WorldWideScience

Sample records for international agencies recommended

  1. International recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, Bo

    1986-01-01

    Full text: This short presentation will indicate the general radiation protection background to protective measures against foodstuffs contaminated with radioactive substances. A number of international organizations are involved in various aspects of radiation protection, for example, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the World Health Organization (WHO). Two international organizations, however, provide the basic background. These are the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR). UNSCEAR provides the scientific information on radiation levels and effects. It consists of 21 member countries, with truly international coverage. It issues reports to the UN General Assembly, including comprehensive scientific annexes. Its latest comprehensive report was issued in 1982, the next is expected to be published in 1988. That report will include an assessment of the radiological consequences of the Chernobyl accident. The ICRP is a non-governmental organization. It has issued recommendations on radiation protection since 1928. The postulated biological basis for radiation protection recommendations involves two types of biological effects. The so-called non-stochastic effects, mainly due to cell death, appear only when the radiation doses exceed a certain threshold value. These effects, therefore, can only appear after high accidental exposures. After the Chernobyl accident, they only affected about 200 individuals involved in fire extinction and rescue work at the damaged nuclear power plant. Stochastic effects, with some simplification, may be seen as the result of initial changes in the genetic code of some surviving cells. If these cells are germ cells, this may lead to hereditary harm. If they are somatic cells, the result could be cancer

  2. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  3. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-01-01

    Background Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Conclusions Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear

  4. Medical physics in Europe following recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casar, Bozidar; Lopes, Maria do Carmo; Drljević, Advan; Gershkevitsh, Eduard; Pesznyak, Csilla

    2016-03-01

    Medical physics is a health profession where principles of applied physics are mostly directed towards the application of ionizing radiation in medicine. The key role of the medical physics expert in safe and effective use of ionizing radiation in medicine was widely recognized in recent European reference documents like the European Union Council Directive 2013/59/EURATOM (2014), and European Commission Radiation Protection No. 174, European Guidelines on Medical Physics Expert (2014). Also the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been outspoken in supporting and fostering the status of medical physics in radiation medicine through multiple initiatives as technical and cooperation projects and important documents like IAEA Human Health Series No. 25, Roles and Responsibilities, and Education and Training Requirements for Clinically Qualified Medical Physicists (2013) and the International Basic Safety Standards, General Safety Requirements Part 3 (2014). The significance of these documents and the recognition of the present insufficient fulfilment of the requirements and recommendations in many European countries have led the IAEA to organize in 2015 the Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe, where major issues in medical physics in Europe were discussed. Most important outcomes of the meeting were the recommendations addressed to European member states and the survey on medical physics status in Europe conducted by the IAEA and European Federation of Organizations for Medical Physics. Published recommendations of IAEA Regional Meeting on Medical Physics in Europe shall be followed and enforced in all European states. Appropriate qualification framework including education, clinical specialization, certification and registration of medical physicists shall be established and international recommendation regarding staffing levels in the field of medical physics shall be fulfilled in particular. European states have clear legal and moral

  5. What aspects of the health technology assessment process recommended by international health technology assessment agencies received the most attention in Poland in 2008?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasa, Katarzyna; Dziomdziora, Malgorzata; Fajutrao, Liberty

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to determine the extent to which international standards on transparency and quality are met by the health technology assessment (HTA) process in Poland. A secondary objective is to describe the outcomes of the HTA process and their associated factors. All published online HTA appraisal and meeting proceedings on pharmaceutical products in 2008 were reviewed using a score card developed from international checklists recommended by INAHTA and ECHTA. The sixty-nine reports reviewed showed that five of nine transparency standards and six of eight quality standards were usually met by the HTA reports. Areas for improvement for transparency include inputs from external stakeholders, availability of English summaries, conclusions, implications of results, and suggested program of action. Areas of improvement for quality include appropriateness of target population and comparator/s, sufficiency of evidence on efficacy and safety, methodological rigor, economic model assumptions, and adaptation to the Polish setting. A consideration of the ethical and social consequences to the healthcare system must also be strengthened. The study demonstrates that the incorporation and implementation of the HTA appraisal process in Poland has been successful. HTA appraisal reports in Poland have considered most of the international standards of transparency and quality. Recommendations for both HTA users and doers are forwarded for the improvement of the HTA process in the Polish setting.

  6. International Information, Education and Cultural Relations: Recommendations for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC. Center for Strategic and International Studies.

    The report analyzes American government programs in international information, education, and cultural relations in order to provide recommendations for program improvement. A history of public diplomacy programs since World War II traces creation of the United States Information Agency (USIA) and the Bureau of Cultural Relations (CU) and analyzes…

  7. 76 FR 69714 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ...: Notice of Meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA... Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency (IEA) will be held at the headquarters of... of Switzerland --Questionnaire Response of The Netherlands 5. Emergency Response Exercises...

  8. The Perspectives of the International Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollander, Astrid

    2005-01-01

    An Inter-agency Panel of Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) experts, drawn from seven United Nations and other international agencies, was one of the highlights in the programme of UNESCO's International Experts Meeting "Learning for Work, Citizenship and Sustainability" (Bonn, Germany, 25-28 October 2004). The Panel…

  9. 15 CFR 1170.5 - Recommendations for agency organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recommendations for agency organization. 1170.5 Section 1170.5 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued) TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE METRIC CONVERSION POLICY FOR FEDERAL...

  10. International Atomic Energy Agency and Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abd Rahim Mohd Nor

    1985-01-01

    A review on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) and its relation with Malaysia is given. This article also discusses the background history of IAEA, its organization and functions in the field of nuclear energy

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2012. - The IAEA Annual Report 2012 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). - The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2012 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. - Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. - Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. - The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. - The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. - The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non- Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2012. - The IAEA Annual Report 2012 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). - The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2012 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. - Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. - Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. - The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. - The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. - The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non- Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2013. The IAEA Annual Report 2013 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report, starting on page 15, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2012-2013 (GC(55)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2013 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available, in electronic form only, on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear- Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear-weapon State' is as used in

  14. 77 FR 16826 - International Energy Agency Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    .... ACTION: Notice of meetings. SUMMARY: The Industry Advisory Board (IAB) to the International Energy Agency.... 6272(c)(1)(A)(i)) (EPCA), the following notice of meetings is provided: Meetings of the Industry... --Emergency Response Review of Switzerland --Emergency Response Review of The Netherlands --Questionnaire...

  15. Religion, Education, and Secularism in International Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambach, Amy; Marshall, Katherine; Nelson, Matthew J.; Andreescu, Liviu; Kwayu, Aikande C.; Wexler, Philip; Hotam, Yotam; Fischer, Shlomo; El Bilawi, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    During the interwar years of the early twentieth century, and through at least the 1980s, education was seen by scholars, state leaders, and international agency representatives alike as a way to modernize and secularize underdeveloped communities. Arguments about the modernizing power of education did not erase or discount the presence of…

  16. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1991-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1991. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency: Highlights of activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, A.

    1992-09-01

    This document provides a brief, well-illustrated summary of the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the months up to September 1992. Especially mentioned are the programmes to enhance the safety of nuclear power, from the study of nuclear reactors to assessing the radiological consequences of reactor accidents, and the areas of non-proliferation and safeguards

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The Annual Report 2009 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2008-2009 (GC(51)/2). The introductory chapter, '2009 in Perspective', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2009 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional infomation covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Publications/Reports/Anrep2009/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Natinos document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT). The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT

  20. Recommendations of International Commission of Radiation Protection 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The book summarizes the recommendations on radiation protection of International of Radiation Protection. The main chapters are: 1.- Rates in radiation protection 2.- Biological aspects of radiation protection 3.- Framework of radiation protection. 4.- System of protection. 5.- Implantation of commission's recommendations. 6.- Summary of recommendations

  1. International and national radiation protection standards and recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swindon, T.N.

    1989-01-01

    The recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and their basis are discussed with particular emphasis on the extensive review of its earlier recommendations undertaken by the ICRP during the 1970s. The new recommendations issued in 1977 after this review are described. The dose limits for various organs and tissues before and after 1977 are compared. The optimization principle contained in the 1977 recommendations is assessed. The implementation of the 1977 recommendations, the subsequent changes to them and the ICRP's 1987 statement on cancer risk assessments are discussed. The National Radiological Protection Board's October 1987 radiation protection recommendations are outlined. 8 refs., 1 fig

  2. Contemporaneous International Asthma Guidelines Present Differing Recommendations: An Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samir Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Several international groups develop asthma guidelines. Conflicting recommendations across guidelines have been described in several disease areas and may contribute to practice variability. Accordingly, we compared the latest Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS asthma guideline with contemporaneous international asthma guidelines to evaluate conflicting recommendations and their causes. Methods. We identified the latest CTS asthma guideline update (2012 and the following societies which also updated their guidelines in 2012: the British Thoracic Society and Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network and the Global Initiative for Asthma. We compared these three guidelines on (1 key methodological factors and (2 adult pharmacotherapy recommendations. Results. Methods used and documentation provided for literature search strategy and dates, evidence synthesis, outcomes considered, evidence appraisal, and recommendation formulation varied between guidelines. Criteria used to define suboptimal asthma control varied widely between guidelines. Inhaled corticosteroid dosing recommendations diverged, as did recommendations surrounding use of budesonide/formoterol as a reliever and controller and recommendations in the subsequent step. Conclusions. There are important differences between recommendations provided in contemporaneous asthma guidelines. Causes include differences in methods used for interpreting evidence and formulating recommendations. Adopting a common set of valid and explicit methods across international societies could harmonize recommendations and facilitate guideline implementation.

  3. The International Atomic Energy Agency: activities and relationship with Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abud Osuna, Javier.

    1987-01-01

    Legal and political studies on the activities of the IAEA infer that the pacific uses of nuclear energy become more significant every day in the ambit of international relationships. The studies analyze as a whole relationships among member states. The first part is divided into four chapters, starting with the background and creation of the agency, its structure, statutes, amendments and the performance of its main organisms. It continues to describe mechanisms and programmes carried out, including cooperation agreements between the IAEA and other specialized organizations in the United Nations. It ends up with the IAEA performance resulting from different treaties. The second part examines Mexican norms on nuclear matter as well as relationships between Mexico and the IAEA. It demonstrates that achievements in the Agency have been possible because of the establishment of an international cooperation basis, which avoids duplicity of actions. The conclusions recommend joint efforts from both the developed and the developing countries in the following: a) to imbue public opinion with the goodness of nuclear energy; b) to discourage the construction and operation of nuclear installations; c) to unify national standards on nuclear safety and control; d) to decrease export restrictions, based on safeguards; e) to promote internal nuclear research in Mexico or throught regional integration agreements, with technical assistance and support from the IAEA. (author)

  4. Role of International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bianco, A.

    1986-01-01

    About 10 years ago, the IAEA formulated guidelines for mutual emergency assistance in case of accidents. These guidelines have been revised periodically and updated, with the latest revision prepared in 1984. As a response to Chernobyl, two new conventions have been produced: (1) the Convention on Early Notification of a Nuclear Accident, and (2) the Convention on Assistance in the Case of a Nuclear Accident or Radiological Emergency. It is important to emphasize that points of contact and a focal point within the IAEA shall be available continuously for the implementation of the Conventions. A total of 58 and 57 Member States have signed Conventions 1 and 2, respectively, as of October 27, 1987. It is expected that these numbers will increase significantly in the near future. According to the INSAG Summary Report, the following areas have been recommended as top priority: epidemiology study; problems of skin lesions, problem of biological dosimetry in selected cohorts of the population; and medical literature. The IAEA has been designated to take the lead in these areas in close collaboration with WHO and other international organizations

  5. 78 FR 55724 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Recommended...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... of Dockets Management (HFA- 305), Food and Drug Administration, 5630 Fishers Lane, Rm. 1061... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comment Request; Recommended Glossary and Educational Outreach To Support Use of Symbols on...

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  7. The Internal Agency Approach to Managing and Developing Marketing Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruell, Christopher

    1995-01-01

    Argues that the internal agency model of a marketing communications department forces the department to compete with outside sources for work, while department members sharpen their skills and improve their knowledge of their company's business. Describes the process for creating such an internal agency, including initiating, implementing, and…

  8. CCSDS - A forum to facilitate international cooperation among space agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Edward P.; Delmas, Georges

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) in its role as a promoter the development and utilization of compatible data-systems standards among the principal space agencies of the world. Attention is also given to the CCSDS affiliation categories comprising member agencies, observer agencies, and associates. Consideration is given to the CCSDS organization, the technical panels, and current CCSDS recommendations.

  9. Intergovernmental organisation activities: European Atomic Energy Community, International Atomic Energy Agency, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2012-01-01

    European Atomic Energy Community: Proposed legislative instruments, Adopted legislative instruments, Non-legislative instruments, Other activities (meetings). International Atomic Energy Agency: IAEA Action Plan on Nuclear Safety. OECD Nuclear Energy Agency: The Russian Federation to join the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Participation by the regulatory authorities of India and the United Arab Emirates in the Multinational Design Evaluation Programme (MDEP); NEA International Workshop on Crisis Communication, 9-10 May 2012; International School of Nuclear Law: 2013; Next NEA International Nuclear Law Essentials Course

  10. Application of ICRP recommendations relevant to internal dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowser, K.E.; Snyder, W.S.; Struxness, E.G.

    1969-01-01

    The intent of this paper is to review several of the basic concepts of radiation protection (with emphasis on internal dose) currently recommended by the International Commission on radiological Protection (ICRP), to summarize the assumptions and methods used in the calculation of internal dose, and to illustrate by example the practical application of the pertinent guidelines. Two broad subject areas are considered: (1) standards of radiation protection and (2) bases of internal dose estimation. Topics discussed within the framework of radiation protection standards include maximum permissible dose, categories of radiation exposure, maximum permissible dose commitment, simultaneous internal and external exposure, multiple organ exposure, and size of the exposed group. Discussion of internal dose estimation is limited to selected items that include the body burden of radionuclides and the calculation of absorbed dose, the dose equivalent, the derivation of maximum permissible concentration (MPC), the relationship of stable element intake to the MPC, and short term and chronic exposure situations. (author)

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report 2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three pillars of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2006-2007 (GC(49)/2). The introductory chapter seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2006 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2006/. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to technology are: nuclear power; nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies; capacity building and nuclear knowledge maintenance for sustainable energy development; nuclear science; food and agriculture; human health; water resources; assessment and management of marine and terrestrial environments; radioisotope production and radiation technology; safety and security; incident and emergency preparedness and response; safety of nuclear installations; radiation and transport safety; management of radioactive waste; nuclear security

  12. The International Atomic Energy Agency Flag Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the IAEA Flag Code which was promulgated by the Director General on 15 September 1999, pursuant to the decision of the Board of Governors on 10 June 1999 to adopt an Agency flag as described in document GOV/1999/41 and its use in accordance with a flag code to be promulgated by the Director General

  13. Regulatory agencies' recommendations for medicine information leaflets: Are they in line with research findings?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Amber; Tordoff, June; Smith, Alesha

    2018-02-01

    The design of medicine information leaflets can determine whether a leaflet will be read or discarded by patients. It may also influence patients' ability to understand the information about their medicines within the leaflet. Researchers compared regulatory agencies' recommendations for medicine information leaflet design from New Zealand, the United Kingdom, the European Union, and the United States against recommended good design principles to determine the appropriateness, comprehensiveness, and consistency of their recommendations. Recommendations for medicine information leaflets varied between the regulatory agencies. There were some inconsistencies between the recommendations and some gaps were identified. There was little regulatory guidance given to creators of medicine information leaflets in New Zealand compared to other countries, and this could lead to manufacturer-produced information leaflets of a poorer quality. Up-to-date and enforceable guidance for creators of medicine information leaflets should be provided in all countries to ensure they are of an appropriate standard. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Combating hidden hunger: the role of international agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalmiya, Nita; Schultink, Werner

    2003-12-01

    The importance of micronutrient deficiencies or "hidden hunger" was clearly emphasized by the inclusion of specific goals on iron, vitamin A, and iodine deficiency at the 1990 World Summit for Children and other major international nutrition conferences. Significant progress has since been made toward eliminating vitamin A and iodine deficiencies, with less progress made toward reducing the burden of iron-deficiency anemia. The role of international agencies, such as the World Health Organization, United Nations Children's Fund, Food and Agricultural Organization, and World Bank in assisting countries to make progress toward the World Summit for Children goals has been very important. International agencies have played a critical role in advocating for and raising awareness of these issues at the international, regional, and national levels among policymakers and the general population. Using a rights-based approach, UNICEF and other agencies have been instrumental in elevating to the highest political level the discussion of every child's right to adequate nutrition. International agencies have also been very supportive at the national level in providing technical guidance for programs, including monitoring and evaluation. These agencies have played a critical role in engaging the cooperation of other partners, including bilateral donors, non-governmental organizations, and the private sector for micronutrient programs. Furthermore, international agencies provide financial and material support for micronutrient programs. In the future, such agencies must continue to be heavily involved in programs to achieve the newly confirmed goals for 2010. The present paper focuses on the role of international agencies in combating micronutrient deficiencies, drawing on the lessons learned over the last decade. The first section of the paper summarizes the progress achieved since 1990, and the second section describes the specific role of international agencies in contributing

  15. "Agency in Mobility": Towards a Conceptualisation of International Student Agency in Transnational Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Ly Thi; Vu, Thao Thi Phuong

    2018-01-01

    Student mobility is becoming a prominent phenomenon of tertiary education in the twenty-first century. Internationally mobile students' lived experiences are intimately linked to their potential to exercise agency in transnational mobility. However, the notion of agency within the context of student mobility has not been the explicit focus of…

  16. The United Nations recommendations and data efforts: international migration statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, A B

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the UN's efforts to improve international migration statistics. The review addresses the challenges faced by the UN, the direction in which this effort is going, gaps in the current approach, and priorities for future action. The content of the UN recommendations has changed in the past and seems to be moving toward further changes. At each stage, the direction of change corresponds broadly to earlier shifts in the overall context of world social-economic affairs and related transformations in international travel and migration patterns. Early (1953) objectives were vaguely stated in terms of social, economic, and demographic impacts of long term settlement. 1976 recommendations continued the focus on long term resettlement and, at the same time, gave more attention to at least 1 kind of short term (work-related) movement. Most recent recommendations have given more attention to other classes of short term travellers, such as refugees and contract workers. Recommendations on the measures and data sources have changed over time, also. The 1953 recommendations were limited to flow data from international border statistics. 1976 recommendations drew attention to stock data and the use of civil registration data to supplement border crossing data. Recent UN reflections recognize that the volume of border crossings has now reached the point where many countries simply refuse to gather data on all travellers, choosing instead to make estimates. It is implied that either sample surveys at border points and/or visas and entry permits may be the best way of counting various specific kinds of migrants. Future recommendations corresponding to contemporary and emerging concerns will require that the guidelines be restructured: 1) to give more explicit attention in international migration statistics to citizenship and access to political and welfare benefits; 2) to distinguish more carefully various sub-classes of movers; 3) to expand objectives of data

  17. The International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pezzutti, A.A.C.

    1980-01-01

    The origens, functions and objectives of the IAEA are analysed. The application of safeguards to avoid military uses of nuclear energy is discussed. In the final section the agrement between Brazil and Germany regarding IAEA safeguards, as well as the competence for executing the brazilian program are explained. It is, then, an informative study dealing with nuclear energy and its peaceful path, the creation of International Fuel Cycle Evaluation and nonproliferation [pt

  18. A Comparison of Reimbursement Recommendations by European HTA Agencies: Is There Opportunity for Further Alignment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Allen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In Europe and beyond, the rising costs of healthcare and limited healthcare resources have resulted in the implementation of health technology assessment (HTA to inform health policy and reimbursement decision-making. European legislation has provided a harmonized route for the regulatory process with the European Medicines Agency, but reimbursement decision-making still remains the responsibility of each country. There is a recognized need to move toward a more objective and collaborative reimbursement environment for new medicines in Europe. Therefore, the aim of this study was to objectively assess and compare the national reimbursement recommendations of 9 European jurisdictions following European Medicines Agency (EMA recommendation for centralized marketing authorization.Methods: Using publicly available data and newly developed classification tools, this study appraised 9 European reimbursement systems by assessing HTA processes and the relationship between the regulatory, HTA and decision-making organizations. Each national HTA agency was classified according to two novel taxonomies. The System taxonomy, focuses on the position of the HTA agency within the national reimbursement system according to the relationship between the regulator, the HTA-performing agency, and the reimbursement decision-making coverage body. The HTA Process taxonomy distinguishes between the individual HTA agency's approach to economic and therapeutic evaluation and the inclusion of an independent appraisal step. The taxonomic groups were subsequently compared with national HTA recommendations.Results: This study identified European national reimbursement recommendations for 102 new active substances (NASs approved by the EMA from 2008 to 2012. These reimbursement recommendations were compared using a novel classification tool and identified alignment between the organizational structure of reimbursement systems (System taxonomy and HTA

  19. International Energy Agency 2012 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-01

    The IEA Executive Director’s Annual Report 2012 is the first of a regular annual series reporting on the IEA’s operational and organisational achievements, as well as challenges and events over the year. It is presented to the IEA Governing Board and released publicly to ensure transparency and also to take stock of the organisation’s activities from a strategic perspective. 2012 was a transitional year for the IEA, given fundamental changes in the global energy economy as well as internal management and budget issues. At the same time demand for IEA products set new records, and the public and political impact of IEA work through effective communication was measured as high.

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  1. International Regulations and Recommendations for Utility Data for Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowen, Donna; Azzabi Zouraq, Ismail; Chevrou-Severac, Helene; van Hout, Ben

    2017-12-01

    Recommendations and guidelines for the collection, generation, source and usage of utility data for health technology assessment (HTA) vary across different countries, with no international consensus. Many international agencies generate their own guidelines providing details on their preferred methods for HTA submissions, and there is variability in both what they recommend and the clarity and amount of detail provided in their guidelines. This article provides an overview of international regulations and recommendations for utility data in HTA for a selection of key HTA countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain (Catalonia), Sweden and the UK (England/Wales and Scotland). International guidelines are typically clear and detailed for the selection of countries assessed regarding the source description of health states (e.g. generic preference-based measure) and who should provide preference weights for these health states (e.g. general population for own country). Many guidelines specify the use of off-the-shelf generic preference-based measures, and some further specify a measure, such as EQ-5D. However, international guidelines are either unclear or lack detailed guidance regarding the collection (e.g. patients report own health), source (e.g. clinical trial) and usage (e.g. adjusting for comorbidities) of utility values. It is argued that there is a need for transparent and detailed international guidelines on utility data recommendations to provide decision makers with the best possible evidence. Where this is not possible it is recommended that best practice should be used to inform the collection, source and usage of utility values in HTA.

  2. The recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vennart, J.

    1983-01-01

    The most recent recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection in its Publication 26 differ from all those made earlier by being based quantitatively on the risk of deleterious effects. Two types of effect are considered: stochastic and non-stochastic effects. The recommended dose limits are designed to avoid non-stochastic effects and reduce the risks of stochastic effects to acceptable values. The dose equivalent limits are only part of a much wider system that requires justification for the use of sources of ionizing radiation and consideration of costs and benefits to ensure that doses are kept as low as reasonably achievable. Annual Limits for Intakes (ALIs) of radionuclides by workers are recommended in ICRP Publication 30 and the dosimetric models and sources of data used to derive these values are described. ICRP are currently considering a statement about values of ALI for members of the public. The many factors by which these would differ from those recommended for workers are discussed. (author)

  3. Environment. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment issued during the period 1980-1993. The major subjects covered include: effect of agrochemical residues on soils and aquatic ecosystems, application of radioisotopes in conservation of the environment, siting of nuclear power plants, environmental isotope data and environmental contamination due to nuclear accidents

  4. Radiation therapy. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-04-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Radiation Therapy, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  5. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1986-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-11-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1986 up to the end of 1999 and still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered important have also been included. The catalogue is in CD-ROM format

  6. Environment. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalog lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the Environment, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 30 April 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. These are noted in the catalogue

  7. International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, A. J.

    This trip was undertaken to participate in and represent the United States Industry at the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Program (SHCP) Task 14 Workshop. The meeting took place at the A1 Bani Hotel in Rome Italy.

  8. The prepossession of international institutions for energy. The example International Energy Agency (IEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fell, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    In the contribution under consideration, the author reports on the fact that large international energy agencies, which are advisory active in energy questions active, affect the world-wide policy. In particular, these are the International Atomic Energy Authority in Vienna (Austria) and the International Energy Agency in Paris (France). The International Energy Agency is considered world-wide as the most important institution for all energy questions. Nearly annually, it publishes the World Energy Outlook by summarizing the most important current energy data of the world, prognoses the future power supply and makes future energy prices. The reality of the International Energy Agency looks completely differently: It performs no own sciences, but consists of statisticians, who gather only statistical data without scientific analysis. The author of this contribution summarizes the work of the International Energy Agency in three points: (a) Promotion of the interests of companies in mineral oil, natural gas, coal and atomic energy; (b) Hindering the world-wide conversion of renewable energy; (c) Endangerment of the world economy and prevention of an effective climate protection. The International Energy Agency does not justice to its own goal of a reliable, economical and pollution free power supply

  9. International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards: Challenge and response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spector, Leonard S.

    2017-11-01

    This article provides a critical review of the nuclear accounting and inspection system of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), known as "IAEA safeguards." The article focuses on the multiple challenges the Agency confronts in verifying that all nuclear activities in the countries under its safeguards system are being pursued for exclusively peaceful purposes. The principal challenges noted are those posed by: undeclared facilities, the development of enrichment and reprocessing capabilities, illicit procurement activities, denial of inspector access, difficulties in verifying absence of weaponization activities, and difficulties in establishing that all nuclear-relevant activities in a state are peaceful. The article is in the form of annotated PowerPoint briefing slides.

  10. Creating Quality Assurance and International Transparency for Quality Assurance Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Dorte; Lindeberg, Tobias

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the experiences gained in the pilot project on mutual recognition conducted by the quality assurance agencies in the Nordic countries and the future perspective for international quality assurance of national quality assurance agencies. The background of the project was the need......, on the one hand, to advance internationalisation of quality assurance of higher education, and on the other hand, allow for the differences in the national approaches to quality assurance. The paper will focus on two issues: first, the strength and weaknesses of the method employed and of the use of the ENQA...

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [French Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Chinese Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Spanish Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2010 [Russian Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Annual Report 2010 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question The main part of the report, starting on page 17, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'Overview', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement and Background to the Safeguards Statement and Summary. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org./Publications/ Reports/index.html. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this report do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The mention of names of specific companies or products (whether or not indicated as registered) does not imply any intention to infringe proprietary rights, nor should it be construed as an endorsement or recommendation on the part of the Agency. The term 'non-nuclear-weapon State' is used as in the Final Document of the 1968 Conference of Non-Nuclear-Weapon States (United Nations document A/7277) and in the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT) The term 'nuclear weapon State' is as used in the NPT.

  15. Lifestyle recommendations for the prevention and management of metabolic syndrome: an international panel recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Athyros, Vasilios G; Bullo, Mónica; Couture, Patrick; Covas, María I; de Koning, Lawrence; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Díaz-López, Andrés; Drevon, Christian A; Estruch, Ramón; Esposito, Katherine; Fitó, Montserrat; Garaulet, Marta; Giugliano, Dario; García-Ríos, Antonio; Katsiki, Niki; Kolovou, Genovefa; Lamarche, Benoît; Maiorino, Maria Ida; Mena-Sánchez, Guillermo; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Nikolic, Dragana; Ordovás, José M; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; Rizzo, Manfredi; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Schröder, Helmut; Tinahones, Francisco J; de la Torre, Rafael; van Ommen, Ben; Wopereis, Suzan; Ros, Emilio; López-Miranda, José

    2017-05-01

    The importance of metabolic syndrome (MetS) lies in its associated risk of cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, as well as other harmful conditions such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In this report, the available scientific evidence on the associations between lifestyle changes and MetS and its components is reviewed to derive recommendations for MetS prevention and management. Weight loss through an energy-restricted diet together with increased energy expenditure through physical activity contribute to the prevention and treatment of MetS. A Mediterranean-type diet, with or without energy restriction, is an effective treatment component. This dietary pattern should be built upon an increased intake of unsaturated fat, primarily from olive oil, and emphasize the consumption of legumes, cereals (whole grains), fruits, vegetables, nuts, fish, and low-fat dairy products, as well as moderate consumption of alcohol. Other dietary patterns (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension, new Nordic, and vegetarian diets) have also been proposed as alternatives for preventing MetS. Quitting smoking and reducing intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and meat and meat products are mandatory. Nevertheless, there are inconsistencies and gaps in the evidence, and additional research is needed to define the most appropriate therapies for MetS. In conclusion, a healthy lifestyle is critical to prevent or delay the onset of MetS in susceptible individuals and to prevent cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in those with existing MetS. The recommendations provided in this article should help patients and clinicians understand and implement the most effective approaches for lifestyle change to prevent MetS and improve cardiometabolic health. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Alternate Funding Sources for the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toomey, Christopher; Wyse, Evan T.; Kurzrok, Andrew J.; Swarthout, Jordan M.

    2012-09-04

    Since 1957, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has worked to ensure the safe and responsible promotion of nuclear technology throughout the world. The IAEA operates at the intersection of the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty’s (NPT) fourth and third articles, which guarantee Parties to the Treaty the right to peaceful uses of nuclear technology, provided those activities are placed under safeguards verified by the IAEA. However, while the IAEA has enjoyed substantial success and prestige in the international community, there is a concern that its resources are being stretched to a point where it may no longer be possible to execute its multifaceted mission in its entirety. As noted by the Director General (DG) in 2008, demographics suggest that every aspect of the IAEA’s operations will be in higher demand due to increasing reliance on non-carbon-based energy and the concomitant nonproliferation, safety, and security risks that growth entails. In addition to these nuclear energy concerns, the demand for technical developmental assistance in the fields of food security, resource conservation, and human health is also predicted to increase as the rest of the world develops. Even with a 100% value-for-money rating by the U.S. Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and being described as an “extraordinary bargain” by the United Nations Secretary-General’s High-level Panel on Threats, Challenges and Change, real budget growth at the Agency has been limited to zero-real growth for a better part of the last two decades. Although the 2012 regular budget (RB) received a small increase for most programs, the 2013 RB has been set at zero-real growth. As a result, the IAEA has had to defer infrastructure investments, which has hindered its ability to provide the public goods its Members seek, decreased global security and development opportunities, and functionally transformed the IAEA into a charity, dependent on extrabudgetary (EB) contributions to sustain

  17. International Geoscience Workforce Trends: More Challenges for Federal Agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groat, C. G.

    2005-12-01

    Concern about the decreasing number of students entering undergraduate geoscience programs has been chronic and, at times, acute over the past three decades. Despite dwindling populations of undergraduate majors, graduate programs have remained relatively robust, bolstered by international students. With Increasing competition for graduate students by universities in Europe, Japan, Australia, and some developing countries, and with procedural challenges faced by international students seeking entry into the United States and its universities, this supply source is threatened. For corporations operating on a global scale, the opportunity to employ students from and trained in the regions in which they operate is generally a plus. For U.S. universities that have traditionally supplied this workforce, the changing situation poses challenges, but also opportunities for creative international partnerships. Federal government science agencies face more challenges than opportunities in meeting workforce needs under both present and changing education conditions. Restrictions on hiring non-U.S. citizens into the permanent workforce have been a long-standing issue for federal agencies. Exceptions are granted only where they can document the absence of eligible U.S.-citizen candidates. The U.S. Geological Survey has been successful in doing this in its Mendenhall Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Program, but there has been no solution to the broader limitation. Under current and forecast workforce recruitment conditions, creativity, such as that evidenced by the Mendenhall program,will be necessary if federal agencies are to draw from the increasingly international geoscience talent pool. With fewer U.S. citizens in U.S. geoscience graduate programs and a growing number of advanced-degreed scientists coming from universities outside the U.S., the need for changes in federal hiring policies is heightened. The near-term liklihood of this is low and combined with the decline in

  18. Priorities for endometriosis research: recommendations from an international consensus workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Peter A W; D'Hooghe, Thomas M; Fazleabas, Asgerally; Gargett, Caroline E; Giudice, Linda C; Montgomery, Grant W; Rombauts, Luk; Salamonsen, Lois A; Zondervan, Krina T

    2009-04-01

    Endometriosis is an estrogen-dependent disorder where endometrial tissue forms lesions outside the uterus. Endometriosis affects an estimated 10% of women in the reproductive-age group, rising to 30% to 50% in patients with infertility and/or pain, with significant impact on their physical, mental, and social well-being. There is no known cure, and most current medical treatments are not suitable long term due to their side-effect profiles. Endometriosis has an estimated annual cost in the United States of $18.8 to $22 billion (2002 figures). Although endometriosis was first described more than 100 years ago, current knowledge of its pathogenesis, spontaneous evolution, and the pathophysiology of the related infertility and pelvic pain, remain unclear. A consensus workshop was convened following the 10th World Congress on Endometriosis to establish recommendations for priorities in endometriosis research. One major issue identified as impacting on the capacity to undertake endometriosis research is the need for multidisciplinary expertise. A total of 25 recommendations for research have been developed, grouped under 5 subheadings: (1) diagnosis, (2) classification and prognosis, (3) treatment and outcome, (4) epidemiology, and (5) pathophysiology. Endometriosis research is underfunded relative to other diseases with high health care burdens. This may be due to the practical difficulties of developing competitive research proposals on a complex and poorly understood disease, which affects only women. By producing this consensus international research priorities statement it is the hope of the workshop participants that researchers will be encouraged to develop new interdisciplinary research proposals that will attract increased funding support for work on endometriosis.

  19. Cancer screening recommendations: an international comparison of high income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebell, Mark H; Thai, Thuy Nhu; Royalty, Kyle J

    2018-01-01

    Recommendations regarding cancer screening vary from country to country, and may also vary within countries depending on the organization making the recommendations. The goal of this study was to summarize the cancer screening recommendations from the 21 countries with the highest per capita spending on healthcare. Cancer screening guidelines were identified for each country based on a review of the medical literature, internet searches, and contact with key informants in most countries. The highest level recommendation was identified for each country, in the order of national recommendation, cancer society recommendation, or medical specialty society recommendation. Breast cancer screening recommendations were generally consistent across countries, most commonly recommending mammography biennially from ages 50 to 69 or 70 years. In the USA, specialty societies generally offered more intensive screening recommendations. All countries also recommend cervical cancer screening, although there is some heterogeneity regarding the test (cytology or HPV or both) and the age of initiation and screening interval. Most countries recommend colorectal cancer screening using fecal immunochemical (FIT) testing, while only seven countries recommend general or selective screening for prostate cancer, and a similar number explicitly recommend against screening for prostate cancer. Screening for lung and skin cancer is only recommended by a few countries. Greater per capita healthcare expenditures are not associated with greater screening intensity, with the possible exception of prostate cancer. Guidelines for cancer screening differ between countries, with areas of commonality but also clear differences. Recommendations have important commonalities for well-established cancer screening programs such as breast and cervical cancer, with greater variation between countries regarding prostate, colorectal, lung, and skin cancer screening. Ideally, recommendations should be made by a

  20. Creating Quality Assurance and International Transparency for Quality Assurance Agencies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, Dorte; Lindeberg, Tobias

    2004-01-01

    The paper presents the experiences gained in the pilot project on mutual recognition conducted by the quality assurance agencies in the Nordic countries and the future perspective for international quality assurance of national quality assurance agencies. The background of the project was the need......, on the one hand, to advance internationalisation of quality assurance of higher education, and on the other hand, allow for the differences in the national approaches to quality assurance. The paper will focus on two issues: first, the strength and weaknesses of the method employed and of the use of the ENQA......‐membership provision as a basis for the evaluative procedure; and second, the pros and cons of using mutual recognition as international evaluative procedure compared with other approaches....

  1. Environment, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Environment and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  2. Earth sciences. 1990-2001. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 May 2001. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as A for Arabic, C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number

  3. Current radiation protection activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, G.A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) program of the Radiation Safety Section is described in this paper. The Section has two main components: (1) the development of consensus safety documentation and (2) the use of that documentation as the basis for assisting countries to deal safely with their applications of radiation and radioactivity. Main activities of the section are listed for each of these components. Activities include documentation, coordinated research programs, and assistance to developing countries. 14 tabs

  4. Radiological protection of patients: conceptual framework and new international recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gisone, Pablo A.; Perez, Maria del R.

    2005-01-01

    Medical exposures represent the largest man-made source of radiation exposure. Within the concept medical exposures includes different kind of exposure: of patients as part of their own medical diagnosis or treatment; of individuals as part of occupational health surveillance; of individuals as part of health screening programs; of volunteers participating in biomedical research programs; of individuals as part of medico-legal procedures and of voluntary patient caregivers (relatives or friends). Radiological protection of patients (RPP) is founded on two basic principles: justification and optimization. The justification of a medical exposure is founded in the consideration that it will give a sufficient net benefit, including the direct health benefits to the patients and the potential benefits to society, against the individual detriment that the exposure might cause, taking into account the efficacy, benefits and risks of available alternative techniques having the same objective but involving no or less exposure to ionizing radiation. Concerning optimization in diagnosis, the radiological protection objective is to keep doses as low as reasonably achievable while obtaining the necessary diagnostic information. In therapy, the objective is to ensure that the target tissue is given the prescribed dose while minimizing the dose to surrounding healthy tissue. In this presentation we analyze new international recommendations concerning RPP, with emphasis in the Directive 97/43/EURATOM. The importance of referral guidelines to help physicians during the process of justification and use of diagnostic reference levels (to help in optimization) is discussed. (author)

  5. An international survey and recommendations for modern hydrokinetic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Basnet, Bipin; Dunsmore, Ian

    2017-04-01

    This study presents the results of a survey on some of the advantages of the novel and uniquehydrokinetic energy generation systems over other technologies available today. Recently, a comprehensive assessment study for the application of internationally leading hydrokinetic technologies in water engineering has been conducted. The study was carried with the collaboration of the School of Engineering, University of Glasgow and Scottish Water Horizons Ltd. The assessment involved the information collection, critical analysis of various features and financial viability analysis of various hydrokinetic systems available at this time. The outcomes of the study are summarized below: - The preliminary assessment of the hydrokinetic system and their application were carried out. The technologies were divided into different categories as per their core theory, scope of application as well as positive and negatives effects of their application. - A variety of criteria were used to assess the technical, economical and ecological potential from the application of hydrokinetic systems. - A number of companies representing a wide range of technologies available worldwide were ranked considering the performance of these against the above criteria. - Only a couple of the companies could satisfy the selection condition to be adopted into select sites of low flow and low pressure head. - A more detailed assessment for specific sites and further testing of these technologies is recommended to further assess the advantages and optimal performance of the selected technologies. A preliminary evaluation of the best performing systems demonstrates its effectiveness, particularly over other existing hydrokinetic technologies, when ecology of the open water surface system is considered. Specifically it will be of interest to use the selected technology in combination with a fish passage, as compared with other technologies this system has a minimal amount of fast moving components.

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications. Catalogue 1980-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued from 1980 up to the end of 1995 an still available. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is noted as C for Chinese, E for English, F for French, R for Russian and S For Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, seminars and panels, of experts contain papers in their original language (English, French, Russian or Spanish) with abstracts in English and in the original language

  7. International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group (IPOG) consensus recommendations : Hearing loss in the pediatric patient

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liming, Bryan J; Carter, John; Cheng, Alan; Choo, Daniel; Curotta, John; Carvalho, Daniela; Germiller, John A; Hone, Stephen; Kenna, Margaret A; Loundon, Natalie; Preciado, Diego; Schilder, Anne; Reilly, Brian J; Roman, Stephane; Strychowsky, Julie; Triglia, Jean-Michel; Young, Nancy; Smith, Richard J H

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide recommendations for the workup of hearing loss in the pediatric patient. METHODS: Expert opinion by the members of the International Pediatric Otolaryngology Group. RESULTS: Consensus recommendations include initial screening and diagnosis as well as the workup of

  8. Safeguards and legal matters 1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all currently valid sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  9. Earth sciences 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences issued during the period 1969-1994. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  10. R and D programs of the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyne, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    This paper provides a description of the collaborative research program of the International Energy Agency. Focusing on the organization of the program, rather than attempting to cover the technical content of the research, the discussion conveys how its operation is facilitated through a framework that takes account of the interests of participating governments as well as technical objectives. Some Canadian activities in the IEA program are briefly described as illustration and a list of current IEA Research Agreements and associated activities is presented in an Appendix

  11. The International Business Research Agenda: Recommendations from Marketing Practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundstrom, William J.; White, D. Steven; Schuster, Camille P.

    1997-01-01

    A survey of 250 American Marketing Association members investigated which international business research topics were seen as having high utility or importance. It also identified five latent factors (global market expansion; international marketing management; management issues in an international context; quality, values, and expectations;…

  12. The International Energy Agency collaboration in wind energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beurskens, H.J.M.; Pershagen, B.

    1991-07-01

    The International Energy Agency (IEA) wind energy agreements have provided a useful framework for international cooperative efforts during more than thirteen years. Nine comprehensive research Tasks have been successfully completed and three Tasks are currently in progress. The sharing of research and information has clearly contributed to the development of wind technology, has eliminated unnecessary redundancy in national programmes, has encouraged utilization of the most efficient approaches to solve common problems, and has created a cooperative spirit among the professional groups that seems to be unique. After a brief introduction on the activities of the IEA on wind energy an overview is given of the ongoing tasks and other current activities with regard to the subject. 1 fig., 5 tabs., 9 refs

  13. RUSSIAN AND INTERNATIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS ON MANAGEMENT OF CONSTIPATIONS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Zakharova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Among various disorders of gastrointestinal tract deserving special attention of pediatricians constipations play one of the main roles. In Russian pediatrics there are no unified criteria to assessment of the normal frequency of defecation in children. The article contains recommendations on diagnostics and treatment of constipations in children according to the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN, as well as updated recommendations of the British National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.

  14. International Atomic Energy Agency. Highlights of activities. September 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gillen, V.A.

    1993-09-01

    This document describes the most important activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency during the period September 1992 - September 1993, in particular in the following areas: (i) nuclear power; (ii) nuclear fuel cycle; (iii) radioactive waste management; (iv) comparative assessment of energy sources; (v) IAEA laboratory activities; (vi) nuclear applications in the food industry and in agriculture; (vii) human health applications of nuclear techniques, especially in the treatment and prevention of diseases and in the analysis of health problems related to the environment; (viii) industry and earth sciences; (ix) physical and chemical sciences; (x) radiation protection; (xi) safety of nuclear installations; (xii) safeguards and non-proliferation activities; (xiii) activities in the area of public and technical information such as the International Nuclear Information System (INIS) and other IAEA computerized databases and reference systems, the publication Nuclear Fusion, a monthly scientific journal of articles on thermonuclear fusion research and development, and the organization of meetings on atomic energy; and (xiv) a description of the Agency's technical assistance activities, including financial data

  15. CitRec 2017 : International Workshop on Recommender Systems for Citizens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, J.; Sun, Zhu; Bozzon, A.; Zhang, J.; Larson, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    The "International Workshop on Recommender Systems for Citizens" (CitRec) is focused on a novel type of recommender systems both in terms of ownership and purpose: recommender systems run by citizens and serving society as a whole.

  16. Proposal for the International Atomic Energy Agency Training Course

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, T.L.

    1994-06-01

    The Hanford Site has hosted similar activities, including both Hanford Summits I and II. The Hanford Summits were two-day televised events to discuss the commitment of the current Presidential administration to the environmental restoration of the Hanford Site. Public involvement and strategic issues established from Hanford Summit I include: Regulatory issues, training and education, economic development and partnership, and technology transfer. Hanford Summit II provided a summary of how Secretary of Energy O'Leary is proceeding on the above strategic issues. The DOE and Westinghouse School for Environmental Excellence frequently offers a six-week course for environmental professionals and workers. Approximately thirty to forty individuals attend the training course, which provides training in environmental regulation compliance. The Hanford Site has hosted two previous International Atomic Energy Agency training courses. The courses lasted two weeks and had approximately eight to ten participants. Nuclear Material Management and Neutron Monitoring were the courses hosted by the Hanford Site

  17. The International Atomic Energy Agency's program on decontamination and decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feraday, M.A.

    1989-01-01

    The International Atomic energy Agency (IAEA) is developing an integrated information base that will systematically cover the technical, regulatory, radiation protection, planning, and economic aspects related to the decontamination and decommissioning (D/D) of nuclear facilities. The object of this program is to assist member states in developing the required expertise, equipment, and programs so that they can decommission their nuclear facilities in a safe, timely, and cost-effective manner. In addition to providing information, the IAEA encourages research and provides technical assistance in the form of expert missions, equipment design and procurement, etc., to assist member states in implementing their D/D programs. The technology contained in some recent IAEA reports is reviewed, including the decontamination, segmentation, and demolition of concrete and steel; the recycle/reuse of components from decommissioning; and the reduction of occupational exposures in D/D and the regulatory process in decommissioning. The IAEA's future program is briefly reviewed

  18. Safeguards and legal matters 1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Safeguards and Legal Matters issued during the period 1970-1994. Most publications are published in English, through some are also available in French, Russian and Spanish. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  19. Optimal allocation of International Atomic Energy Agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-12-01

    The Safeguards Department of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to assure the peaceful use of a state's nuclear materials and facilities. Because of limited resources for conducting inspections, the careful disposition of inspection effort among these facilities is essential if the IAEA is to attain its safeguards goals. This report describes an optimization procedure for assigning an inspection effort to maximize attainment of IAEA goals. The procedure does not require quantitative estimates of safeguards effectiveness, material value, or facility importance. Instead, the optimization is based on qualitative, relative prioritizations of inspection activities and materials to be safeguarded. This allocation framework is applicable to an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  20. [Health care research within international normative frameworks and the literature : assessment, stakes and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogognon, Patrick; Godard, Béatrice

    2017-05-22

    Research in health occupies a central place in the elaboration of public policies and the interventions that aim to reduce inequality and make the right to health effective. However, research in health remains marked by inequalities which particularly affect developing countries. The objective of this critical recension of the international normative frameworks and the scientific literature is to present a summary of the assessment, underline the challenges and identify the main recommendations as well as the ethical principles that aim to reduce inequalities in the field of health research. The normative frameworks included in this recension have been adopted by the United Nations Organisation through its agencies specialised in the field of health and scientific research. Particular attention has also been given to the scientific literature concerned with the inequalities in health research. The results of this recension show us that inequalities in health research can be an impediment to the equitable distribution of healthcare services and to human development. With regard to this, these inequalities raise concerns about justice and equity for research institutions, researchers and communities in developing countries. The recommendations and ethical principles analysed here are therefore designed to reduce them and to promote access for developing countries to research and the consequent benefits. Finally, this recension emphasises the need to undertake research to understand the role of research practices in countries of the South in the emergence and persistence of these inequalities.

  1. Recommendations for the Technical Infrastructure for Standardized International Rights Statements

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Valentine; Cowles, Esmé; Estlund, Karen; Isaac, Antoine; Johnson, Tom; Matienzo, Mark A.; Peiffer, Patrick; Urban, Richard J.; Zeinstra, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    This white paper is the product of a joint Digital Public Library of America (DPLA)-Europeana working group organized to develop minimum rights statement metadata standards for organizations that contribute to DPLA and Europeana. This white paper deals specifically with the technical infrastructure of a common namespace (rightsstatements.org) that hosts the rights statements to be used by (at minimum) the DPLA and Europeana. These recommendations for a common technical infrastructure for righ...

