InterPACK 󈧋 , July 8-12, 2007, Vancouver, British Columbia, CANADA Lutwak , R., et al., “The chip-scale atomic clock – prototype evaluation

  5. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1995-01-01

    President Eisenhower's ''Atoms for Peace'' speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency's scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs

  6. REAL-TIME OBJECT DETECTION IN PARALLEL THROUGH ATOMIC TRANSACTIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sivakumar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Object detection and tracking is important operation involved in embedded systems like video surveillance, Traffic monitoring, campus security system, machine vision applications and other areas. Detecting and tracking multiple objects in a video or image is challenging problem in machine vision and computer vision based embedded systems. Implementation of such a object detection and tracking systems are done in sequential way of processing and also it was implemented using hardware synthesize tools like verilog HDL with FPGA, achieves considerably lesser performance in speed and it does support lesser atomic transactions. There are many object detection and tracking algorithm were proposed and implemented, among them background subtraction is one of them. This paper proposes a implementation of detecting and tracking multiple objects based on background subtraction algorithm using java and .NET and also discuss about the architecture concept for object detection through atomic transactional, modern hardware synthesizes language called Bluespec.

  7. Atomics International fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program [contributed by T.A. Moss, AI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moss, T.A.

    1993-01-01

    The AI facility is approximately 30,000 square feet in area and consists of four general areas. One area is devoted to the production of UAl x powder. It consists of a series of arc melting furnaces, crushing lines, glove boxes, and compacting presses. The second area is used for the rolling of fuel plates. The third area is used for the machining of the plates to final size and also the machining of the fuel elements. In the fourth area the fuel plates are swaged into assemblies, and all welding and inspection operations are performed. As part of the lower enrichment program we are scheduled to put a second UAl x powder line into operation and we have had to expand some of our storage area. Under the low enrichment program the AI fuel facility will be modified to accommodate a separate low enrichment Al x production line and compacting line. This facility modification should be done by the end of the fiscal year. We anticipate producing fuel with an enrichment slightly less than 20% We anticipate powder being available for plate production shortly after the facility is completed. Atomics International is scheduled to conduct plate LEU verification work using fully enriched material in the June-July time period, at which time we will investigate what level of uranium loadings we can go to using the current process. It is anticipated that 55 volume percent uranium compound in our fuel form can be achieved

  8. A Realization of a Quasi-Random Walk for Atoms in Time-Dependent Optical Potentials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torsten Hinkel

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider the time dependent dynamics of an atom in a two-color pumped cavity, longitudinally through a side mirror and transversally via direct driving of the atomic dipole. The beating of the two driving frequencies leads to a time dependent effective optical potential that forces the atom into a non-trivial motion, strongly resembling a discrete random walk behavior between lattice sites. We provide both numerical and analytical analysis of such a quasi-random walk behavior.

  9. Development of the Science Data System for the International Space Station Cold Atom Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Harmelen, Chris; Soriano, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) is a facility that will enable scientists to study ultra-cold quantum gases in a microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) beginning in 2016. The primary science data for each experiment consists of two images taken in quick succession. The first image is of the trapped cold atoms and the second image is of the background. The two images are subtracted to obtain optical density. These raw Level 0 atom and background images are processed into the Level 1 optical density data product, and then into the Level 2 data products: atom number, Magneto-Optical Trap (MOT) lifetime, magnetic chip-trap atom lifetime, and condensate fraction. These products can also be used as diagnostics of the instrument health. With experiments being conducted for 8 hours every day, the amount of data being generated poses many technical challenges, such as downlinking and managing the required data volume. A parallel processing design is described, implemented, and benchmarked. In addition to optimizing the data pipeline, accuracy and speed in producing the Level 1 and 2 data products is key. Algorithms for feature recognition are explored, facilitating image cropping and accurate atom number calculations.

  10. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) detection or hot atom reaction product internal energy distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quick, C.R. Jr.; Moore, D.S.

    1983-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS) is being utilized to investigate the rovibrational energy distributions produced by reactive and nonreactive collisions of translationally hot atoms with simple molecules. Translationally hot H atoms are produced by ArF laser photolysis of HBr. Using CARS we have monitored, in a state-specific and time-resolved manner, rotational excitation of HBr (v = 0), vibrational excitation of HBr and H 2 , rovibrational excitation of H 2 produced by the reaction H + HBr → H 2 + Br, and Br atom production by photolysis of HBr

  11. Time evolution, Lamb shift, and emission spectra of spontaneous emission of two identical atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Dawei; Li Zhenghong; Zheng Hang; Zhu Shiyao

    2010-01-01

    A unitary transformation method is used to investigate the dynamic evolution of two multilevel atoms, in the basis of symmetric and antisymmetric states, with one atom being initially prepared in the first excited state and the other in the ground state. The unitary transformation guarantees that our calculations are based on the ground state of the atom-field system and the self-energy is subtracted at the beginning. The total Lamb shifts of the symmetric and antisymmetric states are divided into transformed shift and dynamic shift. The transformed shift is due to emitting and reabsorbing of virtual photons, by a single atom (nondynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (quasi-static shift). The dynamic shift is due to the emitting and reabsorbing of real photons, by a single atom (dynamic single atomic shift) and between the two atoms (dynamic interatomic shift). The emitting and reabsorbing of virtual and real photons between the two atoms result in the interatomic shift, which does not exist for the one-atom case. The spectra at the long-time limit are calculated. If the distance between the two atoms is shorter than or comparable to the wavelength, the strong coupling between the two atoms splits the spectrum into two peaks, one from the symmetric state and the other from the antisymmetric state. The origin of the red or blue shifts for the symmetric and antisymmetric states mainly lies in the negative or positive interaction energy between the two atoms. In the investigation of the short time evolution, we find the modification of the effective density of states by the interaction between two atoms can modulate the quantum Zeno and quantum anti-Zeno effects in the decays of the symmetric and antisymmetric states.

  12. Protocol Additional to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in France is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 22 September 1998. Pursuant to Article 16 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 30 April 2004, the date on which the Agency received written notification that the European Atomic Energy Community and France had met their respective internal requirements for entry into force

  13. The Iranian Atomic program - Energy- versus Safety policy? On the problem of international non-proliferation regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klimas, Mirko

    2007-01-01

    The Iranian atomic program: An important part of national energy policy or military way out of the international safety dilemma? In detail the author investigates - against background of Neorealism Theory - the coherences between international non-proliferation regimes - from Atoms for Peace program of the 1950 years up to actual measures of the IAEA - and the development of the Iranian atomic program. Off from superficial discussions on intentions of the Iranian government the book lightens the background of an international policy, which not only favours Iran during production of nuclear weapons as also invites the country to a military utilization of its atomic program. (orig./GL)

  14. Earth sciences: Uranium geology, exploration and mining, hydrology, 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with earth sciences and issued during the period of 1986-1996. These topics are mainly in the field of uranium geology, exploration and mining, isotope applications in hydrology, IAEA Yearbook 1996 on the developments in nuclear science and technology and meetings on atomic energy. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English but all of these papers have English abstracts. The prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings

  15. International comparison of methods to test the validity of dead-time and pile-up corrections for high-precision. gamma. -ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houtermans, H.; Schaerf, K.; Reichel, F. (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)); Debertin, K. (Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Braunschweig (Germany, F.R.))

    1983-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency organized an international comparison of methods applied in high-precision ..gamma..-ray spectrometry for the correction of dead-time and pile-up losses. Results of this comparison are reported and discussed.

  16. Bismuth as a general internal standard for lead in atomic absorption spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechlin, Marcos A.; Fortunato, Felipe M.; Ferreira, Edilene C.; Neto, José A. Gomes; Nóbrega, Joaquim A.; Donati, George L.; Jones, Bradley T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Single internal standard is commonly proposed for definite application in AAS. • Internal standard for general use in AAS techniques is original. • Bi showed efficiency as internal standard for Pb determinations by FAAS and GFAAS. • Assorted samples were analyzed and accurate results were found. - Abstract: Bismuth was evaluated as internal standard for Pb determination by line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS), high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) and line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (LS GFAAS). Analysis of samples containing different matrices indicated close relationship between Pb and Bi absorbances. Correlation coefficients of calibration curves built up by plotting A Pb /A Bi versus Pb concentration were higher than 0.9953 (FAAS) and higher than 0.9993 (GFAAS). Recoveries of Pb improved from 52–118% (without IS) to 97–109% (IS, LS FAAS); 74–231% (without IS) to 96–109% (IS, HR-CS FAAS); and 36–125% (without IS) to 96–110% (IS, LS GFAAS). The relative standard deviations (n = 12) were reduced from 0.6–9.2% (without IS) to 0.3–4.3% (IS, LS FAAS); 0.7–7.7% (without IS) to 0.1–4.0% (IS, HR-CS FAAS); and 2.1–13% (without IS) to 0.4–5.9% (IS, LS GFAAS)

  17. Scalar Aharonov–Bohm Phase in Ramsey Atom Interferometry under Time-Varying Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuo Morinaga

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In a Ramsey atom interferometer excited by two electromagnetic fields, if atoms are under a time-varying scalar potential during the interrogation time, the phase of the Ramsey fringes shifts owing to the scalar Aharonov–Bohm effect. The phase shift was precisely examined using a Ramsey atom interferometer with a two-photon Raman transition under the second-order Zeeman potential, and a formula for the phase shift was derived. Using the derived formula, the frequency shift due to the scalar Aharonov–Bohm effect in the frequency standards utilizing the Ramsey atom interferometer was discussed.

  18. Atomizer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fixed stereo electroacoustic music, included in Robert Voisey’s (Curator) VoxNovus 60×60 Dance, 60×60 2010 International Mix and 60×60 Sanguine Mix projects. Performed internationally, including Stratford Circus, London, UK. Full performance listings and press available online....

  19. Platinum atom location on the internal walls of nanocavities investigated by ion channeling analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinomura, A.; Williams, J.S.; Tsubouchi, N.; Horino, Y.

    2002-01-01

    Atomic locations of Pt trapped at hydrogen-induced cavities in Si have been investigated by ion channeling analysis. A Pt dose of 1x10 14 cm -2 , corresponding to a monolayer coverage of the internal walls of cavities, was implanted into cavity-containing samples. The gettering of Pt to the cavities was induced by annealing at 850 deg. C for 1 h. Clear channeling effects were observed in aligned and random backscattering spectra for the , and axes. Angular yield profiles for three crystalline axes exhibited dips with a narrowing of Pt signal half width compared with the Si matrix. Results suggested that the Pt atoms trapped at the cavities are closely aligned with the Si atomic strings bounding axial channels in Si

  20. Model for prioritization of regional strategies within the technical cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Pedro Maffia da

    2017-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Cooperation Program is the main mechanism through which services are provided to its member states to help them build, strengthen and maintain their capabilities in the safe use of nuclear technology in support of socio-economic development. The technical cooperation program operates in four geographical regions, each regional program helps Member States to meet their specific needs, taking into account existing capacities and different operating conditions. The technical cooperation regions are Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. Developing activities together with the technical cooperation program we have the Regional Cooperation Agreement for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean (ARCAL), which involves the majority of the members of the International Atomic Energy Agency of that region, for Technical Cooperation. All ARCAL's work is guided by the Regional Strategic Profile, which identifies the needs and problems of the region that require support projects. In the technical meeting of the Regional Strategic Profile, the needs and problems that are analyzed through indexes associated with severity, urgency, extension, relevance and difficulty are listed by different thematic areas. To these indexes, values are established by the technical staff on a continuous scale between 1 and 5. From these values an expression is used to arrive at a priority number for the needs and problems. In the face of many criticisms associated with similar approaches, such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and Timing, Trend and Impact Matrix, the aim of this thesis is to propose a methodological approach that can assist in the prioritization of investments of technical cooperation projects and programs that take into account the budget available and the technical and strategic visions of the parties involved. For this, the Probabilistic Composition

  1. Attosecond time delays in the photoionization of noble gas atoms studied in TDLDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magrakvelidze, Maia; Chakraborty, Himadri; Madjet, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    We perform time-dependent local density functional calculations of the quantum phase and time delays of valence photoionization of noble gas atoms. Results may be accessed by XUV-IR interferometric metrology. (paper)

  2. Improved spin squeezing of an atomic ensemble through internal state control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Daniel; Montano, Enrique; Deutsch, Ivan; Jessen, Poul

    2016-05-01

    Squeezing of collective atomic spins is typically generated by quantum backaction from a QND measurement of the relevant spin component. In this scenario the degree of squeezing is determined by the measurement resolution relative to the quantum projection noise (QPN) of a spin coherent state (SCS). Greater squeezing can be achieved through optimization of the 3D geometry of probe and atom cloud, or by placing the atoms in an optical cavity. We explore here a complementary strategy that relies on quantum control of the large internal spin available in alkali atoms such as Cs. Using a combination of rf and uw magnetic fields, we coherently map the internal spins in our ensemble from the SCS (| f = 4, m = 4>) to a ``cat'' state which is an equal superposition of | f = 4, m = 4>and | f = 4, m = -4>. This increases QPN by a factor of 2 f = 8 relative to the SCS, and therefore the amount of backaction and spin-spin entanglement produced by our QND measurement. In a final step, squeezing generated in the cat state basis can be mapped back to the SCS basis, where it corresponds to increased squeezing of the physical spin. Our experiments suggest that up to 8dB of metrologically useful squeezing can be generated in this way, compared to ~ 3 dB in an otherwise identical experiment starting from a SCS.

  3. The IAEA's WorldAtom Internet site: International news and information services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyd, D.R.

    2000-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) provides news and public information services via the Internet through its WorldAtom home page. The page is accessible at www.iaea.org/worldatom. Following are brief highlights of the items available on the site by clicking Press Centre, Reference Centre, or other links: Daily Press Review: Summaries of selected news items pertaining to global nuclear developments and the IAEA's work are provided each day, drawing upon a wide range of global media sources. IAEA NewsBriefs: Regularly featured are updates about IAEA activities related to areas of safety, technology transfer, and nuclear safeguards. Meetings and training courses: News about IAEA-sponsored symposia, seminars, and other meetings, as well as information about international meetings on atomic energy sponsored by other organizations, are updated on a daily basis. Press releases and statements: All IAEA press releases and media advisories since 1995 are accessible on the site. Topical and feature pages: In-depth coverage and links to information resources within and outside the IAEA are regularly given to selected topics of high international interest involving the IAEA. IAEA publications: listings and overviews of IAEA technical reports, safety standards, and other publications are updated as they are issued. Scientific and technical information: WorldAtom includes links (Reference Centre) to the International Nuclear Information System, IAEA's extensive bibliographic database of references and resources, to the nuclear database, and to departmental pages at IAEA that focus on IAEA programs and activities. IAEA documents: Electronic versions of official IAEA documents are added as they are issued. These documents include the texts and status lists of international conventions under IAEA auspices; IAEA information circulars to member states; IAEA annual reports (since 1995); and background reports and documents for the IAEA General Conference related to

  4. International Conference on the Interaction of atoms, molecules and plasmas with intense ultrashort laser pulses. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    International Conference on the Interaction of atoms, molecules and plasmas with intense ultrashort laser pulses was held in Hungary in 2006. This conference which joined the ULTRA COST activity ('Laser-matter interactions with ultra-short pulses, high-frequency pulses and ultra-intense pulses. From attophysics to petawatt physics') and the XTRA ('Ultrashort XUV Pulses for Time-Resolved and Non-Linear Applications') Marie-Curie Research Training Network, intends to offer a possibility to the members of both of these activities to exchange ideas on recent theoretical and experimental results on the interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with matter giving a broad view from theoretical models to practical and technical applications. Ultrashort laser pulses reaching extra high intensities open new windows to obtain information about molecular and atomic processes. These pulses are even able to penetrate into atomic scalelengths not only by generating particles of ultrahigh energy but also inside the spatial and temporal atomic scalelengths. New regimes of laser-matter interaction were opened in the last decade with an increasing number of laboratories and researchers in these fields. (S.I.)

  5. Atoms for peace - the time is now for India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grandey, Gerald W.

    2009-01-01

    When Dwight D. Eisenhower addressed the United Nations General Assembly back in 1953, he spoke passionately about his dream to bring peaceful uses of atomic energy to a post-war world. He encouraged the developed world to dedicate some of their strength 'to serve the needs rather than the fears of mankind'. Like many visionaries, Eisenhower did not see that dream fully realized in his lifetime as the Cold War and market forces combined to stall its progress for more than 20 years. Today, with the resurgence of nuclear as a clean, green technology in an energy-starved world, we have an opportunity to finish what Eisenhower started. Key to this process will be engaging the developing world - where billions of the world's most poor desperately need the benefits that nuclear can provide. India - with a population of over a billion people and an insatiable appetite for energy - has a good start down this path

  6. IAEA technical documents (TECDOCs) 1992-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all technical documents (TECDOCs) of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all documents in numerical order, starting with the most recent publication. The second part lists all documents by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  7. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State

  8. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter

  9. 6th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research

    CERN Document Server

    Błaszczak, Z; Marinova, K; LASER 2004

    2006-01-01

    6th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research, LASER 2004, held in Poznan, Poland, 24-27 May, 2004 Researchers and graduate students interested in the Mössbauer Effect and its applications will find this volume indispensable. The volume presents the most recent developments in the methodology of Mössbauer spectroscopy. Reprinted from Hyperfine Interactions (HYPE) Volume 162, 1-4

  10. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1959-08-17

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State.

  11. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [ru

  12. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [fr

  13. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications, including technical documents (TECDOCs), of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all sales publications in alphabetical order by subject category whereas the second part lists all TECDOCs in alphabetical order by subject category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  14. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications, including technical documents (TECDOCs), of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all sales publications in alphabetical order by subject category whereas the second part lists all TECDOCs in alphabetical order by subject category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages.

  15. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management, 1986-1999. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1999. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  16. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [es

  17. Nuclear and radiological safety 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear and Radiological Safety issued during the period 1980-1994. The following aspects are covered: Uranium mining and milling, Fuel fabrication and storage, Nuclear power plants, Research reactors, Radiation sources and accelerators, Transport of radioactive materials, Waste repositories, Radiation protection, Accident response, Radioactive waste management, Safety analysis, Quality management, Legal and governmental aspects

  18. International dose assurance service programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    In order to execute normalization of high-doses on an international scale and to further promote dosimetry as quality control measures in radiation processing, the International Dose Assurance Service (IDAS) has recently been initiated in the framework of a high-dose standardization programme. IDAS is being provided on the basis of an ''Agreement Concerning the Provision of a Dose Assurance Service by the IAEA to Irradiation Facilities in its Member States''. The aim of the IDAS programme will be to meet stringent requirements for standardization of dosimetry, and to achieve concerted international efforts for quality assurance of radiation processing. Details of the programme and the achievements made to date are discussed. (author). 5 refs

  19. Internal exposure profile of occupational workers of a BWR type atomic power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegde, A.G.; Bhat, I.S.

    1979-01-01

    The internal exposure profile of major radionuclides, for Tarapur Atomic Power Station (India) occupational staff for the last 9 years (1970-1978) of station operation, is presented. This power station has two boiling water reactor units. The occupational staff were monitored for internal exposure with the whole body counter. It has been observed that 60 Co, 134 Cs and 137 Cs are major contaminants. The highest yearly average of internal exposure was less than 1% of maximum permissible body burden recommended by ICRP. Depending on the nature of exposures the power station employees were classified under four different groups, (i) maintenance, (ii) operations, (iii) techanical and (iv) non-technical. This study revealed that maintenance group had highest incidence of internal exposure among these. It is also observed that contribution of 60 Co is maximum in the exposure of this group. (B.G.W.)

  20. Theoretical expression of the internal conversion coefficient of a M1 transition between two atomic states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Attallah, F.; Chemin, J.F.; Scheurer, J.N.; Karpeshin, F.; Harston, M.

    1997-01-01

    We have established a general relation for the expression of the internal conversion of an M 1 transition a 1s electronic state to an empty ns electronic bound state. Under the hypothesis that the density of the electron level ρ n satisfies the condition ρ n Γ >> 1 (where Γ is the total width of the excited atomic state) a calculation in the first order gives a relation for the internal conversion coefficient.This relation shows that the internal conversion coefficient takes a resonant character when the nuclear energy transition is smaller than the binding energy of the 1s electron. An application of this relation to an M 1 transition in the case of the ion 125 T e with a charge state Q = 45 and an 1s electron binding energy E B 45 = 35.581 KeV gives the value for the internal conversion coefficient R = 5.7

  1. Watching the Solvation of Atoms in Liquids One Solvent Molecule at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg, Arthur E.; Glover, William J.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2010-06-01

    We use mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics simulations and ultrafast transient hole-burning spectroscopy to build a molecular-level picture of the motions of solvent molecules around Na atoms in liquid tetrahydrofuran. We find that even at room temperature, the solvation of Na atoms occurs in discrete steps, with the number of solvent molecules nearest the atom changing one at a time. This explains why the rate of solvent relaxation differs for different initial nonequilibrium states, and reveals how the solvent helps determine the identity of atomic species in liquids.

  2. Time-dependence and averaging techniques in atomic photoionization calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheibner, K.F.

    1984-01-01

    Two distinct problems in the development and application of averaging techniques to photoionization calculations are considered. The first part of the thesis is concerned with the specific problem of near-resonant three-photon ionization in hydrogen, a process for which no cross section exists. Effects of the inclusion of the laser pulse characteristics (both temporal and spatial) on the dynamics of the ionization probability and of the metastable state probability are examined. It is found, for example, that the ionization probability can decrease with increasing field intensity. The temporal profile of the laser pulse is found to affect the dynamics very little, whereas the spatial character of the pulse can affect the results drastically. In the second part of the thesis techniques are developed for calculating averaged cross sections directly without first calculating a detailed cross section. Techniques are developed whereby the detailed cross section never has to be calculated as an intermediate step, but rather, the averaged cross section is calculated directly. A variation of the moment technique and a new method based on the stabilization technique are applied successfully to atomic hydrogen and helium

  3. The Scales of Time, Length, Mass, Energy, and Other Fundamental Physical Quantities in the Atomic World and the Use of Atomic Units in Quantum Mechanical Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Boon K.; Li, Wai-Kee

    2011-01-01

    This article is divided into two parts. In the first part, the atomic unit (au) system is introduced and the scales of time, space (length), and speed, as well as those of mass and energy, in the atomic world are discussed. In the second part, the utility of atomic units in quantum mechanical and spectroscopic calculations is illustrated with…

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency use of facility calorimeters for safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McRae, L.P.; Delegard, C.H.; Hamilton, R.A.; Westsik, G.A.; Moriarty, T.F.; Lemaire, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is performing nuclear materials safeguards on an inventory of pure and scrap plutonium oxide powder materials held in Vault 3 of the Plutonium Finishing Plant, operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Company for the US Department of Energy at the Hanford Site in Washington State. The International Atomic Energy Agency uses qualitative and quantitative techniques to verify the presence and quantity of the nuclear materials under safeguards. The Agency uses weighing, sampling, and destructive analyses to obtain the most accurate verification measurements of containers of plutonium powders. In contrast, the plant operator generally uses non-destructive plutonium assay based on gamma spectrometry and calorimetry for its most accurate plutonium powder container measurements. Recent results have shown that the operator''s calorimeter system achieves measurement variabilities comparable with, or better than, the destructive analyses, particularly for scrap. The results are achieved more quickly and economically, with less waste and lower radiation exposure and contamination hazard, by calorimetry than by classical destructive analyses. Techniques, including authentication methods, are being jointly developed to permit use of the operator''s calorimeter system for international safeguards purposes. The authentication is to ensure the independence of, and to substantiate the validity of, calorimeter measurements for international safeguards. The authentication methods considered and being developed are discussed

  5. New prescription for traumatic times | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Those are the tough questions at the heart of the Trauma and Global Health Program, ... at McGill University's Douglas Mental Health University Institute in Montréal. ... While acknowledging the international community has good intentions in ...

  6. The International Atomic Energy Agency - Organization, Work and Services in Selected Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köteles, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    In an address to the 8th General Assembly of the United Nations (1953) the President of the United States suggested that Governments should begin to make joint contributions from their stockpiles of fissile materials to an international atomic energy agency which would be set up under the aegis of the United Nations. The fissile material so collected would be used to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind. Experts would be mobilized to apply atomic energy to the needs of agriculture, medicine and other peaceful purposes and a special effort would be made to provide abundant electrical energy in the power-starved areas of the world. This suggestion was taken up. A Statute which defines the structure and purpose of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was prepared by a group of nations and approved by a conference at the United Nations Headquarters in 1956. The Statute entered into force on 29 July 1957. The Agency's objectives, as defined in its Statute, are that it ''shall seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. It shall ensure, as far as it is able, that assistance provided by it or at its request or under its supervision or control is not used in such a way as to further any military purpose''. To attain these objectives, the IAEA is authorized ''to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world; and, if requested to do so, to act as an intermediary for the purposes of securing the performance of services or the supplying of materials, equipment, or facilities by one member of the Agency for another''; to ''... assemble and make available in an accessible form the [scientific] information made available to it...'' and furthermore ''to make provision, ... for materials, services, equipment, and facilities to meet the

  7. Imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry for determination of mercury in seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Bihan, Alain; Cabon, Jean-Yves; Deschamps, Laure; Giamarchi, Philippe

    2011-06-15

    In this study, direct determination of mercury at the nanogram per liter level in the complex seawater matrix by imaging time-resolved electrothermal atomization laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (ITR-ETA-LEAFS) is described. In the case of mercury, the use of a nonresonant line for fluorescence detection with only one laser excitation is not possible. For measurements at the 253.652 nm resonant line, scattering phenomena have been minimized by eliminating the simultaneous vaporization of salts and by using temporal resolution and the imaging mode of the camera. Electrothermal conditions (0.1 M oxalic acid as matrix modifier, low atomization temperature) have been optimized in order to suppress chemical interferences and to obtain a good separation of specific signal and seawater background signal. For ETA-LEAFS, a specific response has been obtained for Hg with the use of time resolution. Moreover, an important improvement of the detection limit has been obtained by selecting, from the furnace image, pixels collecting the lowest number of scattered photons. Using optimal experimental conditions, a detection limit of 10 ng L(-1) for 10 μL of sample, close to the lowest concentration level of total Hg in the open ocean, has been obtained.

  8. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 66, August 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Bannister, M.E.; Fuhr, J.; Gilbody, H.B.

    2007-08-01

    Information in this Bulletin is presented in four parts. The Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency is presented in Part 1. The indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions in Part 2. The structure and spectra indexation lines are grouped by process. The first column gives the process, the second one the reactants and then the character of the data contained (Th for theoretical, Ex for experimental, and E/T for both experimental and theoretical). The number in the last column is the reference number in Part 3 of the Bulletin. The atomic and molecular indexation lines are grouped by one collision partner (photon, electron or heavy particle). The first column gives the reactants, the second column gives the process, the third column gives the energy range with the appropriate units, and the last two columns are the same as in the structure and spectra indexation lines. The particle-surface interactions indexation lines are grouped by process. The first column gives the reactants, the second the energy range with the appropriate units, and the last two columns are the same as in the previous cases. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references. Those references which are indexed in Part 1 are identified by the repeated indexation lines. The Author Index (Part 4) refers to the bibliographic references contained in Part 3

  9. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 68, December 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.K.; Humbert, D.

    2009-12-01

    Information in this Bulletin is presented in four parts. The Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency is presented in Part 1. The indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions in Part 2. The structure and spectra index lines are grouped by process. The first column gives the reactants, the second one the process and then the character of the data contained (Th for theoretical, Ex for experimental, and E/T for both experimental and theoretical). The number in the last column is the reference number in Part 3 of the Bulletin. The atomic and molecular index lines are grouped by one collision partner (photon, electron or heavy particle). The first column gives the reactants, the second column gives the process, the third column gives the energy range with the appropriate units, and the last two columns are the same as in the structure and spectra index lines. The particle-surface interactions index lines are grouped by process. The first column gives the reactants, the second the energy range with the appropriate units, and the last two columns are the same as in the previous cases. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references. Those references which are indexed in Part 1 are identified by the repeated index lines. The Author Index (Part 4) refers to the bibliographic references contained in Part 3

  10. International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. No. 67, December 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.

    2008-12-01

    Information in this Bulletin is presented in four parts. The Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the International Atomic Energy Agency is presented in Part 1. The indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions in Part 2. The structure and spectra indexation lines are grouped by process. The first column gives the process, the second one the reactants and then the character of the data contained (Th for theoretical, Ex for experimental, and E/T for both experimental and theoretical). The number in the last column is the reference number in Part 3 of the Bulletin. The atomic and molecular indexation lines are grouped by one collision partner (photon, electron or heavy particle). The first column gives the reactants, the second column gives the process, the third column gives the energy range with the appropriate units, and the last two columns are the same as in the structure and spectra indexation lines. The particle-surface interactions indexation lines are grouped by process. The first column gives the reactants, the second the energy range with the appropriate units, and the last two columns are the same as in the previous cases. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references. Those references which are indexed in Part 1 are identified by the repeated indexation lines. The Author Index (Part 4) refers to the bibliographic references contained in Part 3.

  11. Time-dependent internal density functional theory formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme for self-bound systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Messud, Jeremie

    2009-01-01

    The stationary internal density functional theory (DFT) formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme are generalized to the time-dependent case. It is proven that, in the time-dependent case, the internal properties of a self-bound system (such as an atomic nuclei or a helium droplet) are all defined by the internal one-body density and the initial state. A time-dependent internal Kohn-Sham scheme is set up as a practical way to compute the internal density. The main difference from the traditional DFT formalism and Kohn-Sham scheme is the inclusion of the center-of-mass correlations in the functional.

  12. Determining Nuclear Fingerprints: Glove Boxes, Radiation Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentetzi, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In a nuclear laboratory, a glove box is a windowed, sealed container equipped with two flexible gloves that allow the user to manipulate nuclear materials from the outside in an ostensibly safe environment. As a routine laboratory device, it invites neglect from historians and storytellers of science. Yet, since especially the Gulf War, glove boxes have put the interdependence of science, diplomacy, and politics into clear relief. Standing at the intersection of history of science and international history, technological materials and devices such as the glove box can provide penetrating insight into the role of international diplomatic organizations to the global circulation and control of scientific knowledge. The focus here is on the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of time-dependent photoionization on interstellar pickup atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isenberg, P.A.; Lee, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    We present an analytical model for the density variations of interstellar pickup ions in the solar wind due to a time-dependent variation in the photoionization rate, our model predicts a pickup ion density enhancement lasting for a time of the order of the duration of the increase plus the solar wind convection time to the observation point. If the photoionization rate returns to its initial value, this enhancement is followed by a decreased pickup ion density resulting from a depleted interstellar neutral particle density. In the absence of further variations in the photoionization rate, the pickup ion density recovers on a time which scales as the radial position of the observation point divided by the inflow speed of the neutral particles. Gradual variations in the photoionization rate result in a pickup ion density which tends to track the ionization rate, though the density variations are smoothed and delayed in time due to the solar wind convection of ions picked up at points closer to the Sun. 27 refs., 4 figs

  14. Theory of the time orbiting potential (TOP) quadrupole magnetic trap for cold atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minogin, V.G.; Richmond, J.A.; Opat, G.I.

    1997-12-31

    An analytical theory of the time orbiting potential (TOP) quadrupole magnetic trap for cold atoms is developed. It is shown that the rotating magnetic filed used to create the time-average harmonic potential is responsible for the formation of quasi-energy states of an atom in the trap. It is found that the motion of an atom near the origin of the trap can be represented as consisting of slow motion in the effective potential and fast oscillations with small amplitude. Dipole, quadrupole and higher order atomic transitions between quasi-energy states are shown to be responsible for an additional effective potential for slow atomic motion which is proportional to the fourth power of the atomic co-ordinate. Eigenstates and eigenfunctions are used to calculate the co-ordinate distribution for a single atom. It is concluded that at low temperature the quantum statistical co-ordinate distribution for a single atom exhibits a narrow central peak due to the ground state population, together with relatively broad wings due to the excited state population. (authors). 20 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  15. Description of card input data and formats for the International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Smith, F.J.

    1979-05-01

    This document describes the input data and the corresponding format of the computer programme which is used by the Atomic and Molecular Unit of the IAEA for storing, compiling and retrieving numerical data and/or bibliographic information for publishing the International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion

  16. Communication of 23 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Ukraine to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a note verbale of 23 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Ukraine providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of Ukraine

  17. Communication of 31 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of South Africa to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a note verbale of 31 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of South Africa providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of South Africa

  18. Communication of 31 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of South Africa to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-12

    The Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a note verbale of 31 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of South Africa providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of South Africa.

  19. Communication of 28 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General has received a note verbale of 28 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of Croatia

  20. The Role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in a Response to Nuclear and Radiological Incidents and Emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buglova, E.; Baciu, F., E-mail: E.Buglova@iaea.org [International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Department of Nuclear Safety and Security, Wagramer Strasse 5, P.O. Box 100, 1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-10-15

    Full text: The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in a response to nuclear and radiological incidents and emergencies has been defined and further expanded through the IAEA Statute, the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency, the Convention on Physical Protection of Nuclear Material, IAEA safety standards, relevant decisions by Policy Making Organs of the IAEA, inter-agency agreements and other documents such as the IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. The IAEA Secretariat fulfils its roles through the Agency's Incident and Emergency System (IES) and the Incident and Emergency Centre (IEC). The IEC is the global focal point for international preparedness and response to nuclear and radiological safety or security related incidents, emergencies, threats or events of media interest and for coordination of International assistance. During a response the IEC performs and facilitates for Member States many specific functions which include: prompt notification; official information exchange; assessment of potential consequences; prognosis of emergency progression; provision, facilitation and coordination of International assistance; provision of timely, accurate and easily understandable public information; coordination of inter-agency response at the International level. Through officially designated contact points of Member States the IEC is able to communicate at any time with national authorities to ensure the prompt and successful sharing of information and resources. The IEC routinely performs internal exercising of all aspects of the IAEA response and in cooperation with Member States, the IAEA organizes and facilitates the conduct of large scale international exercises to practice cooperation and coordination. This presentation outlines in detail the specific functions of the IAEA IEC during a response. (author)

  1. Design optimization of twin-fluid atomizers with an internal mixing chamber for heavy fuel oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, German; Garcia, Juan Antonio; Barreras, Felix; Lozano, Antonio [LITEC, CSIC - Univ. Zaragoza, Maria de Luna 10, 50018 - Zaragoza (Spain); Lincheta, Eduardo [CECYEN, Universidad de Matanzas, Highway to Varadero, km 31/2, 44740 - Matanzas (Cuba)

    2009-02-15

    The present work is devoted to determine the magnitude of the main parameters that yield the optimum results for twin-fluid nozzles with an internal mixing chamber. The focus is placed on the study of the interaction of both air and liquid flows at the internal chamber and its effects on the resulting spray. To this end, some experiments have been performed for different air central channel diameters and liquid ports, as well as for several experimental conditions (air and liquid mass flow rates), in order to understand the influence of the flow conditions at the mixing chamber on the size of the droplets produced. It has been demonstrated that under certain experimental conditions the atomizing fluid discharged to the internal chamber is choked. The sonic condition is achieved for different air and liquid mass flow rates as a function of the air central channel diameter. It has also been obtained that to achieve the best results with moderate atomizing fluid flow rates, it is convenient to operate in choked conditions. This is an important result that will help in the optimum design of this type of nozzles. (author)

  2. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1995-12-01

    President Eisenhower`s ``Atoms for Peace`` speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency`s scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs.

  3. Strategies for real-time position control of a single atom in cavity QED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lynn, T W; Birnbaum, K; Kimble, H J

    2005-01-01

    Recent realizations of single-atom trapping and tracking in cavity QED open the door for feedback schemes which actively stabilize the motion of a single atom in real time. We present feedback algorithms for cooling the radial component of motion for a single atom trapped by strong coupling to single-photon fields in an optical cavity. Performance of various algorithms is studied through simulations of single-atom trajectories, with full dynamical and measurement noise included. Closed loop feedback algorithms compare favourably to open loop 'switching' analogues, demonstrating the importance of applying actual position information in real time. The high optical information rate in current experiments enables real-time tracking that approaches the standard quantum limit for broadband position measurements, suggesting that realistic active feedback schemes may reach a regime where measurement backaction appreciably alters the motional dynamics

  4. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B.

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter

  5. Sixteenth International Conference on the physics of electronic and atomic collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalgarno, A.; Freund, R.S.; Lubell, M.S.; Lucatorto, T.B. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report contains abstracts of papers on the following topics: photons, electron-atom collisions; electron-molecule collisions; electron-ion collisions; collisions involving exotic species; ion- atom collisions, ion-molecule or atom-molecule collisions; atom-atom collisions; ion-ion collisions; collisions involving rydberg atoms; field assisted collisions; collisions involving clusters and collisions involving condensed matter.

  6. Symposium on extension of life time of atomic energy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This symposium was held on November 18, 1987 in University of Tokyo under the sponsorship of Japan Welding Engineering Society. The papers were presented on the various problems on the examination of the extension of life time and the deterioration with the lapse of years of nuclear power plants, the data of corrosion fatigue strength in high temperature water and the controlling factors, the trend of the research on corrosion fatigue crack development in high temperature, high pressure water and future problems, long life corrosion fatigue characteristics and the method of estimating remaining life, the trend of the research on the neutron irradiation embrittlement of pressure vessels, the results of the property confirmation test on the strain aging of reactor pressure vessel materials, the evaluation of life time by probabilistic fracture mechanics, the radiation deterioration of electric wire coating and insulation materials, the deterioration of concrete structures with the lapse of years, and the detection of the deterioration with the lapse of years. (K.I.)

  7. Earth sciences uranium geology, exploration and mining, hydrology, 1986-1998. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This catalogue lists sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences issued during the period 1986-1998. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  8. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  9. Interactive Web-based Visualization of Atomic Position-time Series Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, S.; Karki, B. B.

    2017-12-01

    Extracting and interpreting the information contained in large sets of time-varying three dimensional positional data for the constituent atoms of simulated material is a challenging task. We have recently implemented a web-based visualization system to analyze the position-time series data extracted from the local or remote hosts. It involves a pre-processing step for data reduction, which involves skipping uninteresting parts of the data uniformly (at full atomic configuration level) or non-uniformly (at atomic species level or individual atom level). Atomic configuration snapshot is rendered using the ball-stick representation and can be animated by rendering successive configurations. The entire atomic dynamics can be captured as the trajectories by rendering the atomic positions at all time steps together as points. The trajectories can be manipulated at both species and atomic levels so that we can focus on one or more trajectories of interest, and can be also superimposed with the instantaneous atomic structure. The implementation was done using WebGL and Three.js for graphical rendering, HTML5 and Javascript for GUI, and Elasticsearch and JSON for data storage and retrieval within the Grails Framework. We have applied our visualization system to the simulation datatsets for proton-bearing forsterite (Mg2SiO4) - an abundant mineral of Earths upper mantle. Visualization reveals that protons (hydrogen ions) incorporated as interstitials are much more mobile than protons substituting the host Mg and Si cation sites. The proton diffusion appears to be anisotropic with high mobility along the x-direction, showing limited discrete jumps in other two directions.

  10. The Role of Atomic Energy in the Promotion of International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabi, I. I.

    1959-10-31

    A brief survey is presented of the international cooperation which made a success of the First Geneva Conference and which has initiated many international scientific meetings since that time. The policy of the United States in this respect is discussed. (J.S.R.)

  11. The effect of decaying atomic states on integral and time differential Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kankeleit, E.

    1975-01-01

    Moessbauer spectra for time dependent monopole interaction have been calculated for the case that the nuclear transition feeding the Moessbauer state excites an electric state of the atom. This is assumed to decay in a time comparable with the lifetime of the Moessbauer state. Spectra have been calculated for both time differential and integral experiments. (orig.) [de

  12. Bismuth as a general internal standard for lead in atomic absorption spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechlin, Marcos A; Fortunato, Felipe M; Ferreira, Edilene C; Gomes Neto, José A; Nóbrega, Joaquim A; Donati, George L; Jones, Bradley T

    2014-06-11

    Bismuth was evaluated as internal standard for Pb determination by line source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (LS FAAS), high-resolution continuum source flame atomic absorption spectrometry (HR-CS FAAS) and line source graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (LS GFAAS). Analysis of samples containing different matrices indicated close relationship between Pb and Bi absorbances. Correlation coefficients of calibration curves built up by plotting A(Pb)/A(Bi)versus Pb concentration were higher than 0.9953 (FAAS) and higher than 0.9993 (GFAAS). Recoveries of Pb improved from 52-118% (without IS) to 97-109% (IS, LS FAAS); 74-231% (without IS) to 96-109% (IS, HR-CS FAAS); and 36-125% (without IS) to 96-110% (IS, LS GFAAS). The relative standard deviations (n=12) were reduced from 0.6-9.2% (without IS) to 0.3-4.3% (IS, LS FAAS); 0.7-7.7% (without IS) to 0.1-4.0% (IS, HR-CS FAAS); and 2.1-13% (without IS) to 0.4-5.9% (IS, LS GFAAS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 2nd International School of Physics of Exotic Atoms "Ettore Majorana"

    CERN Document Server

    Duclos, J; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Torelli, Gabriele; Exotic atoms : fundamental interactions and structure of matter

    1980-01-01

    The second course of the International School on the Physics of Exotic Atoms took place at the "Ettore Majorana" Center for Scien­ tific Culture, Erice, Sicily, during the period from March 25 to April 5, 1979. It was attended by 40 participants from 23 insti­ tutes in 8 countries. The purpose of the course was to review the various aspects of the physics of exotic atoms, with particular emphasis on the re­ sults obtained in the last two years, i.e., after the first course of the School (Erice, April 24-30, 1977). The course dealt with two main topics, A) Exotic atoms and fundamental interactions and B) Applications to the study of the structure of matter. One of the aims of the course was to offer an opportunity for the exchange of experiences between scientists working in the two fields. In view of this, the lectures in the morning discussed the more general arguments in a common session, whereas the more specialized topics were treated in the afternoon, in two parallel sections. Section A was or...

  14. The fifth international symposium ''atomic cluster collisions''. ISACC 2011. Book of Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2011-07-01

    The Fifth International Symposium ''Atomic Cluster Collisions'' (ISACC 2011) will take place in July 21-25, 2011 in Berlin, Germany. The venue of the meeting will be the St.-Michaels-Heim a lovely place located within a garden area of Berlin-Grunewald. The ISACC 2011 is organized by the Fritz-Haber-Institute of the Max- Planck Society along with the King Saud University, Rhiyadh and by the Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies (FIAS), Frankfurt am Main, Germany. ISACC started as the international symposium on atomic cluster collisions in St. Petersburg, Russia in 2003. The second ISACC was held at the GSI, Darmstadt, Germany in 2007. Both first and second symposia were satellites of the International Conferences on Photonic Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC). The third ISACC has returned to St. Petersburg, Russia in 2008. The last ISACC took place in Ann Arbor, again as a satellite meeting of the ICPEAC. Initially the symposium was mainly focused on dynamics of atomic clusters, especially in atomic cluster collisions, but since then its scope has been widened significantly to include dynamics of nanosystems, biomolecules, and macromolecules with the emphasis on the similarity of numerous essential clustering phenomena arising in different branches of physics, chemistry, and biology. After the four ISACC meetings it has become clear that there is a need for an interdisciplinary conference covering a broad range of topics related to the Dynamics of Systems on a Nanoscale. Therefore in 2010 it was decided to expand upon this series of meetings with a new conference organized under the new title ''Dynamics of Systems on the Nanoscale'', the DySoN Conference, since this title better reflects the interdisciplinary character of the earlier ISACC meetings embracing all the topics of interest under a common theme. The first DySoN Conference took place in Rome, Italy in 2010. The fifth ISACC symposium will be again a

  15. Time-resolved and doppler-reduced laser spectroscopy on atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstroem, H.

    1991-10-01

    Radiative lifetimes have been studied in neutral boron, carbon, silicon and strontium, in singly ionized gadolinium and tantalum and in molecular carbon monoxide and C 2 . The time-resolved techniques were based either on pulsed lasers or pulse-modulated CW lasers. Several techniques have been utilized for the production of free atoms and ions such as evaporation into an atomic beam, sputtering in hollow cathodes and laser-produced plasmas. Hyperfine interactions in boron, copper and strontium have been examined using quantum beat spectroscopy, saturation spectroscopy and collimated atomic beam spectroscopy. Measurement techniques based on effusive hollow cathodes as well as laser produced plasmas in atomic physics have been developed. Investigations on laser produced plasmas using two colour beam deflection tomography for determination of electron densities have been performed. Finally, new possibilities for view-time-expansion in light-in-flight holography using mode-locked CW lasers have been demonstrated. (au)

  16. Attosecond Time Delay in Photoionization of Noble-Gas and Halogen Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-Wen Pi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafast processes are now accessible on the attosecond time scale due to the availability of ultrashort XUV laser pulses. Noble-gas and halogen atoms remain important targets due to their giant dipole resonance and Cooper minimum. Here, we calculate photoionization cross section, asymmetry parameter and Wigner time delay using the time-dependent local-density approximation (TDLDA, which includes the electron correlation effects. Our results are consistent with experimental data and other theoretical calculations. The asymmetry parameter provides an extra layer of access to the phase information of the photoionization processes. We find that halogen atoms bear a strong resemblance on cross section, asymmetry parameter and time delay to their noble-gas neighbors. Our predicted time delay should provide a guidance for future experiments on those atoms and related molecules.

  17. Time Zones, Shift Working and International Outsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuoka, Yuji; Fukushima, Marcelo

    2009-01-01

    We build a trade model with two identical countries located in different time zones and a monopolistically competitive sector of which production requires differentiated goods produced in two successive stages. We introduce shift working disutility and allow consumers to choose between day and night shifts. Shift working disutility raises the cost of night production and firms can reduce costs by “virtually” outsourcing foreign labor. We found that firms only outsource if relat...

  18. Cooperation Agreement. The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 October 2008 pursuant to Article 8

  19. Cooperation Agreement. The Text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 October 2008 pursuant to Article 8 [fr

  20. Cooperation Agreement. The Text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 October 2008 pursuant to Article 8

  1. Cooperation Agreement. The Text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 October 2008 pursuant to Article 8 [es

  2. Time-series observation of the spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells with atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han Dong; Ma Wanyun; Liao Fulong; Yeh Meiling; Ouyang Zhigang; Sun Yunxu

    2003-01-01

    The spreading out of microvessel endothelial cells plays a key role in angiogenesis and the post-injury healing of endothelial cells. In our study, a physical force applied with an atomic force microscopic (AFM) cantilever tip in contact mode partly broke the peripheral adhesion that just-confluent cultured rat cerebral microvessel endothelial cells had formed with basal structures and resulted in the cells actively withdrawing from the stimulated area. Time-series changes in cell extension were imaged using tapping mode AFM, in conjunction with total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy, intensified charge-coupled device and field emission scanning electron microscopy. We also interpreted phase images of living endothelial cells. The results showed that formation of a fibronectin molecule monolayer is key to the spreading out of the cells. Lamellipods as well as filopods would spread out in temporal and spatial distribution following the formation of fibronectin layer. In addition, a lattice-like meshwork of filopods formed in the regions leading lamellipods, which would possibly provide a fulcrum for the filaments of the cytoskeleton within the leading cell body periphery

  3. Time-Dependent Close-Coupling Methods for Electron-Atom/Molecule Scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colgan, James

    2014-01-01

    The time-dependent close-coupling (TDCC) method centers on an accurate representation of the interaction between two outgoing electrons moving in the presence of a Coulomb field. It has been extensively applied to many problems of electrons, photons, and ions scattering from light atomic targets. Theoretical Description: The TDCC method centers on a solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for two interacting electrons. The advantages of a time-dependent approach are two-fold; one treats the electron-electron interaction essentially in an exact manner (within numerical accuracy) and a time-dependent approach avoids the difficult boundary condition encountered when two free electrons move in a Coulomb field (the classic three-body Coulomb problem). The TDCC method has been applied to many fundamental atomic collision processes, including photon-, electron- and ion-impact ionization of light atoms. For application to electron-impact ionization of atomic systems, one decomposes the two-electron wavefunction in a partial wave expansion and represents the subsequent two-electron radial wavefunctions on a numerical lattice. The number of partial waves required to converge the ionization process depends on the energy of the incoming electron wavepacket and on the ionization threshold of the target atom or ion.

  4. Participation of Czechoslovakia in the beginnings of international cooperation on peaceful use of atomic energy (IAEA, UNSCEAR, ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesinska, E.

    2006-01-01

    The former Czechoslovakia, as a producer or natural uranium and a country heading to construction of nuclear power stations, took an active part in the establishment of international cooperation in peaceful use of atomic energy in the mid-1950s. Its 17-member delegation attended the 1 st International Conference on Peaceful Use of Atomic Energy in Geneva in August 1955. Czechoslovakia was invited to work of the twelve countries on the final draft of the International Atomic Energy Agency Statutes in 1956, it became a member of the IAEA Board of Governors (alternating with Poland), and the first Czechoslovak Governor P. Winkler was elected President of the Board in 1957. Czechoslovakia also was one of the fifteen countries designated to the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation in 1955. Besides, Czechoslovak specialists participated actively in the work of committees of the International Commission on Radiological Protection for many years. Involvement in the international cooperation on peaceful use of atomic energy represented for Czechoslovakia obligations as well as stimuli to the national development of nuclear fields, including radiobiology. (author)

  5. A polarized hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source for internal target experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szczerba, D.; Buuren, L.D. van; Brand, J.F.J. van den; Bulten, H.J.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Klous, S.; Kolster, H.; Lang, J.; Mul, F.; Poolman, H.R.; Simani, M.C.

    2000-01-01

    A high-brightness hydrogen/deuterium atomic beam source is presented. The apparatus, previously used in electron scattering experiments with tensor-polarized deuterium (Ferro-Luzzi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77 (1996) 2630; van den Brand et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78 (1997) 1235; Zhou et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1998) 687; Bouwhuis et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 82 (1999) 3755), was configured as a source for internal target experiments to measure single- and double-polarization observables, with either polarized hydrogen or vector/tensor polarized deuterium. The atomic beam intensity was enhanced by a factor of ∼2.5 by optimizing the Stern-Gerlach focusing system using high tip-field (∼1.5 T) rare-earth permanent magnets, and by increasing the pumping speed in the beam-formation chamber. Fluxes of (5.9±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s were measured in a diameter 12 mmx122 mm compression tube with its entrance at a distance of 27 cm from the last focusing element. The total output flux amounted to (7.6±0.2)x10 16 1 H/s

  6. Proceedings of the International Conference on Applications of High Precision Atomic and Nuclear Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olariu, Agata; Stenstroem, Kristina; Hellborg, Ragnar

    2005-01-01

    This volume presents the Proceedings of the International Conference on Applications of High Precision Atomic and Nuclear Methods, held in Neptun, Romania from 2nd to 6th of September 2002. The conference was organized by The Center of Excellence of the European Commission: Inter-Disciplinary Research and Applications based on Nuclear and Atomic Physics (IDRANAP) from Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, IFIN-HH, Bucharest-Magurele, Romania. The meeting gathered 66 participants from 25 different laboratories in 11 countries, namely: Belgium, Bulgaria, France, Germany, Hungary, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia and Sweden. Non European delegate came from Japan. The topics covered by the conference were as follows: - Environment: air, water and soil pollution, pollution with heavy elements and with radioisotopes, bio-monitoring (10 papers); - Radionuclide metrology (10 papers); - Ion beam based techniques for characterization of materials surface, ERDA, PIXE, PIGE, computer simulations, materials modifications, wear, corrosion (10 papers) ; - Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and applications in environment, archaeology, and medicine (7 papers); - Application of neutron spectrometry in condensed matter (1 paper); - Advanced techniques, facilities and applications (11). Seventeen invited speakers covered through overview talks the main parts of these topics. The book contains the overview talks, oral contributions and poster contributions

  7. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) standards and recommendations on radioactive waste and transport safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnecke, E.; Rawl, R.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) publishes standards and recommendations on all aspects of nuclear safety in its Safety Series, which includes radioactive waste management and transport of radioactive materials. Safety Series documents may be adopted by a State into its national legal framework. Most of the States used the IAEA transport regulations (Safety Series No. 6) as a basis for their national regulation. The two highest ranking documents of the Radioactive Waste Safety Standards (RADWASS) programme, the Safety Fundamentals and the Safety Standard on the national waste management system, have been published. Both provide impetus into the waste management safety convention, a legally binding document for signatory states, which is being drafted. The already existing Convention on Nuclear Safety covers the management of radioactive waste at land-based civil nuclear power plants. (author) 1 fig., 18 refs

  8. Negotiating supranational rules - The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, Astrid

    1998-12-31

    The object of this thesis is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid 1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The evolution is traced not through the practical implementation of the safeguards system, but through the various multilateral negotiations through which it was created. The focus is on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective is to single out the factors determining the result. The discussion is organised into the following chapters: (1) The statute of the IAEA, (2) The IAEA 1961 safeguard document (INFCIRC/26), (3) The IAEA 1965 safeguards document (INFCIRC/66), (4) The non-proliferation treaty, (5) NPT safeguards. 92 refs.

  9. Seismic risk analysis for the Atomics International Nuclear Materials Development Facility, Santa Susana California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    This report presents the results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) operated by Atomics International at Santa Susana, California. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases including the USGS, California Institute of Technology and NEIS data bases. The resulting seismic record, covering the period 1969 to 1977, was used to identify all possible sources of seismicity that could affect the site. The best estimate curve indicates that the facility will experience 30% g with a return period of 55 years and 60% g with a return period of 750 years

  10. Internal conversion coefficients for atomic numbers Z less than or equal to 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Band, I.M.; Trzhaskovskaya, M.B.; Listengarten, M.A.

    1976-01-01

    Presented here are internal conversion coefficients (ICC) of gamma rays for 20 values of atomic number, Z, in the range 3 less than or equal to Z less than or equal to 30, including all Z greater than or equal to 14. The tables provide the previously missing data for light elements. Coefficients are given for 19 values of gamma-ray transition energies up to 6 MeV for the K-electron shell and 18 values up to 2 MeV for three L-subshells. The minimum enegy is 15 keV. The first five electric and magnetic nuclear transition multipolarities are covered. The calculations are relativistic, with screening and finite nuclear size effect taken into account

  11. Negotiating supranational rules - The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, Astrid

    1999-12-31

    The object of this thesis is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid 1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The evolution is traced not through the practical implementation of the safeguards system, but through the various multilateral negotiations through which it was created. The focus is on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective is to single out the factors determining the result. The discussion is organised into the following chapters: (1) The statute of the IAEA, (2) The IAEA 1961 safeguard document (INFCIRC/26), (3) The IAEA 1965 safeguards document (INFCIRC/66), (4) The non-proliferation treaty, (5) NPT safeguards. 92 refs.

  12. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are issued in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  13. Gamma techniques for IAEA [International Atomic Energy Agency] safeguards at centrifuge enrichment cascades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aaldijk, J.K.; de Betue, P.A.C.; van der Meer, K.; Harry, R.J.S.

    1987-01-01

    On February 4, 1983, the Hexapartite Safeguards Project (HSP) concluded that the safeguards approach involving limited frequency unannounced access (LFUA) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) inspectors to cascades areas together with inspection activities outside the cascade areas meets the IAEA safeguards objectives in an effective and efficient way. In this way, the risks of revealing sensitive information were also minimized. The approach has been defined clearly and unambiguously, and it should be applied equally to all technology holders. One of the conclusions of the HSP was that a nondestructive assay go/no-go technique should be used during the LFUA inspections in the cascade areas of centrifuge enrichment plants. The purpose is to verify that the enrichment of the product UF 6 gas is in the range of low-enriched uranium (LEU), i.e., the enrichment is below 20%

  14. Seismic risk analysis for the Atomics International Nuclear Materials Development Facility, Santa Susana California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-29

    This report presents the results of a detailed seismic risk analysis of the Nuclear Materials Development Facility (NMDF) operated by Atomics International at Santa Susana, California. The historical seismic record was established after a review of available literature, consultation with operators of local seismic arrays and examination of appropriate seismic data bases including the USGS, California Institute of Technology and NEIS data bases. The resulting seismic record, covering the period 1969 to 1977, was used to identify all possible sources of seismicity that could affect the site. The best estimate curve indicates that the facility will experience 30% g with a return period of 55 years and 60% g with a return period of 750 years.

  15. 5. All-Russian (international) scientific conference. Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules. Collection of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.Yu.; Kolesnikov, Yu.A.

    2000-01-01

    The materials of the 5. All-Russian (international) scientific conference: Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules, are presented. The conference took place in Zvenigorod, 2-6 October, 2000. A wide range of items connected with uranium enrichment, selection of atoms and molecules by isotopic composition: laser methods, ion cyclotron-resonance method, are discussed. The selection of molecules and atoms by rectification and chemical isotopic exchange methods, the selection in the field of centrifugal forces are treated. The questions of search for the new advanced methods for selection of atoms and molecules were discussed at the conference, the problems of radioisotope production were represented. The subject matter of the use of stable isotopes and radionuclides is demonstrated widely. The subjects connected with experimental and engineering equipment for selection of atoms and molecules are embodied in the paper [ru

  16. Communication of 15 May 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Peru to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received the attached note verbale of 15 May 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Peru transmitting comments on statements made by the Director of the Atomic Energy Commission of the Republic of Ecuador, concerning possible diversion of Peruvian nuclear technology for non-peaceful purposes. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Peru, the text of the note verbale is circulated to the Member States

  17. The effect of a finite time horizon in the durable good monopoly problem with atomic consumers

    OpenAIRE

    Berbeglia, Gerardo; Sloan, Peter; Vetta, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    A durable good is a long-lasting good that can be consumed repeatedly over time, and a duropolist is a monopolist in the market of a durable good. In 1972, Ronald Coase conjectured that a duropolist who lacks commitment power cannot sell the good above the competitive price if the time between periods approaches zero. Coase's counterintuitive conjecture was later proven by Gul et al. (1986) under an infinite time horizon model with non-atomic consumers. Remarkably, the situation changes drama...

  18. Atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation - Time dependence and the asymptotic wave function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devries, P. L.; George, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    A time-dependent, wave-packet description of atomic collisions in the presence of laser radiation is extracted from the more conventional time-independent, stationary-state description. This approach resolves certain difficulties of interpretation in the time-independent approach which arise in the case of asymptotic near resonance. In the two-state model investigated, the approach predicts the existence of three spherically scattered waves in this asymptotically near-resonant case.

  19. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in radiation and waste safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.; Ortiz-Lopez, P.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is specifically required by its Statute 'to establish or adopt ... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property ... and to provide for the application of these standards ...'. Standards encompass three main elements: legally binding international undertakings among States; globally agreed international safety standards; and the provision for facilitating the application of those standards. Radiation safety standards are national responsibilities, but there is considerable value in formulating harmonized approaches throughout the world. The Agency has attempted to do this by establishing internationally agreed safety standards and by prompting their application. Of prime importance are the Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. These deal with the basic requirements that must be met in order to ensure an adequate standard of safety. More detailed guidance on the application of these requirements is given in Safety Guides established under them. Fuller technical support is given in a series of Safety Reports. A number of Safety Guides are relevant to this meeting. An existing Safety Guide on exemption is being revised to cover related topics such as exclusion and clearance, and this is the subject of a separate presentation. As part of the programme to combat illicit trafficking in radioactive materials, a new Safety Guide on the topic is being developed. Both are near completion. Another Safety Guide is being produced to elaborate the requirements in the Basic Safety Standards on the safety of radioactive sources. The topics of illicit trafficking in radioactive materials and the safety of radioactive sources were given added impetus by resolutions of the last General Conference of the Agency. This paper provides an overview of these activities of the Agency. (author)

  20. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.; Bannister, M.E.; Delcroix, J.L.; Fuhr, J.

    2001-06-01

    This bulletin comprises updated atomic and molecular data for fusion. It includes the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA. It contains two parts: a bibliographic database for atomic and molecular data for fusion research, and numerical databases of recommended and evaluated atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interaction data. The indexed papers are also listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions

  1. Internal-time observable of classical relativistic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Ya'acov, Uri

    2006-01-01

    The relativistic framework with its symmetries offers a natural definition for the internal time of classical (non-quantum) physical systems as a Lorentz-invariant observable. The internal-time observable, measuring the system's aging or internal evolution, is identified with the proper time of the system derived from its centre-of-mass (CM) coordinate. For its definition as an observable it is required that the system be symmetric not only under Lorentz-Poincare transformations but also under uniform scaling, with the associated existence of a dilatation function D, and yet that D be a varying-not conserved-quantity. Two alternative definitions are discussed, and it is found that in order to maintain simultaneity of the CM time with the events that define it, it is necessary to split the dilatation function into a CM part and an internal part

  2. Helium in chirped laser fields as a time-asymmetric atomic switch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 1 (2014), "014307-1"-"014307-14" ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : laser excitation * chirped pulses * non-hermitian quantum mechanics * time-asymmetry Subject RIV: BG - Nuclear, Atomic and Molecular Physics, Colliders Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  3. Understanding the time dependence of atomic level populations in evolving plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judge, Philip G.