  2. 78 FR 22530 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Program for International Student Assessment... of Collection: Program for International Student Assessment (PISA 2015) Recruitment and Field Test.... Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 6,313. Abstract: The Program for International Student...

  3. Summary points and consensus recommendations from the international protein summit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurt, Ryan T; McClave, Stephen A; Martindale, Robert G; Ochoa Gautier, Juan B; Coss-Bu, Jorge A; Dickerson, Roland N; Heyland, Daren K; Hoffer, L John; Moore, Frederick A; Morris, Claudia R; Paddon-Jones, Douglas; Patel, Jayshil J; Phillips, Stuart M; Rugeles, Saúl J; Sarav Md, Menaka; Weijs, Peter J M; Wernerman, Jan; Hamilton-Reeves, Jill; McClain, Craig J; Taylor, Beth

    2017-01-01

    The International Protein Summit in 2016 brought experts in clinical nutrition and protein metabolism together from around the globe to determine the impact of high-dose protein administration on clinical outcomes and address barriers to its delivery in the critically ill patient. It has been

  4. Decarbonizing the international shipping industry : solutions and policy recommendations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    el Makhloufi, A.

    2017-01-01

    Ship-source greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could increase by up to 250% from 2012 levels by 2050 owing to increasing global freight volumes. Binding international legal agreements to regulate GHGs, however, are lacking as technical solutions remain expensive and crucial industrial support is absent.

  5. Breast cancer in pregnancy: recommendations of an international consensus meeting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amant, F.; Deckers, S.; Calsteren, K. van; Loibl, S.; Halaska, M.; Brepoels, L.; Beijnen, J.; Cardoso, F.; Gentilini, O.; Lagae, L.; Mir, O.; Neven, P.; Ottevanger, N.; Pans, S.; Peccatori, F.; Rouzier, R.; Senn, H.J.; Struikmans, H.; Christiaens, M.R.; Cameron, D.; Bois, A. du

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide guidance for clinicians about the diagnosis, staging and treatment of breast cancer occurring during an otherwise uncomplicated pregnancy. METHODS: An international expert Panel convened to address a series of questions identified by a literature review and personal experience.

  6. The International Atomic Energy Agency Nuclear Security Education Strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BRAUNEGGER-GUELICH, A.; RUKHLO, V.; GREGORIC, M.; COLGAN, P.

    2011-01-01

    The threat of nuclear terrorism has not diminished. In response to the concerns of States, an international nuclear security framework has emerged through the establishment of a number of legally binding and non-binding international instruments which obligates or commits States to carry out a number of actions to protect against nuclear terrorism. In this context, the need for human resource development programmes in nuclear security was underscored at several International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) General Conferences and Board of Governors' Meetings. In the pursuit of this need, the IAEA provides a comprehensive nuclear security training programme to States on a regular basis, and has developed a concept that seeks to effectively pass ownership of nuclear security knowledge and skills to States through the establishment of a Nuclear Security Support Centre. In addition, the IAEA has developed a technical guidance titled IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12 - Educational Programme in Nuclear Security that consists of a model of a Master of Science (M.Sc.) and assists educational institutions to provide nuclear security education. The article sets out IAEA efforts in the area of nuclear security training and education, including the assistance to States for establishing a Nuclear Security Support Centre. It underlines the objective and content of the IAEA Nuclear Security Series No. 12, discusses different concepts on how to establish nuclear security at universities and, emphasizes on the IAEA efforts to assist educational and research institutions, and other stake holders to enhance global nuclear security by developing, sharing and promoting excellence in nuclear security education. (author)

  7. International Nuclear Information System. 1988-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications and products of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS), and issued during the period 1 January 1990 - 31 July 2002. Most publications are issued in English, though some are also available in other languages. This is noted as E for English, F for French, G for German, R for Russian and S for Spanish before the relevant ISBN number. Some INIS Reference Series publications are available in electronic form from the INIS Clearinghouse. For more details on the INIS publications programme, please visit the INIS web site mentioned above

  8. International Linear Collider Steering Committee issues charge to Technology Recommendation Panel

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Following its November 19 meeting in Paris, the International Linear Collider Steering Committee, a subcommittee of the International Committee for Future Accelerators, has published the charge http://www.fnal.gov/directorate/icfa/ITRP_Charge.pdf to the International Technology Recommendation Panel appointed by ICFA" (2 paragraphs).

  9. Decarbonizing the international shipping industry: Solutions and policy recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Zheng; El Makhloufi, Abdel; Chen, Yang; Tang, Jiayuan

    2018-01-01

    Ship-source greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions could increase by up to 250% by 2050 from their 2012 levels, owing to increasing global freight volumes. Binding international legal agreements to regulate GHGs, however, are lacking as technical solutions remain expensive, and crucial industrial support is absent. In 2003, the International Maritime Organization adopted Resolution A.963 (23) to regulate shipping CO 2 emissions via technical, operational, and market-based routes. However, progress has been slow and uncertain; there is no concrete emission reduction target or definitive action plan. Yet, a full-fledged roadmap may not even emerge until 2023. In this policy analysis, we revisit the progress of technical, operational, and market-based routes and the associated controversies. We argue that 1) a performance-based index, though good-intentioned, has loopholes affecting meaningful CO 2 emission reductions driven by technical advancements; 2) using slow steaming to cut energy consumption stands out among all operational solutions thanks to its immediate and obvious results, but with the already slow speed in practice, this single source has limited emission reduction potential; 3) without a technology-savvy shipping industry, a market-based approach is essentially needed to address the environmental impact. To give shipping a 50:50 chance for contributing fairly and proportionately to keep global warming below 2°C, deep emission reductions should occur soon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The annual report for 1998. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1998

  11. The annual report for 1997. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-07-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1997

  12. The annual report for 1999. International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    Article VI.J of the Agency's Statute requires the Board of Governors to submit 'an annual report to the General Conference concerning the affairs of the Agency and any projects approved by the Agency'. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 1999

  13. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014. Additional Annex Information

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This annex contains information on: • Coordinated research projects completed in 2014; • Publications issued in 2014; • Training courses, seminars and workshops held in 2014; • Relevant Agency web sites; • Number and types of facilities under Agency safeguards by State as of 31 December 2014 and • Facilities under Agency safeguards or containing safeguarded nuclear material on 31 December 2014

  14. PANCREATIC DIABETES TYPE 2 IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: INTERNATIONAL RECOMMENDATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V. Vasyukova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Violent growth of type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM morbidity in children and adolescents is spread all around the world. Peculiarities of DM type 2 in this age group are: absence of determined diagnostic criteria, difficulty of differential diagnosis with DM type 1, early development of complications. International Society of Pediatric and Adolescent Diabetes propose Guideline of DM type 2 management, which consider main questions of diagnostics, treatment and prophylaxis of this disease. The agent of choice for treatment of DM type 2 in children upwards 10 years is metformin.Key words: children, diabetes mellitus type 2, diagnostics, treatment.(Voprosy sovremennoi pediatrii — Current Pediatrics. 2009;8(2:49-53

  15. Recommendations of the International Symposium on Contraceptive Research and Development for the Year 2000 and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    The government of Mexico and the UNDP/UNFPA/WHO/World Bank Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction organized an international symposium on "Contraceptive Research and Development for the Year 2000 and Beyond" that was held March 8-10, 1993 in Mexico City. 11 recommendations were established: 1) reproductive and sexual health should be given priority in both governmental and nongovernmental health research agendas, with coordination and collaboration between public and private sectors, nationally and internationally; 2) more funds should be provided by international donors for such research in developing countries; 3) women's health advocates and potential users should be represented on advisory bodies and in the decision making processes; 4) the existing health infrastructure and family planning services available, method potential, and safeguards concerning safety, effectiveness, and consent should be considered before adopting a new procedure; 5) "basic biomedical, technological, clinical, epidemiological, and social science research" leading to new or improved methods that are safe, effective, affordable, suitable for different age groups and designed in response to user's needs should receive increased support; 6) support should also be increased for "introductory, sociocultural, programmatic, operational, epidemiological, and qualitative research" that improves information, method, or service delivery; 7) research is needed on sexuality, gender roles, and gender relationships in different cultures; in particular, on discrimination and violence against women, sexual behavior, risk taking attitudes toward disease transmission and pregnancy, men's perceived needs, and the reasons for refusal of or inability to use services available; 8) industry, especially in developing countries, should collaborate with national regulatory agencies in order to expedite the process of development; 9) research should be undertaken

  16. The international atomic energy agency's programme on utilization of accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytlewski, Nikolai; Mank, Günter; Rosengard, Ulf; Bamford, Samuel; Markowicz, Andrzej; Wegrzynek, Dariusz

    2006-06-01

    Low-energy accelerators have in the past produced a major part of our current knowledge of nuclear physics. Today they are mainly used for applied research and industrial applications. In view of this, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has during recent years initiated several Coordinated Research Projects (CRPs) concerning Ion Beam Analysis of Materials, Accelerator Mass Spectrometry and Nuclear Microprobe Techniques. The CRPs involve laboratories from developing as well as developed Member States, networking on a common topic coordinated by the IAEA. In order to facilitate networking, the IAEA has recently published the "World Survey of Accelerator Based Analytical Techniques" available on the Internet and as a CD-ROM. The IAEA maintains also a beamline at a 6 MV Van de Graaff accelerator in the Ru đjer Bo\\vsković Institute, Zagreb, Croatia. Small and medium power accelerator driven spallation neutron sources will become more important as many small neutron producing research reactors are approaching the end of their useful working life. The IAEA has, within its Department for Nuclear Sciences and Applications, a programme on the Effective Utilization of Accelerators. This programme helps Member States, in particular developing Member States, in finding new areas of applications for their low and medium energy accelerators through increased participation in activities such as Coordinated Research Projects, Technical Meetings and Conferences. This paper describes the IAEA's current programme on accelerator utilization and proposed future activities.

  17. Optimal allocation of international atomic energy agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Each year the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to confirm that nuclear materials and facilities are employed for peaceful purposes. Because of limited inspection resources, however, the IAEA cannot fully attain its safeguards goals either quantitatively as measured by the inspection effort negotiated in the facility attachments or qualitatively as measured by the IAEA criteria for evaluating attainment of safeguards goals. Under current IAEA procedures the allocation of inspection resources assigns essentially equal inspection effort to facilities of the same type. An alternative approach would incorporate consideration of all material categories and facilities to be assigned inspection resources when allocating effort to a particular facility. One such method for allocating inspection resources is based on the IAEA criteria. The criteria provide a framework for allocating inspection effort that includes a ranking of material types according to their safeguards importance, an implicit definition of inspection activities for each material and facility type, and criteria for judging the attainment of safeguards goals in terms of the quality and frequency of these inspection activities. This framework is applicable to resource allocation for an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  18. Best Practice of Selecting Strategic International Agency Banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Leslie Soon-Lim

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available International agency or correspondent banking (corbanking is cross border bank to bank businesses that agent banks act on behalf of principals. Despite drastic changing banking environment, corbanking remains from doing business by mainly fee based, packaging reciprocal products and services, and so on. Corbanking is therefore identified as an alternative to serve clients worldwide in a strategic low cost way. Best practice to identify for entering corbanking relationships and selecting their correspondents are the themes of this paper, which are useful for financial institutions to make strategic and operational decisions for their expansion. Eighteen determinant factors to establish corbanking relationships and nineteen selection criteria of correspondents were identified through literature reviews, case studies, and exploratory surveys. Empirical surveys were conducted on 43 sample banks in Australia, which were further categorized in ten bank groups. Analytical methods included descriptive statistics and stepwise least square regression with case studies. The findings were: the most significant factor for financial institutions to enter correspondent banking systems was the bank size and a lower ranking factor was location not physically present, whereas there was different consensus for different bank groups about the selection criteria for agents overseas.

  19. Community Report and Recommendations from International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foing, Bernard H.

    2016-07-01

    and Resource Utilisation; Infrastructure and Human aspects; Moon, Space and Society. The latest technical achievements and results of recent missions (SMART-1, Kaguya, Chang'E1, Chandrayaan-1, LCROSS and LRO) were discussed at a plenary panel and technical sessions, with the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) still in operation. Chang'E1 has generated many useful results for the community. Four plenary panel sessions were conducted: 1. What are the plans? 2. New mission results; 3. From space stations and robotic precursors to lunar bases; 4. Moon, Space, Society The participants summarised their findings, discussions and recommend o continue efforts by agencies and the community on previous ICEUM recommendations, and the continuation of the ILEWG forum, technical groups activities and pilot projects. 1. Science and exploration - World-wide access to raw and derived (geophysical units) data products using consistent formats and coordinate systems will maximize return on investment. We call to develop and implement plans for generation, validation, and release of these data products. Data should be made available for scientific analysis and supporting the development and planning of future missions - There are still Outstanding Questions: Structure and composition of crust, mantle, and core and implications for the origin and evolution of the Earth-Moon system; Timing, origin, and consequences of late heavy bombardment; Impact processes and regolith evolution; Nature and origin of volatile emplacement; Implications for resource utilization. These questions require international cooperation and sharing of results in order to be answered in a cost-effective manner - Ground truth information on the lunar far side is missing and needed to address many important scientific questions, e.g. with a sample return from South Pole- Aitken Basin - Knowledge of the interior is poor relative to the surface, and is needed to address a number of key questions, e.g. with International

  20. Oil substitution and energy saving - A research and development strategy of the International Energy Agency /IEA/

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath-Nagel, S.

    1981-03-01

    Systems analyses were carried out by the International Energy Agency for the participating 15 countries in order to work out strategies and scenarios for lessening the dependence on imported oil and for developing new energy technologies. MARKAL model computations show the technology and energy mixes necessary for achieving a reduction of oil imports by two thirds over the next 40 years. The scenario 'high social security' examines the projected rise in energy consumption, the development of oil substitutes, the increase in alternative heating sources, the development of markets for liquid energy products, the demand for gas, and the relative usage of various energy generation methods. The recommended strategy involves as the most important points an increase in coal consumption, greater nuclear energy reliance and development of alternative technologies.

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (French Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  2. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Chinese Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  3. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Spanish Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2011 (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    The IAEA Annual Report 2011 aims to summarize only the significant activities of the Agency during the year in question. This report covers the period 1 January to 31 December 2011. The main part of the report, starting on page 21, generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2010-2011 (GC(53)/5). The introductory chapter, 'The Year in Review', seeks to provide a thematic analysis of the Agency's activities within the context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2011 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is available in electronic form only on iaea.org, along with the Annual Report.

  5. Paternity Testing Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on genetic investigations in paternity cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Allen, Robert W; Carracedo, Angel

    2002-01-01

    The International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG) has established a Paternity Testing Commission (PTC) with the purpose of formulating international recommendations concerning genetic investigations in paternity testing. The PTC recommends that paternity testing be performed in accordance...

  6. Good practice recommendations - medical-professional control of internal exposure to radionuclides in nuclear base installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berard, Philippe; Blanchin, Nicolas; Fottorino, Robert; Gonin, Michele; Quesne, Benoit; Agrinier, Anne-Laure; Bourgaut, Laurent; Blanchardon, Eric; Challeton de Vathaire, Cecile; Franck, Didier; Piechowski, Jean; Fritsch, Paul; Poncy, Jean-Luc

    2011-07-01

    The first part of this voluminous report presents the context and method of definition of recommendations for a clinical practice and comprises a literature review of national, European and international recommendations, standards and work-group reports. The second part develops recommendations under four main themes: assessment of the committed effective dose (objectives, implementation, communication, traceability and archiving), control programs, dosimetric estimation based on results, and health risk and taking into care by the occupational physician. The authors adopted the same structure for each sub-theme or issue: target extract of regulatory and standard requirements and international recommendations, analysis of literature and of data from professional practices, opinion of the work-group, and graded recommendations with respect to the proof level

  7. International Nuclear Information System 1983-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the International Nuclear Information System (INIS). INIS was established in 1969 to announced the scientific literature published worldwide on the peaceful uses of nuclear energy. All books are published in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 21 x 30 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated. In addition all books in this catalogue, except for the INIS Input Training Kit, are available on microfiche. For information on the microfiche versions, contact the INIS Clearinghouse of the IAEA

  8. International Review Team (IRT) Safety Case Recommendations for the Yucca Mountain Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Supporting the Site Recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Luik, Abraham E.

    2004-01-01

    The session started with Abe Van Luik (IGSC Chair, US-DOE-YM, USA) who presented the feedback of the international peer review of the US-DOE Yucca Mountain TSPA (Total System Performance Assessment) supporting the successful designation of the site by the Congress and the President of the U.S. In particular, he listed key implications of the IRT (International Review team) recommendations on the forthcoming US-DOE documentation of its case for safety to be submitted to the regulator, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, mainly: - The documentation submitted to the licensing authority should address technical aspects and compliance with regulatory criteria. - That documentation should reflect sound science and good engineering practice; it should present detailed and rigorous modelling. - In addition, it should present both quantitative and qualitative arguments, make a statement on why there can be confidence in the face of uncertainty, acknowledge remaining issues and provide the strategy to resolve them. - Demonstrating understanding is as important as demonstrating compliance. - There is a need to provide a clear explanation of the case made to the regulator for more general audiences to complement the large amount of technical documents that will be produced. The US-DOE response to these recommendations for the License Application, which is under preparation, is that the recommendations will be implemented to the maximum extent possible. In subsequent discussion, with respect to the License Application, it was acknowledged that detailed guidance from the U.S. regulator was very useful, and guidance of this type would be generally useful. At the current time, the words 'safety case' are not mentioned in U.S. regulations, but if one reads both the regulation and guidance documents it becomes evident that all aspects of a safety case need to be provided in the License Application and its accompanying documents

  9. Highlights 96. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinley, D.H.

    1996-01-01

    The past year saw a process of strengthening in some important areas of the work of the Agency with the aim of improving the impact and efficiency of its activities. The activities in these areas are described

  10. Between forwarding and mentoring: a qualitative study of recommending medical doctors for international postdoctoral research positions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marušić Matko

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Young scientists rarely have extensive international connections that could facilitate their mobility. They often rely on their doctoral supervisors and other senior academics, who use their networks to generate opportunities for young scientists to gain international experience and provide the initial trigger for an outward move. Methods To explore the process of informal recommending of young physicians from a small country for postdoctoral research positions in foreign countries, we conducted in-depth interviews with eight senior academics who acted as recommenders and eight physicians who, based on the recommendations of senior academics, spent at least a year working in a laboratory abroad. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed by using the framework approach. Results The findings showed that recommending can take four distinct forms: 1 forwarding information, 2 passive recommending, 3 active recommending, and 4 mentor recommending. These forms differ in their level of commitment and mutual trust among actors, and possible control over the success of the process. Two groups of recommendees - 'naive' and 'experienced' - can be distinguished based on their previous scientific experience and research collaboration with the recommender. Crucial for the success of the process is an adequate preparation of recommendees' stay abroad, as well as their return and reintegration. The benefits of recommending extend beyond the individual participants to the scientific community and broader society of the sending country. Conclusions With a sufficient level of commitment by the actors, informal recommending can be a part of or grow into an all-encompassing developmental relationship equal to mentoring. The importance of senior academics' informal contacts and recommendations in promoting junior scientists' mobility should be acknowledged and encouraged by the research institutions and universities, particularly in developing

  11. Tumor radiosensitizers - current status of development of various approaches: Report of an International Atomic Energy Agency meeting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsman, Michael Robert; Bohm, Lothar; Margison, Geoffrey P.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those well-established in clinical practice, that operated through a variety of mechanisms to sensitize tumors to radiation and (2) to compare...... contrasted with new molecular antisense and gene therapy strategies. All the drugs discussed have previously been shown to act as tumor cell radiosensitizers or to kill hypoxic cells present in tumors. CONCLUSION: Specific recommendations were made for more preclinical studies with certain of the agents...... and for clinical trials that would be suitable for industrialized countries, as well as trials that were considered more appropriate for developing countries.PURPOSE: The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) held a Technical Meeting of Consultants to (1) discuss a selection of relatively new agents, not those...

  12. Adherence to international recommendations for gastric lavage in medical drug poisonings in Denmark 2007-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Bo; Høgberg, Lotte Christine Groth; Groenlykke, Thor Buch

    2012-01-01

    Recent reviews strongly discourage the routine use of gastric lavage in oral poisonings, but the authors suspected that gastric lavage might still be in widespread use in Denmark. We wished to estimate the extent to which gastric lavage in cases of medical drug poisoning, reported in inquiries...... to the Danish Poison Information Centre (DPIC) from 2007 to 2010, was performed according to international recommendations and whether adherence to recommendations improved over the period....

  13. U.S. licensing requirements and recommendations on international principles and rules on licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrick, J.F.

    1986-01-01

    In the USA, the basic law concerning licensing requirements and recommendations on international principles and rules on licensing is set forth in the Atomic Energy Act of 1954. The Act is implemented through regulations issued by the NRC, which prescribes the standards for licensing including safety standards. The recommendations concern the exchange of technical information, operating experience, and the development of certain minimum safety guidelines. (CW) [de

  14. Improving the International Agency for Research on Cancer's consideration of mechanistic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Julie; Lynch, Heather

    2017-03-15

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) recently developed a framework for evaluating mechanistic evidence that includes a list of 10 key characteristics of carcinogens. This framework is useful for identifying and organizing large bodies of literature on carcinogenic mechanisms, but it lacks sufficient guidance for conducting evaluations that fully integrate mechanistic evidence into hazard assessments. We summarize the framework, and suggest approaches to strengthen the evaluation of mechanistic evidence using this framework. While the framework is useful for organizing mechanistic evidence, its lack of guidance for implementation limits its utility for understanding human carcinogenic potential. Specifically, it does not include explicit guidance for evaluating the biological significance of mechanistic endpoints, inter- and intra-individual variability, or study quality and relevance. It also does not explicitly address how mechanistic evidence should be integrated with other realms of evidence. Because mechanistic evidence is critical to understanding human cancer hazards, we recommend that IARC develop transparent and systematic guidelines for the use of this framework so that mechanistic evidence will be evaluated and integrated in a robust manner, and concurrently with other realms of evidence, to reach a final human cancer hazard conclusion. IARC does not currently provide a standardized approach to evaluating mechanistic evidence. Incorporating the recommendations discussed here will make IARC analyses of mechanistic evidence more transparent, and lead to assessments of cancer hazards that reflect the weight of the scientific evidence and allow for scientifically defensible decision-making. Copyright © 2017 Gradient. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. New recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection-a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A D

    2008-01-01

    For almost half a century, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has revised its recommendations on radiological protection with an average frequency of about 10 years, building on the experience gained in their implementation. This has ensured that the recommendations remain up to date and fit for purpose and it is this that has led in turn to their wide acceptance internationally. Indeed, the 1990 version of the recommendations forms the basis of the international radiological protection standards and the systems of control of exposure to ionizing radiation in many countries throughout the world. This version introduced new concepts and a more holistic approach to radiological protection but marrying the different exposure situations into one coherent framework has proved not to be straightforward and further reflection seemed necessary in order to satisfy both those who are responsible for the development of the control systems as well as a broader audience. Review of the 1990 recommendations started around 1998 and, since then, many ideas have been explored and avenues followed. Eventually, new recommendations were agreed by the Commission at its meeting in Essen in March 2007. This paper provides a review of these new recommendations and their possible implications. (topical review)

  16. On the new recommendation of the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Publication 60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chukhin, S.G.

    1994-01-01

    The International Commission on Radioligical Protection (ICRP) published in 1990 new main recommendations (Publication 60), in which the recommendations of 1977 (Publication 26) were revised and noticeable changes were introduced. The main changes in ICRP recommendations important for practical personnel are discussed. These important changes include introduction of two protection systems, which are the protection system in practice and that during intervention, conception of potential irradiation, dose and risk limits, changes in dose limits and risk coefficients, determination of the effective dose and its numerical values by changing the weighting coefficients. The problems open to arguments are formulated

  17. Noise from wind power plants. A study in anticipation of the recommendation from the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almgren, Martin

    2006-03-01

    Noise from wind turbines are today treated as industrial noise sources according to the guidelines for external industry noise set by Naturvaardsverket (the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency) in RR 1978:5. A praxis has been established with recommended limit 40 dBA equivalent continuous sound pressure level outside dwellings day, evening and night. Naturvaardsverket is planning new guidelines specific for wind turbine noise. A draft was presented at an information meeting 13th May 2005. Special requirements, which in some cases may be far-reaching, are planned for wind turbines. The purpose of this investigation is to illustrate the fairness of the planned requirements. Application of the recommended prediction model for sound propagation above a sea surface in the draft of Naturvaardsverket may lead to serious consequences for the planning of wind power plants near the coast. Research with measurements on sound propagation above water is at present made by the Royal Institute of Technology in Kalmarsund in Sweden. The results of these measurements, which probably will be completed during the spring 2006, should be waited for before a prediction model is recommended. If the model would be valid for sound propagation from wind turbines at sea, there should be some reports on complaint on noise from offshore based wind power plants. We have not been able to locate such complaints in Sweden (Bockstigen), in Denmark (Middelgrunden, Nystedts havmoellepark and Horns rev) or in the Netherlands. For Middelgrund and Nysted, the sound level calculated with Naturvaardsverkets model at 4,5 km and 7 km respectively is around 48 dBA. According to Swedish studies, such a level is annoying to many people. Two methods to set out limits for wind turbine noise are used internationally. In the first an absolute limit for the equivalent continuous sound pressure level is set. In the other, the sound pressure level is related to the background noise level. Naturvaardsverket is

  18. Inequalities and Agencies in Workplace Learning Experiences: International Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Tony; Tran, Ly Thi; Soejatminah, Sri

    2017-01-01

    National systems of vocational education and training around the globe are facing reform driven by quality, international mobility, and equity. Evidence suggests that there are qualitatively distinctive challenges in providing and sustaining workplace learning experiences to international students. However, despite growing conceptual and empirical…

  19. Gadolinium retention after administration of contrast agents based on linear chelators and the recommendations of the European Medicines Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekkers, Ilona A; Roos, Rick; van der Molen, Aart J

    2018-04-01

    The Pharmacovigilance Risk Assessment Committee (PRAC) of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) earlier this year recommended to suspend some marketing authorisations for Gadolinium Containing Contrast Agents (GCCAs) based on linear chelators due to the potential risk of gadolinium retention in the human body. These recommendations have recently been re-evaluated by EMA's Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP), and confirmed the final opinion of the European Medicines Agency. This editorial provides an overview of the available GCCAs and summarises the recent evidence of gadolinium retention. Moreover, a critical appraisal of the strengths and limitations of the scientific evidence currently available on gadolinium retention is given. • EMA recommended suspension of some EU marketing authorisations of four linear GCCAs. • Brain MRI findings indicating gadolinium retention have been confirmed by mass spectrometry. • Current scientific evidence for gadolinium retention has several methodological limitations. • No clear clinical evidence exists indicating that gadolinium retention causes neurotoxicity. • Long-term safety of GCCAs, however, remains unclear.

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. New publications Autumn 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    This Publications Catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming for the period Autumn 2003 - early 2004. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. This is indicated at the bottom of the book entry. A complete listing of all IAEA priced publications is available on the IAEA's web site: http://www.iaea.org/books

  1. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1995-01-01

    President Eisenhower's ''Atoms for Peace'' speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency's scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs

  2. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-01-01

    The text of the Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, as approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959, is re produced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. As required by section 38 of the Agreement, the Director General will transmit certified copies, in the Agency's four working languages, to the Government of each Member State

  3. International radiation protection recommendations. Five years experience of ICRP Publication 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindell, B.; Beninson, D.; Sowby, F.D.

    1983-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection has issued radiation protection recommendations since 1928. The latest set of basic recommendations was adopted by the Commission on 17 January 1977, and subsequently published as ICRP Publication 26. This document has met with a wider interest than any of the previous ICRP recommendations. It has been considered to mark a radical change in the protection policy advocated by ICRP. It is not often appreciated that recommendations which are believed to be 'new' in ICRP Publication 26 had already been made in ICRP Publication 9 more than ten years earlier. In any event, ICRP Publication 26 has had a substantial impact on regulatory work in countries all over the world. It forms the basis for the Basic Safety Standards of the international organizations IAEA, ILO, OECD/NEA and WHO. The paper refers to the experience gained in using the new ICRP recommendations over the five years that have passed since ICRP Publication 26 was adopted and discusses some of the problems that have arisen in the practical application of the new recommendations in various countries. (author)

  4. The pre-operational monitoring - how useful are recommendations of international organizations and various national programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihailovic, M.

    1980-01-01

    National legislation and the preoperational monitoring program around Nuclear Power Plant Krsko are described. The usefulness of international recommendations and various national preoperational monitoring programs is examined. Modifications are described which were introduced with the aim of identifying the site specific critical exposure pathways. The role of qualified and experienced experts is discussed. (H.K.)

  5. Radioactivity: Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (1962), (ICRU) Report 10 c.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Bureau of Standards (DOC), Washington, DC.

    This handbook presents recommendations agreed upon at the meeting of the International Commission on Radiological Units and Measurements (ICRU) held in Montreux, Switzerland, in April 1962. It is written in a report form with a preface including symbols, abbreviations and definitions of terms used in the report. The report consists of four…

  6. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on Education in Health and Medical Informatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Arokiasamy, J.; Ball, M.; Barnett, D.; Bearman, M.; Bemmel van, J.; Douglas, J.; Fisher, P.; Garrie, R.; Gatewood, L.; Goossen, W.; Grant, A.; Hales, J.; Hasman, A.; Haux, R.; Hovenga, E.; Johns, M.; Knaup, P.; Leven, F. J.; Lorenzi, N.; Murray, P.; Neame, R.; Protti, D.; Power, M.; Richard, J.; Schuster, E.; Swinkels, W.; Yang, J.; Zelmer, L.; Zvárová, Jana

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 5 (2001), s. 267-277 ISSN 0026-1270 Institutional research plan: AV0Z1030915 Keywords : health informatics * medical informatics * education * recommendations * International Medical Informatics Association * IMIA Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 1.254, year: 2001

  7. Adherence of preventive oral care products in the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habes, D; Mahzia, R; Nakhleh, K; Joury, E

    2016-09-25

    No study has investigated the availability and adherence of preventive oral care products on the Syrian market to evidence-based international recommendations. Data were collected in 2012, and updated in 2016, in terms of availability, characteristics and adherence to evidence-based international recommendations. Few preventive products adhered to the recommendations. Despite the large decrease in the number of oral care products on the Syrian market, due to the Syrian crisis, nonadherence of some of the available products is still present. A multisectorial approach at a policy level is needed to address such important limitations. The Syrian Ministry of Health should reform regulations for fluoride products to become subject to drug monitoring systems; the Syrian Arab Committee for Measurements and Standards needs to update its standards; and the Syrian General Dental Association should distribute a preventive booklet to dental practitioners.

  8. Funding agencies and disease organizations: resources and recommendations to facilitate ALS clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chad, David A; Bidichandani, Sanjay; Bruijn, Lucie; Capra, J Donald; Dickie, Brian; Ferguson, John; Figlewicz, Denise; Forsythe, Melissa; Kaufmann, Petra; Kirshner, Annette; Monti, William

    2013-05-01

    Ten groups presented their perspectives on facilitating clinical research in ALS including four federal agencies, four disease organizations, one foundation and one advocacy group. The federal agencies (National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Office of Rare Diseases Research, Department of Defense) encourage fostering a team approach between pre-clinical and clinical research investigators, coordinating with patient groups in the early phases of clinical studies, enhancing private and public partnerships, and investigating the interplay between genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure. The disease organizations (Muscular Dystrophy Association, ALS Association, ALS Society of Canada, and the Motor Neurone Disease Association UK) support fellowship training programs to develop ALS clinician scientists, and encourage work on the epidemiology of ALS, on genetic and epigenetic mechanisms that are relevant to ALS pathogenesis, on developing ALS registries and biobanks, and building bridges of collaboration among study groups. The Foundation supports innovative projects, including stem-cell research, and Patient Advocacy is committed to supporting excellence in ALS research and patient care, and believes strongly in enhancing communication between patients and members of the research community.

  9. Crisis Communication Practices at an International Relief Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genova, Gina L.

    2006-01-01

    When a disaster strikes, the affected population relies upon the swift response and aid rendered by relief organizations such as the California-based Direct Relief International. Since 1948, Direct Relief's mission has been to provide essential material resources to locally run health programs in areas affected by natural disasters, wars, and…

  10. Environmental aspects of hydraulic fracturing - Main results and recommendations from two studies on behalf of the German Environment Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krischbaum, Bernd; Bertram, Andreas; Böttcher, Christian; Iyimen-Schwarz, Züleyha; Rechenberg, Jörg; Dannwolf, Uwe; Meiners, Georg

    2016-04-01

    The German Environment Agency (UBA) accompanies the debate on fracking for years. Two major reports on risks and environmental impacts regarding the exploration and exploitation of unconventional natural gas, in particular shale gas have been published. On the basis of these studies as well as on scientific evidence UBA considers ecological barriers as a sustainable means to minimize the risks to environment and human health. 1) Recent studies show that the contamination of shallow aquifers by rise of fluids through natural faults or artificially created fractures is extremely unlikely. However, activities on the surface and lack of wellbore integrity pose threats and substantial risks for the quality of shallow aquifers. 2) The need for thorough groundwater monitoring is fully accepted, yet its range and design is subject to discussion. 3) Formerly, analysis and mass balances of flowback and produced water have been insufficient, thus there is a lack of exact information on proportions of frac-fluids, flowback and formation water respectively, as well as data on possible reaction products. 4) Currently, neither on national nor on European level best reference techniques (BREF) for the treatment and disposal of flowback and produced water are available. 5) In addition, land consumption, emission of greenhouse gases, and induced seismicity are major issues. UBA recommends amongst others the implementation of an environmental impact assessment (EIA) for fracking activities, the prohibition of fracking in water protection areas as well as their catchments, and the disclosure of all frac-fluid chemicals within a national chemical registry. To achieve these objectives the German Environment Agency suggests a step-by-step approach. The paper will present the main results from the studies and the recommendations of the German Environment Agency regarding hydraulic fracturing for unconventional gas exploitation.

  11. 78 FR 23233 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; IEPS International Resource...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-18

    ... the on-line reporting system, International Resource Information System (IRIS) that IFLE uses to... Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; IEPS International Resource Information System... will not be accepted. Written requests for information or comments submitted by postal mail or delivery...

  12. Engaging International Students: An Analysis of the Australian Universities Quality Agency (AUQA) Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdett, Jane; Crossman, Joanna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Australia has enjoyed two decades of growth in international student enrolments. This phenomenon, combined with the evolution of quality assurance policy frameworks, has stimulated interest in the social and academic experiences of international students and their educational outcomes. The Australian Universities Quality Agency's (AUQA)…

  13. Adjustment of the Brazilian radioprotection standards to the safety principles of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.

    2013-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a recommendation with 10 basic safety principles (Fundamental Safety Principles Safety Fundamentals series, number SF-1), which are: 1) Responsibility for safety; 2) Role for government; 3) Leadership and management for safety; 4) Justification of facilities and activities; 5) Optimization of protection; 6) Limitation of risk to individuals; 7) Protection of present and futures generations; 8) Prevention of accidents; 9) Emergency preparedness and response and 10) Protection actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiations risk. The aim of this study is to verify that the Brazilian standards of radiation protection meet the principles described above and how well suited to them. The analysis of the national radiation protection regulatory system, developed and deployed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), showed that out of the ten items, two are covered partially, the number 2 and 10. The others are fully met. The item 2 the fact that the regulatory body (CNEN) be stock controller of a large company in the sector put in check its independence as a regulatory body. In item 10 the Brazilian standard of radiation protection does not provide explicit resolution of environmental liabilities

  14. Recommendations of the International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) on Education in Biomedical and Health Informatics. First Revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mantas, John; Ammenwerth, Elske; Demiris, George; Hasman, Arie; Haux, Reinhold; Hersh, William; Hovenga, Evelyn; Lun, K. C.; Marin, Heimar; Martin-Sanchez, Fernando; Wright, Graham

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The International Medical Informatics Association (IMIA) agreed on revising the existing international recommendations in health informatics/medical informatics education. These should help to establish courses, course tracks or even complete programs in this field, to further develop

  15. Development of the practical application of the recommendations of the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunster, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection grew out of the International X-ray and Radium Protection Commission set up in 1928. Its Recommendations have developed from simple prescriptive rules for protecting the medical staff using x rays and radium to a complete System of Protection for all human activities that involve exposure to ionizing radiation. The Commission is satisfied that some of the health effects of radiation are caused, albeit with small probabilities, by small doses. Its System of Protection is therefore risk-based. It is no longer prescriptive and has to be applied with judgement. The basis of that judgement and the framework for its application are set out in ICRP Publication 60, the 1990 Recommendations of the Commission

  16. Neutron data compilation at the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemmel, H.D.; Attree, P.M.; Byer, T.A.; Good, W.M.; Hjaerne, L.; Konshin, V.A.; Lorens, A.

    1968-03-01

    The paper describes the present status of the neutron data compilation center of the IAEA Nuclear Data Unit, which is now in full operation. An outline i s given of the principles and objectives, the working routines, and the services available within the two-fold functions of the Unit: a) to promote cooperation and international neutron data exchange between the four major centers at Brookhaven, Saclay, Obninsk and Vienna, which share responsibilities in a geographical distribution of labour; b) to collect systematically the neutron data arising from countries in East Europe, Asia, Australia, Africa, South and Central America and to offer certain services to these countries. A brief description of DASTAR, the DAta STorage And Retrieval system, and of CINDU, the data Catalog of the JAEA Nuclear Data Unit, is given. (author)

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [French Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Chinese Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Arabic Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  20. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Spanish Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency Annual Report 2014 [Russian Version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Development Goals. Technical cooperation projects provide expertise in fields where nuclear techniques offer advantages over other approaches, or where they can successfully supplement conventional approaches. The IAEA had 342 million euros in regular budget funding in 2014, while its extrabudgetary expenditures totalled 68.3 million euros. Highlights mentioned in the Annual report include: Nuclear Energy: • The IAEA published several new guidance materials for countries considering to introduce nuclear power programmes. Four new e-learning modules on the IAEA’s ‘Milestones’ approach to nuclear power were launched, bringing to 11 the number of modules in this series available on iaea.org by the end of the year. • More systematic training approaches were used in the nuclear field globally, helping to ensure succession and knowledge management, concluded participants of the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes. • The International Symposium on Uranium Raw Material for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle highlighted new initiatives such as innovative financing and the use of advanced technologies in 'smart mines', and the need for increased attention to stakeholder engagement. Nuclear Sciences and Applications: • As part of the IAEA’s effort to meet growing Member State needs, the Renovation of the Nuclear Applications Laboratories (ReNuAL) project began on 1 January, 2014. Following completion of the feasibility study in February, the strategic plan for the project was issued in May, and conceptual designs for the new buildings were completed in November. A donor package providing detailed information on the project and its requirements was made available to Member States last December. • Against the background of outbreaks of avian influenza H5N1 and H7N9 and other animal diseases that can spread to humans, the IAEA established the VetLab network of animal diagnostic laboratories in Africa to intensify its work on

  2. The Military Spouse Education and Career Opportunities Program: Recommendations for an Internal Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    have a surplus of posi- tions available for teachers of English as a Second Language because the federal government changed the national immigration...mycaa/Career/Search.aspx Swan, Gerry, “Tools for Data-Driven Decision Making in Teacher Education ,” Journal of Computing in Teacher Education , Vol...The Military Spouse Education and Career Opportunities Program Recommendations for an Internal Monitoring System Gabriella C. Gonzalez, Laura L

  3. Community participation in international health: practical recommendations for donor and recipient organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akukwe Chinua

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the need for donor agencies and recipient organizations to involve target communities in the conceptualization, development, monitoring, and implementation of health services and programs in international health. This paper assumes that most donor organizations are based in industrialized countries. Given that resources are finite in both developing and developed countries, the article briefly reviews the current trend of declining public funds for health systems and an increasing role for privately funded health services worldwide. The article calls for community-based international health services that reflect the priorities of target populations, and it also discusses practi cal steps to involve local populations in community-based health planning and management in international health.

  4. Gender characteristics of legal conscience in internal affairs agencies staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznetsova O.V.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the empirical research results of the level of legal conscience forming in law enforcement officials. The study of gender specifics of personnel is now becoming more and more relevant due to a constant increase in the number of women entering the Ministry of Internal Affairs service. The study involved 160 male and 120 female staff members. Analysis of the results revealed a general legal conscience trend typical for male and female employees which manifests in a high level of legal knowledge, adequate understanding of group relativity of moral and ethical norms, civic un-engagement and disinterest to leadership role. This trend reflects a certain viewpoint when human rights are considered to include only freedom, independence and personal self-assertion without responsibility and civic duties. It was found that female employees have higher level of legal conscience forming than male employees. This led to the conclusion of a high-availability of female employees to comply with legal regulations and requirements.

  5. Early national and international recommendations for X-ray and radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tesinska, E.

    2008-01-01

    The first three decades of pioneering work in the field of X-ray and natural radioactivity research and use took its toll all over the world because of lack of knowledge and caution. Coordinated, international cooperation in the field of X-ray and radium protection and standardization of measures was established after the World War I. The First and the Second International Congress of Radiology held in London in 1925 and in Stockholm in 1928 respectively, played a crucial role in it. Based on these congresses' initiatives and resolutions, the International X-ray Unit Committee and the International X-ray and Radium Protection Committee were established in 1828. The early recommendations on the international X-ray unit and on X-ray and radium protection, as passed by the Second International Congress of Radiology in Stockholm in 1928, are presented and compared with two related national initiatives, namely with the Memorandum No. 1 (July 1921) of the British X-ray and Radium Protection Committee, and with a draft of a legal measure regarding the X-ray and radium treatment regulation in Czechoslovakia, which was put together by the Czechoslovak Society of Radiology and the Vereinigung der deutschen Roentgenologen und Radiologen in der Tschechoslowakischen Republik in 1927 at a request of the Chamber of Doctor of Medicine for Bohemia and Moravia and in response to the international initiatives in that field. (author)

  6. 22 CFR Appendix A to Part 201 - Supplier's Certificate and Agreement With the Agency for International Development (AID 282)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Supplier's Certificate and Agreement With the Agency for International Development (AID 282) A Appendix A to Part 201 Foreign Relations AGENCY FOR..., App. A Appendix A to Part 201—Supplier's Certificate and Agreement With the Agency for International...

  7. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [fr

  8. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [es

  9. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter

  10. Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    The Agreement on the Privileges and Immunities of the International Atomic Energy Agency, the text of which is reproduced herein, was approved by the Board of Governors on 1 July 1959. As required by section 38, the Director General has transmitted a certified copy of the Agreement to the Government of each Member of the Agency, and will transmit such a copy to the Government of every State that becomes a Member hereafter [ru

  11. International recommendations for national patient safety incident reporting systems: an expert Delphi consensus-building process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Ann-Marie; Burns, Elaine M; Hull, Louise; Mayer, Erik; Sevdalis, Nick; Darzi, Ara

    2017-02-01

    Patient safety incident reporting systems (PSRS) have been established for over a decade, but uncertainty remains regarding the role that they can and ought to play in quantifying healthcare-related harm and improving care. To establish international, expert consensus on the purpose of PSRS regarding monitoring and learning from incidents and developing recommendations for their future role. After a scoping review of the literature, semi-structured interviews with experts in PSRS were conducted. Based on these findings, a survey-based questionnaire was developed and subsequently completed by a larger expert panel. Using a Delphi approach, consensus was reached regarding the ideal role of PSRSs. Recommendations for best practice were devised. Forty recommendations emerged from the Delphi procedure on the role and use of PSRS. Experts agreed reporting system should not be used as an epidemiological tool to monitor the rate of harm over time or to appraise the relative safety of hospitals. They agreed reporting is a valuable mechanism for identifying organisational safety needs. The benefit of a national system was clear with respect to medication error, device failures, hospital-acquired infections and never events as these problems often require solutions at a national level. Experts recommended training for senior healthcare professionals in incident investigation. Consensus recommendation was for hospitals to take responsibility for creating safety solutions locally that could be shared nationally. We obtained reasonable consensus among experts on aims and specifications of PSRS. This information can be used to reflect on existing and future PSRS, and their role within the wider patient safety landscape. The role of PSRS as instruments for learning needs to be elaborated and developed further internationally. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  12. Hope over fear. The establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1995-12-01

    President Eisenhower`s ``Atoms for Peace`` speech in 1953 started a process that led to the establishment of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This study analyses the negotiations of the Statute of the Agency. It focuses on how the Agency`s scope of action regarding safeguards was negotiated. The Statute is seen as a reflection of the dual purpose of the new Agency to promote peaceful uses of nuclear energy, and to control that peaceful nuclear activities receiving IAEA assistance are not diverted to military purposes. On one hand, the countries receiving assistance from the Agency accepted a degree of international control that represented a breakthrough in international relations. On the other hand, many countries strongly resented controls. Consequently, compromises had to be made in the course of the negotiations in order to reach a consensus. Thus, although the IAEA was established as a competent and technical body, the underlying compromises meant that its scope of actions was restricted. 6 refs.

  13. Image data compression in diagnostic imaging. International literature review and workflow recommendation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braunschweig, R.; Kaden, Ingmar; Schwarzer, J.; Sprengel, C.; Klose, K.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Today healthcare policy is based on effectiveness. Diagnostic imaging became a ''pace-setter'' due to amazing technical developments (e.g. multislice CT), extensive data volumes, and especially the well defined workflow-orientated scenarios on a local and (inter)national level. To make centralized networks sufficient, image data compression has been regarded as the key to a simple and secure solution. In February 2008 specialized working groups of the DRG held a consensus conference. They designed recommended data compression techniques and ratios. Material und methoden: The purpose of our paper is an international review of the literature of compression technologies, different imaging procedures (e.g. DR, CT etc.), and targets (abdomen, etc.) and to combine recommendations for compression ratios and techniques with different workflows. The studies were assigned to 4 different levels (0-3) according to the evidence. 51 studies were assigned to the highest level 3. Results: We recommend a compression factor of 1: 8 (excluding cranial scans 1:5). For workflow reasons data compression should be based on the modalities (CT, etc.). PACS-based compression is currently possible but fails to maximize workflow benefits. Only the modality-based scenarios achieve all benefits. (orig.)

  14. Primary hyperparathyroidism: review and recommendations on evaluation, diagnosis, and management. A Canadian and international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, A A; Hanley, D A; Rizzoli, R; Bollerslev, J; Young, J E M; Rejnmark, L; Thakker, R; D'Amour, P; Paul, T; Van Uum, S; Shrayyef, M Zakaria; Goltzman, D; Kaiser, S; Cusano, N E; Bouillon, R; Mosekilde, L; Kung, A W; Rao, S D; Bhadada, S K; Clarke, B L; Liu, J; Duh, Q; Lewiecki, E Michael; Bandeira, F; Eastell, R; Marcocci, C; Silverberg, S J; Udelsman, R; Davison, K Shawn; Potts, J T; Brandi, M L; Bilezikian, J P

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to assess the most recent evidence in the management of primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and provide updated recommendations for its evaluation, diagnosis and treatment. A Medline search of "Hyperparathyroidism. Primary" was conducted and the literature with the highest levels of evidence were reviewed and used to formulate recommendations. PHPT is a common endocrine disorder usually discovered by routine biochemical screening. PHPT is defined as hypercalcemia with increased or inappropriately normal plasma parathyroid hormone (PTH). It is most commonly seen after the age of 50 years, with women predominating by three to fourfold. In countries with routine multichannel screening, PHPT is identified earlier and may be asymptomatic. Where biochemical testing is not routine, PHPT is more likely to present with skeletal complications, or nephrolithiasis. Parathyroidectomy (PTx) is indicated for those with symptomatic disease. For asymptomatic patients, recent guidelines have recommended criteria for surgery, however PTx can also be considered in those who do not meet criteria, and prefer surgery. Non-surgical therapies are available when surgery is not appropriate. This review presents the current state of the art in the diagnosis and management of PHPT and updates the Canadian Position paper on PHPT. An overview of the impact of PHPT on the skeleton and other target organs is presented with international consensus. Differences in the international presentation of this condition are also summarized.

  15. Recommendations for international gambling harm-minimisation guidelines: comparison with effective public health policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Blankers, Matthijs; Wilkinson, Claire; Schelleman-Offermans, Karen; Cousijn, Janna

    2014-12-01

    Problem gambling represents a significant public health problem, however, research on effective gambling harm-minimisation measures lags behind other fields, including other addictive disorders. In recognition of the need for consistency between international jurisdictions and the importance of basing policy on empirical evidence, international conventions exist for policy on alcohol, tobacco, and illegal substances. This paper examines the evidence of best practice policies to provide recommendations for international guidelines for harm-minimisation policy for gambling, including specific consideration of the specific requirements for policies on Internet gambling. Evidence indicates that many of the public health policies implemented for addictive substances can be adapted to address gambling-related harms. Specifically, a minimum legal age of at least 18 for gambling participation, licensing of gambling venues and activities with responsible gambling and consumer protection strategies mandated, and brief interventions should be available for those at-risk for and experiencing gambling-related problems. However, there is mixed evidence on the effectiveness of limits on opening hours and gambling venue density and increased taxation to minimise harms. Given increases in trade globalisation and particularly the global nature of Internet gambling, it is recommended that jurisdictions take actions to harmonise gambling public health policies.

  16. Internal Medicine Hospitalists' Perceived Barriers and Recommendations for Optimizing Secondary Prevention of Osteoporotic Hip Fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Eng Keong; Loh, Kah Poh; Goff, Sarah L

    2017-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health concern affecting an estimated 10 million people in the United States. To the best of our knowledge, no qualitative study has explored barriers perceived by medicine hospitalists to secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures. We aimed to describe these perceived barriers and recommendations regarding how to optimize secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fracture. In-depth, semistructured interviews were performed with 15 internal medicine hospitalists in a tertiary-care referral medical center. The interviews were analyzed with directed content analysis. Internal medicine hospitalists consider secondary osteoporotic hip fracture prevention as the responsibility of outpatient physicians. Identified barriers were stratified based on themes including physicians' perception, patients' characteristics, risks and benefits of osteoporosis treatment, healthcare delivery system, and patient care transition from the inpatient to the outpatient setting. Some of the recommendations include building an integrated system that involves a multidisciplinary team such as the fracture liaison service, initiating a change to the hospital policy to facilitate inpatient care and management of osteoporosis, and creating a smooth patient care transition to the outpatient setting. Our study highlighted how internal medicine hospitalists perceive their role in the secondary prevention of osteoporotic hip fractures and what they perceive as barriers to initiating preventive measures in the hospital. Inconsistency in patient care transition and the fragmented nature of the existing healthcare system were identified as major barriers. A fracture liaison service could remove some of these barriers.

  17. Recommendations for administering hepatitis A vaccine to contacts of international adoptees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-01

    The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommend routine administration of hepatitis A vaccine for household members and close contacts, including baby-sitters, when children are adopted from countries with high or intermediate rates of hepatitis A infection. This policy expands previous AAP recommendations to immunize travelers to countries who are seeking to adopt a child in countries with high or medium hepatitis A endemicity. All previously nonimmune unvaccinated people who anticipate close exposure to international adoptees during the 60 days after their arrival should receive hepatitis A immunization, ideally 2 or more weeks before the arrival of the adopted child.

  18. Radiation protection standards for radioluminous timepieces. Recommendations of the European Nuclear Energy Agency and the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1967-01-01

    Users of radioluminous timepieces are exposed to ionizing radiations from the luminous paints contained in the timepieces. There standards have been prepared to ensure that users of radioluminous timepieces are exposed to as little ionizing radiation as practicable, and not to levels in excess of the maximum permissible levels laid down in basic radiation protection standards; and that the contribution to the dose received by the whole population from the use of radioluminous timepieces is kept within the limits adopted by the appropriate national authority.

  19. International retrospective cohort study of neural tube defects in relation to folic acid recommendations : are the recommendations working?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botto, LD; Lisi, A; Robert-Gnansia, E; Erickson, JD; Vollset, SE; Mastroiacovo, P; Botting, B; Cocchi, G; de Vigan, C; de Walle, H; Feijoo, M; Irgens, LM; McDonnell, B; Merlob, P; Ritvanen, A; Scarano, G; Siffel, C; Metneki, J; Stoll, C; Smithells, R; Goujard, J

    2005-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of policies and recommendations on folic acid aimed at reducing the occurrence of neural tube defects. Design Retrospective cohort study of births monitored by birth defect registries. Setting 13 birth defects registries monitoring rates of neural tube defects

  20. 77 FR 12364 - Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Reporting Required for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    ...-0002] Agency Information Collection; Activity Under OMB Review: Reporting Required for International... furnishing financial and traffic reports to ICAO; (2) BTS accurately estimated the reporting burden; (3) there are other ways to enhance the quality, utility and clarity of the information collected; and (4...

  1. Atoms for peace - the work of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daglish, J.

    1984-01-01

    The article deals with the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which is situated in Vienna. The aims of the IAEA and its work are described. The safeguards system; promotional work; technical cooperation programme; and nuclear safety work concerned with basic safety standards for radiation protection; are all discussed. (U.K.)

  2. Transport of radioactive material. 1994-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-10-01

    This document lists all sales publications, IAEA-TECDOC Series, Training Course Series and National Competent Authorities Lists of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with the transport of radioactive materials during the period 1994-2002. It gives a short abstract and contents of these issues along with their costs in EURO

  3. Nuclear power. Nuclear fuel cycle and waste management. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-02-01

    This document lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, issued during the period 1990-2002. It gives a short abstract of these publications along with contents and their costs

  4. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Fabian F.; Yu, Yi-Hsiang; Nielsen, Kim

    2017-01-01

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 ...

  5. The role of international atomic energy agency in maintaining nuclear safety competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.; Mazour, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides information how International Atomic Energy Agency can assist Member States in maintaining and developing nuclear safety competence. The topics covered include the development of safety standards, organisation of nuclear safety related conferences, provision of safety reviews, organisation of training courses and topical workshops and publication of training related documents. Usefulness of these activities for competence development is discussed. (author)

  6. Student Agency and Language-Learning Processes and Outcomes in International Online Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basharina, Olga

    2009-01-01

    This research focuses on the kinds of learning afforded by asynchronous international computer-mediated communication (I-CMC) among Japanese, Mexican, and Russian English language learners and the role of student agency in learning. To find learning evidence, the discourse analysis and content analysis of interaction protocols were conducted in…

  7. Participating in an International Master's Programme: Impact on Agency for African In-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impedovo, Maria Antonietta; Ligorio, Maria Beatrice

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates teachers' agency in relation to their professional development. In particular, we refer to research skills and attitude in-service teachers may acquire while attending an international master of research in education. A semi-structured interview was administrated to nine in-service teachers, coming from three different…

  8. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    The catalogue lists all publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Food And Agriculture during the period 1980-1994. The major subjects covered include: food irradiation, insect and pest control, mutation plant breeding, plant biotechnology, soil fertility and irrigation, agrochemicals animal production and health

  9. Advancing Nursing Informatics in the Next Decade: Recommendations from an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topaz, Maxim; Ronquillo, Charlene; Peltonen, Laura-Maria; Pruinelli, Lisiane; Sarmiento, Raymond Francis; Badger, Martha K; Ali, Samira; Lewis, Adrienne; Georgsson, Mattias; Jeon, Eunjoo; Tayaben, Jude L; Kuo, Chiu-Hsiang; Islam, Tasneem; Sommer, Janine; Jung, Hyunggu; Eler, Gabrielle Jacklin; Alhuwail, Dari

    2016-01-01

    In the summer of 2015, the International Medical Informatics Association Nursing Informatics Special Interest Group (IMIA NISIG) Student Working Group developed and distributed an international survey of current and future trends in nursing informatics. The survey was developed based on current literature on nursing informatics trends and translated into six languages. Respondents were from 31 different countries in Asia, Africa, North and Central America, South America, Europe, and Australia. This paper presents the results of responses to the survey question: "What should be done (at a country or organizational level) to advance nursing informatics in the next 5-10 years?" (n responders = 272). Using thematic qualitative analysis, responses were grouped into five key themes: 1) Education and training; 2) Research; 3) Practice; 4) Visibility; and 5) Collaboration and integration. We also provide actionable recommendations for advancing nursing informatics in the next decade.

  10. International organizations as corporate actors: Agency and emergence in theories of international relations

    OpenAIRE

    Maier-Rigaud, Remi

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, the implicit and explicit conceptualizations of international organizations found in the three major theories of international relations are outlined and compared. It turns out that in a neorealist framework, international organizations can be explained; however, they exhibit no autonomy and cannot therefore be conceptualized as a corporate actor. Principally, the same applies to rational choice institutionalism, although limited autonomy is conceivable. Both theories are reduc...

  11. Hate crimes recording: Recommendations of the international bodies and their significance to Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dokmanović Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Data recording and keeping the official unique database on hate crimes contributes to increasing visibility of this type of crimes, as well as to formulating effective policies of preventing discrimination, racism and non-tolerance. At the end of 2012, the Republic of Serbia introduced the aggravating circumstance in sentencing crimes motivated by hatred on the basis of race, religion belief, national or ethnical belonging, sex, sexual orientation or gender identity. The Action Plan of the Implementation of the Strategy of Prevention and Protection against Discrimination (2014 foresees introducing the unique database on hate crimes by the end of 2016. The subject of the paper is the analysis of the importance of establishing this type of database from the perspective of acknowledging victims’ rights. The relevant activities and the recommendations of the EU Fundamental Rights Agency (FRA and the OSCE to the member states, with respect to efficient recording data on hate crimes, have been also introduced. The aim of the paper is to contribute developing of the methodology of data recording of hate crimes in the Republic of Serbia in line with the given recommendations of the FRA and the OSCE. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179044: Razvoj metodologije evidentiranja kriminaliteta kao osnova efikasnih mera za njegovo suzbijanje i prevenciju

  12. International recommendations on the diagnosis and treatment of patients with acquired hemophilia A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huth-Kühne, Angela; Baudo, Francesco; Collins, Peter; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Kessler, Craig M.; Lévesque, Hervé; Castellano, Maria Eva Mingot; Shima, Midori; St-Louis, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Acquired hemophilia A (AHA) is a rare bleeding disorder characterized by autoantibodies directed against circulating coagulation factor (F) VIII. Typically, patients with no prior history of a bleeding disorder present with spontaneous bleeding and an isolated prolonged aPTT. AHA may, however, present without any bleeding symptoms, therefore an isolated prolonged aPTT should always be investigated further irrespective of the clinical findings. Control of acute bleeding is the first priority, and we recommend first-line therapy with bypassing agents such as recombinant activated FVII or activated prothrombin complex concentrate. Once the diagnosis has been achieved, immediate autoantibody eradication to reduce subsequent bleeding risk should be performed. We recommend initial treatment with corticosteroids or combination therapy with corticosteroids and cyclophosphamide and suggest second-line therapy with rituximab if first-line therapy fails or is contraindicated. In contrast to congenital hemophilia, no comparative studies exist to support treatment recommendations for patients with AHA, therefore treatment guidance must rely on the expertise and clinical experience of specialists in the field. The aim of this document is to provide a set of international practice guidelines based on our collective clinical experience in treating patients with AHA and contribute to improved care for this patient group. PMID:19336751

  13. Comments on the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pochin, E.E.; Rock Carling, Ernest; Court Brown, W.M.

    1960-01-01

    Full text: The Medical Research Council's Committee on Protection against Ionizing Radiations has considered the recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection adopted September 9th, 1958 (Pergamon Press, 1959), and the explanatory statement and amendments to the 1958 recommendations made at the 1959 meeting of the Commission (Brit. J. Radiol., 1960, 33, 189). Subject to the following comments, the Committee advocates the acceptance of the Commission's recommendations. The text of these recommendations is not reproduced here and requires to be read in conjunction with these comments. References below to numbered paragraphs refer to the text of the Commission's recommendations. Occupational exposure - 1. The formula given in para. 47 relates the maximum permissible total occupational dose accumulated in the gonads or certain other organs to the age of a subject above the age of 18 by the relationship D= 5 (N - 8) where D is the tissue dose in rems and N is the age in years. The Committee notes that this formula would permit a maximum dose to the gonads of 60 rems by age 30 and is of the opinion that this dose is acceptable provided that the contribution from this source to the genetic dose for the whole population does not exceed I rem per head of population. 2. The Commission recommends (para. 51c) that, when a person begins to be occupationally exposed at an age of less than 18 years, the dose to various specified tissues shall not exceed 5 rems in any one year under age 18, and the dose accumulated to age 30 shall not exceed 60 rems. The Committee recommends that those persons between the ages of 6 and 18 years who are in occupational contact with radiation should not be allowed to receive, as a result of their occupation. an annual dose in excess of 1-5 rems. This should be sufficient to allow the training of such persons in the use of ionizing radiations in hospitals, industrial establishments, technical colleges and schools. However

  14. Meeting the Climate Challenge. Recommendations of the International Climate Change Taskforce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    To chart a way forward, an International Climate Change Taskforce, composed of leading scientists, public officials, and representatives of business and non-governmental organisations, was established at the invitation of three leading public policy institutes - the Institute for Public Policy Research, the Center for American Progress and The Australia Institute. The Taskforce's aim has been to develop proposals to consolidate and build on the gains achieved under the UNFCCC and the Kyoto Protocol to ensure that climate change is addressed effectively over the long term. In doing so, the Taskforce has met twice, in Windsor, United Kingdom and Sydney, Australia, where they reviewed and debated detailed research papers prepared by the Taskforce Secretariat, provided by the three founding organisations. The Taskforce's recommendations are to all governments and policy-makers worldwide. However, particular emphasis is placed on providing independent advice to the governments of the Group of Eight (G8) and the European Union (EU) in the context of the UK's presidencies of both organisations in 2005, during which Prime Minister Tony Blair has pledged to make addressing climate change a priority. The recommendations are also made in the context of the start of international negotiations in 2005 on future collective action on climate change, and the need to engage the governments of those industrialised countries that have not ratified the Kyoto Protocol

  15. International migration in Asia and the Pacific: trends, problems, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto Diaz, C

    1986-01-01

    Like other parts of the world, the Asia and Pacific region has experienced mass movements of the population within and across countries. This report presents the issues and problems discussed, and the recommendations given at the Expert Group Meeting on International Migration in Asia and the Pacific, held in 1984 in Manila. The 9 issues discussed include: 1) available data on international migration are often inconsistent, incomplete, and inadequate for a thorough analysis of the migration situation; 2) the conventional economic theory of migration, and the modern view are different, but related; 3) are internal and international migration 2 distinct phenomena, or are they simply opposite ends of a continuum ranging from short-distance moves within a country to long-distance moves across national boundaries?; 4) permanent migration from Asia and the Pacific to the US, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand has risen sharply over the the past few years; 5) international migration could have considerable effects on the size, composition, growth, and structure of the populations of both sending and receiving countries; 6) temporary labor migration to the Middle East increased rapidly in the recent past; 7) temporary labor migration has benefits and costs to the home country and to the returning workers and their families; 8) refugee movements within and from Asia have had significant repercussions, not only in the lives of the migrants themselves, but also in the national policies and social structures of the asylum countries; and 9) international migration, if properly controlled and organized, could work for the benefit of every country involved.

  16. Obsolete or resurgent? The International Energy Agency in a changing global landscape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Graaf, Thijs

    2012-01-01

    Founded in response to the 1973 oil shock, the International Energy Agency (IEA) is arguably still the most important multilateral organization for energy-importing countries. Yet, the global geopolitical landscape has changed considerably since the IEA's creation. The rise of new energy consumers, new energy-related challenges and new international energy forums prompt a rethink of the agency's current role and institutional design. This article seeks to contribute to the recent debate on the future role of the IEA by examining specific drivers, avenues and constraints for institutional reform. The method used is SWOT analysis, which allows to summarize the key factors emanating from an assessment of an organization's internal characteristics (strengths and weaknesses) and its external environment (opportunities and threats). Building on this SWOT analysis, the article formulates a strategy for the IEA to remain the focal point in global energy governance. Key elements of this strategy include: stronger engagement with new consumers, rapprochement with OPEC, becoming a leading voice in the energy transition, and changing the agency's internal governance practices. - Highlights: ► The IEA is challenged by the rise of new consumers, threats and organizations. ► Assessment of the agency’s internal characteristics and external environment. ► The IEA needs to step up its outreach policy and fully embrace sustainable energy.

  17. Letters of recommendation: rating, writing, and reading by clerkship directors of internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeZee, Kent J; Thomas, Matthew R; Mintz, Matthew; Durning, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    Letters of Recommendations (LORs) are used for applications to medical school and graduate medical education, but how they are used by current internal medicine educators is unknown. In 2006, the Clerkship Directors of Internal Medicine conducted its annual, voluntary survey, and one section pertained to LORs. Survey items were categorized into questions regarding rating, writing, and reading LORs with answers on 3- to 5-point scales. The response rate for the 110 institution members was 75%. When rating LORs, the most important factor was depth of understanding of the trainee (98% essential or important), followed by a numerical comparison to other students (94%), grade distribution (92%), and summary statement (91%). Although most (78%) agreed that reading LORs in general were important for trainee selection, few agreed that this was because of the ability to discern marginal performance (31%) or predict future performance (25%). LORs remain an important part of the application process for medical school and internal medicine residency. Letter writers should convey a great depth of understanding of the applicant, provide a numerical comparison with other students (including a denominator), and give a specific summary statement.

  18. Antiretroviral Drugs for Treatment and Prevention of HIV Infection in Adults: 2016 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günthard, Huldrych F; Saag, Michael S; Benson, Constance A; del Rio, Carlos; Eron, Joseph J; Gallant, Joel E; Hoy, Jennifer F; Mugavero, Michael J; Sax, Paul E; Thompson, Melanie A; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Landovitz, Raphael J; Smith, Davey M; Jacobsen, Donna M; Volberding, Paul A

    2016-07-12

    New data and therapeutic options warrant updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral drugs (ARVs) to treat or to prevent HIV infection in adults. To provide updated recommendations for the use of antiretroviral therapy in adults (aged ≥18 years) with established HIV infection, including when to start treatment, initial regimens, and changing regimens, along with recommendations for using ARVs for preventing HIV among those at risk, including preexposure and postexposure prophylaxis. A panel of experts in HIV research and patient care convened by the International Antiviral Society-USA reviewed data published in peer-reviewed journals, presented by regulatory agencies, or presented as conference abstracts at peer-reviewed scientific conferences since the 2014 report, for new data or evidence that would change previous recommendations or their ratings. Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in the PubMed and EMBASE databases through April 2016. Recommendations were by consensus, and each recommendation was rated by strength and quality of the evidence. Newer data support the widely accepted recommendation that antiretroviral therapy should be started in all individuals with HIV infection with detectable viremia regardless of CD4 cell count. Recommended optimal initial regimens for most patients are 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) plus an integrase strand transfer inhibitor (InSTI). Other effective regimens include nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or boosted protease inhibitors with 2 NRTIs. Recommendations for special populations and in the settings of opportunistic infections and concomitant conditions are provided. Reasons for switching therapy include convenience, tolerability, simplification, anticipation of potential new drug interactions, pregnancy or plans for pregnancy, elimination of food restrictions, virologic failure, or drug toxicities. Laboratory assessments are recommended before treatment, and

  19. 75 FR 62366 - Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by the U.S. Agency for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-08

    ... on the respondents, including the use of automated collection techniques or other forms of... Division, U.S. Agency for International Development, Room 2.07-106, RRB, Washington, DC 20523, (202) 712..., Participant Training Team, United States Agency for International Development, Ronald Reagan Building, 1300...

  20. The case for a United Nations verification agency. Disarmament under effective international control. Working paper 26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorn, A.W.

    1990-07-01

    It is now universally recognized that arms control treaties should be effectively verified. The most objective, flexible and cost-effective means to verify the majority of multilateral treaties would be through a new agency under the United Nations. As a cooperative international effort to develop both the technology and the political framework for arms control verification, a United Nations verification agency (UNVA) would speed up and help secure the disarmament process by: verifying a number of existing and future treaties; investigating alleged breaches of treaties; and certifying, upon request, that voluntary arms control and confidence-building measures have been carried out. This paper presents the case for such a proposal, outlines a possible institutional configuration, considers the possibilities for growth and discusses the challenges facing the establishment of such an agency. (author). 16 refs., 1 tab

  1. Decentralized approach in USAID (United States Agency for International Development) population funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-01

    Jim Bracket, Chief of the Demography Division, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Development Services Bureau, on a recent visit to Bangkok outlined a shift in the agency's funding of population programs. A return to a decentralized approach, with a transfer of responsibility to the agency's 4 regional bureaus, has been proposed. This change is connected with the recent trend to increase the family planning component in other development programs and reflects a shift away from clinic-based family planning programs and forml integration with such programs as education, nutrition, disease control, and maternal and child health services. The commitment of the Carter administration to population work is demonstrated by a 27% increase in its funding for the fiscal year 1979 from $155 million to $205.4 million.

  2. Recommendations for Planning and Managing International Short-term Pharmacy Service Trips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kalin L; Alsharif, Naser Z; Rovers, John; Connor, Sharon; White, Nicole D; Hogue, Michael D

    2017-03-25

    International pharmacy service trips by schools and colleges of pharmacy allow students to provide health care to medically underserved areas. A literature review (2000-2016) in databases and Internet searches with specific keywords or terms was performed to assess current practices to establish and maintain successful pharmacy service trips. Educational documents such as syllabi were obtained from pharmacy programs and examined. A preliminary draft was developed and authors worked on sections of interest and expertise. Considerations and current recommendations are provided for the key aspects of the home institution and the host country requirements for pharmacy service trips based on findings from a literature search and the authors' collective, extensive experience. Evaluation of the trip and ethical considerations are also discussed. This article serves as a resource for schools and colleges of pharmacy that are interested in the development of new pharmacy service trips and provides key considerations for continuous quality improvement of current or future activities.

  3. The multiple myeloma treatment landscape: international guideline recommendations and clinical practice in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavo, Michele; Terpos, Evangelos; Bargay, Joan; Einsele, Hermann; Cavet, Jim; Greil, Richard; de Wit, Edwin

    2018-03-01

    Guidelines provide recommendations on the management of multiple myeloma (MM), but there are no standard algorithms for the choice and sequencing of treatments. As a result, there is widespread variation in the interpretation and implementation of these guidelines. Areas covered: This review will cover: the real-world data on MM treatment patterns; the approved agents available for the treatment of MM; a comparative summary of the national and international clinical guidelines; a discussion on the impact reimbursement decisions have on treatment availability. Expert commentary: In the future, treatment choices may become even more complex as clonal heterogeneity is better understood in the context of response to treatment, and next-generation agents become available. Although information on real-world practice patterns can provide further guidance, to date, few studies have generated data on patients treated with the newer agents in real-world settings. Furthermore, the translation of guideline recommendations into clinical practice across Europe is inconsistent. Additional real-world data are therefore vital to understanding current clinical practice patterns, so that new agents can be effectively incorporated into existing treatment strategies. Such information may aid the development of better guidance, which will ultimately help to ensure that patients receive the best possible care.

  4. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management, 1986-1999. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power and nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1999. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  5. IAEA technical documents (TECDOCs) 1992-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all technical documents (TECDOCs) of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1992 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all documents in numerical order, starting with the most recent publication. The second part lists all documents by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  6. Nuclear techniques in food and agriculture 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-02-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications, including technical documents (TECDOCs), of the International Atomic Energy Agency issued between 1 January 1990 and 31 December 2002. It is divided into two parts. The first part lists all sales publications in alphabetical order by subject category whereas the second part lists all TECDOCs in alphabetical order by subject category. Most publications are issued in English, although some are also available in other languages

  7. Nuclear and radiological safety 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear and Radiological Safety issued during the period 1980-1994. The following aspects are covered: Uranium mining and milling, Fuel fabrication and storage, Nuclear power plants, Research reactors, Radiation sources and accelerators, Transport of radioactive materials, Waste repositories, Radiation protection, Accident response, Radioactive waste management, Safety analysis, Quality management, Legal and governmental aspects

  8. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in radiation and waste safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wrixon, A.D.; Ortiz-Lopez, P.

    1999-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency is specifically required by its Statute 'to establish or adopt ... standards of safety for protection of health and minimization of danger to life and property ... and to provide for the application of these standards ...'. Standards encompass three main elements: legally binding international undertakings among States; globally agreed international safety standards; and the provision for facilitating the application of those standards. Radiation safety standards are national responsibilities, but there is considerable value in formulating harmonized approaches throughout the world. The Agency has attempted to do this by establishing internationally agreed safety standards and by prompting their application. Of prime importance are the Basic Safety Standards for Protection against Ionizing Radiation and for the Safety of Radiation Sources. These deal with the basic requirements that must be met in order to ensure an adequate standard of safety. More detailed guidance on the application of these requirements is given in Safety Guides established under them. Fuller technical support is given in a series of Safety Reports. A number of Safety Guides are relevant to this meeting. An existing Safety Guide on exemption is being revised to cover related topics such as exclusion and clearance, and this is the subject of a separate presentation. As part of the programme to combat illicit trafficking in radioactive materials, a new Safety Guide on the topic is being developed. Both are near completion. Another Safety Guide is being produced to elaborate the requirements in the Basic Safety Standards on the safety of radioactive sources. The topics of illicit trafficking in radioactive materials and the safety of radioactive sources were given added impetus by resolutions of the last General Conference of the Agency. This paper provides an overview of these activities of the Agency. (author)

  9. International Myeloma Working Group Recommendations for the Diagnosis and Management of Myeloma-Related Renal Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimopoulos, Meletios A; Sonneveld, Pieter; Leung, Nelson; Merlini, Giampaolo; Ludwig, Heinz; Kastritis, Efstathios; Goldschmidt, Hartmut; Joshua, Douglas; Orlowski, Robert Z; Powles, Raymond; Vesole, David H; Garderet, Laurent; Einsele, Hermann; Palumbo, Antonio; Cavo, Michele; Richardson, Paul G; Moreau, Philippe; San Miguel, Jesús; Rajkumar, S Vincent; Durie, Brian G M; Terpos, Evangelos

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the International Myeloma Working Group was to develop practical recommendations for the diagnosis and management of multiple myeloma-related renal impairment (RI). Recommendations were based on published data through December 2015, and were developed using the system developed by the Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation Working Group. All patients with myeloma at diagnosis and at disease assessment should have serum creatinine, estimated glomerular filtration rate, and electrolytes measurements as well as free light chain, if available, and urine electrophoresis of a sample from a 24-hour urine collection (grade A). The Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration, preferably, or the Modification of Diet in Renal Disease formula should be used for the evaluation of estimated glomerular filtration rate in patients with stabilized serum creatinine (grade A). International Myeloma Working Group criteria for renal reversibility should be used (grade B). For the management of RI in patients with multiple myeloma, high fluid intake is indicated along with antimyeloma therapy (grade B). The use of high-cutoff hemodialysis membranes in combination with antimyeloma therapy can be considered (grade B). Bortezomib-based regimens remain the cornerstone of the management of myeloma-related RI (grade A). High-dose dexamethasone should be administered at least for the first month of therapy (grade B). Thalidomide is effective in patients with myeloma with RI, and no dose modifications are needed (grade B). Lenalidomide is effective and safe, mainly in patients with mild to moderate RI (grade B); for patients with severe RI or on dialysis, lenalidomide should be given with close monitoring for hematologic toxicity (grade B) with dose reduction as needed. High-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation (with melphalan 100 mg/m(2) to 140 mg/m(2)) is feasible in patients with RI (grade C). Carfilzomib can be safely

  10. Modeling the costs and benefits of temporary recommendations for poliovirus exporting countries to vaccinate international travelers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duintjer Tebbens, Radboud J; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2017-07-05

    Recognizing that infectious agents readily cross international borders, the International Health Regulations Emergency Committee issues Temporary Recommendations (TRs) that include vaccination of travelers from countries affected by public health emergencies, including serotype 1 wild polioviruses (WPV1s). This analysis estimates the costs and benefits of TRs implemented by countries with reported WPV1 during 2014-2016 while accounting for numerous uncertainties. We estimate the TR costs based on programmatic data and prior economic analyses and TR benefits by simulating potential WPV1 outbreaks in the absence of the TRs using the rate and extent of WPV1 importation outbreaks per reported WPV1 case during 2004-2013 and the number of reported WPV1 cases that occurred in countries with active TRs. The benefits of TRs outweigh the costs in 77% of model iterations, resulting in expected incremental net economic benefits of $210 million. Inclusion of indirect costs increases the costs by 13%, the expected savings from prevented outbreaks by 4%, and the expected incremental net benefits by 3%. Despite the considerable costs of implementing TRs, this study provides health and economic justification for these investments in the context of managing a disease in advanced stages of its global eradication. Copyright © 2017 The Auhors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. 1990 Recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection adopted by the Commission in November 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    This publication represents a completely new set of basic recommendations, outdating ICRP Publication 26. They aim to: a) take account of new biological information and of trends in setting safety standards; b) improve the presentation of the recommendations: c) maintain as much stability in the recommendations as is consistent with the new information. The recommendations cover quantities, biological aspects, the conceptual framework of radiological protection, proposed and continuing practices (occupational, medical and public exposure) and implementation of the Commission's Recommendations. (UK)

  12. The International Atomic Energy Agency - Organization, Work and Services in Selected Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köteles, G.J.

    1979-01-01

    In an address to the 8th General Assembly of the United Nations (1953) the President of the United States suggested that Governments should begin to make joint contributions from their stockpiles of fissile materials to an international atomic energy agency which would be set up under the aegis of the United Nations. The fissile material so collected would be used to serve the peaceful pursuits of mankind. Experts would be mobilized to apply atomic energy to the needs of agriculture, medicine and other peaceful purposes and a special effort would be made to provide abundant electrical energy in the power-starved areas of the world. This suggestion was taken up. A Statute which defines the structure and purpose of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was prepared by a group of nations and approved by a conference at the United Nations Headquarters in 1956. The Statute entered into force on 29 July 1957. The Agency's objectives, as defined in its Statute, are that it ''shall seek to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. It shall ensure, as far as it is able, that assistance provided by it or at its request or under its supervision or control is not used in such a way as to further any military purpose''. To attain these objectives, the IAEA is authorized ''to encourage and assist research on, and development and practical application of, atomic energy for peaceful uses throughout the world; and, if requested to do so, to act as an intermediary for the purposes of securing the performance of services or the supplying of materials, equipment, or facilities by one member of the Agency for another''; to ''... assemble and make available in an accessible form the [scientific] information made available to it...'' and furthermore ''to make provision, ... for materials, services, equipment, and facilities to meet the

  13. Determining Nuclear Fingerprints: Glove Boxes, Radiation Protection, and the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentetzi, Maria

    2017-06-01

    In a nuclear laboratory, a glove box is a windowed, sealed container equipped with two flexible gloves that allow the user to manipulate nuclear materials from the outside in an ostensibly safe environment. As a routine laboratory device, it invites neglect from historians and storytellers of science. Yet, since especially the Gulf War, glove boxes have put the interdependence of science, diplomacy, and politics into clear relief. Standing at the intersection of history of science and international history, technological materials and devices such as the glove box can provide penetrating insight into the role of international diplomatic organizations to the global circulation and control of scientific knowledge. The focus here is on the International Atomic Energy Agency. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Revision of the recommended international general standard for irradiated foods and of the recommended international code of practice for the operation of radiation facilities used for the treatment of foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-11-01

    In view of the findings and statements of the Joint FAO/IAEA/WHO Expert Committee on the Wholesomeness of Irradiated Food, convened in Geneva from 27 October to 3 November 1980, a Consultation Group, convened in Geneva from 1 to 3 July 1981 suggested the revision of the Recommended International General Standard for Irradiated Foods and of the Recommended International Code of Practice for the Operation of Radiation Facilities. The proposed changes are given and justified and the revised wording of the documents presented

  15. The nuclear power safety programme of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, M.

    1981-01-01

    The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in the field of nuclear power safety is growing. In the period since the Three Mile Island accident, a significant expansion in its nuclear safety programme has taken place. To assure an acceptable safety level world-wide, new emphasis is being placed on the major effort to establish and foster the use of a comprehensive set of internationally agreed safety standards for nuclear power plants. New initiatives are in progress to intensify international co-operative safety efforts through the exchange of information on safety-related operating occurrences, and through a more open sharing of safety research results. Emergency accident assistance lends itself to international co-operation and steps are being taken to establish an emergency assistance programme so the Agency can aid in co-ordinating a timely response to provide, at short notice, help and advice in case of a nuclear power accident. There has been some strengthening of those advisory services which involve missions of international experts primarily to countries with less developed nuclear power programmes, and in conjunction with the Technical Assistance Programme there is a co-ordinated programme for developing countries, involving safety training courses and assistance aimed at promoting an effective national regulatory programme in all countries using nuclear power. This paper discusses the major features of the IAEA activities in nuclear power plant safety. An understanding of the programme and its limitations is essential to its more effective use. Additional initiatives may still be proposed, but the possibilities for international and regional co-operation to assure an adequate level of safety world-wide already exist. (author)

  16. Relevance of the international spinal cord injury basic data sets to youth: an Inter-Professional review with recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, A; Vogel, L C; Zebracki, K; Noonan, V K; Biering-Sørensen, F; Mulcahey, M J

    2017-09-01

    Mixed methods, using the Modified Delphi Technique and Expert Panel Review. To evaluate the utility and relevance of the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Core and Basic Data Sets for children and youth with SCI. International. Via 20 electronic surveys, an interprofessional sample of healthcare professionals with pediatric SCI experience participated in an iterative critical review of the International SCI Data Sets, and submitted suggestions for modifications for use with four pediatric age groups. A panel of 5 experts scrutinized the utility of all data sets, correlated any modifications with the developing National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) pediatric SCI Common Data Elements (CDE) and distributed final recommendations for modifications required to the adult data sets to the International SCI Data Set Committee and the associated Working Groups. Two International SCI Data Sets were considered relevant and appropriate for use with children without any changes. Three were considered not appropriate or applicable for use with children, regardless of age. Recommendations were made for five data sets to enhance their relevance and applicability to children across the age groups, and recommendations for seven data sets were specific to infants and younger children. The results of this critical review are significant in that substantive recommendations to align the International SCI Core and Basic Data Sets to pediatric practice were made. This project was funded by the Rick Hansen Institute Grant# 2015-27.

  17. Are University Students in Singapore Meeting the International and National Recommended Daily Servings of Fruits and Vegetables?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Raymond Boon Tar; Tham, Dede Kam Tyng; Müller-Riemenschneider, Falk; Wong, Mee Lian

    2017-04-01

    Data are lacking on fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption among young adults in the Asia-Pacific region. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of students who met the international and national recommendation of daily consumption of 5 and 4 FV servings, respectively, in a university in Singapore and the factors associated with meeting the national recommendation. A cross-sectional survey using proportional stratified random sampling was conducted on 884 undergraduates in 2013. The prevalence of meeting the international and national recommendation was 13.6% and 27.1%, respectively. The significant factors of meeting national recommendation were those from higher socioeconomic status, those making conscious effort to eat food high in fiber, those not skipping breakfast, those having a lower frequency of deep fried food consumption and those with higher meal frequency. Behavioral and structural interventions to educate, motivate and nudge university students to promote FV consumption are required in Singapore.

  18. International Off-grid Renewable Energy Conference 2012: Key Findings and Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-06-15

    IRENA co-organised the International Off-grid Renewable Energy Conference (IOREC) along with the ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) and the Alliance for Rural Electrification (ARE), in Accra, Ghana, on 1-2 November 2012. This report presents the key findings and recommendations that emerged from the roundtable discussions during IOREC. The report highlights that off-grid renewable energy systems, stand-alone and mini-grids, have the potential to play a significant role in achieving the goal of universal electricity access. In recognition of this role, their development needs to be integrated into the mainstream rural electrification strategies. While several successful deployment approaches exist, there is a need to scale up. What is required is a shift from the prevalent project-by-project approach, to one that focusses on the creation of a sustainable environment that facilitates large-scale deployment. Involvement of the private sector, and in particular of local enterprises, will be instrumental in extending electricity access in rural areas, rapidly and sustainably, and hence needs to be promoted. Off-grid renewable energy technologies produce striking synergies with sectors critical for human development, and play an important role in improving access to water supply while also extending healthcare and telecommunication services in rural areas.

  19. 78 FR 39741 - Announcement of Agency Decision: Recommendations on the Use of Chimpanzees in NIH-Supported Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-02

    ... developing its recommendations, the Council Working Group considered the scientific use of chimpanzees in... and use programs. The Guide provides: (1) A framework for institutional policies, management, and... commenters supported the recommendation to house chimpanzees in groups of at least 7 members in theory but...

  20. The prepossession of international institutions for energy. The example International Energy Agency (IEA); Die Voreingenommenheit internationaler Energieinstitutionen. Das Beispiel Internationale Energieagentur (IEA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fell, H.J. [Europaeische Sonnenergie-Vereinigung EUROSOLAR e.V., Bonn (Germany). Sektion Deutschland

    2007-07-01

    In the contribution under consideration, the author reports on the fact that large international energy agencies, which are advisory active in energy questions active, affect the world-wide policy. In particular, these are the International Atomic Energy Authority in Vienna (Austria) and the International Energy Agency in Paris (France). The International Energy Agency is considered world-wide as the most important institution for all energy questions. Nearly annually, it publishes the World Energy Outlook by summarizing the most important current energy data of the world, prognoses the future power supply and makes future energy prices. The reality of the International Energy Agency looks completely differently: It performs no own sciences, but consists of statisticians, who gather only statistical data without scientific analysis. The author of this contribution summarizes the work of the International Energy Agency in three points: (a) Promotion of the interests of companies in mineral oil, natural gas, coal and atomic energy; (b) Hindering the world-wide conversion of renewable energy; (c) Endangerment of the world economy and prevention of an effective climate protection. The International Energy Agency does not justice to its own goal of a reliable, economical and pollution free power supply.

  1. International Union of Geological Sciences Subcommission on Geochronology recommendation for the standardization of fission track dating calibration and data reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurford, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Because of the difficulties of calibration in fission track (FT) dating over the last 20 yr, including uncertainty of the absolute λ f value, complexities of neutron dosimetry, complexities of neutron irradiation, correction factors necessary in some methodological procedures, and personal factors in track counting, the Working Group elected at the Cambridge ICOG meeting in 1986 recommended to FT workers meeting at the 6th International Fission Track Dating Workshop in Besancon on 9 September 1988, a uniform approach to system calibration, sample irradiation, calculation of FT age, and presentation of data. After discussion and modification, the recommendation was accepted. This modified recommendation is presented. (author)

  2. Recommendations for Adopting the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes Into U.S. Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldavini, Jessica; Taillie, Lindsey Smith

    2017-08-01

    In 1981, the World Health Organization adopted the International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes ( International Code), with subsequent resolutions adopted since then. The International Code contributes to the safe and adequate provision of nutrition for infants by protecting and promoting breastfeeding and ensuring that human milk substitutes, when necessary, are used properly through adequate information and appropriate marketing and distribution. Despite the World Health Organization recommendations for all member nations to implement the International Code in its entirety, the United States has yet to take action to translate it into any national measures. In 2012, only 22.3% of infants in the United States met the American Academy of Pediatrics recommendation of at least 6 months of exclusive breastfeeding. Countries adopting legislation reflecting the provisions of the International Code have seen increases in breastfeeding rates. This article discusses recommendations for translating the International Code into U.S. policy. Adopting legislation that implements, monitors, and enforces the International Code in its entirety has the potential to contribute to increased rates of breastfeeding in the United States, which can lead to improved health outcomes in both infants and breastfeeding mothers.

  3. Energy policy of the International Energy Agency (IEA) countries. General review of the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-01-01

    This book is a general review on energy policy leaded by Members countries of International Energy Agency (IEA) during the year 1990. This book describes also the trends and the recent events which have affected energy demand, energy conservation, energy efficiency, energy supply and energy source development. This annual review gives the IEA energy forecasting for the next years, till year 2001. A detailed study of energy policy in Federal Republic of Germany, Austria, Denmark, Greece, Ireland and Japan is given. The policy of fifteen another Members countries, which have been analyzed the previous years, is recapitulated and briefly brought up to date

  4. Earth sciences uranium geology, exploration and mining, hydrology, 1986-1998. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-09-01

    This catalogue lists sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Earth Sciences issued during the period 1986-1998. Most publications are published in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all these papers have abstracts in English. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  5. Nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  6. Earth sciences: Uranium geology, exploration and mining, hydrology, 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with earth sciences and issued during the period of 1986-1996. These topics are mainly in the field of uranium geology, exploration and mining, isotope applications in hydrology, IAEA Yearbook 1996 on the developments in nuclear science and technology and meetings on atomic energy. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English but all of these papers have English abstracts. The prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings

  7. Communication of 28 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General has received a note verbale of 28 February 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Croatia to the International Atomic Energy Agency providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of Croatia

  8. Communication of 31 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of South Africa to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a note verbale of 31 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of South Africa providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of South Africa

  9. Communication received on 10 May 1999 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a communication received on 10 May 1999 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency, with regard to the resolution adopted by the 42nd Agency General Conference, entitled 'The safety of radiation sources and the security of radioactive materials' (GC(42)/RES/12), in connection with the war in Yugoslavia

  10. 77 FR 27113 - Export and Import of Nuclear Equipment and Material; Export of International Atomic Energy Agency...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... / Wednesday, May 9, 2012 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 110 RIN 3150-AJ04 Export and Import of Nuclear Equipment and Material; Export of International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards Samples AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S...

  11. 48 CFR 719.273 - The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Mentor-Protégé Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... International Development (USAID) Mentor-Protégé Program. 719.273 Section 719.273 Federal Acquisition Regulations System AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT SOCIOECONOMIC PROGRAMS SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS The U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) Mentor-Protégé Program 719.273 The U.S. Agency for...

  12. International Energy Agency Ocean Energy Systems Task 10 Wave Energy Converter Modeling Verification and Validation: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Fabian F [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yu, Yi-Hsiang [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nielsen, Kim [Ramboll, Copenhagen (Denmark); Ruehl, Kelley [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bunnik, Tim [MARIN (Netherlands); Touzon, Imanol [Tecnalia (Spain); Nam, Bo Woo [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Kim, Jeong Seok [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Janson, Carl Erik [Chalmers University (Sweden); Jakobsen, Ken-Robert [EDRMedeso (Norway); Crowley, Sarah [WavEC (Portugal); Vega, Luis [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Rajagopalan, Krishnakimar [Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (United States); Mathai, Thomas [Glosten (United States); Greaves, Deborah [Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Ransley, Edward [Plymouth University (United Kingdom); Lamont-Kane, Paul [Queen' s University Belfast (United Kingdom); Sheng, Wanan [University College Cork (Ireland); Costello, Ronan [Wave Venture (United Kingdom); Kennedy, Ben [Wave Venture (United Kingdom); Thomas, Sarah [Floating Power Plant (Denmark); Heras, Pilar [Floating Power Plant (Denmark); Bingham, Harry [Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Kurniawan, Adi [Aalborg University (Denmark); Kramer, Morten Mejlhede [Aalborg University (Denmark); Ogden, David [INNOSEA (France); Girardin, Samuel [INNOSEA (France); Babarit, Aurelien [EC Nantes (France); Wuillaume, Pierre-Yves [EC Nantes (France); Steinke, Dean [Dynamic Systems Analysis (Canada); Roy, Andre [Dynamic Systems Analysis (Canada); Beatty, Scott [Cascadia Coast Research (Canada); Schofield, Paul [ANSYS (United States); Kim, Kyong-Hwan [KRISO (Korea, Rep. of); Jansson, Johan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); BCAM (Spain); Hoffman, Johan [KTH Royal Inst. of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2017-10-16

    This is the first joint reference paper for the Ocean Energy Systems (OES) Task 10 Wave Energy Converter modeling verification and validation group. The group is established under the OES Energy Technology Network program under the International Energy Agency. OES was founded in 2001 and Task 10 was proposed by Bob Thresher (National Renewable Energy Laboratory) in 2015 and approved by the OES Executive Committee EXCO in 2016. The kickoff workshop took place in September 2016, wherein the initial baseline task was defined. Experience from similar offshore wind validation/verification projects (OC3-OC5 conducted within the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30) [1], [2] showed that a simple test case would help the initial cooperation to present results in a comparable way. A heaving sphere was chosen as the first test case. The team of project participants simulated different numerical experiments, such as heave decay tests and regular and irregular wave cases. The simulation results are presented and discussed in this paper.

  13. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  14. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  15. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years, the DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses...

  16. International cooperation in nuclear safety and licensing in the framework of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, M.; Oliver, P.; Olivier, J.P.; Stadie, K.B.; Stephens, M.

    1980-01-01

    This article describes the international cooperative program in nuclear safety and licensing that is carried out in the framework of the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and is directed by the NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI). Its prinicpal objectives are: (1) to increase the fund of knowledge in key areas of safety research through international cooperation and hence broaden the technical data base available to regulatory authorities; and (2) to bring about an international consensus on important safety issues. The CSNI also provides a forum for the exchange of information and experience between licensing authorities in the OECD countries. The program is made up of general exchanges of information and operational cooperation. The article gives examples of both aspects of the program, describing the objectives and the different working methods used. It goes on to point out the need for enhanced international cooperation in safety research and outlines the directions this should take

  17. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, A.

    1997-12-31

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs.