    2005-01-01

    The time dependence of atomic level populations in evolving plasmas is studied using an eigenfunction expansion of the non-LTE rate equations. The work aims to develop understanding without the need for, and as an aid to, numerical solutions. The discussion is mostly limited to linear systems, especially those for optically thin plasmas, but the implicitly non-linear case of non-LTE radiative transfer is briefly discussed. Eigenvalue spectra for typical atomic systems are examined using results compiled by Hearon. Diagonal dominance and sign symmetry of rate matrices show that just one eigenvalue is zero (corresponding to the equilibrium state), that the remaining eigenvalues have negative real parts, and that oscillations, if any, are necessarily damped. Gershgorin's theorems are used to show that many eigenvalues are determined by the radiative lifetimes of certain levels, because of diagonal dominance. With other properties, this demonstrates the existence of both 'slow' and 'fast' time-scales, where the 'slow' evolution is controlled by properties of meta-stable levels. It is shown that, when collisions are present, Rydberg states contribute only 'fast' eigenvalues. This justifies use of the quasi-static approximation, in which atoms containing just meta-stable levels can suffice to determine the atomic evolution on time-scales long compared with typical radiative lifetimes. Analytic solutions for two- and three-level atoms are used to examine the basis of earlier intuitive ideas, such as the 'ionizing plasma' approximation. The power and limitations of Gershgorin's theorems are examined through examples taken from the solar atmosphere. The methods should help in the planning and interpretation of both experimental and numerical experiments in which atomic evolution is important. While the examples are astrophysical, the methods and results are applicable to plasmas in general

  4. The Ninth International scientific and technical conference Safety, efficiency and economy of atomic energy. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The abstracts of the Ninth International scientific and technical conference Safety, efficiency and economy of atomic energy are present. The conference took place in Moscow, 21-23 May, 2014. The problems of WWER, RBMK, BN and EhGP-6 NPPs operation, maintenance and repair; materials testing and metallic structures control; radioactive wastes and spent fuel management; NPP decommissioning; radiation safety, NPP ecology, emergency preparedness were discussed on the conference. The great attention was paid to the problems of atomic energy economy and its developing, international cooperation for NPP safety and young NPP specialists training [ru

  5. Molecular markers predicting radiotherapy response: Report and recommendations from an International Atomic Energy Agency technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    West, Catharine M.L.; McKay, Michael J.; Hoelscher, Tobias; Baumann, Michael; Stratford, Ian J.; Bristow, Robert G.; Iwakawa, Mayumi; Imai, Takashi; Zingde, Surekha M.; Anscher, Mitchell S.; Bourhis, Jean; Begg, Adrian C.; Haustermans, Karin; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: There is increasing interest in radiogenomics and the characterization of molecular profiles that predict normal tissue and tumor radioresponse. A meeting in Amsterdam was organized by the International Atomic Energy Agency to discuss this topic on an international basis. Methods and Materials: This report is not completely exhaustive, but highlights some of the ongoing studies and new initiatives being carried out worldwide in the banking of tumor and normal tissue samples underpinning the development of molecular marker profiles for predicting patient response to radiotherapy. It is generally considered that these profiles will more accurately define individual or group radiosensitivities compared with the nondefinitive findings from the previous era of cellular-based techniques. However, so far there are only a few robust reports of molecular markers predicting normal tissue or tumor response. Results: Many centers in different countries have initiated tissue and tumor banks to store samples from clinical trials for future molecular profiling analysis, to identify profiles that predict for radiotherapy response. The European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology GENEtic pathways for the Prediction of the effects of Irradiation (GENEPI) project, to store, document, and analyze sample characteristics vs. response, is the most comprehensive in this regard. Conclusions: The next 5-10 years are likely to see the results of these and other correlative studies, and promising associations of profiles with response should be validated in larger definitive trials

  6. Real-time monitoring of atom vapor concentration with laser absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Fengying; Gao Peng; Jiang Tao

    2012-01-01

    The technology of laser absorption spectroscopy was used for real-time monitoring of gadolinium atom vapor concentration measurement and the solid state laser pumped ring dye laser was used as optical source. The optical fiber was taken to improve the stability of laser transmission. The multi-pass absorption technology combined with reference optical signal avoided the influence of laser power fluctuation. The experiment result shows that the system based on this detection method has a standard error of 4%. It is proved that the monitoring system provides reliable data for atom vapor laser isotope separation process and the separation efficiency can be improved. (authors)

  7. Digital atom interferometer with single particle control on a discretized space-time geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Andreas; Alberti, Andrea; Alt, Wolfgang; Belmechri, Noomen; Hild, Sebastian; Karski, Michał; Widera, Artur; Meschede, Dieter

    2012-06-19

    Engineering quantum particle systems, such as quantum simulators and quantum cellular automata, relies on full coherent control of quantum paths at the single particle level. Here we present an atom interferometer operating with single trapped atoms, where single particle wave packets are controlled through spin-dependent potentials. The interferometer is constructed from a sequence of discrete operations based on a set of elementary building blocks, which permit composing arbitrary interferometer geometries in a digital manner. We use this modularity to devise a space-time analogue of the well-known spin echo technique, yielding insight into decoherence mechanisms. We also demonstrate mesoscopic delocalization of single atoms with a separation-to-localization ratio exceeding 500; this result suggests their utilization beyond quantum logic applications as nano-resolution quantum probes in precision measurements, being able to measure potential gradients with precision 5 x 10(-4) in units of gravitational acceleration g.

  8. On the tunneling time of ultracold atoms through a system of two mazer cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badshah, Fazal; Ge, Guo-Qin; Irfan, Muhammad; Qamar, Sajid; Qamar, Shahid

    2018-01-30

    We study the resonant tunneling of ultraslow atoms through a system of high quality microwave cavities. We find that the phase tunneling time across the two coupled cavities exhibits more frequent resonances as compared to the single cavity interaction. The increased resonances are instrumental in the display of an alternate sub and superclassical character of the tunneling time along the momentum axis with increasing energies of the incident slow atoms. Here, the intercavity separation appears as an additional controlling parameter of the system that provides an efficient control of the superclassical behavior of the phase tunneling time. Further, we find that the phase time characteristics through two cavity system has the combined features of the tunneling through a double barrier and a double well arrangements.

  9. The time-energy distribution of atoms in a radiation damage cascade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M.M.R.

    1976-01-01

    The time-energy distribution of atoms in a cascade induced by a primary knock-on is obtained by solving the Boltzmann equation. A more general scattering law is used than has hitherto been possible which is based upon a rational approximation to the Thomas-Fermi model of atomic scattering. The virtue of this scheme is that it remains possible to obtain an exact, closed form solution but allows a more realistic description of the scattering process. Time moments of the distribution are obtained from which the slowing down time and associated variance can be calculated. It is shown that the complete time-energy distribution may be reconstructed from the moments. (author)

  10. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  11. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-03-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  12. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Conclusions Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear

  13. Efforts made for health and medical care by International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The author, being a former senior medical officer and currently a consultant of the Nuclear Medicine Section, the Division of Human Health, the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to standardize the isotope and radiation technologies for health and medical care and transfer them to the IAEA member states to address their health issues, participated in an international cooperation project to survey the current situation of the health and medical care in Viet Nam and exchange opinions with the World Health Organization Western Pacific Regional Office Viet Nam Office and the Viet Nam Health Department coordinated by the Japan Public Health Association from 10th to 15th January 2016 and perceived efforts made and action plans for the health and medical care in Viet Nam by the international organizations of the IAEA and the World Health Organization (WHO). IAEA has verified various isotopes and radiation technologies up to now in the international field of health and medical care and has being offered them to the member states under the sustainable frame work of technical co-operation. However, the activity in the health and medical care field of IAEA is hardly recognized by the public health professionals in Japan. In order to attain the objective to improve and maintain human health under the umbrella of the United Nations system, the peaceful use of nuclear technology has been promoted in the field of non-electric applications of nuclear energy including human health and medical care by the IAEA. There are several discrepancies seen with the field and tactics of health and medical care between the IAEA and the WHO. In terms of measures to fight NCDs which should be an urgent issue in most of the member states, a comprehensive approach is often needed beyond the capability of IAEA as isotopes and radiation technologies. The IAEA should strive to solve issues on human health and medical care maintaining much

  14. Updated mortality analysis of radiation workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boice, John; Cohen, Sarah; Mumma, Michael; Ellis, Elizabeth D.; Eckerman, Keith F.; Leggett, Richard Wayne; Boecker, Bruce; Brill, Bertrand; Henderson, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 5,801 radiation workers, including 2,232 monitored for radionuclide intakes, and 41,169 non-radiation workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). The mean dose from external radiation was 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv), and the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined was 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional nine years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs), and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models. All cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the relative risk (RR) at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17) and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but significant increases in lung and kidney disease were not seen. The extended follow-up re-enforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger

  15. International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. No. 28

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.G.

    1985-03-01

    The bulletin presents a selected bibliography (462 literature pieces) on atomic and molecular data relevant to fusion research and technology. It also gives a list of indexed papers, separately on structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface effects

  16. International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. No. 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.G.

    1985-12-01

    This bulletin presents a selected bibliography (363 literature pieces) on atomic and molecular data for fusion. It also gives a list of indexed papers on structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions

  17. Internal reflection of interstitial atoms from close-packed tungsten faces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dranova, Zh.I.; Mikhajlovskij, I.M.

    1981-01-01

    Use of field-ion microscopy methods has shown that changes in microtopography of tungsten specimens irradiated with 2-5 keV helium atoms are mainly related to the liberation of interstitial atoms on the surface. It is established that the atom liberation on the surface is considerably anisotropic: maximum quantity of atoms is observed in the vicinity of faces (100), (111) and (211) along the sections of zone lines (110) oriented along the edge of the first Brillouin zone. The atom liberation on plane sections of the most dense-packed face (110) was not observed as a rule; atomic steps of the face are interstitial atom sinks. It is concluded on the basis of the results obtained that there is the predominant inner reflection of interstitial atoms from the dense-packed faces and a possible contribution of inner reflection to the surface migration processes activated with the ion bombardment as well as material swelling have been analyzed [ru

  18. Comparison of Y-jet and OIL effervescent atomizers based on internal and external two-phase flow characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mlkvik Marek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented paper focuses on spraying of two viscous liquids (μ = 60 and 143 mPa·s by two types of twinfluid atomizers with internal mixing. We compared the well-known Y-jet atomizer with the less known, “outside in liquid” (OIL, configuration of the effervescent atomizer. The required liquid viscosity was achieved by using the water-maltodextrin solutions of different concentrations. Both the liquids were sprayed at two gas inlet pressures (Δp = 0.14 and 0.28 MPa and various gas-to-liquid ratios (GLR = 2.5%, 5%, 10% and 20%. The comparison was focused on four characteristics: liquid flow-rate (for the same working regimes, defined by Δp and GLR, internal flow regimes, Weber numbers of a liquid breakup (We and droplet sizes. A high-speed camera and Malvern Spraytec laser diffraction system were used to obtain necessary experimental data. Comparing the results of our experiments, we can state that for both the liquids the OIL atomizer reached higher liquid flow-rates at corresponding working regimes, it was typical by annular internal flow and higher We in the near-nozzle region at all the working regimes. As a result, it produced considerably smaller droplets than the second tested atomizing device, especially for GLR < 10%.

  19. Comparison of Y-jet and OIL effervescent atomizers based on internal and external two-phase flow characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlkvik, Marek; Zaremba, Matous; Jedelsky, Jan; Jicha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Presented paper focuses on spraying of two viscous liquids (μ = 60 and 143 mPa·s) by two types of twinfluid atomizers with internal mixing. We compared the well-known Y-jet atomizer with the less known, "outside in liquid" (OIL), configuration of the effervescent atomizer. The required liquid viscosity was achieved by using the water-maltodextrin solutions of different concentrations. Both the liquids were sprayed at two gas inlet pressures (Δp = 0.14 and 0.28 MPa) and various gas-to-liquid ratios (GLR = 2.5%, 5%, 10% and 20%). The comparison was focused on four characteristics: liquid flow-rate (for the same working regimes, defined by Δp and GLR), internal flow regimes, Weber numbers of a liquid breakup (We) and droplet sizes. A high-speed camera and Malvern Spraytec laser diffraction system were used to obtain necessary experimental data. Comparing the results of our experiments, we can state that for both the liquids the OIL atomizer reached higher liquid flow-rates at corresponding working regimes, it was typical by annular internal flow and higher We in the near-nozzle region at all the working regimes. As a result, it produced considerably smaller droplets than the second tested atomizing device, especially for GLR < 10%.

  20. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  1. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  2. Signal Tracking Beyond the Time Resolution of an Atomic Sensor by Kalman Filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Martínez, Ricardo; Kołodyński, Jan; Troullinou, Charikleia; Lucivero, Vito Giovanni; Kong, Jia; Mitchell, Morgan W.

    2018-01-01

    We study causal waveform estimation (tracking) of time-varying signals in a paradigmatic atomic sensor, an alkali vapor monitored by Faraday rotation probing. We use Kalman filtering, which optimally tracks known linear Gaussian stochastic processes, to estimate stochastic input signals that we generate by optical pumping. Comparing the known input to the estimates, we confirm the accuracy of the atomic statistical model and the reliability of the Kalman filter, allowing recovery of waveform details far briefer than the sensor's intrinsic time resolution. With proper filter choice, we obtain similar benefits when tracking partially known and non-Gaussian signal processes, as are found in most practical sensing applications. The method evades the trade-off between sensitivity and time resolution in coherent sensing.

  3. 4. All-Russian (international) scientific conference. Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules. Collection of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baranov, V.Yu.; Kolesnikov, Yu.A.

    1999-01-01

    The reports of the 4. All-Russian (international) scientific conference: Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules, are presented. The conference took place in Zvenigorod, 4-8 October, 1999. Contents of the reports are the following: laser isotope separation of molecules and atoms; isotopic selection of molecules and atoms in the field of centrifugal forces; selection of molecules by means of rectification and isotopic exchange methods; separation of isotopes by ion cyclotron-resonance method, in electric discharge and electromagnetic field; change in physical properties of substances which variation of their natural isotopic composition; use of isotopes in pharmacy preparation; status of experimental and diagnostic technique; certain promising methods of selection of atoms and molecules. The problems of laser separation of uranium isotopes, separation of carbon isotopes by multi-photon selective dissociation are discussed. The procedures permitting production of isotopes with high concentration and efficiency are developed [ru

  4. 2nd International Symposium "Atomic Cluster Collisions : Structure and Dynamics from the Nuclear to the Biological Scale"

    CERN Document Server

    Solov'yov, Andrey; ISACC 2007; Latest advances in atomic cluster collisions

    2008-01-01

    This book presents a 'snapshot' of the most recent and significant advances in the field of cluster physics. It is a comprehensive review based on contributions by the participants of the 2nd International Symposium on Atomic Cluster Collisions (ISACC 2007) held in July 19-23, 2007 at GSI, Darmstadt, Germany. The purpose of the Symposium is to promote the growth and exchange of scientific information on the structure and properties of nuclear, atomic, molecular, biological and complex cluster systems studied by means of photonic, electronic, heavy particle and atomic collisions. Particular attention is devoted to dynamic phenomena, many-body effects taking place in cluster systems of a different nature - these include problems of fusion and fission, fragmentation, collective electron excitations, phase transitions, etc.Both the experimental and theoretical aspects of cluster physics, uniquely placed between nuclear physics on the one hand and atomic, molecular and solid state physics on the other, are discuss...

  5. Communication from the Permanent Mission of Israel to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding nuclear export controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter dated 13 July 2004 from the Permanent Mission of Israel providing information on Israel's nuclear export policies and practices. As requested by the Permanent Mission, the letter and document attached to it are reproduced herein for the information of Member States

  6. Communication received on 10 May 1999 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a communication received on 10 May 1999 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency, with regard to the resolution adopted by the 42nd Agency General Conference, entitled 'The safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials' (GC(42)/RES/12), in connection with the war in Yugoslavia

  7. Communication of 24 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Communication of 24 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency, including a statement by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation in connection with the ratification by the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

  8. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero, J.

    1993-12-01

    This bulletin, published by the IAEA, provides atomic and molecular data references relevant to fusion research and technology. In part I the indexation of the papers is provided separately for (i) structure and spectra, (ii) atomic and molecular collisions, and (iii) surface interactions. Part II contains the bibliographic data for the above-listed topics and for high-energy laser and beam-matter interaction of atomic particles with fields. Also included are sections on atomic and molecular data needs for fusion research and on news about ALADDIN (A Labelled Atomic Data INterface) and evaluated data bases

  9. International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing

    OpenAIRE

    Kerksick, Chad M.; Arent, Shawn; Schoenfeld, Brad J.; Stout, Jeffrey R.; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D.; Taylor, Lem; Kalman, Doug; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Kreider, Richard B.; Willoughby, Darryn; Arciero, Paul J.; VanDusseldorp, Trisha A.; Ormsbee, Michael J.; Wildman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Position statement The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review regarding the timing of macronutrients in reference to healthy, exercising adults and in particular highly trained individuals on exercise performance and body composition. The following points summarize the position of the ISSN: Nutrient timing incorporates the use of methodical planning and eating of whole foods, fortified foods and dietary supplements. The timing of energy inta...

  10. Microfluidic Imaging Flow Cytometry by Asymmetric-detection Time-stretch Optical Microscopy (ATOM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Anson H L; Lai, Queenie T K; Chung, Bob M F; Lee, Kelvin C M; Mok, Aaron T Y; Yip, G K; Shum, Anderson H C; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Tsia, Kevin K

    2017-06-28

    Scaling the number of measurable parameters, which allows for multidimensional data analysis and thus higher-confidence statistical results, has been the main trend in the advanced development of flow cytometry. Notably, adding high-resolution imaging capabilities allows for the complex morphological analysis of cellular/sub-cellular structures. This is not possible with standard flow cytometers. However, it is valuable for advancing our knowledge of cellular functions and can benefit life science research, clinical diagnostics, and environmental monitoring. Incorporating imaging capabilities into flow cytometry compromises the assay throughput, primarily due to the limitations on speed and sensitivity in the camera technologies. To overcome this speed or throughput challenge facing imaging flow cytometry while preserving the image quality, asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) has been demonstrated to enable high-contrast, single-cell imaging with sub-cellular resolution, at an imaging throughput as high as 100,000 cells/s. Based on the imaging concept of conventional time-stretch imaging, which relies on all-optical image encoding and retrieval through the use of ultrafast broadband laser pulses, ATOM further advances imaging performance by enhancing the image contrast of unlabeled/unstained cells. This is achieved by accessing the phase-gradient information of the cells, which is spectrally encoded into single-shot broadband pulses. Hence, ATOM is particularly advantageous in high-throughput measurements of single-cell morphology and texture - information indicative of cell types, states, and even functions. Ultimately, this could become a powerful imaging flow cytometry platform for the biophysical phenotyping of cells, complementing the current state-of-the-art biochemical-marker-based cellular assay. This work describes a protocol to establish the key modules of an ATOM system (from optical frontend to data processing and visualization

  11. The international atomic energy agency's programme on utilization of accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytlewski, Nikolai [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Mank, Guenter [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: g.mank@iaea.org; Rosengard, Ulf [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Bamford, Samuel [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Markowicz, Andrzej [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria); Wegrzynek, Dariusz [International Atomic Energy Agency, Wagramer Str. 5, A-1400 Vienna (Austria)

    2006-06-23

    Low-energy accelerators have in the past produced a major part of our current knowledge of nuclear physics. Today they are mainly used for applied research and industrial applications. In view of this, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has during recent years initiated several Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) concerning Ion Beam Analysis of Materials, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Microprobe Techniques. The CRPs involve laboratories from developing as well as developed Member States, networking on a common topic coordinated by the IAEA. In order to facilitate networking, the IAEA has recently published the 'World Survey of Accelerator Based Analytical Techniques' available on the Internet and as a CD-ROM. The IAEA maintains also a beamline at a 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in the Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb, Croatia. Small and medium power accelerator driven spallation neutron sources will become more important as many small neutron producing research reactors are approaching the end of their useful working life. The IAEA has, within its Department for Nuclear Sciences and Applications, a programme on the Effective Utilization of Accelerators. This programme helps Member States, in particular developing Member States, in finding new areas of applications for their low and medium energy accelerators through increased participation in activities such as Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings and Conferences. This paper describes the IAEA's current programme on accelerator utilization and proposed future activities.

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency/Hanford Site shared use of calorimeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welsh, T.L.

    1997-01-01

    Hanford Site operators combine gamma ray isotopic and calorimetry measurements for nondestructive plutonium assay. Such measurements offer lower variability (particularly for heterogeneous materials) and decreased radiation exposure, cost, waste, intrusiveness, and material handling compared to destructive analysis. Until now, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has relied on destructive analysis to perform the most accurate verification requirements for plutonium stored under safeguards at the Hanford Site. It was recognized that using calorimetry could significantly reduce the need for the IAEA to perform destructive analysis. To authorize the operator's calorimeters for routine IAEA use, however, it was necessary to develop authentication features and perform independent 1558 testing. Authentication features include IAEA control of the hardware and calorimeter operating system software, measurement of certified IAEA standards, sealing of calorimeter chambers, and limited destructive analysis of IAEA selected items. A field test of these authentication features was performed at the Hanford Site in June 1997. The field test also was meant to enhance the credibility the IAEA imputes to calorimetry prior to its implementation. Progress in shared use of the Hanford Site calorimeters is reported

  13. Adjustment of the Brazilian radioprotection standards to the safety principles of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a recommendation with 10 basic safety principles (Fundamental Safety Principles Safety Fundamentals series, number SF-1), which are: 1) Responsibility for safety; 2) Role for government; 3) Leadership and management for safety; 4) Justification of facilities and activities; 5) Optimization of protection; 6) Limitation of risk to individuals; 7) Protection of present and futures generations; 8) Prevention of accidents; 9) Emergency preparedness and response and 10) Protection actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiations risk. The aim of this study is to verify that the Brazilian standards of radiation protection meet the principles described above and how well suited to them. The analysis of the national radiation protection regulatory system, developed and deployed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), showed that out of the ten items, two are covered partially, the number 2 and 10. The others are fully met. The item 2 the fact that the regulatory body (CNEN) be stock controller of a large company in the sector put in check its independence as a regulatory body. In item 10 the Brazilian standard of radiation protection does not provide explicit resolution of environmental liabilities

  14. Wavepacket dynamics of a Rydberg atom monitored by a pair of time-delayed laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, PeiPei; Cheng, Hong; Zhang, ShanShan; Wang, HanMu; Liu, HongPing

    2018-02-01

    We have investigated the Rydberg state population of an argon atom by an intense laser pulse and its wavepacket dynamics monitored by another successive laser pulse in the tunneling regime. A wavepacket comprising a superposition of close high-lying Rydberg states is irradiated by a multicycle laser pulse, where the sub-wave components in the wavepacket have fixed relative phases. A time-delayed second laser pulse is employed to apply on the excited Rydberg atom. If the time is properly chosen, one of the sub-wave components will be guided towards the ionization area while the rest remains intact. By means of this pump-probe technique, we could control and monitor the Rydberg wavepacket dynamics and reveal some interesting phenomenon such as the survival rate of individual Rydberg states related to the classical orbital period of electron.

  15. Relativistic effects in photoionization time delay near the Cooper minimum of noble-gas atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Soumyajit; Mandal, Ankur; Jose, Jobin; Varma, Hari R.; Deshmukh, P. C.; Kheifets, A. S.; Dolmatov, V. K.; Manson, S. T.

    2014-11-01

    Time delay of photoemission from valence n s , n p3 /2 , and n p1 /2 subshells of noble-gas atoms is theoretically scrutinized within the framework of the dipole relativistic random phase approximation. The focus is on the variation of time delay in the vicinity of the Cooper minima in photoionization of the outer subshells of neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, where the corresponding dipole matrix element changes its sign while passing through a node. It is revealed that the presence of the Cooper minimum in one photoionization channel has a strong effect on time delay in other channels. This is shown to be due to interchannel coupling.

  16. Features of atomic images reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holography using SPEA-MEM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushita, Tomohiro, E-mail: matusita@spring8.or.jp [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Matsui, Fumihiko [Graduate School of Materials Science, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • We develop a 3D atomic image reconstruction algorithm for photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector holography. • We examine the shapes of the atomic images reconstructed by using a developed kernel function. • We examine refraction effect at surface, limitation effect of the hologram data, energy resolution effect, and angular resolution effect. • These discussions indicate the experimental requirements to obtain the clear 3D atomic image. - Abstract: Three-dimensional atomic images can be reconstructed from photoelectron, Auger electron, and internal detector electron holograms using a scattering pattern extraction algorithm using the maximum entropy method (SPEA-MEM) that utilizes an integral transform. An integral kernel function for the integral transform is the key to clear atomic image reconstruction. We composed the kernel function using a scattering pattern function and estimated its ability. Image distortion caused by multiple scattering was also evaluated. Four types of Auger electron wave functions were investigated, and the effect of these wave function types was estimated. In addition, we addressed refraction at the surface, the effects of data limitation, and energy and angular resolutions.

  17. Evaluation of effervescent atomizer internal design on the spray unsteadiness using a phase/Doppler particle analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Meng; Duan, YuFeng; Zhang, TieNan [School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University, Sipailou 2, Nanjing 210096 (China)

    2010-09-15

    The purpose of this research was to investigate the dependence of effervescent spray unsteadiness on operational conditions and atomizer internal design by the ideal spray theory of Edwards and Marx. The convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer spraying water with air as atomizing medium in the ''outside-in'' gas injection was used in this study. Results demonstrated that droplet formation process at various air to liquid ratio (ALR) led to the spray unsteadiness and all droplet size classes exhibited unsteadiness behavior in spray. The spray unsteadiness reduced quickly at ALR of 3% and decreased moderately at ALR of other values as the axial distance increased. When the axial distance was 200 mm, the spray unsteadiness reduced dramatically with the increase in radial distance, but lower spray unsteadiness at the center of spray and higher spray unsteadiness at the edge of spray were shown as the axial distance increased. The spray unsteadiness at the center region of spray increased with the injection pressure. Low spray unsteadiness and good atomization performance can be obtained when the diameter of incline aeration holes increased at ALR of 10%. Although short mixing chamber with large discharge orifice diameter for convergent-divergent effervescent atomizer produced good atomization, the center region of spay showed high spray unsteadiness and maybe formed the droplet clustering. (author)

  18. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 64. October 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Bannister, M.E.; Bretagne, J.; Fuhr, J.

    2005-10-01

    This bulletin comprises updated atomic and molecular data for fusion. It contains four parts. In part one the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA is presented. In part two, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions. Part three contains the bibliographic data for both indexed and and non-indexed references. The author index (part four) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part three

  19. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 63

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Bannister, M.E.; Bretagne, J.; Fuhr, J.

    2004-10-01

    This bulletin comprises updated atomic and molecular data for fusion. It contains four parts. In part one the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA is presented. In part two, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions. Part three contains the bibliographic data for both indexed and and non-indexed references. The author index (part four) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part three

  20. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 62. August 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Bannister, M.E.; Delcroix, J.L.; Fuhr, J.

    2003-10-01

    This bulletin comprises updated atomic and molecular data for fusion. It contains four parts. In part one the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA is presented. In part two, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions. Part three contains the bibliographic data for both indexed and and non-indexed references. The author index (part four) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part three

  1. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 65. July 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humbert, D.; Bannister, M.E.; Bretagne, J.; Fuhr, J.

    2006-08-01

    This bulletin comprises updated atomic and molecular data for fusion. It contains four parts. In part one the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA is presented. In part two, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions. Part three contains the bibliographic data for both indexed and and non-indexed references. The author index (part four) refers to the bibliographic references contained in part three

  2. Atomic politics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skogmar, G.

    1979-01-01

    The authors basic point is that the military and civil sides of atomic energy cannot be separated. The general aim of the book is to analyze both the military and civil branches, and the interdependence between them, of American foreign policy in the atomic field. Atomic policy is seen as one of the most important imstruments of foreign policy which, in turn, is seen against the background of American imperialism in general. Firstly, the book investigates the most important means by which the United States has controlled the development in the nuclear field in other countries. These means include influencing the conditions of access to nuclear resources of various kinds, influencing the flow of technical-economic information and influencing international organizations and treaties bearing on atomic energy. The time period treated is 1945-1973. 1973 is chosen as the end-year of the study mainly because of the new conditions in the whole energy field initiated by the oil crisis in that year. The sources of the empirical work are mainly hearings before the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy of the U.S. Congress and legal material of various kinds. Secondly, the goals of the American policy are analyzed. The goals identified are armament effect, non-proliferation (horizontal), sales, and energy dependence. The relation between the main goals is discussed.The discussion is centered on the interdependence between the military and the civil aspects, conflict and coincidence of various goals, the relation between short-term and long-term goals, and the possibilities of using one goal as pretext for another. Thirdly, some causes of the changes in the atomic policy around 1953 and 1963 are identified. These are the strategic balance, the competitive situation, the capacity (of the American atomic productive apparatus), and the nuclear technological stage. The specific composition of these four factors at the two time-points can explain the changes of policy. (author)

  3. Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

    2011-08-01

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all

  4. Seventh international conference on time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, R.B.; Martinez, M.A.D.; Shreve, A.; Woodruff, W.H. [comps.

    1997-04-01

    The International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy (TRVS) is widely recognized as the major international forum for the discussion of advances in this rapidly growing field. The 1995 conference was the seventh in a series that began at Lake Placid, New York, 1982. Santa Fe, New Mexico, was the site of the Seventh International Conference on Time-Resolved Vibrational Spectroscopy, held from June 11 to 16, 1995. TRVS-7 was attended by 157 participants from 16 countries and 85 institutions, and research ranging across the full breadth of the field of time-resolved vibrational spectroscopy was presented. Advances in both experimental capabilities for time-resolved vibrational measurements and in theoretical descriptions of time-resolved vibrational methods continue to occur, and several sessions of the conference were devoted to discussion of these advances and the associated new directions in TRVS. Continuing the interdisciplinary tradition of the TRVS meetings, applications of time-resolved vibrational methods to problems in physics, biology, materials science, and chemistry comprised a large portion of the papers presented at the conference.

  5. Chemistry of the heaviest elements--one atom at a time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, Darleane C.; Lee, Diana M.

    2000-01-01

    In keeping with the goal of the Viewpoint series of the Journal of Chemical Education, this article gives a 75-year perspective of the chemistry of the heaviest elements, including a 50-year retrospective view of past developments, a summary of current research achievements and applications, and some predictions about exciting, new developments that might be envisioned within the next 25 years. A historical perspective of the importance of chemical separations in the discoveries of the transuranium elements from neptunium (Z=93) through mendelevium (Z=101) is given. The development of techniques for studying the chemical properties of mendelevium and still heavier elements on the basis of measuring the radioactive decay of a single atom (''atom-at-a-time'' chemistry) and combining the results of many separate experiments is reviewed. The influence of relativistic effects (expected to increase as Z 2 ) on chemical properties is discussed. The results from recent atom-at-a-time studies of the chemistry of the heaviest elements through seaborgium (Z=106) are summarized and show that their properties cannot be readily predicted based on simple extrapolation from the properties of their lighter homologues in the periodic table. The prospects for extending chemical studies to still heavier elements than seaborgium are considered and appear promising

  6. Studies of the reactions of hydrogen atoms by time-resolved E. S. R. spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, R W; Verma, N C [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, Pa. (USA). Dept. of Chemistry

    1977-01-01

    Time-resolved e.s.r. spectroscopy has been used to follow directly the reactions of H atoms produced by pulse radiolysis of acid solutions. Detailed analysis of the time profile of the e.s.r. signal was carried out by means of modified Bloch equations. The increased signal found when a scavenger for OH such as t-butyl alcohol is present is shown to be mainly the result of slower H atom decay by radical-radical reaction. The reaction H + OH does not appear to produce any signal polarization. The decay curves observed in the presence of solute are readily accounted for by the treatment, and good plots of pseudo first-order rate constant against solute concentration are obtained. The absolute rate constants for reaction with H atoms are for methanol 2.5 x10/sup 6/, for ethanol 2.1 X 10/sup 7/, for isopropanol 6.8 x 10/sup 7/, and for succinic acid 3.0 x 10/sup 6/ dm/sup 3/ mol/sup -1/s/sup -1/. These values are in good agreement with the earlier chemical measurements.

  7. Atomic motion of resonantly vibrating quartz crystal visualized by time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoyagi, Shinobu; Osawa, Hitoshi; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Takeda, Shoichi; Moriyoshi, Chikako; Kuroiwa, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    Transient atomic displacements during a resonant thickness-shear vibration of AT-cut α-quartz are revealed by time-resolved X-ray diffraction under an alternating electric field. The lattice strain resonantly amplified by the alternating electric field is ∼10 4 times larger than that induced by a static electric field. The resonantly amplified lattice strain is achieved by fast displacements of oxygen anions and collateral resilient deformation of Si−O−Si angles bridging rigid SiO 4 tetrahedra, which efficiently transduce electric energy into elastic energy

  8. A time-dependent density functional theory investigation of plasmon resonances of linear Au atomic chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Dan-Dan; Zhang Hong

    2011-01-01

    We report theoretical studies on the plasmon resonances in linear Au atomic chains by using ab initio time-dependent density functional theory. The dipole responses are investigated each as a function of chain length. They converge into a single resonance in the longitudinal mode but split into two transverse modes. As the chain length increases, the longitudinal plasmon mode is redshifted in energy while the transverse modes shift in the opposite direction (blueshifts). In addition, the energy gap between the two transverse modes reduces with chain length increasing. We find that there are unique characteristics, different from those of other metallic chains. These characteristics are crucial to atomic-scale engineering of single-molecule sensing, optical spectroscopy, and so on. (condensed matter: electronic structure, electrical, magnetic, and optical properties)

  9. Time-Averaged Adiabatic Potentials: Versatile Matter-Wave Guides and Atom Traps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lesanovsky, Igor; Klitzing, Wolf von

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel class of trapping potentials, time-averaged adiabatic potentials (TAAP), which allows the generation of a large variety of traps for quantum gases and matter-wave guides for atom interferometers. Examples include stacks of pancakes, rows of cigars, and multiple rings or sickles. The traps can be coupled through controllable tunneling barriers or merged altogether. We present analytical expressions for pancake-, cigar-, and ring-shaped traps. The ring geometry is of particular interest for guided matter-wave interferometry as it provides a perfectly smooth waveguide of widely tunable diameter and thus adjustable sensitivity of the interferometer. The flexibility of the TAAP would make possible the use of Bose-Einstein condensates as coherent matter waves in large-area atom interferometers

  10. Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Protocol on 21 March 2000. It was signed on 22 March 2000 in Vienna. Pursuant to Article 11 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 16 October 2007, the date on which the Agency received from the Russian Federation written notification that the procedures of the Russian Federation required for entry into force had been met

  11. Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Protocol on 21 March 2000. It was signed on 22 March 2000 in Vienna. Pursuant to Article 11 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 16 October 2007, the date on which the Agency received from the Russian Federation written notification that the procedures of the Russian Federation required for entry into force had been met [es

  12. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: The Approach adopted by the international atomic energy agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Jaervinen, H.; Butler, P.; McLean, I. D.; Pentecost, M.; Rickard, M.; Abdullah, B.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  13. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  14. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 39

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.J.

    1989-07-01

    The Bulletin provides information on atomic and molecular data relevant for fusion research. In part I the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions. Part II contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references (514 references). An author index is included

  15. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1984-06-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is also briefly reported (Collision strengths and recombination coefficients for ions of C,N,O; Reactions between ions and atomic hydrogen; Cross sections for electron impact ionisation of Ne + , Ti + and Ni + ions)

  16. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 40

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.J.

    1990-03-01

    Indexed papers relating to structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface interactions relevant to nuclear fusion are given. Included is the bibliography for all indexed papers. In addition, a list of evaluated numerical atomic databases stored in the IAEA data bank is given

  17. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.J.

    1987-05-01

    The bulletin provides information on atomic and molecular data for fusion research. In Part I the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions, and surface effects. Part II contains all the bibliographic data for both indexed and non-indexed references (536 references). An author index is included

  18. International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. No. 36

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    The bulletin provides information on atomic and molecular data relevant for fusion research. In Part I the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions and surface interactions. Part II contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references (555 references). An author index is included

  19. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 38

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.J.

    1989-01-01

    The Bulletin provides information on atomic and molecular data relevant for fusion research. In Part I the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions and surface interactions. Part II contains all the bibliographic data for both the indexed and non-indexed references (654 references). An author index is included

  20. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 18

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1982-02-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported (electron impact excitation of hydrogen-like argon ions, excitation and charge transfer in collisions of Li atoms with alpha particles)

  1. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    This bulletin provides atomic and molecular data references relevant to thermonuclear fusion research and technology. In part I the indexing of the papers is given separately for (i) structure and spectra (energy levels, wavelengths; transition probabilities, oscillator strengths; interatomic potentials), (ii) atomic and molecular collisions (photon collisions, electron collisions, heavy particle collisions), and (iii) surface interactions (sputtering, surface damage, blistering, flaking, arcing, chemical reactions). Part II contains the bibliographic data for the above listed topics and for plasma composition and impurities, plasma heating, cooling and fuelling, high energy laser- and beam- matter interaction, bibliographic and numerical data collections, and on interaction of atomic particles with fields. Also included are sections on atomic and molecular data needs for fusion research and on news about ALADDIN (A Labelled Atomic Data Interface) and evaluated-data bases

  2. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  3. Atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pabst, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    Time-resolved investigations of ultrafast electronic and molecular dynamics were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of these processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. The tremendous technological progress in recent years made it possible to generate ultrashort pulses, which can be used to trigger, to watch, and to control atomic and molecular motion. This tutorial focuses on experimental and theoretical advances which are used to study the dynamics of electrons and molecules in the presence of ultrashort pulses. In the first part, the rotational dynamics of molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales, is reviewed. Well-aligned molecules are particularly suitable for angle-dependent investigations like x-ray diffraction or strong-field ionization experiments. In the second part, the ionization dynamics of atoms is studied. The characteristic time scale lies, here, in the attosecond to few-femtosecond regime. Although a one-particle picture has been successfully applied to many processes, many-body effects do constantly occur. After a broad overview of the main mechanisms and the most common tools in attosecond physics, examples of many-body dynamics in the attosecond world (e.g., in high-harmonic generation and attosecond transient absorption spectroscopy) are discussed.

  4. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Botero, J.

    1995-06-01

    This issue of the bulletin provides atomic and molecular data references relevant to fusion research and technology. In part 1 the indexation of the papers is provided separately for (i) structure and spectra, (ii) atomic and molecular collisions, and (iii) surface interactions. Part 2 contains the bibliographic data for the above-listed topics and brief bibliographic lists for the following topics: (a) fusion research of general interest, (b) high energy laser- and beam-matter interaction, (c) bibliographic and numerical data collections, and (d) interaction of atomic particles with fields. Moreover, the creation of the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) is announced by the IAEA. AMDIS contains three main parts: the Atomic and Molecular Bibliographic Data System (AMBDAS), the numerical database of recommended and evaluated atomic, molecular and plasma-surface interaction data ALADDIN and an electronic bulletin board with information regarding data needs, meetings and programs of the IAEA Atomic and Molecular Data Unit. AMDIS may be reached via INTERNET. For information on how to access AMDIS, an electronic mail inquiry can be sent (address: ''pms'' followed by the usual ''at'' symbol followed by ''ripcrs01.iaea.or.at'')

  5. Tumor radiosensitizers - current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare...... and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials...... and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those...

  6. Collapse and revival in atom internal dynamics due to quantum translational motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muradyan, A Zh; Muradyan, G A

    2004-01-01

    Interaction of a lossless two-level atom with a monochromatic (classical) field of radiation is considered, as the atom initially possesses a translational state with a number of equidistant and discrete momenta. It is shown that the Rabi oscillations in such an atom evolve as a sequence of collapses and revivals, if the coupling wave deeply saturates the optical transition. Between revivals, the populations undergo subrevivals. Approximate analytical formulae are obtained taking the initial momentum distribution in the form of two shifted Gaussians or a Besselian. A possible experimental realization of such revivals is discussed

  7. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beaty, E.C.; Katsonis, K.

    1977-10-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion (spectroscopic data, atomic and molecular collisions, surface effects, ...). Particular emphasis is given to data applicable to Tokamak devices. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. A description of work in progress and ''Data Requests'' in the fusion field are also mentioned. Numerical data on light ion sputtering yields of first wall materials, electron capture and impact ionization for iron ions colliding with molecular hydrogen and charge exchange between multicharged ions and helium, argon, and, atomic or molecular hydrogen are given

  8. Communication received on 25 April 1995 from the Resident Representative of Belarus to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 25 April 1995, the Director General received a letter from the Resident Representative of Belarus to the International Atomic Energy Agency submitting the official notification of the signing of Belarus of the Agreement between the Republic of Belarus and the Agency for the Application of Safeguards pursuant to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. At the request of the Resident Representative, the text of the attached notification is circulated for the information of Member States

  9. 7th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research “Nuclear Ground and Isometric State Properties”

    CERN Document Server

    Błaszczak, Z; Marinova, K; LASER 2006

    2007-01-01

    7th International Workshop on Application of Lasers in Atomic Nuclei Research, LASER 2004, held in Poznan, Poland, May 29-June 01, 2006 Researchers and PhD students interested in recent results in the nuclear structure investigation by laser spectroscopy, the progress of the experimental technique and the future developments in the field will find this volume indispensable. Reprinted from Hyperfine Interactions (HYPE) Volume ???

  10. Communication of 17 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Communication of 17 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency, including a statement by the Acting President of the Russian Federation in connection with the ratification by the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation of START-II Treaty and the package agreements on antimissile defence of 1997

  11. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation. Industrial applications. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2002. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English, though some are also available in other languages than English

  12. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  13. Real-time nanofabrication with high-speed atomic force microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicary, J A; Miles, M J

    2009-01-01

    The ability to follow nanoscale processes in real-time has obvious benefits for the future of material science. In particular, the ability to evaluate the success of fabrication processes in situ would be an advantage for many in the semiconductor industry. We report on the application of a previously described high-speed atomic force microscope (AFM) for nanofabrication. The specific fabrication method presented here concerns the modification of a silicon surface by locally oxidizing the region in the vicinity of the AFM tip. Oxide features were fabricated during imaging, with relative tip-sample velocities of up to 10 cm s -1 , and with a data capture rate of 15 fps.

  14. 16. International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids. Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, H; Bauer, P; Semrad, D [ed.; Johannes Kepler Univ., Linz (Austria). Inst. fuer Experimentalphysik

    1996-12-31

    In this conference book of abstracts the following topics are treated: The interaction of atomic, molecular or ion beams with surfaces of solid metals and crystals, scattering and collisions, ion bombardment, ion channeling, energy losses and charge exchange, thin films, secondary emission, the Auger effect, sputtering of particles and atomic and molecular clusters. Thereby not only experimental results are presented but also computerized simulation methods are applied. (Suda).

  15. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 61

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.A.; Bannister, M.E.; Delcroix, J.L.; Fuhr, J.

    2002-01-01

    This bulletin is prepared by the IAEA to assist in the development of fusion research and technology. In part 1 the Atomic and Molecular Data Information System (AMDIS) of the IAEA is presented. In part 2, the indexed papers are listed separately for structure and spectra, atomic and molecular collisions and surface interactions. Part 3 contains all the bibliographic data for both indexed and non-indexed references

  16. 16. International Conference on Atomic Collisions in Solids. Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul, H.; Bauer, P.; Semrad, D.

    1995-01-01

    In this conference book of abstracts the following topics are treated: The interaction of atomic, molecular or ion beams with surfaces of solid metals and crystals, scattering and collisions, ion bombardment, ion channeling, energy losses and charge exchange, thin films, secondary emission, the Auger effect, sputtering of particles and atomic and molecular clusters. Thereby not only experimental results are presented but also computerized simulation methods are applied. (Suda)

  17. Decommissioning: Strategies and programmes at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included decommissioning in its regular programmes since 1985. Until a few years ago, attention was focused on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants, and to a lesser extent, research reactors. Some countries, however, are now devoting greater attention to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, with implementation of these programmes being seen as a high priority. This demanded equal attention in IAEA's programmes. In recent years, the IAEA has expanded its programmes to include guidance on decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities which are prevailing in most of its over 130 Member States. By 2010-2020, a significant number of nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle and non-reactor facilities will have exceeded their normal design lifetimes. Many of these facilities are already shutdown and are awaiting decommissioning. In 1996, the IAEA organized the decommissioning programme along two directions. A first direction focuses on the safety of management of radioactive waste including decommissioning. A second direction focuses on the technology and strategies to support waste management and decommissioning activities. This split of activities was instituted in order to keep the regulatory aspects separated from the strategic and technology-related activities. The focus of this paper will be on current and foreseen activities related to strategies and technologies of decommissioning, but other activities will be touched upon as well. All technical divisions of the IAEA provide technical support for Technical Co-operation (TC) projects with developing countries. TC projects in the field of decommissioning are given separate coverage in this paper. The IAEA documents on decommissioning strategies and technologies are presented in Section 2. Technical Co-operation Programme concerning Decommissioning is discussed focusing the objectives, the specific projects and the

  18. Introducing the Brazilian program of technical support to the International Atomic Energy Agency - Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, Laercio A.; Palhares, Lilia C.; Dias, Fabio C.; Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    As an active Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Brazil has applied substantial resources in order to maintain the best possible cooperation with the Agency, aiming at a continuous improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards system. Over the last decades a number of projects, involving the participation of high-level Brazilian professionals in the nuclear area, have already been jointly completed. To continue providing this voluntary support to the IAEA Department of Safeguards for research, development and implementation, in 2006 Brazil decided to accept the IAEA's invitation to participate in the IAEA Member States Support Programmes initiative, which currently includes 21 Member States. The Research and Development (R and D) Programme for Nuclear Verification is the IAEA reference in this regard, establishing the high priority needs and describing each recognized departmental project. The Programme is issued every two years. The 'Brazilian Support Programme (BRZ SP)' was established on the basis of a set of administrative procedures titled 'Cooperation Arrangements and Guidelines', agreed between the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the IAEA - Department of Safeguards. The scope of the BRZ SP includes: the participation in field tests and the evaluation of state-of-the-art technologies as requested by the IAEA for its safeguards applications; the training of safeguards personnel involved with safeguards implementation at both facility and State levels; laboratorial support in the area of destructive and nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials; the analysis of safeguards issues; information acquisition, analysis and evaluation; and the provision of human resources, such as experts and consultants to work directly with the IAEA Secretariat. The activities agreed under the BRZ SP are not restricted to CNEN staff members. Professionals from other Brazilian organizations may also be involved

  19. Real time drift measurement for colloidal probe atomic force microscope: a visual sensing approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yuliang, E-mail: wangyuliang@buaa.edu.cn; Bi, Shusheng [Robotics Institute, School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China); Wang, Huimin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Rd., Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Drift has long been an issue in atomic force microscope (AFM) systems and limits their ability to make long time period measurements. In this study, a new method is proposed to directly measure and compensate for the drift between AFM cantilevers and sample surfaces in AFM systems. This was achieved by simultaneously measuring z positions for beads at the end of an AFM colloidal probe and on sample surface through an off-focus image processing based visual sensing method. The working principle and system configuration are presented. Experiments were conducted to validate the real time drift measurement and compensation. The implication of the proposed method for regular AFM measurements is discussed. We believe that this technique provides a practical and efficient approach for AFM experiments requiring long time period measurement.

  20. Short Sleep Times Predict Obesity in Internal Medicine Clinic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buscemi, Dolores; Kumar, Ashwani; Nugent, Rebecca; Nugent, Kenneth

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated an association between short sleep times and obesity as defined by body mass index (BMI). We wanted to determine whether this association occurs in patients with chronic medical diagnoses since the number of confounding factors is likely higher in patients than the general population. Methods: Two hundred patients attending internal medicine clinics completed a survey regarding sleep habits, lifestyle characteristics, and medical diagnoses. An independent surveyor collected the information on the questionnaires and reviewed the medical records. Height and weight were measured by clinic personnel. Data were analyzed with multivariate logistic regression. Results: Subjects with short sleep times (< 7 hours) had an increased likelihood of obesity as defined by a BMI ≥ 30 kg/m2 when compared to the reference group of (8, 9] hours (odds ratio 2.93; 95% confidence interval, 1.06–8.09). There was a U-shaped relationship between obesity and sleep time in women but not in men. Young age (18 to 49 years), not smoking, drinking alcohol, hypertension, diabetes, and sleep apnea were also associated with obesity in the overall model. Conclusions: This study demonstrates an association between short sleep times and obesity in undifferentiated patients attending an internal medicine clinic using models adjusting for age, lifestyle characteristics, and some medical diagnoses. The U-shaped relationship in women suggests that sleep patterns may have gender specific associations. These observations provide the background for therapeutic trials in weight loss in patients with established medical problems. Citation: Buscemi D; Kumar A; Nugent R; Nugent K. Short sleep times predict obesity in internal medicine clinic patients. J Clin Sleep Med 2007;3(7):681–688. PMID:18198800

  1. Shorting time of magnetically insulated reflex-ion diodes from the neutral-atom charge-exchange mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strobel, G.

    1981-10-01

    In a magnetically insulated diode, collision-free electrons return to the cathode and no electron current is present at the anode. Electron transport to the anode is studied in this paper. Steady-state space-charge-limited flow is assumed initially. Breakdown of ion flow occurs when static neutral atoms at the anode undergo charge exchange, which results in neutral atoms drifting across the diode. These are subsequently ionized by reflexing ions producing electrons trapped in Larmor orbits throughout the diode. These electrons drift to the anode via ionization and inelastic collisions with other neutral atoms. Model calculations compare the effects of foil and mesh cathodes. Steady-state space-charge-limited ion current densities are calculated. The neutral atom density at the cathode is determined as a function of time. The shorting time of the diode is scaled versus the electrode separation d, the diode potential V 0 , the magnetic field, and the initial concentration of static neutron atoms

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiatives: Records management for deep and near surface geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The international scientific community has long had an interest in determining methods by which information regarding nuclear waste repositories, and the inherent danger to humanity, could be passed from generation to generation and society to society. Because nuclear waste will remain radioactive for thousands of years future generations must be warned of the dangers thus eliminating intentional or inadvertent intrusion. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained so that this information remains accessible to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years; thus the retention of information continues beyond current societies, cultures and languages, and must be continually migrated to new retrieval technologies to assure access

  3. Time-of-flight mass spectrographs—From ions to neutral atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möbius, E.; Galvin, A. B.; Kistler, L. M.; Kucharek, H.; Popecki, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    After their introduction to space physics in the mid 1980s time-of-flight (TOF) spectrographs have become a main staple in spaceborne mass spectrometry. They have largely replaced magnetic spectrometers, except when extremely high mass resolution is required to identify complex molecules, for example, in the vicinity of comets or in planetary atmospheres. In combination with electrostatic analyzers and often solid state detectors, TOF spectrographs have become key instruments to diagnose space plasma velocity distributions, mass, and ionic charge composition. With a variety of implementation schemes that also include isochronous electric field configurations, TOF spectrographs can respond to diverse science requirements. This includes a wide range in mass resolution to allow the separation of medium heavy isotopes or to simply provide distributions of the major species, such as H, He, and O, to obtain information on source tracers or mass fluxes. With a top-hat analyzer at the front end, or in combination with deflectors for three-axis stabilized spacecraft, the distribution function of ions can be obtained with good time resolution. Most recently, the reach of TOF ion mass spectrographs has been extended to include energetic neutral atoms. After selecting the arrival direction with mechanical collimation, followed by conversion to ions, adapted TOF sensors form a new branch of the spectrograph family tree. We review the requirements, challenges, and implementation schemes for ion and neutral atom spectrographs, including potential directions for the future, while largely avoiding overlap with complementary contributions in this special issue.

  4. Relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation theory and applications to atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parpia, F.Z.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent linear-response theory appropriate to the relativistic local-density approximation (RLDA) to quantum electrodynamics (QED) is developed. The resulting theory, the relativistic time-dependent local-density approximation (RTDLDA) is specialized to the treatment of electric excitations in closed-shell atoms. This formalism is applied to the calculation of atomic photoionization parameters in the dipole approximation. The static-field limit of the RTDLDA is applied to the calculation of dipole polarizabilities. Extensive numerical calculations of the photoionization parameters for the rare gases neon, argon, krypton, and xenon, and for mercury from the RTDLDA are presented and compared in detail with the results of other theories, in particular the relativistic random-phase approximation (RRPA), and with experimental measurements. The predictions of the RTDLDA are comparable with the RRPA calculations made to date. This is remarkable in that the RTDLDA entails appreciably less computational effort. Finally, the dipole polarizabilities predicted by the static-field RTDLDA are compared with other determinations of these quantities. In view of its simplicity, the static-field RTDLDA demonstrates itself to be one of the most powerful theories available for the calculation of dipole polarizabilities

  5. Time ordering of two-step processes in energetic ion-atom collisions: Basic formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stolterfoht, N.

    1993-01-01

    The semiclassical approximation is applied in second order to describe time ordering of two-step processes in energetic ion-atom collisions. Emphasis is given to the conditions for interferences between first- and second-order terms. In systems with two active electrons, time ordering gives rise to a pair of associated paths involving a second-order process and its time-inverted process. Combining these paths within the independent-particle frozen orbital model, time ordering is lost. It is shown that the loss of time ordering modifies the second-order amplitude so that its ability to interfere with the first-order amplitude is essentially reduced. Time ordering and the capability for interference is regained, as one path is blocked by means of the Pauli exclusion principle. The time-ordering formalism is prepared for papers dealing with collision experiments of single excitation [Stolterfoht et al., following paper, Phys. Rev. A 48, 2986 (1993)] and double excitation [Stolterfoht et al. (unpublished)

  6. Direct atomic fabrication and dopant positioning in Si using electron beams with active real-time image-based feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Hudak, Bethany M.; Zarkadoula, Eva; Song, Jiaming; Maksov, Artem; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Snijders, Panchapakesan C.; Lupini, Andrew R.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2018-06-01

    Semiconductor fabrication is a mainstay of modern civilization, enabling the myriad applications and technologies that underpin everyday life. However, while sub-10 nanometer devices are already entering the mainstream, the end of the Moore’s law roadmap still lacks tools capable of bulk semiconductor fabrication on sub-nanometer and atomic levels, with probe-based manipulation being explored as the only known pathway. Here we demonstrate that the atomic-sized focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to manipulate semiconductors such as Si on the atomic level, inducing growth of crystalline Si from the amorphous phase, reentrant amorphization, milling, and dopant front motion. These phenomena are visualized in real-time with atomic resolution. We further implement active feedback control based on real-time image analytics to automatically control the e-beam motion, enabling shape control and providing a pathway for atom-by-atom correction of fabricated structures in the near future. These observations open a new epoch for atom-by-atom manufacturing in bulk, the long-held dream of nanotechnology.

  7. Direct atomic fabrication and dopant positioning in Si using electron beams with active real-time image-based feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesse, Stephen; Hudak, Bethany M; Zarkadoula, Eva; Song, Jiaming; Maksov, Artem; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kravchenko, Ivan; Snijders, Panchapakesan C; Lupini, Andrew R; Borisevich, Albina Y; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2018-06-22

    Semiconductor fabrication is a mainstay of modern civilization, enabling the myriad applications and technologies that underpin everyday life. However, while sub-10 nanometer devices are already entering the mainstream, the end of the Moore's law roadmap still lacks tools capable of bulk semiconductor fabrication on sub-nanometer and atomic levels, with probe-based manipulation being explored as the only known pathway. Here we demonstrate that the atomic-sized focused beam of a scanning transmission electron microscope can be used to manipulate semiconductors such as Si on the atomic level, inducing growth of crystalline Si from the amorphous phase, reentrant amorphization, milling, and dopant front motion. These phenomena are visualized in real-time with atomic resolution. We further implement active feedback control based on real-time image analytics to automatically control the e-beam motion, enabling shape control and providing a pathway for atom-by-atom correction of fabricated structures in the near future. These observations open a new epoch for atom-by-atom manufacturing in bulk, the long-held dream of nanotechnology.

  8. On the dynamics of excited atoms in time dependent electromagnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerre, Morten

    2004-06-01

    This thesis is composed of seven scientific publications written in the period 2001-2004. The focus has been set on Rydberg atoms of hydrogen and lithium in relatively weak electromagnetic fields. Such atoms have been studied extensively during many years, both experimentally and theoretically, They are relatively easy to handle in the laboratory. Their willingness to react to conventional field sources and their long lifetimes, are two reasons for this. Much new insight into fundamental quantum mechanics has been extracted from such studies. By exciting a non-hydrogenic ground state atom or molecule into a highly excited state, many properties of atomic hydrogen are adopted. In many cases the dynamics of such systems can be accurately described by the hydrogenic theory, or alternatively by some slightly modified version like quantum defect theory. In such theories the Rydberg electron(s) of the non-hydrogenic Rydberg system is treated like it is confined in a modified Coulomb potential, which arises from the non-hydrogenic core. defined by the non-excited electrons and the nucleus. The more heavily bound core electrons are less influenced from external perturbations than the excited electrons, giving rise to the so-called frozen-core approximation. where the total effect of the core electrons is put into a modified Coulomb potential. A major part of this thesis has been allocated to the study of core effects in highly excited states of lithium. In collaboration with time experimental group of Erik Horsdal-Pedersen at Aarhus University, we have considered several hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic aspects of such states, when exposed to weak slowly varying electromagnetic fields. The dynamics was restricted to one principal shell (intrashell). Two general features were observed, either the hydrogenic theory applied or alternatively, in case of massive deviation, the dynamics was accurately described by quantum defect theory, clearly demonstrating the usefulness of such

  9. On the dynamics of excited atoms in time dependent electromagnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerre, Morten

    2004-06-01

    This thesis is composed of seven scientific publications written in the period 2001-2004. The focus has been set on Rydberg atoms of hydrogen and lithium in relatively weak electromagnetic fields. Such atoms have been studied extensively during many years, both experimentally and theoretically, They are relatively easy to handle in the laboratory. Their willingness to react to conventional field sources and their long lifetimes, are two reasons for this. Much new insight into fundamental quantum mechanics has been extracted from such studies. By exciting a non-hydrogenic ground state atom or molecule into a highly excited state, many properties of atomic hydrogen are adopted. In many cases the dynamics of such systems can be accurately described by the hydrogenic theory, or alternatively by some slightly modified version like quantum defect theory. In such theories the Rydberg electron(s) of the non-hydrogenic Rydberg system is treated like it is confined in a modified Coulomb potential, which arises from the non-hydrogenic core. defined by the non-excited electrons and the nucleus. The more heavily bound core electrons are less influenced from external perturbations than the excited electrons, giving rise to the so-called frozen-core approximation. where the total effect of the core electrons is put into a modified Coulomb potential. A major part of this thesis has been allocated to the study of core effects in highly excited states of lithium. In collaboration with time experimental group of Erik Horsdal-Pedersen at Aarhus University, we have considered several hydrogenic and non-hydrogenic aspects of such states, when exposed to weak slowly varying electromagnetic fields. The dynamics was restricted to one principal shell (intrashell). Two general features were observed, either the hydrogenic theory applied or alternatively, in case of massive deviation, the dynamics was accurately described by quantum defect theory, clearly demonstrating the usefulness of such

  10. Velocity-gauge real-time TDDFT within a numerical atomic orbital basis set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pemmaraju, C. D.; Vila, F. D.; Kas, J. J.; Sato, S. A.; Rehr, J. J.; Yabana, K.; Prendergast, David

    2018-05-01

    The interaction of laser fields with solid-state systems can be modeled efficiently within the velocity-gauge formalism of real-time time dependent density functional theory (RT-TDDFT). In this article, we discuss the implementation of the velocity-gauge RT-TDDFT equations for electron dynamics within a linear combination of atomic orbitals (LCAO) basis set framework. Numerical results obtained from our LCAO implementation, for the electronic response of periodic systems to both weak and intense laser fields, are compared to those obtained from established real-space grid and Full-Potential Linearized Augmented Planewave approaches. Potential applications of the LCAO based scheme in the context of extreme ultra-violet and soft X-ray spectroscopies involving core-electronic excitations are discussed.