  18. Negotiating supranational rules. The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forland, A.

    1997-01-01

    The object of this study is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid-1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The main aim of the study is not to describe the IAEA safeguards system as such. The focus will be on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective will be to single out the factors determining the result. In the course of the time span under study two international treaties were negotiated which were decisive for the development of international nuclear safeguards. These were the IAEA Stature (1956) and the Non-Proliferation Treaty (1968). The Statue as well as the NPT contain articles on international nuclear safeguards. These articles limit themselves to spelling out the safeguards principles. It was thus left to the IAEA Board of Governors to develop the safeguards procedures in detail. Two IAEA safeguards documents were negotiated between 1959 and 1965 in order to implement the safeguards article of the Statue. The safeguards requirements of the NPT were spelled out in a new model agreement in 1972. 58 refs

  19. Antiretroviral Treatment of Adult HIV Infection 2014 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Günthard, Huldrych F.; Aberg, Judith A.; Eron, Joseph J.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Telenti, Amalio; Benson, Constance A.; Burger, David M.; Cahn, Pedro; Gallant, Joel E.; Glesby, Marshall J.; Reiss, Peter; Saag, Michael S.; Thomas, David L.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE New data and antiretroviral regimens expand treatment choices in resource-rich settings and warrant an update of recommendations to treat adults infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). OBJECTIVE To provide updated treatment recommendations for adults with HIV, emphasizing when

  20. Adjustment of the Brazilian radioprotection standards to the safety principles of the International Atomic Energy Agency; Adequacao das normas brasileiras de radioprotecao aos principios fundamentais de seguranca da International Atomic Energy Agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, Alphonse, E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais. Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos; Pereira, Juliana R. de S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a recommendation with 10 basic safety principles (Fundamental Safety Principles Safety Fundamentals series, number SF-1), which are: 1) Responsibility for safety; 2) Role for government; 3) Leadership and management for safety; 4) Justification of facilities and activities; 5) Optimization of protection; 6) Limitation of risk to individuals; 7) Protection of present and futures generations; 8) Prevention of accidents; 9) Emergency preparedness and response and 10) Protection actions to reduce existing or unregulated radiations risk. The aim of this study is to verify that the Brazilian standards of radiation protection meet the principles described above and how well suited to them. The analysis of the national radiation protection regulatory system, developed and deployed by the National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN), showed that out of the ten items, two are covered partially, the number 2 and 10. The others are fully met. The item 2 the fact that the regulatory body (CNEN) be stock controller of a large company in the sector put in check its independence as a regulatory body. In item 10 the Brazilian standard of radiation protection does not provide explicit resolution of environmental liabilities.

  1. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG): an update of the recommendations on the use of Y-STRs in forensic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusmão, L; Butler, John M; Carracedo, Angel

    2006-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y...

  2. Translation and Adaptation of Tests: Lessons Learned and Recommendations for Countries Participating in timss, pisa and other International Comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Solano-Flores

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a conceptual model and methodology for the review of translated tests in the context of such international comparisons as the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS and the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA. We also present the results of an investigation into the quality of the Mexican translation of the TIMSS-1995 into the Spanish language. We identified translation errors in a significant percentage of the items, as well as relatively high correlations between the severity of translation errors and the items’ p-values. These findings indicate that our error-coding system is highly sensitive to test-translation error. The results underscore the need for improved translation and translation-review procedures in international comparisons. In our opinion, to implement the guidelines properly for test translation in international comparisons, each participating country needs to have internal procedures that would ensure a rigorous review of its own translations. The article concludes with four recommendations for countries participating in international comparisons. These recommendations relate to: (a the characteristics of the individuals in charge of translating instruments; (b the use of review, not simply at the end of the process, but during the process of test translation; (c the minimum time needed for various translation review iterations to take place; and (d the need for proper documentation of the entire process of test translation.

  3. Cooperation Agreement. The Text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 October 2008 pursuant to Article 8

  4. Cooperation Agreement. The Text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Cooperation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the ITER International Fusion Energy Organization is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 13 October 2008 pursuant to Article 8 [es

  5. Quality audits of radiotherapy centres in Latin America: a pilot experience of the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Izewska, Joanna; Binia, Sergio; Garcia-Yip, Fernando; Jimenez, Pablo

    2015-08-14

    In Latin America radiotherapy quality varies significantly among hospitals, where highly equipped academic centers coexist with others not meeting minimal requirements. In 2007, the International Atomic Energy Agency published guidelines for auditing radiotherapy centers, known as the "Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology" (QUATRO) audits. The present report summarizes a pilot experience with QUATRO audits to 12 radiotherapy centres. The findings from QUATRO audits conducted in 12 radiotherapy centres in Latin America between 2008 and 2013 were analysed. Events representing weaknesses or gaps in the process of radiotherapy were recorded. Relevant data for estimating human and technological needs of visited centres were processed. The main difficulties and strengths faced by institutions were also documented. All 12 radiotherapy centres were successfully audited following the QUATRO method. IAEA provided a dosimetry kit for quality control. Forty percent of audited institutions were immersed in a health system that did not recognize cancer as a public health priority problem. With few exceptions, local training programs for physicists and technologists were scarce and research was not an activity of interest among physicians. Centres were provided with sufficient staff to meet the local demand, both in the case of radiation oncologists, physicists and radiation therapists. Three centres lacking the minimum infrastructure were identified. Three institutions did not perform gynaecological brachytherapy, and one installation delivered around 900 teletherapy treatments annually without simulation, planning or dosimetry equipment for that purpose. Recommendations to centres were classified as related to personnel, infrastructure, processes and institutional organizational aspects. Many recommendations warned governments about the evident need for allocating more budgetary resources to radiotherapy. Most recommendations pointed out different aspects related to

  6. Quality audits of radiotherapy centres in Latin America: a pilot experience of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenblatt, Eduardo; Zubizarreta, Eduardo; Izewska, Joanna; Binia, Sergio; Garcia-Yip, Fernando; Jimenez, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In Latin America radiotherapy quality varies significantly among hospitals, where highly equipped academic centers coexist with others not meeting minimal requirements. In 2007, the International Atomic Energy Agency published guidelines for auditing radiotherapy centers, known as the “Quality Assurance Team for Radiation Oncology” (QUATRO) audits. The present report summarizes a pilot experience with QUATRO audits to 12 radiotherapy centres. The findings from QUATRO audits conducted in 12 radiotherapy centres in Latin America between 2008 and 2013 were analysed. Events representing weaknesses or gaps in the process of radiotherapy were recorded. Relevant data for estimating human and technological needs of visited centres were processed. The main difficulties and strengths faced by institutions were also documented. All 12 radiotherapy centres were successfully audited following the QUATRO method. IAEA provided a dosimetry kit for quality control. Forty percent of audited institutions were immersed in a health system that did not recognize cancer as a public health priority problem. With few exceptions, local training programs for physicists and technologists were scarce and research was not an activity of interest among physicians. Centres were provided with sufficient staff to meet the local demand, both in the case of radiation oncologists, physicists and radiation therapists. Three centres lacking the minimum infrastructure were identified. Three institutions did not perform gynaecological brachytherapy, and one installation delivered around 900 teletherapy treatments annually without simulation, planning or dosimetry equipment for that purpose. Recommendations to centres were classified as related to personnel, infrastructure, processes and institutional organizational aspects. Many recommendations warned governments about the evident need for allocating more budgetary resources to radiotherapy. Most recommendations pointed out different aspects related

  7. Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-01-01

    This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological 'hot spots' in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

  8. Book Review: Radiological Conditions in the Dnieper River Basin: Assessment by an International Expert Team and Recommendations for an Action Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-12-31

    This article is a book review of a report from the International Atomic Energy Agency that was prepared by a team of scientists from Belarus, the Russian Federation, and Ukraine as an assessment of radiological contamination of the Dnieper River, which flows through these three countries. The topics covered begin with radioactive sources (actual and potential) including areas affected by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, nuclear power plants along the river and its tributaries, uranium mining and ore processing, radioactive waste storage and disposal sites, and non-power sources, such as medicine, industry, and research. The report continues with an assessment of human exposures to radiation from these sources. An additional area of consideration is radiological “hot spots” in the region. The report finishes with conclusions and recommendations to the regional governments for a strategic action plan and individual government national plans.

  9. Co-operation agreement. The text of the agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for accounting and control of nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials which entered into force on 25 May 1998

  10. How To Adopt Internationally: A Guide for Agency-Directed and Independent Adoptions. 2000-2002 Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Erichsen, Jean; Erichsen, Heino R.

    Many potential adoptive parents seeking international adoption find the process to be extremely complex. This guide details the international adoption process, including organizing a home study and fulfilling state requirements as well as selecting a country from which to adopt, working through emigration and immigration agencies, and traveling…

  11. 75 FR 39204 - Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by the U.S. Agency for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Emergency Relief Information. Type of Review: Renewal of Information Collection. Purpose: The purpose of... AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by... International Development (USAID) is making efforts to reduce the paperwork burden. USAID invites the general...

  12. Trends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification: an international assessment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Botto, Lorenzo D

    2006-10-01

    Two crucial issues relative to the benefits and impact of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects are whether supplementation recommendations alone, without fortification, are effective in reducing the population-wide rates of neural tube defects (NTDs), and whether such policies can reduce the occurrence of other birth defects. Using data from 15 registries, we assessed rates and trends of 14 major defects, including NTDs, in areas with official recommendations or fortification to assess the effectiveness of recommendations and fortification on a wide range of major birth defects.

  13. Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Primary Lung Cancer and Other Targets: Results of Consultant Meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagata, Yasushi; Wulf, Joern; Lax, Ingmar; Timmerman, Robert; Zimmermann, Frank; Stojkovski, Igor; Jeremic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the current status of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) and identify both advantages and disadvantages of its use in developing countries, a meeting composed of consultants of the International Atomic Energy Agency was held in Vienna in November 2006. Owing to continuous developments in the field, the meeting was extended by subsequent discussions and correspondence (2007-2010), which led to the summary presented here. The advantages and disadvantages of SBRT expected to be encountered in developing countries were identified. The definitions, typical treatment courses, and clinical results were presented. Thereafter, minimal methodology/technology requirements for SBRT were evaluated. Finally, characteristics of SBRT for developing countries were recommended. Patients for SBRT should be carefully selected, because single high-dose radiotherapy may cause serious complications in some serial organs at risk. Clinical experiences have been reported in some populations of lung cancer, lung oligometastases, liver cancer, pancreas cancer, and kidney cancer. Despite the disadvantages expected to be experienced in developing countries, SBRT using fewer fractions may be useful in selected patients with various extracranial cancers with favorable outcome and low toxicity.

  14. When and for how long should glucocorticoids be used in rheumatoid arthritis? International guidelines and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaujoux-Viala, Cécile; Gossec, Laure

    2014-05-01

    Glucocorticoids are widely used in rheumatoid arthritis (RA); however, their effectiveness and safety is still a subject of debate. In particular, when to introduce glucocorticoids, but also when and how to taper them, are important questions for clinicians. In this paper, we will discuss the place of glucocorticoids in the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations for the management of RA and review the literature that was the basis for these recommendations. The recommendations cover the introduction of glucocorticoids (and for whom they are recommended), doses and duration of treatment, and tapering strategies. Items still on the research agenda include more data on safety, particularly for long-term use, and small doses of glucocorticoids. © 2014 New York Academy of Sciences.

  15. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: 2014 update of the recommendations of an international task force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolen, Josef S; Breedveld, Ferdinand C; Burmester, Gerd R; Bykerk, Vivian; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Kvien, Tore K; Navarro-Compán, M Victoria; Oliver, Susan; Schoels, Monika; Scholte-Voshaar, Marieke; Stamm, Tanja; Stoffer, Michaela; Takeuchi, Tsutomu; Aletaha, Daniel; Andreu, Jose Louis; Aringer, Martin; Bergman, Martin; Betteridge, Neil; Bijlsma, Hans; Burkhardt, Harald; Combe, Bernard; Durez, Patrick; Fonseca, Joao Eurico; Gibofsky, Alan; Gomez-Reino, Juan J; Graninger, Winfried; Hannonen, Pekka; Haraoui, Boulos; Kouloumas, Marios; Landewe, Robert; Martin-Mola, Emilio; Nash, Peter; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Östör, Andrew; Richards, Pam; Sokka-Isler, Tuulikki; Thorne, Carter; Tzioufas, Athanasios G; van Vollenhoven, Ronald; de Wit, Martinus

    2016-01-01

    Background Reaching the therapeutic target of remission or low-disease activity has improved outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) significantly. The treat-to-target recommendations, formulated in 2010, have provided a basis for implementation of a strategic approach towards this therapeutic goal in routine clinical practice, but these recommendations need to be re-evaluated for appropriateness and practicability in the light of new insights. Objective To update the 2010 treat-to-target recommendations based on systematic literature reviews (SLR) and expert opinion. Methods A task force of rheumatologists, patients and a nurse specialist assessed the SLR results and evaluated the individual items of the 2010 recommendations accordingly, reformulating many of the items. These were subsequently discussed, amended and voted upon by >40 experts, including 5 patients, from various regions of the world. Levels of evidence, strengths of recommendations and levels of agreement were derived. Results The update resulted in 4 overarching principles and 10 recommendations. The previous recommendations were partly adapted and their order changed as deemed appropriate in terms of importance in the view of the experts. The SLR had now provided also data for the effectiveness of targeting low-disease activity or remission in established rather than only early disease. The role of comorbidities, including their potential to preclude treatment intensification, was highlighted more strongly than before. The treatment aim was again defined as remission with low-disease activity being an alternative goal especially in patients with long-standing disease. Regular follow-up (every 1–3 months during active disease) with according therapeutic adaptations to reach the desired state was recommended. Follow-up examinations ought to employ composite measures of disease activity that include joint counts. Additional items provide further details for particular aspects of the

  16. Analyse of the international recommendations on the calculation of absorbed dose in the biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A.; Universidade Federal Fluminense; Kelecom, Alphonse

    2011-01-01

    This paper evaluates the recommendations of ICRP which has as objective the environmental radioprotection. It was analysed the recommendations 26, 60, 91, 103 and 108 of the ICRP. The ICRP-103 defined the concept of animal and plant of reference (APR) to be used in the RAP based on the calculation of absorbed dose based on APR concept. This last view allows to build a legal framework of environmental protection with a etic, moral and scientific visualization, more defensible than the anthropomorphic concept

  17. How did international agencies perceive the avian influenza problem? The adoption and manufacture of the 'One World, One Health' framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Yu-Ju

    2013-02-01

    Over the past few years, a 'One World, One Health' (OWOH) policy framework has become the guiding principle for international responses to avian influenza and other zoonotic infectious diseases. Several specialised inter-governmental agencies, including the World Health Organization, the Food and Agricultural Organization and World Organization for Animal Health, jointly endorsed and promoted this framework. This article attempts to explain why international agencies advocated OWOH despite its vagueness. By examining how these international agencies gradually reframed avian flu problems, this article illustrates the crucial roles of international agencies in constructing disease knowledge and relevant policy responses. It shows that the three agencies adopted an all-inclusive approach to reduce conflicts, defend their legitimacy, and facilitate commitment for collaboration. Not only has this new framework reduced tensions between agencies, it has also reshaped the interests and interactions of other global actors. The case thus illustrates how these organisational actors actively manufacture new cognitive frames and policy regimes that advance their own legitimacy and influence. © 2012 The Author. Sociology of Health & Illness © 2012 Foundation for the Sociology of Health & Illness/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Negotiating supranational rules - The genesis of the International Atomic Energy Agency Safeguards System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forland, Astrid

    1998-12-31

    The object of this thesis is the evolution from 1954-56 up until the mid 1970s of the nuclear safeguards system administered by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna. The evolution is traced not through the practical implementation of the safeguards system, but through the various multilateral negotiations through which it was created. The focus is on analysing the arguments advanced in the various negotiations, and the main objective is to single out the factors determining the result. The discussion is organised into the following chapters: (1) The statute of the IAEA, (2) The IAEA 1961 safeguard document (INFCIRC/26), (3) The IAEA 1965 safeguards document (INFCIRC/66), (4) The non-proliferation treaty, (5) NPT safeguards. 92 refs.

  19. Project plan international atomic energy agency (IAEA) safeguards project plutonium finishing plant; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BARTLETT, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    This plan presents the overall objectives, description, justification and planning for the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) project. The intent of this plan is to describe how this project will be managed and integrated with other facility stabilization and deactivation activities. This plan supplements the overall integrated plan presented in the PFP Integrated Project Management Plan (PMP), HNF-3617,Rev. 0. This project plan is the top-level definitive project management document for the PFP IAEA project. It specifies the technical, schedule, requirements and the cost baselines to manage the execution of the IAEA project. Any deviations to the document must be authorized through the appropriate change control process

  20. The International Agencies: Their Role in the Creation and Expansion of the New School Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Evelin Urrea Quintero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Thinking about the primary basic education in the Colombian rurality implies thinking about the New School model. Such a model, since the end of 1970’s and the beginning of 1980’s, was shaped as the most important educational proposal in serving such a population. How did it originate? What made it so remarkable and successful in order for it to become a flagship program of the primary basic education in the Colombian countryside? These are the main concerns, which are to be addressed in this article. The main conclusion shows the engine, which the International Agencies, gave the New School, by recognizing in it, a proposal to the countryside, under the rationale for progress and development, which attempted to establish the principles and the strategies of the market in education.

  1. Testing the validity of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safety culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López de Castro, Borja; Gracia, Francisco J; Peiró, José M; Pietrantoni, Luca; Hernández, Ana

    2013-11-01

    This paper takes the first steps to empirically validate the widely used model of safety culture of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), composed of five dimensions, further specified by 37 attributes. To do so, three independent and complementary studies are presented. First, 290 students serve to collect evidence about the face validity of the model. Second, 48 experts in organizational behavior judge its content validity. And third, 468 workers in a Spanish nuclear power plant help to reveal how closely the theoretical five-dimensional model can be replicated. Our findings suggest that several attributes of the model may not be related to their corresponding dimensions. According to our results, a one-dimensional structure fits the data better than the five dimensions proposed by the IAEA. Moreover, the IAEA model, as it stands, seems to have rather moderate content validity and low face validity. Practical implications for researchers and practitioners are included. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nuclear Power, Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency Publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are issued in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. If publications are also available in other languages than English, this is noted as C for Chinese, F for French, R for Russian and S for Spanish by the relevant ISBN number. It should be noted that prices of books are quoted in Austrian Schillings. The prices do not include local taxes and are subject to change without notice. All books in this catalogue are 16 x 24 cm, paper-bound, unless otherwise stated

  3. Review for the Korean Health Professionals and International Cooperation Doctors Dispatched to Peru by the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bongyoung

    2015-04-01

    South Korea dispatches Korean nationals to partner developing countries as an Official Development Assistance (ODA) project through the Korea International Cooperation Agency (KOICA). In the health sector, KOICA dispatches international cooperation doctors (ICDs), nurses, physical therapists, radiologic technologists, nutritionists, medical laboratory technologists, occupational therapists, and dental hygienists. A total of 216 ICDs were dispatched over 19 times from 1995 until 2013. There were 19 areas of specialties among the ICDs. The most common specialty was internal medicine (61/216, 28.2%), the second most common specialty was general surgery (43/216, 19.9%), followed by oriental medicine (27/216, 12.5%), pediatrics (17/216, 7.9%), orthopedics (16/216, 7.4%), family medicine (16/216, 7.4%), and odontology (14/216, 6.5%). The ICDs have worked in 21 countries. KOICA dispatched the highest number of ICDs to Asia (97/216, 44.9%), followed by Africa (50/216, 23.1%), Latin America (34/216, 15.7%), the commonwealth of independent states (31/216, 14.4%), and Oceania (4/216, 1.9%). Nobody was dispatched to the Middle East. A total of 134 KOICA health professionals were dispatched to Peru from 1996 until October 1, 2014. Of these, 19.4% (26/134) were ICDs, 44.8% (60/216) were nurses, 20.1% (27/134) were physical therapists, 6.7% (9/134) were radiologic technologists, 2.2% (3/134) were nutritionists, and 6.7% (9/134) were medical laboratory. ICDs' specialties comprised internal medicine (13/26, 50%), family medicine (8/26, 30.8%), pediatrics (2/26, 7.7%), otorhinolaryngology (1/26, 3.8%), orthopedics (1/26, 3.8%), and oriental medicine (1/26, 3.8%). Most of the dispatched health professionals worked at institutions that were supported by KOICA. For this reason, the proportion of health professionals who worked at public health centers (PHCs) was the highest (58.2%, 78/134) when classified by workplace type. Other KOICA health professionals worked at hospitals

  4. Statement and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection from its 1980 meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A short report of the 1980 annual meeting of the ICRP is given along with the recommendations proposed. These are as follows: 1) for the lens of the eye, the annual dose-equivalent limit should be reduced from 0.3Sv to 0.15 Sv, 2) the recommended annual limit for intake by inhalation for radon-222 daughters is 0.02 J and corresponds to an air concentration of 0.4 working levels in previous practical units, 3) the recent information on estimate of radiation risk does not call for changes in the risk factors for stochastic effects or the dose-effect relationships for non-stochastic effects underlying the dose-equivalent limits recommended in ICRP publication 26. The assessment of the total detriment by summation using weighting factors for different organs is also discussed. (U.K.)

  5. Mercury in fish from two Nicaraguan lakes: A recommendation for increased monitoring of fish for international commerce

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrary, Jeffrey K. [University of Central America, Apdo. 69, Managua (Nicaragua) and College of Natural Resources, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)]. E-mail: jmccrary2@yahoo.com; Castro, Mark [Appalachian Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, 301 Braddock Road, Frostburg, MD 21532 (United States); McKaye, Kenneth R. [University of Central America, Apdo. 69, Managua (Nicaragua); Appalachian Laboratory, University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, 301 Braddock Road, Frostburg, MD 21532 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    We measured total mercury concentrations in water and fish of Lake Managua and Lake Apoyo. Water mercury concentrations were 10-fold higher in Lake Managua than in Lake Apoyo, although differences in mercury concentration in the most common native fish were not significant. One-fourth of the commercially fished tilapia in Lake Managua exceeded maximum recommended mercury levels for consumption among pregnant women and other at-risk groups, although bioavailability to fishes was lower than in previously studied sites in Brazil and Western Maryland. The lower bioavailiability may present important information for management options to reduce mercury exposure to fishes and humans. We recommend closer mercury monitoring among freshwater fish destined for international commerce. - Fish commonly exported into the international food supply may be contaminated with mercury.

  6. Mercury in fish from two Nicaraguan lakes: A recommendation for increased monitoring of fish for international commerce

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCrary, Jeffrey K.; Castro, Mark; McKaye, Kenneth R.

    2006-01-01

    We measured total mercury concentrations in water and fish of Lake Managua and Lake Apoyo. Water mercury concentrations were 10-fold higher in Lake Managua than in Lake Apoyo, although differences in mercury concentration in the most common native fish were not significant. One-fourth of the commercially fished tilapia in Lake Managua exceeded maximum recommended mercury levels for consumption among pregnant women and other at-risk groups, although bioavailability to fishes was lower than in previously studied sites in Brazil and Western Maryland. The lower bioavailiability may present important information for management options to reduce mercury exposure to fishes and humans. We recommend closer mercury monitoring among freshwater fish destined for international commerce. - Fish commonly exported into the international food supply may be contaminated with mercury

  7. International Student-Athlete Adjustment Issues: Advising Recommendations for Effective Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Emily M.

    2015-01-01

    Through an extensive literature review, student--athlete college transition issues as well as concerns of international student-athletes are identified. Research on general student advising, developmental advising, and mentoring literature points to successful tactics for assisting domestic students, international students, and student-athletes…

  8. How global is international CSR research? Insights and recommendations from a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pisani, N.; Kourula, A.; Kolk, A.; Meijer, R.

    While studies on international corporate social responsibility (CSR) have expanded significantly, their true global nature can be questioned. We systematically review 494 articles in 31 journals over a 31-year period. We assess the embeddedness of CSR in international management/business (IB);

  9. DNA commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome STRs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P; Brenner, C; Brinkmann, B

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods....

  10. DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics: recommendations on forensic analysis using Y-chromosome short tandem repeats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gill, P.; Brenner, C.; Brinkmann, B.

    2001-01-01

    During the past few years the DNA commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics has published a series of documents providing guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. This latest report addresses a relat...... a relatively new area, namely Y-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). This report addresses nomenclature, use of allelic ladders, population genetics and reporting methods Udgivelsesdato: 2001/12...

  11. Science Communication during the International Polar Year 2007-2008: Successes and Recommendations (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, D. J.; Ipy Education, Outreach; Communication Committee

    2010-12-01

    This IPY (International Polar Year 2007-2008) represented one of the largest international scientific research efforts ever undertaken. It stimulated the active engagement of thousands of teachers, students, and citizens around the globe through international collaboration and cooperation, careful cultivation of a global community of enthusiastic professional science communicators and educators, and creative use of free technologies. From music performances in Alaska to tree planting in Malaysia, hundreds of events and activities around the world demonstrated the public enthusiasm and the broad impact of IPY. This paper describes the core concepts and tangible activities developed and implemented by the IPY international Education, Outreach, and Communication (EOC) Committee and community and the International Programme Office (IPO) between March 2006 and December 2009. We present methods and accomplishments and address two questions: 1) How did these activities come about? 2) How do the ideas, tools, experiences, and successes from this IPY apply more broadly to science communication?

  12. Integrating global energy and climate governance: The changing role of the International Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heubaum, Harald; Biermann, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Despite the long-recognized interlinkages between global energy consumption and climate change, there has historically been only limited policy interaction, let alone integration, between the two fields. This compartmentalization is mirrored in scholarship, where much research has focused on the fragmentation of, respectively, global energy and global climate governance, but only little has been said about how these fields might be integrated. Our analysis of the International Energy Agency’s (IEA) changing activities in recent years shows that governance integration – both within global energy governance and between global energy and climate governance – is now happening. The IEA has broadened its portfolio to embrace the full spectrum of energy issues, including renewable energy and climate change; it has built and is expanding key partnerships with both the UN climate convention and the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA); and it has become an authoritative advocate for the inter-related goals of a low-carbon transition and climate change mitigation. We show that these developments are not the result of a top-down plan, but have rather emerged through the Agency’s various efforts to pursue its energy-centric mandate in a fast-changing global policy environment. - Highlights: • Assesses integration between global energy and global climate governance. • Analyzes organizational change in the IEA and its impact on governance integration. • Discusses recent activities and advocacy by the IEA in relation to climate change.

  13. Internal Audit Status For ISO 9001 And ISO/ IEC 17025 In Malaysian Nuclear Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazila Said; Nurul Huda Mudri; Nik Arlina Ali

    2012-01-01

    The development of MS ISO 9001 and MS ISO/ IEC 17025 in Malaysian Nuclear Agency is the basic step to enhance and improve the Quality Management System (QMS) for processes and laboratories that involve customers and suppliers in delivering products and services. The effectiveness of QMS is monitored by Research and Innovation Management Centre (RIMC) to ensure that all activities related to audit such as Internal Audit are well organized and implemented as documented in quality manual and procedure. This paper will discuss the status of internal audit for processes that implement MS ISO 9001 and laboratories that accredited with MS/ ISO IEC 17025 in year 2008, 2009 and 2010. The total of non-conformance (nc) and opportunity for improvement (ofi) for processes and laboratories and their numbers as per clause in MS ISO 9001 and MS ISO/ IEC 17025 are the indicators that reflects the effectiveness of QMS. Then, the total effectiveness of QMS for MS 9001 and MS ISO/ IEC 17025 is also determined via the number of conformance clause versus non-conformance clause for those three years. (author)

  14. Proceedings from an international consensus meeting on posttransplantation diabetes mellitus: recommendations and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharif, A.; Hecking, M.; de Vries, A.P.

    2014-01-01

    to other solid organ transplant recipients. Our recommendations include: terminology revision from new-onset diabetes after transplantation to posttransplantation diabetes mellitus (PTDM), exclusion of transient posttransplant hyperglycemia from PTDM diagnosis, expansion of screening strategies......-based and intended to serve as a template for planned guidelines update, based on systematic and graded literature review, on the diagnosis and management of PTDM...

  15. Antiretroviral Treatment of Adult HIV Infection 2012 Recommendations of the International Antiviral Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Aberg, Judith A.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Telenti, Amalio; Benson, Constance; Cahn, Pedro; Eron, Joseph J.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hammer, Scott M.; Reiss, Peter; Richman, Douglas D.; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Thomas, David L.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    New trial data and drug regimens that have become available in the last 2 years warrant an update to guidelines for antiretroviral therapy (ART) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in resource-rich settings. To provide current recommendations for the treatment of adult HIV

  16. 75 FR 42098 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Draft Recommendation for the Revision of the Permitted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-20

    .... IV. Electronic Access to Documents and the Maintenance Procedures Persons with access to the Internet...-827-1800. See the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic access to the draft recommendation... includes representatives from each of the ICH sponsors and the IFPMA, as well as observers from the World...

  17. 77 FR 10754 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Final Recommendation for the Revision of the Permitted...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-23

    ... Access Persons with access to the Internet may obtain the Q3C guidance documents at http://www... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section for electronic access to the draft recommendation. Submit electronic comments... observers from the World Health Organization, Health Canada, and the European Free Trade Area. In 1999, ICH...

  18. Hip protectors: recommendations for conducting clinical trials--an international consensus statement (part II)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cameron, I D; Robinovitch, S; Birge, S

    2010-01-01

    While hip protectors are effective in some clinical trials, many, including all in community settings, have been unable to demonstrate effectiveness. This is due partly to differences in the design and analysis. The aim of this report is to develop recommendations for subsequent clinical research....

  19. Treating rheumatoid arthritis to target: Revision of the 2014 International Expert Group Recommendations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. T. Vatutin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new edition (2014 of basic approaches to therapy of rheumatoid arthritis (RA based on the principle of «Treat to target », which has been elaborated by the experts of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR and the American College of Rheumatology (ACR. The revised recommendations consider the results of numerous randomized controlled and cohort studies, as well as the data of an extensive systematic review of the literature. The new 2014 version contains 4 basic principles and 10 recommendations for the management of patients with RA. When making the updated recommendations, the experts took into account particularly issues, such as criteria for defining a remission, the need to minimize comorbidities in patients with RA and to individualize its therapy, as well as their working ability. The basic principles in the management of patients with RA, by using a treat-to-target strategy, are discussed in detail and the rewording of the main points of the 2010 recommendations and their new edition are substantiated.

  20. Trends of selected malformations in relation to folic acid recommendations and fortification : An international assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botto, Lorenzo D.; Lisi, Alessandra; Bower, Carol; Canfield, Mark A.; Dattani, Nirupa; De Vigan, Catherine; De Walle, Hermien; Erickson, David J.; Halliday, Jane; Irgens, Lorentz M.; Lowry, R. Brian; McDonnel, Robert; Metneki, Julia; Poetzsch, Simone; Ritvanen, Annukka; Robert-Gnansia, Elisabeth; Siffel, Csaba; Stoll, Claude; Mastroiacovo, Pierpaolo

    2006-01-01

    Background: Two crucial issues relative to the benefits and impact of folic acid in the prevention of birth defects are whether supplementation recommendations alone, without fortification, are effective in reducing the population-wide rates of neural tube defects (NTDs), and whether such policies

  1. Recommendations for radioembolisation after liver surgery using yttrium-90 resin microspheres based on a survey of an international expert panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samim, Morsal [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Veenendaal, Linde M. van; Braat, Manon N.G.J.A.; Hoven, Andor F. van den; Bosch, Maurice A.A.J. van den; Lam, Marnix G.E.H. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Hillegersberg, Richard van [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Surgery, Utrecht (Netherlands); Sangro, Bruno [Clinica Universidad de Navarra-IDISNA and CIBEREHD, Liver Unit, Pamplona (Spain); Kao, Yung Hsiang [Cabrini Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Melbourne (Australia); Liu, Dave [Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Louie, John D.; Sze, Daniel Y. [Stanford University Medical Center, Division of Interventional Radiology, Stanford (United States); Rose, Steven C. [University of California, Department of Radiology, San Diego (United States); Brown, Daniel B. [Vanderbilt University, Medical Center North, Department of Radiology, Nashville (United States); Ahmadzadehfar, Hojjat [University Hospital Bonn, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Bonn (Germany); Kim, Edward [Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, New York (United States)

    2017-12-15

    Guidelines on how to adjust activity in patients with a history of liver surgery who are undergoing yttrium-90 radioembolisation ({sup 90}Y-RE) are lacking. The aim was to study the variability in activity prescription in these patients, between centres with extensive experience using resin microspheres {sup 90}Y-RE, and to draw recommendations on activity prescription based on an expert consensus. The variability in activity prescription between centres was investigated by a survey of international experts in the field of {sup 90}Y-RE. Six representative post-surgical patients (i.e. comparable activity prescription, different outcome) were selected. Information on patients' disease characteristics and data needed for activity calculation was presented to the expert panel. Reported was the used method for activity prescription and whether, how and why activity reduction was found indicated. Ten experts took part in the survey. Recommendations on activity reduction were highly variable between the expert panel. The median intra-patient range was 44 Gy (range 18-55 Gy). Reductions in prescribed activity were recommended in 68% of the cases. In consensus, a maximum D{sub Target} of 50 Gy was recommended. With a current lack of guidelines, large variability in activity prescription in post-surgical patients undergoing {sup 90}Y-RE exists. In consensus, D{sub Target} ≤50 Gy is recommended. (orig.)

  2. Climate change and developing countries: A role for the Canadian International Development Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragusa, P.

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA) is primarily responsible for Canada's official development assistance program whose objective is to foster sustainable development in order to reduce poverty and contribute to a more secure, equitable and prosperous world. CIDA programs are directed to the needs of developing countries to assist them in capacity building, to provide financial resources and technology transfer, to help them to meet the cost of adaptation to adverse effects, and to develop and enhance indigenous capabilities. With respect to climate change, CIDA, in concert with other federal government departments, endeavours to maximize Canada's capabilities to meet international environmental commitments and Kyoto climate change targets at the lowest cost, ensure a level playing field with Canada's competitors by maximizing participation of major developed and developing economies in the Kyoto Protocol, and maximize opportunities for Canadian businesses in international projects and initiatives in climate change. Accordingly, the 2000 CIDA Budget provides official development assistance funding of $100 million over four years for technology transfer to help developing countries reduce their greenhouse gas emissions and promote sustainable development. First call for proposals is targeted for August 2001, with assessment of proposals and projects during September and second call for proposals before year end. Major provisions of the Kyoto Protocol, the purposes of the Clean Development Mechanism, the role that CIDA can play in support of implementation of CDM, benefits and opportunities provided by CDM are summarized. Ways in which private sector firms seeking to expand into developing countries can benefit by working with CIDA, are also discussed

  3. Efforts made for health and medical care by International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Naoyuki

    2016-01-01

    The author, being a former senior medical officer and currently a consultant of the Nuclear Medicine Section, the Division of Human Health, the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to standardize the isotope and radiation technologies for health and medical care and transfer them to the IAEA member states to address their health issues, participated in an international cooperation project to survey the current situation of the health and medical care in Viet Nam and exchange opinions with the World Health Organization Western Pacific Regional Office Viet Nam Office and the Viet Nam Health Department coordinated by the Japan Public Health Association from 10th to 15th January 2016 and perceived efforts made and action plans for the health and medical care in Viet Nam by the international organizations of the IAEA and the World Health Organization (WHO). IAEA has verified various isotopes and radiation technologies up to now in the international field of health and medical care and has being offered them to the member states under the sustainable frame work of technical co-operation. However, the activity in the health and medical care field of IAEA is hardly recognized by the public health professionals in Japan. In order to attain the objective to improve and maintain human health under the umbrella of the United Nations system, the peaceful use of nuclear technology has been promoted in the field of non-electric applications of nuclear energy including human health and medical care by the IAEA. There are several discrepancies seen with the field and tactics of health and medical care between the IAEA and the WHO. In terms of measures to fight NCDs which should be an urgent issue in most of the member states, a comprehensive approach is often needed beyond the capability of IAEA as isotopes and radiation technologies. The IAEA should strive to solve issues on human health and medical care maintaining much

  4. 75 FR 53973 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-02

    ... Pharmaceutical Industries Associations; the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare; the Japanese... and Research, FDA; and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The ICH Secretariat... regulatory authorities and industry associations to promote international harmonization of regulatory...

  5. 75 FR 54153 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-03

    ... Pharmaceutical Industries Associations; the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare; the Japanese... and Research, FDA; and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The ICH Secretariat... regulatory authorities and industry associations to promote international harmonization of regulatory...

  6. 78 FR 31944 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ... Commission; the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries Associations; the Japanese Ministry of...; and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The ICH Secretariat, which coordinates... initiatives have been undertaken by regulatory authorities and industry associations to promote international...

  7. Recommendations for international gambling harm-minimisation guidelines : comparison with effective public health policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gainsbury, Sally M; Blankers, Matthijs; Wilkinson, Claire; Schelleman-Offermans, Karen; Cousijn, Janna

    2014-01-01

    Problem gambling represents a significant public health problem, however, research on effective gambling harm-minimisation measures lags behind other fields, including other addictive disorders. In recognition of the need for consistency between international jurisdictions and the importance of

  8. Recommendations for international gambling harm-minimisation guidelines: comparison with effective public health policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gainsbury, Sally M.; Blankers, Matthijs; Wilkinson, Claire; Schelleman-Offermans, Karen; Cousijn, Janna

    2014-01-01

    Problem gambling represents a significant public health problem, however, research on effective gambling harm-minimisation measures lags behind other fields, including other addictive disorders. In recognition of the need for consistency between international jurisdictions and the importance of

  9. [Isolated primary nocturnal enuresis: international evidence based management. Consensus recommendations by French expert group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubert, D; Berard, E; Blanc, J-P; Lenoir, G; Liard, F; Lottmann, H

    2010-05-01

    The causes and treatment of isolated primary nocturnal enuresis (PNE) are the subject of ongoing controversy. We are proposing consensus practical recommendations, based on a formalised analysis of the literature and validated by a large panel of experts. A task force of six experts based its work on the guide for literature analysis and recommendations and recommendation grading of the French Haute Autorité de Santé (formalized consensus process methodological guidelines) to evaluate the level of scientific proof (grade of 1 to 4) and the strength of the recommendations (grade A, B, C) of the publications on PNE. As a result of this, 223 articles from 2003 on were identified, of which only 127 (57 %) have an evaluable level of proof. This evaluation was then reviewed by a 19-member rating group. Several recommendations, poorly defined by the literature, had to be proposed by a professional agreement resulting from a consultation between the members of the task force and those of the rating group. For its final validation, the document was submitted to a reading group of 21 members working in a wide range of specialist areas and practices but all involved in PNE. The definition of PNE is very specific: intermittent incontinence during sleep, from the age of 5, with no continuous period of continence longer than 6 months, with no other associated symptom, particularly during the day. Its diagnosis is clinical by the exclusion of all other urinary pathologies. Two factors must be identified during the consultation: nocturnal polyuria promoted by excessive fluid intake, inverse secretion of vasopressin, snoring and sleep apnoea. It is sensitive to desmopressin; small bladder capacity evaluated according to a voiding diary and the ICCS formula. It may be associated with diurnal hyperactivity of the detrusor (30 %). It is resistant to desmopressin. Problems associated with PNE are: abnormal arousal threshold, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (10 %), low

  10. Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Protocol on 21 March 2000. It was signed on 22 March 2000 in Vienna. Pursuant to Article 11 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 16 October 2007, the date on which the Agency received from the Russian Federation written notification that the procedures of the Russian Federation required for entry into force had been met

  11. Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Protocol on 21 March 2000. It was signed on 22 March 2000 in Vienna. Pursuant to Article 11 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 16 October 2007, the date on which the Agency received from the Russian Federation written notification that the procedures of the Russian Federation required for entry into force had been met [fr

  12. Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Russian Federation and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Protocol on 21 March 2000. It was signed on 22 March 2000 in Vienna. Pursuant to Article 11 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 16 October 2007, the date on which the Agency received from the Russian Federation written notification that the procedures of the Russian Federation required for entry into force had been met [es

  13. Model for prioritization of regional strategies within the technical cooperation of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Pedro Maffia da

    2017-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency's Technical Cooperation Program is the main mechanism through which services are provided to its member states to help them build, strengthen and maintain their capabilities in the safe use of nuclear technology in support of socio-economic development. The technical cooperation program operates in four geographical regions, each regional program helps Member States to meet their specific needs, taking into account existing capacities and different operating conditions. The technical cooperation regions are Asia and the Pacific, Europe, Africa and Latin America and the Caribbean. Developing activities together with the technical cooperation program we have the Regional Cooperation Agreement for the Promotion of Nuclear Science and Technology in Latin America and the Caribbean (ARCAL), which involves the majority of the members of the International Atomic Energy Agency of that region, for Technical Cooperation. All ARCAL's work is guided by the Regional Strategic Profile, which identifies the needs and problems of the region that require support projects. In the technical meeting of the Regional Strategic Profile, the needs and problems that are analyzed through indexes associated with severity, urgency, extension, relevance and difficulty are listed by different thematic areas. To these indexes, values are established by the technical staff on a continuous scale between 1 and 5. From these values an expression is used to arrive at a priority number for the needs and problems. In the face of many criticisms associated with similar approaches, such as Failure Modes and Effects Analysis, and Timing, Trend and Impact Matrix, the aim of this thesis is to propose a methodological approach that can assist in the prioritization of investments of technical cooperation projects and programs that take into account the budget available and the technical and strategic visions of the parties involved. For this, the Probabilistic

  14. Status of Emergency Contraceptives in Europe One Year after the European Medicines Agency's Recommendation to Switch Ulipristal Acetate to Non-Prescription Status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Italia, Salvatore; Brand, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    In November 2014, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) recommended switching the emergency contraceptive (EMC) ulipristal acetate to non-prescription status. This study's objective is to assess the current legal status of the two EMCs ulipristal acetate and levonorgestrel in Europe and to report on the development of sales figures for EMCs since they were made freely available. Health authorities were contacted in autumn 2015 and asked about the current status of EMCs and whether the sales figures had changed after a switch to non-prescription status. Additionally, data on consumption were collected in 18 German community pharmacies. As of November 2015, most countries in the European Union (EU) have followed the EMA recommendation. Hungary kept the prescription-only status. In Malta, EMC drugs are not authorized. Germany and Croatia switched levonorgestrel to non-prescription status as well. Of the EU candidate and European Free Trade Association countries, ulipristal acetate is available without prescription in Norway and Bosnia and Herzegovina only. Several countries reported an increase in EMC sales since the switch. An EMA recommendation can strongly contribute to the harmonization of a drug's legal status in the EU. In most European countries, ulipristal acetate and/or levonorgestrel are now freely available. © 2016 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Analysis of the international and US response to the Haiti earthquake: recommendations for change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirsch, Thomas; Sauer, Lauren; Guha Sapir, Debarati

    2012-10-01

    The 2010 earthquake in Haiti was unprecedented in its impact. The dual loss of the Haitian government and United Nations (UN) leadership led to an atypical disaster response driven by the US government and military. Although the response was massive, the leadership and logistical support were initially insufficient, and the UN cluster system struggled with the overwhelming influx of nontraditional agencies and individuals, which complicated the health care response. Moreover, the provision of care was beyond the country's health care standards. The management of the US government resembled a whole-of-government domestic response, combined with a massive military presence that went beyond logistical support. Among the most important lessons learned were the management of the response and how it could be strengthened by adapting a structure such as the domestic National Response Framework. Also, mechanisms were needed to increase the limited personnel to surge in a major response. One obvious pool has been the military, but the military needs to increase integration with the humanitarian community and improve its own humanitarian response expertise. In addition, information management needs standardized tools and analysis to improve its use of independent agencies.

  16. EVALUATION OF PATIENT AND PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT INITIATIVES IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT: A SURVEY OF INTERNATIONAL AGENCIES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Laura; Polisena, Julie; Scott, Anna Mae; Holtorf, Anke-Peggy; Staniszewska, Sophie; Facey, Karen

    2017-01-01

    Although there is increased awareness of patient and public involvement (PPI) among health technology assessment (HTA) organizations, evaluations of PPI initiatives are relatively scarce. Our objective as members of Health Technology Assessment International's (HTAi's) Patient and Citizen Involvement Group (PCIG) was to advance understanding of the range of evaluation strategies adopted by HTA organizations and their potential usefulness. In March 2016, a survey was sent to fifty-four HTA organizations through the International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment (INAHTA) and contacts of members of HTAi's PCIG. Respondents were asked about their organizational structure; how patients and members of the public are involved; whether and how PPI initiatives have been evaluated, and, if so, which facilitators and challenges to evaluation were found and how results were used and disseminated. Fifteen (n = 15) programs from twelve countries responded (response rate 27.8 percent) that involved patients (14/15) and members of the public (10/15) in HTA activities. Seven programs evaluated their PPI activities, including participant satisfaction (5/7), process (5/7) and impact evaluations (4/7). Evaluation results were used to improve PPI activities, identify education and training needs, and direct strategic priorities. Facilitators and challenges revolved around the need for stakeholder buy-in, sufficient resources, senior leadership, and including patients in evaluations. A small but diverse set of HTA organizations evaluate their PPI activities using a range of strategies that reflect the range of rationales and approaches to PPI in HTA. It will be important for HTA organizations to draw on evaluation theories and methods.

  17. INTDOS: a computer code for estimating internal radiation dose using recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, M.T.

    1981-09-01

    INTDOS is a user-oriented computer code designed to calculate estimates of internal radiation dose commitment resulting from the acute inhalation intake of various radionuclides. It is designed so that users unfamiliar with the details of such can obtain results by answering a few questions regarding the exposure case. The user must identify the radionuclide name, solubility class, particle size, time since exposure, and the measured lung burden. INTDOS calculates the fractions of the lung burden remaining at time, t, postexposure considering the solubility class and particle size information. From the fraction remaining in the lung at time, t, the quantity inhaled is estimated. Radioactive decay is accounted for in the estimate. Finally, effective committed dose equivalents to various organs and tissues of the body are calculated using inhalation committed dose factors presented by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). This computer code was written for execution on a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP-10 computer and is written in Fortran IV. A flow chart and example calculations are discussed in detail to aid the user who is unfamiliar with computer operations

  18. Challenges Social Work Students Encounter in International Field Placements and Recommendations for Responsible Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew, Lenore E.; Lough, Benjamin J.

    2017-01-01

    Social work students often face personal and institutional challenges prior to, during, and after international field placements. If not managed, these challenges may compromise students' professional development and hinder their meaningful contribution to placements abroad, which is of particular concern when students from the Global North are…

  19. Antiretroviral treatment of adult HIV infection - 2008 recommendations of the International AIDS Society USA panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hammer, Scott M.; Eron, Joseph J.; Reiss, Peter; Schooley, Robert T.; Thompson, Melanie A.; Walmsley, Sharon; Cahn, Pedro; Fischl, Margaret A.; Gatell, Jose M.; Hirsch, Martin S.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Richman, Douglas D.; Yeni, Patrick G.; Volberding, Paul A.

    2008-01-01

    Context The availability of new antiretroviral drugs and formulations, including drugs in new classes, and recent data on treatment choices for antiretroviral- naive and - experienced patients warrant an update of the International AIDS Society - USA guidelines for the use of antiretroviral therapy

  20. Antiretroviral Treatment of Adult HIV Infection 2010 Recommendations of the International AIDS Society-USA Panel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, Melanie A.; Aberg, Judith A.; Cahn, Pedro; Montaner, Julio S. G.; Rizzardini, Giuliano; Telenti, Amalio; Gatell, José M.; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Hammer, Scott M.; Hirsch, Martin S.; Jacobsen, Donna M.; Reiss, Peter; Richman, Douglas D.; Volberding, Paul A.; Yeni, Patrick; Schooley, Robert T.