  11. Time-dependent first-principles study of angle-resolved secondary electron emission from atomic sheets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yasumitsu; Watanabe, Kazuyuki

    2018-02-01

    Angle-resolved secondary electron emission (ARSEE) spectra were analyzed for two-dimensional atomic sheets using a time-dependent first-principles simulation of electron scattering. We demonstrate that the calculated ARSEE spectra capture the unoccupied band structure of the atomic sheets. The excitation dynamics that lead to SEE have also been revealed by the time-dependent Kohn-Sham decomposition scheme. In the present study, the mechanism for the experimentally observed ARSEE from atomic sheets is elucidated with respect to both energetics and the dynamical aspects of SEE.

  12. Time scaling internal state predictive control of a solar plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, R.N. [DEE-FCT/UNL, Caparica (Portugal); Rato, L.M. [INESC-ID/University, Evora (Portugal); Lemos, J.M. [INESC-ID/IST, Lisboa (Portugal)

    2003-12-01

    The control of a distributed collector solar field is addressed in this work, exploiting the plant's transport characteristic. The plant is modeled by a hyperbolic type partial differential equation (PDE) where the transport speed is the manipulated flow, i.e. the controller output. The model has an external distributed source, which is the solar radiation captured along the collector, approximated to depend only of time. From the solution of the PDE, a linear discrete state space model is obtained by using time-scaling and the redefinition of the control input. This method allows overcoming the dependency of the time constants with the operating point. A model-based predictive adaptive controller is derived with the internal temperature distribution estimated with a state observer. Experimental results at the solar power plant are presented, illustrating the advantages of the approach under consideration. (author)

  13. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Smith, F.J.

    1978-10-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion (spectroscopic data, atomic and molecular collisions, surface effects, ...). Particular emphasis is given to data applicable to Tokamak devices. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. A description of work in progress and ''Data Requests'' in the fusion field are also mentioned. Cross-sections for the electron impact excitation of 2sub(p1/2) and 2sub(p3/2) states of the lithium-line ions C 3+ , F 23+ , Mo 39+ and W 71+ calculated in the relativistic Coulomb-Born approximation are presented

  14. Blind deconvolution of time-of-flight mass spectra from atom probe tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, L.J.S.; Thuvander, M.; Stiller, K.; Odén, M.; Hultman, L.

    2013-01-01

    A major source of uncertainty in compositional measurements in atom probe tomography stems from the uncertainties of assigning peaks or parts of peaks in the mass spectrum to their correct identities. In particular, peak overlap is a limiting factor, whereas an ideal mass spectrum would have peaks at their correct positions with zero broadening. Here, we report a method to deconvolute the experimental mass spectrum into such an ideal spectrum and a system function describing the peak broadening introduced by the field evaporation and detection of each ion. By making the assumption of a linear and time-invariant behavior, a system of equations is derived that describes the peak shape and peak intensities. The model is fitted to the observed spectrum by minimizing the squared residuals, regularized by the maximum entropy method. For synthetic data perfectly obeying the assumptions, the method recovered peak intensities to within ±0.33at%. The application of this model to experimental APT data is exemplified with Fe–Cr data. Knowledge of the peak shape opens up several new possibilities, not just for better overall compositional determination, but, e.g., for the estimation of errors of ranging due to peak overlap or peak separation constrained by isotope abundances. - Highlights: • A method for the deconvolution of atom probe mass spectra is proposed. • Applied to synthetic randomly generated spectra the accuracy was ±0.33 at. • Application of the method to an experimental Fe–Cr spectrum is demonstrated

  15. Physics and Its Multiple Roles in the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massey, Charles D.

    2017-01-01

    The IAEA is the world's centre for cooperation in the nuclear field. It was set up as the world's ``Atoms for Peace'' organization in 1957 within the United Nations family. The Agency works with its Member States and multiple partners worldwide to promote the safe, secure and peaceful use of nuclear technologies. Three main areas of work underpin the IAEA's mission: Safety and Security, Science and Technology, and Safeguards and Verification. To carry out its mission, the Agency is authorized to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world; foster the exchange of scientific and technical information on peaceful uses of atomic energy; and encourage the exchange of training of scientists and experts in the field of peaceful uses of atomic energy. Nowadays, nuclear physics and nuclear technology are applied in a great variety of social areas, such as power production, medical diagnosis and therapies, environmental protection, security control, material tests, food processing, waste treatments, agriculture and artifacts analysis. This presentation will cover the role and practical application of physics at the IAEA, and, in particular, focus on the role physics has, and will play, in nuclear security.

  16. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1984-01-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided, work in progress is briefly reported: Transport on tokamak plasmas simulation, post collisions of gold ions in helium

  17. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 27

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.G.

    1984-12-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent relevent data, summarized in the document, is provided (373 literature pieces). Work in progress on the ionization by electron impact (theoretical results) is also briefly reported on

  18. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 16

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1981-06-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. ''Data Request'' in the fusion field are also mentioned. The bulletin contains a list of references covering the years 1980 and 1981 for all the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics

  19. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1980-11-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. The bulletin contains a list of references covering the year 1980 for all the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics

  20. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 23

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1983-09-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported (OIV in temperature and density diagnostics, measured cross section for electron impact ionization of Iron and Tungsten)

  1. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 22

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1983-05-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. Work in progress is briefly reported (charge exchange of slow ionized ions with neutral gases, cross section for electron impact ionization of Alt). The bulletin contains a list of references covering the years 1981, 1982 and 1983 for publications on controlled thermonuclear fusion and plasma physics

  2. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Rumble, J. Jr.; Smith, F.J.

    1979-07-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. The bulletin contains a list of references covering the years 1978 and 1979 for all the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics

  3. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1981-03-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. The bulletin contains a list of references covering the years 1980 and 1981 for all the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics

  4. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Smith, F.J.

    1979-01-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. The bulletin contains an extensive list of references covering the years 1977 and 1978 for all the publications on control fusion and plasma physics

  5. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Smith, F.J.

    1979-04-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. The bulletin contains an extensive list of references covering the year 1978 and the beginning of 1979 for all the publications on control fusion and plasma physics

  6. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1982-06-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported. The bulletin contains a list of references covering the years 1981 and 1982 for all the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics

  7. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.

    1982-09-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. The bulletin contains a list of references covering the year 1982 for all the publications on controlled thermonuclear fusion and plasma physics

  8. Nanophotonic Optical Isolator Controlled by the Internal State of Cold Atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Sayrin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The realization of nanophotonic optical isolators with high optical isolation even at ultralow light levels and low optical losses is an open problem. Here, we employ the link between the local polarization of strongly confined light and its direction of propagation to realize low-loss nonreciprocal transmission through a silica nanofiber at the single-photon level. The direction of the resulting optical isolator is controlled by the spin state of cold atoms. We perform our experiment in two qualitatively different regimes, i.e., with an ensemble of cold atoms where each atom is weakly coupled to the waveguide and with a single atom strongly coupled to the waveguide mode. In both cases, we observe simultaneously high isolation and high forward transmission. The isolator concept constitutes a nanoscale quantum optical analog of microwave ferrite resonance isolators, can be implemented with all kinds of optical waveguides and emitters, and might enable novel integrated optical devices for fiber-based classical and quantum networks.

  9. Long Spin-Relaxation Times in a Transition-Metal Atom in Direct Contact to a Metal Substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermenau, Jan; Ternes, Markus; Steinbrecher, Manuel; Wiesendanger, Roland; Wiebe, Jens

    2018-03-14

    Long spin-relaxation times are a prerequisite for the use of spins in data storage or nanospintronics technologies. An atomic-scale solid-state realization of such a system is the spin of a transition-metal atom adsorbed on a suitable substrate. For the case of a metallic substrate, which enables the direct addressing of the spin by conduction electrons, the experimentally measured lifetimes reported to date are on the order of only hundreds of femtoseconds. Here, we show that the spin states of iron atoms adsorbed directly on a conductive platinum substrate have a surprisingly long spin-relaxation time in the nanosecond regime, which is comparable to that of a transition metal atom decoupled from the substrate electrons by a thin decoupling layer. The combination of long spin-relaxation times and strong coupling to conduction electrons implies the possibility to use flexible coupling schemes to process the spin information.

  10. Observation of nuclear track in organic material by atomic force microscopy in real time during etching

    CERN Document Server

    Palmino, F; Labrune, J C

    1999-01-01

    The developments of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allow to investigated solid surfaces with a nanometer scale. These techniques are useful methods allowing direct observation of surface morphologies. Particularly in the nuclear track fields, they offer a new tool to give many new informations on track formation. In this paper we present the preliminary results of a new use of this technique to characterize continuously the formation of the revealed track in a cellulose nitrate detector (LR115) after an alpha particle irradiation. For that, a specific cell has been used to observe, by nano-observations, the evolution of track shapes simultaneously with chemical treatment. Thus, the track shape evolution has been studied; visualizing the evolution of the tracks in real time, in situ during the chemical etching process.

  11. Development, relevance, and applications of 'atom-at-a-time' techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.C.

    2012-01-01

    A brief history of the development and some of the first uses of 'atom-at-a-time' techniques to investigate the chemical and nuclear properties of the actinide and transactinide elements are presented. The currently known transactinides (all elements with Z > 103) were discovered using physical (nuclear) techniques rather than chemical separation techniques because of their short half-lives and low production rates and the difficulty in accurately predicting chemical properties of the heaviest elements because of relativistic effects. Some of the constraints on systems suitable for such studies and whether these tracer-scale results can be extended to the macro-scale are discussed. The relevance and importance of the methods and their potential for application to some current problems such as nuclear forensics and proliferation and environmental concerns are considered. The value of graduate research utilizing such techniques in helping to attract and educate the next generation of nuclear scientists is highlighted. (author)

  12. An open source/real-time atomic force microscope architecture to perform customizable force spectroscopy experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materassi, Donatello; Baschieri, Paolo; Tiribilli, Bruno; Zuccheri, Giampaolo; Samorì, Bruno

    2009-08-01

    We describe the realization of an atomic force microscope architecture designed to perform customizable experiments in a flexible and automatic way. Novel technological contributions are given by the software implementation platform (RTAI-LINUX), which is free and open source, and from a functional point of view, by the implementation of hard real-time control algorithms. Some other technical solutions such as a new way to estimate the optical lever constant are described as well. The adoption of this architecture provides many degrees of freedom in the device behavior and, furthermore, allows one to obtain a flexible experimental instrument at a relatively low cost. In particular, we show how such a system has been employed to obtain measures in sophisticated single-molecule force spectroscopy experiments [Fernandez and Li, Science 303, 1674 (2004)]. Experimental results on proteins already studied using the same methodologies are provided in order to show the reliability of the measure system.

  13. Atom-by-atom assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hla, Saw Wai

    2014-01-01

    Atomic manipulation using a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip enables the construction of quantum structures on an atom-by-atom basis, as well as the investigation of the electronic and dynamical properties of individual atoms on a one-atom-at-a-time basis. An STM is not only an instrument that is used to ‘see’ individual atoms by means of imaging, but is also a tool that is used to ‘touch’ and ‘take’ the atoms, or to ‘hear’ their movements. Therefore, the STM can be considered as the ‘eyes’, ‘hands’ and ‘ears’ of the scientists, connecting our macroscopic world to the exciting atomic world. In this article, various STM atom manipulation schemes and their example applications are described. The future directions of atomic level assembly on surfaces using scanning probe tips are also discussed. (review article)

  14. ENAM'04 Fourth International Conference on Exotic Nuclei and Atomic Masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, C. J.; Nazarewicz, W.; Rykaczewski, K. P.

    2005-01-01

    The conference can trace its origins to the 1950s and 1960s with the Atomic Mass and Fundamental Constants (AMCO) and the Nuclei Far From Stability (NFFS) series of conferences. Held jointly in 1992, the conferences officially merged in 1995 and the fourth conference was held at Callaway Gardens in Pine Mountain, GA and was organized by the Physics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The conference covered a broad list of topics consisting of a series of invited and contributed presentation highlighting recent research in the following fields: Atomic masses, nuclear moments, and nuclear radii; Forms of radioactivity; Nuclear structure, nuclei at the drip lines, cluster phenomena; Reactions with radioactive ion beams; Nuclear astrophysics; Fundamental symmetries and interactions; Heaviest elements and fission; Radioactive ion beam production and experimental developments; Applications of exotic nuclei

  15. An atomic orbital based real-time time-dependent density functional theory for computing electronic circular dichroism band spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong, E-mail: xsli@uw.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    One of the challenges of interpreting electronic circular dichroism (ECD) band spectra is that different states may have different rotatory strength signs, determined by their absolute configuration. If the states are closely spaced and opposite in sign, observed transitions may be washed out by nearby states, unlike absorption spectra where transitions are always positive additive. To accurately compute ECD bands, it is necessary to compute a large number of excited states, which may be prohibitively costly if one uses the linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) framework. Here we implement a real-time, atomic-orbital based TDDFT method for computing the entire ECD spectrum simultaneously. The method is advantageous for large systems with a high density of states. In contrast to previous implementations based on real-space grids, the method is variational, independent of nuclear orientation, and does not rely on pseudopotential approximations, making it suitable for computation of chiroptical properties well into the X-ray regime.

  16. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques, and Instrumentation, Industrial Applications, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1986-1996. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. Contents cover the three main areas of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactor and Particle Accelerator Applications, and Nuclear Data), (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, and Tracers), and (iii) Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

  17. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world.

  18. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  19. Seventh international seminar on ion-atom collisions (ISIAC VII): summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The scientific program was structured into eight symposia representing seven important research areas. The subject matter was expanded to include ion-molecule collisions as one of the eight symposia. The symposia were: (1) collisions involving strong binding phenomena and nuclear effects; (2) low-energy, high charge state collisions; (3) Rydberg states; (4) an Open Session; (5) ion-molecule collisions; (6) laser applications to atomic and molecular collisions; (7) collision spectroscopy; and (8) polarization, alignment and correlation

  20. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  1. Time-resolved X-ray scattering by electronic wave packets: analytic solutions to the hydrogen atom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmermacher, Mats; Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2017-01-01

    Modern pulsed X-ray sources permit time-dependent measurements of dynamical changes in atoms and molecules via non-resonant scattering. The planning, analysis, and interpretation of such experiments, however, require a firm and elaborated theoretical framework. This paper provides a detailed...... description of time-resolved X-ray scattering by non-stationary electronic wave packets in atomic systems. A consistent application of the Waller-Hartree approximation is discussed and different contributions to the total differential scattering signal are identified and interpreted. Moreover......, it is demonstrated how the scattering signal of wave packets in the hydrogen atom can be expressed analytically. This permits simulations without numerical integration and establishes a benchmark for both efficiency and accuracy. Based on that, scattering patterns of an exemplary wave packet in the hydrogen atom...

  2. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts J Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching, comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years. Only 42 hours (15% involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year. Most AHD hours (78% focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4, which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  3. FOREWORD: The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchang-Brillet, Wad Lydia; Wyart, Jean-François; Zeippen, Claude

    1996-01-01

    The 5th International Colloquium on Atomic Spectra and Oscillator Strengths for Astrophysical and Laboratory Plasmas was held in Meudon, France, from August 28 to 31 1995. It was the fifth in a series started by the Atomic Spectroscopic Group at the University of Lund, Sweden, in 1983. Then followed the meetings in Toledo, USA, Amsterdam, The Nether- lands and Gaithersburg, USA, with a three year period. The original title of the series ended with "... for Astrophysics and Fusion Research" and became more general with the 4th colloquium in Gaithersburg. The purpose of the present meeting was, in line with tradition, to bring together "producers" and "users" of atomic data so as to ensure optimal coordination. Atomic physicists who study the structure of atoms and their radiative and collisional properties were invited to explain the development of their work, emphasizing the possibilities of producing precise transition wavelengths and relative line intensities. Astrophysicists and laboratory plasma physicists were invited to review their present research interests and the context in which atomic data are needed. The number of participants was about 70 for the first three meetings, then exploded to 170 at Gaithersburg. About 140 participants, coming from 13 countries, attended the colloquium in Meudon. This large gathering was partly due to a number of participants from Eastern Europe larger than in the past, and it certainly showed a steady interest for interdisciplinary exchanges between different communities of scientists. This volume includes all the invited papers given at the conference and, in the appendix, practical information on access to some databases. All invited speakers presented their talks aiming at good communication between scientists from different backgrounds. A separate bound volume containing extended abstracts of the poster papers has been published by the Publications de l'Observatoire de Paris, (Meudon 1996), under the responsibility of

  4. Atomic force microscope cantilever as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Koenders, Ludger; Wolff, Helmut; Haertig, Frank; Schilling, Meinhard

    2010-01-01

    A tuning fork-based atomic force microscope cantilever has been investigated for application as an encoding sensor for real-time displacement measurement. The algorithm used to encode the displacement is based on the direct count of the integer pitches of a known grating, and the calculation of the fractional parts of a pitch at the beginning and during displacement. A cross-correlation technique has been adopted and applied to the real-time signal filtering process for the determination of the pitch during scanning by using a half sinusoidal waveform template. For the first investigation, a 1D sinusoidal grating with the pitch of 300 nm is used. The repeatability of displacement measurements over a distance of 70 µm is better than 2.2 nm. As the first application, the real-time displacement of a scanning stage is measured by the new encoding principle as it is moved in an open-loop mode and closed-loop mode based on its built-in capacitance sensor

  5. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-11-13

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  6. Direct observation of ultrafast atomic motion using time-resolved X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shymanovich, U.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is dedicated to the study of the atomic motion in laser irradiated solids on a picosecond to subpicosecond time-scale using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction technique. In the second chapter, the laser system, the laser-plasma based X-ray source and the experimental setup for optical pump / X-ray probe measurements were presented. Chapter 3 is devoted to the characterization and comparison of different types of X-ray optics. Chapter 4 presented the time-resolved X-ray diffraction experiments performed for this thesis. The first two sections of this chapter discuss the measurements of initially unexpected strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity of the X-ray probe beam. The elimination of the strain-induced transient changes of the integrated reflectivity represented an important prerequisite to perform the study of lattice heating in Germanium after femtosecond optical excitation by measuring the transient Debye-Waller effect. The third section describes the investigations of acoustic waves upon ultrafast optical excitation and discusses the two different pressure contributions driving them: the thermal and the electronic ones. (orig.)

  7. Evolution in time of an N-atom system. II. Calculation of the eigenstates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rudolph, Terry; Yavin, Itay; Freedhoff, Helen

    2004-01-01

    We calculate the energy eigenvalues and eigenstates corresponding to coherent single and multiple excitations of a number of different arrays of N identical two-level atoms (TLA's) or qubits, including polygons, 'diamond' structures, polygon multilayers, icosahedra, and dodecahedra. We assume only that the coupling occurs via an exchange interaction which depends on the separation between the atoms. We include the interactions between all pairs of atoms, and our results are valid for arbitrary separations relative to the radiation wavelength

  8. A real-time internal dose assessment exercise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bingham, D.; Bull, R. K.

    2013-01-01

    A real-time internal dose assessment exercise has been conducted in which participants were required to make decisions about sampling requirements, seek relevant information about the 'incident' and make various interim dose assessments. At the end of the exercise, each participant was requested to make a formal assessment, providing statements of the methods, models and assumptions used in that assessment. In this paper we describe how the hypothetical assessment case was set up and the exercise was conducted, the responses of the participants and the assessments of dose that they made. Finally we discuss the lessons learnt from the exercise and suggest how the exercise may be adapted to a wider range of participants. (authors)

  9. Real-time control of internal transport barriers in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazon, D.; Litaudon, X.; Moreau, D. [Association Euratom-CEA, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul lez Durance (France)] [and others

    2002-07-01

    We present the results of recent experiments related to real-time control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) in JET. Using a simple criterion to characterize the ITB existence, location and strength, we have successfully controlled for the first time the radial electron temperature profile within the ITB. The dimensionless variable used in the real-time algorithm - ratio of the ion gyro-radius to the local gradient scale length of the electron temperature - is a measure of the normalized electron temperature gradient and characterizes satisfactorily the main ITB features with a relatively low computational cost. We show several examples of control of this variable in various experimental conditions of toroidal field and plasma current, using different heating systems as control actuators. We also present a double-loop feedback scheme where both the global neutron rate from D-D reactions and the ITB strength are controlled simultaneously. In this case the ITB is sustained in a fully non-inductive current drive regime during several seconds. With the proposed control method, disruptions are avoided by holding the plasma performance at a prescribed target and this opens the route towards stationary operation of tokamak plasmas with ITBs. Initial results suggest that the additional control of the current profile is an important issue for achieving steady-state operation, in particular in the triggering and the sustainment of the ITB. (author)

  10. Application of Internal Standard Method for Several 3d-Transition Metallic Elements in Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using a Multi-wavelength High-resolution Spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toya, Yusuke; Itagaki, Toshiko; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    We investigated a simultaneous internal standard method in flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS), in order to better the analytical precision of 3d-transition metals contained in steel materials. For this purpose, a new spectrometer system for FAAS, comprising a bright xenon lamp as the primary radiation source and a high-resolution Echelle monochromator, was employed to measure several absorption lines at a wavelength width of ca. 0.3 nm at the same time, which enables the absorbances of an analytical line and also an internal standard line to be estimated. In considering several criteria for selecting an internal standard element and the absorption line, it could be suggested that platinum-group elements: ruthenium, rhodium, or palladium, were suitable for an internal standard element to determine the 3d-transition metal elements, such as titanium, iron, and nickel, by measuring an appropriate pair of these absorption lines simultaneously. Several variances of the absorption signal, such as a variation in aspirated amounts of sample solution and a short-period drift of the primary light source, would be corrected and thus reduced, when the absorbance ratio of the analytical line to the internal standard line was measured. In Ti-Pd, Ni-Rh, and Fe-Ru systems chosen as typical test samples, the repeatability of the signal respnses was investigated with/without the internal standard method, resulting in better precision when the internal standard method was applied in the FAAS with a nitrous oxide-acetylene flame rather than an air-acetylene flame.

  11. Internal standardization in atomic-emission spectrometry using inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The principle of internal standardization has been used in quantitative analytical emission spectroscopy since 1925 to minimize the errors arising from fluctuations in sample preparation, excitation-source conditions, and detection parameters. Although modern spectroscopic excitation sources are far more stable and electronic detection methods are more precise than before, the system for the introduction of the sample in spectrometric analysis using inductively coupled plasma (ICP) introduces significant errors, and internal standardization can still play a useful role in improving the overall precision of the analytical results. The criteria for the selection of the elements to be used as internal standards in arc and spark spectrographic analysis apply to a much lesser extent in ICP-spectrometric analysis. Internal standardization is recommended for use in routine ICP-simultaneous spectrometric analysis to improve its accuracy and precision and to provide a monitor for the reassurance of the analyst. However, the selection of an unsuitable reference element can result in misuse of the principle of internal standardization and, although internal standardization can be applied when a sequential monochromator is used, the main sources of error will not be minimized

  12. Spectral fitting method for the solution of time-dependent Schroedinger equations: Applications to atoms in intense laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Haoxue; Cai Qingyu; Rao Jianguo; Li Baiwen

    2002-01-01

    A spectral fitting method for solving the time-dependent Schroedinger equation has been developed and applied to the atom in intense laser fields. This method allows us to obtain a highly accurate time-dependent wave function with a contribution from the high-order term of Δt. Moreover, the time-dependent wave function is determined on a small number of discrete mesh points, thus making calculations simple and accurate. This method is illustrated by computing wave functions and harmonic generation spectra of a model atom in laser fields

  13. The complete treatment of the time evolution in the case of a discretized atom-field interaction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seke, J.; Adam, G.; Soldatov, A.V.; Bogolubov, N.N.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The dynamics of a discretized atom-field interaction model with a physically relevant form factor is analyzed. It is shown that after some short time interval only a small fraction of eigenvalues and eigenstates (belonging to the close vicinity of the excited atomic state energy E=ω 0 /2) contributes to the nondecay probability amplitudes in the long-time regime, whereas the contribution of all other eigenstates and eigenvalues is negligible. Nevertheless, to describe correctly the non-Markovian dynamics in the short-time regime the contribution of all eigenstates and eigenvalues must be taken into account. (author)

  14. International Conference on the Frontiers in Atomic, Molecular, and Optical Physics (AMO2016)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    Atoms, molecules, and light have been at the forefront of understanding quantum mechanics, since its discovery over 100 years ago. Since then the field has progressed from understanding the most fundamental aspects of how particles behave under quantum mechanics to controlling individual atoms for creating new technologies. While matter and light are from ordinary experience rather different, with today's control of coherent quantum phenomena many of the ideas freely cross their respective boundaries. Some of the topics that will be covered at the conference include, but are not limited to, cold atoms and cold molecules, ultrafast and precision spectroscopy, quantum manipulation and precision measurement, quantum computing and quantum communication, and quantum metrology. In this conference we aim to bring together the leading experts working in the frontiers of atomic, molecular, and optical systems. Scientific Committee: Guoxiang Huang Director, NYU-ECNU Institute of Physics at NYU Shanghai; Professor of Physics Department of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy East China Normal University Daniel L. Stein Director, NYU-ECNU Institute of Physics at NYU Shanghai; Professor of Physics and Mathematics Departments of Physics and Mathematics, NYU Jian Wu Director, Professor of Physics State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy East China Normal University E Wu Researcher State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy East China Normal University Haibin Wu Professor of Physics State Key Laboratory of Precision Spectroscopy East China Normal University Tim Byrnes Assistant Professor of Physics at NYU Shanghai Invited Speakers: Jurgen Appel (Copenhagen, Denmark) Luiz Davidovich (Universidade Federal Do Rio De Janeiro, Brazil) Jonathan Dowling (LSU, USA) Luming Duan (Michigan, USA) Claude Fabre (Universite Pierre Et Marie Curie, France) Elisabeth Giacobino (CNRS Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, France) Rudolf Grimm (Innsbruck, Austria) Fedor

  15. International bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion. No. 17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Langley, R.A.

    1981-11-01

    This bulletin deals with atomic and molecular data for fusion. A bibliography for the most recent data presented in the document is provided. Work in progress is briefly reported: Electron ionization cross sections for light elements, single electron capture by highly charged ions colliding with hydrogen, inconel 626 surface exfoliation, cavities in nickel induced by helium ion irradiation, electron impact excitation of hydrogenic ions. The bulletin contains a list of references for the publications on controlled fusion and plasma physics for 1980 and 1981

  16. The standardisation of trace elements in international biological standard reference materials with neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectrophotometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieterse, H.

    1981-12-01

    An investigation was undertaken into the analytical procedures and the identification of problem areas, for the certification of a new biological standard reference material supplied by the International Atomic Energy Agency, namely, a human hair sample designated as HH-I. The analyses comprised the determination of the elements As, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni, Sb, Se, and Zn in the hair sample by using two analytical techniques, namely, Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and Atomic Absorption. Three other certified biological reference materials, namely, Orchard Leaves (ORCH-L), Sea Plant Material (SPM-I) and Copepod (MAA-I) were used as control standards. Determinations were made of the moisture content of the samples, using varying conditions of drying, and the necessary corrections were applied to all analytical results so that the final elemental values related to dry weight of samples. Attention was also given to the possible loss of specific elements during ashing of the samples prior to the actual instrumental analysis. The results obtained for the hair sample by the two techniques were in good agreement for the elements Co, Fe, Mn, and Zn, but did not agree for the elements Cr and Sb. As, Hg and Se could only be determined with Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis, and Cd, Cu and Ni only with Atomic Absorption. Most of the results obtained for the three control standard reference materials were within the ranges specified for the individual elements in each sample. The analytical procedures used for determining Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni and Sb with Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis and As, Cr, Sb and Se with Atomic Absorption, need further investigation. The measurement of the moisture content and the ashing of samples also require further investigation with a view to improving accuracy

  17. Environmental Radioactivity Studies Within The Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute During The Time Period 1980 - 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dang Duc Nhan; Pham Duy Hien; Ngo Quang Huy; Nguyen Hao Quang; Nguyen Trong Trang; Tran Ngoc Toan; Vuong Thu Bac; Nguyen Quang Long; Nguyen Thanh Binh; Phan Son Hai; Nguyen Trong Ngo; Truong Y

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the monitoring activities for natural and anthropogenic radioactivity in the environment such as in surface soil, in surface and groundwater, in the atmosphere and food of Viet Nam that have been conducted by the staff of the Vietnam Atomic Energy Institute (VAEI) since the first day of its foundation. Among natural radionuclide, uranium/radium, thorium, potassium-40 in surface soils and 222 Rn in the atmosphere are of particular interest for estimating the annual effective dose resulted from gamma radiation and inhalation to the public. The total annual effective dose (outdoor and indoor dose) from gamma radiation of natural radioactivity (U, Th, 40 K) in surface soil to the public of all the 63 provinces over Viet Nam was estimated as high as 0.54 mSv that is in 10% higher than those reported in the UN SCEAR-2000. The annual effective dose due to inhalation with the air containing 222 Rn to the habitant in the Ha Noi city was found to be as high as 1.13 mSv that is in the range of the dose reported for the Asian region. The anthropogenic radionuclides under the monitoring are 90 Sr, 137 Cs, and 239+240 Pu originated from nuclear weapon tests during the 1950-1960. Concentration of the anthropogenic radionuclide in surface soil gives an idea about the fall-out inventory of the radio-isotopes from the nuclear explosion in the past. This information would be necessary for the Environmental Impact Assessment for the Nuclear Power Construction Project in Viet Nam. The results of environmental radioactivity monitoring activities of the VAEI has been composed in twelve scientific papers published in numerous International Scientific Journals like J. Environ. Radioact. and Radiat. Prot. Dosim. Two books entitled: Radioactivity in the Environment and Radioactivity Measurement Applied in the Environmental Researches has been drafted and submitted to the Science and Technique Publisher for printing out soon. (author)

  18. time-consciuosness: a presentation and critique of Husserl's phenomenology on the consciousness of internal time

    OpenAIRE

    Nissen Løje, Kamille; Mommer, Trine Kirstine; Sørensen, Emma Amalie Forum; Rasmussen, Nina Randrup; Lundkvist, Silas

    2009-01-01

    The project is based on Edmund Husserl’s lectures from 1905, On the Phenomenology of the Consciousness of Internal Time (1893-1917). The project is twofold; the first part is an account of Husserl’s branch of phenomenology. The second part consists of a discussion- and critique of some of the concepts in his phenomenology, which was needed to answer our problem definition. Discussions were among others, a distinction between recollection and retention, and protention and anticipation. Further...