    2010-01-01

    Context Recent data regarding the consequences of untreated human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the expansion of treatment choices for antiretroviral-naive and antiretroviral-experienced patients warrant an update of the International AIDS Society-USA guidelines for the use of

  1. Educating Chinese, Japanese, and Korean International Students: Recommendations to American Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Shelly R.

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses the unique barriers and learning difficulties encountered by Chinese, Japanese, and Korean international students when they study at institutions of higher education in the US. These learning difficulties arise because of inability of some American professors to use discourse markers, summarize at the end of lectures, write…

  2. Recommendations for liver transplantation for hepatocellular carcinoma: an international consensus conference report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clavien, Pierre-Alain; Lesurtel, Mickael; Bossuyt, Patrick M. M.; Gores, Gregory J.; Langer, Bernard; Perrier, Arnaud; Abecassis, M.; Balabaud, C.; Bhoori, S.; Breitenstein, S.; Broelsch, C.; Burra, P.; Cherqui, D.; Colombo, M.; d'Albuquerque, C.; D'Alessandro, A.; de Santibanes, E.; Dufour, J. F.; Durand, F.; Dutkowski, P.; El-Serag, H.; Fan, S. T.; Fisher, R.; Forner, A.; Fung, J.; Geier, A.; Germani, G.; Gouw, A. S. H.; Gurusamy, K.; Heaton, N.; Heim, M.; Hemming, A.; Hubscher, S.; Ichida, T.; Kahn, D.; Kew, M.; Kita, Y.; Kiuchi, T.; Kudo, M.; Lee, S. G.; Lencioni, R.; Livraghi, T.; Lodge, P.; McCaughan, G.; Madoff, D.; Marrero, J.; Mergental, H.; Merle, P.; Miksad, R.; Mornex, F.; Paradis, V.; Pestalozzi, B.; Poon, R.; Porte, R.; Prasad, K. R.; Roskams, T.; Rossi, M.; Schlitt, H.; Shaked, A.; Sherman, M.; Siegler, M.; Suh, K.; Todo, S.; Toso, C.; Trevisani, F.; Valdecasas, J. C. G.; Vauthey, J. N.; Vilgrain, V.; Villamil, F.; Wald, C.; Weber, A.; Wiesner, R.; Wright, L.; Zheng, S.; Zucman-Rossi, J.; Bertschi, V.; Clavien, P. A.; Meyer, M.; Müllhaupt, B.; Munson, A.; Lesurtel, M.; Raptis, D.; Vonlanthen, R.

    2012-01-01

    Although liver transplantation is a widely accepted treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), much controversy remains and there is no generally accepted set of guidelines. An international consensus conference was held on Dec 2-4, 2010, in Zurich, Switzerland, with the aim of reviewing current

  3. Recommendations for Using the Case Study Method in International Business Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vissak, Tiia

    2010-01-01

    The case study method has not been as frequently used in international business (IB) research as quantitative methods. Moreover, it has been sometimes misused and quite often criticized. Still, it can be very useful for understanding such complex phenomena as the internationalization process or the management of multinational enterprises. Based on…

  4. Treatment recommendations from the Eighth International Workshop on Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leblond, Véronique; Kastritis, Efstathios; Advani, Ranjana; Ansell, Stephen M; Buske, Christian; Castillo, Jorge J; García-Sanz, Ramón; Gertz, Morie; Kimby, Eva; Kyriakou, Charalampia; Merlini, Giampaolo; Minnema, Monique C; Morel, Pierre; Morra, Enrica; Rummel, Mathias; Wechalekar, Ashutosh; Patterson, Christopher J; Treon, Steven P; Dimopoulos, Meletios A

    2016-01-01

    Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM) is a distinct B-cell lymphoproliferative disorder for which clearly defined criteria for the diagnosis, initiation of therapy, and treatment strategy have been proposed as part of the consensus panels of the International Workshop on Waldenström's Macroglobulinemia

  5. Radiological protection and geological disposal. The guiding principles and recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-06-01

    The protection of humans and the environment from the dangers of radiation is an integral part of the development of deep underground disposal for the categories of radioactive waste that will remain significantly radioactive for centuries to come and in which a high level of radioactivity is concentrated. This flyer succinctly presents the concepts and principles recommended in 2013 by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), a gathering of the foremost specialists in radiological protection. Intended for the interested public, the flyer uses plain language. Those wishing to learn more are encouraged to consult the ICRP Publication 122. ICRP is an independent, international and non-governmental organisation with more than two hundred volunteer members from approximately thirty countries across six continents. They represent the leading scientists and policy makers in the field of radiological protection. Since 1928, the ICRP has been responsible for the International System of Radiological Protection used world-wide as the common basis for radiological protection policy, standards, legislation, regulation, guidelines, programmes, and practice. Recognizing the importance of geological disposal as a societal issue, the NEA Committees on Radioactive Waste Management and on Radiation Protection and Public Health offer this flyer jointly with the ICRP. The goal of a geological disposal facility is to contain and isolate the waste in order to protect humans and the environment for periods that are comparable with geological time scales. Geological disposal is recognized by international organisations as especially suited for high level radioactive waste or spent fuel in which a high level of radioactivity is concentrated and which will remain significantly radioactive for many thousands of years. Geological disposal may also be used for other long-lived wastes, especially when there is a similar need for long term protection. the ICRP has released

  6. Summary of remarks and recommendations concerning the 2nd draft revision of the IAEA transport regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report contains a summary of all the remarks and recommendations that had been received by the International Atomic Energy Agency from Member States and International Organizations on the second draft revision of the IAEA transport regulations

  7. The Application of Knowledge Management in The United States Agency for International Development ( USAID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Rosyihan Hendrawan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to find out the implementation of Knowledge Management by The United States Agency for International Development (USAID. The other goal of this study is to determine why USAID tries to develop KM. This study was done by using a literature review method with descriptive analyses. Data was collected by documents analyses. This result of the study shows that knowledge management (KM has a strategic and vital position to the existence of USAID. USAID has been Able to run continuously through the KM division specifically created to carry out a series of policies that have been determined by the USAID. As a worldwide organization, USAID has been very worth implementing its own strategic system in an effort to reach every knowledge management of the latest and dynamic information so that it can be an organization's intellectual assets for sustainability in the era of globalization. Expected with the implementation of KM system will be Able to improve the performance of the organization so that it has a competitive advantage in the face of global competition.

  8. International atomic energy agency organization (IAEA) in case of extra territorial accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Nogueira de Oliveira, C.

    2006-01-01

    This article sums up the actual activities of IAEA in terms of preparation and responses to nuclear or radiological emergencies. The Agency has established in 1986 a surveillance unit 24 h/24 h and an operational unit: the center of response to emergencies (C.R.U). The C.R.U. is the principal operational unit in charge of acting in case of nuclear emergency notification and to answer to the demand of information or help during an incident or emergency. It receives the reports of an authority of any state, on an incident and checks any report that is not confirmed. It establishes the first functional links with the state at the origin o the report and any state potentially concerned. It establishes links with W.H.O (world health organization), W.M.O.(world meteorological organization), (B.C.A.H.) the office of coordination of humanitarian affairs of united nations, the FAO ( food and agriculture organization).The principal lessons got from interventions made during real events have been the following ones: first, official information communicated by the Center for the IAEA emergency interventions have contributed to avoid the propagations of hearsay and panic, secondly a fast international cooperation and the presence of the team of IAEA center on the premises during an intervention in case of event with multi sectorial consequences are extremely important. (N.C.)

  9. A report on progress towards new recommendations. A communication from the international commission on radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, R.H.

    2001-01-01

    Throughout the hundred-year history of the uses of ionising radiation in medicine and industry there has been advice on the need to protect people from the hazards associated with exposure. Protection standards have evolved throughout this period to reflect both the scientific understanding of the biological effects of exposure and the social and ethical standards to be applied. The Main Commission of ICRP is now considering a revised, simpler approach that is based on an individual-oriented philosophy and represents a potential shift by the Commission from the past emphasis on societal-oriented criteria. The initial proposals were promulgated through IRPA and an open literature publication was published in the Journal of Radiological Protection in June 1999. On the basis of comments received and the observations presented at the IRPA 10 congress in May 2000, the Commission is beginning to develop the Nest Recommendations. The author describes the issues involved in the preparation of the Next Recommendations and indicates the process that the Commission proposed to follow. The Commission wishes there to be an on-going debate with an iteration of ideas over the next few years

  10. 22 CFR 208.610 - What procedures does the U.S. Agency for International Development use in suspension and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Principles Relating to Suspension and Debarment Actions § 208.610 What procedures does the U.S. Agency for..., we handle the actions as informally as practicable, consistent with principles of fundamental... International Development use in suspension and debarment actions? 208.610 Section 208.610 Foreign Relations...

  11. Communication of 24 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Communication of 24 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency, including a statement by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation in connection with the ratification by the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty

  12. 75 FR 968 - Notice of Public Information Collections Being Reviewed by the U.S. Agency for International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-07

    ... at [email protected] or mail comments to: Tracy Hembry, Small Disadvantage Business Specialist...., Washington, DC 20523 (202-712- 4983). FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Beverly Johnson, Bureau for Management, Office of Administrative Services, Information and Records Division, U.S. Agency for International...

  13. Methodological recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder by the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Targeting Cognition Task Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miskowiak, K W; Burdick, K E; Martinez-Aran, A

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To aid the development of treatment for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to create a consensus-based guidance paper for the methodology and design of cognition trials in bipolar disorder. METHODS...... of treatments to illness stage and using a multimodal approach. CONCLUSIONS: This ISBD task force guidance paper provides the first consensus-based recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder. Adherence to these recommendations will likely improve the sensitivity in detecting treatment efficacy...... or partly remitted patients. It is strongly encouraged that trials exclude patients with current substance or alcohol use disorders, neurological disease or unstable medical illness, and keep non-study medications stable. Additional methodological considerations include neuroimaging assessments, targeting...

  14. Reports and recommendations from COSPAR Planetary Exploration Committee (PEX) & International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Foing, Bernard

    2014-05-01

    In response to the growing importance of space exploration, the objectives of the COSPAR Panel on Exploration (PEX) are to provide high quality, independent science input to support the development of a global space exploration program while working to safeguard the scientific assets of solar system bodies. PEX engages with COSPAR Commissions and Panels, science foundations, IAA, IAF, UN bodies, and IISL to support in particular national and international space exploration working groups and the new era of planetary exploration. COSPAR's input, as gathered by PEX, is intended to express the consensus view of the international scientific community and should ultimately provide a series of guidelines to support future space exploration activities and cooperative efforts, leading to outstanding scientific discoveries, opportunities for innovation, strategic partnerships, technology progression, and inspiration for people of all ages and cultures worldwide. We shall focus on the lunar exploration aspects, where the COSPAR PEX is building on previous COSPAR, ILEWG and community conferences. An updated COSPAR PEX report is published and available online (Ehrenfreund P. et al, COSPAR planetary exploration panel report, http://www.gwu.edu/~spi/assets/COSPAR_PEX2012.pdf). We celebrate 20 years after the 1st International Conference on Exploration and Utilisation of the Moon at Beatenberg in June 1994. The International Lunar Exploration Working Group (ILEWG) was established the year after in April 1995 at an EGS meeting in Hamburg, Germany. As established in its charter, this working group reports to COSPAR and is charged with developing an international strategy for the exploration of the Moon (http://sci.esa.int/ilewg/ ). It discusses coordination between missions, and a road map for future international lunar exploration and utilisation. It fosters information exchange or potential and real future lunar robotic and human missions, as well as for new scientific and

  15. Epidemiology of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) in international travellers to Western/Central Europe and conclusions on vaccination recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffen, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) endemicity is spreading in Europe becoming an increasing health risk also for travellers. Previous reviews on TBE in civilian travellers lacked of numerator data and offered at most rough estimates on denominator data. An evidence-based quantification of the risk so far has been impossible; that resulted in fundamentally differing vaccination recommendations. A standard internet search was conducted with a focus on the data used to formulate vaccination recommendations. As TBE became notifiable at the European Union (EU) level the databases of European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) were analysed for cases imported from abroad 2012. Since these included only 19 EU countries, individual experts were contacted in countries, which had not submitted data and additional surveillance databases were investigated to obtain a comprehensive account on travel-associated TBE in Central and Western Europe. In 2012, the ECDC and other data sources included 38 reported cases of internationally acquired TBE. Basing on estimates of the exposed number of visitors, the attack rate for an undefined period of time could be very roughly extrapolated to be 0.5-1.3 per 100,000 (1 per 77,000-200.000) overall in Western/Central Europe endemic areas for the exposed at-risk population. As advised by the World Health Organization (WHO) travellers exposed outdoors in rural endemic areas to a risk of TBE during the period of transmission should be recommended immunization. In contrast, the advice to recommend TBE vaccination for all visitors of endemic areas is inappropriate. Implementation of the risk strategy is compromised by the fact that many at-risk travellers are unaware of the risk, thus they will not consult competent health professionals. Others may consult late, and in some countries of origin no TBE vaccine is marketed. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For

  16. Improving Hospital Care and Collaborative Communications for the 21st Century: Key Recommendations for General Internal Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Vivian; Rossos, Peter; Kuziemsky, Craig; O’Leary, Kevin J; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Reeves, Scott; Wong, Brian M; Morra, Dante

    2012-01-01

    Background Communication and collaboration failures can have negative impacts on the efficiency of both individual clinicians and health care system delivery as well as on the quality of patient care. Recognizing the problems associated with clinical and collaboration communication, health care professionals and organizations alike have begun to look at alternative communication technologies to address some of these inefficiencies and to improve interprofessional collaboration. Objective To develop recommendations that assist health care organizations in improving communication and collaboration in order to develop effective methods for evaluation. Methods An interprofessional meeting was held in a large urban city in Canada with 19 nationally and internationally renowned experts to discuss suitable recommendations for an ideal communication and collaboration system as well as a research framework for general internal medicine (GIM) environments. Results In designing an ideal GIM communication and collaboration system, attendees believed that the new system should possess attributes that aim to: a) improve workflow through prioritization of information and detection of individuals’ contextual situations; b) promote stronger interprofessional relationships with adequate exchange of information; c) enhance patient-centered care by allowing greater patient autonomy over their health care information; d) enable interoperability and scalability between and within institutions; and e) function across different platforms. In terms of evaluating the effects of technology in GIM settings, participants championed the use of rigorous scientific methods that span multiple perspectives and disciplines. Specifically, participants recommended that consistent measures and definitions need to be established so that these impacts can be examined across individual, group, and organizational levels. Conclusions Discussions from our meeting demonstrated the complexities of

  17. Methodological recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder by the International Society for Bipolar Disorders Targeting Cognition Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miskowiak, K W; Burdick, K E; Martinez-Aran, A; Bonnin, C M; Bowie, C R; Carvalho, A F; Gallagher, P; Lafer, B; López-Jaramillo, C; Sumiyoshi, T; McIntyre, R S; Schaffer, A; Porter, R J; Torres, I J; Yatham, L N; Young, A H; Kessing, L V; Vieta, E

    2017-12-01

    To aid the development of treatment for cognitive impairment in bipolar disorder, the International Society for Bipolar Disorders (ISBD) convened a task force to create a consensus-based guidance paper for the methodology and design of cognition trials in bipolar disorder. The task force was launched in September 2016, consisting of 18 international experts from nine countries. A series of methodological issues were identified based on literature review and expert opinion. The issues were discussed and expanded upon in an initial face-to-face meeting, telephone conference call and email exchanges. Based upon these exchanges, recommendations were achieved. Key methodological challenges are: lack of consensus on how to screen for entry into cognitive treatment trials, define cognitive impairment, track efficacy, assess functional implications, and manage mood symptoms and concomitant medication. Task force recommendations are to: (i) enrich trials with objectively measured cognitively impaired patients; (ii) generally select a broad cognitive composite score as the primary outcome and a functional measure as a key secondary outcome; and (iii) include remitted or partly remitted patients. It is strongly encouraged that trials exclude patients with current substance or alcohol use disorders, neurological disease or unstable medical illness, and keep non-study medications stable. Additional methodological considerations include neuroimaging assessments, targeting of treatments to illness stage and using a multimodal approach. This ISBD task force guidance paper provides the first consensus-based recommendations for cognition trials in bipolar disorder. Adherence to these recommendations will likely improve the sensitivity in detecting treatment efficacy in future trials and increase comparability between studies. © 2017 The Authors Bipolar Disorders Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Survey of international regulatory bioequivalence recommendations for approval of generic topical dermatological drug products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braddy, April C; Davit, Barbara M; Stier, Ethan M; Conner, Dale P

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to discuss the similarities and differences in accepted bioequivalence (BE) approaches for generic topical dermatological drug products between international regulatory authorities and organizations. These drug products are locally applied and not intended for systemic absorption. Therefore, the BE approaches which serve as surrogates to establish safety and efficacy for topical dosage forms tend to differ from the traditional solid oral dosage forms. We focused on 15 different international jurisdictions and organizations that currently participate in the International Generic Drug Regulators Pilot Project. These are Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Chinese Taipei, the European Medicines Association (EMA), Japan, Mexico, New Zealand, Singapore (a member of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations), South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, the USA and the World Health Organization (WHO). Upon evaluation, we observed that currently only Canada, the EMA, Japan, and the USA have specific guidance documents for topical drug products. Across all jurisdictions and organizations, the three approaches consistently required are (1) BE studies with clinical endpoints for most topical drug products; (2) in vivo pharmacodynamic studies, in particular the vasoconstrictor assay for topical corticosteroids; and (3) waivers from BE study requirements for topical solutions. Japan, South Africa, the USA, and the WHO are also making strides to accept other BE approaches such as in vivo pharmacokinetic studies for BE assessment, in vivo dermatopharmacokinetic studies and/or BE studies with in vitro endpoints.

  19. Recommended radiological air sampling and internal contamination control at nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rich, B.L.; Ritter, P.D.; Martz, D.E.

    1984-01-01

    It has long been recognized by the NRC Technical Staffs that estimating the quantity of radioactivity inhaled by an individual worker involved large uncertainties. General air samples usually produce concentrations lower than those in the workers Breathing Zone (BZ). NRC guides have recognized this problem by specifying air monitoring programs which sample the Breathing Zone or concentrations known to be higher than that actually inhaled. In addition the availability of suitable samplers to obtain BZ samples and the practicality of requiring their use was somewhat in question to the NRC technical staff. AN NRC development contract was issued to provide a detailed review of the technical aspects of the problems and recommendations for practical upgrade of federal guidance. This project accomplished a review of the nuclear industry experience and knowledge through a literature search, site visits to representative licensed facilities, telephone surveys of many others, laboratory testing of personal air samplers (lapel samplers) and aerosol diffusion experiments to verify key conclusions and assumptions

  20. Safety assessment guidance in the International Atomic Energy Agency RADWASS Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vovk, I.F.; Seitz, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    The IAEA RADWASS programme is aimed at establishing a coherent and comprehensive set of principles and standards for the safe management of waste and formulating the guidelines necessary for their application. A large portion of this programme has been devoted to safety assessments for various waste management activities. Five Safety Guides are planned to be developed to provide general guidance to enable operators and regulators to develop necessary framework for safety assessment process in accordance with international recommendations. They cover predisposal, near surface disposal, geological disposal, uranium/thorium mining and milling waste, and decommissioning and environmental restoration. The Guide on safety assessment for near surface disposal is at the most advanced stage of preparation. This draft Safety Guide contains guidance on description of the disposal system, development of a conceptual model, identification and description of relevant scenarios and pathways, consequence analysis, presentation of results and confidence building. The set of RADWASS publications is currently undergoing in-depth review to ensure a harmonized approach throughout the Safety Series.

  1. Introducing the Brazilian program of technical support to the International Atomic Energy Agency - Department of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinhas, Laercio A.; Palhares, Lilia C.; Dias, Fabio C.; Khlebnikov, Nikolai

    2009-01-01

    As an active Member State of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Brazil has applied substantial resources in order to maintain the best possible cooperation with the Agency, aiming at a continuous improvement of the effectiveness and efficiency of the safeguards system. Over the last decades a number of projects, involving the participation of high-level Brazilian professionals in the nuclear area, have already been jointly completed. To continue providing this voluntary support to the IAEA Department of Safeguards for research, development and implementation, in 2006 Brazil decided to accept the IAEA's invitation to participate in the IAEA Member States Support Programmes initiative, which currently includes 21 Member States. The Research and Development (R and D) Programme for Nuclear Verification is the IAEA reference in this regard, establishing the high priority needs and describing each recognized departmental project. The Programme is issued every two years. The 'Brazilian Support Programme (BRZ SP)' was established on the basis of a set of administrative procedures titled 'Cooperation Arrangements and Guidelines', agreed between the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN) and the IAEA - Department of Safeguards. The scope of the BRZ SP includes: the participation in field tests and the evaluation of state-of-the-art technologies as requested by the IAEA for its safeguards applications; the training of safeguards personnel involved with safeguards implementation at both facility and State levels; laboratorial support in the area of destructive and nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials; the analysis of safeguards issues; information acquisition, analysis and evaluation; and the provision of human resources, such as experts and consultants to work directly with the IAEA Secretariat. The activities agreed under the BRZ SP are not restricted to CNEN staff members. Professionals from other Brazilian organizations may also be involved

  2. Delphi survey of international pharmacology experts: an attempt to derive international recommendations for use of medicine in breastfeeding women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Lisa H; Ryan, Kath; Barnett, Clare

    2015-04-01

    There are currently no common guidelines used by health professionals to aid decision-making around the use of medicines during breastfeeding. Several specialized books, Web sites, and drug information services exist; however, all use slightly different criteria to derive their "safety hierarchy." The aim of this study was to build consensus among international experts in pharmacology and breastfeeding to develop an agreed-upon classification system for safety of medicine use in breastfeeding women. A three-round Web-based Delphi qualitative research design was used. Seventeen experts in pharmacy/pharmacology and breastfeeding identified 15 key parameters that are used to inform decisions about medicines and breastfeeding. The most important parameters about the infant were the age and health of the child, and those of the medicine were the safety profile and experience of use in infants. The experts had a clear understanding of the complexity of decision-making when prescribing for breastfeeding women. Although the current number or letter classification systems do not incorporate important considerations such as infant age, a longer "descriptive text" incorporating all considerations may be impractical in busy clinical practice. Although clinicians and lay people would appreciate a simple classification scheme, in practice, decision-making about the safety of medicines for breastfeeding women is complex.

  3. Report of the International Atomic Energy Agency to the General Assembly of the United Nations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1959-10-01

    The report is submitted in accordance with Article III.B.4 of the Statute and Article III of the Relationship Agreement between the two organizations and describes the important developments in the work of the Agency from 1 July 1950 to 30 June 1959. It is thus the first to cover a full year of the activities of the Agency. The important developments in the Agency's work since the report was prepared are covered briefly in this preface. The period covered is characterized by the fact that Member States began to make substantial requests to the Agency for assistance, which the Agency was able to meet. Furthermore, the Agency began to carry out its regulatory tasks, organized its first meeting, conferences and symposia, started its own research and greatly expanded the collection and publication of technical information

  4. Advancing nursing home practice: the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolson, Debbie; Morley, John E; Rolland, Yves; Vellas, Bruno

    2011-01-01

    Recognition of the urgent need to improve the provision of long-term care, as well as the known variations in standards of nursing home care around the world, prompted the International Association of Geriatrics and Gerontology (IAGG), in association with the World Health Organization (WHO), to form a task force. This task force was charged with the identification of the key concerns, research priorities, and actions that would enhance the care provided to older people in nursing homes. Nurses are equipped with the knowledge to take a leadership role in the IAGG/WHO initiative, and the task force eagerly seeks their input. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Disparity between state fish consumption advisory systems for Methylmercury and US Environmental Protection Agency recommendations: a case study of the South Central United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Kimberly; Drenner, Ray W.; Chumchal, Matthew M.; Donato, David I.

    2015-01-01

    Fish consumption advisories are used to inform citizens in the United States about noncommercial game fish with hazardous levels of methylmercury (MeHg). The US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) suggests issuing a fish consumption advisory when concentrations of MeHg in fish exceed a human health screening value of 300 ng/g. However, states have authority to develop their own systems for issuing fish consumption advisories for MeHg. Five states in the south central United States (Arkansas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas) issue advisories for the general human population when concentrations of MeHg exceed 700 ng/g to 1000 ng/g. The objective of the present study was to estimate the increase in fish consumption advisories that would occur if these states followed USEPA recommendations. The authors used the National Descriptive Model of Mercury in Fish to estimate the mercury concentrations in 5 size categories of largemouth bass–equivalent fish at 766 lentic and lotic sites within the 5 states. The authors found that states in this region have not issued site-specific fish consumption advisories for most of the water bodies that would have such advisories if USEPA recommendations were followed. One outcome of the present study may be to stimulate discussion between scientists and policy makers at the federal and state levels about appropriate screening values to protect the public from the health hazards of consuming MeHg-contaminated game fish.

  6. International Energy Agency building energy simulation test (BESTEST) and diagnostic method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    1995-01-01

    This is a report on the Building Energy Simulation Test (BESTEST) project conducted by the Model Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 12 Subtask B, and the Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems (BCS) Programme, Annex 21 Subtask C. Recognizing that the needs for model evaluation were similar in both IEA programmes, the combined Experts Group was approved by the Executive Committees in 1990. This is the first joint group organized by the respective IEA Executive Committees, and it has resulted in significant cost savings for all participating countries. The objective of this subtask has been to develop practical implementation procedures and data for an overall IEA validation methodology which has been under development by NREL since 1981, with refinements contributed by the United Kingdom. The methodology consists of a combination of empirical l validation, analytical verification, and comparative analysis techniques. This report documents a comparative testing and diagnostic procedure for thermal models related to the architectural fabric of the building. Other projects (reported elsewhere) conducted by this group include work on empirical validation, analytical verification, and comparative test cases for commercial buildings. In the BESTEST project, a method was developed for systematically testing whole-building energy simulation programs and diagnosing the sources of predictive disagreement. Field trials of the method were conducted with a number of(open q uotes)reference(close q uotes) programs selected by the participants to represent the best state-of-the-art detailed simulation capability available in the United States and Europe. These included BLAST, DOE2, ESP, SERIRES, S3PAS, TASE, and TRNSYS

  7. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: the approach adopted by the International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, K; Järvinen, H; Butler, P; McLean, I D; Pentecost, M; Rickard, M; Abdullah, B

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  8. Contribution of the Japan International Cooperation Agency health-related projects to health system strengthening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuasa, Motoyuki; Yamaguchi, Yoshie; Imada, Mihoko

    2013-09-22

    The Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) has focused its attention on appraising health development assistance projects and redirecting efforts towards health system strengthening. This study aimed to describe the type of project and targets of interest, and assess the contribution of JICA health-related projects to strengthening health systems worldwide. We collected a web-based Project Design Matrix (PDM) of 105 JICA projects implemented between January 2005 and December 2009. We developed an analytical matrix based on the World Health Organization (WHO) health system framework to examine the PDM data and thereby assess the projects' contributions to health system strengthening. The majority of JICA projects had prioritized workforce development, and improvements in governance and service delivery. Conversely, there was little assistance for finance or medical product development. The vast majority (87.6%) of JICA projects addressed public health issues, for example programs to improve maternal and child health, and the prevention and treatment of infectious diseases such as AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Nearly 90% of JICA technical healthcare assistance directly focused on improving governance as the most critical means of accomplishing its goals. Our study confirmed that JICA projects met the goals of bilateral cooperation by developing workforce capacity and governance. Nevertheless, our findings suggest that JICA assistance could be used to support financial aspects of healthcare systems, which is an area of increasing concern. We also showed that the analytical matrix methodology is an effective means of examining the component of health system strengthening to which the activity and output of a project contributes. This may help policy makers and practitioners focus future projects on priority areas.

  9. A clinical audit programme for diagnostic radiology: The Approach adopted by the international atomic energy agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, K.; Jaervinen, H.; Butler, P.; McLean, I. D.; Pentecost, M.; Rickard, M.; Abdullah, B.

    2010-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has a mandate to assist member states in areas of human health and particularly in the use of radiation for diagnosis and treatment. Clinical audit is seen as an essential tool to assist in assuring the quality of radiation medicine, particularly in the instance of multidisciplinary audit of diagnostic radiology. Consequently, an external clinical audit programme has been developed by the IAEA to examine the structure and processes existent at a clinical site, with the basic objectives of: (1) improvement in the quality of patient care; (2) promotion of the effective use of resources; (3) enhancement of the provision and organisation of clinical services; (4) further professional education and training. These objectives apply in four general areas of service delivery, namely quality management and infrastructure, patient procedures, technical procedures and education, training and research. In the IAEA approach, the audit process is initiated by a request from the centre seeking the audit. A three-member team, comprising a radiologist, medical physicist and radiographer, subsequently undertakes a 5-d audit visit to the clinical site to perform the audit and write the formal audit report. Preparation for the audit visit is crucial and involves the local clinical centre completing a form, which provides the audit team with information on the clinical centre. While all main aspects of clinical structure and process are examined, particular attention is paid to radiation-related activities as described in the relevant documents such as the IAEA Basic Safety Standards, the Code of Practice for Dosimetry in Diagnostic Radiology and related equipment and quality assurance documentation. It should be stressed, however, that the clinical audit does not have any regulatory function. The main purpose of the IAEA approach to clinical audit is one of promoting quality improvement and learning. This paper describes the background to

  10. Recommendations for strengthening the national systems and the international regime for combating of illicit trafficking. Keynote address/session 10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ek, P.; Wredberg, L.

    2001-01-01

    internal control, quality assurance, security culture and individual responsibilities; Shortage of suitable and modern equipment for monitoring and detection of radioactive material; Shortage of staff and training capabilities and insufficient financial resources concerning supervision and law enforcement authorities; Insufficient access to relevant information and data bases. A first step to improve national systems would be to assist states, by educating key-persons and authority staff, how to establish good, state-of-the-art national systems for combating of illicit trafficking, which would meet the requirements of international legal instruments, recommendations and guidelines. State Governments need to be made more aware of the seriousness of the proliferation threat and be convinced that supervision and law enforcement resources must be reinforced for bringing their national systems up to international standard. On the international level, combating of illicit trafficking would be ameliorated by improving the communication links between national authorities bi-laterally and with the international organisations. Also increased information exchange between national and international databases would improve prevention and detection capabilities. For the effective and consequent combating of illicit trafficking of nuclear material and equipment, it is, however, necessary that the international non-proliferation regime be strengthened through new initiatives and approaches. These should focus on, inter alia, a set of minimum requirements to be implemented, and to pursue, impose, follow-up and audit the implementation of those requirements into the national systems for combating of illicit trafficking. The IAEA is the recognised international organisation, both for nuclear energy promoting activities, and for the implementation of the international non-proliferation regime. The IAEA has, within its area of competence, relevant know-how and capability, including qualified

  11. Do current national and international guidelines have specific recommendations for older adults with bipolar disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dols, Annemiek; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Strejilevich, Sergio A

    2016-01-01

    a variety of sources have become available in recent years. It is expected that at least some of this emerging information on OABD would be incorporated into treatment guidelines available to clinicians around the world. METHODS: The International Society of Bipolar Disorders OABD task force compiled......OBJECTIVE: Older adults with bipolar disorder (OABD) are a growing segment of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) for which specific guidelines are warranted. Although, OABD are frequently excluded from randomized controlled trials due to their age or somatic comorbidity, more treatment data from...... mental health workforce with geriatric expertise, it is critical that additional effort and resources be devoted to studying treatment interventions specific to OABD and that treatment guidelines reflect research findings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  12. Assessment of Ki67 in Breast Cancer: Recommendations from the International Ki67 in Breast Cancer Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Torsten O.; A’Hern, Roger; Bartlett, John; Coombes, R. Charles; Cuzick, Jack; Ellis, Matthew; Henry, N. Lynn; Hugh, Judith C.; Lively, Tracy; McShane, Lisa; Paik, Soon; Penault-Llorca, Frederique; Prudkin, Ljudmila; Regan, Meredith; Salter, Janine; Sotiriou, Christos; Smith, Ian E.; Viale, Giuseppe; Zujewski, Jo Anne; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2011-01-01

    Uncontrolled proliferation is a hallmark of cancer. In breast cancer, immunohistochemical assessment of the proportion of cells staining for the nuclear antigen Ki67 has become the most widely used method for comparing proliferation between tumor samples. Potential uses include prognosis, prediction of relative responsiveness or resistance to chemotherapy or endocrine therapy, estimation of residual risk in patients on standard therapy and as a dynamic biomarker of treatment efficacy in samples taken before, during, and after neoadjuvant therapy, particularly neoadjuvant endocrine therapy. Increasingly, Ki67 is measured in these scenarios for clinical research, including as a primary efficacy endpoint for clinical trials, and sometimes for clinical management. At present, the enormous variation in analytical practice markedly limits the value of Ki67 in each of these contexts. On March 12, 2010, an international panel of investigators with substantial expertise in the assessment of Ki67 and in the development of biomarker guidelines was convened in London by the cochairs of the Breast International Group and North American Breast Cancer Group Biomarker Working Party to consider evidence for potential applications. Comprehensive recommendations on preanalytical and analytical assessment, and interpretation and scoring of Ki67 were formulated based on current evidence. These recommendations are geared toward achieving a harmonized methodology, create greater between-laboratory and between-study comparability, and allow earlier valid applications of this marker in clinical practice. PMID:21960707

  13. Towards an international authoritative system for coordination and management of a unique recommended k0-NAA database

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Corte, F.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the evolution of the database in k 0 -standardized neutron activation analysis (k 0 -NAA), ranging from its full supervision by the founders of the k 0 -method at the Institute for Nuclear Sciences (INW)/Gent and the Central Research Institute for Physics (KFKI)/Budapest (from about the mid 1970s up to the early 1990s), to the present situation (roughly speaking starting with the first k 0 Users Workshop in 1992) where an increasing number of researchers from institutes allover the world are reporting on their experimental work aiming at the improvement and extension of the existing database. Although these individual contributions are undoubtedly commendable, the resulting fragmentary data sets leave behind important questions with respect to interpretation, evaluation, integration and recommendation, as illustrated with the (extreme) example of 131 Ba. This situation urgently calls for establishing and managing an international authoritative system for the coordination and quality control of a unique database with recommended data for k 0 -NAA, considering such parameters as accuracy, traceability and consistency. In the present paper, it is proposed to entrust this task to a standing 'Reference k 0 -Data Subcommittee' of the k 0 -ISC (k 0 International Scientific Committee).

  14. Reporting and Staging of Testicular Germ Cell Tumors: The International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) Testicular Cancer Consultation Conference Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verrill, Clare; Yilmaz, Asli; Srigley, John R; Amin, Mahul B; Compérat, Eva; Egevad, Lars; Ulbright, Thomas M; Tickoo, Satish K; Berney, Daniel M; Epstein, Jonathan I

    2017-06-01

    The International Society of Urological Pathology held a conference devoted to issues in testicular and penile pathology in Boston in March 2015, which included a presentation and discussion led by the testis microscopic features working group. This conference focused on controversies related to staging and reporting of testicular tumors and was preceded by an online survey of the International Society of Urological Pathology members. The survey results were used to initiate discussions, but decisions were made by expert consensus rather than voting. A number of recommendations emerged from the conference, including that lymphovascular invasion (LVI) should always be reported and no distinction need be made between lymphatic or blood invasion. If LVI is equivocal, then it should be regarded as negative to avoid triggering unnecessary therapy. LVI in the spermatic cord is considered as category pT2, not pT3, unless future studies provide contrary evidence. At the time of gross dissection, a block should be taken just superior to the epididymis to define the base of the spermatic cord, and direct invasion of tumor in this block indicates a category of pT3. Pagetoid involvement of the rete testis epithelium must be distinguished from rete testis stromal invasion, with only the latter being prognostically useful. Percentages of different tumor elements in mixed germ cell tumors should be reported. Although consensus was reached on many issues, there are still areas of practice that need further evidence on which to base firm recommendations.

  15. Building a robust 21st century chemical testing program at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency: recommendations for strengthening scientific engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPartland, Jennifer; Dantzker, Heather C; Portier, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Biological pathway-based chemical testing approaches are central to the National Research Council's vision for 21st century toxicity testing. Approaches such as high-throughput in vitro screening offer the potential to evaluate thousands of chemicals faster and cheaper than ever before and to reduce testing on laboratory animals. Collaborative scientific engagement is important in addressing scientific issues arising in new federal chemical testing programs and for achieving stakeholder support of their use. We present two recommendations specifically focused on increasing scientific engagement in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ToxCast™ initiative. Through these recommendations we seek to bolster the scientific foundation of federal chemical testing efforts such as ToxCast™ and the public health decisions that rely upon them. Environmental Defense Fund works across disciplines and with diverse groups to improve the science underlying environmental health decisions. We propose that the U.S. EPA can strengthen the scientific foundation of its new chemical testing efforts and increase support for them in the scientific research community by a) expanding and diversifying scientific input into the development and application of new chemical testing methods through collaborative workshops, and b) seeking out mutually beneficial research partnerships. Our recommendations provide concrete actions for the U.S. EPA to increase and diversify engagement with the scientific research community in its ToxCast™ initiative. We believe that such engagement will help ensure that new chemical testing data are scientifically robust and that the U.S. EPA gains the support and acceptance needed to sustain new testing efforts to protect public health.

  16. Food fortification to reduce vitamin A deficiency: International Vitamin A Consultative Group recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dary, Omar; Mora, Jose O

    2002-09-01

    In developed countries, food fortification has proven an effective and low-cost way to increase the micronutrient supply and reduce the consequences of micronutrient deficiencies. It has been rarely used in the developing world, but general conclusions can be drawn. The biological efficacy, but not the effectiveness, of fortifying oil and hydrogenated oil products as well as cereal flours and meals with vitamin A has been shown. Sugar has been fortified with vitamin A in Central American countries for years, and biological efficacy and program effectiveness are well established. Efficacy of fortifying monosodium glutamate with vitamin A was demonstrated but a program has not been established. Fortification with vitamin A in the developing world should satisfy certain elements for success. a) A potential food matrix (a food regularly consumed, produced by a few centralized factories, without sensorial changes compared with the nonfortified equivalent, and nutrient remains bioavailable and in a sufficient amount) is required. b) Fortified foods should provide at least 15% of the recommended daily intakes for the target group (e.g., individuals consuming the lowest amount of the fortified food). c) Voluntary fortification of processed foods should be regulated to prevent excessive consumption of vitamin A. d) Neighboring countries should harmonize technical standards, facilitate compliance and minimize conflicts over global trade laws. e) A practical monitoring system should be instituted. f) Social marketing activities should be permanent and aimed at industry, government and consumers. g) Food fortification should be combined with other strategies (e.g., supplementation) to reach those not adequately covered by fortification alone. Infants and small children, whose dietary habits differ from those of adults, require special attention. Fortification of food commodities is a very attractive and economic way to prevent and control vitamin A deficiency. Effective food

  17. Do current national and international guidelines have specific recommendations for older adults with bipolar disorder? A brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dols, Annemiek; Kessing, Lars Vedel; Strejilevich, Sergio A; Rej, Soham; Tsai, Shang-Ying; Gildengers, Ariel G; Almeida, Osvaldo P; Shulman, Kenneth I; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-12-01

    Older adults with bipolar disorder (OABD) are a growing segment of patients with bipolar disorder (BD) for which specific guidelines are warranted. Although, OABD are frequently excluded from randomized controlled trials due to their age or somatic comorbidity, more treatment data from a variety of sources have become available in recent years. It is expected that at least some of this emerging information on OABD would be incorporated into treatment guidelines available to clinicians around the world. The International Society of Bipolar Disorders OABD task force compiled and compared recommendations from current national and international guidelines that specifically address geriatric or older individuals with BD (from year 2005 onwards). There were 34 guidelines, representing six continents and 19 countries. The majority of guidelines had no separate section on OABD. General principles for treating OABD with medication are recommended to be similar to those for younger adults, with special caution for side effects due to somatic comorbidity and concomitant medications. Therapeutic lithium serum levels are suggested to be lower but recommendations are very general and mostly not informed by specific research evidence. There is a lack of emphasis of OABD-specific issues in existing guidelines. Given the substantial clinical heterogeneity in BD across the life span, along with the rapidly expanding population of older individuals worldwide, and limited mental health workforce with geriatric expertise, it is critical that additional effort and resources be devoted to studying treatment interventions specific to OABD and that treatment guidelines reflect research findings. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. New IUPAC (International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry) recommendations on the measurement of pH - background and essentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baucke, Friedrich G K

    2002-11-01

    The IUPAC Recommendations on pH (1985) have serious metrological deficiencies (recommendation of two pH scales and of several pH definitions and procedures to measure pH). Background and essential features of new recommendations, which replace the 1985 document, are reported in this paper. The new document is strictly based on metrological principles. pH is defined (notionally) by the negative logarithm of the hydrogen ion activity according to Sørensen and Linderstrøm-Lang (1924), that is pH=-lg a(H). Because pH is a single ion quantity it is immeasurable and is therefore experimentally verified, with stated uncertainties, by pH(PS) values of primary standard buffer solutions. The assignment of pH(PS) is carried out in a Harned cell (without transference), which is defined as a primary method of measurement, and involves the Bates-Guggenheim convention. pH(PS) is thus a conventional quantity. Consideration of the uncertainty of the Bates-Guggenhein convention, however, permits its incorporation into the internationally accepted SI system of measurement. Comparison of the pH of secondary buffer solutions with pH(PS) values in recommended cells with transference yields secondary standards, whose pH(SS) can be traced back to pH(PS) and consequently to the definition of pH. The traceability chain is continued "downwards" by practical cells with transference containing glass electrodes for the measurement of pH(X) values of unknown solutions, for which three calibration procedures are recommended. The measurement of pH is thus represented by the traceability chain pH(X)-->pH(SS)-->pH(PS)-->pH as defined, each step having stated uncertainties. This hierarchical system of measurement excludes any pH 'scale'. Tabulated pH(PS) values are given as examples, and it is recommended that actual pH(PS) and pH(SS) be taken from certificates, which are to accompany each lot of certified reference material (CRM). Target uncertainties and examples of their calculation, a sign

  19. Climate and pollution agency #En Dash# International projects and partnerships 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-03-01

    The report describes the agency's work with partners, mainly authorities in other countries, to implement regional and bilateral programs and projects that reduce the impacts on the environment.(Author)

  20. Decommissioning: Strategies and programmes at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laraia, M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has included decommissioning in its regular programmes since 1985. Until a few years ago, attention was focused on the decommissioning of nuclear power plants, and to a lesser extent, research reactors. Some countries, however, are now devoting greater attention to the decommissioning of non-reactor facilities, with implementation of these programmes being seen as a high priority. This demanded equal attention in IAEA's programmes. In recent years, the IAEA has expanded its programmes to include guidance on decommissioning of small medical, industrial and research facilities which are prevailing in most of its over 130 Member States. By 2010-2020, a significant number of nuclear power plants, research reactors, fuel cycle and non-reactor facilities will have exceeded their normal design lifetimes. Many of these facilities are already shutdown and are awaiting decommissioning. In 1996, the IAEA organized the decommissioning programme along two directions. A first direction focuses on the safety of management of radioactive waste including decommissioning. A second direction focuses on the technology and strategies to support waste management and decommissioning activities. This split of activities was instituted in order to keep the regulatory aspects separated from the strategic and technology-related activities. The focus of this paper will be on current and foreseen activities related to strategies and technologies of decommissioning, but other activities will be touched upon as well. All technical divisions of the IAEA provide technical support for Technical Co-operation (TC) projects with developing countries. TC projects in the field of decommissioning are given separate coverage in this paper. The IAEA documents on decommissioning strategies and technologies are presented in Section 2. Technical Co-operation Programme concerning Decommissioning is discussed focusing the objectives, the specific projects and the

  1. Diplomatic agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    diplomatic agency has been conceptualized in International Relations theory (English School, game theory, Foreign Policy Analysis, constructivism, practice theory, post-positivism) before presenting and exemplifying major and overlapping types of diplomatic agency, including communication, negotiation......, it discusses how diplomatic agency is linked to conceptions of diplomatic representation and legitimacy in its actual, functional and symbolic forms....

  2. Communication of 15 May 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Peru to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Secretariat of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received the attached note verbale of 15 May 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Peru transmitting comments on statements made by the Director of the Atomic Energy Commission of the Republic of Ecuador, concerning possible diversion of Peruvian nuclear technology for non-peaceful purposes. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Peru, the text of the note verbale is circulated to the Member States

  3. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation. Industrial applications. Plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1990-2002. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-08-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Power and Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Waste Management, and issued during the period 1 January 1990 and 31 July 2002. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English, though some are also available in other languages than English

  4. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1986-1997. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-06-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with nuclear power, nuclear fuel cycle and waste management and issued during the period of 1986-1997. Some earlier titles which form part of an established series or are still considered of importance have been included. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain papers in languages other than English, but all of these papers have abstracts in English

  5. Communication of 17 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Communication of 17 April 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency, including a statement by the Acting President of the Russian Federation in connection with the ratification by the State Duma of the Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation of START-II Treaty and the package agreements on antimissile defence of 1997

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency consultants' meeting on Analytical Quality Control Services, Vienna, 17-19 September 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-10-01

    An International Atomic Energy Agency Consultants' Meeting on Analytical Quality Control Services was held at the Vienna International Center 17-19 September 1990. The Consultants generally conclude that the current methods of the preparation of the materials for intercomparison studies and facilities are adequate for the current Agency mission for trace element and radionuclide materials, but it is suggested that freeze-drying facilities for biological materials are needed. This is critically important for many of the collected materials uniquely important to the Agency mission. Also new equipment for automated sieving analysis be acquired for some applications. Homogeneity testing performed by AQCS includes the determination of several trace elements (radionuclides) of different concentrations of several sub-samples taken from one bottle and the results are compared with those obtained for sub-samples taken from various bottles chosen at random using one way analysis of variance. This procedure is found to be appropriate and could be used further. TC and CRP should be promoted in relation to the development of reliable analytical methods for the determination of so called ''difficult elements'' like: Mo, Al, I, F, Li, Co, Cd and Ni as well as 237 Np, 226 Ra, 228 Ra. Intercomparison runs should stay open to the whole international community although it would be desirable to consult ''reference labs'' for the certification of selected (''difficult'') analytes. The presently employed programme for intercomparison studies for data evaluation are valuable and suitable. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Agreement of 13 December 1991 between the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The text of the Agreement (and the Protocol thereto) between the Republic of Argentina, the Federative Republic of Brazil, the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 7 December 1991 and signed in Vienna on 13 December 1991

  8. 78 FR 31578 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-24

    ... Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: International Terrorism Victim Compensation... Form/Collection: International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program (ITVERP) Application. (3.... The Office for Victims of Crime, Office of Justice Programs, United States Department of Justice is...

  9. International Osteoporosis Foundation and European Calcified Tissue Society Working Group. Recommendations for the screening of adherence to oral bisphosphonates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diez-Perez, Adolfo; Naylor, K E; Abrahamsen, B

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to oral bisphosphonates is low. A screening strategy is proposed based on the response of biochemical markers of bone turnover after 3 months of therapy. If no change is observed, the clinician should reassess the adherence to the treatment and also other potential issues with the drug....... INTRODUCTION: Low adherence to oral bisphosphonates is a common problem that jeopardizes the efficacy of treatment of osteoporosis. No clear screening strategy for the assessment of compliance is widely accepted in these patients. METHODS: The International Osteoporosis Foundation and the European Calcified...... bisphosphonates for osteoporosis. The findings of the TRIO study specifically address this question and were used as the basis for testing the hypothesis. RESULTS: Based on the findings of the TRIO study, specifically addressing this question, the working group recommends measuring PINP and CTX at baseline and 3...

  10. Co-operation Agreement. The Text of the Agreement of 25 May 1998 between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The text of the Co-operation Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Brazilian-Argentine Agency for Accounting and Control of Nuclear Materials is reproduced herein for the information of all Members. The Agreement entered into force on 25 May 1998, pursuant to Article 8 [es

  11. The text of the Agreement of 16 May 1986 between the Government of Monaco and the Agency concerning the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity and the privileges and immunities of the Agency within the Principality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The document reproduces the Seat Agreement between the Government of Monaco and the Agency concerning the International Laboratory of Marine Radioactivity and defining the privileges and immunities of the Agency in Monaco, as approved by the Board of Governors of the IAEA In September 1985 and signed on 16 May 1985. The agreement entered into force on 17 October 1986

  12. 78 FR 38957 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Comment Request; Trends in International Mathematics...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ...; Comment Request; Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS): 2015 Recruitment and Field... of Collection: Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS): 2015 Recruitment and... Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) is an international assessment of fourth and eighth grade students...

  13. 78 FR 15047 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Proposed Collection; Comments Requested: International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ...: International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program Application ACTION: 60-Day Notice. The Department...) The title of the form/collection: International Terrorism Victim Expense Reimbursement Program (ITVERP.... Government employees who are victims of acts of international terrorism that occur(red) outside of the United...

  14. DNA Commission of the International Society for Forensic Genetics (ISFG): an update of the recommendations on the use of Y-STRs in forensic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gusmão, L; Butler, J M; Carracedo, A

    2006-01-01

    The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y-chromosome po......The DNA Commission of the International Society of Forensic Genetics (ISFG) regularly publishes guidelines and recommendations concerning the application of DNA polymorphisms to the problems of human identification. A previous recommendation published in 2001 has already addressed Y......-chromosome polymorphisms, with particular emphasis on short tandem repeats (STRs). Since then, the use of Y-STRs has become very popular, and numerous new loci have been introduced. The current recommendations address important aspects to clarify problems regarding the nomenclature, the definition of loci and alleles...

  15. International Atomic Energy Agency annual report 2007: 50 years of atoms for peace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    The Annual Report reviews the results of the Agency's programme according to the three pillars of technology, safety and verification. The main part of the report generally follows the programme structure as given in The Agency's Programme and Budget 2006-2007 (GC(49)/2). The introductory chapter seeks to provide a thematic analysis, based on the three pillars, of the Agency's activities within the overall context of notable developments during the year. More detailed information can be found in the latest editions of the Agency's Nuclear Safety Review, Nuclear Technology Review, Technical Cooperation Report and the Safeguards Statement for 2007 and Background to the Safeguards Statement. For the convenience of readers, these documents are available on the CD-ROM attached to the inside back cover of this report. Additional information covering various aspects of the Agency's programme is provided on the attached CD-ROM, and is also available on the Agency's web site at http://www.iaea.org/Worldatom/Documents/Anrep/Anrep2007/. Except where indicated, all sums of money are expressed in United States dollars. The designations employed and the presentation of material in this document do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Secretariat concerning the legal status of any country or territory or of its authorities, or concerning the delimitation of its frontiers. The topics covered in the chapter related to technology are: nuclear power; nuclear fuel cycle and materials technologies; capacity building and nuclear knowledge maintenance for sustainable energy development; nuclear science; food and agriculture; human health; water resources; assessment and management of marine and terrestrial environments; radioisotope production and radiation technology; safety and security; incident and emergency preparedness and response; safety of nuclear installations; radiation and transport safety; management of radioactive waste; nuclear security

  16. Children with epilepsy in Africa: recommendations from the International Child Neurology Association/African Child Neurology Association Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmshurst, Jo M; Cross, J Helen; Newton, Charles; Kakooza, Angelina M; Wammanda, Robinson D; Mallewa, Macpherson; Samia, Pauline; Venter, Andre; Hirtz, Deborah; Chugani, Harry

    2013-05-01

    This article presents key findings from the International Child Neurology Association/African Child Neurology Association Workshop. The viability of international guidelines for the management of children with epilepsy should be reviewed within each African country, and adapted to comply with the regional capacity. Such recommendations can be used to lobby for resources. More training centers should be developed in Africa, so that specialists can be trained within Africa, in skills relevant to the continent, in collaboration with "out of Africa" visiting-specialists to develop the concept of "train the trainers." At least 1 child neurology specialist per 100,000 of the population is required. Specific to Africa are the challenges from stigma, prejudice, and misconceptions. "Epilepsy teams," inclusive of the traditional healers, would enable management of increased numbers of children, and challenge policy such that it is the right of the child with epilepsy to have reliable access to appropriate antiepileptic drugs, support, and health care equity between the rural and urban settings.

  17. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Program. Part 2: Analysis of Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Ordonez, Felix Barajas; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency has developed a program, named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), to help its Member States to check the status of their nuclear medicine practices and their adherence to international reference standards, covering all aspects of nuclear medicine, including quality assurance/quality control of instrumentation, radiopharmacy (further subdivided into levels 1, 2, and 3, according to complexity of work), radiation safety, clinical applications, as well as managerial aspects. The QUANUM program is based on both internal and external audits and, with specifically developed Excel spreadsheets, it helps assess the level of conformance (LoC) to those previously defined quality standards. According to their level of implementation, the level of conformance to requested standards; 0 (absent) up to 4 (full conformance). Items scored 0, 1, and 2 are considered non-conformance; items scored 3 and 4 are considered conformance. To assess results of the audit missions performed worldwide over the last 8 years, a retrospective analysis has been run on reports from a total of 42 audit missions in 39 centers, three of which had been re-audited. The analysis of all audit reports has shown an overall LoC of 73.9 ± 8.3% (mean ± standard deviation), ranging between 56.6% and 87.9%. The highest LoC has been found in the area of clinical services (83.7% for imaging and 87.9% for therapy), whereas the lowest levels have been found for Radiopharmacy Level 2 (56.6%); Computer Systems and Data Handling (66.6%); and Evaluation of the Quality Management System (67.6%). Prioritization of non-conformances produced a total of 1687 recommendations in the final audit report. Depending on the impact on safety and daily clinical activities, they were further classified as critical (requiring immediate action; n = 276; 16% of the total); major (requiring action in relatively short time, typically from 3 to 6 months; n = 604

  18. Summary remarks and recommended reactions for an international data file for dosimetry applications for LWR, FBR, and MFR reactor research, development and testing programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McElroy, W.N.; Lippincott, E.P.; Grundl, J.A.; Fabry, A.; Dierckx, R.; Farinelli, U.

    1979-01-01

    The need for the use of an internationally accepted data file for dosimetry applications for light water reactor (LWR), fast breeder reactor (FBR), and magnetic fusion reactor (MFR) research, development, and testing programs continues to exist for the Nuclear Industry. The work of this IAEA meeting, therefore, will be another important step in achieving consensus agreement on an internationally recommended file and its purpose, content, structure, selected reactions, and associated uncertainy files. Summary remarks and a listing of recommended reactions for consideration in the formulation of an ''International Data File for Dosimetry Applications'' are presented in subsequent sections of this report

  19. People who perceive themselves as active cannot identify the intensity recommended by the international physical activity guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokop NW

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Neal W Prokop,1 Travis JR Hrubeniuk,1 Martin Sénéchal,2,3 Danielle R Bouchard1,4 1Faculty of Kinesiology and Recreation Management, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 2Manitoba Institute of Child Health, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 3Department of Pediatrics and Child Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada; 4Health, Leisure, and Human Performance Research Institute, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Background: Many national and international organizations recommend that adults achieve at least 150 minutes of aerobic physical activity (PA weekly, at a minimum moderate intensity to optimize health benefits. It is unknown if people who consider themselves as active have the ability to identify what is considered moderate intensity. Methods: Fifty-one participants who reported achieving a minimum 150 minutes per week at a minimum of moderate intensity PA were recruited through a local fitness facility. All participants underwent a single assessment involving questionnaires, clinical measures, and a treadmill test to measure the ability to perceive moderate intensity. Following the visit, participants' PA level was evaluated by heart rate monitor, while exercising, for 7 consecutive days. Results: Eighty percent of participants overestimated moderate intensity on the treadmill test; they were at vigorous intensity compared to what is considered moderate. Only 11.8% of participants accurately identified moderate intensity; all of them were women (P=0.03, had a high level of education (P=0.04, and knew that moderate intensity was the minimum intensity recommended by health organizations (P<0.01. Only 69.2% of participants reached the aerobic component of the International Physical Activity Guidelines with no significant advantage for those correctly identifying moderate intensity. Conclusion: Most people who perceive themselves as active are exercising at vigorous intensity while believing they are

  20. The International Atomic Energy Agency's Laboratories Seibersdorf and Vienna. Meeting the challenges of research and international co-operation in the application of nuclear techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krippl, E.

    1999-08-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency therefore maintains a unique, multidisciplinary, analytical, research and training centre: the IAEA Laboratories, located at Seibersdorf near Vienna and at the Agency's Headquarters in the Vienna International Centre. They are organized in three branches: (i) the FAO/IAEA Agriculture and Biotechnology Laboratory: Soil Science, Plant Breeding, Animal Production and Health, Entomology, Agrochemicals; (ii) the Physics, Chemistry and Instrumentation Laboratory: Chemistry, Instrumentation, Dosimetry, Isotope Hydrology; (iii) the Safeguards Analytical Laboratory: Isotopic Analysis, Chemical Analysis, Clean Laboratory. 'The Mission of the IAEA Laboratories is to contribute to the implementation of the Agency's programmes in food and agriculture, human health, physical and chemical sciences, water resources, industry, environment, radiation protection and safeguards verification'. Together with a General Services and Safety Section, which provides logistics, information, industrial safety and maintenance services and runs a mechanical workshop, the three groups form the 'Seibersdorf Laboratories' and are part of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications. The Laboratories contribute an important share to projects fostering peaceful applications of radiation and isotopes and radiation protection, and play a significant part in the nuclear verification mechanism. All activities are therefore planned and implemented in close co-operation with relevant divisions and departments of the IAEA. In specific sectors, the Laboratories also operate in conjunction with other organizations in the UN system, such as the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the World Health Organization (WHO) and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), and with networks of national laboratories in Member States

  1. CSAIO – a progressive tool at the service of staff associations of international organizations and European agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Every year in autumn, a two-day CSAIO (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations) conference is organized for staff associations of international organizations based mainly in Europe, as well as European agencies. Creation, objectives and progress CSAIO, created by the staff associations of CERN and OECD in 2000, invites about 30 staff associations to share their experiences and ideas to better identify the expectations and aspirations of a personnel evolving at the heart of international and European organizations. Over time, the preparation of the conference has evolved to better accommodate the requests of the staff representatives coming from different horizons. For two years, there has been an initiative to institutionalize the informal follow-up, during the first half-day of the conference, of themes discussed the previous year. This follow-up allows participants to share their experience on the implementation and impacts of certain propositions as reflected in their organizations ...

  2. "Educating the educators" guidelines for education in radiation medicine: a pragmatic approach at International Atomic Energy Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ros, Soveacha; Chhem, Rethy K

    2013-05-01

    Drawing on the experience of the Division of Human Health within the Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, we explore "educating the educators" guidelines for planning, developing, implementing, and evaluating education and training programs in radiation medicine for the International Atomic Energy Agency's Member States. The guidelines are based on a pragmatic approach to strengthen an internal quality-assurance framework. This article is based on the consultants' meetings and reports, participatory observations, bi monthly capacity-building sessions, and informal communication with staff members of the Division of Human Health, held between December 2009 and August 2012. This article contributes to the theoretical and practical applications of "educating the educators" philosophy as continuously cultivated in an international organization that transforms itself as a learning organization. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Health research funding agencies' support and promotion of knowledge translation: an international study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tetroe, J.M.; Graham, I.D.; Foy, R.; Robinson, N.; Eccles, M.P.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Durieux, P.; Legare, F.; Nielson, C.P.; Adily, A.; Ward, J.E.; Porter, C.; Shea, B.; Grimshaw, J.

    2008-01-01

    CONTEXT: The process of knowledge translation (KT) in health research depends on the activities of a wide range of actors, including health professionals, researchers, the public, policymakers, and research funders. Little is known, however, about health research funding agencies' support and

  4. International Atomic Energy Agency publications. Publications catalogue 2001-2002, including IAEA technical documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-09-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the IAEA issued and forthcoming between January 2001 and September 2002. Most Agency publications are issued in English, though some are also available in Arabic, Chinese, French, Russian or Spanish. The lists all publications by subject category, in alphabetical order within each category

  5. Deficits in agency in schizophrenia, and additional deficits in body image, body schema and internal timing, in passivity symptoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyran Trent Graham

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Individuals with schizophrenia, particularly those with passivity symptoms, may not feel in control of their actions, believing them to be controlled by external agents. Cognitive operations that contribute to these symptoms may include abnormal processing in agency, as well as body representations that deal with body schema and body image. However, these operations in schizophrenia are not fully understood, and the questions of general versus specific deficits in individuals with different symptom profiles remain unanswered. Using the projected hand illusion (a digital video version of the rubber hand illusion with syn-chronous and asynchronous stroking (500 ms delay, and a hand laterality judgment task, we assessed sense of agency, body image and body schema in 53 people with clinically stable schizophrenia (with a current, past, and no history of passivity symptoms and 48 healthy controls. The results revealed a stable trait in schizophrenia with no difference be-tween clinical subgroups (sense of agency, and some quantitative (specific differences de-pending on the passivity symptom profile (body image and body schema. Specifically, a reduced sense of self-agency was a common feature of all clinical subgroups. However, subgroup comparisons showed that individuals with passivity symptoms (both current and past had significantly greater deficits on tasks assessing body image and body schema, relative to the other groups. In addition, patients with current passivity symptoms failed to demonstrate the normal reduction in body illusion typically seen with a 500 ms delay in visual feedback (asynchronous condition, suggesting internal timing problems. Altogether, the results underscore self-abnormalities in schizophrenia, provide evidence for both trait abnormalities and state changes specific to passivity symptoms, and point to a role for internal timing deficits as a mechanistic explanation for external cues becoming a possible source of self

  6. The withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has informed the Government of the United States of America, as depository of the Agency's Statute, in a diplomatic note dated 13 June 1994, that the Government of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea has decided to withdraw from the IAEA as of 13 June 1994. The Director General of the IAEA was notified of this withdrawal by a letter dated 15 June 1994 from the Resident Representative of the United States of America to the IAEA. The text of this letter and the enclosed diplomatic note from the DPRK are attached hereto. In accordance with Article XVIII, D of the Statute, the Board of Governors was informed on 15 June 1994 (GOV/INF/748). In compliance with the request of the Resident Representative of the United States of America, the Member States of the Agency are informed by this INFCIRC

  7. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-07-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  8. Science serving people. International Atomic Energy Agency technical co-operation for development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    This brochure tells the story of how the IAEA is helping to harness knowledge to promote development and deliver real benefits to the poor. It demonstrates how nuclear science and technology applications are being employed to overcome the challenges of water scarcity, food insecurity, malnutrition, malaria, environmental degradation and many other problems. It also shows how the complementary development, safety, and security initiatives of the IAEA are fulfilling the 'Atoms for Peace' mandate of the Agency in the developing world

  9. Nuclear non-proliferation states urged to conclude Safeguards Agreement with International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The document contains a brief presentation of the annual report of the IAEA, the statement of the Director General of the IAEA at the General Assembly Plenary with emphasis on Agency's actions to strengthen safeguards, and statements made by the representatives of Brazil, Finland, Mexico, United States, Lithuania, Cuba, Czech Republic, Japan, Egypt, Ukraine, South Africa, India, Myanmar, and the Russian Federation at the 46th Meeting, on 4 November 1999

  10. Communications dated 2 and 6 June 1994 received from the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The texts of two telex communications, dated 2 and 6 June 1994, which the International Atomic Energy Agency received from the General Department of Atomic Energy of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea are being circulated to all Member States of the Agency at the request of the Permanent Mission of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea. These texts were received by the Secretariat before the withdrawal of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea from the Agency

  11. Many Infants and Young Children Are Not Compliant with Mexican and International Complementary Feeding Recommendations for Milk and Other Beverages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myriam C. Afeiche

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Mexican and international authorities provide guidelines for milk and beverage consumption for young children. This study classifies beverages as appropriate or inappropriate by age (0–5.9, 6–11.9, and 12–23.9 months and details consumption patterns, amounts consumed, and the associated socio-demographic characteristics. Analysis of the Mexican National Nutrition and Health Survey (ENSANUT 2012 was conducted (n = 949. Among 0–5.9 month olds, 66.7% consumed either breast milk, infant formula, or a combination with no other beverages, whereas 29.3% consumed breast milk and/or infant formula with water (mean = 58 g/day and/or other beverages (mean = 115 g/day, such as 100% fruit juice, milk, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs. For infants 6–11.9 months, appropriate beverages include breast milk, infant formula, and water; only 40.2% met these recommendations. Many 6–11.9 month olds consumed age-inappropriate beverages, including milk (31% and SSBs (35%. After 12 months of age, appropriate beverages include water, milk, and a limited amount of 100% fruit juice and SSBs; 32.4% complied fully, 18.3% consumed appropriate and inappropriate beverages, and 49.3% consumed only inappropriate beverages. Among 12–23.9 month olds, 58% consumed milk, 18% juice, and 42% water while 63% consumed SSBs. Many infants and young children are not compliant with Mexican and international breastfeeding and complementary feeding guidelines for beverages. Communication and guidance about age-appropriate beverages should be improved.

  12. Many Infants and Young Children Are Not Compliant with Mexican and International Complementary Feeding Recommendations for Milk and Other Beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afeiche, Myriam C; Villalpando-Carrión, Salvador; Reidy, Kathleen C; Fries, Lisa R; Eldridge, Alison L

    2018-04-10

    Mexican and international authorities provide guidelines for milk and beverage consumption for young children. This study classifies beverages as appropriate or inappropriate by age (0-5.9, 6-11.9, and 12-23.9 months) and details consumption patterns, amounts consumed, and the associated socio-demographic characteristics. Analysis of the Mexican National Nutrition and Health Survey (ENSANUT 2012) was conducted ( n = 949). Among 0-5.9 month olds, 66.7% consumed either breast milk, infant formula, or a combination with no other beverages, whereas 29.3% consumed breast milk and/or infant formula with water (mean = 58 g/day) and/or other beverages (mean = 115 g/day), such as 100% fruit juice, milk, and sugar-sweetened beverages (SSBs). For infants 6-11.9 months, appropriate beverages include breast milk, infant formula, and water; only 40.2% met these recommendations. Many 6-11.9 month olds consumed age-inappropriate beverages, including milk (31%) and SSBs (35%). After 12 months of age, appropriate beverages include water, milk, and a limited amount of 100% fruit juice and SSBs; 32.4% complied fully, 18.3% consumed appropriate and inappropriate beverages, and 49.3% consumed only inappropriate beverages. Among 12-23.9 month olds, 58% consumed milk, 18% juice, and 42% water while 63% consumed SSBs. Many infants and young children are not compliant with Mexican and international breastfeeding and complementary feeding guidelines for beverages. Communication and guidance about age-appropriate beverages should be improved.

  13. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation, industrial applications, plasma physics and nuclear fusion 1986-1996. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-03-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques, and Instrumentation, Industrial Applications, Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1986-1996. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia and panels of experts may contain some papers in languages other than English (French, Russian or Spanish), but all of these papers have abstracts in English. Contents cover the three main areas of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactor and Particle Accelerator Applications, and Nuclear Data), (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, and Tracers), and (iii) Plasma Physics and Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion

  14. International Energy Agency (IEA): Implementing Agreement for Co-operation in the Research and Development of Wind Turbine Systems (IEA Wind)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinclair, Karin C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-15

    This fact sheet covers the work that is being done via the International Energy Agency Task 34 (WREN). The fact sheet highlights the objective, strategy, primary activities, members, and contacts for this task.

  15. Communication of 27 March 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Cuba to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter of 27 March 1995 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Cuba informing the Agency that the Government of the Republic of Cuba signed the Treaty for the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in Latin America and the Caribbean (Tlatelolco Treaty) on 25 March 1995

  16. Clinical Orofacial Examination in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: International Consensus-based Recommendations for Monitoring Patients in Clinical Practice and Research Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoustrup, Peter; Twilt, Marinka; Spiegel, Lynn; Kristensen, Kasper Dahl; Koos, Bernd; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Küseler, Annelise; Cron, Randy Q; Abramowicz, Shelly; Verna, Carlalberta; Peltomäki, Timo; Alstergren, Per; Petty, Ross; Ringold, Sarah; Nørholt, Sven Erik; Saurenmann, Rotraud K; Herlin, Troels

    2017-03-01

    To develop international consensus-based recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), for use in clinical practice and research. Using a sequential phased approach, a multidisciplinary task force developed and evaluated a set of recommendations for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA. Phase 1: A Delphi survey was conducted among 40 expert physicians and dentists with the aim of identifying and ranking the importance of items for inclusion. Phase 2: The task force developed consensus about the domains and items to be included in the recommendations. Phase 3: A systematic literature review was performed to assess the evidence supporting the consensus-based recommendations. Phase 4: An independent group of orofacial and JIA experts were invited to assess the content validity of the task force's recommendations. Five recommendations were developed to assess the following 5 domains: medical history, orofacial symptoms, muscle and temporomandibular joint function, orofacial function, and dentofacial growth. After application of data search criteria, 56 articles were included in the systematic review. The level of evidence for the 5 recommendations was derived primarily from descriptive studies, such as cross-sectional and case-control studies. Five recommendations are proposed for the orofacial examination of patients with JIA to improve the clinical practice and aid standardized data collection for future studies. The task force has formulated a future research program based on the proposed recommendations.

  17. Medical-professional control of internal exposure to radionuclides in base nuclear installations. Extract from recommendations elaborated according to the methodological guide 'Recommendations for clinical practice' published by the Health High Authority in July 2011 - Occupational health references Nr 130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrinier, Anne-Laure; Berard, Philippe; Piechowski, Jean; Blanchardon, Eric; Challeton de Vathaire, Cecile; Franck, Didier; Blanchin, Nicolas; Fottorino, Robert; Bourgaut, Laurent; Fritsch, Paul; Poncy, Jean-Luc; Gonin, Michele; Quesne, Benoit

    2012-06-01

    This sheet addresses the medical-professional control of the internal exposure to radionuclides in relationship with professional activity of workers exposed to this risk in base nuclear installations. It presents and discusses published recommendations which aimed at optimizing the prevention of the internal exposure risk and the medical follow-up of workers exposed to this risk. Different themes are addressed which concerns the implementation, communication, traceability and archiving, control programmes, the assessment of the efficient dose, the health risk and the taking on by labour medicine

  18. Diplomatic agency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adler-Nissen, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    diplomatic agency has been conceptualized in International Relations theory (English School, game theory, Foreign Policy Analysis, constructivism, practice theory, post-positivism) before presenting and exemplifying major and overlapping types of diplomatic agency, including communication, negotiation......Diplomatic agency is intriguing. On the one hand, diplomats are crucial to the management of day-to-day international relations and the negotiation of war and peace. On the other hand, most diplomatic action is highly constrained or invisible. This chapter provides an overview of the ways in which...... and advocacy. It analyzes how professionalization, legalization, personalization and popularization of diplomacy have shaped diplomatic agency including how international law, bureaucracy, public diplomacy and new information technologies have impacted the scope and content of diplomatic agency. Finally...

  19. Developing and Evaluating Digital Interventions to Promote Behavior Change in Health and Health Care: Recommendations Resulting From an International Workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michie, Susan; Yardley, Lucy; West, Robert; Patrick, Kevin; Greaves, Felix

    2017-06-29

    Devices and programs using digital technology to foster or support behavior change (digital interventions) are increasingly ubiquitous, being adopted for use in patient diagnosis and treatment, self-management of chronic diseases, and in primary prevention. They have been heralded as potentially revolutionizing the ways in which individuals can monitor and improve their health behaviors and health care by improving outcomes, reducing costs, and improving the patient experience. However, we are still mainly in the age of promise rather than delivery. Developing and evaluating these digital interventions presents new challenges and new versions of old challenges that require use of improved and perhaps entirely new methods for research and evaluation. This article discusses these challenges and provides recommendations aimed at accelerating the rate of progress in digital behavior intervention research and practice. Areas addressed include intervention development in a rapidly changing technological landscape, promoting user engagement, advancing the underpinning science and theory, evaluating effectiveness and cost-effectiveness, and addressing issues of regulatory, ethical, and information governance. This article is the result of a two-day international workshop on how to create, evaluate, and implement effective digital interventions in relation to health behaviors. It was held in London in September 2015 and was supported by the United Kingdom's Medical Research Council (MRC), the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), the Methodology Research Programme (PI Susan Michie), and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation of the United States (PI Kevin Patrick). Important recommendations to manage the rapid pace of change include considering using emerging techniques from data science, machine learning, and Bayesian approaches and learning from other disciplines including computer science and engineering. With regard to assessing and promoting engagement, a key

  20. Agency and Social Capital in Chinese International Doctoral Students' Conversion to Christianity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Qun; Devine, Nesta

    2017-01-01

    Chinese international students constitute the largest proportion of overseas students in several English-speaking countries such as the UK and New Zealand. Little research has been done concerning those undertaking doctoral study. This qualitative study explores how Chinese overseas doctoral students become involved in church communities and how…

  1. Afro-Caribbean International Students' Ethnic Identity Development: Fluidity, Intersectionality, Agency, and Performativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malcolm, Zaria T.; Mendoza, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Afro-Caribbean international students (ACIS) often become engrossed in a complex racial and ethnic dialogue wherein they are thrust into homogenous categorizations forcing them to negotiate their Afro-Caribbean self with other identities perceived by others such as African American, first- and second-generation Caribbean immigrant, African, and…

  2. Patient safety incidents associated with obesity: a review of reports to the National Patient Safety Agency and recommendations for hospital practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, C M A; Moore, C E; Eddleston, J; Sharman, M; Atkinson, D; Moore, J A

    2011-10-01

    The incidence and prevalence of obesity are increasing world wide. In the UK, obesity governmental strategy has primarily focused on prevention measures, with less focus on the demands of treating obese patients in hospital. Increasing service demand by obese patients coupled with a lack of adequate provision for care of these patients may lead to an increase in patient safety incidents. By classifying patient safety incidents associated with obesity reported to the National Patient Safety Agency, this report aims to identify areas for improvement in the quality and safety of care of the obese patient. A search of the National Reporting and Learning System database was conducted for all incidents caused by or relating to obesity for the period 1 January 2005 to 31 August 2008. The keywords 'obesity', 'overweight', 'BMI' (body mass index), and 'bariatric' were used. The relevant free text fields of the resulting set of incidents were then searched for the terms designed to isolate incidents occurring in anaesthesia, critical care, and surgery. Reported incidents were analysed and subsequently categorised to identify incident themes. Levels of harm were also established. 555 patient safety incidents were identified; 388 met inclusion criteria for analysis. 148 incidents were related to assessment, diagnosis or treatment, 213 related to infrastructure and 27 related to staffing. The majority of incidents were classified as no or low harm. Three deaths were reported, all within the domain of anaesthesia. This report identifies that the majority of safety incidents associated with obesity were related to infrastructure, suggesting that there is inadequate provision in place for the care of obese patients. While levels of harm were mostly low, the occurrence of incidents resulting in severe harm or death highlights the specific dangers associated with the care of the obese patient. A global approach to improving the safety of care delivery for obese patients is

  3. [Evidence-based recommendations for the management of undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis (UPIA). The German perspective on the international 3e initiative].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarner, I H; Albrecht, K; Fleck, M; Gromnica-Ihle, E; Keyßer, G; Köhler, L; Kötter, I; Krüger, K; Kuipers, J; Nüßlein, H; Rubbert-Roth, A; Wollenhaupt, J; Schneider, M; Manger, B; Müller-Ladner, U

    2014-05-01

    Peripheral arthritis is the most common presenting complaint in clinical rheumatology. Unequivocal identification of the underlying entity can be difficult, particularly at an early stage. Such cases are commonly referred to as undifferentiated peripheral inflammatory arthritis (UPIA). Since evidence-based recommendations for the clinical management of UPIA are lacking, this international 3e initiative convened 697 rheumatologists from 17 countries to develop appropriate recommendations. Based on a systematic literature research in Medline, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, and the ACR/EULAR abstracts of 2007/2008, 10 multinational recommendations were developed by 3 rounds of a Delphi process. In Germany, a national group of experts worked on 3 additional recommendations using the same method. The recommendations were discussed among the members of the 3e initiative and the degree of consensus was analyzed as well as the potential impact of the recommendations on clinical practice. A total of 39,756 references were identified, of which 250 were systematically reviewed for the development of 10 multinational recommendations concerning differential diagnosis, diagnostic and prognostic value of clinical assessments, laboratory tests and imaging techniques, and monitoring of UPIA. In addition, 3 national recommendations on the diagnostic and prognostic value of a response to anti-inflammatory therapy on the analysis of synovial fluid and on enthesitis were developed by the German experts based on 35 out of 5542 references. The article translates the 2011 published original paper of the international 3e initiative (Machado et al., Ann Rheum Dis 70:15-24, 2011) and reports the methods and results of the national vote and the additional 3 national recommendations.

  4. Working together for global health goals: The United States Agency for International Development and faith-based organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clydette L Powell

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For many years, and before the term “FBO” was used for faith-based organizations, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID has supported the work of FBOs in global health and development. The Agency has long recognized the impact of FBOs within that development space, because these organizations are often well positioned to reach the hard-to-reach and to go the last mile because of their strong ties to the community. Moreover, FBOs deliver a substantial percentage of the health services in some developing countries. Faith partners, whether Catholic, Protestant, Buddhist, Hindu, Muslim, or other, have an important role to play as implementers in global health and to support global efforts towards achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs in health. In addition, partnerships at national and international levels are key to the success of US Presidential Initiatives in the developing world, such as President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR and President’s Malaria Initiative (PMI. FBOs also have an important voice in policy and strategy formulation. Among other international donors, USAID support has been of great importance to the work of FBOs, thereby helping host nations to achieve goals in ending preventable child and maternal deaths, improving communicable disease control and prevention, and by supporting the construction and renovation of hospitals and health facilities where service delivery is most needed. The development literature is replete with examples of the work of FBOs made possible through access to resources. This paper focuses on some of the work supported by USAID in global health initiatives in order to reach complementary goals and achieve significant public health advances. Given the vastness of the topic, not all the global health initiatives involving FBOs supported by USAID are included here; the reader is encouraged to access the USAID website and USAID implementing partners for

  5. Conclusions and Recommendations of the IAEA International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Safety: Ensuring Safety for Sustainable Nuclear Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shanawany, Mamdouh

    2011-01-01

    Over 200 participants from 33 countries and three international organizations came and actively participated and contributed to focused discussions and the success of the conference. The following points summarize the key conclusions and recommendations of the conference with respect to nuclear safety. 1. The nuclear safety approach is based on the philosophy developed in the 60's: defense in depth principles and deterministic criteria. When properly applied and completed by probabilistic analyses and operational experience feedback, it continues to be a successful approach. However, guarding against the risk of accidents requires constant vigilance and high technical competence and a never ending fight against complacency. In this context, having a strong leadership with a commitment to continuous improvement and a vision of sustained excellence is a key element of nuclear safety. Continuous improvement in safety also should be pursued through scientific research and operational experience feedback. 2. An accident anywhere is of concern to all Member States. Therefore, it is in the interest of all Member States to share and collaborate on safety matters. Participation of all Member States in international nuclear safety instruments and conventions, including liability for nuclear damage, is considered beneficial to global safety. The Convention on Nuclear Safety, the Joint Convention, international cooperation through IAEA and other organizations, bilateral or multilateral arrangements are important elements for establishing networks for sharing and transferring knowledge. It is acknowledged that the IAEA's Safety Fundamentals and Safety Requirements provide a sound foundation for high level nuclear safety. IAEA Safety Standards should be the basis for the establishment and maintenance of safety infrastructure. The IAEA's peer reviews and services such as IRRS, OSART, Site Evaluation and Reactor Safety Reviews provide also a valuable platform for sharing

  6. Main Conclusions and Recommendations of International Conference on Topical Issues in Nuclear Installation Safety: Ensuring Safety for Sustainable Nuclear Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Shanawany, Mamdouh

    2011-01-01

    Over 200 participants from 33 countries and three international organizations came and actively participated and contributed to focused discussions and the success of the conference. The following points summarize the key conclusions and recommendations of the conference with respect to nuclear safety. 1. The nuclear safety approach is based on the philosophy developed in the 60's: defense in depth principles and deterministic criteria. When properly applied and completed by probabilistic analyses and operational experience feedback, it continues to be a successful approach. However, guarding against the risk of accidents requires constant vigilance and high technical competence and a never ending fight against complacency. In this context, having a strong leadership with a commitment to continuous improvement and a vision of sustained excellence is a key element of nuclear safety. Continuous improvement in safety also should be pursued through scientific research and operational experience feedback. 2. An accident anywhere is of concern to all Member States. Therefore, it is in the interest of all Member States to share and collaborate on safety matters. Participation of all Member States in international nuclear safety instruments and conventions, including liability for nuclear damage, is considered beneficial to global safety. The Convention on Nuclear Safety, the Joint Convention, international cooperation through IAEA and other organizations, bilateral or multilateral arrangements are important elements for establishing networks for sharing and transferring knowledge. It is acknowledged that the IAEA's Safety Fundamentals and Safety Requirements provide a sound foundation for high level nuclear safety. IAEA Safety Standards should be the basis for the establishment and maintenance of safety infrastructure. The IAEA's peer reviews and services such as IRRS, OSART, Site Evaluation and Reactor Safety Reviews provide also a valuable platform for sharing

  7. Definitions, End Points, and Clinical Trial Designs for Non-Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: Recommendations From the International Bladder Cancer Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamat, A.M.; Sylvester, R.J.; Bohle, A.; Palou, J.; Lamm, D.L.; Brausi, M.; Soloway, M.; Persad, R.; Buckley, R.; Colombel, M.; Witjes, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To provide recommendations on appropriate clinical trial designs in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) based on current literature and expert consensus of the International Bladder Cancer Group. METHODS: We reviewed published trials, guidelines, meta-analyses, and reviews and

  8. Application of international recommendations and guidance on low level radioactive waste management and remediation of contaminated land at the national level: Experience of regulatory support in Northwest Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sneve, M.; Smith, G.M.; Kerrigan, E

    2005-01-01

    This paper notes the developments in international recommendations on radioactive waste management and remediation of contaminated land and considers their implementation in the context of the Norwegian Plan of Action to improve nuclear safety in North West Russia. Summary information is provided on projects to implement waste management activities (so-called Industrial Projects) and on projects to support regulatory supervision of waste management activities (so-called Regulatory Support Projects). The links between international recommendations and national practice are discussed and it is concluded that, in practice, the details of national standards differ both among themselves and, in some respects, from the recommendations of the ICRP and IAEA. Examples of further potential collaboration projects are listed. While separate responsibilities among organisations have to clear and maintained, combined involvement of operators and regulators is recognised as a prioritised area in future cooperation between NRPA and Russia. (author)

  9. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the Government of the Republic of Italy concerning the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993, by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993, and ratified by the Italian Parliament on 2 January 1995

  10. Text of the agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the joint operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization concerning the Joint Operation of the International Centre for Theoretical Physics at Trieste is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1993 and by the UNESCO General Conference on 16 November 1993

  11. International Atomic Energy Agency programme and activity on the utilization of low energy accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shalnov, A.V.; Whetstone, S.L.

    1974-01-01

    One of the chief missions of the Agency is as intermediary between the more highly developed of its member states and the less developed. This involves transmittal of needs of the latter to the former and, where possible, in response to the needs, an appropriate transfer of information and technical assistance. The physics section of the IAEA has recently encouraged and supported requests for technical assistance for programs based on neutron activation studies or pedagogic neutron physics experiments for institutes entering the nuclear field. Neutron generator laboratories have been set up with IAEA-assistance most recently in Burma, Hong Kong, Lebanon. Other recent technical assistance projects involving low-energy accelerators include: (1) consultation on the future program for the accelerator laboratory in Algeria; (2) equipment and experts to assist the nuclear physics program at the Van de Graaff in Bangladesh; (3) expert assistance and equipment in support of the installation of an electron linear accelerator in Egypt; and (4) expert assistance for nuclear physics studies at the cyclotron in Chile. A large number of young scientists, particularly from S.E. Europe, but also from the Middle East and South America, have received training in nuclear physics experimentation by advanced countries at low energy accelerator laboratories under the IAEA fellowship program

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiatives: Records management for deep and near surface geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1996-01-01

    The international scientific community has long had an interest in determining methods by which information regarding nuclear waste repositories, and the inherent danger to humanity, could be passed from generation to generation and society to society. Because nuclear waste will remain radioactive for thousands of years future generations must be warned of the dangers thus eliminating intentional or inadvertent intrusion. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained so that this information remains accessible to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years; thus the retention of information continues beyond current societies, cultures and languages, and must be continually migrated to new retrieval technologies to assure access

  13. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

  14. Patient doses in CT examinations in 18 countries: initial results from International Atomic Energy Agency projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhogora, W E; Ahmed, N A; Beganovic, A; Benider, A; Ciraj-Bjelac, O; Gershan, V; Gershkevitsh, E; Grupetta, E; Kharita, M H; Manatrakul, N; Milakovic, M; Ohno, K; Ben Omrane, L; Ptacek, J; Schandorf, C; Shabaan, M S; Stoyanov, D; Toutaoui, N; Wambani, J S; Rehani, M M

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this prospective study at 73 facilities in 18 countries in Africa, Asia and Eastern Europe was to investigate if the CT doses to adult patients in developing countries are higher than international standards. The dose assessment was performed in terms of weighted computed tomography dose index (CTDIw) and dose length product (DLP) for chest, chest (high resolution), lumbar spine, abdomen and pelvis CT examinations using standard methods. Except in one case, the mean CTDIw values were below diagnostic reference level (DRL) while for DLP, 17 % of situations were above DRLs. The resulting CT images were of adequate quality for diagnosis. The CTDIw and DLP data presented herein are largely similar to those from two recent national surveys. The study has shown a stronger need to create awareness and training of radiology personnel as well as monitoring of radiation doses in many developing countries so as to conform to the ALARA principle.

  15. Using research metrics to evaluate the International Atomic Energy Agency guidelines on quality assurance for R&D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1994-06-01

    The objective of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Guidelines on Quality Assurance for R&D is to provide guidance for developing quality assurance (QA) programs for R&D work on items, services, and processes important to safety, and to support the siting, design, construction, commissioning, operation, and decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The standard approach to writing papers describing new quality guidelines documents is to present a descriptive overview of the contents of the document. I will depart from this approach. Instead, I will first discuss a conceptual framework of metrics for evaluating and improving basic and applied experimental science as well as the associated role that quality management should play in understanding and implementing these metrics. I will conclude by evaluating how well the IAEA document addresses the metrics from this conceptual framework and the broader principles of quality management.

  16. Project planning at the Hanford Site for International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards of excess fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.W.; McRae, L.P.; Walker, A.C.

    1995-06-01

    In his September 1993 address to the United Nations General Assembly, President Clinton proposed several initiatives to promote nuclear nonproliferation. One element is of these initiatives was that the United States offered to place excess fissile material under International Atomic Energy Agency at sign A) safeguards. Three Department of Energy (DOE) facilities were identified as part of a phased approach for initial implementation. This paper describes the planning process used to provide information to assist the DOE in making decisions for the initial offer, outlines tasks to be performed, and develops a budget request. The process consisted of: (1) Characterizing the Hanford Site from the perspective of IAEA safeguards; (2) identify key issues to be resolved; (3) developing budget estimates and schedules; (4) interfacing with other DOE components and the IAEA to clarify expected activities; and (5) initiating additional data collection and preparatory activities to reduce planning uncertainties

  17. Rapid development of tissue bank achieved by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Tissue Banking Programme in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Min; Wang, Jian-Ru; Zhang, Nai-Li; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Zhou, Mo; Ma, Shao-Ying; Yang, Ting; Li, Bao-Xing

    2014-09-01

    Before 1986, the development of tissue banking in China has been slow and relatively uncoordinated. Under the support of International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Tissue Banking in China experienced rapid development. In this period, China Institute for Radiation Protection tissue bank mastered systematic and modern tissue banking technique by IAEA training course and gradually developed the first regional tissue bank (Shanxi Provincial Tissue Bank, SPTB) to provide tissue allograft. Benefit from training course, SPTB promoted the development of tissue transplantation by ways of training, brochure, advertisement and meeting. Tissue allograft transplantation acquired recognition from clinic and supervision and administration from government. Quality system gradually is developing and perfecting. Tissue allograft transplantation and tissue bank are developing rapidly and healthy.

  18. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion. 1980-1994. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-04-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1994. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (i) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  19. Nuclear measurements, techniques and instrumentation industrial applications plasma physics and nuclear fusion, 1980-1993. International Atomic Energy Agency publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    This catalogue lists all sales publications of the International Atomic Energy Agency dealing with Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation, with Industrial Applications (of Nuclear Physics and Engineering), and with Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion, issued during the period 1980-1993. Most publications are in English. Proceedings of conferences, symposia, and panels of experts may contain some papers in other languages (French, Russian, or Spanish), but all papers have abstracts in English. Price quotes are in Austrian Schillings, do not include local taxes, and are subject to change without notice. Contents cover the three main categories of (I) Nuclear Measurements, Techniques and Instrumentation (Physics, Chemistry, Dosimetry Techniques, Nuclear Analytical Techniques, Research Reactors and Particle Accelerator Applications, Nuclear Data); (ii) Industrial Applications (Radiation Processing, Radiometry, Tracers); and (iii) Plasma Physics and Nuclear Fusion

  20. Development of a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorenson, K.B.; Salzbrenner, R.; Nickell, R.E.

    1992-01-01

    An effort has been undertaken to develop a brittle fracture acceptance criterion for structural components of nuclear material transportation casks. The need for such a criterion was twofold. First, new generation cask designs have proposed the use of ferritic steels and other materials to replace the austenitic stainless steel commonly used for structural components in transport casks. Unlike austenitic stainless steel which fails in a high-energy absorbing, ductile tearing mode, it is possible for these candidate materials to fail via brittle fracture when subjected to certain combinations of elevated loading rates and low temperatures. Second, there is no established brittle fracture criterion accepted by the regulatory community that covers a broad range of structural materials. Although the existing IAEA Safety Series number-sign 37 addressed brittle fracture, its the guidance was dated and pertained only to ferritic steels. Consultant's Services Meetings held under the auspices of the IAEA have resulted in a recommended brittle fracture criterion. The brittle fracture criterion is based on linear elastic fracture mechanics, and is the result of a consensus of experts from six participating IAEA-member countries. The brittle fracture criterion allows three approaches to determine the fracture toughness of the structural material. The three approaches present the opportunity to balance material testing requirements and the conservatism of the material's fracture toughness which must be used to demonstrate resistance to brittle fracture. This work has resulted in a revised Appendix IX to Safety Series number-sign 37 which will be released as an IAEA Technical Document within the coming year

  1. Draft nuclear energy policy statement for DOE report to the International Energy Agency: long version

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    US national energy policy recognizes that the continued development of commercial nuclear power in the United States is vital to US national security and energy stability since it is a significant domestic energy resource that is relatively free from international pressures. As of this writing (August 1989) the United States had 108 nuclear power reactors in commercial status. In January 1989 nuclear energy produced 46 billion KwH or 20% of total US electricity generated in contrast to 45 billion KwH (18.8%) produced in January 1988. The US Federal Government has been engaged in a variety of activities to ensure that nuclear energy remains a safe, economically competitive and environmentally acceptable option. Much of the federal effort in recent months has been devoted to developing initiatives designed to remove institutional and regulatory obstacles to the continued use of nuclear power as part of the US energy system. Within this context, the following paragraphs summarize the major features of the current status of the US nuclear energy program and policies

  2. International and Domestic Sustainable Forest Management Policies: Distributive Effects on Power among State Agencies in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas Giessen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades of forest policy discussions have been dominated by calls for sustainable management of forest resources. Consequently, multiple international and domestic policies, supporting sustainable forest management (SFM, have evolved in numerous jurisdictions. Policies in developing countries often rely on foreign donors’ projects, which supplement domestic SFM policy. These policies assign various policy tasks to specific public bureaucracies, who then compete for these very tasks, as well as the related staff and budgets. Therefore, project and policy task assignment greatly influences bureaucratic power. This article analyzes the distributive effects of SFM policy on power (in terms of coercion, incentives and dominant information among relevant domestic and foreign donor bureaucracies in Bangladesh. Concepts from power theory, bureaucratic politics theory, and concepts of policy and policy process were combined to analyze 121 Bangladeshi SFM policies from 1992–2013, which assign a total of 1012 policy tasks to specific public bureaucracies. Using qualitative content analysis, inferences about power were assigned to specific competing bureaucracies by the totality of SFM policies made. Results identify domestic and foreign bureaucracies whose power distribution benefit most from the SFM policies viz. their competitors. It is concluded that bureaucracies gaining the most power set the limits and directions in designing, implementing and evaluating various elements of any national SFM policies.

  3. Results of the International Energy Agency Round Robin on Fast Pyrolysis Bio-oil Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Meier, Dietrich; Oasmaa, Anja; van de Beld, Bert; Bridgwater, Anthony V.; Marklund, Magnus

    2017-04-06

    An international round robin study of the production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil was undertaken. Fifteen institutions in six countries contributed. Three biomass samples were distributed to the laboratories for processing in fast pyrolysis reactors. Samples of the bio-oil produced were transported to a central analytical laboratory for analysis. The round robin was focused on validating the pyrolysis community understanding of production of fast pyrolysis bio-oil by providing a common feedstock for bio-oil preparation. The round robin included: •distribution of 3 feedstock samples from a common source to each participating laboratory; •preparation of fast pyrolysis bio-oil in each laboratory with the 3 feedstocks provided; •return of the 3 bio-oil products (minimum 500 ml) with operational description to a central analytical laboratory for bio-oil property determination. The analyses of interest were: density, viscosity, dissolved water, filterable solids, CHN, S, trace element analysis, ash, total acid number, pyrolytic lignin, and accelerated aging of bio-oil. In addition, an effort was made to compare the bio-oil components to the products of analytical pyrolysis through GC/MS analysis. The results showed that clear differences can occur in fast pyrolysis bio-oil properties by applying different reactor technologies or configurations. The comparison to analytical pyrolysis method suggested that Py-GC/MS could serve as a rapid screening method for bio-oil composition when produced in fluid-bed reactors. Furthermore, hot vapor filtration generally resulted in the most favorable bio-oil product, with respect to water, solids, viscosity, and total acid number. These results can be helpful in understanding the variation in bio-oil production methods and their effects on bio-oil product composition.

  4. Comprehensive Auditing in Nuclear Medicine Through the International Atomic Energy Agency Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM) Program. Part 1: the QUANUM Program and Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondi, Maurizio; Torres, Leonel; Marengo, Mario; Massardo, Teresa; Mishani, Eyal; Van Zyl Ellmann, Annare; Solanki, Kishor; Bischof Delaloye, Angelika; Lobato, Enrique Estrada; Miller, Rodolfo Nunez; Paez, Diana; Pascual, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    An effective management system that integrates quality management is essential for a modern nuclear medicine practice. The Nuclear Medicine and Diagnostic Imaging Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has the mission of supporting nuclear medicine practice in low- and middle-income countries and of helping them introduce it in their health-care system, when not yet present. The experience gathered over several years has shown diversified levels of development and varying degrees of quality of practice, among others because of limited professional networking and limited or no opportunities for exchange of experiences. Those findings triggered the development of a program named Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine (QUANUM), aimed at improving the standards of NM practice in low- and middle-income countries to internationally accepted standards through the introduction of a culture of quality management and systematic auditing programs. QUANUM takes into account the diversity of nuclear medicine services around the world and multidisciplinary contributions to the practice. Those contributions include clinical, technical, radiopharmaceutical, and medical physics procedures. Aspects of radiation safety and patient protection are also integral to the process. Such an approach ensures consistency in providing safe services of superior quality to patients. The level of conformance is assessed using standards based on publications of the IAEA and the International Commission on Radiological Protection, and guidelines from scientific societies such as Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging (SNMMI) and European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM). Following QUANUM guidelines and by means of a specific assessment tool developed by the IAEA, auditors, both internal and external, will be able to evaluate the level of conformance. Nonconformances will then be prioritized and recommendations will be provided during an exit briefing. The

  5. Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards to all nuclear material in all peaceful nuclear activities of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-02-01

    The text of the Agreement between Ukraine and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to all Nuclear Material in all Peaceful Nuclear Activities of Ukraine is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 12 September 1994 and signed in Vienna on 28 September 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 13 January 1995

  6. Guidelines for the International Observation by the Agency of Nuclear Explosions for Peaceful Purposes under the Provisions of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or Analogous Provisions in Other International Agreements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    On 21 June 1972 the Board of Governors approved guidelines for the international observation by the Agency of nuclear explosions for peaceful purposes under the provisions of the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons or analogous provisions in other international agreements. These guidelines are now reproduced herein for the information of all Members

  7. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects

  8. United States of America activities relative to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) initiative: Records management for deep geologic repositories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warner, P.J.

    1997-03-01

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has conducted consultant and advisory meetings to prepare a Technical Document which is intended to provide guidance to all IAEA Member States (otherwise known as countries) that are currently planning, designing, constructing or operating a deep or near surface geological repository for the storage and protection of vitrified high-level radioactive waste, spent fuel waste and TRU-waste (transuranic). Eleven countries of the international community are presently in various stages of siting, designing, or constructing deep geologic repositories. Member States of the IAEA have determined that the principle safety of such completed and operation sites must not rely solely on long term institutional arrangements for the retention of information. It is believed that repository siting, design, operation and postoperation information should be gathered, managed and retained in a manner that will provide information to future societies over a very long period of time. The radionuclide life is 10,000 years thus the retention of information must outlive current societies, languages, and be continually migrated to new technology to assure retrieval. This presentation will provide an overview of the status of consideration and implementation of these issues within the United States efforts relative to deep geologic repository projects.

  9. Agreement between the Government of India and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards to civilian nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Government of India and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards to Civilian Nuclear Facilities is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Board of Governors approved the Agreement on 1 August 2008. It was signed in Vienna on 2 February 2009. Pursuant to paragraph 108 of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 11 May 2009, the date on which the Agency received from India written notification that India's statutory and constitutional requirements for entry into force had been met

  10. Best practices recommendations in the application of immunohistochemistry in urologic pathology: report from the International Society of Urological Pathology consensus conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Mahul B; Epstein, Jonathan I; Ulbright, Thomas M; Humphrey, Peter A; Egevad, Lars; Montironi, Rodolfo; Grignon, David; Trpkov, Kiril; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Zhou, Ming; Argani, Pedram; Delahunt, Brett; Berney, Daniel M; Srigley, John R; Tickoo, Satish K; Reuter, Victor E

    2014-08-01

    Members of the International Society of Urological Pathology (ISUP) participated in a half-day consensus conference to discuss guidelines and recommendations regarding best practice approaches to use of immunohistochemistry (IHC) in differential diagnostic situations in urologic pathology, including bladder, prostate, testis and, kidney lesions. Four working groups, selected by the ISUP leadership, identified several high-interest topics based on common or relevant challenging diagnostic situations and proposed best practice recommendations, which were discussed by the membership. The overall summary of the discussions and the consensus opinion forms the basis of a series of articles, one for each organ site. This Special Article summarizes the overall recommendations made by the four working groups. It is anticipated that this ISUP effort will be valuable to the entire practicing community in the appropriate use of IHC in diagnostic urologic pathology.

  11. Guidance as to restrictions on exposures to time varying electromagnetic fields and the 1988 recommendations of the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee

    CERN Document Server

    Dennis, J A

    1989-01-01

    Under a direction from the Health Ministers, NRPB is required to advise on the acceptability to the United Kingdom of standards recommended or proposed by certain international bodies relating to protection from both ionising radiations and non-ionising electromagnetic radiations. This document contains the Board's advice in response to guidelines recommended by the International Non-Ionizing Radiation Committee (INIRC) on limiting exposures to electromagnetic fields in the frequency range 100 kHz to 300 GHz (Health Physics, 54, 115 (1988)). The Board's advice, however, extends over all frequencies up to 300 GHz. It has been prepared after considering advice from the Medical Research Council and responses to consultative documents published by the Board in 1982 and 1986. The Board's advice is intended to protect against the thermal effects of the absorption of electromagnetic energy and against the possibilities of electric shock and burn. It consists of a set of basic restrictions both on the average rate of...

  12. Protocol Additional to the agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between France, the European Atomic Energy Community and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in France is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 22 September 1998. Pursuant to Article 16 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 30 April 2004, the date on which the Agency received written notification that the European Atomic Energy Community and France had met their respective internal requirements for entry into force

  13. 75 FR 41871 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Draft Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-19

    ... Pharmaceutical Industries Associations; the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour, and Welfare; the Japanese... and Research, FDA; and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The ICH Secretariat... the Q4B process entitled ``Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of Pharmaceutical Texts for Use in the...

  14. A comparison of initial antiretroviral therapy in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study and the recommendations of the International AIDS Society-USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wandeler, Gilles; Keiser, Olivia; Hirschel, Bernard; Günthard, Huldrych F; Bernasconi, Enos; Battegay, Manuel; Clerc, Olivier; Vernazza, Pietro L; Furrer, Hansjakob

    2011-01-01

    In order to facilitate and improve the use of antiretroviral therapy (ART), international recommendations are released and updated regularly. We aimed to study if adherence to the recommendations is associated with better treatment outcomes in the Swiss HIV Cohort Study (SHCS). Initial ART regimens prescribed to participants between 1998 and 2007 were classified according to IAS-USA recommendations. Baseline characteristics of patients who received regimens in violation with these recommendations (violation ART) were compared to other patients. Multivariable logistic and linear regression analyses were performed to identify associations between violation ART and (i) virological suppression and (ii) CD4 cell count increase, after one year. Between 1998 and 2007, 4189 SHCS participants started 241 different ART regimens. A violation ART was started in 5% of patients. Female patients (adjusted odds ratio aOR 1.83, 95%CI 1.28-2.62), those with a high education level (aOR 1.49, 95%CI 1.07-2.06) or a high CD4 count (aOR 1.53, 95%CI 1.02-2.30) were more likely to receive violation ART. The proportion of patients with an undetectable viral load (ART than with recommended regimens (aOR 0.54, 95% CI 0.37-0.80) whereas CD4 count increase after one year of treatment was similar in both groups. Although more than 240 different initial regimens were prescribed, violations of the IAS-USA recommendations were uncommon. Patients receiving these regimens were less likely to have an undetectable viral load after one year, which strengthens the validity of these recommendations.

  15. National Recommended Water Quality Criteria

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The National Recommended Water Quality Criteria is a compilation of national recommended water quality criteria for the protection of aquatic life and human health...

  16. 75 FR 40843 - International Conference on Harmonisation; Draft Guidance on Q4B Evaluation and Recommendation of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-14

    .... The six ICH sponsors are the European Commission; the European Federation of Pharmaceutical Industries... Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America. The ICH Secretariat, which coordinates the preparation of... industry associations to promote international harmonization of regulatory requirements. FDA has...

  17. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) evaluation of the carcinogenicity of outdoor air pollution: focus on China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loomis, Dana; Huang, Wei; Chen, Guosheng

    2014-04-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has classified outdoor air pollution and the particulate matter (PM) in outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic to humans, as based on sufficient evidence of carcinogenicity in humans and experimental animals and strong support by mechanistic studies. The data with important contributions to the evaluation are reviewed, highlighting the data with particular relevance to China, and implications of the evaluation with respect to China are discussed. The air pollution levels in Chinese cities are among the highest observed in the world today and frequently exceed health-based national and international guidelines. Data from high-quality epidemiologic studies in Asia, Europe, and North America consistently show positive associations between lung cancer and PM exposure and other indicators of air pollution, which persist after adjustment for important lung cancer risk factors, such as tobacco smoking. Epidemiologic data from China are limited but nevertheless indicate an increased risk of lung cancer associated with several air pollutants. Excess cancer risk is also observed in experimental animals exposed to polluted outdoor air or extracted PM. The exposure of several species to outdoor air pollution is associated with markers of genetic damage that have been linked to increased cancer risk in humans. Numerous studies from China, especially genetic biomarker studies in exposed populations, support that the polluted air in China is genotoxic and carcinogenic to humans. The evaluation by IARC indicates both the need for further research into the cancer risks associated with exposure to air pollution in China and the urgent need to act to reduce exposure to the population.

  18. Recommendations for the standardization of bone marrow disease assessment and reporting in children with neuroblastoma on behalf of the International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria Bone Marrow Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Susan A; Beiske, Klaus; Shimada, Hiroyuki; Ambros, Peter F; Seeger, Robert; Tytgat, Godelieve A M; Brock, Penelope R; Haber, Michelle; Park, Julie R; Berthold, Frank

    2017-04-01

    The current study was conducted to expedite international standardized reporting of bone marrow disease in children with neuroblastoma and to improve equivalence of care. A multidisciplinary International Neuroblastoma Response Criteria Bone Marrow Working Group was convened by the US National Cancer Institute in January 2012 with representation from Europe, North America, and Australia. Practical transferable recommendations to standardize the reporting of bone marrow disease were developed. To the authors' knowledge, the current study is the first to comprehensively present consensus criteria for the collection, analysis, and reporting of the percentage area of bone marrow parenchyma occupied by tumor cells in trephine-biopsies. The quantitative analysis of neuroblastoma content in bone marrow aspirates by immunocytology and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction are revised. The inclusion of paired-like homeobox 2b (PHOX2B) for immunohistochemistry and reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reaction is recommended. Recommendations for recording bone marrow response are provided. The authors endorse the quantitative assessment of neuroblastoma cell content in bilateral core needle biopsies-trephines and aspirates in all children with neuroblastoma, with the exception of infants, in whom the evaluation of aspirates alone is advised. It is interesting to note that 5% disease is accepted as an internationally achievable level for disease assessment. The quantitative assessment of neuroblastoma cells is recommended to provide data from which evidence-based numerical criteria for the reporting of bone marrow response can be realized. This is particularly important in the minimal disease setting and when neuroblastoma detection in bone marrow is intermittent, where clinical impact has yet to be validated. The wide adoption of these harmonized criteria will enhance the ability to compare outcomes from different trials and facilitate

  19. Prospects for coal briquettes as a substitute fuel for wood and charcoal in US Agency for International Development Assisted countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perlack, R.D.; Stevenson, G.G.; Shelton, R.B.

    1986-02-01

    Fuelwood shortages and potential shortages are widespread throughout the developing world, and are becoming increasingly more prevalent because of the clearing of land for subsistence and plantation agriculture, excessive and inefficient commercial timber harvesting for domestic and export construction, and charcoal production to meet rising urban demands. Further, the environmental and socioeconomic consequences of the resulting deforestation are both pervasive and complex. This report focuses on the substitution of coal briquettes for fuelwood. Although substantial adverse health effects could be expected from burning non-anthracite coal or coal briquettes, a well-developed technique, carbonization, exists to convert coal to a safer form for combustion. The costs associated with briquetting and carbonizing coal indicate that ''smokeless'' coal briquettes can be produced at costs competitive with fuelwood and charcoal. The US Agency for International Development (USAID) is working on implementing this energy option in Haiti and Pakistan by (1) evaluating resources, (2) assessing markets, (3) analyzing technologies, (4) studying government policy and planning, and (5) packaging the idea for the private sector to implement. 26 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

  20. Adverse event reporting and developments in radiation biology after normal tissue injury: International Atomic Energy Agency consultation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yuhchyau; Trotti, Andy; Coleman, C. Norman; Machtay, Mitchell; Mirimanoff, Rene O.; Hay, John; O'Brien, Peter C.; El-Gueddari, Brahim; Salvajoli, Joao V.; Jeremic, Branislav

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Recent research has enhanced our understanding of radiation injury at the molecular-cellular and tissue levels; significant strides have occurred in standardization of adverse event reporting in clinical trials. In response, the International Atomic Energy Agency, through its Division of Human Health and its section for Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy, organized a consultation meeting in Atlanta (October 2, 2004) to discuss developments in radiobiology, normal tissue reactions, and adverse event reporting. Methods and Materials: Representatives from cooperative groups of African Radiation Oncology Group, Curriculo Radioterapeutica Ibero Latino Americana, European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer, National Cancer Institute of Canada Clinical Trials Group, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, and Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group held the meeting discussion. Results: Representatives of major radiotherapy groups/organizations and prominent leaders in radiotherapy discussed current understanding of normal tissue radiobiologic effects, the design and implementation of future clinical and translational projects for normal tissue injury, and the standardization of adverse-event reporting worldwide. Conclusions: The consensus was to adopt NCI comprehensive adverse event reporting terminology and grading system (CTCAE v3.0) as the new standard for all cooperative group trials. Future plans included the implementation of coordinated research projects focusing on normal tissue biomarkers and data collection methods

  1. Communication dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency regarding an International Conference on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning Japan's intention to organize an international conference, during the latter half of 2012, on nuclear safety in cooperation with the IAEA. As requested by the Resident Representative of Japan, the letter is circulated herewith for information of all Member States [es

  2. Communication dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency regarding an International Conference on Nuclear Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    The Director General has received a letter dated 1 June 2011 from the Resident Representative of Japan to the Agency concerning Japan's intention to organize an international conference, during the latter half of 2012, on nuclear safety in cooperation with the IAEA. As requested by the Resident Representative of Japan, the letter is circulated herewith for information of all Member States [fr

  3. Communication of 4 October 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a letter of 4 October 1995 from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Korea providing information on the nuclear export policies and practices of the Government of the Republic of Korea. In the light of the request expressed in the letter, the text of the letter and its enclosure are attached hereto

  4. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States of America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in the United States of America is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 11 June 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 12 June 1998

  5. Communication of 14 March 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the United States of America to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the communication of 14 March 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the United States of America to the International Atomic Energy Agency including two statements of the President and the Secretary of State of the United States of America regarding the Nuclear Non-proliferation Treaty

  6. Proposal to modify Rule 10a and to delete Recommendation 10a(3) from the International Code of Nomenclature of Prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Aharon

    2017-09-01

    Principle 2 of the Prokaryotic Code, as modified by the ICSP in 1999, reads: 'The nomenclature of prokaryotes is not independent of botanical and zoological nomenclature. When naming new taxa in the rank of genus or higher, due consideration is to be given to avoiding names which are regulated by the International Code of Zoological Nomenclature and the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi and plants'. But in the current version of the Prokaryotic Code no Rule implements this version of Principle 2. I therefore propose adding the following sentence to Rule 10a: 'As from January 2001, newly proposed generic names must not be later homonyms of names in use in botany or zoology'. Recommendation 10a(3) of the Code states: 'Avoid introducing into bacteriology as generic names such names as are in use in botany or zoology, in particular well-known names'. This Recommendation contravenes the current version of Principle 2 and the proposed new version of Rule 10a. Therefore I propose to delete Recommendation 10a(3) from the Prokaryotic Code.

  7. Comparison between the Brazilian regulation of radioprotection and the recommendation of International Commission on Radiological Protection published in 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Wagner S.; Py Junior, Delcy A.; Dantas, Marcelino V.A.; Oliveira, Sergio Q. de; Kelecom, Alphonse; Mortagua, Valter Jose

    2011-01-01

    This paper intends to compare the Brasilian basic regulation on radiological protection with the new recommendations of ICRP through existent differences. The main difference between the publication 60 and the publication 103 of the ICRP is the changing of concept of protection based on the process by use of practice and intervention concepts, to the protection based on the exposure situation, through the concepts of planned exposure, emergency and existent situation. For adequacy to the Brazilian regulation it is necessary to change its concept of protection and the values of radiation weighing and tissues, up dating of radiation detriments, besides to make clear the concept of environmental radioprotection

  8. The translation of the new ICRP recommendations into practice: a new challenge for International Co-operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ilari, O.; Gonzalez, A.; Boutrif, E.; Hanson, G.; Borras, C.

    1992-01-01

    The new ICRP recommendations have introduced several elements of novelty which may have a significant impact on the requirements and costs of radiation protection in Member countries. There is now a need for a conversion of the ICRP guidance into terms that are sufficiently practical and straightforward to facilitate their transfer into regulatory texts and operational practices at the national level. The paper discusses the strategy adopted for the revision of the Basic Safety Standards for Radiation Protection and highlights the main issues to be considered in this work.(author)

  9. Recommendations for reporting tumor budding in colorectal cancer based on the International Tumor Budding Consensus Conference (ITBCC) 2016

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lugli, Alessandro; Kirsch, Richard; Ajioka, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    -based standardized scoring system for tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The ITBCC included nine sessions with presentations, a pre-meeting survey and an e-book covering the key publications on tumor budding in colorectal cancer. The Grading of Recommendation Assessment, Development and Evaluation' method was used...... colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is an independent predictor of survival in stage II colorectal cancer (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding should be taken into account along with other clinicopathological features in a multidisciplinary setting (23/23, 100%). Tumor budding is counted on H&E (19/22, 86...

  10. International children's continence society's recommendations for therapeutic intervention in congenital neuropathic bladder and bowel dysfunction in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rawashdeh, Y. F.; Austin, P.; Siggaard, C.; Bauer, S. B.; Franco, I.; de Jong, T. P.; Jorgensen, T. M.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose We present a consensus view of members of the International Children's Continence Society on the therapeutic intervention in congenital neuropatic bladder and bowel dysfunction in children. Material and Methods Discussions were held by a group of pediatric urologists and gastroenterologists

  11. International Approaches to Renewable Energy Education--A Faculty Professional Development Case Study with Recommended Practices for STEM Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walz, Kenneth A.; Slowinski, Mary; Alfano, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Calls for increased international competency in U.S. college graduates and the global nature of the renewable energy industry require an exploration of how to incorporate a global perspective in STEM curricula, and how to best develop faculty providing them with global knowledge and skills necessary to update and improve existing teaching…

  12. [Adherence to international recommendations in the fight against antimicrobial resistance - Substantial difference between outpatient consumption in Spain and Denmark].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malo, Sara; Rabanaque, María José; Bjerrum, Lars

    2016-02-01

    Increasing antibiotic resistance represents a major public health threat that jeopardises the future treatment of bacterial infections. This study aims to describe the adherence to recommendations proposed by the World Health Organization (WHO) Advisory Group on Integrated Surveillance of Antimicrobial Resistance (AGISAR), in Spain and Denmark, and to analyse the relation between the outpatient use of Critically Important Antimicrobials (CIA) and the bacterial resistance rates to these agents. The Antimicrobial consumption interactive database (ESAC-Net) and Antimicrobial resistance interactive database (EARS-Net) provided data on outpatient use (2010-2013) of CIA (fluoroquinolones, macrolides, and 3rd and 4th generation cephalosporins) and the percentages of isolates of the main pathogens causing serious infections, resistant to these agents. The use of cephalosporins and fluoroquinolones, as well as the percentage of bacteria resistant, is higher in Spain than in Denmark. Although consumption of macrolides in both countries is similar, the proportion of Streptococcus pneumoniae resistant to macrolides is significantly higher in Spain. The high outpatient consumption of CIA agents in Spain deviates substantially from the WHO recommendations. Moreover, it has the effect of elevated rates of antimicrobial resistance, that are lower in Denmark.

  13. Diversity in smallholder farms growing coffee and their use of recommended coffee management practices in Uganda

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, G.; Fleskens, L.; Ven, van de G.W.J.; Mukasa, D.; Giller, K.E.; Asten, van P.

    2015-01-01

    Many smallholder farm systems in Uganda produce coffee as an important cash crop. Yet coffee yields are poor. To increase farmers’ production, a range of agronomic practices have been recommended by national and international agencies. Yet the adoption potential of recommendations differs between

  14. Treatment with Ca-DTPA of internal contaminations by plutonium and americium: Recommendations for writing protocols in Cea and AREVA centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grappin, L.; Legoff, J.P.; Andre, F.; Carbone, L.; Agrinier, A.L.; Courtay, C.; Aninat, M.; Amabile, J.C.; Florin, A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide physicians working in a B.N.F. (Basic Nuclear Facility) with recommendations for the drafting of Ca-DTPA treatment protocols for internal contamination by actinides. These recommendations are based on the results of injections carried out by Cea and AREVA doctors in a working group, with the collaboration of the Army Radiation Protection Service. The study focused on Ca-DTPA IV injection. Other dosage forms, routes of administration as well as adjuvant treatments are also mentioned. For cases of contaminated wounds and inhalation, indicators for treatment with Ca-DTPA, particularly its initialization, the dosage, duration, frequency of administration, the criteria for ending the treatment, then its efficiency and dosimetry gain are covered. A guide for the prescription of the radio toxicological monitoring necessary for the treatment and the dosimetric evaluation is proposed. (authors)

  15. 22 CFR 1203.735-213 - Recommendations for employment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Recommendations for employment. 1203.735-213 Section 1203.735-213 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Employees § 1203.735-213...

  16. Review of WHO/PAHO/IAEA recommendations concerning radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, G.P.

    1996-01-01

    Since the mid 1960s the World Health Organization, the Pan American Health Organization, and the International Atomic Energy Agency have provided recommendations concerning radiotherapy services, including organization, staff requirements and facilities. These are contained in various reports of WHO, PAHO and IAEA, which are reviewed and summarized. (author). 9 refs

  17. Methodology for developing evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines: Joint recommendations by Korea society of radiology and national evidence-based healthcare collaborating agency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Sol Ji; Jo, Ae Jeong; Choi, Jin A [Div. for Healthcare Technology Assessment Research, National Evidence-Based Healthcare Collaborating Agency, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2017-01-15

    This paper is a summary of the methodology including protocol used to develop evidence-based clinical imaging guidelines (CIGs) in Korea, led by the Korean Society of Radiology and the National Evidence-based Healthcare Collaborating Agency. This is the first protocol to reflect the process of developing diagnostic guidelines in Korea. The development protocol is largely divided into the following sections: set-up, process of adaptation, and finalization. The working group is composed of clinical imaging experts, and the developmental committee is composed of multidisciplinary experts to validate the methodology. The Korean CIGs will continue to develop based on this protocol, and these guidelines will act for decision supporting tools for clinicians as well as reduce medical radiation exposure.

  18. Government control over health-related not-for-profit organisations: Agency for International Development v. Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vines, Tim; Donohoo, Angus M; Faunce, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    The relationship between government and the not-for-profit (NFP) sector has important implications for society, especially in relation to the delivery of public health measures and the protection of the environment. In key health-related areas such as provision of medical services, welfare, foreign aid and education, governments have traditionally preferred for the NFP sector to act as service partners, with the relationship mediated through grants or funding agreements. This service delivery arrangement is intended to provide a diversity of voices, and encourage volunteerism and altruism, in conjunction with the purposes and objectives of the relevant NGO. Under the pretence of "accountability", however, governments increasingly are seeking to impose intrusive conditions on grantees, which limit their ability to fulfil their mission and advocate on behalf of their constituents. This column examines the United States Supreme Court decision, Agency for International Development v Alliance for Open Society International Inc 570 US_(2013), and compares it to the removal of gag clauses in Australian federal funding rules. Recent national changes to the health-related NFP sector in Australia are then discussed, such as those found in the Charities Act 2013 (Cth) and the Not-for-Profit Sector Freedom to Advocate Act 2013 (Cth). These respectively include the establishment of the Australian Charities and Not-For-Profit Commission, the modernising of the definition of "charity" and statutory blocks on "gag" clauses. This analysis concludes with a survey of recent moves by Australian States to impose new restrictions on the ability of health-related NFPs to lobby against harmful government policy Among the responses considered is the protection afforded by s 51l(xxiiiA) of the Australian Constitution. This constitutional guarantee appears to have been focused historically on preventing medical and dental practitioners and related small businesses being practically coerced

  19. BUCOVINA AS A TOURIST DESTINATION AND THE IMPACT OF THE RECENT INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL CRISIS. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR A MODERN DESTINATION MANAGEMENT APPROACH IN INTERNATIONAL DESTINATION MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike BÄHRE

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Bucovina is a cultural landscape in the triangle bordered between the Ukraine, Romania and Moldova. Based on a theoretical planning approach in destination marketing management, Bucovina is to be regarded as a destination situated at the end of the involvement stage of the Tourism Area Life Cycle (TALC. Literature, internet research, qualitative interviews, and on site-observations depict Bucovina as a travel destination. The authors explore the impact of the financial crisis on Bucovina and forecast the destination trend for the next few years. Finally, they give recommendations for development of the Bucovina region in a sustainable, rapid and regulated manner.

  20. Medicine in the 21st century: recommended essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Brent C; Warshaw, Gregg; Fabiny, Anne Rebecca; Lundebjerg Mpa, Nancy; Medina-Walpole, Annette; Sauvigne, Karen; Schwartzberg, Joanne G; Leipzig, Rosanne M

    2010-09-01

    Physician workforce projections by the Institute of Medicine require enhanced training in geriatrics for all primary care and subspecialty physicians. Defining essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residents would improve training for primary care and subspecialty physicians. The objectives of this study were to (1) define essential geriatrics competencies common to internal medicine and family medicine residents that build on established national geriatrics competencies for medical students, are feasible within current residency programs, are assessable, and address the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education competencies; and (2) involve key stakeholder organizations in their development and implementation. Initial candidate competencies were defined through small group meetings and a survey of more than 100 experts, followed by detailed item review by 26 program directors and residency clinical educators from key professional organizations. Throughout, an 8-member working group made revisions to maintain consistency and compatibility among the competencies. Support and participation by key stakeholder organizations were secured throughout the project. The process identified 26 competencies in 7 domains: Medication Management; Cognitive, Affective, and Behavioral Health; Complex or Chronic Illness(es) in Older Adults; Palliative and End-of-Life Care; Hospital Patient Safety; Transitions of Care; and Ambulatory Care. The competencies map directly onto the medical student geriatric competencies and the 6 Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education Competencies. Through a consensus-building process that included leadership and members of key stakeholder organizations, a concise set of essential geriatrics competencies for internal medicine and family medicine residencies has been developed. These competencies are well aligned with concerns for residency training raised in a recent Medicare Payment Advisory

  1. Protection of the public in a radiological emergency: International recommendations and actual practice in the USSR and Russia after the Chernobyl accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konstantinov, Yu.

    1997-01-01

    Whilst the basic principles for protection of the public in radiological emergency are well discussed and widely accepted, application of these principles in real intervention practices face problems. Radiological information is most complicated to understand and interpret for decision-makers. The paper deals with some of these points when establishing intervention levels, which need careful attention to reduce misunderstanding in the decision-making process. The points listed below are considered on the basis of analysis of international recommendations (ICRP, IAEA, CEC et al.) as well as experience gained via the post-Chernobyl intervention policy in Russia. The latter is briefly summarized here to introduce the following discussion

  2. Protocol Additional to the Agreement between the People's Republic of China and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The text of the Protocol Additional to the Safeguards Agreement concluded between the People's Republic of China and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in China is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Additional Protocol was approved by the Board of Governors on 25 November 1998. It was signed in Vienna on 31 December 1998. Pursuant to Article 10 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on the date on which the Agency received from China written notification that China's statutory and constitutional requirements for entry into force have been met, i.e. on 28 March 2002

  3. Recommandations pour la protection des fonds de réservoirs contre la corrosion externe et interne Recommendations for Protecting Tank Bottoms Against External and Internal Corrosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chambre Syndicale du Pétrole

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Ce document analyse le sprincipales causes de corrosion externe et inerne des réservoirs de stockage à axe vertical et recommande diverses mesures de prévention. Pour la protection externe, ces mesures concernent la conception des fondations et des fonds et la protection cathodique our la protection interne, elles concernet l'inhibition chimique, la protection cathodique et surtout les revêtements. This article analyzes the leading causes of external ant internal corrosion of vertical-axis storage tanks ant reccomends different prevention measures to protect the outside these measures have to do with the design of the foundations and bottom as well as with cathodic protection. t protect the inside they have to do with chemical inhibition, cathodic production and espacially coatings.

  4. What are the minimum requirements for ketogenic diet services in resource-limited regions? Recommendations from the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force for Dietary Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Al-Macki, Nabil; Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Kim, Heung D; Liao, Jianxiang; Megaw, Katherine; Nathan, Janak K; Raimann, Ximena; Rivera, Rocio; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Williams, Emma; Zupec-Kania, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of dietary therapies for children and adults with refractory epilepsy, the availability of these treatments in developing countries with limited resources remains suboptimal. One possible contributory factor may be the costs. There is often reported a significant perceived need for a large ketogenic diet team, supplements, laboratory studies, and follow-up visits to provide this treatment. The 2009 Epilepsia Consensus Statement described ideal requirements for a ketogenic diet center, but in some situations this is not feasible. As a result, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Dietary Therapy was asked to convene and provide practical, cost-effective recommendations for new ketogenic diet centers in resource-limited regions of the world. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  5. Agency Correspondence Tracking System (ACTS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Agency Correspondence Tracking System: is an executive correspondence tracking system for the Administrator. It collects and organizes information on reports...

  6. Neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction: Clinical management recommendations of the Neurologic Incontinence committee of the fifth International Consultation on Incontinence 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Marcus John; Apostolidis, Apostolos; Cocci, Andrea; Emmanuel, Anton; Gajewski, Jerzy B; Harrison, Simon C W; Heesakkers, John P F A; Lemack, Gary E; Madersbacher, Helmut; Panicker, Jalesh N; Radziszewski, Piotr; Sakakibara, Ryuji; Wyndaele, Jean Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based guidelines for the management of neurological disease and lower urinary tract dysfunction have been produced by the International Consultations on Incontinence (ICI). These are comprehensive guidelines, and were developed to have world-wide relevance. To update clinical management of neurogenic bladder dysfunction from the recommendations of the fourth ICI, 2009. A series of evidence reviews and updates were performed by members of the working group. The resulting guidelines were presented at the 2012 meeting of the European Association of Urology for consultation, and consequently amended to deliver evidence-based conclusions and recommendations in 2013. The current review is a synthesis of the conclusions and recommendations, including the algorithms for initial and specialized management of neurogenic lower urinary tract dysfunction. The pathophysiology is categorized according to the nature of onset of neurological disease and the part(s) of the nervous system affected. Assessment requires clinical evaluation, general investigations, and specialized testing. Treatment primarily focuses on ensuring safety of the patient and optimizing quality of life. Symptom management covers conservative and interventional measures to aid urine storage and bladder emptying, along with containment of incontinence. A multidisciplinary approach to management is essential. The review offers a pragmatic review of management in the context of complex pathophysiology and varied evidence base. Neurourol. Urodynam. 35:657-665, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Canada's Response to the Recommendations in the Tenth Biennial Report on Great Lakes Water Quality of the International Joint Commission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    The Government of Canada and Ontario are currently renegotiating the Canada-Ontario Agreement Respecting the Great Lakes Basin Ecosystem (COA). They are committed to restoring and maintaining the basin's chemical, physical and biological integrity and ensuring that it has a healthy, sustainable future. The COA has established a strategic framework for coordinated federal-provincial responsibilities regarding the Great Lakes basin ecosystem. This document presents responses to the recommendations of the International Joint Commission's (IJC) Tenth Biennial Report on how to improve the performance and effectiveness of government programs such as the Great Lakes Water Quality Agreement. According to the IJC, there are many challenges ahead, including: cleanup of Canadian Areas of Concern; controlling and preventing the further introduction of exotic species; mitigating the impact of rapid urban growth on environmental conditions throughout the basin; and reducing contaminants transported in the atmosphere over long distances to the Great Lakes. This document presented the government's responses to each of the following IJC recommendations regarding remedial action plans, threats to human health with respect to consumption of fish, contaminated sediment, airborne toxic substances, Great Lakes binational toxics strategy, land use, alien invasive species, and information and data management. IJC also recommended that indicators should be reported regarding whether the Great Lakes surface waters are suitable for drinking, swimming and whether fish are edible.

  8. Report on the behalf of the Foreign Affairs Commission on the bill project n 3080 authorizing the ratification of the statutes of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-01-01

    This document first recalls that the creation of the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) is due to a German initiative. It recalls the rather quick negotiations (2007-2009) which led to the creation of the Agency, outlines that its statutes were inspired by those of other organizations coming under the United Nations. It comments the content of the article which defines the agency's missions. Then it discusses some questions which have been shelved: the absence of China and Russia, the risk of non ratification by the United States, the language issue. In a second part, the document reports the discussions during the bill examination by the Commission. An appendix indicates the countries which have signed or ratified the IRENA statutes

  9. Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 16 June 2005. It was signed on 7 July 2006 in Sydney and 14 July 2006 in Vienna [fr

  10. Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 16 June 2005. It was signed on 7 July 2006 in Sydney and 14 July 2006 in Vienna

  11. Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 16 June 2005. It was signed on 7 July 2006 in Sydney and 14 July 2006 in Vienna [es

  12. Statement of the Director General to the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1999-01-01

    In his Statement on the forty-third regular session of the General Conference of the IAEA, the Director General of the Agency presented the past, present and future programme of the Agency in terms of the three 'pillars' that constitute its mandate: Nuclear technology (with emphasis on nuclear power and nuclear applications); Nuclear, radiation and waste safety (with emphasis on international conventions prescribing the basic legal norms for the safe use of nuclear energy, internationally accepted safety standards, and measures to assist Member States in the implementation of these conventions and standards, including technological solutions for improving safety); Nuclear verification and the security of material (with emphasis on IAEA safeguards, and physical protection of nuclear material), including possible new verification activities and specific verification issues (Iraq, DPRK, Middle East region). The Director General also touched in his Statement on two supporting elements that undergird these 'pillars': effective interaction with partners and the public, and achieving excellence in management

  13. Social Media and the Freedom of the Press: a long-term Perspective from within International News Agencies (AFP, Reuters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérémie NICEY

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1780s, discussions among news professionals on issues such as access to sources and the funding of “the media” are often at odds with issues debated by legislators, activists, the executive and the judiciary, in the USA, France and Britain. Is this the case today, with the debate on “social media”, the “Arab spring”, Internet, blogs, SMS, “Twitter” and the like? This is one issue that will be addressed. The authors have researched the history and present news-products and performance of AFP and Reuters (now Thomson-Reuters for many years. The second issue addressed here is: how do news-professionals assess current geopolitical and technological “changes” with respect to their established canons and practices of news-reporting? How do they access, filter, and select from the apparent abundance of sources emerging from “civil society actors”, while respecting established practices of news-agency journalism? As the very notion of “mainstream media” encompasses an ever-growing number of actors (CNN is “mainstream”, al-Jazeera has become ‘mainstream’…, is the issue of access to an ever-widening number of sources to be reassessed in terms not only of the freedom of the media but also to that of the resources available to “seasoned, reputable” news-professionals and their organizations to check, cross-check the “images”, “texts” and numbers emanating from these sources? Issues such as the freedom of the media are ever-more linked to that of the canons of international news-reporting. The authors argue that whereas the freedom of the media is still of central importance, the advent of communications technologies – and the commercial logics that underpin them – often linked to the Internet, radically modify how news-professionals go about their business, in an era of “globalization”, “social media” and “democratization”.

  14. Communication of 19 June 1997 received from the resident representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-07-01

    The document reproduces the text of a letter dated 19 June 1997 received by the Director General of the IAEA from the Resident Representative of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, referring to the Revised Supplementary Agreement Concerning the Provision of Technical Assistance by the International Atomic Energy Agency to the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland on behalf of the Government of Hong Kong done at Vienna on 4 February 1983

  15. Text of communication of 14 November 2000 received from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The Director General has received a communication dated 14 November 2000 from the Permanent Mission of the Russian Federation to the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning nuclear disarmament, attaching a statement by the President of the Russian Federation. The text of the communication and, as requested therein, the text of the President of the Russian Federation, are attached hereto for the information of Member States

  16. Communication of 22 February 1999 received from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Belarus to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a communication from the Permanent Mission of the Republic of Belarus concerning a Note of 28 January 1999 from the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Belarus which provides information about the nuclear export policies and practices of Belarus. In light of the wish expressed in the Note, its text is attached hereto

  17. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist's Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately

  18. Assessment of the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in relevant human resources development in Sudan during the period 1999-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadalla, S.A.

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the role of International Atomic Energy Agency in human resources development. The Agency is believed to be one of the specialized U N organizations aiming at peaceful applications of atomic energy in areas such as human health, animal health, agriculture, industry. Sudan joined the Agency in 1958 to make use of assistance provided to establish human development projects in the country through technical cooperation. Through this study, the role of research projects has been highlighted and the impact on human resources development and service enhancement is discussed. The annual reports from the Agency and the competent authority were the secondary sources. The primary source was personal interviews with national coordinators and director general of Sudan Atomic Energy Commission. The study concluded that the technical assistance from the Agency played a significant role in development through technology transfer especially in waste management, non-destructive testing, and human health. The role of Sudan Atomic Energy Commission in management of such projects is acknowledged.(Author)

  19. 'My body is mine': Qualitatively exploring agency among internally displaced women participants in a small-group intervention in Leogane, Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logie, Carmen H; Daniel, CarolAnn

    2016-01-01

    The 2010 earthquake resulted in the breakdown of Haiti's social, economic and health infrastructure. Over one-quarter of a million people remain internally displaced (ID). ID women experience heightened vulnerability to intimate partner violence (IPV) due to increased poverty and reduced community networks. Scant research has examined experiences of IPV among ID women in post-earthquake Haiti. We conducted a qualitative study to explore the impact of participating in Famn an Aksyon Pou Santé Yo (FASY), a small-group HIV prevention intervention, on ID women's agency in Leogane, Haiti. We conducted four focus groups with ID women, FASY participants (n = 40) and in-depth individual interviews with peer health workers (n = 7). Our study was guided by critical ethnography and paid particular attention to power relations. Findings highlighted multiple forms of IPV (e.g., physical, sexual). Participants discussed processes of intrapersonal (confidence), interpersonal (communication), relational (support) and collective (women's rights) agency. Yet structural factors, including patriarchal gender norms and poverty, silenced IPV discussions and constrained women's agency. Findings suggest that agency among ID women is a multi-level, non-linear and incremental process. To effectively address IPV among ID women in Haiti, interventions should address structural contexts of gender inequity and poverty and concurrently facilitate multi-level processes of agency.

  20. International Children's Continence Society's recommendations for therapeutic intervention in congenital neuropathic bladder and bowel dysfunction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawashdeh, Y F; Austin, P; Siggaard, C; Bauer, S B; Franco, I; de Jong, T P; Jorgensen, T M

    2012-06-01

    We present a consensus view of members of the International Children's Continence Society on the therapeutic intervention in congenital neuropatic bladder and bowel dysfunction in children. Discussions were held by a group of pediatric urologists and gastroenterologists appointed by the board. The following draft review document was open to all the ICCS members via the ICCS web site. Feedback was considered by the core authors and by agreement, amendments were made as necessary. The final document is not a systematic literature review. It includes relevant research when available as well as expert opinion on the current understanding of therapeutic intervention in congenital neuropatic bladder and bowel dysfunction in children. Guidelines on pharmalogical and surgical intervention are presented. First the multiple modalities for intervention that do not involve surgical reconstruction are summarized concerning pharmacological agents, medical devices, and neuromodulation. The non-surgical intervention is promoted before undertaking major surgery. Indicators for non-surgical treatments depend on issues related to intravesical pressure, upper urinary tract status, prevalence of urinary tract infections, and the degree of incontinence. The optimal age for treatment of incontinence is also addressed. This is followed by a survey of specific treatments such as anticholinergics, botulinum-A toxin, antibiotics, and catheters. Neuromodulation of the bladder via intravesical electrical stimulation, sacral nerve stimulation, transcutaneous stimulation, and biofeedback is scrutinized. Then follows surgical intervention, which should be tailored to each individual, based on careful consideration of urodynamic findings, medical history, age, and presence of other disability. Treatments mentioned are: urethral dilation, vesicostomy, bladder, augmentation, fascial sling, artificial urinary sphincters, and bladder neck reconstruction and are summarized with regards to success rates

  1. Quality Assurance of Quality Assurance Agencies from an Asian Perspective: Regulation, Autonomy and Accountability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Angela Yung-Chi; Ince, Martin; Tsai, Sandy; Chiang, Chung Lin

    2015-01-01

    As quality guardians of higher education, quality assurance agencies are required to guarantee the credibility of the review process and to ensure the objectivity and transparency of their decisions and recommendations. These agencies are therefore expected to use a range of internal and external approaches to prove the quality of their review…

  2. Possible implications of draft ICRP recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has, since its inception, worked to develop and improve international norms in the area of radiological protection of the public, workers and the environment. International radiological protection norms continue to evolve, with significant new steps having been taken by the International Radiological Protection Commission (ICRP). Since the issuance of its 1990 recommendations, which form the basis of the international system of radiological protection, the ICRP has continued to add to them. The sum of these recommendations has become overly complicated and at times incoherent. In 1999 the ICRP therefore began to re-evaluate its recommendations with the aim of consolidation, simplification and clarification. New ICRP recommendations are due to be published in 2005. The CRPPH is contributing to the development of these new recommendations by providing the views of regulators and practitioners from its member countries. This report summarises the views of the CRPPH regarding the conceptual framework that the ICRP has recently proposed as the basis for its forthcoming detailed recommendations. The CRPPH highly appreciates the open stakeholder process that the ICRP has initiated to gather input for the development of new recommendations. This document, which is supported by the NEA Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health, and by the NEA Radioactive Waste Management Committee, provides detailed suggestions with regard to the proposed ICRP framework. The stakeholder views expressed in this report have been presented to the ICRP at the second NEA/ICRP Forum in April 2003, and have persuaded the ICRP to reintroduce several key concepts into its proposed new system. (author)

  3. Use of contraceptive methods and contraceptive recommendations among health care providers actively involved in contraceptive counseling -- results of an international survey in 10 countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gemzell-Danielsson, Kristina; Cho, SiHyun; Inki, Pirjo; Mansour, Diana; Reid, Robert; Bahamondes, Luis

    2012-12-01

    This study was conducted to determine the personal choices of contraceptive methods among an international sample of contraception health care professionals (HCPs) and to determine if these choices are concordant with their recommendations to women. In an anonymous online survey, 1001 HCPs actively involved in contraceptive counseling [obstetrician/gynecologists (OB/GYNs), general practitioners (GPs) and midwives (only in Sweden)] from 10 countries (Australia, Brazil, Canada, France, Germany, Korea, Mexico, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom) were asked about their personal use of contraceptive methods and their recommendations to women in two different clinical scenarios: for spacing between children (Group A) and after completion of the family (Group B). The largest HCP group was OB/GYNs (67.1%), followed by GPs (31.4%) and midwives (1.5%). A total of 42.7% of respondents were male, and 57.3% were female. The majority of respondents were aged 36-45 years (38.9%) or 46-55 years (42.8%), 79.7% had children, and 53.9% were currently using contraception (by themselves or by their partners). Among 540 contraceptive users, the three most common methods were the levonorgestrel-releasing intrauterine system (LNG-IUS; 29.3%), combined oral contraceptives (COCs; 20.0%) and condoms (17.0%). OB/GYNs were more likely to be using the LNG-IUS than GPs (p=.014). Gender did not seem to influence contraceptive preference. Reasons for these choices were largely influenced by family situation and high contraceptive efficacy (for the LNG-IUS) or side effects caused by other methods (for condoms). The top contraceptive recommendation was COCs for Group A and the LNG-IUS for Group B. HCPs currently using COCs and the LNG-IUS were more likely to recommend these methods than other contraceptive methods for Group A and Group B, respectively. The most popular contraceptive method in this sample of HCPs was the LNG-IUS. Choice of contraceptive method was driven by family situation, age

  4. Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The text of the Protocol between the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the International Atomic Energy Agency Additional to the Agreement between the Government of Fiji and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in the Annex to this document for the information of all Members. The Board of Governors approved the Additional Protocol on 16 June 2005. It was signed on 7 July 2006 in Sydney and 14 July 2006 in Vienna. Pursuant to Article 17 of the Additional Protocol, the Protocol entered into force on 14 July 2006, upon signature by the representatives of the Republic of the Fiji Islands and the Agency

  5. Radiotherapy for non-small cell lung cancer: volume definition and patient selection. Annecy 1998 international Association for the study of lung cancer (IASLC) Workshop recommendations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mornex, F.; Loubeyre, P.; Van houtte, P.; Scalliet, P.

    1998-01-01

    Chemo-radiation is the standard treatment of unresectable, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, with a mean dose of 60-66 Gy, excluding escalation dose schemes. The standard treated volume includes primary tumor, ipsilateral hilar and mediastinal nodes, supraclavicular and contralateral nodes as well, regardless of the node status. This work tries to answer the question of the optimal volume to be treated. Drainage routes analysis is in favor of large volumes, while toxicity analysis favors small volumes. Combined modality treatment may increase the observed toxicity. The optimal volume definition is difficult, and requires available conformal therapy tools. Patients selection is another important issue. A volume definition is then attempted, based on the IASLC (International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer) Annecy workshop experience, highlighting the inter-observers discrepancies, and suggests basic recommendations to harmonize volume definition. (author)

  6. International Atomic Energy Agency fellows: Where are they now? The Department of Technical Cooperation's report on the fellowship survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    In order to assess the impact and the quality of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) fellowship programme, the Department of Technical Cooperation conducted a survey among former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. These fellows have all completed the fellowship training, and have had time to judge in what way their training is useful to their work in their home country. As a result of this survey, further surveys could be conducted to serve as a continuous systematic assessment of the fellowship and other programmes. Former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 were asked to fill out a questionnaire containing questions regarding the following: Where are the former fellows now and what are they doing? How did the fellows rate the quality of the fellowship programme? How did the fellows rate the impact of the training they received through the fellowship programme, the impact on their home institution, and the impact on the TC project and their home country? The survey period was 11 February - 4 March 2005. Reaching a sufficient number of former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002 posed some difficulties. The National Liaison Officers contributed greatly in finding the former fellows' current contact information. Out of the 2067 fellows who were in the field in the years 2001 and 2002, 613 participated in the survey (meaning, 30% of all fellows from those years and 50% of those reached by email or fax). The results of the survey given below represent only the survey participants' opinions, not those of all former fellows from the years 2001 and 2002. To ensure that the results are representative of all fellows, a follow-up study of seven countries is currently being done. The IAEA fellowship programme contributes successfully to knowledge and technology transfer to fellows' home institutions, their home countries and the TC projects they are involved in, as evidenced by the following survey results: 94% of the fellows who participated in the survey

  7. Correlation study among the International Atomic Energy Agency standards and market standards on management system applicable to a UF6 conversion plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Dirceu Paulo de

    2008-01-01

    The Agency - International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), following the market trend of the management system integration, has decided to revise the quality assurance standards - IAEA 50-C/SG-Q publishing, in 2006, the standard on Management System (MS). IAEA GS-R-3 and its IAEA GS-G-3.1 guide. Also, the IAEA is about to publish a supplementary guide - IAEA DS349, which consider the integration of several functions involved in management of nuclear facilities, such as: safety, health, environmental and quality, ensuring that nuclear safety is not compromised. Conversion plants of 'Yellowcake' in UF 6 use and process radioactive materials, as well as other substances normally found in the chemical conventional industry, inserting themselves in the organization profile that require a high pattern of definition, implementation and continuous improvement of their MS and, therefore, should consider an approach of management integrated system (MIS). Taking a UF 6 conversion plant as focus, the correlation was performed among the Agency MS standards and those of the market - ISO 9001, ISO 14001 and OHSAS 18001, as well as with the Agency drafts standards on safety (DS316 and DS344), concluding that, in structuring an MIS, in compliance with the Agency MS standards, except for some adjustments, the ISO 9001, ISO 14001, and OHSAS 18001 are going to be met. On the other hand, the structuring of MIS should identify other requirements on safety, health and environmental, which also consider the conventional chemical and industrial characteristics that are out of the scope (ionizing radiation) of the safety standards of the Agency. The research proposes a documental procedure for a MIS applicable to this plant, providing elements for rationalization and contents of the identified documentation, for the promotion of the integration of the considered MS functions. (author)

  8. AST/ALT ratio is not an index of liver fibrosis in chronic hepatitis C when aminotransferase activities are determinate according to the international recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guéchot, Jérôme; Boisson, Renée Claude; Zarski, Jean-Pierre; Sturm, Nathalie; Calès, Paul; Lasnier, Elisabeth

    2013-11-01

    The aspartate aminotransferase activity (AST)/alanine aminotransferase activity (ALT) ratio is used as liver fibrosis index whereas the reported data are conflicting. In chronic hepatitis C (CHC), reported diagnostic accuracies range from none to good for significant fibrosis and to excellent for cirrhosis. Assuming that AST/ALT increases are mainly due to vitamin B6 defects since pyridoxal phosphate (PLP), active form of B6, acts as coenzyme in transamination reactions, we evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of the AST/ALT ratio using standardized methods for AST and ALT activities, with PLP addition as recommended, in a prospective multicenter cohort of CHC patients. ALT and AST activities were measured using the recommended IFCC methods with addition of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate. We evaluated the AST/ALT ratio for the diagnosis of liver fibrosis or cirrhosis in a cohort of CHC patients included in a multicenter prospective study. A liver biopsy was performed in each patient and reviewed by two independent pathologists in order to determine the fibrosis stage according to Metavir classification which was the reference standard. AST/ALT ratio significantly increased with histological stage of liver fibrosis and there was a significant correlation between Metavir fibrosis stage and AST/ALT ratio (r=0.129, PALT ratio does not discriminate significant fibrosis (F≥2) (AUROC=0.531) and had only very poor diagnostic accuracies for severe fibrosis (F≥3) (AUROC=0.584) or cirrhosis (F4) (AUROC=0.626). AST/ALT ratio is not a good and discriminative index of liver fibrosis in CHC when aminotransferase activities are determinate according to the international recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Communication of 29 September 1998 received from the Permanent Mission of Qatar to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of a Communication received at IAEA on 29 September 1998 from the Permanent Mission of Qatar to the IAEA in connection with the vote of the delegation of Qatar to the forty-second session of the Agency's General Conference regarding the agenda item 19 on the 'Implementation of United Nations Security Council resolution relating to Iraq'

  10. Communication of 30 June 1995 received from the permanent mission of Australia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 3 July 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 30 June 1995 transmitting a Statement of 23 June 1995 by the Prime Minister of Australia concerning the resumption of nuclear testing by France. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Australia, the text of the Statement is being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  11. Announcement on the scope of application of the agreement on the privileges and exemptions of the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    The German Democratic Republic does not feel bound by articles 26 and 34 of the Convention enacting obligatory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice. With regard to the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice in controversies arising from the interpretation or application of the Convention, the GDR holds the view that in every single case the consent of all parties concerned is necessary for the commitment of a specific controversy to the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice. This reservation also applies to the terms under article 34 according to which the opinion of the International Court of Justice is considered to be of binding force. (orig./AK) [de

  12. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and its role in world-wide security of nuclear fuels and facilities and non-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eklund, S.

    1976-01-01

    This article outlines the wide range of the Agency's concerns in both promoting the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and ensuring that it is safely used with minimal risk of damage to man and his environment. This latter aspect includes measures against diversion to military purposes, theft or sabotage. There is a marked tendency to leave the promotion of nuclear energy to industry and commerce, and for many regional and national nuclear energy authorities to become increasingly absorbed in its safety and regulatory aspects--the ultimate aim being the establishment of a world nuclear law. This trend will certainly also be reflected in the Agency's program and will gain strength as time goes on. However, the International Atomic Energy Agency is sharply differentiated from national authorities in the industrial countries and from most regional nuclear energy authorities by the fact that its program must continue to reflect the needs of the developing nations which constitute a majority of its Member States. These nations--most of which are ''energy hungry''--need the Agency's help to benefit from the peaceful applications of nuclear science and technology

  13. Demonstrations of Agency in Contemporary International Children's Literature: An Exploratory Critical Content Analysis across Personal, Social, and Cultural Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, Janelle B.

    2015-01-01

    International children's literature has the potential to create global experiences and cultural insights for young people confronted with limited and biased images of the world offered by media. The current inquiry was designed to explore, through a critical content analysis approach, international children's literature in which characters…

  14. Part 3: Adult Basic Life Support and Automated External Defibrillation: 2015 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travers, Andrew H; Perkins, Gavin D; Berg, Robert A; Castren, Maaret; Considine, Julie; Escalante, Raffo; Gazmuri, Raul J; Koster, Rudolph W; Lim, Swee Han; Nation, Kevin J; Olasveengen, Theresa M; Sakamoto, Tetsuya; Sayre, Michael R; Sierra, Alfredo; Smyth, Michael A; Stanton, David; Vaillancourt, Christian

    2015-10-20

    This review comprises the most extensive literature search and evidence evaluation to date on the most important international BLS interventions, diagnostics, and prognostic factors for cardiac arrest victims. It reemphasizes that the critical lifesaving steps of BLS are (1) prevention, (2) immediate recognition and activation of the emergency response system, (3) early high-quality CPR, and (4) rapid defibrillation for shockable rhythms. Highlights in prevention indicate the rational and judicious deployment of search-and-rescue operations in drowning victims and the importance of education on opioid-associated emergencies. Other 2015 highlights in recognition and activation include the critical role of dispatcher recognition and dispatch-assisted chest compressions, which has been demonstrated in multiple international jurisdictions with consistent improvements in cardiac arrest survival. Similar to the 2010 ILCOR BLS treatment recommendations, the importance of high quality was reemphasized across all measures of CPR quality: rate, depth, recoil, and minimal chest compression pauses, with a universal understanding that we all should be providing chest compressions to all victims of cardiac arrest. This review continued to focus on the interface of BLS sequencing and ensuring high-quality CPR with other important BLS interventions, such as ventilation and defibrillation. In addition, this consensus statement highlights the importance of EMS systems, which employ bundles of care focusing on providing high-quality chest compressions while extricating the patient from the scene to the next level of care. Highlights in defibrillation indicate the global importance of increasing the number of sites with public-access defibrillation programs. Whereas the 2010 ILCOR Consensus on Science provided important direction for the “what” in resuscitation (ie, what to do), the 2015 consensus has begun with the GRADE methodology to provide direction for the quality of

  15. Communication of 26 June 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Ecuador to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 27 June 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 26 June 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Ecuador transmitting a Statement of 22 June 1995 issued by the Rio Group concerning the resumption of nuclear testing by France. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Ecuador, the text of the Statement is being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  16. Communication of 24 November 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Australia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 27 November 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 24 November 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Australia transmitting Statements of 22 November 1995 by the Prime Minister of Australia, by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Australia and by the Secretary-General of the South Pacific Forum on ''The Fourth French Nuclear Test''. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Australia, the texts of the Statements are being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  17. Communication of 30 August 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Australia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 1 September 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 30 August 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Australia transmitting a Declaration of 17 August 1995 by South Pacific Environment Ministers concerning the resumption of nuclear testing by France. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Australia, the text of the Declaration is being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  18. Communication of 7 September 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Australia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 8 September 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 7 September 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Australia transmitting two Statements by the Prime Minister of Australia, one issued in his capacity as Chairman of the South Pacific Forum, concerning the resumption of nuclear testing by France. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Australia, the texts of the Statements are being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency specialists meeting on experience in ageing, maintenance, and modernization of instrumentation and control systems for improving nuclear power plant availability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-10-01

    This report presents the proceedings of the Specialist`s Meeting on Experience in Aging, Maintenance and Modernization of Instrumentation and Control Systems for Improving Nuclear Power Plant Availability that was held at the Ramada Inn in Rockville, Maryland on May 5--7, 1993. The Meeting was presented in cooperation with the Electric Power Research Institute, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the International Atomic Energy Agency. There were approximately 65 participants from 13 countries at the Meeting. Individual reports have been cataloged separately.

  20. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST); Volume 1: Cases E100-E200

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.

    2002-01-01

    This report describes the Building Energy Simulation Test for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST) project conducted by the Tool Evaluation and Improvement International Energy Agency (IEA) Experts Group. The group was composed of experts from the Solar Heating and Cooling (SHC) Programme, Task 22, Subtask A. The current test cases, E100-E200, represent the beginning of work on mechanical equipment test cases; additional cases that would expand the current test suite have been proposed for future development.

  1. Proposal for a coordination research programme (CRP) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) on stable isotope tracer techniques for studies on protein-energy interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shetty, P.; James, W.P.T.

    1993-01-01

    This Report provides a rationale and justification for the initiation of a Coordinated Research programme to support studies using stable isotopic tracer techniques to address priority areas of human protein-energy interactions with special emphasis on the problems of human nutrition in developing countries. The Report suggests a modus for establishing such a practically oriented Coordinated Research Programme under the aegis of the International Atomic Energy Agency with concrete suggestions for its organization and the identification of probable participants in such a programme. The likely sources of additional funding to sustain such an activity viable for a period of 4 to 5 years are also indicated. 8 refs

  2. Communication from the Permanent Mission of Australia to the International Atomic Energy Agency regarding Guidelines for the Export of Nuclear Material, Equipment and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Director General of the International Atomic Energy Agency has received a Note Verbale from the Permanent Mission of Australia, dated 31 August 2001, providing information on the export policies and practices of the Government of Australia with respect to the export of nuclear material, equipment and technology. In the light of the wish expressed at the end of the Note Verbale, the text of the Note Verbale is attached. The attachment referenced in the Note Verbale was issued previously as INFCIRC/254/Rev. 5/Part 1

  3. A critical exploration of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework from the perspective of oncology: recommendations for revision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornbaum, Catherine C; Doyle, Philip C; Skarakis-Doyle, Elizabeth; Theurer, Julie A

    2013-01-01

    In 2001, the World Health Organization developed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) framework in an effort to attend to the multidimensional health-related concerns of individuals. Historically, although the ICF has frequently been used in a rehabilitation-based context, the World Health Organization has positioned it as a universal framework of health and its related states. Consequently, the ICF has been utilized for a diverse array of purposes in the field of oncology, including: evaluating functioning in individuals with cancer, guiding assessment in oncology rehabilitation, assessing the comprehensiveness of outcome measures utilized in oncology research, assisting in health-related quality of life instrument selection, and comparing the primary concerns of health professionals with those of their patients. Examination of the ICF through the lens of cancer care highlights the fact that this framework can be a valuable tool to facilitate comprehensive care in oncology, but it currently possesses some areas of limitation that require conceptual revision; to this end, several recommendations have been proposed. Specifically, these proposed recommendations center on the following three areas of the ICF framework: (1) the replacement of the term "health condition" with the more inclusive and dynamic term "health state;" (2) the continuing development and refinement of the personal factors component to ensure issues such as comorbidities can be accounted for appropriately; and (3) the inclusion of a mechanism to account for the subjective dimension of health and functioning (eg, quality of life). It is through the expansion of these conceptual parameters that the ICF may become more relevant and applicable to the field of oncology. With these important revisions, the ICF has the potential to provide a broader biopsychosocial perspective of care that captures the diverse range of concerns that arise throughout the continuum

  4. Communication of 23 August 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of Australia to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 25 August 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 23 August 1995 from the Permanent Mission of Australia transmitting a Statement of 22 August 1995 by the Prime Minister of Australia made as Chairman of the South Pacific Forum concerning the second test of a nuclear weapon by China since the 1995 NPT Review and Extension Conference. As requested by the Permanent Mission of Australia, the text of the Statement is being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  5. The text of the amended Protocol to the Agreement between the Kingdom of Swaziland and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Member States of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    The text of the amended Protocol to the Agreement between the Kingdom of Swaziland and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, is reproduced in this document for the information of all Member States of the Agency [es

  6. An evaluation of the International Society for Animal Genetics recommended parentage and identification panel for the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, M; van Haeringen, W A

    2017-08-01

    In this study, the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG) recommended panel for the identification of the domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica) is characterized based on commonly used statistical parameters. The marker panel is based on 16 short tandem repeat (STR) loci (PIGN15, PIGN10, PIGN57, PIGN26, CliμD16, CliμD19, PIGN12, CliμD17, CliμT17, PIGN04, CliμD01, CliμD11, CliμD35, CliμT02, CliμT13, CliμT43). The alleles of the 16 loci consist of a mixture of tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexameric repeat patterns. A sex determination marker was included in the multiplex for quality control. The repeat sequence of the PIGN markers was previously unpublished and therefore sequenced to reveal the sequence pattern. In total, 1421 pigeons were genotyped on 16 STR loci to generate allele frequency data for each locus. For all 16 markers combined, a PE1 (combined non-exclusion probability, first parent) of 0.9986 and PE2 (combined non-exclusion probability, second parent) of >0.9999 was observed. Comparing the alleged father and mother, a PE value of >0.9999 was observed. Two of the markers, CliμD19 and PIGN12, were found to have relatively high Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and F(null) values. Therefore these markers may be considered to be replaced by other STRs. Another point of discussion may be to add a gender identification marker to the recommended ISAG panel. Not only can this serve as an extra identification marker, but this can also confirm the sex of a sample, because it is challenging to determine the sex based on phenotypical characteristics, especially for chicks. In conclusion, the set of 16 STR markers can be used in routine parentage verification and the identification of individuals. © 2017 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  7. Evidence-informed recommendations to reduce dissemination bias in clinical research: conclusions from the OPEN (Overcome failure to Publish nEgative fiNdings) project based on an international consensus meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerpohl, Joerg J; Schell, Lisa K; Bassler, Dirk; Gallus, Silvano; Kleijnen, Jos; Kulig, Michael; La Vecchia, Carlo; Marušić, Ana; Ravaud, Philippe; Reis, Andreas; Schmucker, Christine; Strech, Daniel; Urrútia, Gerard; Wager, Elizabeth; Antes, Gerd

    2015-05-05

    Dissemination bias in clinical research severely impedes informed decision-making not only for healthcare professionals and patients, but also for funders, research ethics committees, regulatory bodies and other stakeholder groups that make health-related decisions. Decisions based on incomplete and biased evidence cannot only harm people, but may also have huge financial implications by wasting resources on ineffective or harmful diagnostic and therapeutic measures, and unnecessary research. Owing to involvement of multiple stakeholders, it remains easy for any single group to assign responsibility for resolving the problem to others. To develop evidence-informed general and targeted recommendations addressing the various stakeholders involved in knowledge generation and dissemination to help overcome the problem of dissemination bias on the basis of previously collated evidence. Based on findings from systematic reviews, document analyses and surveys, we developed general and targeted draft recommendations. During a 2-day workshop in summer 2013, these draft recommendations were discussed with external experts and key stakeholders, and refined following a rigorous and transparent methodological approach. Four general, overarching recommendations applicable to all or most stakeholder groups were formulated, addressing (1) awareness raising, (2) implementation of targeted recommendations, (3) trial registration and results posting, and (4) systematic approaches to evidence synthesis. These general recommendations are complemented and specified by 47 targeted recommendations tailored towards funding agencies, pharmaceutical and device companies, research institutions, researchers (systematic reviewers and trialists), research ethics committees, trial registries, journal editors and publishers, regulatory agencies, benefit (health technology) assessment institutions and legislators. Despite various recent examples of dissemination bias and several initiatives to

  8. Protocol between Romania and the International Atomic Energy Agency additional to the agreement between the Socialist Republic of Romania and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the Protocol Additional to the agreement between Romania and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons which was approved by the Board of Governors on 9 June 1999, signed in Vienna on 11 June 1999, and entered into force on 7 July 2000

  9. "Recommendations for uniform reporting of data following major trauma--the Utstein style" (as of July 17, 1999). An International Trauma Anaesthesia and Critical Care Society (ITACCS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, W F; Baskett, P J; Grande, C; Delooz, H; Kloeck, W; Lackner, C; Lipp, M; Mauritz, W; Nerlich, M; Nicholl, J; Nolan, J; Oakley, P; Parr, M; Seekamp, A; Soreide, E; Steen, P A; van Camp, L; Wolcke, B; Yates, D

    2000-01-01

    Basic and advanced care of trauma patients has always been an important aspect of prehospital and immediate in-hospital emergency medicine, involving a broad spectrum of disciplines, specialties and skills delivered through Emergency Medical Services Systems which, however, may differ significantly in structure, resources and operation. This complex background has, at least in part, hindered the development of a uniform pattern or set of criteria and definitions. This in turn has hitherto rendered data incompatible, with the consequence that such differing systems or protocols of care cannot be readily evaluated or compared with acceptable validity. Guided by previous consensus processes evolved by the ERC, the AHA and other International Organizations--represented in ILCOR--on 'Uniform reporting of data following out-of-hospital and in-hospital cardiac arrest--the Utstein style' an international working group of ITACCS has drafted a document, 'Recommendations for uniform reporting of data following major trauma--the Utstein style'. The reporting system is based on the following considerations: A structured reporting system based on an "Utstein style template" which would permit the compilation of data and statistics on major trauma care, facilitating and validating independent or comparative audit of performance and quality of care (and enable groups to challenge performance statistics which did not take account of all relevant information). The recommendations and template should encompass both out-of-hospital and in-hospital trauma care. The recommendations and template should further permit intra- and inter-system evaluation to improve the quality of delivered care and identification of the relative benefits of different systems and innovative initiatives. The template should facilitate studies setting out to improve epidemiological understanding of trauma; for example such studies might focus on the factors that determine survival. The document is structured

  10. Recommendations for uniform reporting of data following major trauma--the Utstein Style: an initiative. International Trauma Anaesthesia and Critical Care Society (ITACCS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Basic and advanced care of trauma patients always has been an important aspect of prehospital and immediate in-hospital Emergency Medicine, involving a broad spectrum of disciplines, specialties, and skills delivered through Emergency Medical Services Systems which, however, may differ significantly in structure, resources, and operation. This complex background, at least in part, has hindered the development of a uniform pattern or set of criteria and definitions. This in turn, has rendered data incompatible, with the consequence that such differing systems or protocols of care cannot be evaluated or compared readily with acceptable validity. Guided by previous consensus processes evolved by the ERC, the AHA, and other International Organisations represented in ILCOR--on Uniform Reporting of Data following Out-of-hospital and In-hospital Cardiac Arrest--the Utstein Style, an international working group of ITACCS, has drafted a document, Recommendations for Uniform Reporting of Data following Major Trauma--the Utstein Style. The reporting system is based on the following considerations: 1) A structured reporting system based on an "Utstein style template" that would permit the compilation of data and statistics on major trauma care, facilitating and validating independent or comparative audit of performance, and quality of care (and enable groups to challenge performance statistics that did not take account of all relevant information); 2) The Recommendations and Template should encompass both out-of-hospital and in-hospital trauma care; 3) The Recommendations and Template should permit further intra- and inter-system evaluation to improve the quality of delivered care and identification of the relative benefits of different systems and innovative initiatives; and 4) The Template should facilitate studies setting out to improve epidemiological understanding of trauma; for example, such studies might focus on the factors that determine survival. The document is

  11. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications: Recommendations of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network* and Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond; Look, John; Anderson, Gary; Goulet, Jean-Paul; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Gonzalez, Yoly; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambra; Brooks, Sharon L.; Ceusters, Werner; Drangsholt, Mark; Ettlin, Dominik; Gaul, Charly; Goldberg, Louis J.; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A.; Hollender, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T.; De Laat, Antoon; de Leeuw, Reny; Maixner, William; van der Meulen, Marylee; Murray, Greg M.; Nixdorf, Donald R.; Palla, Sandro; Petersson, Arne; Pionchon, Paul; Smith, Barry; Visscher, Corine M.; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Dworkin, Samuel F.

    2015-01-01

    Aims The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. Methods Through a series of workshops and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I diagnostic algorithms were assessed for validity by using the Validation Project's data set, and for reliability by using newly collected data from the ongoing TMJ Impact Project—the follow-up study to the Validation Project. New Axis II instruments were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature providing valid instruments that, relative to the RDC/TMD, are shorter in length, are available in the public domain, and currently are being used in medical settings. Results The newly recommended Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) Axis I protocol includes both a valid screener for detecting any pain-related TMD as well as valid diagnostic criteria for differentiating the most common pain-related TMD (sensitivity ≥ 0.86, specificity ≥ 0

  12. Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (DC/TMD) for Clinical and Research Applications: recommendations of the International RDC/TMD Consortium Network* and Orofacial Pain Special Interest Group†.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffman, Eric; Ohrbach, Richard; Truelove, Edmond; Look, John; Anderson, Gary; Goulet, Jean-Paul; List, Thomas; Svensson, Peter; Gonzalez, Yoly; Lobbezoo, Frank; Michelotti, Ambra; Brooks, Sharon L; Ceusters, Werner; Drangsholt, Mark; Ettlin, Dominik; Gaul, Charly; Goldberg, Louis J; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Hollender, Lars; Jensen, Rigmor; John, Mike T; De Laat, Antoon; de Leeuw, Reny; Maixner, William; van der Meulen, Marylee; Murray, Greg M; Nixdorf, Donald R; Palla, Sandro; Petersson, Arne; Pionchon, Paul; Smith, Barry; Visscher, Corine M; Zakrzewska, Joanna; Dworkin, Samuel F

    2014-01-01

    The original Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) Axis I diagnostic algorithms have been demonstrated to be reliable. However, the Validation Project determined that the RDC/TMD Axis I validity was below the target sensitivity of ≥ 0.70 and specificity of ≥ 0.95. Consequently, these empirical results supported the development of revised RDC/TMD Axis I diagnostic algorithms that were subsequently demonstrated to be valid for the most common pain-related TMD and for one temporomandibular joint (TMJ) intra-articular disorder. The original RDC/TMD Axis II instruments were shown to be both reliable and valid. Working from these findings and revisions, two international consensus workshops were convened, from which recommendations were obtained for the finalization of new Axis I diagnostic algorithms and new Axis II instruments. Through a series of workshops and symposia, a panel of clinical and basic science pain experts modified the revised RDC/TMD Axis I algorithms by using comprehensive searches of published TMD diagnostic literature followed by review and consensus via a formal structured process. The panel's recommendations for further revision of the Axis I diagnostic algorithms were assessed for validity by using the Validation Project's data set, and for reliability by using newly collected data from the ongoing TMJ Impact Project-the follow-up study to the Validation Project. New Axis II instruments were identified through a comprehensive search of the literature providing valid instruments that, relative to the RDC/TMD, are shorter in length, are available in the public domain, and currently are being used in medical settings. The newly recommended Diagnostic Criteria for TMD (DC/TMD) Axis I protocol includes both a valid screener for detecting any pain-related TMD as well as valid diagnostic criteria for differentiating the most common pain-related TMD (sensitivity ≥ 0.86, specificity ≥ 0.98) and for one intra

  13. Evaluation de la qualité de l'Audit interne/Audit externe : Application dans le cadre des relations d'agence internes

    OpenAIRE

    Makram Chemangui

    2006-01-01

    International audience; Les récents constats d'inefficacité des audits interne et externe réconfortent l'idée, aussi bien chez les praticiens que les académiciens, de redéfinir les règles d'évaluation de leurs rôles respectifs. L'approche traditionnelle de la qualité de l'audit débouche sur une incapacité à évaluer la pertinence des travaux d'audit menés. Nous estimons que le contrôle de la qualité de l'audit doit désormais se situer au niveau de sa mise en œuvre. Il s'agit désormais de mesur...

  14. Communication of 18 September 1995 received from the Permanent Mission of New Zealand to the International Atomic Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    On 18 September 1995, the Director General received a communication dated 18 September 1995 from the Permanent Mission of New Zealand transmitting: The text of a statement made by the Prime Minister of New Zealand on 17 August 1995 concerning by the nuclear test carried out by China; The text of a statement made by the Prime Minister of New Zealand on 6 September 1995 concerning the nuclear test carried out by France; the text of a resolution unanimously adopted by the New Zealand Parliament on 20 July 1995 concerning nuclear testing. As requested by the Permanent Mission of New Zealand, the texts of the statements and of the resolution are being circulated for the information of Member States of the Agency

  15. Chest Pain of Suspected Cardiac Origin: Current Evidence-based Recommendations for Prehospital Care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Brian Savino

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In the United States, emergency medical services (EMS protocols vary widely across jurisdictions. We sought to develop evidence-based recommendations for the prehospital evaluation and treatment of chest pain of suspected cardiac origin and to compare these recommendations against the current protocols used by the 33 EMS agencies in the state of California. Methods: We performed a literature review of the current evidence in the prehospital treatment of chest pain and augmented this review with guidelines from various national and international societies to create our evidence-based recommendations. We then compared the chest pain protocols of each of the 33 EMS agencies for consistency with these recommendations. The specific protocol components that we analyzed were use of supplemental oxygen, aspirin, nitrates, opiates, 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI regionalization systems, prehospital fibrinolysis and β-blockers. Results: The protocols varied widely in terms of medication and dosing choices, as well as listed contraindications to treatments. Every agency uses oxygen with 54% recommending titrated dosing. All agencies use aspirin (64% recommending 325mg, 24% recommending 162mg and 15% recommending either, as well as nitroglycerin and opiates (58% choosing morphine. Prehospital 12- Lead ECGs are used in 97% of agencies, and all but one agency has some form of regionalized care for their STEMI patients. No agency is currently employing prehospital fibrinolysis or β-blocker use. Conclusion: Protocols for chest pain of suspected cardiac origin vary widely across California. The evidence-based recommendations that we present for the prehospital diagnosis and treatment of this condition may be useful for EMS medical directors tasked with creating and revising these protocols.

  16. Recommender systems

    CERN Document Server

    Kembellec, Gérald; Saleh, Imad

    2014-01-01

    Acclaimed by various content platforms (books, music, movies) and auction sites online, recommendation systems are key elements of digital strategies. If development was originally intended for the performance of information systems, the issues are now massively moved on logical optimization of the customer relationship, with the main objective to maximize potential sales. On the transdisciplinary approach, engines and recommender systems brings together contributions linking information science and communications, marketing, sociology, mathematics and computing. It deals with the understan

  17. Statement to the 40th session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency 16 September 1996; Statement to the 51st session of the United Nations General Assembly 28 October 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blix, H.

    1996-11-01

    In the Statement to the 40th Session of the General Conference of the International Atomic Energy Agency main directions of the IAEA activities and plans for the future are outlined. In the Statement to the 51th Session of the United Nations General Assembly main achievements and challenge facing the international community in the field of IAEA competence are discussed

  18. International Society for Quality of Life Research commentary on the draft European Medicines Agency reflection paper on the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures in oncology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyte, Derek; Reeve, Bryce B; Efficace, Fabio; Haywood, Kirstie; Mercieca-Bebber, Rebecca; King, Madeleine T; Norquist, Josephine M; Lenderking, William R; Snyder, Claire; Ring, Lena; Velikova, Galina; Calvert, Melanie

    2016-02-01

    In 2014, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) released for comment a draft reflection paper on the use of patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures in oncology studies. A twelve-member International Society for Quality of Life Research (ISOQOL) taskforce was convened to coordinate the ISOQOL response. Twenty-one ISOQOL members provided detailed comments and suggestions on the paper: 81 % from academia and 19 % from industry. Taskforce members consolidated and further refined these comments and shared the recommendations with the wider ISOQOL membership. A final response was submitted to the EMA in November 2014. The impending publication of the EMA reflection paper presents a valuable opportunity for ISOQOL to comment on the current direction of EMA PRO guidance and strategy. The EMA paper, although focused on cancer, could serve as a model for using PROs in other conditions, as it provides a useful update surrounding some of the design issues common to all trial research including PRO endpoints. However, we believe there are a number of additional areas in need of greater consideration. The purpose of this commentary is therefore to highlight the strengths of this timely and potentially useful document, but also to outline areas that may warrant further discussion.

  19. Data Farming and the Exploration of Inter-Agency, Inter-Disciplinary, and International "What If?" Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Steve; Horne, Gary; Meyer, Ted; Triola, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Data farming uses simulation modeling, high performance computing, and analysis to examine questions of interest with large possibility spaces.This methodology allows for the examination of whole landscapes of potential outcomes and provides the capability of executing enough experiments so that outlets might be captured and examined for insights. This capability may be quite informative when used to examine the plethora of "What if?" questions that result when examining potential scenarios that our forces may face in the uncertain world of the future. Many of theses scenarios most certainly will be challenging and solutions may depend on interagency and international collaboration as well as the need for inter-disciplinary scientific inquiry preceding these events. In this paper, we describe data farming and illustrate it in the context of application to questions inherent to military decision-making as we consider alternate future scenarios.

  20. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method for Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Equipment Models (HVAC BESTEST): Volume 2: Cases E300-E545.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neymark J.; Judkoff, R.

    2004-12-01

    This report documents an additional set of mechanical system test cases that are planned for inclusion in ANSI/ASHRAE STANDARD 140. The cases test a program's modeling capabilities on the working-fluid side of the coil, but in an hourly dynamic context over an expanded range of performance conditions. These cases help to scale the significance of disagreements that are less obvious in the steady-state cases. The report is Vol. 2 of HVAC BESTEST Volume 1. Volume 1 was limited to steady-state test cases that could be solved with analytical solutions. Volume 2 includes hourly dynamic effects, and other cases that cannot be solved analytically. NREL conducted this work in collaboration with the Tool Evaluation and Improvement Experts Group under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Solar Heating and Cooling Programme Task 22.

  1. INVOLVEMENT OF THE FACULTY OF MINING, GEOLOGY & PETROLEUM ENGINEERING IN TECHNICAL COOPERATION OF THE REPUBLIC OF CROATIA WITH THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC ENERGY AGENCY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Kovačević Zelić

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the question of energy production from nuclear sources considering the growing demand for energy worldwide, the advantages and disadvantages of using nuclear energy. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA promotes the peaceful use of nuclear energy, and the State Office for Radiological and Nuclear Safety (DZNRS monitors the use of ionizing radiation sources in Republic of Croatia. Paper describes the role of the IAEA technical cooperation program involving Croatia (INT9173 "Training in Radioactive Waste Disposal Technologies in Underground Research Facilities - URFs". The importance of the involvement of Croatian scientists and experts, in the said project of technical cooperation in the field of radioactive waste management, is presented through activities conducted during the period since 2009 to date, taking into account Croatia's obligations regarding the disposal of radioactive waste generated by operation of the nuclear power plant Krško (the paper is published in Croatian.

  2. USGEO DMWG Cloud Computing Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.; McInerney, M.; Frame, M. T.; Summers, C.

    2017-12-01

    The US Group on Earth Observations (USGEO) Data Management Working Group (DMWG) has been developing Cloud Computing Recommendations for Earth Observations. This inter-agency report is currently in draft form; DMWG hopes to have released the report as a public Request for Information (RFI) by the time of AGU. The recommendations are geared toward organizations that have already decided to use the Cloud for some of their activities (i.e., the focus is not on "why you should use the Cloud," but rather "If you plan to use the Cloud, consider these suggestions.") The report comprises Introductory Material, including Definitions, Potential Cloud Benefits, and Potential Cloud Disadvantages, followed by Recommendations in several areas: Assessing When to Use the Cloud, Transferring Data to the Cloud, Data and Metadata Contents, Developing Applications in the Cloud, Cost Minimization, Security Considerations, Monitoring and Metrics, Agency Support, and Earth Observations-specific recommendations. This talk will summarize the recommendations and invite comment on the RFI.

  3. Agreement among the Portuguese Republic, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for assistance in securing nuclear fuel for a research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Agreement among the Portuguese Republic, the Government of the United States of America and the International Atomic Energy Agency for Assistance in Securing Nuclear Fuel for a Research Reactor is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Agency's Board of Governors approved the above mentioned Agreement on 14 June 2006. The Agreement was signed by the authorized representatives of Portugal on 27 June 2006 and the United States on 13 December 2006, and by the Director General of the IAEA on 14 December 2006. Pursuant to the Article XII.1 of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 19 April 2007, the date on which the Agency received written notification from Portugal that its internal requirements for entry into force had been met

  4. Agreement of 30 September 1993 between the Republic of Armenia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Republic of Armenia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 21 September 1993 and signed in Vienna on 30 September 1993. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 5 May 1994

  5. Agreement of 21 December 1993 between the Republic of Latvia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Republic of Latvia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 2 December 1993 and signed in Vienna on 6 December 1993 and in Riga on 21 December 1993

  6. Agreement of 22 September 1994 between the Republic of Zambia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-10-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Republic of Zambia and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 8 June 1994 and signed in Vienna on 22 September 1994. The Agreement entered into force, pursuant to Article 24, on 22 September 1994

  7. Agreement of 18 November 1993 between the Kingdom of Tonga and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the treaty on the non-proliferation of nuclear weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The text of the Agreement (and the Protocol thereto) between the Kingdom of Tonga and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 25 February 1975 and signed in Vienna on 31 October 1990 and in Nuku'Alofa on 18 November 1993

  8. Agreement of 26 July 1994 between the Republic of Kazakhstan and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the Application of Safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-04-01

    The text of the Agreement between the Republic of Kazakhstan and the International Atomic Energy Agency for the application of safeguards in connection with the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Agreement was approved by the Agency's Board of Governors on 8 June 1994 and signed in Almaty on 26 July 1994

  9. Balancing the benefits and harms of thyroid cancer surveillance in survivors of Childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer: Recommendations from the international Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clement, S C; Kremer, L C M; Verburg, F A; Simmons, J H; Goldfarb, M; Peeters, R P; Alexander, E K; Bardi, E; Brignardello, E; Constine, L S; Dinauer, C A; Drozd, V M; Felicetti, F; Frey, E; Heinzel, A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Huang, S A; Links, T P; Lorenz, K; Mulder, R L; Neggers, S J; Nieveen van Dijkum, E J M; Oeffinger, K C; van Rijn, R R; Rivkees, S A; Ronckers, C M; Schneider, A B; Skinner, R; Wasserman, J D; Wynn, T; Hudson, M M; Nathan, P C; van Santen, H M

    2018-02-01

    Radiation exposure to the thyroid gland during treatment of childhood, adolescent and young adult cancer (CAYAC) may cause differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC). Surveillance recommendations for DTC vary considerably, causing uncertainty about optimum screening practices. The International Late Effects of Childhood Cancer Guideline Harmonization Group, in collaboration with the PanCareSurFup Consortium, developed consensus recommendations for thyroid cancer surveillance in CAYAC survivors. These recommendations were developed by an international multidisciplinary panel that included 33 experts in relevant medical specialties who used a consistent and transparent process. Recommendations were graded according to the strength of underlying evidence and potential benefit gained by early detection and appropriate management. Of the two available surveillance strategies, thyroid ultrasound and neck palpation, neither was shown to be superior. Consequently, a decision aid was formulated to guide the health care provider in counseling the survivor. The recommendations highlight the need for shared decision making regarding whether to undergo surveillance for DTC and in the choice of surveillance modality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The Text of a Protocol between the Agency and the Governments of Thailand and the United States of America Terminating the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of the Kingdom of Thailand and the Government of the United States of America for the Application of Safeguards and Terminating the Protocol Suspending that Agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The text of a protocol between the Agency and the Governments of Thailand and the United States of America terminating the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency, the Government of the Kingdom of Thailand and the Government of the United States of America for the Application of Safeguards and terminating the Protocol suspending that Agreement is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members. The Protocol entered into force on 27 June 1974, pursuant to Section 6 thereof.

  11. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in technology transfer for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the strengthening of the Safeguards system, Santiago, 9 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the IAEA national seminar on 'Nuclear Development and its Implications for Chilean International Policy' in Santiago, Chile, on 9 December 1998. After a short presentation of Chile's participation in all aspects of the work of the Agency, the conference focuses on the Agency's role in the following areas: technology transfer with emphasis on Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme, nuclear power and sustainable energy development, including nuclear safety aspects, and the strengthened safeguards system, including future prospects of verification

  12. The role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in technology transfer for the peaceful use of nuclear energy and the strengthening of the Safeguards system, Buenos Aires, 15 December 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ElBaradei, M.

    1998-01-01

    The document reproduces the text of the conference given by the Director General of the IAEA at the meeting of the Council for International Relations in Buenos Aires, Argentina, on 15 December 1998. After a short presentation of Argentina's participation in all aspects of the work of the Agency, the conference focuses on the Agency's role in the following areas: nuclear power and sustainable energy development, including nuclear safety aspects, verification and the strengthened safeguards system (including future prospects of verification), and technology transfer with emphasis on Agency's Technical Co-operation Programme

  13. Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Government of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan for the application of safeguards in connection with the supply of a nuclear power station from the People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The text of the Agreement between the International Atomic Energy Agency and the Government of the Islamic Republic of Pakistan for the Application of Safeguards in Connection with the Supply of a Nuclear Power Station from the People's Republic of China is reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. The Board of Governors approved the Agreement on 23 November 2006. It was signed in Vienna on 22 February 2007. Pursuant to Section 30 of the Agreement, the Agreement entered into force on 22 February 2007, upon signature by the Director General of the Agency and by the authorised representative of Pakistan

  14. Implementation of a Strengthened International Safeguards System. ABACC 15 Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vicens, H.R.; Maceiras, E.; Dominguez, C.A.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to explain how the system of a regional safeguard has been operating and developing in the framework of the Brazilian-Argentine Agency of Accounting and control of nuclear Materials (ABACC), and how the international recommendations of radiological protection must be taken into account in the safeguards implementation and its impact in the international context.

  15. Analyse of the international recommendations on the calculation of absorbed dose in the biota; Analise das recomendacoes internacionais sobre calculo de dose absorvida na biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Wagner de S.; Py Junior, Delcy de A., E-mail: wspereira@inb.gov.b, E-mail: delcy@inb.gov.b [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (UTM/INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerios; Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia e Radiometria; Kelecom, Alphonse [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia Ambiental

    2011-10-26

    This paper evaluates the recommendations of ICRP which has as objective the environmental radioprotection. It was analysed the recommendations 26, 60, 91, 103 and 108 of the ICRP. The ICRP-103 defined the concept of animal and plant of reference (APR) to be used in the RAP based on the calculation of absorbed dose based on APR concept. This last view allows to build a legal framework of environmental protection with a etic, moral and scientific visualization, more defensible than the anthropomorphic concept

  16. Evidence-based recommendations for the use of Negative Pressure Wound Therapy in traumatic wounds and reconstructive surgery: steps towards an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, E; Berg, L; Lee, C; Hudson, D; Birke-Sorensen, H; Depoorter, M; Dunn, R; Jeffery, S; Duteille, F; Bruhin, A; Caravaggi, C; Chariker, M; Dowsett, C; Ferreira, F; Martínez, J M Francos; Grudzien, G; Ichioka, S; Ingemansson, R; Malmsjo, M; Rome, P; Vig, S; Runkel, N; Martin, R; Smith, J

    2011-02-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has become widely adopted over the last 15 years and over 1000 peer reviewed publications are available describing its use. Despite this, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of usage. In order to respond to this gap a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In this paper the results of the study of evidence in traumatic wounds (including soft tissue defects, open fractures and burns) and reconstructive procedures (including flaps and grafts) are reported. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence, drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel, followed by a formal consultative consensus development program in which 422 independent healthcare professionals were able to agree or disagree with the recommendations. The criteria for agreement were set at 80% approval. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the SIGN (Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network) classification system. Twelve recommendations were developed in total; 4 for soft tissue trauma and open fracture injuries, 1 for burn injuries, 3 for flaps and 4 for skin grafts. The present evidence base is strongest for the use of NPWT on skin grafts and weakest as a primary treatment for burns. In the consultative process, 11/12 of the proposed recommendations reached the 80% agreement threshold. The development of evidence-based recommendations for NPWT with direct validation from a large group of practicing clinicians offers a broader basis for consensus than work by an expert panel alone. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Evidence-based recommendations for negative pressure wound therapy: treatment variables (pressure levels, wound filler and contact layer)--steps towards an international consensus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birke-Sorensen, H; Malmsjo, M; Rome, P; Hudson, D; Krug, E; Berg, L; Bruhin, A; Caravaggi, C; Chariker, M; Depoorter, M; Dowsett, C; Dunn, R; Duteille, F; Ferreira, F; Francos Martínez, J M; Grudzien, G; Ichioka, S; Ingemansson, R; Jeffery, S; Lee, C; Vig, S; Runkel, N; Martin, R; Smith, J

    2011-09-01

    Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is becoming a commonplace treatment in many clinical settings. New devices and dressings are being introduced. Despite widespread adoption, there remains uncertainty regarding several aspects of NPWT use. To respond to these gaps, a global expert panel was convened to develop evidence-based recommendations describing the use of NPWT. In a previous communication, we have reviewed the evidence base for the use of NPWT within trauma and reconstructive surgery. In this communication, we present results of the assessment of evidence relating to the different NPWT treatment variables: different wound fillers (principally foam and gauze); when to use a wound contact layer; different pressure settings; and the impact of NPWT on bacterial bioburden. Evidence-based recommendations were obtained by a systematic review of the literature, grading of evidence and drafting of the recommendations by a global expert panel. Evidence and recommendations were graded according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) classification system. In general, there is relatively weak evidence on which to base recommendations for any one NPWT treatment variable over another. Overall, 14 recommendations were developed: five for the choice of wound filler and wound contact layer, four for choice of pressure setting and five for use of NPWT in infected wounds. With respect to bioburden, evidence suggests that reduction of bacteria in wounds is not a major mode of action of NPWT. Copyright © 2011 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mrabit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2004-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the Government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the resolutions of its General Conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. Several General Conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training [e.g. GC(XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991; GC(XXXVI)/RES/584 in 1992; GC(43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC(44)/RES/13 in 2000]. In response to GC(44)/RES/13, the IAEA prepared a S trategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation and Waste Safety ( Strategy on Education and Training) aiming at establishing, by 2010, sustainable education and training programmes in Member States. This Strategy was endorsed by the General Conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the Secretariat to implement the Strategy on Education and Training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member State' national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation. (Author)

  19. International Atomic Energy Agency Activities on Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety: Strategic Approach for a Sustainable System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marbit, K.; Sadagopan, G.

    2005-01-01

    The statutory safety functions of the international Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) include the establishment of and provision for the application of safety standards for protection of health, life and property against ionizing radiation. The safety standards are based on the presumption that a national infrastructure is in place enabling the government to discharge its responsibilities for protection and safety. Education and training is an essential element of the infrastructure. The IAEA education and training activities follows the the resolutions of its general conferences and reflects the latest IAEA standards and guidance. several general conference resolutions have emphasized the importance of education and training (e.g. GC (XXXV)/RES/552 in 1991,GC (XXXVI)/ RES/584 in 1992, GC (43)/RES/13 in 1999 and more recently GC (44)/RES/13 in 2000). In response to GC (44) /RES/13, the IAEA prepared a strategic approach to education and training in radiation and waste safety (strategy on education and training) aiming at establishing, by 2010 sustainable education and training programmes in member states. This strategy was endorsed by the general conference resolution GC(45)/RES/10C that, inter alia, urged the secretariat to implement the strategy on education and training, and to continue to strengthen, subject to available resources, its current effort in this area, and in particular to assist Member States national, regional and collaborating centres in conducting such education and training activities in the relevant official languages of the IAEA. The General Conference resolutions GC(46)RES/9C in 2002 and GC(47)RES/7 in 2003 urged the Agency to continue its efforts to implement the Strategy. The purpose of this paper is to present the newly established Strategic Approach to Education and Training in Radiation, Transport and Waste Safety and its implementation

  20. Objectives, capabilities and dangers in the role of international organizations and funding agencies in promoting gene-based technologies for livestock in developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodges, J.

    2005-01-01

    Gene-based technologies offer the world unprecedented opportunities for improving quality of life, or for reducing it in irreversible ways. The basic question addressed in this paper is the position and response of international bodies and donors on whether or not to provide gene-based technologies to developing countries. It will not be easy to attain a responsible and coherent answer to this challenging question. Gaining an objective understanding of the essential issues is hard when controversy rages across the supposedly neutral scientific facts. Nevertheless, the outcome of the discussion is of prime importance at a global level. This paper seeks to bring light into this arena. After the Introduction, three principle concerns are examined which should be at the top of the agenda of these international institutions. Following this, short reviews of the critical issues are presented covering: the scientific characteristics and uncertainties associated with gene-based technologies; the nature of target areas in which they may be applied; and the considerable disquiet in society generally. These short outlines highlight the possible benefits and dangers associated with the critical issues. It is concluded that the objectives, capabilities, opportunities and dangers cannot be evaluated at the scientific level alone; they must be evaluated as matters of high policy by all stakeholders before gene-based technologies are implemented on the ground. In view of these perspectives, at the end of the paper it is proposed that scientists should place a moratorium on the development of gene-based technologies for the development of transgenic animals. It is also proposed that, during the moratorium, the United Nations should carry out a global referendum on the desirability of gene-based technologies being applied to the food chain. Meanwhile it is recommended that international organizations and funding bodies should not promote these techniques. (author)