  19. 78 FR 28987 - Revisions to Transportation Safety Requirements and Harmonization With International Atomic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    .... 115, ``International Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the... paragraph 107(f) of TS-R-1, which addresses non-radioactive solid objects with radioactive substances..., ``Radiation protection--Sealed radioactive sources-- General requirements and classification,'' Second Edition...

  20. Three-dimensional time-dependent computer modeling of the electrothermal atomizers for analytical spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsivilskiy, I. V.; Nagulin, K. Yu.; Gilmutdinov, A. Kh.

    2016-02-01

    A full three-dimensional nonstationary numerical model of graphite electrothermal atomizers of various types is developed. The model is based on solution of a heat equation within solid walls of the atomizer with a radiative heat transfer and numerical solution of a full set of Navier-Stokes equations with an energy equation for a gas. Governing equations for the behavior of a discrete phase, i.e., atomic particles suspended in a gas (including gas-phase processes of evaporation and condensation), are derived from the formal equations molecular kinetics by numerical solution of the Hertz-Langmuir equation. The following atomizers test the model: a Varian standard heated electrothermal vaporizer (ETV), a Perkin Elmer standard THGA transversely heated graphite tube with integrated platform (THGA), and the original double-stage tube-helix atomizer (DSTHA). The experimental verification of computer calculations is carried out by a method of shadow spectral visualization of the spatial distributions of atomic and molecular vapors in an analytical space of an atomizer.

  1. Time-variable gravity potential components for optical clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voigt, C.; Denker, H.; Timmen, L.

    2016-01-01

    The latest generation of optical atomic clocks is approaching the level of one part in 10 18 in terms of frequency stability and uncertainty. For clock comparisons and the definition of international time scales, a relativistic redshift effect of the clock frequencies has to be taken into account at a corresponding uncertainty level of about 0.1 m 2 s -2 and 0.01 m in terms of gravity potential and height, respectively. Besides the predominant static part of the gravity potential, temporal variations must be considered in order to avoid systematic frequency shifts. Time-variable gravity potential components induced by tides and non-tidal mass redistributions are investigated with regard to the level of one part in 10 18 . The magnitudes and dominant time periods of the individual gravity potential contributions are investigated globally and for specific laboratory sites together with the related uncertainty estimates. The basics of the computation methods are presented along with the applied models, data sets and software. Solid Earth tides contribute by far the most dominant signal with a global maximum amplitude of 4.2 m 2 s -2 for the potential and a range (maximum-to-minimum) of up to 1.3 and 10.0 m 2 s -2 in terms of potential differences between specific laboratories over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. Amplitudes of the ocean tidal loading potential can amount up to 1.25 m 2 s -2 , while the range of the potential between specific laboratories is 0.3 and 1.1 m 2 s -2 over continental and intercontinental scales, respectively. These are the only two contributors being relevant at a 10 -17 level. However, several other time-variable potential effects can particularly affect clock comparisons at the 10 -18 level. Besides solid Earth pole tides, these are non-tidal mass redistributions in the atmosphere, the oceans and the continental water storage. (authors)

  2. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The expanded role of the IAEA in the field of nuclear power safety will be discussed. Emphasis will be given to the NUSS program (the letters being an acronym for Nuclear Safety Standards) to establish internationally accepted safety codes and guides for nuclear power plants dealing with governmental regulatory organizations, siting, design, operation and quality assurance. Other activities discussed will be advisory services, exchange of information and training, emergency accident assistance, and technical assistance. (orig./RW)

  3. Atomic bomb suffering and Chernobyl accident lessons learnt from international medical aid programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Shunichi

    2005-01-01

    The cooperative medical projects between Nagasaki University and countries of the former USSR have had being performed in mainly two regions: Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk since 1990 and 1995, respectively. The 21 st Center of Excellence (COE) program of ''International Consortium for Medical Care of Hibakusha and Radiation Life Science'' recently established in Nagasaki University can now serve our knowledge and experience much more directly. Its activity can be further extended to the radiocontaminated areas around the world, and based on the lessons of the past, it can indeed contribute to the future planning of the Network of Excellence (NOE) for Radiation Education Program as well as Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance under the auspices of the WHO-REMPAN. Within the frame of International Consortium of Radiation Research, a molecular epidemiology of thyroid diseases are now conducted in our departments in addition to international medical assistance. The clue of radiation-associated thyroid carcinogenesis may give us a new concept on experimental and epidemiological approaches to low dose radiation effects on human health, including those of internal radiation exposure. Concerning the role and responsibility of our work to the public, to avoid unnecessary radiophobia and to correctly understand radiation hazard and safety, we must build a bridge between basic research and widely open public education. Therefore, it is of high necessity to continuously work on clarification of the effects of ionizing radiation on human beings worldwide and to contribute the development of general guideline of radiation safety and radiation hazard, and to strive for the creation of substantiated radiation protection programs. (author)

  4. Atomic bomb suffering and Chernobyl accident lessons learnt from international medical aid programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamashita, Shunichi [Nagasaki Univ. Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Atomic Bomb Disease Inst., Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Nagasaki (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    The cooperative medical projects between Nagasaki University and countries of the former USSR have had being performed in mainly two regions: Chernobyl and Semipalatinsk since 1990 and 1995, respectively. The 21{sup st} Center of Excellence (COE) program of ''International Consortium for Medical Care of Hibakusha and Radiation Life Science'' recently established in Nagasaki University can now serve our knowledge and experience much more directly. Its activity can be further extended to the radiocontaminated areas around the world, and based on the lessons of the past, it can indeed contribute to the future planning of the Network of Excellence (NOE) for Radiation Education Program as well as Radiation Emergency Medical Preparedness and Assistance under the auspices of the WHO-REMPAN. Within the frame of International Consortium of Radiation Research, a molecular epidemiology of thyroid diseases are now conducted in our departments in addition to international medical assistance. The clue of radiation-associated thyroid carcinogenesis may give us a new concept on experimental and epidemiological approaches to low dose radiation effects on human health, including those of internal radiation exposure. Concerning the role and responsibility of our work to the public, to avoid unnecessary radiophobia and to correctly understand radiation hazard and safety, we must build a bridge between basic research and widely open public education. Therefore, it is of high necessity to continuously work on clarification of the effects of ionizing radiation on human beings worldwide and to contribute the development of general guideline of radiation safety and radiation hazard, and to strive for the creation of substantiated radiation protection programs. (author)

  5. The International Time Service of the National Geographic Institute (IGNA Laboratory) Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, D.; Cimbaro, S.

    2014-06-01

    The "International Time Service" (Servicio Internacional de la Hora, SIH) at the Instituto Geográfico National Argentino (IGNA, formerly Instituto Geográfico Militar Argentino, IGMA), has contributed to the maintenance of the international time scale since its creation in 1931. In 2010 the IGNA started a process of upgrading its time laboratory with the objective of improving its contribution to the computation of the international reference time scales at the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM).

  6. Using research metrics to evaluate the International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines on quality assurance for R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Guidelines on Quality Assurance for R&D is to provide guidance for developing quality assurance (QA) programs for R&D work on items, services, and processes important to safety, and to support the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The standard approach to writing papers describing new quality guidelines documents is to present a descriptive overview of the contents of the document. I will depart from this approach. Instead, I will first discuss a conceptual framework of metrics for evaluating and improving basic and applied experimental science as well as the associated role that quality management should play in understanding and implementing these metrics. I will conclude by evaluating how well the IAEA document addresses the metrics from this conceptual framework and the broader principles of quality management.

  7. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  8. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  9. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency; Acuerdo sobre privilegios e inmunidades del Organismo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-10-31

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [Spanish] El Acuerdo sobre Privilegios e Inmunidades del Organismo Internacional de Energia Atomica, cuyo texto se reproduce en este documento, fue aprobado por la Junta de Gobernadores el dia 1 de julio de 1959. Como se dispone en la seccion 38, el Director General ha remitido copias certificadas del Acuerdo a cada uno de los Estados que son Miembros del Organismo, y se las remitira a todos los Estados que pasen a serlo en lo sucesivo.

  10. Review of the International Atomic Energy Agency International database on reactor pressure vessel materials and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission/Oak Ridge National Laboratory embrittlement data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K.

    1998-02-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has supported neutron radiation effects information exchange through meetings and conferences since the mid-1960s. Through an International Working Group on Reliability of Reactor Pressure Components, information exchange and research activities were fostered through the Coordinated Research Program (CRP) sponsored by the IAEA. The final CRP meeting was held in November 1993, where it was recommended that the IAEA coordinate the development of an International Database on Reactor Pressure Vessel Material (IDRPVM) as the first step in generating an International Database on Aging Management. The purpose of this study was to provide special technical assistance to the NRC in monitoring and evaluating the IAEA activities in developing the IAEA IDRPVM, and to compare the IDRPVM with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) - Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB) and provide recommendations for improving the PR-EDB. A first test version of the IDRPVM was distributed at the First Meeting of Liaison Officers to the IAEA IDRPVM, in November 1996. No power reactor surveillance data were included in this version; the testing data were mainly from CRP Phase III data. Therefore, because of insufficient data and a lack of power reactor surveillance data received from the IAEA IDRPVM, the comparison is made based only on the structure of the IDRPVM. In general, the IDRPVM and the EDB have very similar data structure and data format. One anticipates that because the IDRPVM data will be collected from so many different sources, quality assurance of the data will be a difficult task. The consistency of experimental test results will be an important issue. A very wide spectrum of material characteristics of RPV steels and irradiation environments exists among the various countries. Hence the development of embrittlement prediction models will be a formidable task. 4 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Communications dated 2 and 6 June 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The texts of two telex communications, dated 2 and 6 June 1994, which the International Atomic Energy Agency received from the General Department of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea are being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. These texts were received by the Secretariat before the withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the Agency

  12. PREFACE: International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics & 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Nicholas L. S.; deHarak, Bruno A.

    2010-01-01

    From 30 July to 1 August 2009, over a hundred scientists from 18 countries attended the International Symposium on (e,2e), Double Photoionization and Related Topics and the 15th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions which were held at the W T Young Library of the University of Kentucky, USA. Both conferences were satellite meetings of the XXVI International Conference on Photonic, Electronic and Atomic Collisions (ICPEAC) held in Kalamazoo, Michigan, USA, 21-28 July 2009. These symposia covered a broad range of experimental and theoretical topics involving excitation, ionization (single and multiple), and molecular fragmentation, of a wide range of targets by photons and charged particles (polarized and unpolarized). Atomic targets ranged from hydrogen to the heavy elements and ions, while molecular targets ranged from H2 to large molecules of biological interest. On the experimental front, cold target recoil ion momentum spectroscopy (COLTRIMS), also known as the Reaction Microscope because of the complete information it gives about a wide variety of reactions, is becoming commonplace and has greatly expanded the ability of researchers to perform previously inaccessible coincidence experiments. Meanwhile, more conventional spectrometers are also advancing and have been used for increasingly sophisticated and exacting measurements. On the theoretical front great progress has been made in the description of target states, and in the scattering calculations used to describe both simple and complex reactions. The international nature of collaborations between theorists and experimentalists is exemplified by, for example, the paper by Ren et al which has a total of 13 authors of whom the experimental group of six is from Heidelberg, Germany, one theoretical group is from Australia, with the remainder of the theoreticians coming from several different institutions in the United States. A total of 52 invited talks and

  13. The geopotential value W 0 for specifying the relativistic atomic time scale and a global vertical reference system

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Burša, Milan; Kenyon, S.; Kouba, J.; Šíma, Zdislav; Vatrt, V.; Vítek, V.; Vojtíšková, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 81, č. 2 (2007), s. 103-110 ISSN 0949-7714 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/05/2381 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : geopotential * vertical datum unification * relativistic atomic time scale Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 1.636, year: 2007

  14. International Atomic Energy agency use of facility calorimeters for safeguards purposes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mcrae, L.P.

    1996-01-01

    The IAEA is performing nuclear materials safeguards on an inventory of pure and scrap plutonium oxide powder materials held in Vault 3 of the Plutonium Finishing Plant at the Hanford Site,Washington State. The IAEA uses qualitative and quantitative techniques (weighing, sampling, and destructive analyses) to verify the presence and quantity of the nuclear materials under safeguards. In contrast, the plant operator generally uses non-destructive plutonium assay based on gamma spectrometry and calorimetry for its most accurate plutonium powder container measurements. Recent results have shown that the operator's calorimeter system achieves measurement variabilities comparable with, or better than, the destructive analyses, particularly for scrap. The results are achieved more quickly and economically,with less waste and lower radiation exposure and contamination hazard, by calorimetry than by classical destructive analyses.Techniques, including authentication methods, are being jointly developed to permit use of the operator's calorimeter system for international safeguards purposes. The authentication is to ensure the independence of, and to substantiate the validity of,calorimeter measurements for international safeguards. The authentication methods considered and being developed are discussed

  15. Near-threshold photoionization of hydrogenlike uranium studied in ion-atom collisions via the time-reversed process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stöhlker, T; Ma, X; Ludziejewski, T; Beyer, H F; Bosch, F; Brinzanescu, O; Dunford, R W; Eichler, J; Hagmann, S; Ichihara, A; Kozhuharov, C; Krämer, A; Liesen, D; Mokler, P H; Stachura, Z; Swiat, P; Warczak, A

    2001-02-05

    Radiative electron capture, the time-reversed photoionization process occurring in ion-atom collisions, provides presently the only access to photoionization studies for very highly charged ions. By applying the deceleration mode of the ESR storage ring, we studied this process in low-energy collisions of bare uranium ions with low- Z target atoms. This technique allows us to extend the current information about photoionization to much lower energies than those accessible for neutral heavy elements in the direct reaction channel. The results prove that for high- Z systems, higher-order multipole contributions and magnetic corrections persist even at energies close to the threshold.

  16. International Rivalry In The Energy Sector: The Eastern European Market Of Atomic Energy In Focus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Borovsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the post-bipolar world nuclear power has become one of the areas of competition and rivalry betweenRussiaand the West. The comprehensive analysis of theoretical publications allows us to consider international competition as an abstract, depoliticized contest of states and other international actors (including companies for some limited (mainly economic benefits. International rivalry is more a political process, necessarily involving some rival pairs of states (or groups of states that compete with each other not only to get some benefits, but to expand their territory or power. The competition and rivalry betweenRussiaand the West in the sphere of nuclear power are especially apparent in the Eastern European region where the American, European and Japanese corporations, with the support of the Western foreign ministries and EU institutions, try to achieve two main goals. The first goal is to win the contracts to build new power units, especially in tenders where Rosatom participates. The second goal is to become suppliers of nuclear fuel for multiple Russian- or Soviet-made VVER-type reactors, which are functioning or will be run in a number of countries in the region (Slovakia,CzechRepublic,Hungary,Bulgaria, andUkraine. Such activities can involve high risks. The West’s efforts to curb the dominant position of "Rosatom" inEastern Europeare formally associated with the need to create a "competitive market" of nuclear services in the region and to ensure the European energy security. It is also noteworthy that the expansion of Rosatom (and its predecessors to foreign markets, including Eastern Europe, is actively supported by the Russian state which in the second half of the 1990s – after a failed attempt of following in the footsteps of the West – joined in the rivalry, mostly imposed by the U.S. and their allies. As shown by the analysis,Russiaand the West, primarily theUnited States, are involved in the nuclear power sector to

  17. Gauge invariance and quantization applied to atom and nucleon internal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Fan; Sun Weimin; Chen Xiangsong; LU Xiaofu; Goldman, T.

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing theoretical quark and gluon momentum,orbital angular momentum and spin operators, satisfy either gauge invariance or the corresponding canonical commutation relation, but one never has these operators which satisfy both except the quark spin. The conflicts between gauge invariance and the canonical quantization requirement of these operators are discussed. A new set of quark and gluon momentum, orbital angular momentum and spin operators, which satisfy both gauge invariance and canonical momentum and angular momentum commutation relation, are proposed.To achieve such a proper decomposition the key point is to separate the gauge field into the pure gauge and the gauge covariant parts. The same conflicts also exist in QED and quantum mechanics, and have been solved in the same manner. The impacts of this new decomposition to the nucleon internal structure are discussed. (authors)

  18. The International Atomic Energy Agency's Laboratories Seibersdorf and Vienna. Meeting the challenges of research and international co-operation in the application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippl, E.

    1999-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency therefore maintains a unique, multidisciplinary, analytical, research and training centre: the IAEA Laboratories, located at Seibersdorf near Vienna and at the Agency's Headquarters in the Vienna International Centre. They are organized in three branches: (i) the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory: Soil Science, Plant Breeding, Animal Production and Health, Entomology, Agrochemicals; (ii) the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory: Chemistry, Instrumentation, Dosimetry, Isotope Hydrology; (iii) the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Isotopic Analysis, Chemical Analysis, Clean Laboratory. 'The Mission of the IAEA Laboratories is to contribute to the implementation of the Agency's programmes in food and agriculture, human health, physical and chemical sciences, water resources, industry, environment, radiation protection and safeguards verification'. Together with a General Services and Safety Section, which provides logistics, information, industrial safety and maintenance services and runs a mechanical workshop, the three groups form the 'Seibersdorf Laboratories' and are part of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. The Laboratories contribute an important share to projects fostering peaceful applications of radiation and isotopes and radiation protection, and play a significant part in the nuclear verification mechanism. All activities are therefore planned and implemented in close co-operation with relevant divisions and departments of the IAEA. In specific sectors, the Laboratories also operate in conjunction with other organizations in the UN system, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and with networks of national laboratories in Member States

  19. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-01

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO 2 is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  20. New theoretical approaches to atomic and molecular dynamics triggered by ultrashort light pulses on the atto- to picosecond time scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pabst, Stefan Ulf

    2013-04-15

    The concept of atoms as the building blocks of matter has existed for over 3000 years. A revolution in the understanding and the description of atoms and molecules has occurred in the last century with the birth of quantum mechanics. After the electronic structure was understood, interest in studying the dynamics of electrons, atoms, and molecules increased. However, time-resolved investigations of these ultrafast processes were not possible until recently. The typical time scale of atomic and molecular processes is in the picosecond to attosecond realm. Tremendous technological progress in recent years makes it possible to generate light pulses on these time scales. With such ultrashort pulses, atomic and molecular dynamics can be triggered, watched, and controlled. Simultaneously, the need rises for theoretical models describing the underlying mechanisms. This doctoral thesis focuses on the development of theoretical models which can be used to study the dynamical behavior of electrons, atoms, and molecules in the presence of ultrashort light pulses. Several examples are discussed illustrating how light pulses can trigger and control electronic, atomic, and molecular motions. In the first part of this work, I focus on the rotational motion of asymmetric molecules, which happens on picosecond and femtosecond time scales. Here, the aim is to align all three axes of the molecule as well as possible. To investigate theoretically alignment dynamics, I developed a program that can describe alignment motion ranging from the impulsive to the adiabatic regime. The asymmetric molecule SO{sub 2} is taken as an example to discuss strategies of optimizing 3D alignment without the presence of an external field (i.e., field-free alignment). Field-free alignment is particularly advantageous because subsequent experiments on the aligned molecule are not perturbed by the aligning light pulse. Wellaligned molecules in the gas phase are suitable for diffraction experiments. From the

  1. Non-thermal distribution of O(1D) atoms in the night-time thermosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jeng-Hwa

    1988-01-01

    The 6300 A O(1D-3P) emission has been used for many years to remotely monitor the thermospheric temperature from the Doppler width of its line profile. The O(1D) atoms in the nighttime thermosphere are initially produced by the dissociative recombination of O2(+) ions with kinetic energy much greater than the thermal energy of the ambient neutrals. The validity of the technique to monitor neutral ambient temperature by measuring O(1D) 6300 A emission depends on the degree of thermalization of the O(1D) atoms. The object of this study is to calculate the velocity distribution of the O(1D) atoms and to examine the effect of nonthermal distribution on the nighttime thermospheric neutral temperature determined.

  2. Compendium of structure and collision data in the first 12 issues of the international bulletin on atomic and molecular data for fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsonis, K.; Rumble, J. Jr.

    1980-06-01

    This document is a compendium of the structure, spectra and collision data in the first 12 issues of the International Bulletin on Atomic and Molecular Data for Fusion. The Bulletin is issued quarterly by the International Atomic Energy Agency to assist the development of fusion research and technology. Not included in this compendium are those parts of the Bulletin concerned with Surface Effects, Work in Progress, Contributed Numerical Data, and Data Requests. Where necessary, corrections have been made to the data previously published to make the compendium as accurate as possible. The editors would appreciate any information on errors, duplications or omissions which would make future compendia more accurate and useful. (author)

  3. Supervision of nuclear material in the Federal Republic of Germany by the Commission of the European Communities (Euratom) and the International Atomic Energy Organisation (IAEO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brueckner, C.

    1979-01-01

    Since the fifties Euratom has controlled nuclear material in the Federal Republic of Germany. When the verification agreement came into force in the treaty on the non-proliferation of atomic weapons in February 1977, the International Atomic Energy Organisation (IAEO) has commenced the supervision of nuclear material in German nuclear energy installations. The author describes the basic principle of the supervision and the possible effects on the installations. In addition, he also deals with the discussions which have flared up about the international supervision of nuclear material, and indicates possible future developments. (orig.) [de

  4. Visual working memory as visual attention sustained internally over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Marvin M

    2011-05-01

    Visual working memory and visual attention are intimately related, such that working memory encoding and maintenance reflects actively sustained attention to a limited number of visual objects and events important for ongoing cognition and action. Although attention is typically considered to operate over perceptual input, a recent taxonomy proposes to additionally consider how attention can be directed to internal perceptual representations in the absence of sensory input, as well as other internal memories, choices, and thoughts (Chun, Golomb, & Turk-Browne, 2011). Such internal attention enables prolonged binding of features into integrated objects, along with enhancement of relevant sensory mechanisms. These processes are all limited in capacity, although different types of working memory and attention, such as spatial vs. object processing, operate independently with separate capacity. Overall, the success of maintenance depends on the ability to inhibit both external (perceptual) and internal (cognitive) distraction. Working memory is the interface by which attentional mechanisms select and actively maintain relevant perceptual information from the external world as internal representations within the mind. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. International atomic energy agency organization (IAEA) in case of extra territorial accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Nogueira de Oliveira, C.

    2006-01-01

    This article sums up the actual activities of IAEA in terms of preparation and responses to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The Agency has established in 1986 a surveillance unit 24 h/24 h and an operational unit: the center of response to emergencies (C.R.U). The C.R.U. is the principal operational unit in charge of acting in case of nuclear emergency notification and to answer to the demand of information or help during an incident or emergency. It receives the reports of an authority of any state, on an incident and checks any report that is not confirmed. It establishes the first functional links with the state at the origin o the report and any state potentially concerned. It establishes links with W.H.O (world health organization), W.M.O.(world meteorological organization), (B.C.A.H.) the office of coordination of humanitarian affairs of united nations, the FAO ( food and agriculture organization).The principal lessons got from interventions made during real events have been the following ones: first, official information communicated by the Center for the IAEA emergency interventions have contributed to avoid the propagations of hearsay and panic, secondly a fast international cooperation and the presence of the team of IAEA center on the premises during an intervention in case of event with multi sectorial consequences are extremely important. (N.C.)

  6. 8. International conference on atomic masses and fundamental constants (AMCO-8)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Barber, R.C.; Cohen, E.R.

    1990-01-01

    The current recommended values of the fundamental physical constants are base on an adjustment carried out in 1986. Physics, however, has not stood still. New measurements have been reported for the Rydberg constant and the gas constant. Improved calculations and measurements of the electron magnetic moment anomaly, a e have provided an improved value for the fine structure constant α = μ 0 ce 2 /2h. The decision to establish uniform international representation of the volts and ohms in terms of the Josephson effect and the quantized Hall resistance, respectively, stimulated new measurements of 2e/h and e/h 2 . These new data have significantly changed the error-space of the adjustment of the physical constants. In the 1986 adjustments, the one-standard deviation uncertainty in α was 0.045 ppm; the university of Washington measurements of a e and the final results of Kinoshita's 20-year program of numerical evaluation of the eight order QED diagrams yield a new value with an uncertainty of 0.0069 ppm. Combined with the Rydberg constant and the proton-electron mass ratio this means that N Λ h = M p α 2 c/(2(m p /m e )R ∞ ) is defined with an uncertainty of 0.025 ppm

  7. Safety assessment guidance in the International Atomic Energy Agency RADWASS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovk, I.F.; Seitz, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    The IAEA RADWASS programme is aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and standards for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. A large portion of this programme has been devoted to safety assessments for various waste management activities. Five Safety Guides are planned to be developed to provide general guidance to enable operators and regulators to develop necessary framework for safety assessment process in accordance with international recommendations. They cover predisposal, near surface disposal, geological disposal, uranium/thorium mining and milling waste, and decommissioning and environmental restoration. The Guide on safety assessment for near surface disposal is at the most advanced stage of preparation. This draft Safety Guide contains guidance on description of the disposal system, development of a conceptual model, identification and description of relevant scenarios and pathways, consequence analysis, presentation of results and confidence building. The set of RADWASS publications is currently undergoing in-depth review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Series.

  8. Helium in chirped laser fields as a time-asymmetric atomic switch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kaprálová-Žďánská, Petra Ruth; Moiseyev, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 141, č. 1 (2014), 014307 ISSN 0021-9606 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/11/0571 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Atom lasers * Laser pulses * Helium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.952, year: 2014

  9. The evolution of international cooperation up to the present time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldschmidt, Bertrand

    1978-01-01

    This paper delivered at the Symposium organised on the XXth anniservary of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency recalls the historical background of nuclear cooperation which went through three stages : European collaboration, U.S. isolationist policy and finally, openness. Cooperation took place at three levels: bilateral and multilateral technical cooperation; creation of joint multinational undertakings; trade relations. The paper then examines three particular areas which illustrate the evolution of international nuclear cooperation, i.e., organisation of the uranium market, uranium enrichment and the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. (NEA) [fr

  10. Atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Armbruster, P.; Beyer, H.; Bosch, F.; Dohmann, H.D.; Kozhuharov, C.; Liesen, D.; Mann, R.; Mokler, P.H.

    1984-01-01

    The heavy ion accelerator UNILAC is well suited to experiments in the field of atomic physics because, with the aid of high-energy heavy ions atoms can be produced in exotic states - that is, heavy atoms with only a few electrons. Also, in close collisions of heavy ions (atomic number Z 1 ) and heavy target atoms (Z 2 ) short-lived quasi-atomic 'superheavy' systems will be formed - huge 'atoms', where the inner electrons are bound in the field of the combined charge Z 1 + Z 2 , which exceeds by far the charge of the known elements (Z <= 109). Those exotic or transient superheavy atoms delivered from the heavy ion accelerator make it possible to study for the first time in a terrestrial laboratory exotic, but fundamental, processes, which occur only inside stars. Some of the basic research carried out with the UNILAC is discussed. This includes investigation of highly charged heavy atoms with the beam-foil method, the spectroscopy of highly charged slow-recoil ions, atomic collision studies with highly ionised, decelerated ions and investigations of super-heavy quasi-atoms. (U.K.)

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency fellows: Where are they now? The Department of Technical Cooperation's report on the fellowship survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the impact and the quality of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fellowship programme, the Department of Technical Cooperation conducted a survey among former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. These fellows have all completed the fellowship training, and have had time to judge in what way their training is useful to their work in their home country. As a result of this survey, further surveys could be conducted to serve as a continuous systematic assessment of the fellowship and other programmes. Former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 were asked to fill out a questionnaire containing questions regarding the following: Where are the former fellows now and what are they doing? How did the fellows rate the quality of the fellowship programme? How did the fellows rate the impact of the training they received through the fellowship programme, the impact on their home institution, and the impact on the TC project and their home country? The survey period was 11 February - 4 March 2005. Reaching a sufficient number of former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 posed some difficulties. The National Liaison Officers contributed greatly in finding the former fellows' current contact information. Out of the 2067 fellows who were in the field in the years 2001 and 2002, 613 participated in the survey (meaning, 30% of all fellows from those years and 50% of those reached by email or fax). The results of the survey given below represent only the survey participants' opinions, not those of all former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. To ensure that the results are representative of all fellows, a follow-up study of seven countries is currently being done. The IAEA fellowship programme contributes successfully to knowledge and technology transfer to fellows' home institutions, their home countries and the TC projects they are involved in, as evidenced by the following survey results: 94% of the fellows who participated in the survey

  12. Line shapes and time dynamics of the Förster resonances between two Rydberg atoms in a time-varying electric field

    KAUST Repository

    Yakshina, E. A.

    2016-10-21

    The observation of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances between Rydberg atoms excited by narrowband cw laser radiation requires usage of a Stark-switching technique in order to excite the atoms first in a fixed electric field and then to induce the interactions in a varied electric field, which is scanned across the Förster resonance. In our experiments with a few cold Rb Rydberg atoms, we have found that the transients at the edges of the electric pulses strongly affect the line shapes of the Förster resonances, since the population transfer at the resonances occurs on a time scale of ∼100 ns, which is comparable with the duration of the transients. For example, a short-term ringing at a certain frequency causes additional radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances, while nonsharp edges lead to asymmetry. The intentional application of the radio-frequency field induces transitions between collective states, whose line shape depends on the interaction strengths and time. Spatial averaging over the atom positions in a single interaction volume yields a cusped line shape of the Förster resonance. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the line shape and time dynamics of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances Rb(nP3/2)+Rb(nP3/2)→Rb(nS1/2)+Rb([n+1]S1/2) for two Rb Rydberg atoms interacting in a time-varying electric field.

  13. Line shapes and time dynamics of the Förster resonances between two Rydberg atoms in a time-varying electric field

    KAUST Repository

    Yakshina, E. A.; Tretyakov, D. B.; Beterov, I. I.; Entin, V. M.; Andreeva, C.; Cinins, A.; Markovski, A.; Iftikhar, Z.; Ekers, Aigars; Ryabtsev, I. I.

    2016-01-01

    The observation of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances between Rydberg atoms excited by narrowband cw laser radiation requires usage of a Stark-switching technique in order to excite the atoms first in a fixed electric field and then to induce the interactions in a varied electric field, which is scanned across the Förster resonance. In our experiments with a few cold Rb Rydberg atoms, we have found that the transients at the edges of the electric pulses strongly affect the line shapes of the Förster resonances, since the population transfer at the resonances occurs on a time scale of ∼100 ns, which is comparable with the duration of the transients. For example, a short-term ringing at a certain frequency causes additional radio-frequency-assisted Förster resonances, while nonsharp edges lead to asymmetry. The intentional application of the radio-frequency field induces transitions between collective states, whose line shape depends on the interaction strengths and time. Spatial averaging over the atom positions in a single interaction volume yields a cusped line shape of the Förster resonance. We present a detailed experimental and theoretical analysis of the line shape and time dynamics of the Stark-tuned Förster resonances Rb(nP3/2)+Rb(nP3/2)→Rb(nS1/2)+Rb([n+1]S1/2) for two Rb Rydberg atoms interacting in a time-varying electric field.

  14. International society of sports nutrition position stand: nutrient timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerksick, Chad M; Arent, Shawn; Schoenfeld, Brad J; Stout, Jeffrey R; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin D; Taylor, Lem; Kalman, Doug; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Kreider, Richard B; Willoughby, Darryn; Arciero, Paul J; VanDusseldorp, Trisha A; Ormsbee, Michael J; Wildman, Robert; Greenwood, Mike; Ziegenfuss, Tim N; Aragon, Alan A; Antonio, Jose

    2017-01-01

    The International Society of Sports Nutrition (ISSN) provides an objective and critical review regarding the timing of macronutrients in reference to healthy, exercising adults and in particular highly trained individuals on exercise performance and body composition. The following points summarize the position of the ISSN:Nutrient timing incorporates the use of methodical planning and eating of whole foods, fortified foods and dietary supplements. The timing of energy intake and the ratio of certain ingested macronutrients may enhance recovery and tissue repair, augment muscle protein synthesis (MPS), and improve mood states following high-volume or intense exercise.Endogenous glycogen stores are maximized by following a high-carbohydrate diet (8-12 g of carbohydrate/kg/day [g/kg/day]); moreover, these stores are depleted most by high volume exercise.If rapid restoration of glycogen is required (strategies should be considered:aggressive carbohydrate refeeding (1.2 g/kg/h) with a preference towards carbohydrate sources that have a high (> 70) glycemic indexthe addition of caffeine (3-8 mg/kg)combining carbohydrates (0.8 g/kg/h) with protein (0.2-0.4 g/kg/h) Extended (> 60 min) bouts of high intensity (> 70% VO 2 max) exercise challenge fuel supply and fluid regulation, thus carbohydrate should be consumed at a rate of ~30-60 g of carbohydrate/h in a 6-8% carbohydrate-electrolyte solution (6-12 fluid ounces) every 10-15 min throughout the entire exercise bout, particularly in those exercise bouts that span beyond 70 min. When carbohydrate delivery is inadequate, adding protein may help increase performance, ameliorate muscle damage, promote euglycemia and facilitate glycogen re-synthesis.Carbohydrate ingestion throughout resistance exercise (e.g., 3-6 sets of 8-12 repetition maximum [RM] using multiple exercises targeting all major muscle groups) has been shown to promote euglycemia and higher glycogen stores. Consuming carbohydrate solely or in

  15. International business and economic geography : knowledge, time and transactions costs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McCann, Philip

    This paper sketches out how the ways in which a combination of economic geography and international business approaches can shed light on the spatial behaviour of multinational companies. The emphasis of the argument here is on the nature of the knowledge content embedded in the transactions of the

  16. Atomics International fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program. Part 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    Most of you know our company from the last meeting in May in Vienna, so I won't steal your time with explaining and demonstrating the same techniques that we have heard this morning f rom the other speakers. I would just take some words to explain the order of business with highly enriched uranium. NUKEM handles around almost two tons of highly enriched uranium a year and it was necessary to satisfy all the new physical protection philosophies. That means that we have to install storage and safe fabrication sites for a lot of money, 2.5 meter thick concrete walls, and different alarm systems. So just to demonstrate how silly this business is, we have just overcome this for highly enriched uranium, and now we speak about low enriched uranium for which we don't need all of these investments to make this business safe. I would just like to concentrate my words on the status of fabrication and considerations in my company concerning the medium enriched uranium and low enriched uranium. In TABLE I are the different fuel types (see column 1) and then we have the fabrication in column 2; (The reason that I use the blackboard this morning is that I try to demonstrate all the techniques. However, all the speakers before me did this and in theory we are not so far away from each other.) the experience of my company in kg. In column 3 is the irradiation experience of these fuels types. Column 4 shows the studies and calculations made in our company for lower and medium enriched fuels. The preliminary fabrication tests and calculations are in column 5, and in column 6 we have the delivery time for a prototype core in months after UF 6 supply. Column 7 shows the time for the development of specifications including irradiation time in years for 6 and 7, and column 8 is the estimated cost of 6 and 7. There is just one fuel that is not in this summary and that is U-Zr

  17. On the internal resonant modes in marching-on-in-time solution of the time domain electric field integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei

    2013-08-01

    Internal resonant modes are always observed in the marching-on-in-time (MOT) solution of the time domain electric field integral equation (EFIE), although \\'relaxed initial conditions,\\' which are enforced at the beginning of time marching, should in theory prevent these spurious modes from appearing. It has been conjectured that, numerical errors built up during time marching establish the necessary initial conditions and induce the internal resonant modes. However, this conjecture has never been proved by systematic numerical experiments. Our numerical results in this communication demonstrate that, the internal resonant modes\\' amplitudes are indeed dictated by the numerical errors. Additionally, it is shown that in a few cases, the internal resonant modes can be made \\'invisible\\' by significantly suppressing the numerical errors. These tests prove the conjecture that the internal resonant modes are induced by numerical errors when the time domain EFIE is solved by the MOT method. © 2013 IEEE.

  18. On the internal resonant modes in marching-on-in-time solution of the time domain electric field integral equation

    KAUST Repository

    Shi, Yifei; Bagci, Hakan; Lu, Mingyu

    2013-01-01

    Internal resonant modes are always observed in the marching-on-in-time (MOT) solution of the time domain electric field integral equation (EFIE), although 'relaxed initial conditions,' which are enforced at the beginning of time marching, should in theory prevent these spurious modes from appearing. It has been conjectured that, numerical errors built up during time marching establish the necessary initial conditions and induce the internal resonant modes. However, this conjecture has never been proved by systematic numerical experiments. Our numerical results in this communication demonstrate that, the internal resonant modes' amplitudes are indeed dictated by the numerical errors. Additionally, it is shown that in a few cases, the internal resonant modes can be made 'invisible' by significantly suppressing the numerical errors. These tests prove the conjecture that the internal resonant modes are induced by numerical errors when the time domain EFIE is solved by the MOT method. © 2013 IEEE.

  19. Atomics international fuel fabrication facility and low enrichment program [contributed by H.W. Hassel, NUKEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hassel, H.W.

    1993-01-01

    NUKEM handles around almost two tons of highly enriched uranium a year and it was necessary to satisfy all the new physical protection philosophies. That means that we have to install storage and safe fabrication sites for a lot of money, 25 meter thick concrete walls, and different alarm systems. So just to demonstrate how silly this business is, we have just overcome this for highly enriched uranium, and now we speak about low enriched uranium for which we don't need all of these investments to make this business safe. I would-just like to concentrate my words on the status of fabrication and considerations in my company concerning the medium enriched uranium and low enriched uranium. In the table are the different fuel types (see column) and then we have the fabrication in column 2 the experience of my comp any in kg. In column 3 is the irradiation experience of these fuels types. Column 4 shows the studies and calculations made in our company for lower and medium enriched fuels. The preliminary fabrication tests and calculations are in column 5, and in column 6 we have the delivery time for a prototype core in months after UF 6 supply. Column 7 shows the time for the development of specifications including irradiation time in years for 6 and 7 and column is the estimated cost of 6 and 7 There is just one fuel that is not in this summary and that is U-Zr. We now see how complex and sophisticated this business is. I have told you already that we have installed for a lot of millions of Deutsche Mark the physical protection, storage vaults and things like that. Now we have to investigate all these different types of fuels for, as you see, a lot of money. Maybe these are a lot of optimistic figures; anyway the question is, does this make all the overall nuclear situation worldwide easier or not. One cannot answer for the moment, but anyway we have a lot of problems

  20. Adjustment of the Brazilian radioprotection standards to the safety principles of the International Atomic Energy Agency; Adequacao das normas brasileiras de radioprotecao aos principios fundamentais de seguranca da International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Pereira, Juliana R. de S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a recommendation with 10 basic safety principles (Fundamental Safety Principles Safety Fundamentals series, number SF-1), which are: 1) Responsibility for safety; 2) Role for government; 3) Leadership and management for safety; 4) Justification of facilities and activities; 5) Optimization of protection; 6) Limitation of risk to individuals; 7) Protection of present and futures generations; 8) Prevention of accidents; 9) Emergency preparedness and response and 10) Protection actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiations risk. The aim of this study is to verify that the Brazilian standards of radiation protection meet the principles described above and how well suited to them. The analysis of the national radiation protection regulatory system, developed and deployed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), showed that out of the ten items, two are covered partially, the number 2 and 10. The others are fully met. The item 2 the fact that the regulatory body (CNEN) be stock controller of a large company in the sector put in check its independence as a regulatory body. In item 10 the Brazilian standard of radiation protection does not provide explicit resolution of environmental liabilities.

  1. Internal and ancestral controls of cell-generation times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Lateral and longitudinal correlations between related cells reveal associations between the generation times of cells for an intermediate period /three generations in bacteral cultures/. Generation times of progeny are influenced by nongenetic factors transmitted from their ancestors.

  2. How to use the cosmological Schwinger principle for energy flux, entropy, and 'atoms of space-time' to create a thermodynamic space-time and multiverse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beckwith, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    We make explicit an idea by Padmanabhan in DICE 2010, as to finding 'atoms of space-time' permitting a thermodynamic treatment of emergent structure similar to Gibbs treatment of statistical physics. That is, an ensemble of gravitons is used to give an 'atom' of space-time congruent with relic GW. The idea is to reduce the number of independent variables to get a simple emergent space-time structure of entropy. An electric field, based upon the cosmological Schwinger principle, is linked to relic heat flux, with entropy production tied in with candidates as to inflaton potentials. The effective electric field links with the Schwinger 1951s result of an E field leading to pairs of e + e - charges nucleated in space-time volume V · t. Note that in most inflationary models, the assumption is for a magnetic field, not an electric field. An electric field permits a kink-anti-kink construction of an emergent structure, which includes Glinka's recent pioneering approach to a Multiverse. Also an E field allows for an emergent relic particle frequency range between one and 100 GHz. The novel contribution is a relic E field, instead of a B field, in relic space-time 'atom' formation and vacuum nucleation of the same.

  3. Optimal International Asset Allocation with Time-varying Risk

    OpenAIRE

    Flavin, Thomas; Wickens, M.R.

    2006-01-01

    This paper examines the optimal allocation each period of an internationally diversified portfolio from the different points of view of a UK and a US investor. We find that investor location affects optimal asset allocation. The presence of exchange rate risk causes the markets to appear not fully integrated and creates a preference for home assets. Domestic equity is the dominant asset in the optimal portfolio for both investors, but the US investor bears less risk than the UK...

  4. The International Criminal Court: Time to Adjust American Foreign Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-26

    million Cambodians , this slaughter, to some, is not genocide because it was based on politically- divided groups and not based on reasons due to...the Crime of Genocide , essentially establishing the international crime of genocide . The Convention dictated that genocide must be tried by the State in... genocide , and crimes against humanity.29 On 1 July 2003, the Bush Administration invoked one of the provisions of the ASPA and terminated military assistance

  5. Management of internal communication in times of uncertainty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez de la Gala, F.

    2014-01-01

    Garona is having a strong media coverage since 2009. The continuity process is under great controversy that has generated increased uncertainty for workers and their families, affecting motivation. Although internal communication has sought to manage its effects on the structure of the company, the rate of spread of alien information has made this complex mission. The regulatory body has been interested in its potential impact on safety culture, making a significant difference compared to other industrial sectors. (Author)

  6. Two-Electron Time-Delay Interference in Atomic Double Ionization by Attosecond Pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palacios, A.; Rescigno, T. N.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2009-01-01

    A two-color two-photon atomic double ionization experiment using subfemtosecond uv pulses can be designed such that the sequential two-color process dominates and one electron is ejected by each pulse. Nonetheless, ab initio calculations show that, for sufficiently short pulses, a prominent interference pattern in the joint energy distribution of the sequentially ejected electrons can be observed that is due to their indistinguishability and the exchange symmetry of the wave function.

  7. Two-electron time-delay interference in atomic double ionization by attosecond pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rescigno, Thomas N

    2009-10-04

    A two-color two-photon atomic double ionization experiment using subfemtosecond UV pulses can be designed such that the sequential two-color process dominates and one electron is ejected by each pulse. Nonetheless, ab initio calculations show that, for sufficiently short pulses, a prominent interference pattern in the joint energy distribution of the sequentially ejected electrons can be observed that is due to their indistinguishability and the exchange symmetry of the wave function.

  8. Characterizing multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation via internal symmetries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caballar, Roland Cristopher F.; Ocampo, Leonard R.; Galapon, Eric A.

    2010-01-01

    Internal symmetries can be used to classify multiple solutions to the time-energy canonical commutation relation (TE-CCR). The dynamical behavior of solutions to the TE-CCR possessing particular internal symmetries involving time reversal differ significantly from solutions to the TE-CCR without those particular symmetries, implying a connection between the internal symmetries of a quantum system, its internal unitary dynamics, and the TE-CCR.

  9. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luan, P; Knoll, A J; Wang, H; Oehrlein, G S; Kondeti, V S S K; Bruggeman, P J

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O 2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H 2 O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O 2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10 −4 to 10 −3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O 2 and H 2 O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O 2 /H 2 O plasma. (letter)

  10. Model polymer etching and surface modification by a time modulated RF plasma jet: role of atomic oxygen and water vapor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, P.; Knoll, A. J.; Wang, H.; Kondeti, V. S. S. K.; Bruggeman, P. J.; Oehrlein, G. S.

    2017-01-01

    The surface interaction of a well-characterized time modulated radio frequency (RF) plasma jet with polystyrene, poly(methyl methacrylate) and poly(vinyl alcohol) as model polymers is investigated. The RF plasma jet shows fast polymer etching but mild chemical modification with a characteristic carbonate ester and NO formation on the etched surface. By varying the plasma treatment conditions including feed gas composition, environment gaseous composition, and treatment distance, we find that short lived species, especially atomic O for Ar/1% O2 and 1% air plasma and OH for Ar/1% H2O plasma, play an essential role for polymer etching. For O2 containing plasma, we find that atomic O initiates polymer etching and the etching depth mirrors the measured decay of O atoms in the gas phase as the nozzle-surface distance increases. The etching reaction probability of an O atom ranging from 10-4 to 10-3 is consistent with low pressure plasma research. We also find that adding O2 and H2O simultaneously into Ar feed gas quenches polymer etching compared to adding them separately which suggests the reduction of O and OH density in Ar/O2/H2O plasma.

  11. Communication of 14 March 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the United States of America to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the communication of 14 March 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the United States of America to the International Atomic Energy Agency including two statements of the President and the Secretary of State of the United States of America regarding the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty

  12. Communication of 4 October 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter of 4 October 1995 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of the Republic of Korea. In the light of the request expressed in the letter, the text of the letter and its enclosure are attached hereto

  13. Communication of 27 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Cuba to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-05

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter of 27 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Cuba informing the Agency that the Government of the Republic of Cuba signed the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Tlatelolco Treaty) on 25 March 1995.

  14. Communication of 27 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Cuba to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter of 27 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Cuba informing the Agency that the Government of the Republic of Cuba signed the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Tlatelolco Treaty) on 25 March 1995

  15. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States of America is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 12 June 1998

  16. Communication of 4 October 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-19

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter of 4 October 1995 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of the Republic of Korea. In the light of the request expressed in the letter, the text of the letter and its enclosure are attached hereto.

  17. Agreement between the French Republic, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Agreement (and the Protocols thereto) between the French Republic, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Agreement on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 21 March 2000 by the representative of the Government of the French Republic and the Director General of the IAEA, and on 26 September 2000 by the representative of the European Atomic Energy Community. Pursuant to Article 23 of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 26 October 2007, one month after the Agency has received notification from both France and the European Atomic Energy Community that their respective internal requirements for entry into force have been met. Pursuant to Article II of the Protocols, the Protocols entered into force on the same date

  18. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Wulf, Joern; Lax, Ingmar; Timmerman, Robert; Zimmermann, Frank; Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

  19. Prospects for nuclear energy in the 21st century and the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhn, P.E.; Kupitz, J.; Cleveland, J.; Lyon, R.B.

    1998-01-01

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved to an industry that supplies 17% of the world's electricity. A great deal has been achieved and many lessons have been learned. The past decade, however, has seen stagnation or slow growth in nuclear power plant construction except in East Asia. The turn of the century can be a turning point for nuclear power due to increasing world energy consumption, the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and improvements in operation and economics of nuclear power plants. Advanced reactor designs are being developed so that the technology will be ready for the next century. Issues that have dampened support for nuclear power are being addressed through the emerging global nuclear safety culture, attention to nuclear waste disposal and a strengthened safeguards system. The International Atomic Energy Agency promotes technical information exchange and co-operation, provides a source of balanced, objective information, and publishes reports on the current status of reactor development. The Agency will continue to play a major role as the nuclear industry faces the challenges and opportunities of the 21st century. (author)

  20. Tumor radiosensitizers-current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, Michael R.; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.; Milas, Luka; Rosier, Jean-Francois; Safrany, Geza; Selzer, Edgar; Verheij, Marcel; Hendry, Jolyon H.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare and contrast their tumor efficacy, normal tissue toxicity, and status of development regarding clinical application. The aim was to advise the IAEA as to which developing agent or class of agents would be worth promoting further, by supporting additional laboratory research or clinical trials, with the eventual goal of improving cancer control rates using radiotherapy, in developing countries in particular. Results: The agents under discussion included a wide, but not complete, range of different types of drugs, and antibodies that interfered with molecules in cell signaling pathways. These were contrasted with new molecular antisense and gene therapy strategies. All the drugs discussed have previously been shown to act as tumor cell radiosensitizers or to kill hypoxic cells present in tumors. Conclusion: Specific recommendations were made for more preclinical studies with certain of the agents and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries

  1. Adverse event reporting and developments in radiation biology after normal tissue injury: International Atomic Energy Agency consultation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuhchyau; Trotti, Andy; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Hay, John; O'Brien, Peter C.; El-Gueddari, Brahim; Salvajoli, Joao V.; Jeremic, Branislav

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Recent research has enhanced our understanding of radiation injury at the molecular-cellular and tissue levels; significant strides have occurred in standardization of adverse event reporting in clinical trials. In response, the International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Division of Human Health and its section for Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, organized a consultation meeting in Atlanta (October 2, 2004) to discuss developments in radiobiology, normal tissue reactions, and adverse event reporting. Methods and Materials: Representatives from cooperative groups of African Radiation Oncology Group, Curriculo Radioterapeutica Ibero Latino Americana, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group held the meeting discussion. Results: Representatives of major radiotherapy groups/organizations and prominent leaders in radiotherapy discussed current understanding of normal tissue radiobiologic effects, the design and implementation of future clinical and translational projects for normal tissue injury, and the standardization of adverse-event reporting worldwide. Conclusions: The consensus was to adopt NCI comprehensive adverse event reporting terminology and grading system (CTCAE v3.0) as the new standard for all cooperative group trials. Future plans included the implementation of coordinated research projects focusing on normal tissue biomarkers and data collection methods

  2. US enrichment safeguards program development activities with potential International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards applications. Part 1. Executive summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindle, D.W. Jr.

    1984-07-01

    The most recent progress, results, and plans for future work on the US Enrichment Safeguards Program's principal development activities are summarized. Nineteen development activities are reported that have potential International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards applications. Part 1 presents Executive Summaries for these, each of which includes information on (1) the purpose and scope of the development activity; (2) the potential IAEA safeguards application and/or use if adopted; (3) significant development work, results, and/or conclusions to date; and where appropriate (4) future activities and plans for continued work. Development activities cover: measurement technology for limited-frequency-unannounced-access stategy inspections; integrated data acquisition system; enrichment-monitoring system; load-cell-based weighing system for UF 6 cylinder mass verifications; vapor phase versus liquid phase sampling of UF 6 cylinders; tamper-safing hardware and systems; an alternative approach to IAEA nuclear material balance verifications resulting from intermittent inspections; UF 6 sample bottle enrichment analyzer; crated waste assay monitor; and compact 252 Cf shuffler for UF 6 measurements

  3. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency; Accord sur les Privileges et Immunites ee 'Agence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1967-10-31

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [French] Le texte de l'Accord sur les privileges et immunites de l'Agence internationale de l'energie atomique, qui a ete approuve par le Conseil des gouverneurs le 1er juillet 1959, est reproduit dans le present document pour l'information de tous les Etats Membres. Conformment aux dispositions de la section 38 de l'Accord, le Directeur general a adresse au gouvernement de chaque Etat Membre une copie certifiee conforme de l'Accord et en enverra une auv gouvernement de chaque nouvel Etat Membre.

  4. Time-resolved EPR studies of the H atom: A stable heavy isotope of muonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartels, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    Muonium physicists and chemists, when they talk about ''primary processes,'' are probably concerned mostly about end-of-track phenomena in the slowing down of a many-MeV charged particle, analogous to the proton. The author's experience is with electron accelerators and radiolysis; hence, he will comment briefly on the differences and relative advantages of electron and proton radiolysis for the study of H atoms, as opposed to muonium. Then, he will take the liberty of defining primary processes to include the recombination reactions that may occur between geminate or quasi-geminate free radicals within radiolysis spurs

  5. The continuous review and periodic revision process for the International Atomic Energy Agencies regulations for the safe transport of radioactive materials - A status report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Sullivan, R.A.; Pettersson, B.G.; Pope, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agencies (IAEA) Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material, Safety Series No.6 (hereinafter denoted as the Regulations) have developed into the model for international modal organization and individual country regulations (and other regulatory-related documentation) controlling the packaging and transportation of radioactive materials. The Regulations were initially developed in 1961 and have been periodically revised since then. Revised editions of the Regulations, accounting for developments in technology and shipping practices, were issued in 1965, 1967, 1973 (also, an amended 1973 Edition was issued in 1979), and in 1985. The process of developing these documents has been performed on a cooperative basis utilizing inputs from various member states of the IAEA and from other interested international organizations. The latest comprehensive revision of the Regulations and its supportive documents was initiated in 1979, and culminated in the 1985 Edition of the Regulations. This was the first complete revision to be published since 1973 (except for the amended Edition thereto being issued in 1979). During the process which led to the 1985 Edition of the Regulations and its supportive documents, it became apparent that changes needed to be made in this process. Not addressing issues related to transportation regulations on a continuing basis created many difficulties in trying to efficiently and acceptably review and revise these documents in a short period of time. The purpose of this paper is to outline the review/revision process which was established, to summarize the results from that process so far (in terms of changes that have been made to the 1985 Edition through supplements thereto), and to discuss current plans for carrying on with the review/revision process with slight modifications

  6. Time-dependent formulation of the many-electron problem in atoms; Zeitabhaengige Formulierung des Mehr-Elektronen-Problems in Atomen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenberger, Martina

    1997-05-15

    Method development of the time-dependent numerical MCSCF and CI method for atoms, without and with inclusion of an oscillating electric field, linearly polarized (electric dipole approximation for light). In the CI method, the numerical orbitals are kept fixed (not time-dependent), and only the CI coefficients are propagated, whereas in the MCSCF method both the CI coefficients and the numerical orbitals in the CSFs are propagated. The basis for this work were the non-relativistic numerical atomic structure codes for free atoms and for atoms in a static electric field developed at Bielefeld. (orig.)

  7. Calculation of the factor of the time's relativity in quantum area for different atoms based on the `Substantial motion' theory of Mulla Sadra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholibeigian, Hassan

    2015-03-01

    Iranian Philosopher, Mulla Sadra (1571-1640) in his theory of ``Substantial motion'' emphasized that ``the universe moves in its entity'', and ``the time is the fourth dimension of the universe'' This definition of space-time is proposed by him at three hundred years before Einstein. He argued that the time is magnitude of the motion (momentum) of the matter in its entity. In the other words, the time for each atom (body) is sum of the momentums of its involved fundamental particles. The momentum for each atom is different from the other atoms. In this methodology, by proposing some formulas, we can calculate the time for involved particles' momentum (time) for each atom in a second of the Eastern Time Zone (ETZ). Due to differences between these momentums during a second in ETZ, the time for each atom, will be different from the other atoms. This is the relativity in quantum physics. On the other hand, the God communicates with elementary particles via sub-particles (see my next paper) and transfers the packages (bit) of information and laws to them for processing and selection of their next step. Differences between packages like complexity and velocity of processing during the time, is the second variable in relativity of time for each atom which may be effective on the factor.

  8. Time-dependent B-spline R-matrix approach to double ionization of atoms by XUV laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Xiaoxu; Zatsarinny, Oleg; Bartschat, Klaus [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa 50311 (United States); Noble, Clifford J [Computational Science and Engineering Department, Daresbury Laboratory, Warrington WA4 4AD (United Kingdom); Schneider, Barry I, E-mail: xiaoxu.guan@drake.ed, E-mail: klaus.bartschat@drake.ed, E-mail: bschneid@nsf.go [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virgina 22230 (United States)

    2009-11-01

    We present an ab initio and non-perturbative time-dependent approach to the problem of double ionization of a general atom driven by intense XUV laser pulses. After using a highly flexible B-spline R-matrix method to generate field-free Hamiltonian and electric dipole matrices, the initial state is propagated in time using an efficient Arnoldi-Lanczos scheme. Example results for momentum and energy distributions of the two outgoing electrons in two-color pump-probe processes of He are presented.

  9. A time-dependent B-spline R-matrix approach to double ionization of atoms by XUV laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan Xiaoxu; Zatsarinny, O; Noble, C J; Bartschat, K [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Drake University, Des Moines, IA 50311 (United States); Schneider, B I [Physics Division, National Science Foundation, Arlington, Virgina 22230 (United States)], E-mail: xiaoxu.guan@drake.edu, E-mail: oleg.zatsarinny@drake.edu, E-mail: cjn@maxnet.co.nz, E-mail: klaus.bartschat@drake.edu, E-mail: bschneid@nsf.gov

    2009-07-14

    We present an ab initio and non-perturbative time-dependent approach to the problem of double ionization of a general atom driven by intense XUV laser pulses. After using a highly flexible B-spline R-matrix method to generate field-free Hamiltonian and electric dipole matrices, the initial state is propagated in time using an efficient Arnoldi-Lanczos scheme. Test calculations for double ionization of He by a single laser pulse yield good agreement with benchmark results obtained with other methods. The method is then applied to two-colour pump-probe processes, for which momentum and energy distributions of the two outgoing electrons are presented.

  10. Institutional Contexts and International Performances in Schooling : comparing patterns and trends over time in international surveys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Roelande H.; Gray, John M.; Hofman, Roelande

    15 European countries were classified into four types in an international comparative study. The country profiles are based on indicators of the key concepts' funding, governance and choice. This research attempts to answer the question of how the quality of schooling of these types of education

  11. Studies of highly ionized atoms using internal conversion: 197Au, 57Fe; electric monopole transitions in 40Ca, 42Ca, and 44Ca

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulrickson, M.A.

    1975-01-01

    By using heavy-ion reactions, highly ionized electronic states of atoms may be produced. The interaction between excited nuclear levels and the surrounding atomic electrons via internal conversion allows the nucleus to be used as a probe of the electronic structure of the highly ionized atoms. Studies of such atoms were undertaken for strongly internally converted nuclear levels in 197 Au and 57 Fe. The nuclear levels were Coulomb excited by using 16 O and 32 S beams. Simultaneous measurement of the lifetime of the 77-keV state of 197 Au in both neutral gold atoms and gold atoms with mean charge +10 resulted in a measured change in the internal conversion coefficient of Δalpha/alpha equals - 1.7 +- 3.0)10 -3 . This result is consistent with calculations using a Hartree-Fock--Slater program. Measurements of the electric monopole strengths for 0 + → 0 + transitions were undertaken to determine the amount of core-deformation in calcium nuclei. The E0 strengths for the decays of the 0 + states at 5.21 MeV in 40 C, 1.84 MeV in 42 Ca, and 1.88 MeV in 44 Ca were observed. The branching ratios for the subsequent E0 pair decays were measured by observing the coincident annihilation radiation from the e + member of the pair in coincidence with protons feeding the state in the cases of 42 Ca and 44 Ca, and by observing the actual coincident e + --e - pair together with protons feeding the state in the case of 40 Ca. The resulting E0 strengths (rho less than or equal to 0.06, rho = 0.34 +- 0.03, rho = 0.30 +- 0.10 for 40 Ca, 42 Ca, and 44 Ca respectively) agree with theoretical descriptions

  12. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 and by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993

  13. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency`s Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995.

  14. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995

  15. 5. All-Russian (international) scientific conference. Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules. Program of the conference and summary of reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The materials of the 5. All-Russian (international) scientific conference: Physicochemical processes during selection of atoms and molecules, are presented. The conference took place in Zvenigorod, 2-6 October, 2000. A wide range of items connected with uranium enrichment, selection of atoms and molecules by isotopic composition: laser methods, ion cyclotron-resonance method, are discussed. The paper contains the reports about harnessing radionuclides and stable isotopes in medicine and as a means of diagnostics. The results of investigation into modern and advanced technology for isotope separation are outlined. The selection of molecules by means of rectification methods and chemical isotope exchange are discussed [ru

  16. Syntheses of deuterated leu-enkephalins and their use as internal standards for the quantification of leu-enkephalin by fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benfenati, E. (Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo (Italy) Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan (Italy)); Icardi, G.; Chen, S. (Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Bergamo (Italy)); Fanelli, R. (Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan (Italy))

    1990-04-01

    We have developed a synthetic method for the preparation of di- and pentadeuterated leu-enkephalin (LE), Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu, by proton-deuterium exchange using CF[sub 3]COOO[sup 2]H. Four to six deuterium atoms are introduced using a reaction temperature of 120[sup o]C and if 5% of [sup 2]H[sub 2]O is added the di-deuterated LE is obtained. These deuterated compounds are used as internal standards to plot calibration curves of LE using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. (author).

  17. Internally consistent gamma ray burst time history phenomenology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cline, T.L.

    1985-01-01

    A phenomenology for gamma ray burst time histories is outlined. Order of their generally chaotic appearance is attempted, based on the speculation that any one burst event can be represented above 150 keV as a superposition of similarly shaped increases of varying intensity. The increases can generally overlap, however, confusing the picture, but a given event must at least exhibit its own limiting characteristic rise and decay times if the measurements are made with instruments having adequate temporal resolution. Most catalogued observations may be of doubtful or marginal utility to test this hypothesis, but some time histories from Helios-2, Pioneer Venus Orbiter and other instruments having one-to several-millisecond capabilities appear to provide consistency. Also, recent studies of temporally resolved Solar Maximum Mission burst energy spectra are entirely compatible with this picture. The phenomenology suggested here, if correct, may assist as an analytic tool for modelling of burst processes and possibly in the definition of burst source populations

  18. Asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM) for ultrafast high-contrast cellular imaging in flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Terence T. W.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Tang, Matthew Y. H.; Robles, Joseph D. F.; Wei, Xiaoming; Chan, Antony C. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Lam, Edmund Y.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Chan, Godfrey C. F.; Shum, Ho Cheung; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerating imaging speed in optical microscopy is often realized at the expense of image contrast, image resolution, and detection sensitivity – a common predicament for advancing high-speed and high-throughput cellular imaging. We here demonstrate a new imaging approach, called asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (ATOM), which can deliver ultrafast label-free high-contrast flow imaging with well delineated cellular morphological resolution and in-line optical image amplification to overcome the compromised imaging sensitivity at high speed. We show that ATOM can separately reveal the enhanced phase-gradient and absorption contrast in microfluidic live-cell imaging at a flow speed as high as ~10 m/s, corresponding to an imaging throughput of ~100,000 cells/sec. ATOM could thus be the enabling platform to meet the pressing need for intercalating optical microscopy in cellular assay, e.g. imaging flow cytometry – permitting high-throughput access to the morphological information of the individual cells simultaneously with a multitude of parameters obtained in the standard assay. PMID:24413677

  19. International Conference 'Current Problems in Nuclear Physics and Atomic Energy'. May 29 - Jun 03 2006. Book of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyshnevskyi, I.M.

    2006-01-01

    The collective processes in atomic nuclei, nuclear reactions and processes with exotic nuclei, rare nuclear processes, relativistic nuclear physics, neutron physics, physics of nuclear reactors, problems of atomic energy and reactors of the future, applied nuclear physics and technique of experiments was discussed in this conference

  20. Implementation of self-sustaining GA/GC system in Turkish Atomic Energy Authority accordance to Internationally harmonized requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arikan, P.; Acar, O.; Acar, R.; Aycik, G.A.; Cetiner, M.A.; Demirel, H.; Efe, N.; Golge,; Gurellier, R.; Kirmaz, R.; Tulumen, S.; Yucel, H.; Zararsiz, A.; Agus, Y.; Ekinci, S.

    2002-01-01

    In trade, health, safety and environmental protection, users of a laboratory's analytical services are more and more in need of proof of the reliability and credibility of results using internationally accepted standards. The model project of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) is coded RER/2/004 and entitled Quality Control (QC) and Quality Assurance (QA) for Nuclear Analytical Techniques had been approved in 1999 for a period of two years aiming at the implementation of a comprehensive QA/QC protocol in nuclear analytical laboratories (NALs) of Member States following the ISO 17025 quid. Member States are Turkey, Slovakia, Slovenia, Romania, Poland, Latvia, Hungary,Estonia, Croatia, Belarus, Armenia and Agency's Laboratory Seibersdorf which made appropriate staff and facilities available for full participation in the project. In this summary, major goals of participation in the project, core stones of implementation in NALs (gamma, X-rays and alpha/beta), establishing the quality system, improvements of technical and management requirements as well as achievements and difficulties during two year program were discussed in detail. Progress of the nuclear analytical laboratories was monitored by IAEA staff using a concise scorning system that was applied to the submitted progress reports and the audit reviews. Two proficiency tests were applied to evaluate the technical competence of the laboratories by selected radionuclides of environmental importance. The main objective of the exercise were to validate the accuracy and precision of the measurements and to provide feedback to the participants on the performance of methods. PT sample results on gamma and alpha/beta measurements of NALs in center are compatible. It is expected that the reasonable progress gained in this project, will reflect as inching towards accreditation of NALs in near future.In addition to NALs of Centers in Ankara and Istanbul individual IAEA TC project for advanced nondestructive

  1. Time for atomic and molecular data bases is now (an overview of data management research at LLL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, V.E.; Henry, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    Two numerical data bases of atomic and molecular (A and M) data required for laser-induced fusion studies were created. One file contains primarily atomic energy levels and atomic transition data released by Charlotte E. Moore in NBS publications. The second file is based on the spectroscopic constants for more than 1000 molecular levels of approximately 160 heteronuclear diatomic molecules prepared by S. N. Suchard. Additional data bases are contemplated in support of the accelerating research activities in these fields. The present paucity of authenticated, computer-readable A and M data is not unlike that observed two decades ago in nuclear fission research. At that time, emphasis was also given to the accurate measurement of physical parameters and to reaction rates which eventually led to the ENDF/B series of evaluated neutron cross sections. Today, powerful computers have a more dominant role in modeling and predicting the results of promising experiments. Their effective use, however, depends more than ever before upon the availability of comprehensive and accurate files of A and M data. At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), these requirements are accentuated by the heavy reliance on computers. Also, trends are presently becoming apparent among users of the national computer network for Magnetic Fusion Energy, with its center at LLL, to coalesce organization-dependent data files into central data bases containing bibliographic information and numerical data as a common resource. The Data Management Research Project is collaborating with the National Bureau of Standards (NBS/NSRDS) to be able to respond to the emerging requirements. This should contribute to a ''Public Well'' of atomic and molecular data, unencumbered by legal or monetary constraints. 14 figures

  2. The time for atomic and molecular data bases is now. An overview of data management research at LLL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hampel, V.E.; Henry, E.A.

    1977-01-01

    We have created two numerical data bases of atomic and molecular (A+M) data required for laser induced fusion studies. One file contains primarily atomic energy levels and atomic transition data released by Charlotte E. Moore in NBS publications. The second file is based on the spectroscopic constants for more than 1000 molecular levels of approximately 160 heteronuclear diatomic molecules prepared by S. N. Suchard. Additional data bases are contemplated in support of the accelerating research activities in these fields. The present paucity of authenticated, computer-readable A+M data is not unlike that observed two decades ago in nuclear fission research. At that time, emphasis was also given to the accurate measurement of physical parameters and to reaction rates which eventually led to the ENDF/B series of evaluated neutron cross sections. Today, powerful computers have a more dominant role in modeling and predicting the results of promising experiments. Their effective use, however, depends more than ever before upon the availability of comprehensive and accurate files of A+M data. At the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), these requirements are accentuated by the heavy reliance on computers. Also, trends are presently becoming apparent among users of the national computer network for Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE), with its center at LLL, to coalesce organization-dependent data files into central data bases containing bibliographic information and numerical data as a common resource. The Data Management Research Project (LLL/DMRP) is collaborating with the National Bureau of Standards (NBS/NSRDS) to be able to respond to the emerging requirements. This should contribute to a ''Public Well'' of atomic and molecular data, unencumbered by legal or monetary constraints. (author)

  3. Time warp operating system version 2.7 internals manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Time Warp Operating System (TWOS) is an implementation of the Time Warp synchronization method proposed by David Jefferson. In addition, it serves as an actual platform for running discrete event simulations. The code comprising TWOS can be divided into several different sections. TWOS typically relies on an existing operating system to furnish some very basic services. This existing operating system is referred to as the Base OS. The existing operating system varies depending on the hardware TWOS is running on. It is Unix on the Sun workstations, Chrysalis or Mach on the Butterfly, and Mercury on the Mark 3 Hypercube. The base OS could be an entirely new operating system, written to meet the special needs of TWOS, but, to this point, existing systems have been used instead. The base OS's used for TWOS on various platforms are not discussed in detail in this manual, as they are well covered in their own manuals. Appendix G discusses the interface between one such OS, Mach, and TWOS.

  4. Liquidity spillover in international stock markets through distinct time scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righi, Marcelo Brutti; Vieira, Kelmara Mendes

    2014-01-01

    This paper identifies liquidity spillovers through different time scales based on a wavelet multiscaling method. We decompose daily data from U.S., British, Brazilian and Hong Kong stock markets indices in order to calculate the scale correlation between their illiquidities. The sample is divided in order to consider non-crisis, sub-prime crisis and Eurozone crisis. We find that there are changes in correlations of distinct scales and different periods. Association in finest scales is smaller than in coarse scales. There is a rise on associations in periods of crisis. In frequencies, there is predominance for significant distinctions involving the coarsest scale, while for crises periods there is predominance for distinctions on the finest scale.

  5. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Program. Part 2: Analysis of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Ordonez, Felix Barajas; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed a program, named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), to help its Member States to check the status of their nuclear medicine practices and their adherence to international reference standards, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine, including quality assurance/quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmacy (further subdivided into levels 1, 2, and 3, according to complexity of work), radiation safety, clinical applications, as well as managerial aspects. The QUANUM program is based on both internal and external audits and, with specifically developed Excel spreadsheets, it helps assess the level of conformance (LoC) to those previously defined quality standards. According to their level of implementation, the level of conformance to requested standards; 0 (absent) up to 4 (full conformance). Items scored 0, 1, and 2 are considered non-conformance; items scored 3 and 4 are considered conformance. To assess results of the audit missions performed worldwide over the last 8 years, a retrospective analysis has been run on reports from a total of 42 audit missions in 39 centers, three of which had been re-audited. The analysis of all audit reports has shown an overall LoC of 73.9 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), ranging between 56.6% and 87.9%. The highest LoC has been found in the area of clinical services (83.7% for imaging and 87.9% for therapy), whereas the lowest levels have been found for Radiopharmacy Level 2 (56.6%); Computer Systems and Data Handling (66.6%); and Evaluation of the Quality Management System (67.6%). Prioritization of non-conformances produced a total of 1687 recommendations in the final audit report. Depending on the impact on safety and daily clinical activities, they were further classified as critical (requiring immediate action; n = 276; 16% of the total); major (requiring action in relatively short time, typically from 3 to 6 months; n = 604

  6. Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 16 June 2005. It was signed on 7 July 2006 in Sydney and 14 July 2006 in Vienna [es

  7. Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 16 June 2005. It was signed on 7 July 2006 in Sydney and 14 July 2006 in Vienna

  8. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its role in world-wide security of nuclear fuels and facilities and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1976-01-01

    This article outlines the wide range of the Agency's concerns in both promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and ensuring that it is safely used with minimal risk of damage to man and his environment. This latter aspect includes measures against diversion to military purposes, theft or sabotage. There is a marked tendency to leave the promotion of nuclear energy to industry and commerce, and for many regional and national nuclear energy authorities to become increasingly absorbed in its safety and regulatory aspects--the ultimate aim being the establishment of a world nuclear law. This trend will certainly also be reflected in the Agency's program and will gain strength as time goes on. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency is sharply differentiated from national authorities in the industrial countries and from most regional nuclear energy authorities by the fact that its program must continue to reflect the needs of the developing nations which constitute a majority of its Member States. These nations--most of which are ''energy hungry''--need the Agency's help to benefit from the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology

  9. A new time-frequency method to reveal quantum dynamics of atomic hydrogen in intense laser pulses: Synchrosqueezing transform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Yae-lin; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Wu, Hau-tieng; Li, Peng-Cheng; Chu, Shih-I

    2014-01-01

    This study introduces a new adaptive time-frequency (TF) analysis technique, the synchrosqueezing transform (SST), to explore the dynamics of a laser-driven hydrogen atom at an ab initio level, upon which we have demonstrated its versatility as a new viable venue for further exploring quantum dynamics. For a signal composed of oscillatory components which can be characterized by instantaneous frequency, the SST enables rendering the decomposed signal based on the phase information inherited in the linear TF representation with mathematical support. Compared with the classical type of TF methods, the SST clearly depicts several intrinsic quantum dynamical processes such as selection rules, AC Stark effects, and high harmonic generation

  10. An influence of ion and sputtered atom flows inhomogeneity on time evolution of the target surface relief in glow discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondarenko, G G; Kristya, V I

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of ion and sputtered atom transport in the vicinity of the target with a periodical surface relief in glow discharge in pure gas is developed. Under the assumption that the relief amplitude is small, analytical expressions for their flows are found by the perturbation method and an equation describing the relief amplitude time evolution is derived. It is shown that intensity of sputtering exceeds intensity of sputtered material re-deposition at the relief tops, and relief smoothing always takes place in the process of homogeneous target treatment in glow discharge in pure gas

  11. A new methodology for measuring time correlations and excite states of atoms and nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cavalcante, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    A system for measuring time correlation of physical phenomena events in the range of 10 -7 to 10 5 sec is proposed, and his results presented. This system, is based on a sequential time scale which is controlled by a precision quartz oscillator; the zero time of observation is set by means of a JK Flip-Flop, which is operated by a negative transition of pulse in coincidence with the pulse from a detector which marks the time zero of the event (precedent pulse). This electronic system (named digital chronoanalizer) was used in the measurement of excited states of nuclei as well as for the determination of time fluctuations in physical phenomena, such as the time lag in a halogen Geiger counter and is the measurement of the 60 KeV excited state of N P 237 . (author)

  12. International Symposium on (e, 2e), Double Photoionization, and Related Topics and the Thirteenth International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions

    CERN Document Server

    Lohmann, Birgit; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M; 13th International Symposium on Polarization and Correlation in Electronic and Atomic Collisions; Ionization, correlation and polarization in atomic collisions

    2006-01-01

    All papers were peer-reviewed. This proceedings volume contains the invited talks presented at two atomic physics symposia held jointly in Buenos Aires, Argentina from 28-30 July 2005. They represent the latest research in dynamics of collision systems involving collisions between photons, electrons, and ions and a diverse range of target species: atoms, molecules, clusters, and surfaces. There is a particular emphasis on correlation and many-body effects in excitation and ionization.

  13. Communication of 19 June 1997 received from the resident representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 19 June 1997 received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, referring to the Revised Supplementary Agreement Concerning the Provision of Technical Assistance by the International Atomic Energy Agency to the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on behalf of the Government of Hong Kong done at Vienna on 4 February 1983

  14. Communication from the Permanent Mission of Cyprus to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding guidelines for the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a Note Verbale from the Permanent Mission of Cyprus providing information on the export policies and practices of the Government of Cyprus with respect to the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of the Note Verbale, the text of the Note Verbale is attached. The attachment to the Note Verbale was issued previously as INFCIRC/254/Rev. 4/Part 1

  15. Text of communication of 14 November 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 14 November 2000 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament, attaching a statement by the President of the Russian Federation. The text of the communication and, as requested therein, the text of the President of the Russian Federation, are attached hereto for the information of Member States

  16. Communication of 22 February 1999 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Belarus to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a communication from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Belarus concerning a Note of 28 January 1999 from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Belarus which provides information about the nuclear export policies and practices of Belarus. In light of the wish expressed in the Note, its text is attached hereto

  17. Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material in all peaceful nuclear activities of Ukraine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to all Nuclear Material in all Peaceful Nuclear Activities of Ukraine is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency`s Board of Governors on 12 September 1994 and signed in Vienna on 28 September 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 13 January 1995.

  18. Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material in all peaceful nuclear activities of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to all Nuclear Material in all Peaceful Nuclear Activities of Ukraine is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 12 September 1994 and signed in Vienna on 28 September 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 13 January 1995

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist's Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately

  20. Interferometry with atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmcke, J.; Riehle, F.; Witte, A.; Kisters, T.

    1992-01-01

    Physics and experimental results of atom interferometry are reviewed and several realizations of atom interferometers are summarized. As a typical example of an atom interferometer utilizing the internal degrees of freedom of the atom, we discuss the separated field excitation of a calcium atomic beam using four traveling laser fields and demonstrate the Sagnac effect in a rotating interferometer. The sensitivity of this interferometer can be largely increased by use of slow atoms with narrow velocity distribution. We therefore furthermore report on the preparation of a laser cooled and deflected calcium atomic beam. (orig.)

  1. Internalizing versus Externalizing Control: Different Ways to Perform a Time-Based Prospective Memory Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Tracy; Loft, Shayne; Humphreys, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    "Time-based prospective memory" (PM) refers to performing intended actions at a future time. Participants with time-based PM tasks can be slower to perform ongoing tasks (costs) than participants without PM tasks because internal control is required to maintain the PM intention or to make prospective-timing estimates. However, external…

  2. Effect of the nuclear charge of a fast structural ion on its internal effective stopping in collisions with atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gusarevich, E. S., E-mail: gusarevich@gmail.com [Lomonosov Nothern (Arctic) Federal University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The energy losses of fast structural ions in collisions with atoms have been considered in the eikonal approximation. The structural ions are ions consisting of a nucleus and a certain number of electrons bound to it. The effect of nuclear charge Z of the ion on its effective deceleration κ{sup (p)} (energy losses associated with excitation of only intrinsic ion shells) has been analyzed. It is shown that the allowance for the interaction of an atom with the ion nucleus for Z{sub a}Z/v > 1, where Z{sub a} is the charge of the atomic nucleus and v is the velocity of collisions in atomic units, considerably affects the value of κ{sup (p)}, which generally necessitates taking into account nonperturbatively the effect of both charges Z{sub a} and Z on κ{sup (p)}.

  3. Timing of international market entry of UK and German high-tech start-ups

    OpenAIRE

    Bürgel, Oliver; Fier, Andreas; Licht, Georg; Murray, Gordon

    2001-01-01

    We examine the impact of technological product advantages, prior international experience of the management, firm size and age, country differences, and sunk costs as determinants of the timing of international market entry. The timing of internationalisation is analysed using ?event history analysis? for 600 British and German start-up companies in high-technology industries. The results indicate that the incidence of internationalization increases over time. For the majority of new firms th...

  4. Expert system of real time for support of operators of atomic power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashlykov, A.A.; Davidenko, N.N.; Dumshev, V.G.; Kislov, G.I.; Pavlova, E.V.; Prozorovskij, E.D.; Bashlykov, A.A.

    1994-01-01

    The problems of construction and introdution of an intellectual system for information support of operators at nuclear power plants are discussed. This system is used for operator assisstance during real time decision making for NPP operational regime control

  5. Time-resolved entanglement of bound and dissociative atoms and molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishima, K.; Hayashi, M.; Lin, S.H.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we theoretically examine the time-independent and -dependent degrees of entanglement fidelities of bi-partite systems consisting of various bound two particles and of those of dissociative ones. The target maximally entangled state is defined as the non-interacting two particles: they are assumed to be infinitely far away from each other in the distant future. In this case, the potential energy functions which are non-local in nature can be regarded as entangling source. We investigate, how much we can make the target maximally entangled state from the initial (probably somewhat entangled) state without using any non-local external unitary transformation. Specifically, we investigate the cases where the two particles interact by attractive and repulsive Coulomb, harmonic, and Morse potentials which are ubiquitous in physics and chemistry. All of these omnipresent potentials exert non-local unitary transformations of multi-partite systems, which gives rise to the time-dependent entanglement according to the time-dependent Schroedinger equation. In the time-independent case, the bound state with identical mass or different mass shows a definite time-independent entanglement fidelity for each eigenstate. In the time-dependent case, time-dependence manifests itself both in the bound and the dissociative systems. In the former case, the entanglement shows regular oscillatory patterns in harmony with the wave packet revival in the harmonic potential and a prominent enhancement in the anharmonic potential while in the latter case the entanglement diminishes very quickly. From these results, we point out that the time-evolution of the entanglement is much more sensitive to the interaction (potential) of two particles and to the initial wavepacket than that of the autocorrelation function

  6. Quality audits of radiotherapy centres in Latin America: a pilot experience of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Izewska, Joanna; Binia, Sergio; Garcia-Yip, Fernando; Jimenez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In Latin America radiotherapy quality varies significantly among hospitals, where highly equipped academic centers coexist with others not meeting minimal requirements. In 2007, the International Atomic Energy Agency published guidelines for auditing radiotherapy centers, known as the “Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology” (QUATRO) audits. The present report summarizes a pilot experience with QUATRO audits to 12 radiotherapy centres. The findings from QUATRO audits conducted in 12 radiotherapy centres in Latin America between 2008 and 2013 were analysed. Events representing weaknesses or gaps in the process of radiotherapy were recorded. Relevant data for estimating human and technological needs of visited centres were processed. The main difficulties and strengths faced by institutions were also documented. All 12 radiotherapy centres were successfully audited following the QUATRO method. IAEA provided a dosimetry kit for quality control. Forty percent of audited institutions were immersed in a health system that did not recognize cancer as a public health priority problem. With few exceptions, local training programs for physicists and technologists were scarce and research was not an activity of interest among physicians. Centres were provided with sufficient staff to meet the local demand, both in the case of radiation oncologists, physicists and radiation therapists. Three centres lacking the minimum infrastructure were identified. Three institutions did not perform gynaecological brachytherapy, and one installation delivered around 900 teletherapy treatments annually without simulation, planning or dosimetry equipment for that purpose. Recommendations to centres were classified as related to personnel, infrastructure, processes and institutional organizational aspects. Many recommendations warned governments about the evident need for allocating more budgetary resources to radiotherapy. Most recommendations pointed out different aspects related

  7. Bursting onto the big stage: Presenting at an international conference for the first time

    OpenAIRE

    Manley, AJ; Meijen, C

    2008-01-01

    Attending a prestigious international conference and contributing to proceedings by delivering a poster or oral presentation is an excellent opportunity for sport and exercise psychology students to gain valuable experience and meet people from different parts of the world. In this article, we will focus on presenting at an international conference for the first time. An international conference presents different challenges compared to annual national and regional conferences. It will often ...

  8. Time evolution of cascade processes of muonic atoms in hydrogen-helium mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bystritskij, V.; Czaplinski, W.; Filipowicz, M.; Gula, E.; Popov, N.

    1999-01-01

    Time dependence of population of muonic hydrogen states in hydrogen-helium mixtures is calculated for principal quantum number n. Number of muons transferred to helium nuclei is also determined. Dependence of population of the ground state of muonic hydrogen q ls He on time and target density and helium concentration is also considered. The results are in agreement with recent experimental data. The comparison of the calculated yield of K lines of x-ray in pure hydrogen and deuterium with experimental data indicates on essential role of Coulomb de-excitation process. Possible Stark mixing is also analyzed

  9. Comparing internal and external run-time coupling of CFD and building energy simulation software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Djunaedy, E.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a comparison between internal and external run-time coupling of CFD and building energy simulation software. Internal coupling can be seen as the "traditional" way of developing software, i.e. the capabilities of existing software are expanded by merging codes. With external

  10. Atom dynamics in laser fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Su; Mi, No Gin

    2004-12-01

    This book introduces coherent dynamics of internal state, spread of atoms wave speed, semiclassical atoms density matrix such as dynamics equation in both still and moving atoms, excitation of atoms in movement by light, dipole radiating power, quantum statistical mechanics by atoms in movement, semiclassical atoms in movement, atoms in movement in the uniform magnetic field including effects of uniform magnetic field, atom cooling using laser such as Doppler cooling, atom traps using laser and mirrors, radiant heat which particles receive, and near field interactions among atoms in laser light.

  11. Allocation of Internal Medicine Resident Time in a Swiss Hospital: A Time and Motion Study of Day and Evening Shifts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenger, Nathalie; Méan, Marie; Castioni, Julien; Marques-Vidal, Pedro; Waeber, Gérard; Garnier, Antoine

    2017-04-18

    Little current evidence documents how internal medicine residents spend their time at work, particularly with regard to the proportions of time spent in direct patient care versus using computers. To describe how residents allocate their time during day and evening hospital shifts. Time and motion study. Internal medicine residency at a university hospital in Switzerland, May to July 2015. 36 internal medicine residents with an average of 29 months of postgraduate training. Trained observers recorded the residents' activities using a tablet-based application. Twenty-two activities were categorized as directly related to patients, indirectly related to patients, communication, academic, nonmedical tasks, and transition. In addition, the presence of a patient or colleague and use of a computer or telephone during each activity was recorded. Residents were observed for a total of 696.7 hours. Day shifts lasted 11.6 hours (1.6 hours more than scheduled). During these shifts, activities indirectly related to patients accounted for 52.4% of the time, and activities directly related to patients accounted for 28.0%. Residents spent an average of 1.7 hours with patients, 5.2 hours using computers, and 13 minutes doing both. Time spent using a computer was scattered throughout the day, with the heaviest use after 6:00 p.m. The study involved a small sample from 1 institution. At this Swiss teaching hospital, internal medicine residents spent more time at work than scheduled. Activities indirectly related to patients predominated, and about half the workday was spent using a computer. Information Technology Department and Department of Internal Medicine of Lausanne University Hospital.

  12. Estimation of the time scale of last chance alpha emission using an ''atomic clock''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gallamore, L.; Sarantites, D.G.; Charity, R.J.; Nicolis, N.G.; Sobotka, L.G.; Beene, J.R.; Halbert, M.L.; Varner, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    The probability of filling a K-vacancy, created on the incoming part of the collision, before α-particle emission is used to time the decay of Yb compound nuclei. These nuclei were produced in the fusion reaction 250 MeV 60 Ni+ 100 Mo. In general the nuclear decays are too fast to be timed by this clock, however, α-particle emitting compound nucleus states have lifetimes sufficiently long for this technique to work when both the α-particle has low energy and the compound nucleus spin is large. This supports the existence of last, or near last, chance α-particle emission in the deexcitation of high spin compound nuclei

  13. High time resolution measurements of the thermosphere from Fabry-Perot Interferometer measurements of atomic oxygen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. K. Ford

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the performance of CCD detectors have enabled a high time resolution study of the high latitude upper thermosphere with Fabry-Perot Interferometers (FPIs to be performed. 10-s integration times were used during a campaign in April 2004 on an FPI located in northern Sweden in the auroral oval. The FPI is used to study the thermosphere by measuring the oxygen red line emission at 630.0 nm, which emits at an altitude of approximately 240 km. Previous time resolutions have been 4 min at best, due to the cycle of look directions normally observed. By using 10 s rather than 40 s integration times, and by limiting the number of full cycles in a night, high resolution measurements down to 15 s were achievable. This has allowed the maximum variability of the thermospheric winds and temperatures, and 630.0 nm emission intensities, at approximately 240 km, to be determined as a few minutes. This is a significantly greater variability than the often assumed value of 1 h or more. A Lomb-Scargle analysis of this data has shown evidence of gravity wave activity with waves with short periods. Gravity waves are an important feature of mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT dynamics, observed using many techniques and providing an important mechanism for energy transfer between atmospheric regions. At high latitudes gravity waves may be generated in-situ by localised auroral activity. Short period waves were detected in all four clear nights when this experiment was performed, in 630.0 nm intensities and thermospheric winds and temperatures. Waves with many periodicities were observed, from periods of several hours, down to 14 min. These waves were seen in all parameters over several nights, implying that this variability is a typical property of the thermosphere.

  14. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  15. International Comprehensive Ocean Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) in Near-Real Time (NRT)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The International Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set (ICOADS) Near-Real-Time (NRT) product is an extension of the official ICOADS dataset with preliminary...

  16. Real-Time Observation of Internal Motion within Ultrafast Dissipative Optical Soliton Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Katarzyna; Nithyanandan, K.; Andral, Ugo; Tchofo-Dinda, Patrice; Grelu, Philippe

    2017-06-01

    Real-time access to the internal ultrafast dynamics of complex dissipative optical systems opens new explorations of pulse-pulse interactions and dynamic patterns. We present the first direct experimental evidence of the internal motion of a dissipative optical soliton molecule generated in a passively mode-locked erbium-doped fiber laser. We map the internal motion of a soliton pair molecule by using a dispersive Fourier-transform imaging technique, revealing different categories of internal pulsations, including vibrationlike and phase drifting dynamics. Our experiments agree well with numerical predictions and bring insights to the analogy between self-organized states of lights and states of the matter.

  17. The International Telecommunications Satellite (INTELSAT) Solar Array Coupon (ISAC) atomic oxgyen flight experiment: Techniques, results and summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, S.; King, G.; Dunnet, A.; Kirkendahl, T.; Linton, R.; Vaughn, J.

    1993-01-01

    Techniques and results of the ISAC flight experiment are presented, and comparisons between flight tests results and ground based testing are made. The ISAC flight experiment, one component of a larger INTELSAT 6 rescue program, tested solar array configurations and individual silver connects in ground based facilities and during STS-41 (Space Shuttle Discovery). In addition to the INTELSAT specimens, several materials, for which little or no flight data exist, were also tested for atomic oxygen reactivity. Dry lubricants, elastomers, polymeric materials, and inorganic materials were exposed to an oxygen atom fluence of 1.2 x 10(exp 20) atoms. Many of the samples were selected to support Space Station Freedom design and decision-making.

  18. 9th International Workshop on Application of Lasers and Storage Devices in Atomic Nuclei Research: Recent Achievements and Future Prospects

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalska, Magdalena; LASER 2013

    2014-01-01

    Since the beginning, the Workshop has been devoted to the application of lasers in atomic nuclear research. (Details can be found in the proceedings of the previous 6th to 8th workshops: Hyperfine Interactions: volumes 164 (2004), 171 (2006) and 196, (2009).) The subject of the previous VIII Workshop (LASER 2009) was broadened, combining two key technologies of modern research: lasers and ion storage techniques. This combination has opened the event to the new research opportunities for investigations in atomic and nuclear physics, for detection of quantum effects in particle ensembles as well as for precision spectroscopy especially for testing fundamental interactions and symmetries. Due to the increased interest in the previous edition, we decided to retain its title and topics for the 2013 edition stressing on atomic properties of superheavy elements and methods of their investigation.

  19. Atomic Energy Control Act

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-01-01

    This act provides for the establishment of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The board is responsible for the control and supervision of the development, application and use of atomic energy. The board is also considered necessary to enable Canada to participate effectively in measures of international control of atomic energy

  20. Time evolution and decay of an excited atom in a weak electric field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.B.

    1996-01-01

    A Mathematica notebook for describing the time evolution and decay of the hydrogen n=2 states in the presence of a weak external electric field is presented. The work involves (1) solving a set of differential equations coupled by the Hamiltonian of the external electric field and (2) deriving a set of formulas for a complete description of the polarization state of the emitted photons. It is demonstrated how problems with such complexity can be treated with ease and in an error-free manner by using symbolic software such as Mathematica. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics