WorldWideScience

Sample records for internals curriculum resource

  1. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  2. Customizing Curriculum with Digital Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    To effectively use digital resources in the classroom, teachers must customize the information, merge it with pre-existing curriculum, differentiate it for diverse student populations, and still meet standards-based learning goals. This article describes a solution to these challenges: the Curriculum Customization Service, which provides access to…

  3. Planning Curriculum in International Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durtka, Sharon; Dye, Alex; Freund, Judy; Harris, Jay; Kline, Julie; LeBreck, Carol; Reimbold, Rebecca; Tabachnick, Robert; Tantala, Renee; Wagler, Mark

    International education begins at home, in the very communities and environments most familiar to students. A student does not need to travel outside U.S. borders to meet the peoples or understand the issues of the global village. This planning guide shows how curriculum in all subject areas encompasses global challenges, global cultures, and…

  4. Scientific Skills and Processes in Curriculum Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Joe

    2017-11-01

    Increasingly, the science education community has recognized the need for curriculum resources that support student development of authentic scientific practices, rather than focusing exclusively on content knowledge. This paper proposes a tool for teachers and researchers to assess the degree to which certain curriculum resources and lessons achieve this goal. After describing a method for reflecting on and categorizing curriculum resources, I apply the method to highlight differences across three teaching methods: Modeling Instruction, Physics Union Mathematics, and a traditional, lecture-based approach.

  5. An International Marketing Curriculum - Development and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboushi, Suhail; Lackman, Conway; Peace, A. Graham

    1999-01-01

    Describes the process of market-driven curriculum design in the development of an undergraduate International Marketing (IM) major at Duquesne University (Pennsylvania) School of Business Administration. Reports on a market study revealing profiles and IM curriculum design preferences of exporting companies. Discusses the curriculum development,…

  6. A Resource Curriculum in Public Address.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Richard F.

    Developed as part of a series of teacher resource curriculum units in communication arts, this resource unit on public speaking includes several components organized for direct teacher use. The seven units that are offered include introduction to public communication, delivery, language, organization, speaking to share information, speaking to…

  7. International trends in curriculum research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jens

    of the western school systems (especially within natural science and mathematics), the PISA-study has also been followed by school and curriculum radical reforms. The inspiration for the European reforms was taken in the so called accountability policy that during the 1990s had been developed in the USA...... is at the same time a centralization and a decentralization strategy: centralization at the input and the output side and decentralization of processes. The basic idea is that those responsible for the processes (principals and teachers) are held responsible for the outcomes. In the USA outcomes are related...... of their first generation goals as well of their national test systems. A trend in international school reform policy seems to be a break with the New Public Management and accountability philosophy that has played a major role over the last two decades. It is probably too early to say that these strategies...

  8. Food Processing Curriculum Material and Resource Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge.

    Intended for secondary vocational agriculture teachers, this curriculum guide contains a course outline and a resource manual for a seven-unit food processing course on meats. Within the course outline, units are divided into separate lessons. Materials provided for each lesson include preparation for instruction (student objectives, review of…

  9. Evaluation of a cardiopulmonary resuscitation curriculum in a low resource environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Mary P; Lyon, Camila B; Janiszewski, David; Aksamit, Deborah; Kateh, Francis; Sampson, John

    2015-11-07

    To evaluate whether a 2-day International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) Universal Algorithm-based curriculum taught in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia increases local health care provider knowledge and skill comfort level. A combined basic and advanced cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) curriculum was developed for low-resource settings that included lectures and low-fidelity manikin-based simulations. In March 2014, the curriculum was taught to healthcare providers in a tertiary care hospital in Liberia. In a quality assurance review, participants were evaluated for knowledge and comfort levels with resuscitation before and after the workshop. They were also videotaped during simulation sessions and evaluated on standardized performance metrics. Fifty-two hospital staff completed both pre-and post-curriculum surveys. The median score was 45% pre-curriculum and 82% post-curriculum (presuscitation in this low-resource setting.

  10. The Classical Heritage in America: A Curriculum Resource. Tentative Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philadelphia School District, PA. Office of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This curriculum resource is intended to help make students of Latin, Greek and other subjects more aware of America's classical heritage. It is designed to be used selectively by teachers to enrich the regular curriculum in classical languages in elementary and secondary schools. In providing background information for the teacher and suggestions…

  11. A pilot curriculum in international surgery for medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moren, Alexis; Cook, Mackenzie; McClain, Molly; Doberne, Julie; Kiraly, Laszlo; Perkins, Rosina Serene; Kwong, Karen

    2015-01-01

    As medical student interest in global surgical care grows, a comprehensive curriculum is necessary to understand surgical care in resource-limited environments. We developed a surgical elective encompassing a multiyear medical student curriculum, with the goal of improving students' understanding of global surgical care, consisting of a junior seminar and a senior clerkship. This student elective focused on the global burden of surgical disease, ethics of care in low-resource settings, and care of marginalized U.S. Students who participated in the fourth year clerkship at a tertiary center in Northern India completed a reflective essay on their experience. Qualitative analysis was conducted using constant comparison and axial coding to establish a grounded theory. Medical students showed a desire to serve the poor, build collaborative relationships, and integrate international health into their future career. This novel curriculum provides students a clinical and public health basis to understand challenges of surgical care in low-resource environments while laying the groundwork for students with a future career in global health. Copyright © 2015 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper reports on lessons learnt in the use of teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development, in the implementation of the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) programme in South Africa. The researchers in this study were amongst the trainers. The study followed a qualitative research approach, where a ...

  13. Digital Curriculum Resources in Mathematics Education: Foundations for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepin, Birgit; Choppin, Jeffrey; Ruthven, Kenneth; Sinclair, Nathalie

    2017-01-01

    In this conceptual review paper we draw on recent literature with respect to digital curriculum resources (DCR); we briefly outline and explain selected theoretical frames; and we discuss issues related to the design, and the use (by teachers and students) of digital curricula and e-textbooks in mathematics education. The results of our review…

  14. Digital curriculum resources in mathematics education: foundations for change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepin, B.; Choppin, J.; Ruthven, K.; Sinclair, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this conceptual review paper we draw on recent literature with respect to digital curriculum resources (DCR); we briefly outline and explain selected theoretical frames; and we discuss issues related to the design, and the use (by teachers and students) of digital curricula and e-textbooks in

  15. A Resource Curriculum in Broadcast Media. Bulletin No. 8025.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herian, Roger; Moen, Mary

    A resource for teachers who design instructional programs in broadcast media, this curriculum guide consists of eight units which deal with the nature of broadcast media, broadcast programming and public interest, broadcast advertising, broadcast regulation, societal effects of broadcasting, broadcasting and future technology, radio broadcasting,…

  16. Curriculum Integration Using Enterprise Resource Planning: An Integrative Case Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, David M.; Klein, Helen A; Koste, Lori L.; Magal, Simha R.

    2004-01-01

    Efforts to achieve greater curriculum integration in schools of business have included team teaching, student group projects, multidisciplinary cases, and, more recently, the use of enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. Although these approaches are beneficial, they tend to be implemented on an ad hoc basis rather than through curriculum…

  17. The International Curriculum: Current Trends and Emerging Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jesse Jones

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the current state of tertiary level international curricula and provides groundwork for future research aimed at ongoing needs. Recognized is the premise that existing international curricular programs require maintenance. Burn (1995) called for curriculum reform in international departments two decades ago with the rationale…

  18. Analyzing the Structure of the International Business Curriculum in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Deepak K.

    2012-01-01

    This article analyzes the structure of the international business curriculum through a questionnaire-based survey among current students and young managers who are studying or have studied international business courses in one of the top B-Schools of India. Respondents have the opinion that international business is more than internationalization…

  19. Resource Utilisation and Curriculum Implementation in Community Colleges in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Changilwa Kigwilu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The study investigated how Catholic-sponsored community colleges in Nairobi utilise the existing physical facilities and teaching and learning resources for effective implementation of Artisan and Craft curricula. The study adopted a mixed methods research design. Proportional stratified random sampling was used to sample 172 students and 18 teachers while four directors of community colleges were purposively selected. Questionnaires were administered to students and teachers, while directors were interviewed. Teaching and learning resources, such as workshops, equipment, lecture rooms, laboratories, raw materials for practical training and reference books, were found to be adequate, although underutilised. However, sports grounds, libraries and course texts were inadequate. Resource inadequacies were often mitigated by signing equipment co-sharing agreements with peer institutions and local firms. Teachers rated highly the influence of physical facilities on curriculum implementation. Both students and teachers rated highly the influence of teaching and learning resources on curriculum implementation. The study concludes that, while some physical facilities and teaching and learning resources are adequate, their underutilisation and the inadequacy of other core facilities and resources, such as libraries and course textbooks, hinder effective teaching and learning in these community colleges.

  20. Digital curriculum resources in mathematics education: foundations for change

    OpenAIRE

    Pepin, B.; Choppin, J.; Ruthven, K.; Sinclair, N.

    2017-01-01

    In this conceptual review paper we draw on recent literature with respect to digital curriculum resources (DCR); we briefly outline and explain selected theoretical frames; and we discuss issues related to the design, and the use (by teachers and students) of digital curricula and e-textbooks in mathematics education. The results of our review show the following. Firstly, whilst there are some contrasting tendencies between research on instructional technology and research on DCR, these studi...

  1. Integrating Resources into Curriculum with the Systems Connect Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshry, A.; Bean, J. R.

    2017-12-01

    A broadly applicable and guided approach for planning curriculum and instruction around new academic standards or initiatives is critical for implementation success. Curriculum and assessment differs across schools and districts, so built-in adaptability is important for maximal adoption and ease of use by educators. The Systems Connect Planning Guide directs the flow of instruction for building conceptual links between topics in a unit/curriculum through critical vetting and integration of relevant resources. This curricular template is flexible for use in any setting or subject area, and ensures applicability, high impact and responsiveness to academic standards while providing inquiry-based, real-world investigations and action that incorporate authentic research and data. These needs are what informed the creation of the three components of the planning guide:• Curriculum Anchor: alignment with academic standards & learning outcomes and setting the context of the topic• Issues Investigations: informing how students explore topics, and incorporate authentic research and data into learning progressions• Civic Action: development of how students could apply their knowledgeThe Planning Guide also incorporates criteria from transdisciplinary practices, cross-cutting concepts, and organizational charts for outlining guiding questions and conceptual links embedded in the guide. Integration of experiential learning and real-world connections into curricula is important for proficiency and deeper understanding of content, replacing discrete, stand-alone experiences which are not explicitly connected. Rather than information being dispelled through individual activities, relying on students to make the connections, intentionally documenting explicit connections provides opportunities to foster deeper understanding by building conceptual links between topics, which is how fundamental knowledge about earth and living systems is gained. Through the critical vetting

  2. Refining teacher design capacity: mathematics teachers' interactions with digital curriculum resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepin, B.; Gueudet, G.; Trouche, L.

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this conceptual paper is to develop enhanced understandings of mathematics teacher design and design capacity when interacting with digital curriculum resources. We argue that digital resources in particular offer incentives and increasing opportunities for mathematics teachers’ design,

  3. Introducing the ICF: the development of an online resource to support learning, teaching and curriculum design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lester E

    2011-03-01

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) was adopted as one of the key models to support early health professional learning across a suite of new preregistration health science courses. It was decided that an online resource should be developed to enable students, course designers and teaching staff, across all disciplines, to have access to the same definitions, government policies and other supporting information on disability. As part of the comprehensive curriculum review, enquiry-based learning was adopted as the educational approach. Enquiry-based learning promotes deeper learning by encouraging students to engage in authentic challenges. As such, it was important that the online resource was not merely a site for accessing content, but enabled students to make decisions about where else to explore for credible information about the ICF. The selection of a host location that all students and staff could access meant that the resource could not be located in the existing online learning management system. Construction using software being trialled by the library at La Trobe University allowed for the required access, as well as alignment with an enquiry-based learning approach. Consultation for the content of the online resource included formal and informal working groups on curriculum review. The published version included resources from the World Health Organization, examples of research completed within different disciplines, a test of knowledge and a preformatted search page. The format of the online resource allows for updating of information, and feedback on the utilisation of the software has been used to enhance the student experience. The key issues for the development of this online resource were accessibility for students and staff, alignment with the adopted educational approach, consultation with all disciplines, and ease of modification of information and format once published. Copyright © 2010 Chartered

  4. International human resources management challenges and changes

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book covers the issues related to human resource management (HRM) in an international context. It gives perspectives and future direction in International HRM research. The chapters explore the models, tools and processes used by international organizations in order to assist international managers to better face the challenges and changes in HRM. It is suitable to HR managers, engineers, entrepreneurs, practitioners, academics and researchers in the field.

  5. Character education in schools implementing national curriculum and international baccalaureate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hotmaulina Sihotang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the implementation of the character education program of Junior and Senior High School Victory Plus School using the national curriculum and International Baccalaureate. The research method used is mix method. The result of data analysis showed that the average self-concept score was 2.65 (less good; self-management is 2.73 (good; and social services is 2.73 (good in the implementation of courageous, honest, active, mindful, innovative, open minded, and nobel (champion value. The value of champion is relevant to the value of the national curriculum character but the value of hard work, religion, democracy, the spirit of nationality, and the love of the homeland have not yet appeared. The balanced and reflective values in the learner profile are not yet visible.

  6. Extension Resources for International Trade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seal, Susan D.

    2016-01-01

    With the opening of additional trade partnerships, the reduction of global transportation and communication costs, and the increase in demand for U.S. agricultural products and services, international trade is an area of great importance to more and more Extension clients and stakeholders. This article provides information about the primary…

  7. Real time curriculum map for internal medicine residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberts J Mark

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To manage the voluminous formal curriculum content in a limited amount of structured teaching time, we describe the development and evaluation of a curriculum map for academic half days (AHD in a core internal medicine residency program. Methods We created a 3-year cyclical curriculum map (an educational tool combining the content, methodology and timetabling of structured teaching, comprising a matrix of topics under various specialties/themes and corresponding AHD hours. All topics were cross-matched against the ACP-ASIM in-training examination, and all hours were colour coded based on the categories of core competencies. Residents regularly updated the map on a real time basis. Results There were 208 topics covered in 283 AHD hours. All topics represented core competencies with minimal duplication (78% covered once in 3 years. Only 42 hours (15% involved non-didactic teaching, which increased after implementation of the map (18–19 hours/year versus baseline 5 hours/year. Most AHD hours (78% focused on medical expert competencies. Resident satisfaction (90% response was high throughout (range 3.64 ± 0.21, 3.84 ± 0.14 out of 4, which improved after 1 year but returned to baseline after 2 years. Conclusion We developed and implemented an internal medicine curriculum map based on real time resident input, with minimal topic duplication and high resident satisfaction. The map provided an opportunity to balance didactic versus non-didactic teaching, and teaching on medical versus non medical expert topics.

  8. INTERNATIONAL DIMENSIONS OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Cristian Marinaş; Aurel Manolescu

    2007-01-01

    In a global context it is necessary to redefine the role of human resources department that has to offer to high level managers the necessary instruments to react on an international market, which is highly competitive. Speaking about human resources management from an international perspective, it is also important to discuss about the development process of the multinational companies, which are the main way to transfer the managerial know-how between countries and regions. The globalizatio...

  9. Community Resources for International Trade Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, Virgil H.; Channing, Rose M.

    1985-01-01

    Describes Middlesex Community College's involvement in education and training programs aimed at encouraging local business involvement in international trade and the activities of its National Resource for International Trade Education (e.g., information dissemination; consulting services; seminars and workshops; a speakers bank; research; staff…

  10. Re-sourcing curriculum materials : in search of appropriate frameworks for researching the enacted mathematics curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pepin, B.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides a commentary to the eight papers of this issue of ZDM entitled "Researching the enacted mathematics curriculum." It is structured around three main questions concerning (1) the layers of the curriculum addressed in the eight papers; (2) an identification of the main theoretical

  11. Problem based learning (PBL) vs. Case based curriculum in clinical clerkship, Internal Medicine innovated Curriculum, Student prospective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljarallah, Badr; Hassan, Mohammad Saleh

    2015-04-01

    The vast majority of PBL experience is in basic science courses. Application of classic Problem based learning in clerkship phase is challenging. Although the clinical case is considered a problem, yet solving this problem following the burrow's law has faced hurdles. The difficulties are facing the learner, the teacher and curricula. We implement innovative curriculum for the clerkship year in internal medicine course. We surveyed the student just before coming to an internal medicine course to ask them about continuing PBL or other types of learning in clinical years. A committee was created to study the possible ways to integrate PBL in the course. After multiple brainstorming meeting, an innovated curriculum was implemented. Student surveyed again after they completed their course. The survey is asking them about what is the effect of the implemented curriculum in their skills, attitude, and knowledge. 70% of Students, who finished their basic science in PBL, preferred not to have classical PBL, but more a clinical oriented case based curriculum in the clinical years. After this innovated curriculum, 50-60 % of students who completed it showed a positive response in all aspects of effects including skill, attitude, and knowledge. The Innovated curriculum includes daily morning report, 3 bedside teaching, investigation session, and clinical reasoning weekly, and Lectures up to twice a week. We suggest implementing a curriculum with PBL and case-based criteria in clinical phase are feasible, we are providing a framework with this innovated curriculum.

  12. The family medicine curriculum resource project structural framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, Jeffrey A; Stearns, Marjorie A; Davis, Ardis K; Chessman, Alexander W

    2007-01-01

    In the original contract for the Family Medicine Curricular Resource Project (FMCRP), the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Division of Medicine and Dentistry, charged the FMCRP executive committee with reviewing recent medical education reform proposals and relevant recent curricula to develop an analytical framework for the project. The FMCRP executive and advisory committees engaged in a review and analysis of a variety of curricular reform proposals generated during the last decade of the 20th century. At the same time, in a separate and parallel process, representative individuals from all the family medicine organizations, all levels of learners, internal medicine and pediatric faculty, and the national associations of medical and osteopathic colleges (Association of American Medical Colleges and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine) were involved in group discussions to identify educational needs for physicians practicing in the 21st century. After deliberation, a theoretical framework was chosen for this undergraduate medical education resource that mirrors the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) competencies, a conceptual design originated for graduate medical education. In addition to reflecting the current environment calling for change and greater accountability in medical education, use of the ACGME competencies as the theoretical framework for the FMCR provides a continuum of focus between the two major segments of physician education: medical school and residency.

  13. International Directory of Mental Retardation Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dybwad, Rosemary F., Ed.

    The directory lists and describes governmental and voluntary agencies, research, and other resources in the field of mental retardation in foreign countries. The first section, on international organizations, gives names, addresses, names of directors, and one or more paragraphs of description for the United Nations and its specialized agencies,…

  14. Resource allocation planning with international components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Gene; Durham, Ralph; Leppla, Frank; Porter, David

    1993-01-01

    Dumas, Briggs, Reid and Smith (1989) describe the need for identifying mutually acceptable methodologies for developing standard agreements for the exchange of tracking time or facility use among international components. One possible starting point is the current process used at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in planning the use of tracking resources. While there is a significant promise of better resource utilization by international cooperative agreements, there is a serious challenge to provide convenient user participation given the separate project and network locations. Coordination among users and facility providers will require a more decentralized communication process and a wider variety of automated planning tools to help users find potential exchanges. This paper provides a framework in which international cooperation in the utilization of ground based space communication systems can be facilitated.

  15. Cesar Chavez--Grade Seven Model Curriculum and Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    In this California state curriculum model for grade 7, "World History and Geography: Medieval Society," students study the life, work, and philosophy of Cesar Chavez. They learn about the ideas and philosophies that have withstood the test of time and emerged in Chavez's work and actions. Students examine Chavez's ancestral heritage link…

  16. Neglected Literature: An Experimental Curriculum Resource Bulletin for Secondary Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    District of Columbia Public Schools, Washington, DC.

    The materials presented in this teaching guide for Negro literature, prepared under an ESEA Title 3 grant, were collected for inclusion into the traditional English curriculum "to enable students to regard the works of Negro writers as a sharing of diversified human experiences." Sample units on the novel, slave narration, short story, poetry,…

  17. A Resource Curriculum in Driver and Traffic Safety Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Automotive Safety Foundation, Washington, DC.

    Secondary school driver education courses should provide the student with cognitive and affective learning experiences as well as psychomotor skills. Developed through the cooperation of an advisory committee, workshop group, and other consultants, this curriculum guide is intended to help teachers, supervisors, program administrators and teacher…

  18. Career Preparation in Agricultural Resources: A Curriculum Guide for High School Vocational Agriculture. Test Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Householder, Larry

    This curriculum guide in agricultural resources is one of 10 guides developed as part of a vocational project stressing agribusiness, natural resources, and environmental protection. The scope of this guide includes eight occupational subgroups: fish, forestry, mining area restoration, outdoor recreation, soil, range, water, and wildlife. It is…

  19. Resource Pack on Curriculum Design and Assessment to Promote Effective Learning.

    OpenAIRE

    O'Connor, Christine

    2008-01-01

    This resource pack is an overview of current considerations for academics designing programmes for third level education. The changing demographic of third level students along with employers’ demands has resulted in programme development with a focus on skills basis (Hyslop-Margison, 2001) to support a knowledge based society. The rationale behind the changes in curriculum design is introduced and further focus is emphasised in the areas of curriculum design models, assessment models and eva...

  20. Alcohol Abuse Curriculum Guide for Nurse Practitioner Faculty. Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series. Nursing 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasselblad, Judith

    The format for this curriculum guide, written for nurse practitioner faculty, consists of learning objectives, content outline, teaching methodology suggestions, references and recommended readings. Part 1 of the guide, Recognition of Early and Chronic Alcoholism, deals with features of alcoholism such as epidemiological data and theories,…

  1. Opening the Curriculum through Open Educational Practices: International experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ritchie

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A successful international learning initiative focusing on student agency began with a link facilitating OE-enhanced teaching between a UK university and a US high school class. It became an international trip organised and funded by five UK students and their teacher who travelled to California, teaching and performing music across formal and informal learning settings. The project is now a credit-bearing class, retaining the original initiative’s openness within the university curriculum where final-year students collaborate with the teacher, self-organising to design and plan curricular details from travel logistics to musical interactions. Students engage in heutagogy, demonstrating the highest levels of autonomous, personal learning in this co-learning environment. Their assessment, a reflective journal, encourages engage with deeper learning processes. The original trip was documented as an eBook including 10,000 student-authored words telling their collaborative learning journey. The book was published without DRM an accessible model for other students and educators.

  2. Swasti: An International Health Resource Centre

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, N.S.

    2013-01-01

    Swasti, an International Health Resource Centre was established in 2002 in India. The objective was to enhance the health and well-being of communities, particularly the marginalized. Swasti’s main focus lies in the areas of primary health, sexual and reproductive health including HIV, communicable and non-communicable diseases, water, sanitation and hygiene and gender based violence. The organization, during the last decade has grown in leaps and bounds reaching out to the most affected comm...

  3. Curriculum Model for Medical Technology: Lessons from International Benchmarking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pring-Valdez, Anacleta

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum is a crucial component of any educational process. Curriculum development and instructional management serve as effective tools for meeting the present and future needs of the local and national communities. In trying to strengthen the quality assurance system in Philippine higher education, institutions of higher learning were mandated…

  4. Embedding International Experiences in Business Curriculum Design: Cultivating a Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babb, Jeffry; Womble, Lynsee A.; De'Armond, De'Arno

    2013-01-01

    In business education, the impacts of the globalization of markets, financial institutions, and economies exert increasing influence on the curriculum in business schools. Schools of business recognize the need to embed international experiences into their curriculum in order to prepare students for global context of the marketplace. Often,…

  5. Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robi Kroflič

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Modern curriculum theories emphasize that if we understand the curriculum as a real core substance of education. We have to bear in mind, when planning the curriculum, the whole multitude of factors (curricula which have an influence on the educational impact. In the field of andragogy, we especially have to consider educational needs, and linking the strategies of instruction with those of learning. The best way of realizing this principle is the open strategy of planning the national curriculum and process-developmental strategy of planning with the microandragogic situation. This planning strategy is S1m1lar to the system-integration strategy and Jarvis's model of negotiated curriculum, which derive from the basic andragogic principle: that the interests and capacities of adults for education increase if we enable them to cooperate in the planning and production of the curriculum.

  6. Human resource management in international organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Treven

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the author first presents various approaches to the management and recruitment of employees in subsidiaries that the company has established in different countries. Then, she turns her attention to the basic functions of international human resource management, among them recruitment and selection of new employees, development and training of employees, assessment of work efficiency, as well as remuneration of employees. As the expatriates are often given special attention by their work organizations, she concludes the paper with the description of the additional challanges occurring in the management of these employees.

  7. Sustainable Development in the Engineering Curriculum: Teaching and Learning Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Penlington, Roger; Steiner, Simon

    2014-01-01

    This repository of teaching and learning resources is a companion to the 2nd edition of “An Introduction to Sustainable Development in the Engineering Curriculum”, by Roger Penlington and Simon Steiner, originally created by The Higher Education Academy Engineering Subject Centre, Loughborough University. \\ud The purpose of this collection of teaching and learning re-sources is to provide access, with a brief resumé, to materials in curricula reform, recognition awards, and university movemen...

  8. Integrating Enterprise Resource Planning (SAP) in the Accounting Curriculum: A Systematic Literature Review and Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Yvette; Abedin, Babak; Vatanasakdakul, Savanid; Erfani, Seyedezahra

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates how an enterprise resource planning (ERP) software package SAP was integrated into the curriculum of an accounting information systems (AIS) course in an Australian university. Furthermore, the paper provides a systematic literature review of articles published between 1990 and 2013 to understand how ERP systems were…

  9. Education for a Sustainable Future: A Resource for Curriculum Developers, Teachers, and Administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg. School Programs Div.

    This document, on social, environmental, and economic sustainability, is a resource for teachers, administrators, and curriculum developers. The increasing human population on the earth directs attention to sustainability, which was not a problem until the industrial revolution. This book uses an interdisciplinary approach and provides assistance…

  10. Case Study: Incorporating International Themes into the Business Curriculum at Missouri Southern State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzard, Janet; Block, Beverly

    2007-01-01

    Higher education is charged with preparing graduates to be successful in an international society. This paper will examine Missouri Southern State University's approach to internationalizing their campus and curriculum.

  11. Shaping the Curriculum: The Power of a Library's Digital Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkwood, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Researchers were the first adopters of digital resources available through the library. Online journals and databases make finding research articles much easier than when this author started as a librarian more than 20 years ago. Speedier interlibrary loan due to digital delivery means research materials are never far away. Making it easier for…

  12. Resource Utilisation and Curriculum Implementation in Community Colleges in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kigwilu, Peter Changilwa; Akala, Winston Jumba

    2017-01-01

    The study investigated how Catholic-sponsored community colleges in Nairobi utilise the existing physical facilities and teaching and learning resources for effective implementation of Artisan and Craft curricula. The study adopted a mixed methods research design. Proportional stratified random sampling was used to sample 172 students and 18…

  13. Evaluation of a Substance Use Disorder Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Melissa R.; Arnsten, Julia H.; Parish, Sharon J.; Kunins, Hillary V.

    2011-01-01

    Teaching about diagnosis, treatment, and sequelae of substance use disorders (SUDs) is insufficient in most Internal Medicine residency programs. To address this, the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a novel and comprehensive SUD curriculum for first year residents (interns) in Internal Medicine, which anchors the ensuing 3-year…

  14. Determining and prioritizing competencies in the undergraduate internal medicine curriculum in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almoallim, H

    2011-08-01

    To determine knowledge and skills competencies in internal medicine for the undergraduate curriculum in Saudi Arabia, competencies were identified based on group work utilizing common textbooks. The Delphi Technique was used as a consensus method to determine and prioritize competencies in internal medicine. A group of 20 clinicians rated the identified competencies from 0-3 (0: no need to know, 1: interesting to know, 2: should know and 3: must know). After formulating the results, a second Delphi round was conducted with 5 experts in internal medicine. A total of 1513 knowledge competencies and 189 skills competencies were determined and prioritized. The competencies corresponded to the 12 systems in internal medicine. All competencies rated 2.2-3.0 were produced separately and considered core competencies for the undergraduate internal medicine curriculum. Determining and prioritizing competencies should influence the curriculum reform process.

  15. TIMSS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the TIMSS 2011 Background and Curriculum Questionnaires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Arora, Alka, Ed.; Stanco, Gabrielle M., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The TIMSS 2011 International Database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the TIMSS 2011 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the TIMSS 2011 background questionnaires and curriculum questionnaires in the following 10 sections: (1) Fourth Grade Student Questionnaire; (2) Fourth Grade Home…

  16. Competing Issues in Australian Primary Curriculum: Learning from International Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Robyn

    2012-01-01

    There is no doubt that the increasing politicisation of education in an economically rationalist climate is contributing to less equity, access, participation and, therefore, social justice for many Australian primary children. This article initially explores how the development of the impending national Australian curriculum replete with a high…

  17. Developing Curriculum for Democracy through International Partnerships. ERIC Digest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamot, Gregory E.

    The fall of communism in eastern and central Europe inspired the call for curriculum development in citizenship education throughout the growing democratic world. Many programs between U.S. institutions and newly developing democracies continue to produce curricula for democratic citizenship suited to local needs. This digest discusses: (1)…

  18. An Interactive Ambulatory Nephrology Curriculum for Internal Medicine Interns: Design, Implementation, and Participant Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Alexis C; Warburton, Karen M; Miller, Rachel K; Negoianu, Dan; Cohen, Jordana B

    2017-09-01

    While diminishing nephrology fellow recruitment is a known issue, more work is needed to evaluate possible interventions to reverse this trend. We designed and implemented a curriculum to increase exposure to ambulatory nephrology among internal medicine interns. The curriculum focused on key aspects of outpatient nephrology practice, including supervised clinic visits, formal themed didactic content, and an online interactive forum with assigned evidence-based readings and small-group responses to relevant cases. We obtained postcourse surveys from all participating interns. Of the 43 interns who took part in the first year of the ambulatory nephrology curriculum, 100% reported a positive didactic experience and 91% reported a positive interactive online experience. 77% reported an improvement in their familiarity with clinical nephrology practice (median 2-point increase in familiarity score on a 7-point scale, P<0.001 by signed rank testing). Qualitative feedback included praise for the high-yield topics covered by the lectures and energizing teachers. In conclusion, we successfully implemented an ambulatory nephrology curriculum using a framework that integrated formal didactics, interactive online learning, and key clinical components of outpatient nephrology care. Future investigation will evaluate whether early implementation of this curriculum is associated with increased pursuit of nephrology as a career. Copyright © 2017 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. International Content as Hidden Curriculum in Business Statistics: An Overlooked Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sebastianelli, Rose; Trussler, Susan

    2006-01-01

    We revisit the issue of internationalizing the required course in business statistics as a means for introducing international subject matter earlier in the undergraduate business curriculum. A survey of sophomore business students indicates that their level of international knowledge is poor. The results are strikingly similar to a decade ago.…

  20. Beyond Host Language Proficiency: Coping Resources Predicting International Students' Satisfaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Anita S.; Bodycott, Peter; Ramburuth, Prem

    2015-01-01

    As international students navigate in a foreign educational environment, having higher levels of coping or stress-resistance resources--both internal and external--could be related to increased satisfaction with personal and university life. The internal coping resources examined in this study were host language proficiency, self-esteem,…

  1. Alcohol and Drug Abuse Curriculum Guides for Pediatrics Faculty: Health Professions Education Curriculum Resources Series, Medicine 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milman, Doris H.; And Others

    This document provides two separate curriculum guides for pediatrics faculty to use in teaching medical students. The first section contains the alcohol abuse curriculum guide; the second section contains the drug abuse curriculum guide. The drug abuse guide concentrates on cannabis as a paradigm for all nonalcoholic drugs of abuse. Each guide…

  2. Price regulation and international resource supply

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siebert, H

    1982-03-01

    Price regulation is an instrument between two diverging aims: The demand for low resource prices motivated by the principle of equal distribution in our day, and the desire for economical management of resources as a responsibility we have to future generations. The present publication investigates how price regulation influences intertemporal supply of resources. For the assumed cases constant resource price, constant admissible increase in resource price, expected release of resource price and deregulation of a price held constant for a period of time mathematical models are developmed.

  3. Impact of a competency based curriculum on quality improvement among internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fok, Mark C; Wong, Roger Y

    2014-11-28

    Teaching quality improvement (QI) principles during residency is an important component of promoting patient safety and improving quality of care. The literature on QI curricula for internal medicine residents is limited. We sought to evaluate the impact of a competency based curriculum on QI among internal medicine residents. This was a prospective, cohort study over four years (2007-2011) using pre-post curriculum comparison design in an internal medicine residency program in Canada. Overall 175 post-graduate year one internal medicine residents participated. A two-phase, competency based curriculum on QI was developed with didactic workshops and longitudinal, team-based QI projects. The main outcome measures included self-assessment, objective assessment using the Quality Improvement Knowledge Assessment Tool (QIKAT) scores to assess QI knowledge, and performance-based assessment via presentation of longitudinal QI projects. Overall 175 residents participated, with a response rate of 160/175 (91%) post-curriculum and 114/175 (65%) after conducting their longitudinal QI project. Residents' self-reported confidence in making changes to improve health increased and was sustained at twelve months post-curriculum. Self-assessment scores of QI skills improved significantly from pre-curriculum (53.4 to 69.2 percent post-curriculum [p-value 0.002]) and scores were sustained at twelve months after conducting their longitudinal QI projects (53.4 to 72.2 percent [p-value 0.005]). Objective scores using the QIKAT increased post-curriculum from 8.3 to 10.1 out of 15 (p-value for difference value for difference from pre-curriculum based assessment occurred via presentation of all projects at the annual QI Project Podium Presentation Day. The competency based curriculum on QI improved residents' QI knowledge and skills during residency training. Importantly, residents perceived that their QI knowledge improved after the curriculum and this also correlated to improved QIKAT

  4. Resources | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Through IDRC's resource library, we share our results, provide support to ... Our Research Support team provides the resources and tools researchers need to ... It also includes information on how to structure and design your policy brief to ...

  5. Improving Surgical Safety and Nontechnical Skills in Variable-Resource Contexts: A Novel Educational Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yihan; Scott, John W; Yi, Sojung; Taylor, Kathryn K; Ntakiyiruta, Georges; Ntirenganya, Faustin; Banguti, Paulin; Yule, Steven; Riviello, Robert

    2017-10-23

    A substantial proportion of adverse intraoperative events are attributed to failures in nontechnical skills. To strengthen these skills and improve surgical safety, the Non-Technical Skills for Surgeons (NOTSS) taxonomy was developed as a common framework. The NOTSS taxonomy was adapted for low- and middle-income countries, where variable resources pose a significant challenge to safe surgery. The NOTSS for variable-resource contexts (VRC) curriculum was developed and implemented in Rwanda, with the aim of enhancing knowledge and attitudes about nontechnical skills and promoting surgical safety. The NOTSS-VRC curriculum was developed through a rigorous process of integrating contextually appropriate values. It was implemented as a 1-day training course for surgical and anesthesia postgraduate trainees. The curriculum comprises lectures, videos, and group discussions. A pretraining and posttraining questionnaire was administered to compare knowledge and attitudes regarding nontechnical skills, and their potential to improve surgical safety. The setting of this study was in the tertiary teaching hospital of Kigali, Rwanda. Participants were residents of the University of Kigali. A total of 55 residents participated from general surgery (31.4%), obstetrics (25.5%), anesthesia (17.6%), and other surgical specialties (25.5%). In a paired analysis, understanding of NOTSS improved significantly (55.6% precourse, 80.9% postcourse, pskills would improve patient outcomes. Nontechnical skills must be highlighted in surgical training in low- and middle-income countries. The NOTSS-VRC curriculum can be implemented without additional technology or significant financial cost. Its deliberate design for resource-constrained settings allows it to be used both as an educational course and a quality improvement strategy. Our research demonstrates it is feasible to improve knowledge and attitudes about NOTSS through a 1-day course, and represents a novel approach to improving global

  6. Curriculum Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Norma H.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses an article which presents a concise discussion of secular humanism. Reviews additional materials on censorship from the perspective of the new religious right, the fundamentalists, and public policy and the law. The sources provide background to enhance teaching about secular humanism and textbook censorship. (SLM)

  7. Organizing socially constructed internal and external resources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorge, A

    The analysis of economic institutions stands to gain from a consideration of the interactionist theory of institutions, a resource-based view of organizations to develop business and economic perspectives, and a linkage between the two and any theory of economic institutions. A resource-based view

  8. [Internal Medicine in the curriculum of General Medicine at Universities of Mexico, 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Jesús Adrián; Peinado, José María

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze Internal Medicine as a subject and its requirement in each of the Universities curriculum in Mexico that offers a degree in General Medicine. By the end of the first quarter of 2014, the research was closed and 81 campuses were studied. This research was quantitative, using an analytical technique, written discourse, exploratory and purposive sampling not random and homogeneous type. The Likert questionnaire was used in this study to analyse the following variables: the record of Internal Medicine as a subject, the burden of credit, and the location of the program. The procedure consisted of three phases. First obtaining an official list of all the Universities in the Mexican Association of Colleges and Schools of Medicine. Second, obtaining an analysis of each of the Universities' curriculums, and lastly gathering each variable of the study. The results of the Universities were 63% were public and 37% private. Internal Medicine as a subject in the curriculum was 37.1%, and 20% of the universities include it for six months and 9% offer it the whole year. However, the undergraduate internship in Internal Medicine offers it 100%. In conclusion, Internal Medicine as a subject could disappear from the curriculum in General Medicine before coming to the undergraduate internship, even though the latter is declared required in hospital shifts.

  9. Re-Thinking Internationalization as Social Curriculum for Generative Supervision: Letters from the International Community of Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstén, Meeri; Ucker Perotto, Lilian

    2018-01-01

    This paper concerns research issues on curriculum, pedagogy and the creative use of method in international higher education. It is motivated by the witnessing of a recent shifting in consensus within the global research communities on international education, towards curriculum renewal of shared knowledge within the field. The article enters into…

  10. Resources Management Officer | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Resources Management Officer (RMO) contributes intellectual, technical and ... by initiating, coordinating, and monitoring key processes, activities and issues. ... managing the publication site and overseeing the final quality control by the ...

  11. Human Resources Coordinator | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Human Resources Coordinator supports the HR Business Partner in the delivery of ... of various reports for HR Business Partners and HR management. ... services and information to candidates applying on job openings in IDRC, ...

  12. International Migration, Management of Natural Resources and ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... of Natural Resources and Division of Labour along Gender Lines in Veracruz, Mexico ... Mexico, are experiencing an increased rate of migration to Mexico City and the ... Linking research to urban planning at the ICLEI World Congress 2018.

  13. Combining clinical microsystems and an experiential quality improvement curriculum to improve residency education in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tess, Anjala V; Yang, Julius J; Smith, C Christopher; Fawcett, Caitlin M; Bates, Carol K; Reynolds, Eileen E

    2009-03-01

    Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center's internal medicine residency program was admitted to the new Education Innovation Project accreditation pathway of the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education to begin in July 2006. The authors restructured the inpatient medical service to create clinical microsystems in which residents practice throughout residency. Program leadership then mandated an active curriculum in quality improvement based in those microsystems. To provide the experience to every graduating resident, a core faculty in patient safety was trained in the basics of quality improvement. The authors hypothesized that such changes would increase the number of residents participating in quality improvement projects, improve house officer engagement in quality improvement work, enhance the culture of safety the residents perceive in their training environment, improve work flow on the general medicine ward rotations, and improve the overall educational experience for the residents on ward rotations.The authors describe the first 18 months of the intervention (July 2006 to January 2008). The authors assessed attitudes and the educational experience with surveys and evaluation forms. After the intervention, the authors documented residents' participation in projects that overlapped with hospital priorities. More residents reported roles in designing and implementing quality improvement changes. Residents also noted greater satisfaction with the quality of care they deliver. Fewer residents agreed or strongly agreed that the new admitting system interfered with communication. Ongoing residency program assessment showed an improved perception of workload, and educational ratings of rotations improved. The changes required few resources and can be transported to other settings.

  14. The Global Awareness Curriculum in International Business Programs: A Critical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, Anne E.

    2010-01-01

    Designing educational sequences that enhance the cognitive, behavioral, and critical skills of a diverse learning community seeking global competencies, requires mindfulness of different international educational models, a tailored curriculum designed to build different types of awareness learning, and clarity in targeted outputs keeping in mind a…

  15. Learning Effectiveness and Satisfaction of International Medical Students: Introducing a Hybrid-PBL Curriculum in Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Qiu; Ma, Li; Zhu, Lina; Zhang, Wenli

    2017-01-01

    A biochemistry course is a fundamental but important subject in medical education in China. In recent years, the number of international medical students has increased. Curriculum reform in biochemistry teaching is needed because of the knowledge limitations of students, a close linkage of biochemical content with clinics, the shortcomings of…

  16. Curriculum Studies in Brazil: Intellectual Histories, Present Circumstances. International and Development Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinar, William F., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This collection, comprised of chapters focused on the intellectual histories and present circumstances of curriculum studies in Brazil, is Pinar's summary of exchanges (occurring over a two-year period) between the authors and members of an International Panel (scholars working in Finland, South Africa, the United States). From these and the…

  17. Improving International Marketing Programs to Reflect Global Complexity and Risk: Curriculum Drivers and Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This article looks at the curriculum redesign of a master's-level program in international marketing from a UK perspective. In order to ensure that the program would be more fit-for-purpose for future managers working under conditions of complexity, uncertainty, and within regimes often very different from the home market, the team began the…

  18. Neoliberal Global Assemblages: The Emergence of "Public" International High-School Curriculum Programs in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuning

    2018-01-01

    Since 2010, the number of urban Chinese high-school students applying to US universities has rapidly grown. Many of these students have chosen emerging international curriculum programs established by elite public high schools in China. These programs prepare wealthy Chinese students for the US college application process by exposing them to an…

  19. International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis core curriculum project: core competencies in clinical thrombosis and hemostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McLintock, C.; Pabinger, I.; Bauer, K. A.; Laffan, M.; Angchaisuksiri, P.; Rezende, S. M.; Middeldorp, S.; Ross, M.

    2016-01-01

    Essentials The priority of ISTH was to establish a global core curriculum in thrombosis and hemostasis. International survey to determine competencies required for clinical specialists was carried out in the field. Competency framework provides a reference point for mapping and developing regional

  20. The Rise of International Relations Programs in the Brazilian Federal Universities: Curriculum Specificities and Current Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Marcos Alan S. V.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this reflection is to study the new international relations (IR) programs introduced by Brazilian federal universities, looking comparatively at their curriculum specificities and current challenges. In recent years, Brazil has seen an increase of IR programs launched in several regions. Since 2003, the Ministry of Education is in the…

  1. Developing Curriculum: Knowledge and Skills Essential for an International Salesforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruhland, Sheila K.

    A study explored the additional knowledge and skills an international salesforce needs based upon 95 respondents from Wisconsin manufacturing companies. Six areas were evaluated by sales representatives involved with international sales and marketing to identify the education and training needed within the next 3 years by the work force. Four…

  2. Designing Curriculum for Real-World International Business Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Bernard M.; Wright, Lorna

    2014-01-01

    Economies continue to become more integrated through international trade and foreign investment, as well as by more, and more, complex global supply changes. With the expansion in the level and scope of international business (IB), it becomes all the more important that university graduates seeking careers in IB be able to "successfully hit…

  3. Teaching Sustainability and Resource Management Using NOAA's Voices Of The Bay Community Fisheries Education Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hams, J. E.; Uttal, L.; Hunter-Thomson, K.; Nachbar, S.

    2010-12-01

    This presentation highlights the implementation of the NOAA VOICES OF THE BAY education curriculum at a two-year college. The VOICES OF THE BAY curriculum provides students with an understanding of the marine ecology, economy, and culture of fisheries through three interdisciplinary modules that use hands-on activities while meeting a wide range of science, math, social science, and communications standards. In the BALANCE IN THE BAY module, students use critical-thinking skills and apply principles of ecosystem-based management to analyze data, debate and discuss their findings, and make decisions that recognize the complex dynamics associated with maintaining a balance in fisheries. Through role-playing, teamwork, and a little fate, the FROM OCEAN TO TABLE module provides students with an opportunity to get an insider’s view of what it takes to be an active stakeholder in a commercial fishery. In the CAPTURING THE VOICES OF THE BAY module, students research, plan, and conduct personal interviews with citizens of the local fishing community and explore the multiple dimensions of fisheries and how they inter-connect through the lives of those who live and work in the region. The VOICES OF THE BAY modules were introduced into the curriculum at Los Angeles Valley College during the Fall 2009 semester and are currently being used in the introductory Oceanography lecture, introductory Oceanography laboratory, and Environmental Science laboratory courses. Examples of curriculum materials being used (power point presentations, module worksheets and simulated fishing activities) will be presented. In addition, samples of completed student worksheets for the three interdisciplinary modules are provided. Students commented that their overall awareness and knowledge of the issues involved in sustainable fishing and managing fishery resources increased following completion of the VOICES OF THE BAY education curriculum. Students enrolled in the laboratory sections commented

  4. Internal Medicine Point-of-Care Ultrasound Curriculum: Consensus Recommendations from the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Irene W Y; Arishenkoff, Shane; Wiseman, Jeffrey; Desy, Janeve; Ailon, Jonathan; Martin, Leslie; Otremba, Mirek; Halman, Samantha; Willemot, Patrick; Blouw, Marcus

    2017-09-01

    Bedside point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is increasingly used to assess medical patients. At present, no consensus exists for what POCUS curriculum is appropriate for internal medicine residency training programs. This document details the consensus-based recommendations by the Canadian Internal Medicine Ultrasound (CIMUS) group, comprising 39 members, representing 14 institutions across Canada. Guiding principles for selecting curricular content were determined a priori. Consensus was defined as agreement by at least 80% of the members on POCUS applications deemed appropriate for teaching and assessment of trainees in the core (internal medicine postgraduate years [PGY] 1-3) and expanded (general internal medicine PGY 4-5) training programs. We recommend four POCUS applications for the core PGY 1-3 curriculum (inferior vena cava, lung B lines, pleural effusion, and abdominal free fluid) and three ultrasound-guided procedures (central venous catheterization, thoracentesis, and paracentesis). For the expanded PGY 4-5 curriculum, we recommend an additional seven applications (internal jugular vein, lung consolidation, pneumothorax, knee effusion, gross left ventricular systolic function, pericardial effusion, and right ventricular strain) and four ultrasound-guided procedures (knee arthrocentesis, arterial line insertion, arterial blood gas sampling, and peripheral venous catheterization). These recommendations will provide a framework for training programs at a national level.

  5. Curriculum/Resource Development: The "C.A.R.E for St. Lucia" Resource Pack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Michelle

    1993-01-01

    Describes a resource packet that utilizes a four-point approach to make environmental action concerning land use more accessible to teachers. The points are construct a map of the area under consideration; assess the impact of historical development, natural cycles, mining, and eco-tourism on the problem; research land use options; and encourage…

  6. The Use of a Social Media Based Curriculum for Newly Matched Interns Transitioning into Emergency Medicine Residency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel C Park, MD

    2018-04-01

    communicate with each other in a virtual classroom setting. The goal is to create an environment to facilitate collaborative learning and interaction between residents, residency leadership, and program faculty. We created a total of ten cases, which were each posted with an associated intern-appropriate clinical question. We also posted an associated high-resolution image, such as an electrocardiogram (EKG or a radiograph from a website such as LifeintheFastLane.com or ALiEM.com. Typically, 24 to 72 hours were given to allow sufficient time for the residents to contribute answers and ideas. Once the allotted time had ended, the EM faculty member provided the solution to the case with the appropriate supportive ‘Free Open Access Medical Education’ (FOAMed resources. Objectives: This curriculum is designed to bridge this gap by fostering an environment in which incoming interns can communicate, collaborate, and practice clinical reasoning with each other and faculty prior to their arrival in residency. The goals and objectives were tailored to the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME level 1 milestones in patient care. 1. Interpret basic ECGs 2. Demonstrate ability to interpret basic radiographs 3. Identify common visual diagnoses 4. Identify common neurological emergencies on head imaging 5. Recognize basic airway anatomy 6. Demonstrate successful application of FOAMed resources to clinical cases 7. Interpret common ultrasound images 8. Describe common ED procedures 9. Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of evidence-based medicine and biostatistics Methods: The educational strategies used in this curriculum included case-based learning, questions and answers, and links to online Free Open Access Medical Education (FOAMed resources. Using Slack, an online collaborative social media application, we posted specific clinical-based cases in the “Cases” thread and then gave the new residents an opportunity to post their answers. We then posted a follow

  7. Integrating International Business Concepts and Matters of Diversity into the Business Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Marcia; Roseland, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Explains the implications for business educators of globalization of business. Provides an annotated list of resources and a table of additional Web resources for teaching international business concepts. (SK)

  8. [Diagnosis and treatment in general internal medicine. Curriculum selection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, E R; Vázquez, E N; Husni, C

    1994-01-01

    In our country general internists are the providers of adult medical care in urban areas. In the past twenty years, with the increasing subspecialization within internal medicine and the development of advances in technology, the role of the general internist seems to be endangered. Recently much attention has been focused on this area and Divisions and Programs of General Internal Medicine have been established in most medical schools in the USA. The University of Buenos Aires instituted a Program of General Internal Medicine in its major teaching hospital in 1987. One of its purposes was to offer an educational experience to residents in the field of internal medicine primary care. This paper summarizes how this program was carried out and the subjects proposed in the area of Diagnosis and Treatment. The Program of General Internal Medicine is performed in the Outpatient Division and it is staffed by 3 faculty members and 4 fellows. Residents in Internal Medicine have a three month, full-time block rotation in the Program. A young, city dwelling, lower middle class population participates in the Program, with almost 10000 visits a year. The Program offers an experience that includes supervised patient care, an average of 100 office visits a month, and seminars and/or workshops covering topics of "Diagnosis and Treatment", "Case Presentations", "Clinical Epidemiology", "Prevention", and "Doctor-Patient Interview". In the area of Diagnosis and Treatment, the criteria used were: 1-frequency of diagnosis as determined by previous investigations, 2-relevant clinical conditions absent from the frequency list as determined by a consensus process by faculty members.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  9. Renewable Resources, Environmental Pollution, and International Migration

    OpenAIRE

    KENJI KONDO

    2013-01-01

    We develop a two-country model with two industries: the smokestack manufacturing industry, which generates pollution, and the transboundary renewable resource industry. With no trade, migration occurs from the foreign country, with lower manufacturing productivity, to the home country. If the gap in pollution abatement technology, which is superior in the home country, dominates the productivity gap, both countries gain from migration. Under a free trade equilibrium, we also show that if the ...

  10. A "Globalised" Curriculum--International Comparative Practices and the Preschool Child as a Site of Economic Optimisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plum, Maja

    2014-01-01

    Globalisation is often referred to as being external to education--a state of affairs presenting the modern curriculum with numerous challenges. In this article, "globalisation" is examined as something that is internal to curriculum and analysed as a "problematisation" in a Foucaultian sense, that is, as a complex of…

  11. Worlds Apart? International Students, Source-Based Writing, and Faculty Development Across the Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Greer Alison

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how English as a Second Language (ESL) and Writing program faculty at a professional liberal arts college partnered with faculty across the curriculum to help international students learn to write from sources and avoid unintentional plagiarism. Eight participants joined a series of action research professional development workshops. In these workshops, faculty focused on defining plagiarism in both academic and professional settings, designing culturally inclusive assignm...

  12. Adaptation to the International Business Environment: A Resource Advantage Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Portugal Ferreira

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the importance of the adaptation of the firm to the International Business Environment. Using concepts from the literature on resource advantage, we posit that the firms' adaptation capability to different International Business Environments is a valuable, difficult to imitate, non-tradeable, rare butnot scarce and path dependent resource. We further suggest that adaptation to International Business Environment is a non-substitutable core source of competitive advantage for the multinational enterprises, developed over time through the firms experiences and built into their routines. In line with this argument, some propositions are formulated. We conclude with a broad discussion and suggesting some avenues for future research\\.

  13. Introducing glacial geomorphology to secondary schools - an edutainment resource targeting the New Zealand curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmingsen, Maree; Winkler, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    Outreach has become an important undertaking for many tertiary institutions and government agencies. Quite often universities and other tertiary institutions view outreach solely as a tool for the recruitment of future students or as a cost-effective way of meeting governmental obtruded institutional obligations towards community engagement. But for every serious scientist outreach should have an importance beyond that. Competent scientists value the opportunities that an effective outreach programme brings, to inform others of the significance of their particular discipline within the wider framework of science. In this context, glacial geomorphology and related fields of research constitute no exception. Although outreach activities seem to be becoming increasingly popular among scientists in New Zealand, there is still a lack of understanding of what is actually useful for the end user. Often what scientists assume will be useful for school is not. An effective outreach programme needs to be aligned to and represent the school curriculum, regardless of the fact that this may not always be the main focus of the scientist. The most successful resources are those which are developed in collaboration with teachers, by practitioners with an ability to develop outreach activities appropriate for "real" school life with all its restrictions. Sadly, all too often academics and scientists assume they know what schools want and what is important. We cannot stress highly enough that the resources produced need to be accessible to the teachers, who often lack a deep enough scientific background or do not have an appropriate confidence in their own scientific knowledge as well as meet the needs of their students. Frequently educators report their frustration when they cannot properly access resources or run simulations because of IT incompatibility or limited supportive guidance. Geomorphology and its individual sub-disciplines like e.g. glacial geomorphology has an

  14. Quality of faculty, students, curriculum and resources for nursing doctoral education in Korea: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Hyeonkyeong; Kim, Hyun Kyung; Ahn, Yang-Heui; Kim, Euisook; Yun, Soon-Nyoung; Lee, Kwang-Ja

    2010-03-01

    The rapidly increasing number of nursing doctoral programs has caused concern about the quality of nursing doctoral education, including in Korea. To describe the perceived quality of Korean nursing doctoral education in faculty, student, curriculum and resources. Focus group. Fourteen Korean nursing doctoral programs that are research focused and include coursework. Four groups of deans, faculty, students and graduates; students completed three semesters of doctoral program; and graduates completed doctoral programs within the most recent 3 years. Focus groups examined the strengths and weaknesses of faculty, students, curriculum, and resources. Faculty strengths were universities' recognition of faculty research/scholarship and the ability of faculty to attract extramural funding. Faculty weaknesses were aging faculty; high faculty workload; insufficient number of faculty; and teaching without expertise in nursing theories. Student strengths were diverse student backgrounds; multidisciplinary dissertation committee members, and opportunities to socialize with peers and graduates/faculty. Students' weaknesses were overproduction of PhDs with low academic quality; a lower number and quality of doctoral applicants; and lack of full-time students. Curriculum strengths were focusing on specific research areas; emphasis on research ethics; and multidisciplinary courses. Curriculum weaknesses were insufficient time for curriculum development; inadequate courses for core research competencies; and a lack of linkage between theory and practice. Resources strengths were inter-institutional courses with credit transfer. Weaknesses were diminished university financial support for graduate students and limited access to school facilities. Variations in participant groups (providers [deans and faculty] vs. receivers [students and graduates]) and geographical location (capital city vs. regional) were noted on all the four components. The quality characteristics of faculty

  15. The Natural Palette: Hudson River Artists and the Land. Teacher's Guide. Curriculum Resource: Grades 4 through 12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, Ted; Sorin, Gretchen Sullivan; Mack, Stevie; Fiore, Jennifer, Ed.

    This interdisciplinary curriculum guide resource kit focuses on 19th-century Euro-American painters of the Hudson River School. Lessons are designed to encourage student recognition of the significant impact of North American Indians, the natural environment, and the romantic period writers and philosophers artists and their work. The guide…

  16. Implementation of "social and communicative competencies" in medical education. The importance of curriculum, organisational and human resource development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruskil, Susanne; Deis, Nicole; Druener, Susanne; Kiessling, Claudia; Philipp, Swetlana; Rockenbauch, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    With this article we want to support teachers and curriculum planners to be aware of and apply knowledge and recommendations of organisational (OD), curriculums (CD) and human resource development (HRD) ideas already in the planning phase of a project. Taking these into account can influence the process of change successfully and controlled during the introduction and establishment of curricula in the field of communication and social skills in medical education. In the context of a multi-stage developmental process, a recommendation on CD for "Communicative and social competencies" was developed. The basis for it was made during two workshops of the GMA-committee "Communicative and social competencies" and supplemented by the available literature and the experience of communication experts. The "Undeloher Recommendation" (see attachment ) includes a compilation of recommendations and guiding questions, which is geared to the various phases of CD. Additionally, general approaches and recommendations of organisational and human resource development were integrated, which turned out to be particularly relevant in the process of CD. Thus, the "Undeloher recommendation" includes an orientation for each phase of the curriculum development process, the organisation and the staff in order to successfully implement a longitudinal curriculum. In addition to theoretical models the long-term discussion process and the personal experiences of a variety of curriculum planners and teachers have been integrated. The "Undeloher recommendation" can support the implementation processes of curricula in communication and social skills during development and realisation. Its application was reviewed in the context of workshops based on concrete examples. The participating teachers and curriculum planners assessed it to be very helpful. The recommendation goes beyond of what has been described in terms of content models in the CD so fare. In particular, the organisational and human

  17. Establishing the Legitimacy of a School's Claim to Be "International": The Provision of an International Curriculum as the Institutional Primary Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnell, Tristan; Fertig, Michael; James, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The recent growth in the number and diversity of schools around the world classified as "International Schools" raises questions about what makes a school's claim to be an International School legitimate. From the analysis we report here, the provision of an international curriculum emerges as what a school must do to be legitimate as an…

  18. Experience in the United States with a secondary resource curriculum on ''Science, society and America's nuclear waste''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear power and nuclear waste situation in the Usa, is first reviewed. In order to enhance information concerning these topics among pupils and teachers, a resource curriculum, 'Science, society, and America's Nuclear Waste', was developed by teachers for teachers; it consists of four units: nuclear waste, ionizing radiation, the nuclear waste policy act, and the waste management system. It has been well received by teachers. Within nine months after its national introduction, 350000 teacher and student curriculum documents were requested by teachers from all 50 states. Requests have been also received from 250 foreign colleges and universities

  19. Determinants of human resource investment in internal controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hag Choi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Using the unique reporting environment in Korea, this study investigates the determinants of human resource investment in internal controls for 1352 listed firms disclosing the number of personnel who are in charge of internal control-related tasks (IC personnel from 2005 to 2008. We find that the number of IC personnel within a firm and several key departments increase with firm size, number of employees, complexity and for Chaebols, and decrease in rapidly growing firms. Additional analysis reveals that the factors influencing internal control systems have an accentuated effect on firms with relatively larger firm size.

  20. Barriers and opportunities to access international resources for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    But tobacco control does not appear to be a health and development priority for the national government and development stakeholders in Bolivia. The Ministry of Health and civil organizations have experience difficulties in accessing international resources for tobacco control. At the same time, there is neither clear ...

  1. Introduction: the Fogarty International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development Program in historical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millum, Joseph; Grady, Christine; Keusch, Gerald; Sina, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    In response to the increasing need for research ethics expertise in low and middle income countries (LMICs), the NIH's Fogarty International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development Program has provided grants for the development of training programs in international research ethics for LMIC professionals since 2000. This collection of papers draws upon the combined expertise of Fogarty grantees, trainees, and other experts to assess the state of research ethics in LMICs, and the lessons learned over 12 years of international research ethics education; to assess future needs; and to chart a way forward to meet those needs. In this introductory paper we briefly sketch the evolution of research ethics as applied to LMIC research, the underpinning and evolution of the Fogarty bioethics program, and summarize key conclusions from the other papers in the collection.

  2. 'So you want to be a clinician-educator...': designing a clinician-educator curriculum for internal medicine residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heflin, Mitchell T; Pinheiro, Sandro; Kaminetzky, Catherine P; McNeill, Diana

    2009-06-01

    Despite a growing demand for skilled teachers and administrators in graduate medical education, clinician-educator tracks for residents are rare and though some institutions offer 'resident-as-teacher' programs to assist residents in developing teaching skills, the need exists to expand training opportunities in this area. The authors conducted a workshop at a national meeting to develop a description of essential components of a training pathway for internal medicine residents. Through open discussion and small group work, participants defined the various roles of clinician-educators and described goals, training opportunities, assessment and resource needs for such a program. Workshop participants posited that the clinician-educator has several roles to fulfill beyond that of clinician, including those of teacher, curriculum developer, administrator and scholar. A pathway for residents aspiring to become clinician educators must offer structured training in each of these four areas to empower residents to effectively practice clinical education. In addition, the creation of such a track requires securing time and resources to support resident learning experiences and formal faculty development programs to support institutional mentors and leaders. This article provides a framework by which leaders in medical education can begin to prepare current trainees interested in careers as clinician-educators.

  3. Integrating internal communications, human resource management and marketing concepts into the new internal marketing philosophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sinčić, Dubravka; Pološki Vokić, Nina

    2007-01-01

    Successful companies attach great importance to human resource management and internal communications, because they are aware of the value of those activities and of strategic advantage they can bring to the organization. They should also realize that it is necessary to live internal marketing philosophy, if they stream to offer quality products and services to both markets: internal and external. The idea of satisfied employees for the benefit of satisfied customers is accepted and developed...

  4. The Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library: resource for nurse administrators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, J R

    1997-01-01

    This article describes the major knowledge resource of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library, The Registry of Nursing. The first part of this article examines informatics issues and is accompanied by examples of retrieval from a typical bibliographic database and a retrieval from the Registry of Nursing Research using case mix, both as a subject heading and as a research variable. The second part of the article examines the interaction of informatics and technology used in the Registry and presents some other Library resources.

  5. Solid Waste Management in North Carolina: A Curriculum Resource Guide for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watauga County Board of Education, Boone, NC.

    Renewal is the focus of this curriculum designed for students in kindergarten through Grade 8. The purpose of this guide is to educate students and teachers about the problems faced in managing the amount of solid waste generated by society. Each grade level curriculum is organized into activities that support exploration of the nature of solid…

  6. Teaching about Climate Change in the Business Curriculum: An Introductory Module and Resource List

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takacs, C. Helen

    2013-01-01

    Business managers are increasingly engaged with climate change issues, but pedagogy on climate change in the business curriculum is in its infancy. The author addresses the need for greater integration of climate change knowledge in the business curriculum by describing a teaching module for an undergraduate introductory business course and…

  7. Applying Banks' Typology of Ethnic Identity Development and Curriculum Goals to Story Content, Classroom Discussion, and the Ecology of Classroom and Community: Phase One. Instructional Resource No. 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Louise M.

    This instructional resource describes ways in which J. A. Banks' typology of the stages of ethnic identity development and related curriculum goals can be applied to literacy instruction. Banks' definitions of the stages of development and the curriculum goals for each stage are provided. Strategies for analyzing materials and developing relevant…

  8. PIRLS 2011 User Guide for the International Database. Supplement 1: International Version of the PIRLS 2011, Background Questionnaires and Curriculum Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foy, Pierre, Ed.; Drucker, Kathleen T., Ed.

    2013-01-01

    The PIRLS 2011 international database includes data for all questionnaires administered as part of the PIRLS 2011 assessment. This supplement contains the international version of the PIRLS 2011 background questionnaires and curriculum questionnaires in the following 5 sections: (1) Student Questionnaire; (2) Home Questionnaire (Learning to Read…

  9. Internal medicine residency training for unhealthy alcohol and other drug use: recommendations for curriculum design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Unhealthy substance use is the spectrum from use that risks harm, to use associated with problems, to the diagnosable conditions of substance abuse and dependence, often referred to as substance abuse disorders. Despite the prevalence and impact of unhealthy substance use, medical education in this area remains lacking, not providing physicians with the necessary expertise to effectively address one of the most common and costly health conditions. Medical educators have begun to address the need for physician training in unhealthy substance use, and formal curricula have been developed and evaluated, though broad integration into busy residency curricula remains a challenge. Discussion We review the development of unhealthy substance use related competencies, and describe a curriculum in unhealthy substance use that integrates these competencies into internal medicine resident physician training. We outline strategies to facilitate adoption of such curricula by the residency programs. This paper provides an outline for the actual implementation of the curriculum within the structure of a training program, with examples using common teaching venues. We describe and link the content to the core competencies mandated by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the formal accrediting body for residency training programs in the United States. Specific topics are recommended, with suggestions on how to integrate such teaching into existing internal medicine residency training program curricula. Summary Given the burden of disease and effective interventions available that can be delivered by internal medicine physicians, teaching about unhealthy substance use must be incorporated into internal medicine residency training, and can be done within existing teaching venues. PMID:20230607

  10. Biosecurity and Health Monitoring at the Zebrafish International Resource Center

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Katrina N.; Varga, Zolt?n M.; Kent, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) is a repository and distribution center for mutant, transgenic, and wild-type zebrafish. In recent years annual imports of new zebrafish lines to ZIRC have increased tremendously. In addition, after 15 years of research, we have identified some of the most virulent pathogens affecting zebrafish that should be avoided in large production facilities, such as ZIRC. Therefore, while importing a high volume of new lines we prioritize safeguarding ...

  11. International standardisation for the reporting of resources and reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, K.

    2014-01-01

    The mining industry is a vital contributor to national and global economies and yet it is very different from other industries. It is based on depleting finite mineral resources, the knowledge of which is imperfect prior to the commencement of mining or extraction. It is an industry with a colourful history of success and failure, entrepreneurs and opportunists, visionaries and short sightedness. These aspect or traits were both positive, it fostered innovation, and negative for the industry. Negative in that the merit of certain projects or results was difficult to assess, it created a credibility issue and consequently investment in the industry was impacted. In 1989 the first JORC code was released (Joint Ore Reserves Committee) in Australia. It was incorporated into the Australian Stock Exchange (ASX) listing rules thereby becoming binding on companies listed on the ASX it was also adopted by the Australian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM) and became binding on its members. Essentially JORC was the pre-cursor or model for an international standard for the reporting of exploration results, mineral resources and ore reserves. A trend towards tighter corporate governance and regulation demanded an international standard to “good practice” in mineral reserve management as well as high standards of public reporting by responsible, experienced persons. In 2006 CRIRSCO (Committee for Mineral Reserves International Reporting Standards)released an International Reporting Template (the Template), the purpose of which is to assist with the dissemination and promotion of effective, well-tried, good practice for public reporting of Exploration Results, Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves already widely adopted through national reporting codes and standards. CRIRSCO’s members are National Reporting Organisations (NROs) that are responsible for developing mineral reporting codes, standards and guidelines in Australasia (JORC), Chile (National Committee

  12. Clinical and Educational Outcomes of an Integrated Inpatient Quality Improvement Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogrinc, Greg; Cohen, Emily S; van Aalst, Robertus; Harwood, Beth; Ercolano, Ellyn; Baum, Karyn D; Pattison, Adam J; Jones, Anne C; Davies, Louise; West, Al

    2016-10-01

    Integrating teaching and hands-on experience in quality improvement (QI) may increase the learning and the impact of resident QI work. We sought to determine the clinical and educational impact of an integrated QI curriculum. This clustered, randomized trial with early and late intervention groups used mixed methods evaluation. For almost 2 years, internal medicine residents from Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center on the inpatient teams at the White River Junction VA participated in the QI curriculum. QI project effectiveness was assessed using statistical process control. Learning outcomes were assessed with the Quality Improvement Knowledge Application Tool-Revised (QIKAT-R) and through self-efficacy, interprofessional care attitudes, and satisfaction of learners. Free text responses by residents and a focus group of nurses who worked with the residents provided information about the acceptability of the intervention. The QI projects improved many clinical processes and outcomes, but not all led to improvements. Educational outcome response rates were 65% (68 of 105) at baseline, 50% (18 of 36) for the early intervention group at midpoint, 67% (24 of 36) for the control group at midpoint, and 53% (42 of 80) for the late intervention group. Composite QIKAT-R scores (range, 0-27) increased from 13.3 at baseline to 15.3 at end point ( P  < .01), as did the self-efficacy composite score ( P  < .05). Satisfaction with the curriculum was rated highly by all participants. Learning and participating in hands-on QI can be integrated into the usual inpatient work of resident physicians.

  13. Optimal allocation of international atomic energy agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-01-01

    Each year the Department of Safeguards of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to confirm that nuclear materials and facilities are employed for peaceful purposes. Because of limited inspection resources, however, the IAEA cannot fully attain its safeguards goals either quantitatively as measured by the inspection effort negotiated in the facility attachments or qualitatively as measured by the IAEA criteria for evaluating attainment of safeguards goals. Under current IAEA procedures the allocation of inspection resources assigns essentially equal inspection effort to facilities of the same type. An alternative approach would incorporate consideration of all material categories and facilities to be assigned inspection resources when allocating effort to a particular facility. One such method for allocating inspection resources is based on the IAEA criteria. The criteria provide a framework for allocating inspection effort that includes a ranking of material types according to their safeguards importance, an implicit definition of inspection activities for each material and facility type, and criteria for judging the attainment of safeguards goals in terms of the quality and frequency of these inspection activities. This framework is applicable to resource allocation for an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  14. Incorporating International Business Topics into Every Class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Heidi; Burchfield, Kathy

    2001-01-01

    Presents activities and resources for addressing international business in the curriculum, including e-mail partnerships, international document specifications, currency comparisons, marketing to other cultures, scavenger hunt, business lunch, and international telephone and travel etiquette. (SK)

  15. Building international experiences into an engineering curriculum - a design project-based approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Victor; Castillo, Luciano; Carbajal, Gerardo; Hajela, Prabhat

    2014-07-01

    This paper is a descriptive account of how short-term international and multicultural experiences can be integrated into early design experiences in an aerospace engineering curriculum. Such approaches are considered as important not only in fostering a student's interest in the engineering curriculum, but also exposing them to a multicultural setting that they are likely to encounter in their professional careers. In the broader sense, this programme is described as a model that can be duplicated in other engineering disciplines as a first-year experience. In this study, undergraduate students from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) and Universidad del Turabo (UT) in Puerto Rico collaborated on a substantial design project consisting of designing, fabricating, and flight-testing radio-controlled model aircraft as a capstone experience in a semester-long course on Fundamentals of Flight. The two-week long experience in Puerto Rico was organised into academic and cultural components designed with the following objectives: (i) to integrate students in a multicultural team-based academic and social environment, (ii) to practise team-building skills and develop students' critical thinking and analytical skills, and finally (iii) to excite students about their engineering major through practical applications of aeronautics and help them decide if it is a right fit for them.

  16. Framing the International Studies Curriculum: Toward the Development of Common Student Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernotsky, Harry I.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike most disciplinary-based academic programs, interdisciplinary international studies programs vary considerably in terms of their core curricula. They need to fit within the institutional context in which they operate and must insure that there are sufficient faculty and resources available so that required courses are accessible on a regular…

  17. Speculative resources of uranium. A review of International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) estimates 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    On a country by country basis the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) estimates 1982-1983 are reviewed. Information provided includes exploration work, airborne survey, radiometric survey, gamma-ray spectrometric survey, estimate of speculative resources, uranium occurrences, uranium deposits, uranium mineralization, agreements for uranium exploration, feasibilities studies, geological classification of resources, proposed revised resource range, production estimate of uranium

  18. Implementation of computer learning cases into the curriculum of internal medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer, Martin R.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer-based interactive clinical cases were introduced in 1999 to improve problem-solving abilities in undergraduate education in internal medicine at the University of Munich; the content of online cases was matched with the main lecture. Course credits were given for the successful processing of four cases; an additional eight cases were offered to the students for voluntary use. Only the required cases were used substantially (between 89% and 95% of all students whereas a minority of students (between 5% and 11% used the cases voluntarily. In spite of this predominantly extrinsic motivation, most students expressed a high level of intrinsic motivation and rated their self-reported learning success as high. The difficulty of cases was rated as appropriate. This was supported by quantitative data on the correctness of students' answers. In summary, the integration of computer-based cases into a face-to-face learning curriculum should be coupled with the course assessment framework.

  19. PERFORMANCE OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN AN INTERNATIONALLY OPERATING COMPANY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Mura

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In our days, society is greatly influenced and altered by the process of internationalization andglobalization. Globalization refers to a whole set of changes, not to one single dimensional change.The process of internationalization puts a special and high importance on the work of humanresources managers. In order to remain successful and competitive in the international businessenvironment, companies have to pay close attention to cultural factors. These may considerablydiffer among workers in multinational companies. We are taking a careful look at human resourcemanagement in this new age, and especially at the impact of globalization and internationalization.Our case study is built on the company MOL, specifically on some of the activities it develops in thefield of human resource management: training programmes, personnel motivation, careerdevelopment. We highlight some of the critical aspects of human resources management at MOL,and see what lessons are being learned and what conclusions we can draw.

  20. 78 FR 57921 - Patch International, Inc., QuadTech International, Inc., Strategic Resources, Ltd., and Virtual...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-20

    ... International, Inc., Strategic Resources, Ltd., and Virtual Medical Centre, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading... lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Virtual Medical Centre, Inc... October 1, 2013. By the Commission. Jill M. Peterson, Assistant Secretary. [FR Doc. 2013-23043 Filed 9-18...

  1. Concurrent Validity Between a Shared Curriculum, the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination, and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, Stephen D; Bertram, Amanda; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh

    2015-03-01

    A core objective of residency education is to facilitate learning, and programs need more curricula and assessment tools with demonstrated validity evidence. We sought to demonstrate concurrent validity between performance on a widely shared, ambulatory curriculum (the Johns Hopkins Internal Medicine Curriculum), the Internal Medicine In-Training Examination (IM-ITE), and the American Board of Internal Medicine Certifying Examination (ABIM-CE). A cohort study of 443 postgraduate year (PGY)-3 residents at 22 academic and community hospital internal medicine residency programs using the curriculum through the Johns Hopkins Internet Learning Center (ILC). Total and percentile rank scores on ILC didactic modules were compared with total and percentile rank scores on the IM-ITE and total scores on the ABIM-CE. The average score on didactic modules was 80.1%; the percentile rank was 53.8. The average IM-ITE score was 64.1% with a percentile rank of 54.8. The average score on the ABIM-CE was 464. Scores on the didactic modules, IM-ITE, and ABIM-CE correlated with each other (P ITE total and percentile rank scores (P ITE percentile rank. Performance on a widely shared ambulatory curriculum is associated with performance on the IM-ITE and the ABIM-CE.

  2. Funding of Geosciences: Coordinating National and International Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bye, B.; Fontaine, K. S.

    2012-12-01

    Funding is an important element of national as well as international policy for Earth observations. The Group on Earth Observations (GEO) is coordinating efforts to build a Global Earth Observation System of Systems, or GEOSS. The lack of dedicated funding to support specific S&T activities in support of GEOSS is one of the most important obstacles to engaging the S&T communities in its implementation. This problem can be addressed by establishing explicit linkages between research and development programmes funded by GEO Members and Participating Organizations and GEOSS. In appropriate funding programs, these links may take the form of requiring explanations of how projects to be funded will interface with GEOSS and ensuring that demonstrating significant relevance for GEOSS is viewed as an asset of these proposals, requiring registration of Earth observing systems developed in these projects, or stipulating that data and products must adhere to the GEOSS Data Sharing Principles. Examples of Earth observations include: - Measurements from ground-based, in situ monitors; - Observations from Earth satellites; - Products and predictive capabilities from Earth system models, often using the capabilities of high-performance computers; - Scientific knowledge about the Earth system; and, - Data visualization techniques. These examples of Earth observations activities requires different types of resources, R&D top-down, bottom-up funding and programs of various sizes. Where innovation and infrastructure are involved different kind of resources are better suited, for developing countries completely other sources of funding are applicable etc. The European Commission funded Egida project is coordinating the development of a funding mechanism based on current national and international funding instruments such as the European ERANet, the new Joint Programming Initiatives, ESFRI as well as other European and non-European instruments. A general introduction to various

  3. Enhancement of environment and resources engineering studies through an international cooperation network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, E.; Tuneski, A.

    2012-12-01

    Higher education plays a very important role in the modern societies development, enhancing social, cultural and economic development for a sustainable growth, environment respectful. In this framework, the European Commission promotes the TEMPUS-Trans European Mobility Programme for University Studies. Curricula harmonization and lifelong learning programme development in higher education are among the focused aspects of the TEMPUS programme. The DEREL-Development of Environment and Resources Engineering Learning, is a three years TEMPUS project coordinated by the University of Firenze, in cooperation with colleagues of the Ss Cyril and Methodius University, Skopje financed and activated since October 2010. The DEREL Project Consortium consists of 4 EU Universities (from Italy, Greece, Germany and Austria), 7 Partner Countries (PC) Universities (from FYR of Macedonia, Serbia and Albania), and 1 PC Ministry, 4 PC National Agencies, 1 PC non governmental organization and 1 PC enterprise. In cooperation with the same 4 EU Universities and the same Macedonian Institutions, in the period 2005-2008 also a TEMPUS JEP entitled DEREC-Development of Environmental and Resources Engineering Curriculum, was also carried out by the University of Firenze in cooperation with colleagues of the Ss Cyril and Methodius University. Within DEREC a new three-years first cycle curriculum in Environmental and Resources Engineering was opened at the University Ss Cyril and Methodius, Skopje, and the necessary conditions for offering a Joint Degree Title, on the basis of an agreement between the Ss. Cyril and Methodius University and the University of Firenze, were fulfilled. The running DEREL project, as a continuation of DEREC, is aimed to introduce a new, up-to-date, postgraduate second cycle curriculum in Environment and Resources Engineering at the Ss Cyril and Methodius University in Skopje, FYR of Macedonia, University of Novi Sad, Serbia and Polytechnic University of Tirana, Albania

  4. The development of a conceptually based nursing curriculum: an international experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meleis, A I

    1979-11-01

    Nursing programmes in the United States of America are based on a conceptual framework. Not only do faculty and students ascribe to the necessity of such programmes but the national accreditation agency also provides its accreditation approval for the institution only after all criteria are met, including the requirement of a well-defined, operationalized and implemented framework. Can a nursing programme be developed in other nations utilizing the esoteric, American-based idea of the necessity for a conceptually based curriculum? The author answers this question. The manuscript presents both the process utilized in selecting a conceptual framwork for a new junior college programme in Kuwait and discusses the selected framework. The idea of a conceptual framework to guide the curriculum was as foreign in Kuwait as it was to nursing curricula in the United States 15 years ago. Though initially rejected by the faculty in Kuwait, the idea of a conceptual framework was reintroduced after much faculty discussion and questions related to nursing knowledge vis-a-vis medical knowledge, and what should be included in and excluded from the programme. By the end of the second year, a definite framework had been operationalized into courses and content. The selection of the framework evolved from faculty participation in the operationalization of the framework. This point is quite significant particularly in an international assignment, as it is the faculty who are left with the monumental task of supporting and continuing the work which has been done. Strategies used to develop and implement a conceptual framework included confrontation of faculty of the existing situation, lectures, seminars, workshops, and the identification of a critical review board.

  5. Communication skills curriculum for foreign medical graduates in an internal medicine residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M; Kelley, Amy S

    2014-11-01

    Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy, and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. The workshop consisted of two interactive sessions in a small group with two learners and one or two facilitators, during the 4-week geriatrics block in IM internship training year. Twenty-three IM interns at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence, and skill in communication and asked about challenges to effective communication with older adults. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. On a 4-point Likert scale, there was average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which was sustained 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician, and system barriers to effective communication. Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in a sustained increase in overall confidence in IM interns in communication with older adults and may help overcome certain patient- and physician-specific communication barriers. © 2014, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2014, The American Geriatrics Society.

  6. Communication Skills Curriculum for Foreign Medical Graduates in an Internal Medicine Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswamy, Ravishankar; Williams, Alicia; Clark, Elizabeth M.; Kelley, Amy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Effective communication is an important aspect of caring for the elderly, who are more likely to have multimorbidity, limited health literacy and psychosocial barriers to care. About half of Internal Medicine (IM) trainees in the United States are foreign medical graduates, and may not have been exposed to prior communication skills education. This novel communication skills curriculum for IM interns aimed to increase trainees' confidence and use of specific communication tools with older adults, particularly in delivering bad news and conducting family meetings. Methods The workshop consisted of 2 interactive sessions, in a small group with 2 learners and 1-2 facilitators, during the Geriatrics block of the internship year. Twenty-three IM interns were surveyed at the beginning and at the end of the 4-week block and at 3 months after completion of the workshop about their knowledge, confidence and skill in communication, and asked about any challenges to effective communication with older patients. The primary outcome measure was change in self-reported confidence and behavior in communication at 4 weeks. Results On a 4-point Likert scale, there was an average improvement of 0.70 in self-reported confidence in communication, which sustained at 3 months after completion of the workshop. Participants reported several patient, physician and system barriers to effective communication. Conclusion Communication skills education in a small-group setting and the opportunity for repeated practice and self-reflection resulted in sustained increase in overall confidence among IM interns in communication with older adults, and may help overcome certain patient and physician-specific communication barriers. PMID:25354834

  7. Man's Basic Needs. Resource Units, Grade 1. Providence Social Studies Curriculum Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Providence Public Schools, RI.

    GRADES OR AGES: Grade 1. SUBJECT MATTER: Social studies; man's basic needs. ORGANIZATION AND PHYSICAL APPEARANCE: The guide is divided into 11 chapters, five of which outline the basic curriculum subunits. These five chapters are laid out in three columns, one each for topics, activities, and materials. Other chapters are in list form. The guide…

  8. Learning in/through Everyday Resistance: A Cultural-Historical Perspective on Community Resources and Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco, Mariana

    2012-01-01

    This essay addresses the value of leveraging the unique learning, thinking, and knowledge students develop in home-community spaces for school curriculum. The author explores "everyday resistance" to highlight a particular set of enacted political actions and practices in which students, families, and communities participate to negotiate the…

  9. Recognition, Resources, Responsibilities: Using Students' Stories of Family to Renew the South African Social Work Curriculum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bozalek, V.G.

    2004-01-01

    This PhD project aims to demonstrate the importance of giving space to local student voices as forms of subjugated knowledges to inform the curriculum on Family and Child Care. It does so by reflecting upon the process and product of critical autobiographical assignments which social work students

  10. World energy resources. International Geohydroscience and Energy Research Institute

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, C.E.

    2002-01-01

    World Energy Resources is an explanatory energy survey of the countries and major regions of the world, their geographic and economic settings, and significant inter-relationships. This book attempts to combine several interacting energy themes that encompass a historical development, energy issues and forecasts, economic geography, environmental programs, and world energy use. The main thrust of this book -World Energy Resources - is based on principles of energy science, applied geology, geophysics, and other environmental sciences as they relate to the exploration, exploitation, and production of resources in this country and throughout the world. This work is an analysis of the United States (USA) and world oil, gas, coal, and alternative energy resources and their associated issues, forecasts, and related policy. This book could not have been attempted without a broad geological exposure and international geographic awareness. Much information is scattered among federal and state agencies, schools, and other institutions, and this book has attempted to combine some of the vast information base. This attempt can only skim the information surface at best, but its regional and topical coverage is broad in scope. Part I introduces conventional energy resources and their historical developments, and includes chapters 1 to 7. The basic concepts and supporting facts on energy sources are presented here for the general education of energy analysts, policy makers, and scientists that desire a brief review of advanced technologies and history. Part II includes chapters 8 to 14 and provides discussions of the renewable energy sources and the available alternative energy sources and technologies to oil, gas, coal, and nuclear sources. Part III includes chapters 15 to 20 and provides an analysis of United States energy markets and forecasts through the first quarter of the 21st century, while including some world energy data. Widely-used energy forecasting models are

  11. Healthy Choices for Every Body Adult Curriculum Improves Participants' Food Resource Management Skills and Food Safety Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adedokun, Omolola A; Plonski, Paula; Jenkins-Howard, Brooke; Cotterill, Debra B; Vail, Ann

    2018-04-03

    To evaluate the impact of the University of Kentucky's Healthy Choices for Every Body (HCEB) adult nutrition education curriculum on participants' food resource management (FRM) skills and food safety practices. A quasi-experimental design was employed using propensity score matching to pair 8 intervention counties with 8 comparison counties. Independent-samples t tests and ANCOVA models compared gains in FRM skills and food safety practices between the intervention and comparison groups (n = 413 and 113, respectively). Propensity score matching analysis showed a statistical balance and similarities between the comparison and intervention groups. Food resource management and food safety gain scores were statistically significantly higher for the intervention group (P food safety practices of participants. Copyright © 2018 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimal allocation of International Atomic Energy Agency inspection resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markin, J.T.

    1987-12-01

    The Safeguards Department of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) conducts inspections to assure the peaceful use of a state's nuclear materials and facilities. Because of limited resources for conducting inspections, the careful disposition of inspection effort among these facilities is essential if the IAEA is to attain its safeguards goals. This report describes an optimization procedure for assigning an inspection effort to maximize attainment of IAEA goals. The procedure does not require quantitative estimates of safeguards effectiveness, material value, or facility importance. Instead, the optimization is based on qualitative, relative prioritizations of inspection activities and materials to be safeguarded. This allocation framework is applicable to an arbitrary group of facilities such as a state's fuel cycle, the facilities inspected by an operations division, or all of the facilities inspected by the IAEA

  13. Biosecurity and Health Monitoring at the Zebrafish International Resource Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Katrina N; Varga, Zoltán M; Kent, Michael L

    2016-07-01

    The Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC) is a repository and distribution center for mutant, transgenic, and wild-type zebrafish. In recent years annual imports of new zebrafish lines to ZIRC have increased tremendously. In addition, after 15 years of research, we have identified some of the most virulent pathogens affecting zebrafish that should be avoided in large production facilities, such as ZIRC. Therefore, while importing a high volume of new lines we prioritize safeguarding the health of our in-house fish colony. Here, we describe the biosecurity and health-monitoring program implemented at ZIRC. This strategy was designed to prevent introduction of new zebrafish pathogens, minimize pathogens already present in the facility, and ensure a healthy zebrafish colony for in-house uses and shipment to customers.

  14. How Will Access and Reliability of Information Communications Technology Resources Affect the Potential Implementation of the Australian Curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Gemma

    2014-01-01

    The Australian Government has recently introduced a national based curriculum, known as The Australian Curriculum. This new curriculum is intended to provide quality education for all students (Australian Curriculum, Reporting and Assessment Authority, [ACARA], 2013). This article considers some of the possible implications of the Australian…

  15. Can the 'Assessment Drives Learning' effect be detected in clinical skills training? - Implications for curriculum design and resource planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buss, Beate; Krautter, Markus; Möltner, Andreas; Weyrich, Peter; Werner, Anne; Jünger, Jana; Nikendei, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The acquisition of clinical-technical skills is of particular importance for the doctors of tomorrow. Procedural skills are often trained for the first time in skills laboratories, which provide a sheltered learning environment. However, costs to implement and maintain skills laboratories are considerably high. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate students’ patterns of attendance of voluntary skills-lab training sessions and thereby answer the following question: Is it possible to measure an effect of the theoretical construct related to motivational psychology described in the literature – ‘Assessment drives learning’ – reflected in patterns of attendance at voluntary skills-lab training sessions? By answering this question, design recommendations for curriculum planning and resource management should be derived. Method: A retrospective, descriptive analysis of student skills-lab attendance related to voluntary basic and voluntary advanced skills-lab sessions was conducted. The attendance patterns of a total of 340 third-year medical students in different successive year groups from the Medical Faculty at the University of Heidelberg were assessed. Results: Students showed a preference for voluntary basic skills-lab training sessions, which were relevant to clinical skills assessment, especially at the beginning and at the end of the term. Voluntary advanced skills-lab training sessions without reference to clinical skills assessment were used especially at the beginning of the term, but declined towards the end of term. Conclusion: The results show a clear influence of assessments on students’ attendance at skills-lab training sessions. First recommendations for curriculum design and resource management will be described. Nevertheless, further prospective research studies will be necessary to gain a more comprehensive understanding of the motivational factors impacting students’ utilisation of voluntary skills

  16. Internal Resources to Improve the Quality of Higher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Zak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the situation in the Russian higher education system. The factors affecting the improvement of the quality of higher education are analyzed. The emphasis is on mass universities. The main obstacles to improving the quality of education in these institutions are the Institute of collective reputation and the high costs of the struggle for improving the quality of education.The necessity of focusing on the actuation of the internal resources to improve the quality associated with the change in the educational process: giving students the right to choose the timing exams and training period at university. The implementation of the proposed measures will reduce the opportunity costs associated with quality improvement activities. The proposed change in the organization of the learning process opens the possibility to estimate the activity of universities in terms of medium-term implementation of educational programs. The use of this indicator will not only combine the two different targets of universities, but also to minimize the costs of opportunistic behavior of teachers and management.

  17. Human resources for health: global crisis and international cooperation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portela, Gustavo Zoio; Fehn, Amanda Cavada; Ungerer, Regina Lucia Sarmento; Poz, Mario Roberto Dal

    2017-07-01

    From the 1990s onwards, national economies became connected and globalized. Changes in the demographic and epidemiological profile of the population highlighted the need for further discussions and strategies on Human Resources for Health (HRH). The health workforce crisis is a worldwide phenomenon. It includes: difficulties in attracting and retaining health professionals to work in rural and remote areas, poor distribution and high turnover of health staff particularly physicians, poor training of health workforces in new sanitation and demographic conditions and the production of scientific evidence to support HRH decision making, policy management, programs and interventions. In this scenario, technical cooperation activities may contribute to the development of the countries involved, strengthening relationships and expanding exchanges as well as contributing to the production, dissemination and use of technical scientific knowledge and evidence and the training of workers and institutional strengthening. This article aims to explore this context highlighting the participation of Brazil in the international cooperation arena on HRH and emphasizing the role of the World Health Organization in confronting this crisis that limits the ability of countries and their health systems to improve the health and lives of their populations.

  18. Harnessing the International Treaty on Plant Genetic Resources for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    used to promote benefit sharing and conversation of plant genetic resources particularly in ... and Government at the World Food Summit agreed on a global plan of action ... the sustainable use of plant genetic resources by providing a flexible.

  19. A web-based resource for the nuclear science/technology high school curriculum - a summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ripley, C.

    2009-01-01

    On November 15, 2008, the CNA launched a new Nuclear Science Technology High School Curriculum Website. Located at www.cna.ca the site was developed over a decade, first with funding from AECL and finally by the CNA, as a tool to explain concepts and issues related to energy and in particular nuclear energy targeting the public, teachers and students in grades 9-12. It draws upon the expertise of leading nuclear scientists and science educators. Full lesson plans for the teacher, videos for discussion, animations, games, electronic publications, laboratory exercises and quick question and answer sheets will give the student greater knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to solve problems and to critically examine issues in making decisions. Eight modules focus on key areas: Canada's Nuclear History, Atomic Theory, What is Radiation?, Biological Effects of Radiation, World Energy Sources, Nuclear Technology at Work, Safety (includes Waste Disposal) in the Nuclear Industry and Careers. (author)

  20. The 2006 Eldon D. Foote lecture in international business : a changing China : the resource challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balloch, H.R.

    2006-01-01

    China's important role in the market for international resources was discussed. China's emergence as a major economic power may mean that human activity in the world will continue to stress global resource capacities. Challenges that currently face China will affect its own growth in addition to the future of global resource markets and international politics, and China's global influence will have profound implications for the Canadian and international business community. This paper discussed China's economic growth and drivers, and examined the country's growing need for resources. China's foreign policy was examined, and the politics of resource acquisitions were discussed. Recent technological innovations in China were reviewed

  1. International Virtual Observatory System for Water Resources Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinenweber, Lewis; Bermudez, Luis

    2013-04-01

    Sharing, accessing, and integrating hydrologic and climatic data have been identified as a critical need for some time. The current state of data portals, standards, technologies, activities, and expertise can be leverage to develop an initial operational capability for a virtual observatory system. This system will allow to link observations data with stream networks and models, and to solve semantic inconsistencies among communities. Prototyping a virtual observatory system is an inter-disciplinary, inter-agency and international endeavor. The Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) within the OGC Interoperability Program provides the process and expertise to run such collaborative effort. The OGC serves as a global forum for the collaboration of developers and users of spatial data products and services, and to advance the development of international standards for geospatial interoperability. The project coordinated by OGC that is advancing an international virtual observatory system for water resources information is called Climatology-Hydrology Information Sharing Pilot, Phase 1 (CHISP-1). It includes observations and forecasts in the U.S. and Canada levering current networks and capabilities. It is designed to support the following use cases: 1) Hydrologic modeling for historical and near-future stream flow and groundwater conditions. Requires the integration of trans-boundary stream flow and groundwater well data, as well as national river networks (US NHD and Canada NHN) from multiple agencies. Emphasis will be on time series data and real-time flood monitoring. 2) Modeling and assessment of nutrient load into the lakes. Requires accessing water-quality data from multiple agencies and integrating with stream flow information for calculating loads. Emphasis on discrete sampled water quality observations, linking those to specific NHD stream reaches and catchments, and additional metadata for sampled data. The key objectives of these use cases are: 1) To link

  2. A Project to Develop an Associate of Science Degree Curriculum in Renewable Energy Resources and Applications in Agriculture. Final Report, July 1, 1980-June 30, 1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Keith; Fielding, Marvin R.

    A project was conducted at State Fair Community College (SFCC) in Sedalia, Missouri, to develop an associate of science degree curriculum in renewable energy resources and their application in agriculture. A pilot study, designed to verify and rate the importance of 138 competencies in fuel alcohol production and to ascertain employment…

  3. Teachers' Social Capital as a Resource for Curriculum Development: Lessons Learnt in the Implementation of a Child-Friendly Schools Programme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modipane, Mpho; Themane, Mahlapahlapana

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports on lessons learnt in the use of teachers' social capital as a resource for curriculum development, in the implementation of the Child-Friendly Schools (CFS) programme in South Africa. The researchers in this study were amongst the trainers. The study followed a qualitative research approach, where a descriptive research design…

  4. On the development of an International Curriculum on Hydrogen Safety Engineering and its Implementation into Educational Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahoe, A.E.; Molkov, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The present paper provides an overview of the development of an International Curriculum on Hydrogen Safety Engineering and its implementation into new educational programmes. The curriculum has a modular structure, and consists of five basic, six fundamental and four applied modules. The reasons for this particular structure are explained. To accelerate the development of teaching materials and their implementation in training/educational programmes, an annual European Summer School on Hydrogen Safety will be held (the first Summer School is from 15-24 Aug 2006, Belfast, UK), where leading experts deliver keynote lectures to an audience of researchers on topics covering the state-of-the-art in Hydrogen Safety Science and Engineering. The establishment of a Postgraduate Certificate course in Hydrogen Safety Engineering at the University of Ulster (starting in September 2006) as a first step in the development of a worldwide system of Hydrogen Safety education and training is described. (authors)

  5. Review of international classification systems for uranium resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Wenyou

    2007-01-01

    The two primary classification systems for uranium resources in common use in the whole world are described. These uranium resource classification systems were developed under two distinct philosophies, it implies two very different processes, criteria, terms and definitions from which the systems evolved and were implemented. However, the two primary systems are all based on two considerations: the degree of geological confidence and the degree of economic attractiveness based on cost of producing the resource. The uranium resource classification methods currently used in most major uranium producing countries have all a bearing on the two aforesaid classification systems. The disparity exists only in the way or practice of classifying and estimating the uranium resources for reasons of different political and economical systems in various countries. The harmonization of these resource classification systems for uranium can be realized with the economic integration on a global scale. (authors)

  6. International Experience of Resource Management in the North

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Rasmus Ole

    2005-01-01

    sustainable development requires the linking new economic practices with conditions that make them possible, including a general acceptance among both inhabitants, planners and politicians. Such a linkage between scientific insight, practical experience, and public acceptance is possible through......: - Distorted economies: - Property rights, resource access and traditional resource usage: - Human resource impact: - Social impact: - Institutional impact: - New settlement patterns Besides raising the general question of the need for research on the environmental and social impact of development in the North...

  7. International Year of Astronomy (IYA 2009): Selected Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Mandy; Kraus, Joseph R.

    2009-01-01

    The International Year of Astronomy 2009 (IYA2009) is a global celebration of astronomy and its contributions to society and culture initiated by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) and UNESCO. Through local, national and international events, the organization wants to help the citizens of the world connect with the universe through the day…

  8. Bridging the Chasm: Challenges, Opportunities, and Resources for Integrating a Dissemination and Implementation Science Curriculum into Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginossar, Tamar; Heckman, Carolyn J; Cragun, Deborah; Quintiliani, Lisa M; Proctor, Enola K; Chambers, David A; Skolarus, Ted; Brownson, Ross C

    2018-01-01

    Physicians are charged with implementing evidence-based medicine, yet few are trained in the science of Dissemination and Implementation (D&I). In view of the potential of evidence-based training in D&I to help close the gap between research and practice, the goal of this review is to examine the importance of D&I training in medical education, describe challenges to implementing such training, and provide strategies and resources for building D&I capacity. We conducted (1) a systematic review to identify US-based D&I training efforts and (2) a critical review of additional literature to inform our evaluation of the challenges and opportunities of integrating D&I training in medical education. Out of 269 unique articles reviewed, 11 described US-based D&I training. Although vibrant and diverse training opportunities exist, their capacity is limited, and they are not designed to meet physicians' needs. Synthesis of relevant literature using a critical review approach identified challenges inherent to changing medical education, as well as challenges related to D&I science. Finally, selected strategies and resources are available for facilitating incorporation of D&I training into medical education and overcoming existing challenges. Integrating D&I training in the medical education curriculum, and particularly in residency and fellowship training, holds promise for bridging the chasm between scientific discoveries and improved patient care and outcomes. However, unique challenges should be addressed, including the need for greater evidence.

  9. Book Review: Current Issues in International Human Resource Management and Strategy Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretzinger, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    The article reviews the book "Current Issues in International Human Resource Management and Strategy Research," edited by Marion Festing and Susanne Royer.......The article reviews the book "Current Issues in International Human Resource Management and Strategy Research," edited by Marion Festing and Susanne Royer....

  10. Tapping into community resources in China | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-01-18

    Jan 18, 2011 ... CBNRM focuses on protecting and managing these resources by involving ... In China, where "top-down" methods of management have been the rule, .... Solving the water crisis: Increase supplies or improve management?

  11. Integrating technology, curriculum, and online resources: A multilevel model study of impacts on science teachers and students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lei

    This scale-up study investigated the impact of a teacher technology tool (Curriculum Customization Service, CCS), curriculum, and online resources on earth science teachers' attitudes, beliefs, and practices and on students' achievement and engagement with science learning. Participants included 73 teachers and over 2,000 ninth-grade students within five public school districts in the western U.S. To assess the impact on teachers, changes between pre- and postsurveys were examined. Results suggest that the CCS tool appeared to significantly increase both teachers' awareness of other earth science teachers' practices and teachers' frequency of using interactive resources in their lesson planning and classroom teaching. A standard multiple regression model was developed. In addition to "District," "Training condition" (whether or not teachers received CCS training) appeared to predict teachers' attitudes, beliefs, and practices. Teachers who received CCS training tended to have lower postsurvey scores than their peers who had no CCS training. Overall, usage of the CCS tool tended to be low, and there were differences among school districts. To assess the impact on students, changes were examined between pre- and postsurveys of (1) knowledge assessment and (2) students' engagement with science learning. Students showed pre- to postsurvey improvements in knowledge assessment, with small to medium effect sizes. A nesting effect (students clustered within teachers) in the Earth's Dynamic Geosphere (EDG) knowledge assessment was identified and addressed by fitting a two-level hierarchical linear model (HLM). In addition, significant school district differences existed for student post-knowledge assessment scores. On the student engagement questionnaire, students tended to be neutral or to slightly disagree that science learning was important in terms of using science in daily life, stimulating their thinking, discovering science concepts, and satisfying their own

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Taiwan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Taiwan is an island of 36,000 sq km located 160 km east of mainland China. Geologically, the oldest rocks are Tertiary, and the only igneous rocks on the island are Quaternary andesites and basalts. Copper, gold, and silver are the only known metallic minerals produced. Uranium occurrences and exploration efforts are unknown. The potential uranium resource of Taiwan is considered a category 1 resource. (author)

  13. The effects of low internal integration between purchasing and operations on suppliers’ resource mobilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Chris; Koch, Christian

    2012-01-01

    A company that suffers from low internal integration between corporate functions performs worse than its more integrated competitors, leaving it in a position of competitive disparity. This paper reports on an investigation of the effects of internal integration between purchasing and operations...... on the mobilization of supplier resources. Low internal integration generates uncoordinated operations and purchasing behaviors that negatively affect supplier resource mobilization. We find that the lack of operations support for eight major purchasing initiatives in a construction company negatively affects...

  14. Development of a Quality and Safety Competency Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residency: An International Delphi Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adleman, Jenna; Gillan, Caitlin; Caissie, Amanda; Davis, Carol-Anne; Liszewski, Brian; McNiven, Andrea; Giuliani, Meredith

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To develop an entry-to-practice quality and safety competency profile for radiation oncology residency. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive list of potential quality and safety competency items was generated from public and professional resources and interprofessional focus groups. Redundant or out-of-scope items were eliminated through investigator consensus. Remaining items were subjected to an international 2-round modified Delphi process involving experts in radiation oncology, radiation therapy, and medical physics. During Round 1, each item was scored independently on a 9-point Likert scale indicating appropriateness for inclusion in the competency profile. Items indistinctly ranked for inclusion or exclusion were re-evaluated through web conference discussion and reranked in Round 2. Results: An initial 1211 items were compiled from 32 international sources and distilled to 105 unique potential quality and safety competency items. Fifteen of the 50 invited experts participated in round 1: 10 radiation oncologists, 4 radiation therapists, and 1 medical physicist from 13 centers in 5 countries. Round 1 rankings resulted in 80 items included, 1 item excluded, and 24 items indeterminate. Two areas emerged more prominently within the latter group: change management and human factors. Web conference with 5 participants resulted in 9 of these 24 items edited for content or clarity. In Round 2, 12 participants rescored all indeterminate items resulting in 10 items ranked for inclusion. The final 90 enabling competency items were organized into thematic groups consisting of 18 key competencies under headings adapted from Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. Conclusions: This quality and safety competency profile may inform minimum training standards for radiation oncology residency programs.

  15. Development of a Quality and Safety Competency Curriculum for Radiation Oncology Residency: An International Delphi Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adleman, Jenna [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gillan, Caitlin [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Caissie, Amanda [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Saint John Regional Hospital, Saint John, New Brunswick (Canada); Davis, Carol-Anne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Nova Scotia Cancer Centre, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada); Liszewski, Brian [Odette Cancer Centre, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); McNiven, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Giuliani, Meredith, E-mail: Meredith.Giuliani@rmp.uhn.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To develop an entry-to-practice quality and safety competency profile for radiation oncology residency. Methods and Materials: A comprehensive list of potential quality and safety competency items was generated from public and professional resources and interprofessional focus groups. Redundant or out-of-scope items were eliminated through investigator consensus. Remaining items were subjected to an international 2-round modified Delphi process involving experts in radiation oncology, radiation therapy, and medical physics. During Round 1, each item was scored independently on a 9-point Likert scale indicating appropriateness for inclusion in the competency profile. Items indistinctly ranked for inclusion or exclusion were re-evaluated through web conference discussion and reranked in Round 2. Results: An initial 1211 items were compiled from 32 international sources and distilled to 105 unique potential quality and safety competency items. Fifteen of the 50 invited experts participated in round 1: 10 radiation oncologists, 4 radiation therapists, and 1 medical physicist from 13 centers in 5 countries. Round 1 rankings resulted in 80 items included, 1 item excluded, and 24 items indeterminate. Two areas emerged more prominently within the latter group: change management and human factors. Web conference with 5 participants resulted in 9 of these 24 items edited for content or clarity. In Round 2, 12 participants rescored all indeterminate items resulting in 10 items ranked for inclusion. The final 90 enabling competency items were organized into thematic groups consisting of 18 key competencies under headings adapted from Deming's System of Profound Knowledge. Conclusions: This quality and safety competency profile may inform minimum training standards for radiation oncology residency programs.

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    In Australia most exploration for uranium has been conducted by companies and individuals. The geological mapping and airborne radiometric surveying conducted by the BMR is made available to interested persons. Exploration for uranium in Australia can be divided into two periods - 1947 to 1961 and 1966-1977. During the first period the Commonwealth Government introduced measures to encourage uranium exploration including a system of rewards for the discovery of uranium ore. This reward system resulted in extensive activity by prospectors particularly in the known mineral fields. Equipped with a Geiger counter or scintillometer, individuals with little or no experience in prospecting could compete with experienced prospectors and geologists. During this period several relative small uranium deposits were discovered generally by prospectors who found outcropping mineralisation. The second phase of uranium exploration in Australia began in 1966 at which time reserves amounted to only 6,200 tonnes of uranium and by 3 977 reserves had been increased to 289,000 tonnes. Most of the exploration was done by companies with substantial exploration budgets utilising more advanced geological and geophysical techniques. In the field of airborne radiometer the development of multi-channel gamma ray spectrometers with large volume crystal detectors increased the sensitivity of the tool as a uranium detector and resulted in several major discoveries. Expenditure or exploration for uranium increased from 1966 to 1971 but has declines in recent years. After listing the major geological elements of Australia, its uranium production and resources are discussed. During the period 1954-71 the total production of uranium concentrate in Australia amounted to 7,780 tonnes of uranium, and was derived from deposits at Rum Jungle (2,990 tonnes U) and the South Alligator River (610 tonnes U) in the Northern Territory, Mary Kathleen (3,460 tonnes U) in Queensland and Radium Hill (720 tonnes U

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Syria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Very little information is available to IAEA on the geology and uranium potential of Syria. In 1975 a contract was awarded to Huntings Geology and Geophysics Ltd by the Ministry of Petroleum and Mineral Resources to carry out a study of the country's mineral resources with particular reference to phosphate uranium, chrome and industrial materials. The results of this survey are not known. Apart from the assumption of some possibility of uranium recovery as a by-product from phosphate production it is assumed that the Speculative Potential is likely to be less than 1000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  18. European undergraduate curriculum in geriatric medicine developed using an international modified Delphi technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Masud, T.; Blundell, A.; Gordon, A. L.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: the rise in the number of older, frail adults necessitates that future doctors are adequately trained in the skills of geriatric medicine. Few countries have dedicated curricula in geriatric medicine at the undergraduate level. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus among...... geriatricians on a curriculum with the minimal requirements that a medical student should achieve by the end of medical school. Methods: a modified Delphi process was used. First, educational experts and geriatricians proposed a set of learning objectives based on a literature review. Second, three Delphi...... rounds involving a panel with 49 experts representing 29 countries affiliated to the European Union of Medical Specialists (UEMS) was used to gain consensus for a final curriculum. Results: the number of disagreements following Delphi Rounds 1 and 2 were 81 and 53, respectively. Complete agreement...

  19. European undergraduate curriculum in geriatric medicine developed using an international modified Delphi technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Masud, Tahir

    2014-09-01

    the rise in the number of older, frail adults necessitates that future doctors are adequately trained in the skills of geriatric medicine. Few countries have dedicated curricula in geriatric medicine at the undergraduate level. The aim of this project was to develop a consensus among geriatricians on a curriculum with the minimal requirements that a medical student should achieve by the end of medical school.

  20. The Structure of Trade in Genetic Resources: Implications for the International ABS Regime Negotiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikyung Yun

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The intensive exploitation of genetic resources at the international level has led to a negotiation of an international regime on Access and Benefit-Sharing (ABS of genetic resources. Due to lack of systematic data, little is known about the structure of trade in genetic resources to inform the negotiators. This study attempts to shed a greater insight into genetic resources trade in the pharmaceutical sector in Korea, mainly relying on interviews of industry practitioners and scientists in related fields. The study finds that Korea is mainly a genetic resource importer, but that pharmaceutical firms rarely carry out bioprospecting directly, relying on semi-processed biochemicals imports trough agents. Therefore, the impact of the to-be negotiated international ABS negotiation will be larger if derivatives are included in its scope. However, the general impact on the economy as a whole would be small, given the small share of genetic resources trade compared to total trade volumes.

  1. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician's management of cardiac arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Breena R; Orue, Aristides; Stapleton, Edward; Lovato, Luis; Vangala, Sitaram; Tinoco, Lucia Solorzano; Morales, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician's management of simulated code scenarios. Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, PSEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  2. Educational Scholarship and Technology: Resources for a Changing Undergraduate Medical Education Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Brandon N; Corral, Irma; John, Nadyah Janine; Shelton, P G

    2017-06-01

    Returning to the original emphasis of higher education, universities have increasingly recognized the value and scholarship of teaching, and medical schools have been part of this educational scholarship movement. At the same time, the preferred learning styles of a new generation of medical students and advancements in technology have driven a need to incorporate technology into psychiatry undergraduate medical education (UGME). Educators need to understand how to find, access, and utilize such educational technology. This article provides a brief historical context for the return to education as scholarship, along with a discussion of some of the advantages to this approach, as well as several recent examples. Next, the educational needs of the current generation of medical students, particularly their preference to have technology incorporated into their education, will be discussed. Following this, we briefly review the educational scholarship of two newer approaches to psychiatry UGME that incorporate technology. We also offer the reader some resources for accessing up-to-date educational scholarship for psychiatry UGME, many of which take advantage of technology themselves. We conclude by discussing the need for promotion of educational scholarship.

  3. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jippes, Mariëlle; Driessen, Erik W; Broers, Nick J; Majoor, Gerard D; Gijselaers, Wim H; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2015-07-01

    National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on successful curriculum change in medical schools internationally. The authors tested a literature-based conceptual model using multilevel structural equation modeling. For the operationalization of national and organizational culture, the authors used Hofstede's dimensions of culture and Quinn and Spreitzer's competing values framework, respectively. To operationalize successful curriculum change, the authors used two derivates: medical schools' organizational readiness for curriculum change developed by Jippes and colleagues, and change-related behavior developed by Herscovitch and Meyer. The authors administered a questionnaire in 2012 measuring the described operationalizations to medical schools in the process of changing their curriculum. Nine hundred ninety-one of 1,073 invited staff members from 131 of 345 medical schools in 56 of 80 countries completed the questionnaire. An initial poor fit of the model improved to a reasonable fit by two suggested modifications which seemed theoretically plausible. In sum, characteristics of national culture and organizational culture, such as a certain level of risk taking, flexible policies and procedures, and strong leadership, affected successful curriculum change. National and organizational culture influence readiness for change in medical schools. Therefore, medical schools considering curriculum reform should anticipate the potential impact of national and organizational culture.

  4. US Interpretation of International Space Policies Regarding Commercial Resource Acquisitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Russia, India, China, and the U.S. to gain access to the moon’s Helium 3 (He3), an extremely rare commodity believed to be ideal for fusion reactors .53...international treaties that conceptualize ‘The Common Heritage of all Mankind,’ specifically the UN 3 Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) and the...between current and proposed Space Laws with other international treaties that conceptualize ‘The Common Heritage of all Mankind,’ specifically

  5. The Ocean Acidification Curriculum Collection - sharing ocean science resources for k-12 classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, P.

    2016-02-01

    The fish and shellfish provided by ecosystems that abound in the waters of Puget Sound have sustained the Suquamish Tribe for millennia. However, years of development, pollution and over-harvest have reduced some fish and shellfish populations to just a fraction of their former abundance. Now, ocean acidification (OA) and climate change pose additional threats to these essential natural resources. Ocean acidification can't be stopped; however, many of the other human-caused stressors to ocean health can. If human behaviors that harm ocean health can be modified to reduce impacts, fish populations and ecosystems could become more resilient to the changing ocean conditions. School is arguably the best place to convey the ideas and awareness needed for people to adopt new behaviors. Students are open to new ideas and they influence their peers and parents. In addition, they are captive audiences in classrooms for many years.The Suquamish Tribe is helping to foster new generations of ocean stewards by creating an online searchable database (OACurriculumCollection.org). This site is designed to facilitate finding, reviewing and sharing free educational materials on OA. At the same time, the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) were released providing a great opportunity to get new materials into classrooms. OA provides highly appropriate context to teach many of the ideas in the new standards making it attractive to teachers looking for interesting and relevant materials. In this presentation, we will demonstrate how teachers can use the site as a place to find and share materials on OA. We will also present a framework developed by teachers for understanding OA, its impacts, and the many ways students can help ease the impacts on ocean ecosystems. We will provide examples of how OA can be used as context and content for the NGSS and finally, we will discuss the failures and successes on our journey to get relevant materials into the classroom.

  6. Human Resource Management in COSO Internal Control: Integrated Framework

    OpenAIRE

    Uysal, Gürhan

    2010-01-01

    COSO perceives human resource management (HRM) as an organizational governance technic. Because COSO aims to increase efficency and effectiveness of business operations, reliability of financial reporting, and compliance with applicable laws and regulations. Therefore, for example, in COSO HRM policy and practices should enable organizations to achieve organizational goals and objectives. Moreover, HRM is to find out best-ability and capable employees for managerial positions. In addition, or...

  7. The Trends in International Migration of Human Resources under Conditions of Geo-Economic Transformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shymanska Kateryna V.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to reveal the influence of geo-economic transformations on the trends in international migration of human resources as an element of the resource potential of countries and regions. The current state of geo-economic transformations is analyzed, and their influence on the processes of international migration of human resources is revealed. The relevance of analyzing international movement of human resources, not labor ones, in building the geo-economic strategy of a country or a regional grouping is justified. The connection between the international migration of human resources and the trends in development of individual countries and regions (oil exporting countries, newly industrialized countries and least developed agrarian countries is determined, the general patterns of migration flows in these countries are described. Furthermore, the topical issues in studying international migration of human resources in the context of the directions of geo-economics identified by scientists are formulated. It is determined that the regional migration policy should contribute to maximizing the benefits of migration of human resources for the development of the region and the use of immigrants in the countries of the region as an economic resource that becomes strategically important under conditions of geo-economic transformations.

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Thailand is a country with an area of 514?000 square kilometres situated in the centre of continental south-east Asia, The geology of Thailand is very varied with sedimentary formations ranging from Cambrian to Quaternary in age and including sandstones, shales, limestones of many varieties. Among the igneous rocks, granites are very important and rhyolites, tuffs diorites, basalts and ultrabasic rocks also exist. Tin is the most important mineral occurrence. Available information on the geology and mineral resources suggests that the country may contain significant resources of radioactive minerals. Favourable potential host types are; 1) uranium and thorium in monazite in beach sands and tin placer deposits; 2) uranium in sandstones, principally in Jurassic sandstones of the Khorat Plateau; 3) uranium in Tertiary lignite deposits; 4) uranium in veins in granites; 5) uranium related to fluorite deposits; 6) uranium in black shales and phosphates. Uranium mineralization in sedimentary rocks at Phu Wieng was discovered in 1970. The area has been radiometrically grid mapped and limited shallow drilling has shown continuity.of the narrow, carbonaceous, conglomeratic sandstone host bed. No uranium reserves or resources can be stated at the present time, but the favourable geology of the Khorat Plateau, the known uranium occurrence and the very small exploration coverage is possibly indicative of a good future potential. The Speculative Potential is estimated to be between 1000 and 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  9. Barriers and opportunities to access international resources for ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Despite some successes when it comes to national and global efforts at tobacco control, little evidence exists of international funding or support in this area for developing countries like Bolivia. Bolivia is one of 173 countries to date that have ratified the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). The FCTC has ...

  10. Adapting to a US Medical Curriculum in Malaysia: A Qualitative Study on Cultural Dissonance in International Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Ryan Y

    2016-01-01

    Context Minimal research has examined the recent exportation of medical curricula to international settings. Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, USA partnered with Perdana University Graduate School of Medicine in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and implemented the same curriculum currently used at Johns Hopkins University to teach medical students at Perdana University. This study aimed to explore the perspectives of first-year medical students at Perdana University, focusing on issues of cultural dissonance during adaptation to a US curriculum. Methods In-depth semi-structured interviews with the inaugural class of first-year students (n=24) were conducted, audio-recorded, and transcribed. Two reviewers independently coded and analyzed the qualitative data for major themes. Results The most prominent themes identified were the transition from a “passive” to an “active” learning environment and the friendliness and openness of the professors. Students noted that “[Perdana University] is a whole new, different culture and now we are adapting to the culture.” Being vocal during classes and taking exams based on conceptual understanding and knowledge application/integration proved to be more challenging for students than having classes taught entirely in English or the amount of material covered. Discussion This study reinforced many cultural education theories as it revealed the major issues of Malaysian graduate students adapting to a US-style medical curriculum. Despite coming from a collectivistic, Confucian-based cultural learning background, the Malaysian students at Perdana University adopted and adapted to, and subsequently supported, the US learning expectations. PMID:27672530

  11. The 2006 Eldon D. Foote lecture in international business : a changing China : the resource challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balloch, H.R. [Balloch Group, Beijing (China)

    2006-07-01

    China's important role in the market for international resources was discussed. China's emergence as a major economic power may mean that human activity in the world will continue to stress global resource capacities. Challenges that currently face China will affect its own growth in addition to the future of global resource markets and international politics, and China's global influence will have profound implications for the Canadian and international business community. This paper discussed China's economic growth and drivers, and examined the country's growing need for resources. China's foreign policy was examined, and the politics of resource acquisitions were discussed. Recent technological innovations in China were reviewed.

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Physiographically India has a total area of 3,268,010 km 2 in three distinct regions. 1. The Peninsular shield in the south with an area of 823,310 km 2 . 2. The Himalayan mountain system with an area of 1,797,200 km 2 . 3. The Indo-Gangetic alluvial plain with an area of 647,500 km 2 . The three presently recognised major uranium provinces in India are: 1. The Singhbhum uranium province; 2. The Rajasthan uranium province, 3. The Madhya Pradesh uranium province. The Atomic Minerals Division of the Department of Atomic Energy has carried out a vigorous exploration programme since 1949 but despite their efforts a great deal of ground has still to be explored. At present, structurally controlled deposits account for most of the uranium resources of India. Uranium occurrences and deposits have been outlined in (1) Vein type deposits (the Singhbhum belt), (2) Conglomerate (Karnataka and Udaipur area, Raiasthan), (3) Sandstones (Madhra Pradesh and Swaliks, Himachal Pradesh, (4) Others such as carbonatites, marine phosphates, etc, (Mussorrie - Sahasradhara In Uttar Pradesh and Chatterpur-Saucur in Madhya Pradesh), (5) By-product Uranium in copper tailings and beach sands. India's total resources are listed as 52,538 tonnes uranium (68,300 short tons U 3 O 8 ) with additional resources from monazite of 12700 tonnes uranium. In view of the wide geological favourability, the many types of occurrences already known and the vast areas of unexplored ground it is estimated that the Speculative Potential may be between 150,000 and 250,000 tonnes uranium which is Category 5. (author)

  13. 'Soft' human resource management in small international joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the value creation aspects of HRM in international joint ventures of a relatively small size and their implications for strategic management. We assume that HRM in this context is rather a process than a function, and a ‘soft’ – humanistic rather than a ‘hard’, instrumentalist...... of joint venture autonomy. A conceptual framework developed from these empirical insights invites further generalizing efforts, and more importantly, contributes to a dynamic understanding of HRM in small IJVs....

  14. A Future-Oriented, Globally Based Curriculum Model for Industrial Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Michael

    1982-01-01

    Presents a future-oriented curriculum approach for industrial technology programs. Major global issues provide the basic structure for curriculum development. These issues include energy management, resource management, technological advancement, and international relations. Rationales for industrial technology are discussed and a curriculum…

  15. The new UN international framework classification for reserves/resources and its relation to uranium resource classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barthel, F.H.; Kelter, D.

    2001-01-01

    Resources traditionally are classified according to the degree of geological confidence and economic attractiveness. Various names are in use to describe nationally the different resource categories. Commonly, proven, probable or A+B are terms for the category RESERVES, meaning the recoverable portion of a resource under prevailing economic conditions. Since 1965 uranium resources are classified by the Nuclear Energy Agency of OECD and International Atomic Energy Agency using the terms Reasonably Assured Resources (RAR) and Estimated Additional Resources (EAR) in combination with cost categories. The definitions for RAR and EAR have been refined over the time and cost categories have been adapted according to market developments. For practical purposes a comparison of RAR and EAR with major national classification systems is provided in each of the NEA-IAEA publication on 'Uranium Resources Production and Demand' (Red Book). RAR of uranium are defined as quantities recoverable at given production costs with proven mining and processing technology, commonly RAR of the lowest cost category are referred to as Reserves. In 1992 the Committee on Energy - Working Party on Coal of the UN Economic Commission for Europe (UN/ECE) started to develop a new scheme for resource classification under the coordination of one of the authors (Kelter). The main purpose was to create an instrument permitting the classification of reserves and resources on an internationally consistent and uniform basis using market economic criteria. In April 1997 the UN/ECE approved the new 'United Nations International Framework Classification for Reserves/Resources-Solid Fuels and Mineral Commodities' at its 50th Anniversary Session. The new classification will enable the incorporation of national systems into an unified framework in order to make them compatible and comparable. Assistance will be given to economies in transition in reassessing their deposits according to market economy criteria and

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Italian Republic comprises a 1200 - Km - long peninsula ex- tending from southern Europe into the Mediterranean Sea, and a number of adjacent islands, among which the principals are Sicily and Sardinia. The total area is in excess of 300,000 Sq.Km, the islands account for some 50, 000 Sq.Km. From a physiographic and morphologic point of view, Italy mainly consists of the Alpine region and the Po valley to the North and of the Appennine range and small Coastal plains to the Centre and South. Plains occupied only 20% of the total area, hills and mountains, up to 4,810 m of elevation, contribute almost equally to the remaining 80%. The most promising uranium mineralizations have been found in the Bergamasc Alps, near the small town of Novazza. Pitchblende and minor sphalerite (formation temperature, 80 deg. - 100 deg. C) occur disseminated in volcanics of permian age. The host rocks at the Novazza uranium deposit, consist of an acid ignimbrite with cineritic texture. The rocks have been affected by metasomatism which brought abundant neo-formation minerals such as silica, sericite, carbonates and minor adularia, albite and muscovite. The reasonably assured resources of the Novazza deposit have been estimated to be 1,200 ton of U having a grade of 900 p.p.m. U. Estimated additional resources are 1,000 ton U. Production is scheduled to start in 1980

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Jordanian geology is dominated by the Great Rift Valley System. Most of the country is covered by Cretaceous and Eocene sediments, largely sandstones and limestones. These include phosphorates and bituminous limestones in the Upper Cretaceous, South of the Dead Sea, Mesozoic and Paleozoic rocks overlie exposed granitic Pre Cambrian basement rocks carrying many minor intrusives . Phosphates provide the main mineral export of Jordan. The Natural Resources Authority (Geological Survey and Bureau of Mines) initiated a survey in 1972 of the distribution of uranium on the phosphorite horizon. In 1974 the Survey calculated that the uranium content of the phosphate areas surveyed up to that time was 5 million metric tonnes U 3 O 8 . The average U 3 O 8 content is approximately 0.02% U 3 O 8 . The exploitation of such resources would be as a byproduct of the phosphate industry and dependent on the rate of phosphate production and the capacity of triple super-phosphate plants, none of which exist at the present time. In the southern area in Paleozoic and Pre Cambrian areas there are some hopes of conventional type deposits being found but the potential appears to be small. (author)

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Exploration for mineral deposits in Canada resulted in the discovery of large uranium deposits, such as at Great. Bear Lake, Northwest Territories (1930), in the Elliot Lake area, Ontario (1949); Beaverlodge, Wollaston Lake Fold Belt and Carswell Structure in Saskatchewan (1946-1975) and many uranium occurrences in the Canadian Shield, in the Orogenic Belts and in the Platforms. Uranium output in Canada since 1942 until and including 1976 amounted to 112,000 tonnes U. Reasonably Assured uranium resources as of 1976 amounted to 167,000 tonnes U (at a price up to $40/lb. U 3 0 8 ) and 15,000 tonnes U (at a price more than $40 up to $60/lb. U 3 O 8 ). Estimated Additional uranium resources as of 1976 amounted to 392,000 tonnes U (at a price up to $40/lb. U-Og) and 264,000 tonnes U (at a price more than $40 up to $60/lb. U 3 0 8 ). Possible further potential beyond the above mentioned classes is tentatively estimated to be in the 6th category according to NEA/IAEA favourability classification. (author)

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Sikkim

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Sikkim is a country in the eastern Himalayas and is bound on the west by Nepal, on the north by Tibet, on the east by Bhutan and on the south by India. Precambrian Darjeeling gneiss forms the rim of the amphitheatre while schists of Late Precambrian to Lower Paleozoic rocks form tee habital interior. A small outcrop of carboniferous to Permain methomorphic rocks is preserved in the Tista Basin as well in a thin outcrop trust upon fluvitile beds of Sivalik which is mostly of Pliestocene age. Imbricate thrusts have stacked the rocks in a vast heap where reverse metamorphism is common. Ni information is available concerning uranium occurrences and resources as well as past and present explorations. The uranium potential of Sikkim is almost zero

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Iraq

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Iraq consists of a lowland trough lying between asymmetrical and very different upland massifs to the east, north and west and continuing southeastwards to the Persian Gulf. The region is one of crustal weakness and subsidence with relatively young plastic sedimentary rocks engulfed in downwarped, ancient, rigid and highly resistant blocks. Exploration in the 1954-55 period found some minor radioactive anomalies and very low uranium contents in limestones and phosphates. The results of an aerial radiometric survey in 1973-74 are not known to IAEA. Iraq has no reported uranium resources but there are several favourable formations which warrant a detailed survey. In view of the size of the country and the small amount of systematic exploration carried out up to the present time, the Speculative Potential is considered to lie in the 1,000 to 10,000 tonnes uranium category. (author)

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Belgium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    Uranium occurrences and resources - To date the uranium identified in Belgium is limited to a number of occurrences and none of these have as yet proved significant from a reserve or resource viewpoint. The main uranium occurrences ares (1) In the Upper Cambrian graphite schists corresponding to the culm of Sweden small zones are found (30 - 50 cm thick) with an average of 20 ppm uranium. (2) Near Vise at the base of the Carboniferous the Visean formation is discordantly superimposed on the Permian (Frasnian) and overlain by shales and phyllites. Solution pockets at the boundary contain phosphatic lenses that contain uranium values of up to 200 ppm. Autunite and Torbernite are the main uranium minerals associated with a number of complex phosphatic minerals. Within the Chalk (Maestrichtien) of the Mons basin, that is mainly in the Ciply - St. Symphorien and Baudow district. Here is found enrichment of uranium up to 140 ppm over large areas related to phosphatic chalk. The thickness of the zone varies from a few to 20 metres. However, as the P 2 O 5 content is not high enough for the deposits to be exploited at present for phosphate there is little possibility of the uranium being concentrated at high enough levels to be exploited for itself alone. (4) Near to Vielsalm (in the Stavelot Massif) are some thin quartz veins containing small amounts of copper and uranium minerals (Torbornite). Values of up to 70 ppm are recorded. (5) A number of low uranium values are recorded associated with phosphatic nodules and zones in the Lower Pleistocene and Tertiary

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Nigaragua

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    On invitation of the Nicaraguan Government, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission conducted a reconnaissance for uranium in March, 1953. Operating and abandoned mines, as well as prospects, formations, contacts, dikes and sills enroute to these mines were tested by scintillometer. Reconnaissance included two mineralized areas exposed in windows within the volcanic belt but did not include the schists and granitic intrusions in the north eastern part of the country. No anomalous radioactivity was detected. No uranium occurrences were discovered during the 1953 reconnaissance and no uranium deposits or prospects are indicated on the metallogenetic map of Central America or in the bibliography of Nicaraguan geology. Information is net available on current exploration in Nicaragua. All subsoil mineral resources besides quarry materials belong to the state. In the interest of national defence, uranium, thorium, lithium and their derivatives, along with certain other mineral substances, may be classified as o f temporary strategic interest , and their exploration or exploitation would then be subject to special laws. The Ministry of Economy may establish permanent or temporary national reserves on which mining activities are essentially precluded. Foreign nationals and corporations may acquire mineral concessions although particular regulations may be applicable to such an acquisition. Exploration of any favourable formations has been hindered by volcanic ash cover in western Nicaragua and dense vegetation in the East. Little geologic work has been done on the Paleozoic metamorphic rocks or Todos Santos Formation of the Northern Highlands. These could possibly show some potential for discovery of uranium as might the alaskites near Siuna. The potential resources of Nicaragua are estimated at less than 1,000 tonnes uranium

  3. A school mental health literacy curriculum resource training approach: effects on Tanzanian teachers' mental health knowledge, stigma and help-seeking efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, Stan; Wei, Yifeng; Gilberds, Heather; Ubuguyu, Omary; Njau, Tasiana; Brown, Adena; Sabuni, Norman; Magimba, Ayoub; Perkins, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Mental health literacy (MHL) is foundational for mental health promotion, prevention, stigma reduction, and care; School supported information pertaining to MHL in sub-Saharan Africa is extremely limited, including in Tanzania. Successful application of a school MHL curriculum resource may be an effective way to increase teacher MHL and therefore help to improve mental health outcomes for students. Secondary school teachers in Tanzania were trained on the African Guide (AG) a school MHL curriculum resource culturally adapted from a Canadian MHL resource (The Guide) for use in Africa. Teacher training workshops on the classroom application of the AG were used to evaluate its impact on mental health literacy in a sample of Tanzanian Secondary school teachers. Pre-post training assessment of participant knowledge and attitudes was conducted. Help-seeking efficacy for teachers themselves and their interventions for students, friends, family members and peers were determined. Paired t test (n = 37) results demonstrate highly significant improvements in teacher's overall knowledge (p Teachers' stigma against mental illness decreased significantly following the training (p teacher's overall knowledge (p Teachers also reported high rates (greater than ¾ of the sample) of positive help-seeking efficacy for themselves as well as for their students, friends, family members and peers. As a result of the training, the number of students teachers identified for potential mental health care totaled over 200. These positive results, when taken together with other research, suggest that the use of a classroom-based resource (the AG) that integrates MHL into existing school curriculum through training teachers may be an effective and sustainable way to increase the MHL (improved knowledge, decreased stigma and positive help-seeking efficacy) of teachers in Tanzania. As this study replicated the results of a previous intervention in Malawi, consideration could be given to

  4. Natural resource managers: their role in international tourism and rural development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur W. Magill

    1995-01-01

    Though our wildlands are important destinations for international visitors, little is known about their activities or influence on local economies. This paper encourages resource managers to assume leadership for developing an international tourism strategy for our wildlands by packaging lesser known wildland attractions as regional complexes to attract tourists.

  5. International Students Using Online Information Resources to Learn: Complex Experience and Learning Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Hilary

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports the findings of a qualitative study that investigated 25 international students' use of online information resources for study purposes at two Australian universities. Using an expanded critical incident approach, the study viewed international students through an information literacy lens, as information-using learners. The…

  6. Rio+20. Financial resources for improved international environmental governance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerstetter, Christiane; Goerlach, Benjamin; Stoessel, Susanah; Ivanova, Maria; Cavalieri, Sandra; Tedsen, Elizabeth; Bar-On, Haran [Ecologic Institute, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-01

    In the run-up to the Rio+20 summit, which takes place in June 2012, this study investigates the current system for financing international environmental governance (IEG). The current architecture for IEG finance consists of a growing number of bilateral and multilateral actors, funds and financial mechanisms which leads to incoherence, inefficiencies and extra burdens on recipient countries. The resulting intransparency is exerbated by the lack of a comprehensive system for tracking. Against this background, this study investigates the current state of the IEG funding system from a qualitative and - to a lesser degree - quantitative angle. Some of its flaws are discussed as are options for its improvement - all with a view to formulating recommendations for the Rio+20 summit.

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Portugal is situated on the western edge of the Iberian Meseta. At present, its reasonably assured reserves are about 7800 t of U (including 1000 t of U at more than 830/lb U 3 O 8 ) and 850 t of U in estimated additional reserves. This potential is divided between vein deposits and deposits located in the peribatholithic schists or enclaved in granite. Two main districts share these reserves - Beira at the centre of the country and Alto Alentejo in the east, approximately at the same latitude as Lisbon. In spite of the considerable prospecting activities authorized by Portugal in the Meseta area, the subject cannot yet be regarded as exhausted. Additional resources may still be located in the horizontal and vertical extensions of the vein mineralizations or schists from the already known deposits or outside the districts containing such deposits. Moreover, certain post-Palaeozoic sedimentary basins exhibit features favourable for the presence of uranium-bearing deposits and therefore deserve to be taken into consideration. However, there are as yet no examples of economic mineralization in such locations in Portugal. All things considered, we considered it reasonable to place Portugal in category No. 3 of the classiffication adopted by BJREP. (author)

  8. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Indonesia is a country of south east Asia comprising a large island group extending east-west for over 3000 miles. The geology of Indonesia is fairly well known but is extremely complicated. Successive mountain movements took place around an ancient crustal area. The oldest, of Permian-Triassic age formed northeast Sumatra, northern Java and western Kalimantan. This was followed by the Sumatra orogenesis and finally in Cretaceous and Tertiary times the southern half of Java and the islands as far as New Guinea were formed. Geological studies tend to indicate that the most favourable uranium areas are likely to be in West Sumatra and West Kalimantan. Exploration by the Directorate of Survey and Geology of the National Atomic Energy Agency has been carried out on a small scale since 1961. Exploration concession have been granted to French, German and Japanese organisations. No uranium reserve or resource figures have ever been stated but small occurrences and radioactive anomalies have been found in West and South Sumatra, West and Central Kalimantan and in West Irian. Although the geology of some areas appears to be favourable, little success has attended exploration efforts to date and thus the Speculative Potential is noted as between 1,000 and 10,000 tonnes uranium. (author)

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Turkey has an area of 296 185 sq mi or 767 120 square kilometers. The geology is dominated lay Tertiary and post-Tertiary rocks which are very widespread but extensive outcrops of Mesozoic rocks also occur. Paleozoic rocks, mainly gneisses, mica schists and quartzites occur in the ancient massifs, principally the Istranca massif in Thrace, the Merideres massif in western Anatolia and the Karrshir massif in central Anatolia. Prospecting for uranium began in Turkey in 1953 and the Atomic Energy Raw Materials Division of the Maden Tetkikive Arama Enstitusu (M.T.A.) was founded in 1956. By 1962 a total of 78% of the whole country had been covered by serial radiometric reconnaissance prospecting. Uranium was discovered at Kasar in western Anatolia in 1961 and several hundred tons of reserves estimated two years later. Uranium prospecting was largely recessed from 1963 to 1967. IAEA/UNDP assistance was provided in 1962-63 and 1965 and between 1974 and 1977 in a detailed exploration programme in the Kasar area. In the whole country nearly 600 anomalies and occurrences had been identified by 1963. Several occurrences principally in Western Anatolia had been assigned a small reserve. A recent official estimate places the total national reserve at 3150 tonnes uranium in the less than 30% category of reasonably assured resources. A speculative Potential of between 30,000 and 50,000 tonnes uranium is considered to be reasonable. (author)

  10. Sociology of Hidden Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Moradi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the concept of hidden curriculum in the sociological theories and wants to explain sociological aspects of formation of hidden curriculum. The main question concentrates on the theoretical approaches in which hidden curriculum is explained sociologically.For this purpose it was applied qualitative research methodology. The relevant data include various sociological concepts and theories of hidden curriculum collected by the documentary method. The study showed a set of rules, procedures, relationships and social structure of education have decisive role in the formation of hidden curriculum. A hidden curriculum reinforces by existed inequalities among learners (based on their social classes or statues. There is, in fact, a balance between the learner's "knowledge receptions" with their "inequality proportion".The hidden curriculum studies from different major sociological theories such as Functionalism, Marxism and critical theory, Symbolic internationalism and Feminism. According to the functionalist perspective a hidden curriculum has a social function because it transmits social values. Marxists and critical thinkers correlate between hidden curriculum and the totality of social structure. They depicts that curriculum prepares learners for the exploitation in the work markets. Symbolic internationalism rejects absolute hegemony of hidden curriculum on education and looks to the socialization as a result of interaction between learner and instructor. Feminism theory also considers hidden curriculum as a vehicle which legitimates gender stereotypes.

  11. Using structural equation modelling to integrate human resources with internal practices for lean manufacturing implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protik Basu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore and integrate the role of human resources with the internal practices of the Indian manufacturing industries towards successful implementation of lean manu-facturing (LM. An extensive literature survey is carried out. An attempt is made to build an ex-haustive list of all the input manifests related to human resources and internal practices necessary for LM implementation, coupled with a similar exhaustive list of the benefits accrued from its suc-cessful implementation. A structural model is thus conceptualized, which is empirically validated based on the data from the Indian manufacturing sector. Hardly any survey based empirical study in India has been found to integrate human resources with the internal processes towards success-ful LM implementation. This empirical research is thus carried out in the Indian manufacturing in-dustries. The analysis reveals six key input constructs and three output constructs, indicating that these constructs should act in unison to maximize the benefits of implementing lean. The structural model presented in this paper may be treated as a guide to integrate human resources with internal practices to successfully implement lean, leading to an optimum utilization of resources. This work is one of the very first researches to have a survey-based empirical analysis of the role of human resources and internal practices of the Indian manufacturing sector towards an effective lean im-plementation.

  12. The Influence of Human Resource Practices on Internal Customer Satisfaction and Organizational Effectiveness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irfan Ullah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available It is generally believed that the impact of Human Resource Practices on internal customer satisfaction can create comparative advantage for the organizational performance. The main objective of this study was to find out the impact of Human Resource Practices on internal customer satisfaction and organizational effectiveness. The impact of human resource practices on the overall performance of organizations has been a leading subject of research and the results have been encouraging, indicative of positive relationship between Human Resource practices and organizational effectiveness. Data was collected through personally administered questionnaire-based survey from 290 banking personnel of Pakistan. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the anticipated model. The results showed that some Human Resource Practices appear to be linked to internal customer satisfaction and organizational effectiveness. The implications for practitioners were to modify and emphasize certain human resource practices, and to emphasize the role of internal customers for organizational effectiveness enhancement. These findings revealed the importance of internal customers in enhancing employee morale, organizational commitment, employee productivity, turnover rate and the organization’s ability to attract talent.

  13. International student exchange and the medical curriculum: evaluation of a medical sciences translational physiology course in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Mariana; Jones, T David; Rocha, Maria Jose Alves; Fazan, Rubens; Chapleau, Mark W; Salgado, Helio C; Johnson, Alan Kim; Irigoyen, Maria Claudia; Michelini, Lisete C; Goldstein, David L

    2006-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to conduct a short-term international course on translational physiology for medical students from Wright State University and the University of Iowa. The goals were to 1) provide students with an exposure to the academic, cultural, and medical environments in Brazil; 2) promote awareness of the global medical community; and 3) provide an academic course focused on translational physiology. An evaluation of the students was conducted to determine whether such a short-term course might be useful in the medical curriculum. The 2-wk course was held in the summer of 2005 at the University of São Paulo School of Medicine in Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, for 23 American students. The program included presentations of basic and clinical topics, meetings with medical students, and clinical presentations. The program finished with student attendance at a scientific meeting sponsored by the Brazilian Society of Hypertension. Student surveys evaluated issues related to perceived treatment, Brazilian medical school environment, culture and personal attributes, and career aspirations. The international Medical Sciences Translational Physiology course for medical students provided a brief, but intense, experience. It gave students a picture of the medical environment in Brazil and an appreciation for the differences and similarities in cultures. Most students reported that it was a positive experience that would be beneficial to their careers. In conclusion, a short-term international course provides an efficient means for medical students to experience aspects of global medical science.

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-09-01

    France, with an area of 550,000 km 2 , has been prospecting its territory for uranium for more than 30 years. The proven uranium reserves in all the ore categories defined by the NEA/lAEA are estimated at around 120,000 tU, of which 25,000 tU have already been mined. About 70% of these reserves are associated with granites, while the bulk of the remainder is located in Permian sediments and the last in Paleogene sediments. The prospecting effort has not been distributed equally over French territory. More than half of it - recent orogens and large basins - have been little or very little prospected. On the other hand, the Hercynian massifs and their Upper Paleozoic mantle have been systematically prospected. Nevertheless, even within the latter there is still room for further exploration: extensions of already known mineralizations both laterally and vertically, conventional mineralizations deep down or under a mantle, types of mineralizations not investigated previously (those associated with acid or intermediate vulcanism, peribatholithic shales, alkaline complexes etc.). Of course, in the areas that have not been so well explored, because they appear less favourable, there are still some possibilities, namely, in the areas of recent orogens, mineralizations associated with antemesozoic cores (same types as above) or directly associated with orogenesis (slightly to moderately metamorphic sandstone-phyllitic formations, certain sedimentary formations etc.). As for the large basins, they are capable of containing mineralizations associated with some of their formations (Paleogene of the Basin of Aquitaine etc), but they may also cover workable uranium deposits. It is possible that, in the not to distant future access may be gained to such ores in particular cases. On this basis it does not seem unreasonable to reckon with the discovering of new resources of an order of magnitude between half and the same as those already found. (author)

  15. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    Sweden, covers an area of approx. 450 000 square kilometers. It has a population of 8 millions. With few exceptions in the northern part the access can be regarded as good. A dense network of motorroads and railroad exists. The results obtained by the exploration works combined with other available geo-information permit a separation of two principal uranium provinces in Sweden. The first one is confined to sediments of Upper Cambrian and Lower Ordovician which appears in Southern Sweden and along the border of the Caledonian mountain range in Central Sweden. The uranium occurrence are stratiform, of blackshale type which occurs in the Peltura zone of Upper Cambrian or they are associated to a phosphatite-bearing unit of Lower Ordovician overlying the Cambrian shale formation. The distribution of uranium in Upper Cambrian rocks is in general dependant on their lithology which itself is related to the paleography. This conditions explain relatively higher uranium content of the shale from Billigen.The potential resources of the province are estimated at about 1 million tonnes uranium. The second uranium province, called Arjeplog-Arvidsjaur, situated immediately south of the Arctic circle, comprises one deposit - Pleutajokk - and a group of more than twenty occurrences of similar characteristics and age (1 700 - 1 800 my.). The results of the past exploration have shown that uranium is present in different types of rocks. Because of the presence of uranium in many of the pegmatites the possibility of the formation of large low grade deposits should be tested. Favourable areas are those regions where the geological conditions are similar to the geology of the Grenville province in Canada or the Damara belt of SW-Africa. Special studies are recommended on this subject

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Bolivia has an area of 1,098,580 square kilometers. Its capital is La Paz. The western part of the country is dominated by two ranges of the Andes Mountains, the Cordillera Occidental on the vest flank of the high plateau (Altiplano) and the Cordillera Real (or Oriental) on the east flank. The northern Andes average 5,486 meters in elevation; the southern Andes are not as lofty. The Altiplano is 3,658 to A,267 meters high and 129 km. in average width; it is the largest basin of inland drainage in South America and contains the renowned Lake Titicaca on the Peruvian-Bolivian border. The eastern tropical lowlands or pampas (Oriente) comprise about two-thirds of the country, with rain forest in the northern portion. An intermediate zone of valleys and basins lies between the eastern Andes and Oriente. Bolivia differs from other Andean countries, like Chile, Peru and Ecuador, in having large areas of Preeambrian schists, gneisses, migmatites and granites. These crop out in the eastern part of the country. Parts of these rocks contain banded iron formations (i.e., in the Muttin region) and are probably early Precambrian in age. Little systematic exploration for uranium was undertaken in Bolivia until the late 1960's. In 1967, 1968 and 1969 technical assistance was requested from, and provided by, the IAEA. This work led to evaluation of radioactive anomalies in veins of northeast Bolivia and in sandstones in the extreme southern part of the country. Although no uranium reserves are now credited to Bolivia, the geologic possibilities for several kinds of uranium deposits coupled with the relatively limited work done to date suggest that uranium orebodies will be discovered. It is estimated that the potential resources of Bolivia are in the range of 10,000 to 100,000 tonnes uranium

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Guatemala

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    Before 1959 a private individual (Mr. Rene Abularach) is reported to have made an airborne radiometric survey of the Sierra de las Minas and Sierra Madre Ranges. Although many anomalies were detected by this survey, none were verified in the ground survey followup, despite apparently adequate flight control. In 1968 a United Nations Special Fund Mineral Survey Project completed over 1,000 km of carborne radiometric survey with geiger counter readings at 500 m intervals. No anomalies were detected, but background radioactivity for several formations and geologic environments was established. In 1969 the Guatemalan government solicited the IAEA for technical assistance In conducting a preliminary uranium favorability study designed to formulate recommendations for a national radioactive ore prospecting program. A carborne radiometric survey was made of environments theoretically favorable for uranium deposition, with spot geological and radiometric examinations being .conducted in the more favorable areas. All Important mining regions of Guatemala except the leterites and the ultrabasics were visited. No evidence of a uranium province was observed 1n these field investigations and the recommendation was made that the government not embark on a more detailed national prospecting program at that time. At the time of completion of the IAEA-Guatemalan government (GOG) reconnaissance program in 1971, no uranium reserves or resources were known. More recent information on uranium occurrences and resources 1n Guatemala does not appear to be available. Information on more recent uranium reconnaissance than that undertaken during 1971 IAEA-GOG study is lacking. However, in more recent years the country's mineral potential has been generally evaluated with the aid of the UN and ICAITI (Central American Research Institute for Industry). Except for quarry materials, the state owns all minerals. The state has priority on purchase of any mineral production needed for the country

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Panama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    About 20 percent of Panama has been covered by airborne radiometric surveys, largely in the Azuero-Petaquilia area. Essentially no ground examinations have been made. About one third of the country remains unmapped. Most of the rest has been examined only in rapid reconnaissance largely by the United Nations and oil companies. Detailed mapping has been confined to the Canal Zone. No uranium deposits or prospects of economic interest are known in Panama. There appears to be no information available on present exploration activities for uranium. Panama has no specific legislation relating to nuclear energy. However, all mineral deposits belong to the state, except for salt and similar materials, and are governed by the mineral resources code. There appears to be only one remote possibility for uranium mineralization in Panama, namely, sandstone-type deposits. Marginal marine and fluvial sediments, such as host sandstone-type deposits elsewhere, are most abundant 1n the lower Cenozoic parts of the Azuero and possibly Bocas del Toro basins and are probably absent or poorly developed in the Darien and Central basin. Rocks with even moderate background uranium concentrations to be leached and deposited in such sediments are confined to the silicic and alkaline Intrusive rocks of the La Yeguada Formation 1n western Panama and possibly the Rio Guayabo stock in the Sierra de Maje of eastern Panama. Only the La Yeguada Formation is extensive enough and near enough to a potential sedimentary ore host to be important. Uranium concentrations have not been measured in this unit but its silicic composition, relatively young age (with respect to other volcanic rocks in Panama) and high ash content suggest that it may have relatively high Teachable uranium content. The best areas for exploration for La Yeguada-derived sandstone-type uranium deposits would be in the Pese formation between Santiago and Chitre in the Azuero basin. Possibly favourable sandstone type exploration ground

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-07-01

    Reserves of uranium are located in the north eastern part of Mexico, primarily in the states of Tamaulipas and Chihuahua. Most of the remainder of Mexico's reserves are near the Tamaulipas-Neuvo Leon state border in the Tertiary Frio Formation, where they apparently occur in the types of uranium deposits found in Texas, U.S.A. There are two deposits, La Coma and Buenavista, but nothing has been published on dimensions of the ore bodies. Forty-five miles northeast of Hermosillo, in Sonora state is the Los Amoles district where uranium is found associated with gold and other metals in low-grade deposits on the margins of a Cretaceous batholith. Another occurrence is reported in the mining district of Placer de Guadelupe and Puerto del Aire, about 40-50 km northeast of Chihuahua City, in the state of Chihuahua. Reserves of U 3 O 8 which were published in January 1977 by Nuclear Exchange Corporation of Menlo Park, California, are listed. The government of Mexico has not estimated potential resources. It should be noted that much of Mexico appears favourable for uranium, and only 10 percent has been explored. According to NUEXCO (1977), efforts to find uranium are being increased in an attempt to supply Mexico's nuclear reactor requirements through 1990. Activity is reported to be centered in Tamaulipas and Chihuahua states and to a lesser extent in Nueva Leon, Sonora, Coahuila, and Baja California. Major effort will continue to be placed in Chihuahua state to supply the Penna Bianca mill. Correspondence between favorable geological settings for uranium and the geologic regions of Mexico is reported. Mexico is a country with considerable areas that appear promising for discovery of sandstone, vein, and tuff-related deposits. On the other hand, its potential for Precambrian conglomerate and unconformity-related deposits is limited. Considering these geologic factors, as well as the relatively limited amount of exploration done to date, a guesstimate of speculative

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Argentina

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    intruded by acidic rocks. The High Cordiilera, an area of 200,000 square kilometers in northwestern Argentina contains sedimentary, metamorphic, and igneous rocks that could be favorable although the difficult topography is a restrictive influence. The distribution of uranium mineralization in various sediments and other rock types over large areas of Argentina is suggestive of widespread favorability for uranium-ore formation. Inasmuch as uranium reserves plus potential are already estimated at close to 80,000 tons U 3 O 8 , and exploration has not been exhaustively conducted, ultimate resource potential might realistically be expected to fall in the 100,000 to 500,000 ton U 3 O 8 range

  1. Bringing the Flipped Classroom to Day 1: A Novel Didactic Curriculum for Emergency Medicine Intern Orientation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Barrie

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most emergency medicine (EM residency programs provide an orientation program for their incoming interns, with the lecture being the most common education activity during this period. Our orientation program is designed to bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate medical education by ensuring that all learners demonstrate competency on Level 1 Milestones, including medical knowledge (MK. To teach interns core medical knowledge in EM, we reformulated orientation using the flipped-classroom model by replacing lectures with small group, case-based discussions. Interns demonstrated improvement in medical knowledge through higher scores on a posttest. Evaluation survey results were also favorable for the flipped-classroom teaching format.

  2. Bringing the Flipped Classroom to Day 1: A Novel Didactic Curriculum for Emergency Medicine Intern Orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrie, Michael G; Amick, Christopher; Mitzman, Jennifer; Way, David P; King, Andrew M

    2018-01-01

    Most emergency medicine (EM) residency programs provide an orientation program for their incoming interns, with the lecture being the most common education activity during this period. Our orientation program is designed to bridge the gap between undergraduate and graduate medical education by ensuring that all learners demonstrate competency on Level 1 Milestones, including medical knowledge (MK). To teach interns core medical knowledge in EM, we reformulated orientation using the flipped-classroom model by replacing lectures with small group, case-based discussions. Interns demonstrated improvement in medical knowledge through higher scores on a posttest. Evaluation survey results were also favorable for the flipped-classroom teaching format.

  3. Globalisation of water resources: International virtual water flows in relation to international crop trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Hung, P.Q.

    2005-01-01

    The water that is used in the production process of a commodity is called the ‘virtual water’ contained in the commodity. International trade of commodities brings along international flows of virtual water. The objective of this paper is to quantify the volumes of virtual water flows between

  4. Analisis Internal Perusahaan (Strength & Weakness), Menggunakan konsep ‘Resource-Based View of the Firm’ dengan Kerangka VRIO

    OpenAIRE

    Son Wandrial

    2011-01-01

    Problems in the company's internal environmental analysis is to determine the strengths and weaknesses (internal resources), we did not have reasonable grounds to determine whether the company's internal resources as a strength or weakness. Before we can determine whether a resource can be categorized as strengths or weaknesses, we must have a certain criteria so that appropriate resources are said to be a strength or weakness

  5. Analisis Internal Perusahaan (Strength & Weakness, Menggunakan konsep ‘Resource-Based View of the Firm’ dengan Kerangka VRIO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Wandrial

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Problems in the company's internal environmental analysis is to determine the strengths and weaknesses (internal resources, we did not have reasonable grounds to determine whether the company's internal resources as a strength or weakness. Before we can determine whether a resource can be categorized as strengths or weaknesses, we must have a certain criteria so that appropriate resources are said to be a strength or weakness

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Chile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    CCEN has invited proposals from international mining companies for the recovery of uranium from copper-bearing waters at the large Chuquicamata mine. As of mid-1977, it was reported that one proposal from all. S. company had been received. It has been estimated that production of 85 tonnes U/year might be realized here. Relatively little interest is shown in uranium by domestic (Chilean) companies because of the fear that the discovery of uranium might lead to nationalization of the properties. In spite of the possibilities mentioned above, there has been relatively little uranium discovered to date in Chile. In view of the relatively small size of these known deposits and until reconnaissance has taken a harder look at these possibilities, it would be prudent to place the potential of Chile in the 1,000-10,000 tonnes range

  7. A multimodal high-value curriculum affects drivers of utilization and performance on the high-value care component of the internal medicine in-training exam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, Tom; Loertscher, Laura

    2018-01-01

    Background : Teaching the practice of high-value care (HVC) is an increasingly important function of graduate medical education but best practices and long-term outcomes remain unknown. Objective : Whether a multimodal curriculum designed to address specific drivers of low-value care would affect resident attitudes, skills, and performance of HVC as tested by the Internal Medicine In-Training Exam (ITE). Methods : In 2012, we performed a baseline needs assessment among internal medicine residents at a community program regarding drivers of healthcare utilization. We then created a multimodal curriculum with online interactive worksheets, lectures, and faculty buy-in to target specific skills, knowledge, and culture deficiencies. Perceived drivers of care and performance on the Internal Medicine ITE were assessed yearly through 2016. Results : Fourteen of 27 (52%) residents completed the initial needs assessment while the curriculum was eventually seen by at least 24 of 27 (89%). The ITE was taken by every resident every year. Long-term, 3-year follow-up demonstrated persistent improvement in many drivers of utilization (patient requests, reliance on subspecialists, defensive medicine, and academic curiosity) and improvement with sustained high performance on the high-value component of the ITE. Conclusion : A multimodal curriculum targeting specific drivers of low-value care can change culture and lead to sustained improvement in the practice of HVC.

  8. The First Shared Online Curriculum Resources for Veterinary Undergraduate Learning and Teaching in Animal Welfare and Ethics in Australia and New Zealand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Johnson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The need for undergraduate teaching of Animal Welfare and Ethics (AWE in Australian and New Zealand veterinary courses reflects increasing community concerns and expectations about AWE; global pressures regarding food security and sustainability; the demands of veterinary accreditation; and fears that, unless students encounter AWE as part of their formal education, as veterinarians they will be relatively unaware of the discipline of animal welfare science. To address this need we are developing online resources to ensure Australian and New Zealand veterinary graduates have the knowledge, and the research, communication and critical reasoning skills, to fulfill the AWE role demanded of them by contemporary society. To prioritize development of these resources we assembled leaders in the field of AWE education from the eight veterinary schools in Australia and New Zealand and used modified deliberative polling. This paper describes the role of the poll in developing the first shared online curriculum resource for veterinary undergraduate learning and teaching in AWE in Australia and New Zealand. The learning and teaching strategies that ranked highest in the exercise were: scenario-based learning; a quality of animal life assessment tool; the so-called ‘Human Continuum’ discussion platform; and a negotiated curriculum.

  9. Security aspects of "Geoenergeia" and the significance of energy resources management in international politics

    OpenAIRE

    VIDAKIS, Ioannis; BALTOS, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    This paper builds on the tools of geopolitics and geo-economics for analyzing energy resource networks and energy security. To prioritize the role that energy resources play in the interpretation of and decision making in international politics, it proposes the introduction of the Greek language-inspired term "geoenergeia" and a derivative methodology. Unprecedented fluctuations in fuel prices during recent decades and intensifying turmoil in the energy market are all indisputable phenomena t...

  10. Internationalizing the Curriculum: Improving Learning through International Education-- Preparing Students for Success in a Global Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, Stephen H.

    2009-01-01

    In the expanded and updated version of "The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century" (Friedman, 2006), Thomas Friedman cogently describes the promise and peril of an economic and geopolitical future shaped by the forces of globalization wrought by technologically driven global connectivity, international commerce, and…

  11. Teaching "Community Engagement" in Engineering Education for International Development: Integration of an Interdisciplinary Social Work Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorie J.; Held, Mary Lehman; Ellzey, Janet L.; Bailey, William T.; Young, Laurie B.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on challenges faced by engineering faculty in educating their students on community-engaged, sustainable technical solutions in developing countries. We review a number of approaches to increasing teaching modules on social and community components of international development education, from adding capstone…

  12. The Effect of International Financial Reporting Standards Convergence on U. S. Accounting Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Homer L.; Waldrup, Bobby E.; Shea, Vincent

    2011-01-01

    Major changes are coming to U.S. financial accounting and accounting education as U. S. generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) and international financial reporting standards (IFRS) converge within the next few years. In 2008, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published a proposed "road map" for the potential…

  13. The Impact of International Financial Reporting Standards on Accounting Curriculum in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallapragada, RamMohan R.; Toma, Alfred G.; Roe, C. William

    2011-01-01

    According to the time line presently specified by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), business firms in the United States (US) should switch from the existing US accounting reporting guidelines of the Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) to International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) by the year 2014. The US business…

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Curriculum in International Marketing and Business between Peruvian and Guatemalan University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestonjee, Daanish D.; Spillan, John E.; Song, Hongwei; Virzi, Nicholas D.

    2010-01-01

    Business education is important for economic development. A skilled workforce allows for greater advancements in productivity, the creation of new business opportunities, increased employment, and enhances the quality of life of the citizenry. With the changing international business environment it is important for academics and practitioners…

  15. Online International Learning: Internationalising the Curriculum through Virtual Mobility at Coventry University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villar-Onrubia, Daniel; Rajpal, Brinder

    2016-01-01

    Virtual mobility initiatives are one of the most flexible, versatile and inclusive approaches in the provision of international experience opportunities. Given that in most universities only a small fraction of students can benefit from forms of academic mobility that involve travelling abroad, Internet-based intercultural interactions prove to be…

  16. Curriculum Integration versus Educating for Global Citizenship: A (Disciplinary) View from the International Relations Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper offers a view from the classroom and departmental chair's office, using the teaching of introductory "International Relations" and some basic theoretical foundations of the field, "Realism," "Cosmopolitanism," and "Constructivism," to explore how study abroad can balance calls to educate for…

  17. An International Survey of Veterinary Students to Assess Their Use of Online Learning Resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, Laura; Dale, Vicki H M; Powney, Sonya; Gaitskell-Phillips, Gemma H L; Short, Nick R M

    Today's veterinary students have access to a wide range of online resources that support self-directed learning. To develop a benchmark of current global student practice in e-learning, this study measured self-reported access to, and use of, these resources by students internationally. An online survey was designed and promoted via veterinary student mailing lists and international organizations, resulting in 1,070 responses. Analysis of survey data indicated that students now use online resources in a wide range of ways to support their learning. Students reported that access to online veterinary learning resources was now integral to their studies. Almost all students reported using open educational resources (OERs). Ownership of smartphones was widespread, and the majority of respondents agreed that the use of mobile devices, or m-learning, was essential. Social media were highlighted as important for collaborating with peers and sharing knowledge. Constraints to e-learning principally related to poor or absent Internet access and limited institutional provision of computer facilities. There was significant geographical variation, with students from less developed countries disadvantaged by limited access to technology and networks. In conclusion, the survey provides an international benchmark on the range and diversity in terms of access to, and use of, online learning resources by veterinary students globally. It also highlights the inequalities of access among students in different parts of the world.

  18. Stress and turnover intent in international organizations: social support and work life balance as resources

    OpenAIRE

    Giauque, David; Anderfuhren-Biget, Simon; Varone, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates whether work opportunities have an impact on stress and the related turnover intentions of employees working in intergovernmental international organizations. It contextualizes the job resources and demands model within international organizations’ specific work conditions. The empirical test is based on original data from a survey administered in four major organizations of the United Nations system. Results demonstrate that social work opportunities and work-life bal...

  19. Teaching `community engagement' in engineering education for international development: Integration of an interdisciplinary social work curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Dorie J.; Lehman Held, Mary; Ellzey, Janet L.; Bailey, William T.; Young, Laurie B.

    2015-05-01

    This article reviews the literature on challenges faced by engineering faculty in educating their students on community-engaged, sustainable technical solutions in developing countries. We review a number of approaches to increasing teaching modules on social and community components of international development education, from adding capstone courses and educational track seminars to integrating content from other disciplines, particularly the social sciences. After summarising recent pedagogical strategies to increase content on community-focused development, we present a case study of how one engineering programme incorporates social work students and faculty to infuse strategies for community engagement in designing and implementing student-led global engineering development projects. We outline how this interdisciplinary pedagogical approach teaches students from the two disciplines to work together in addressing power balances, economic and social issues and overall sustainability of international development projects.

  20. Equasions for Curriculum Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckenrod, James S.

    1986-01-01

    Describes the Technology in Curriculum (TIC) program resource guides which will be distributed to California schools in the fall of 1986. These guides match available instructional television programs and computer software to existing California curriculum guides in order to facilitate teachers' classroom use. (JDH)

  1. [Resource allocation analysis for international cooperation program for HIV/AIDS prevention and control].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Xue, Hui; Liu, Hui; Guo, Hao-yan; Zhang, Hua; Sun, Jiang-ping

    2008-12-01

    To provide evidence for resource allocation and cooperation between domestic and international HIV/AIDS programs in China by analyzing the needs and current levels of resource input in provinces. National and provincial international cooperation program investment and allocation data from 2000 to 2006 were collected. Several factors in each province were analyzed through multiple regression analysis in order to determine whether they had a statistical correlation to the distribution of international HIV/AIDS program resources in China, including: the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the number of accumulated people living with HIV/AIDS, and the number of accumulated people living with AIDS. Then the Z values were calculated at each provincial level and compared with related international investment. The resource allocation in different program areas were compared with the level of resource input by international and central government HIV/AIDS prevention and control programs through Chi-square test. The international cooperation program investment at local level from 2000 to 2006 were 4893, 24 669, 50 567, 52 950, 112 143, 363 396 and 247 045 thousand RMB respectively, and at national level were 3007, 19 726, 29 035, 37 530, 77 500, 105 786 and 77 035 thousand RMB respectively. There was a statistical correlation between international HIV/AIDS program resource input and the accumulated number of people living with AIDS (R is 0.56 and 0.69 accordingly, and P international resource input and the GDP of each province. International HIV/AIDS cooperation programs did not invest in each province according to its practical needs (R = 0.066, P = 0.725). The international cooperation program investments and needs in different province could not meet completely. The ranks of Z value in Guangdong, Shandong and Jiangsu were 3, 5 and 6, but the ranks of international cooperation program in those provinces were 18, 13 and 28 respectively. The investment proportion for national

  2. Analyses of impacts of China's international trade on its water resources and uses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Z. Y.; Yang, H.; Shi, M. J.; Zehnder, A. J. B.; Abbaspour, K. C.

    2011-04-01

    This study provides an insight into the impact of China's international trade of goods and services on its water resources and uses. Virtual water flows associated with China's international trade are quantified in an input-output framework. The analysis is scaled down to the sectoral and provincial levels to trace the origins and destinations of virtual water flows associated with the international trade. The results reveal that China is a net virtual water exporter of 4.7 × 1010 m3 year-1, accounting for 2.1% of its total water resources and 8.9% of the total water use. Water scarce regions tend to have higher percentages of virtual water export relative to their water resources and water uses. In the water scarce Huang-Huai-Hai region, the net virtual water export accounts for 7.9% of the region's water resources and 11.2% of its water uses. For individual sectors, major net virtual water exporters are those where agriculture provides raw materials in the initial process of the production chain and/or pollution intensity is high. The results suggest that China's economic gains from being a world "manufacture factory" have come at a high cost to its water resources and through pollution to its environment.

  3. Meeting the demand of the future: a curriculum to stimulate interest in careers in primary care internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne, Mary R; Dinh, An

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing need for primary care physicians, but only a small percentage of graduating medical students enter careers in primary care. To assess whether a Primary Care Intraclerkship within the Medicine clerkship can significantly improve students' attitudes by analyzing scores on pre- and post-tests. Students on the Medicine clerkship at the University of Massachusetts Medical School participated in full-day 'intraclerkships',to demonstrate the importance of primary care and the management of chronic illness in various primary care settings. Pre-and post-tests containing students' self-reported, five-point Likert agreement scale evaluations to 26 items (measuring perceptions about the roles of primary care physicians in patient care and treatment) were collected before and after each session. Eleven intraclerkships with 383 students were held between June 2010 and June 2013. Responses were analyzed using the GLM Model Estimate. Results from the survey analysis showed significantly more positive attitudes toward primary care in the post-tests compared to the pre-tests. Students who were satisfied with their primary care physicians were significantly more likely to show an improvement in post-test attitudes toward primary care in the areas of physicians improving the quality of patient care, making a difference in overall patient health, finding primary care as an intellectually challenging field, and in needing to collaborate with specialists. Older students were more likely than younger students to show more favorable answers on questions concerning the relative value of primary care vs. specialty care. A curriculum in Primary Care Internal Medicine can provide a framework to positively influence students' attitudes toward the importance of primary care, and potentially to influence career decisions to enter careers in Primary Care Internal Medicine. Ensuring that medical students receive excellent primary care for themselves can also positively influence

  4. The contribution of internal resources, external resources, and emotional distress to use of drugs and alcohol among Israeli Jewish urban adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipschitz-Elhawi, Racheli; Itzhaky, Haya

    2014-03-01

    The contribution of selected background variables (age, gender), internal resources (mastery, emotional maturity), external resources (parental and peer support), and emotional distress to alcohol and drug use among 160 Israeli Jewish urban high school students were examined. Analyzing the variables with hierarchical regression, emotional distress contributed most significantly to both alcohol and drug use, and the contribution of age was somewhat less significant for both of them. Emotional distress also contributed indirectly to drug use through an interaction with one's sense of mastery. Gender, internal resources, and external resources contributed differentially to alcohol and drug use. Whereas gender and internal resources contributed only to drug use, external resources contributed only to alcohol use. Specifically, peer support contributed positively to alcohol use whereas parental support contributed negatively. The discussion provides explanations for these research findings and their implications, and the research's limitations are noted.

  5. Strategies to teach family assessment and intervention through an online international curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kathryn Hoehn; Friedemann, Marie-Luise

    2010-05-01

    A Web-based certificate program for international health professionals to acquire understanding of family health and strategies to implement culturally sensitive health care of families is outlined. In four Web courses and a project, students progress interactively to apply culture, family, and interdisciplinary health system theories to assessments and clinical interventions with families in the interdisciplinary setting. Four online educational strategies to facilitate student success from the virtual classroom to actual clinical care are described: adjusting to the technology, communicating the learning progress openly, giving mutual feedback, and implementing evidence-based family care. Outcomes addressing student learning and skill enhancement, family interaction, and student and faculty experiences in the virtual learning environment are explored. Overall, students learned to work successfully with families in health care, experienced increasing comfort and competency in challenging situations, introduced family care in their work setting, and emerged as leaders while working in interdisciplinary teams.

  6. Determining an Imaging Literacy Curriculum for Radiation Oncologists: An International Delphi Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giuliani, Meredith E., E-mail: Meredith.Giuliani@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Gillan, Caitlin [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Milne, Robin A. [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Uchino, Minako; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Catton, Pamela [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Rapid evolution of imaging technologies and their integration into radiation therapy practice demands that radiation oncology (RO) training curricula be updated. The purpose of this study was to develop an entry-to-practice image literacy competency profile. Methods and Materials: A list of 263 potential imaging competency items were assembled from international objectives of training. Expert panel eliminated redundant or irrelevant items to create a list of 97 unique potential competency items. An international 2-round Delphi process was conducted with experts in RO. In round 1, all experts scored, on a 9-point Likert scale, the degree to which they agreed an item should be included in the competency profile. Items with a mean score ≥7 were included, those 4 to 6 were reviewed in round 2, and items scored <4 were excluded. In round 2, items were discussed and subsequently ranked for inclusion or exclusion in the competency profile. Items with >75% voting for inclusion were included in the final competency profile. Results: Forty-nine radiation oncologists were invited to participate in round 1, and 32 (65%) did so. Participants represented 24 centers in 6 countries. Of the 97 items ranked in round 1, 80 had a mean score ≥7, 1 item had a score <4, and 16 items with a mean score of 4 to 6 were reviewed and rescored in round 2. In round 2, 4 items had >75% of participants voting for inclusion and were included; the remaining 12 were excluded. The final list of 84 items formed the final competency profile. The 84 enabling competency items were aggregated into the following 4 thematic groups of key competencies: (1) imaging fundamentals (42 items); (2) clinical application (27 items); (3) clinical management (5 items); and (4) professional practice (10 items). Conclusions: We present an imaging literacy competency profile which could constitute the minimum training standards in radiation oncology residency programs.

  7. Determining an Imaging Literacy Curriculum for Radiation Oncologists: An International Delphi Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giuliani, Meredith E.; Gillan, Caitlin; Milne, Robin A.; Uchino, Minako; Millar, Barbara-Ann; Catton, Pamela

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Rapid evolution of imaging technologies and their integration into radiation therapy practice demands that radiation oncology (RO) training curricula be updated. The purpose of this study was to develop an entry-to-practice image literacy competency profile. Methods and Materials: A list of 263 potential imaging competency items were assembled from international objectives of training. Expert panel eliminated redundant or irrelevant items to create a list of 97 unique potential competency items. An international 2-round Delphi process was conducted with experts in RO. In round 1, all experts scored, on a 9-point Likert scale, the degree to which they agreed an item should be included in the competency profile. Items with a mean score ≥7 were included, those 4 to 6 were reviewed in round 2, and items scored <4 were excluded. In round 2, items were discussed and subsequently ranked for inclusion or exclusion in the competency profile. Items with >75% voting for inclusion were included in the final competency profile. Results: Forty-nine radiation oncologists were invited to participate in round 1, and 32 (65%) did so. Participants represented 24 centers in 6 countries. Of the 97 items ranked in round 1, 80 had a mean score ≥7, 1 item had a score <4, and 16 items with a mean score of 4 to 6 were reviewed and rescored in round 2. In round 2, 4 items had >75% of participants voting for inclusion and were included; the remaining 12 were excluded. The final list of 84 items formed the final competency profile. The 84 enabling competency items were aggregated into the following 4 thematic groups of key competencies: (1) imaging fundamentals (42 items); (2) clinical application (27 items); (3) clinical management (5 items); and (4) professional practice (10 items). Conclusions: We present an imaging literacy competency profile which could constitute the minimum training standards in radiation oncology residency programs

  8. ``Dark Skies are a Universal Resource'' Programs Planned for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Berglund, K.; Bueter, C.; Crelin, B.; Duriscoe, D.; Moore, C.; Gauthier, A.; Gay, P. L.; Foster, T.; Heatherly, S. A.; Maddalena, R.; Mann, T.; Patten, K.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R.; Schaaf, F.; Simmons, M.; Smith, C.; Smith, M.; Tafreshi, B.

    2008-11-01

    In an effort to help more people appreciate the ongoing loss of a dark night sky for much of the world's population and to raise public knowledge about diverse impacts of excess artificial lighting on local environments, the International Year of Astronomy's Dark Skies Working Group has established six ``Dark Skies'' programs and six ``Dark Skies'' resources. The Dark Skies programs include GLOBE at Night (with Earth Hour), Astronomy Nights in the [National] Parks, Dark Skies Discovery Sites, Quiet Skies, Good Neighbor Lighting, and a digital photography contest. Resources include the light education toolkit, the ``Let There Be Night'' DVD and planetarium program, the 6-minute video, online interactions like Second Life, podcasts, and traveling exhibits. The programs and resources are summarized here, as they were in a poster for the June 2008 ASP/AAS conference. For more information on these programs and resources, visit http://astronomy2009.us/darkskies/.

  9. The international forum of ophthalmic simulation: developing a virtual reality training curriculum for ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, George M; Lamparter, Julia; Sullivan, Paul M; O'Sullivan, Fiona; Hussain, Badrul; Athanasiadis, Ioannis; Litwin, Andre S; Gillan, Stewart N

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the effect of a structured, supervised, cataract simulation programme on ophthalmic surgeons in their first year of training, and to evaluate the level of skill transfer. Trainees with minimal intraocular and simulator experience in their first year of ophthalmology undertook a structured, sequential, customised, virtual reality (VR) cataract training programme developed through the International Forum of Ophthalmic Simulation. A set of one-handed, bimanual, static and dynamic tasks were evaluated before and after the course and scores obtained. Statistical significance was evaluated with the Wilcoxon sign-rank test. The median precourse score of 101.50/400 (IQR 58.75-145.75) was significantly improved after completing the training programme ((postcourse score: 302/400, range: 266.25-343), p<0.001). While improvement was evident and found to be statistically significant in all parameters, greatest improvements were found for capsulorhexis and antitremor training ((Capsulorhexis: precourse score=0/100, range 0-4.5; postcourse score=81/100, range 13-87.75; p=0.002), (antitremor training: precourse score=0/100, range 0-0; postcourse score=80/100, range 60.25-91.50; p=0.001)). Structured and supervised VR training can offer a significant level of skills transfer to novice ophthalmic surgeons. VR training at the earliest stage of ophthalmic surgical training may, therefore, be of benefit.

  10. Developing a Communication Curriculum and Workshop for an Internal Medicine Residency Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salib, Sherine; Glowacki, Elizabeth M; Chilek, Lindsay A; Mackert, Michael

    2015-06-01

    Learning effective communication is essential for physicians. Effective communication has been shown to affect healthcare outcomes, including patient safety, adherence rates, patient satisfaction, and enhanced teamwork. The importance of these skills has become even more apparent in recent years, with value-based purchasing programs and federal measures of patient satisfaction in the form of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores becoming an important part of measuring the performance of a healthcare facility. We conducted a communication workshop for internal medicine residents at the University of Texas. Topics covered included the Acknowledge, Introduce, Duration, Explanation, Thank You framework; managing up; resolving conflicts; error disclosure; new medication and discharge counseling; intercultural communication; understanding Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores; and avoiding burnout. Because it would have been logistically difficult to block whole days for the workshop, the various topics were offered to residents during their regular noon conference hour for several consecutive days. After the workshop, the residents completed an anonymous questionnaire regarding their perception of the importance of various aspects of communication in patient care. The majority of the participating residents perceived the various communication skills explored during the workshop to be highly important in patient care. Concurrently, however, most residents believed that they had initially overestimated their knowledge about these various communication issues. Some demographic differences in the responses also were noted. Our findings demonstrate a needs gap and an area of potential improvement in medical education. We anticipate that with the growing understanding of the importance of communication skills in the healthcare setting, there will be an enhanced role for teaching these skills at all levels of

  11. International symposium on isotope hydrology and integrated water resources management. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    Scarcity of freshwater, degradation of its quality, and increasing demand has motivated ongoing concern in the international community for more effective utilization of freshwater resources. The IAEA's symposia on the use of isotope techniques in water resources development and management have become a recurrent event held every four years. They have provided an international forum for a comprehensive review of the present state-of-the-art and recent advances made in this specific field as well as a basis for delineation of further research and development needs. The year 2003 marks the 40th anniversary of the first IAEA water resources symposium. Increasing use of isotope techniques over the past four decades, in part due to efforts of IAEA, has enhanced availability and effective use of isotopes to address water resources management issues. The Symposium covers a multi-disciplinary spectrum of research and applications of isotope techniques. The participation of isotope specialists, hydrologists, hydrogeologists, geochemists, environmental scientists and water managers is welcomed. The Organizers further encourage the participation and contribution of graduate students in these fields. The major areas covered include: Water cycle processes in the atmosphere and hydrosphere, including surface water, groundwater, and watershed-based studies, age dating of young groundwaters, water, carbon and nutrient cycling processes at the land-ocean-atmosphere interface, recent advances in analytical techniques for isotope hydrology and field applications of isotopes in groundwater or surface water resources management. This book of synopses covers oral presentations and poster sessions.

  12. Examining internal and external job resources in child welfare: Protecting against caseworker burnout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Amy S; Phillips, Jon D; Lizano, Erica L; Rienks, Shauna; Leake, Robin

    2018-04-28

    Given intense job demands, it is not surprising that job burnout is a consistent threat to the well-being and retention of the child welfare workforce. Guided by central postulates of the Job Demands and Resources (JD-R) model which suggests that job burnout develops because of experiences of high work demands coupled with low resources in the workplace, we applied a conceptual model of job burnout (client and work related) that accounts for both internal and external resources available to child welfare workers. Findings among child welfare caseworkers from three states (N = 1917) indicate that job demands (stress and time pressure) were positively related to client- and work-related burnout. Additionally, both internal and external resources moderated the relationships between job demands and client- and work-related burnout. Study findings have workforce management implications in the child welfare sector, including the role resources might play in mitigating the negative impact of job demands on burnout in the child welfare workforce. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Turkey. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Turkey estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 21 000 to 55 000 tonnes of uranium. This potential is expected to lie in areas of Neogene and possibly other Tertiary sediments, in particular in the areas of the Menderes Massif and Central Anatolia. The mission describes a proposed exploration programme with expenditures over a five year period of between $80 million and $110 million, with nearly half of the amount being spent on drilling. (author)

  14. Languages Across the Curriculum. Translation Perspectives VII. 1994. Invited Essays on the Use of Foreign Languages throughout the Postsecondary Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, H. Stephen, Ed.

    The papers in this special issue provide both a general overview and detailed discussion of specific examples of the languages across the curriculum (LAC) movement that is currently gaining momentum in colleges and universities in the United States. Papers include: (1) "International Students as Resource Specialists: Binghamton's Languages…

  15. From Millennium ERM to Proquest 360 Resource Manager: Implementing a new Electronic Resources Management System ERMS in an International Graduate Research University in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-01-01

    An overview of the Recommendation Study and the subsequent Implementation of a new Electronic Resources Management system ERMS in an international graduate research university in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It covers the timeline, deliverables

  16. Using an Inpatient Quality Improvement Curriculum for Internal Medicine Residents to Improve Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Administration Rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolin, Jonathan; van Aalst, Robertus; Volpp, Bryan; Taylor, Thomas; Cohen, Emily

    2018-06-01

    Pneumococcal infections are an important source of morbidity and mortality in older adults and persons with compromised immune systems. New recommendations from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) became available September 2014, which included recommendations for the use of the 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13). A study was conducted to increase the PCV13 vaccination rates of hospitalized patients at the White River Junction Veterans Affairs Medical Center (White River Junction, Vermont) through the use of a resident-driven quality improvement (QI) project. From December 2014 through April 2016, 16 internal medicine inpatient residents addressed inpatient PCV13 vaccination rates by participating in the facility's QI curriculum. Eight Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles were used, including discharge template editing, electronic reminders, and the discovery of a vaccination administration documentation error in the record through data validation. The measure was the monthly percentage of patients who received PCV13 vaccination (vaccination completion rate) of those discharged from the hospital medicine service who were due for PCV13 vaccination. The percentage of veterans discharged with an up-to-date PCV13 vaccination on discharge increased from approximately 30% to 87% and was sustained. Despite being driven by many different residents, this project demonstrates that continuous improvement can be achieved through a structured and iterative process while providing active learning of core QI concepts to residents. It also displays a method in which new guidelines can be incorporated into practice in an effective manner. Finally, this project is an example of how resident-driven data validation can lead to further improvement. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. 3. SEGMITE International Symposium on Sustainable Development of Surface and Ground Water Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrez, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Society of Economic Geologist and Mineral Technologist (SEGMITE), National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) and Association of Geo-scientists for International Development with the collaboration of Export Promotion Bureau, Government of Pakistan has organised this symposium. The third Segmite International Symposium on Sustainable Development of surface and ground water resources was held on 8-10 march 1999 at Karachi, Pakistan. This book gives the conference information, brochure and abstracts of papers presented in the conference. There are about 38 abstracts submitted for the conference and related nature of the materials. Out of these 38 papers 16 are of nuclear oriented which are presented here separately. (A.B.)

  18. SIMULATION OF INTERNAL AUDIT WITHIN THE DEPARTMENT OF HUMAN RESOURCES IN AN ECONOMIC ENTITY FROM THE PUBLIC SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BOGDAN RĂVAŞ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical research in the fields - internal audit and human resources aims to explain why successful companies have failed to implement effective strategies and policies and effective internal audit and human resources through the application of appropriate models for assessment and analysis activities and specific processes and identifying good practices. The scientific approach was based on the analysis of the operational performance of processes and activities of internal audit and human resources and the size analysis behaviours of the organization as a component of the human resources strategy, which together with marketing strategy and production, are part of a strategic plan of the company.

  19. International negotiations of natural resources on the moon and other celestial bodies : future cooperation or conflict?

    OpenAIRE

    Eymork, Tania Patricia

    2012-01-01

    This thesis aims to assess the degree to which one can expect conflict or cooperation over the natural resources on the Moon and other celestial bodies in the future. By describing and exploring how the emerging global space industry may benefit humankind, it covers existing international space treaties and how fairer administration may help to eradicate poverty by, amongst other things, providing a clean source of environmentally friendly energy. This sixtyyear young industry is redeployi...

  20. International conference Caspy-95. Caspian region: economy, ecology, mineral resources. Technical abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon,

    1996-12-31

    The collection of technical abstracts submitted to the International conference Caspy-95 held in Moscow (the Russian Federation), June 20-23, 1995, contains 166 presentations in the following fields: (1) Sea levels`s fluctuation and changes of water balance; (2) Geodynamics of the Caspian region; (3) Prospecting, exploration and exploitation of oil and gas fields; (4) Ecological and environmental problems; (5) Complex monitoring and engineering coastal protection; (6) Social-economical and legal aspects of natural resources usage.

  1. International conference Caspy-95. Caspian region: economy, ecology, mineral resources. Technical abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1995-01-01

    The collection of technical abstracts submitted to the International conference Caspy-95 held in Moscow (the Russian Federation), June 20-23, 1995, contains 166 presentations in the following fields: 1) Sea levels's fluctuation and changes of water balance; 2) Geodynamics of the Caspian region; 3) Prospecting, exploration and exploitation of oil and gas fields; 4) Ecological and environmental problems; 5) Complex monitoring and engineering coastal protection; 6) Social-economical and legal aspects of natural resources usage

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Madagascar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been made public which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Madagascar. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Madagascar estimates the Speculative Resources of that country to be within the wide range of 4 000 to 38 000 tonnes uranium. Such resources could lie in areas with known occurrences (uranothorianite, Ft. Dauphin up to 5 000 t U, i.e. 'pegmatoids'; uranocircite, Antsirabe up to 3 000 t U in Neogene sediments; carnotiteautonite, Karoo area up to 30 000 t U in sandstones and in areas with as yet untested environments (e.g. related to unconformities and calcretes). Modifications to existing uranium exploration programmes are suggested and policy alternatives reviewed. No specific budget is proposed. (author)

  3. EU's forest fuel resources, energy technology market and international bioenergy trade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asikainen, A.; Laitila, J.; Parikka, H.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the project is to provide for the Finnish bioenergy technology, machine and appliance manufactures information about forest fuel resources in the EU and international bioenergy trade mechanisms. The projects results act as an instrument for market potential assessments and provide information to the local energy producer about biomass as an energy source. The possibilities to use forest chips in CHP and heating plants will be investigated in the case studies. Total number of case studies will be 3-4, and they will mainly be located in Eastern Europe, where also large forest resources and utilisation potential are found. Case studies include three main tasks: 1) Assessment of forest fuel resources around the CHP or heating plant. 2) Forest fuel procurement cost study and 3) Study on the economics forest fuel based energy production. The project will be carried out as cooperation between Finnish research institutes and companies, and local actors. First case study was carried out at Poland. (orig.)

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Uganda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A full report has been compiled describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Uganda. The Mission suggest that the speculative uranium resources of the country could be within the very wide range of 0 to 105 000 tonnes of uranium metal. The Mission finds that most of these speculative resources are related to Proterozoic unconformities and to Cenozoic sandstones of the Western Rift Valley. Some potential is also associated with Post-tectonic granites. The Mission recommends to rehabilitate the Geological Survey of Uganda in order to enable it to conduct and support a uranium exploration programme for unconformity related and for standstone hosted uranium deposits. Recommended exploration methods encompass geological mapping and compilation, an airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey north of 1 deg. North latitude, stream sediment sampling, and ground scintillometric surveys in favourable areas. Follow up work should include VLF-EM surveys, emanometry and drilling. (author)

  5. The practice of career development in the international human resource management of the European countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berber Nemanja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The function very close to the training in the management of human resources is certainly the human resource development. Specifically, the employees acquire new knowledge, abilities and skills during the training process, but also gain new experiences through various business tasks during their working life, developing themselves both, in private life and in the professional sense. Human resource development is seen as the development of the expertise of people through organizational development and training of employees in order of improvement of the performances. In this paper authors explored the practice of carrier development in European countries. Research was based on data from international project, CRANET, in the period from 2008 to 2010. The authors presented data about the usage of techniques for evaluation of career development and investigated obtained results.

  6. Addressing the immediate need for emergency providers in resource-limited settings: the model of a six-month emergency medicine curriculum in Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhani, Shada A; Israel, Kerling; Leandre, Fernet; Pierre, Sosthène; Bollman, Brennan; Marsh, Regan H

    2018-04-06

    In many resource-limited settings, emergency medicine (EM) is underdeveloped and formal EM training limited. Residencies and fellowships are an ideal long-term solution but cannot meet immediate needs for emergency providers, while short-term programs are often too limited in content. We describe a third method successfully implemented in Haiti: a medium-duration certificate program to meet the immediate need for emergency specialists. In conjunction with the Haitian Ministry of Health and National Medical School, we developed and implemented a novel, 6-month EM certificate program to build human resources for health and emergency care capacity. The program consisted of didactic and supervised clinical components, covering core content in EM. Didactics included lectures, simulations, hands-on skill-sessions, and journal clubs. Supervised clinical time reinforced concepts and taught an EM approach to patient care. Fourteen physicians from around Haiti successfully completed the program; all improved from their pre-test to post-test. At the end of the program and 9-month post-program evaluations, participants rated the program highly, and most felt they used their new knowledge daily. Participants found clinical supervision and simulation particularly useful. Key components to our program's success included collaboration with the Ministry of Health and National Medical School, supervised clinical time, and the continual presence of a course director. The program could be improved by a more flexible curriculum and by grouping participants by baseline knowledge levels. Medium-duration certificate programs offer a viable option for addressing immediate human resource gaps in emergency care, and our program offers a model for implementation in resource-limited settings. Similar options should be considered for other emerging specialties in resource-limited settings.

  7. Proposal for the establishment of an International Centre for Resource Management (ICRM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Islam, S.

    1999-01-01

    Energy and physical resources are necessary for development. These resources are not scarce. What is scarce is Technology. Technology is not only machines, it is also knowledge to run these machines. Most of the developing countries waste whatever resources they do have because of a lack of scientists, technologists and modern management. The main reason for underdevelopment of the poor countries is their weak linkage to modern science and technology. The scientists in the developing countries are isolated. Science cannot survive, let alone flourish, in isolation. The International Centre for Theoretical Physics in Trieste, Italy (ICTP) was established to end scientific isolation and to stop brain drain. The centre was established in 1964 under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Now the centre's Management is run by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), ICTP in Trieste started in 1964 with a budget of US$ 355,000. The building was donated by the Government of Italy. Now its budget is about US$ 20 million (90 per cent from Italy). About 4,000 scientists visit the centre every year. Since its establishment about 40,000 scientists from developing countries and 20,000 from developed countries have visited ICTP. The principal purpose of the proposed International Centre for Resource Management will be to foster through seminars, conferences, teaching and research the advancement of better resource utilization and environmental protection in the less developed countries. An international teaching and research institute dealing in energy policy, research and project management, electronic communication, hydrology, water resource management, soil science, climatology, meteorology, oceanography and desertification will provide the developing countries with expertise needed for successful development policy. Since it happens that the major advance in these fields have relevance for development, aid giving

  8. The ANTOSTRAT legacy: Science collaboration and international transparency in potential marine mineral resource exploitation of Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Alan; Barker, Peter; Barrett, Peter; Behrendt, John; Brancolini, Giuliano; Childs, Jonathan R.; Escutia, Carlota; Jokat, Wilfried; Kristoffersen, Yngve; Leitchenkov, German; Stagg, Howard; Tanahashi, Manabu; Wardell, Nigel; Webb, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The Antarctic Offshore Stratigraphy project (ANTOSTRAT; 1989–2002) was an extremely successful collaboration in international marine geological science that also lifted the perceived “veil of secrecy” from studies of potential exploitation of Antarctic marine mineral resources. The project laid the groundwork for circum-Antarctic seismic, drilling, and rock coring programs designed to decipher Antarctica’s tectonic, stratigraphic, and climate histories. In 2002, ANTOSTRAT evolved into the equally successful and currently active Antarctic Climate Evolution research program. The need for, and evolution of, ANTOSTRAT was based on two simple tenets within SCAR and the Antarctic Treaty: international science collaboration and open access to data. The ANTOSTRAT project may be a helpful analog for other regions of strong international science and geopolitical interests, such as the Arctic. This is the ANTOSTRAT story.

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Zambia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Zambia. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Zambia estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 33 000 and 100 000 tonnes uranium. The majority of these resources are believed to exist in the Karoo sediments. Other potentially favourable geological environments are the Precambrian Katanga sediments, as well as intrusive rocks of different chemical compositions and surficial duricrusts. Previous unofficial estimates of Zambia's Reasonably Assured Resources (RAR) and Estimated Additional Resources (EAR) are considered to be still valid: the total RAR amount to 6 000 tonnes uranium, located in Karoo (4 000 tonnes) and Katanga (2 000 tonnes) sediments, while the EAR are believed to total 4 000 tonnes being found only in Karoo sediments. The mission recommends that approximately US$ 40 million be spent on uranium exploration in Zambia over 10 years. The largest part of this expenditure would be for drilling, while the remainder should be spent on airborne and ground surveys, as well as on interpretative work on previous airborne data, Landsat imageries, etc. (author)

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Somalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A full report has been compiled describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Somalia. The Mission suggests that in addition to the reasonably assured resources (RAR) of 5 000 t uranium and estimated additional resources (EAR) of 11 000 t uranium in calcrete deposits, the speculative resources (SR) could be within the wide range of 0 - 150 000 t uranium. The majority of these speculative resources are related to sandstone and calcrete deposits. The potential for magmatic hydrothermal deposits is relatively small. The Mission recommends an exploration programme of about US$ 22 000 000 to test the uranium potential of the country which is thought to be excellent. The Mission also suggests a reorganization of the Somalia Geological Survey in order to improve its efficiency. Recommended methods include geological mapping, Landsat imagery interpretation, airborne and ground scintillometer surveys, and geochemistry. Follow-up radiometric surveys, exploration geophysics, mineralogical studies, trenching and drilling are proposed in favourable areas. (author)

  11. A quarter-century review of human resource management in the US: The growth in importance of the international perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Schuler, Randall S.; Jackson, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    The past quarter century has witnessed many developments in the research and practice of managing human resources in the United States. In this article, we briefly describe two major areas in which these developments have been unfolding: strategic human resource management and international human resource management. Across these two areas of activity, HRM in the U. S. has evolved to encompass a greater appreciation of issues associated with: the systemic character of human resource managemen...

  12. Implementation of a competency-based residency curriculum : experiences from a resource-limited environment in the Caribbean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busari, Jamiu O.; Verhagen, Eduard A. A.; Muskiet, Fred D.; Duits, Ashley J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The introduction of competency-based curricula in institutions situated in resource-limited environments is likely to pose new challenges for the implementation process. The St. Elisabeth Hospital (SEHOS) in Curacao, Dutch Caribbean, is affiliated to university teaching hospitals in the

  13. Developing a Curriculum for On-Line International Business Degree: An Integrated Approach Using Systems and ERP Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Mayur S.; Pitre, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The world today can be characterized by constant change. One such change is globalization: the integration of world economies into a single economy. Because of globalization, it is necessary for colleges and universities to respond with appropriate curriculum changes that addresses this new world phenomenon. Several institutions of higher…

  14. Towards a More Appropriate University English Curriculum in China in the Context of English as an International Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiaoqiong, Betsy Hu; Jing, Xi

    2013-01-01

    The rapid and wide spread of English has given rise to its lingua franca status, which in turn, changes the nature of English and English teaching at the tertiary level. This paper, based on a survey, discusses some of the problems with the current English curriculum used in Chinese universities and proceeds to offer some suggestions for a more…

  15. Collaboration between a US Academic Institution and International Ministry of Health to develop a culturally appropriate palliative care navigation curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Ritabelle; Riklon, Sheldon; Langidrik, Justina R; Williams, Shellie N; Kabua, Neiar

    2014-12-01

    Implementation lessons: (1) The development and testing of a culturally appropriate palliative care navigation curriculum for countries facing high cancer and non-communicable diseases burden requires collaboration with the local Ministry of Health. (2) Lay volunteers from non-governmental and faith-based organizations are potential candidates to provide patient navigation services. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Incorporating International Accounting into the MBA Curriculum: Exploring Implications of the Financial Reporting Crisis of 2001-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langmead, Joseph M.; Sedaghat, Ali M.; Unger, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    Recent developments in the global business environment have led to important changes in accounting/auditing regulations, and have implications for the business school curriculum. While many of these issues are covered in advanced accounting courses, generally taken only by majors, the issues are sufficiently important that nonaccounting majors, at…

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Rwanda

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Rwanda. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Rwanda estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 500 to 5 000 tonnes of uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Precambrian Ruzizian, especially in conjunction with tectonized pegmatoidal remobilizations of metamorphic sediments of western Rwanda. Other favourable geological environments include lamprophyric dikes and post tectonic granites of central Rwanda. The Mission recommends that over a period of five years approximately US$4.2 million be spent on exploration in Rwanda. The majority of this would be spent on airborne and ground geophysical surveys ($1.5 million) and exploration drilling ($1 million). Prospecting, trenching and tunneling and analytical work would require the remainder of the $4.2 million ($1.7 million). (author)

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Colombia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A full report has been released describing the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase Mission to Colombia. The Mission suggests that the speculative uranium resources of the country could be within the very wide range of 20 000 tonnes of 220 000 tonnes of uranium metal. The Mission finds that the area with the highest potential is the Llanos Orientales (Interior Zone), which has the potential of hosting quartz-pebble conglomerate deposits, Proterozoic unconformity-related deposits and sandstone deposits. The Mission recommends that approximately US$80 million should be expended in a phased ten-year exploration programme. It is likely that the majority of the funds will be needed for drilling, followed by ground surveys and airborne radiometry. It is the opinion of the Mission that the considerable funds required for the proposed programme could most suitably be raised by inviting national or foreign commercial organizations to participate under a shared production agreement. (author)

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Burundi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Burundi. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Burundi estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 300 to more than 4 100 tonnes of uranium. The potential is rather evenly distributed throughout the Proterozoic of Burundi in various geological environments (unconformity, hydrothermal, fault controlled, etc.). The mission recommends that over a period of five years U.S. $ 3 to 4.5 million be spent on exploration in Burundi, with even spending on the various exploration techniques as e.g. prospecting, drilling trenching, geophysical surveys, analyses, etc. (author)

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Bolivia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Bolivia. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Bolivia estimates that the Speculative Uranium Resources of that country fall within the range of 100 to 107 500 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Precambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks of the southwestern part of the Central Brazilian Shield. Other potentially favourable geologic environments include Palaeozoic two mica granites and their metasedimentary hosts, Mesozoic granites and granodiorites as well as the intruded formations and finally Tertiary acid to intermediate volcanics. The mission recommends that approximately US$ 13 million be spent on exploration in Bolivia over a five-year period. The majority of this expenditure would be for airborne and surface exploration utilising geologic, magnetometric, radiometric, and geochemical methods and some pitting, trenching, tunneling and drilling to further evaluate the discovered occurrences. (author)

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Venezuela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Venezuela. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Venezuela estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range 2,000 to 42,000 tonnes uranium.- The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Precambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks of the Guayana Shield. Other potentially favorable geologic environments include Cretaceous phosphorite beds, continental sandstone and granitic rocks. The mission recommends that approximately US $18 million be spent on exploration in Venezuela over the next five years. The majority of this expenditure would be for surface surveys utilizing geologic studies, radiometric and geochemical surveys and some drilling for geologic information. Additional drilling would be required later to substantiate preliminary findings. (author)

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Peru

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (TUREP) Mission to Peru. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Peru estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 6 000 to 11 000 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in Late Tertiary ignimbrites and associated sediments in the high Andes of southern Peru. Other favourable geological environments include calcretes, developed from Tertiary volcanogenic sources over the Precambrian in the Pacific Coastal desert in southern Peru, and Hercynian subvolcanic granites in the eastern Cordillera of southern Peru. The Mission recommends that over a period of five years approximately U.S. $10 million be spent on exploration in Peru. The majority of this would be spent on drilling ($5 million) and tunnelling ($2 million) with an additional $3 million on surface and airborne radiometric surveys. (author)

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Cameroon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Cameroon. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Cameroon estimates the Speculative Resources of that country to be in the order of 10 000 tonnes uranium for syenite-associated U-deposits in southern Cameroon, and in the order of 5 000 tonnes uranium for uranium deposits associated with albitized and desilicified late tectonic Panafrican granites (episyenite) and Paleozoic volcanics in northern Cameroon. No specific tonnage is given for Francevillian equivalents (DJA-Series) and for Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, which are thought to hold limited potential for sandstone hosted uranium. However the Douala basin, consisting of mixed marine and continental sequences merits some attention. No specific budget and programme for uranium exploration are proposed for Cameroon. Instead specific recommendations concerning specific potential environments and general recommendation concerning the methodology of exploration are made. (author)

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Ghana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Mission to Ghana. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range of 15 000 to 40 000 tonnes of uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in the Proterozoic Panafrican Mobile Belt (up to 17 000 tonnes uranium) and the Paleozoic Obosum Beds of the Voltaian basin (up to 15 000 tonnes uranium), the remainder being associated with various other geological environments. The mission recommends that over a period of three (3) years approximately U.S. $5 million) would be spent on exploration in Ghana. A major part of this (U.S $2 million) would be spent on an airborne spectrometer survey over the Voltaian basin (Obosum beds), much of the remainder being spent on ground surveys, trenching and percussion drilling. (author)

  5. A Standardized Needs Assessment Tool to Inform the Curriculum Development Process for Pediatric Resuscitation Simulation-Based Education in Resource-Limited Settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Shilkofski

    2018-02-01

    burden reported by respondents was relatively consistent with WHO country-specific UFMR statistics in each setting. Results of the needs assessment survey were subsequently used to refine goals and objectives for the simulation curriculum and to ensure delivery of pragmatic educational content with recommendations that were contextualized for local capacity and resource availability. Effective use of the tool in two different settings increases its potential generalizability.

  6. Resource-sharing between internal maintenance and external selection modulates attentional capture by working memory content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia eKiyonaga

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is unclear why and under what circumstances working memory (WM and attention interact. Here, we apply the logic of the time-based resource-sharing (TBRS model of WM (e.g., Barrouillet, Bernardin, & Camos, 2004 to explore the mixed findings of a separate, but related, literature that studies the guidance of visual attention by WM contents. Specifically, we hypothesize that the linkage between WM representations and visual attention is governed by a time-shared cognitive resource that alternately refreshes internal (WM and selects external (visual attention information. If this were the case, WM content should guide visual attention (involuntarily, but only when there is time for it to be refreshed in an internal focus of attention. To provide an initial test for this hypothesis, we examined whether the amount of unoccupied time during a WM delay could impact the magnitude of attentional capture by WM contents. Participants were presented with a series of visual search trials while they maintained a WM cue for a delayed-recognition test. WM cues could coincide with the search target, a distracter, or neither. We varied both the number of searches to be performed, and the amount of available time to perform them. Slowing of visual search by a WM matching distracter—and facilitation by a matching target—were curtailed when the delay was filled with fast-paced (refreshing-preventing search trials, as was subsequent memory probe accuracy. WM content may, therefore, only capture visual attention when it can be refreshed, suggesting that internal (WM and external attention demands reciprocally impact one another because they share a limited resource. The TBRS rationale can thus be applied in a novel context to explain why WM contents capture attention, and under what conditions that effect should be observed.

  7. International standardisation for the reporting of Mineral Resources and Ore Reserves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farmer, Karilyn

    2014-01-01

    The mining industry is a vital contributor to national and global economies. It is a truly international business that depends on the trust and confidence of investors and other stakeholders for its financial and operational well-being. Unlike many other industries, it is based on depleting mineral assets, the knowledge of which is imperfect prior to the commencement of extraction. It is therefore essential that the industry communicates the risks associated with investment effectively and transparently in order to earn the level of trust necessary to underpin its activities. Enforceable mineral resource and mineral (Ore) reserves codes are critical to earning this confidence.

  8. International Conference on Human Resource Development for Nuclear Power Programmes: Building and Sustaining Capacity. Presentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the conference are to: • Review developments in the global status of HRD since the 2010 international conference; • Emphasize the role of human resources and capacity building programmes at the national and organizational level for achieving safe, secure and sustainable nuclear power programmes; • Discuss the importance of building competence in nuclear safety and security; • Provide a forum for information exchange on national, as well as international, policies and practices; • Share key elements and best practices related to the experience of Member States that are introducing, operating or expanding nuclear power programmes; • Highlight the practices and issues regarding HRD at the organizational and national level; • Highlight education and training programmes and practices; • Emphasize the role of nuclear knowledge management for knowledge transfer and HRD; and • Elaborate on the role and scope of various knowledge networks

  9. Protecting the health of medical students on international electives in low-resource settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Niall; Sandys, Nichola; Geoghegan, Rosemary; O'Donovan, Diarmuid; Flaherty, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    Increasingly, medical students from developed countries are undertaking international medical electives in developing countries. Medical students understand the many benefits of these electives, such as the opportunity to develop clinical skills, to gain insight into global health issues and to travel to interesting regions of the world. However, they may be much less aware of the risk to their health and wellbeing while abroad. Compounding this problem, medical students may not seek advice from travel medicine practitioners and often receive inadequate or no information from their medical school prior to departure. The PubMed database was searched for relevant literature relating to the health of medical elective students. Combinations of the following key words were used as search terms: 'international health elective', 'medical student' and 'health risks'. Articles were restricted to those published in English from 1997 through June 2017. A secondary review of the reference lists of these articles was performed. The grey literature was also searched for relevant material. This narrative literature review outlines the risks of clinical electives in resource-poor settings which include exposure to infectious illness, trauma, sexual health problems, excessive sun exposure, mental health issues and crime. Medical students may mitigate these health risks by being informed and well prepared for high-risk situations. The authors provide evidence-based travel advice which aims to improve pre-travel preparation and maximize student traveller safety. A safer and more enjoyable elective may be achieved if students follow road safety advice, take personal safety measures, demonstrate cultural awareness, attend to their psychological wellbeing and avoid risk-taking behaviours. This article may benefit global health educators, international elective coordinators and travel medicine practitioners. For students, a comprehensive elective checklist, an inventory of health kit

  10. Statement to International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Kaabi, H.

    2010-03-01

    United Arab Emirates is going through a rapid growth in its energy needs, projected to increase to three folds by the year 2020 compared to 2007, reflecting an annual growth rate of 9% from 2007 onward. In evaluating different options to meet the projected demand, Nuclear energy emerged as a proven, environmentally promising and commercially competitive option which could make a significant contribution to the UAE's economy and future energy security. A sustainable , materially-sized nuclear energy program could contribute substantially to the UAE's basic power needs for decades, retain the continued support of international investment partners, yield sufficient revenues to support a competent and fully-professionalized regulation and safety authority, and ensure the continual improvement of safety practices and security in accordance with best international standards. In conclusion, I would like to emphasize the importance that nuclear energy introduction plans are based on long term sustainable strategy to ensure its successful deployment in a safe and responsible manner, and through the adoption of plans and strategies that will ensure the availability of resources and efficiency of the sector through its long life. In the UAE, as we continue to develop our nuclear energy program , the actions outlined in the policy paper will continue to provide a framework which is robust, in line with international best practices, and which is an accurate demonstration of our commitments as a responsible member of the international community

  11. The Effects of International Trade on Resource Misallocation : Trade Partner Matters (Replaced by CentER DP 2012-046)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Curuk, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper suggests that contingent on the productivity level of the trade partner; international trade may create resource misallocation in less productive countries. It theoretically shows how productivity spillovers induced by trade with more productive countries and heterogeneity in pro-

  12. The international environment UNISPACE '82 and the ITU: A relationship between orbit-spectrum resource allocation and orbital debris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmstead, D.

    1985-01-01

    The 1985 Space WARC will examine and potentially modify the current geostationary orbit spectrum resource allocation methodology. Discussions in this international political environment could likely associate the geostationary orbital debris issue with the politicized issue of orbit spectrum allocation.

  13. The intellectual structure of human resource management research: a bibliometric study of the international journal of human resource management, 2000–2012

    OpenAIRE

    García Lillo, Francisco; Úbeda García, Mercedes; Marco-Lajara, Bartolomé

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the existing literature on human resource management (HRM) from all the research papers published in The International Journal of Human Resource Management between 2000 and 2012. The authors apply bibliometric methods to identify the main research lines within this scientific field; in other words, its ‘intellectual structure’. Social network analysis is also used to perform a visualization of this structure. The results of the analysis allow us to defi...

  14. International Human Resources Management of Japanese, American, and European Firms in Asia : The Roles of Headquarters and Subsidiaries

    OpenAIRE

    Hiromichi Shibata; Andrew Doyle

    2006-01-01

    The main role of the headquarters international human resources departments/business units of seven Japanese firms we researched is to manage the Japanese expatriates at their subsidiaries in Asia; they have little involvement with the management of local employees. The headquarters international human resources departments/business units at five researched American firms tend to maintain strong company value/mission that drives use of their performance appraisal/promotion systems for employe...

  15. Worldwide bioassay data resources for plutonium/americium internal dosimetry studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, G.; Bertelli, L.; Little, T.; Guilmette, R.; Riddell, T.; Filipy, R.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Biokinetic models are the scientific underpinning of internal dosimetry. These models describe how materials of interest taken into the body by various routes (for example inhalation) are transported through the body, allowing the modelling of bioassay measurements and the estimation of radiation dose. The International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP) publishes biokinetic models for use in internal dosimetry. These models represent the consensus judgement of a committee of experts, based on human and animal data. Nonetheless, it is important to validate biokinetic models using directly applicable data, in a scientifically transparent manner, especially for internal dosimetry research purposes (as opposed to radiation protection), as in epidemiology studies. Two major goals would be to determine individual variations of model parameters for the purpose of assessing this source of uncertainty in internal dose calculations, and to determine values of workplace specific parameters (such as particle solubility in lung fluids) for different representative workplaces. Furthermore, data on the observed frequency of intakes under various conditions can be used in the interpretation of bioassay data. All of the above may be couched in the terminology of Bayesian statistical analysis and amount to the determination of the Bayesian prior probability distributions needed in a Bayesian interpretation of bioassay data. The authors have direct knowledge of several significant databases of plutonium/americium bioassay data (including autopsy data). The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the worldwide community with these resources and to invite others who may know of other such databases to participate with us in a publication that would document the content, form, and the procedures for seeking access to these databases. These databases represent a tremendous scientific resource in this field. Examples of databases known to the authors include: the

  16. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Bolivia. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leroy, Jacques; Mueller-Kahle, Eberhard

    1982-08-01

    The uranium exploration done so far in Bolivia has been carried out by COBOEN, partly with IAEA support, and AGIP S.p.A. of Italy, which between 1974 and 1978 explored four areas in various parts of Bolivia under a production sharing contract with COBOEN. The basic objective of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) is to 'review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for discovery of additional uranium resources, and to suggest new exploitation efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the country concerned'. Following the initial bibliographic study which formed Phase I of IUREP, it was envisaged that a further assessment in cooperation with, and within, the country concerned would provide a better delineation of areas of high potential and a more reliable estimate as to the degree of favourability for the discovery of additional uranium resources. It was planned that such work would be accomplished through field missions to the country concerned and that these field missions and the resulting report would be known as the Orientation Phase of IUREP. The purpose of the Orientation Phase mission to Bolivia was a) to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, b) to make an estimate of the Speculative Resources of the country, c) to delineate areas favourable for the discovery of these uranium resources, d) to make recommendations as appropriate on the best methods for evaluating the favourable areas, operating procedures and estimated possible costs, e) to develop the logistical data required to carry out any possible further work, and f) to compile a report which would be immediately available to the Bolivian authorities. The mission reports contains information about a general introduction, non-uranium exploration and mining in Bolivia, manpower in exploration, geological review of Bolivia, past uranium

  17. The Impact of Internal and External Resources, and Strategic Actions in Business Networks on Firm Performance in the Software Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Anggraeni, E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the variance in firm performance has been an important topic in the strategic management literature. In the last two decades it has become particularly interesting as business networks increasingly have become an integrated part of a firm's environment. Besides the internal resources, the less-controlled external resources in the firm’s business networks to affect its performance too. The uncertainty associated with the lower levels of control over external resources implies tha...

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published on the findings of the mission to Morocco under the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission estimates that the speculative resources of Morocco range from 70 000 to 180 000 tonnes of uranium, half of which could be expected to occur in the Northern Provinces, which are relatively well explored, and the other half in the little explored Southern Provinces. In the north, speculative resources are fairly evenly distributed among the various types of deposit, in particular vein deposits (intragranitic and contact) linked with Hercynian and Precambrian blocks, the sandstone type deposits linked with Mesozoic strata and the volcanogenic deposits, especially of Precambrian age. The potential for large high-grade deposits, especially for those linked with unconformities and linear albitites, has been little investigated in Morocco and is chiefly thought to lie in the Precambrian in the Anti-Atlas and Southern Provinces. Here, the presence of acid volcanic rock reinforces the uranium potential, and there is also some potential for calcrete-related deposits. Phosphate-related uranium, to be recovered shortly, constitutes by far the largest reserves in Morocco, estimated at about 7 million tonnes of recoverable uranium. Recommendations have been made for further study of known occurrences and identification of new ones, such as unconformity and albitite-related deposits. (author)

  19. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Morocco

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published on the findings of the mission to Morocco under the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) Orientation Phase. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission estimates that the speculative resources of Morocco range from 70 000 to 180 000 tonnes of uranium, half of which could be expected to occur in the Northern Provinces, which are relatively well explored, and the other half in the little explored Southern Provinces. In the north, speculative resources are fairly evenly distributed among the various types of deposit, in particular vein deposits (intragranitic and contact) linked with Hercynian and Precambrian blocks, the sandstone type deposits linked with Mesozoic strata and the volcanogenic deposits, especially of Precambrian age. The potential for large high-grade deposits, especially for those linked with unconformities and linear albitites, has been little investigated in Morocco and is chiefly thought to lie in the Precambrian in the Anti-Atlas and Southern Provinces. Here, the presence of acid volcanic rock reinforces the uranium potential, and there is also some potential for calcrete-related deposits. Phosphate-related uranium, to be recovered shortly, constitutes by far the largest reserves in Morocco, estimated at about 7 million tonnes of recoverable uranium. Recommendations have been made for further study of known occurrences and identification of new ones, such as unconformity and albitite-related deposits. (author) [fr

  20. The SCEC/UseIT Intern Program: Creating Open-Source Visualization Software Using Diverse Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francoeur, H.; Callaghan, S.; Perry, S.; Jordan, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Southern California Earthquake Center undergraduate IT intern program (SCEC UseIT) conducts IT research to benefit collaborative earth science research. Through this program, interns have developed real-time, interactive, 3D visualization software using open-source tools. Dubbed LA3D, a distribution of this software is now in use by the seismic community. LA3D enables the user to interactively view Southern California datasets and models of importance to earthquake scientists, such as faults, earthquakes, fault blocks, digital elevation models, and seismic hazard maps. LA3D is now being extended to support visualizations anywhere on the planet. The new software, called SCEC-VIDEO (Virtual Interactive Display of Earth Objects), makes use of a modular, plugin-based software architecture which supports easy development and integration of new data sets. Currently SCEC-VIDEO is in beta testing, with a full open-source release slated for the future. Both LA3D and SCEC-VIDEO were developed using a wide variety of software technologies. These, which included relational databases, web services, software management technologies, and 3-D graphics in Java, were necessary to integrate the heterogeneous array of data sources which comprise our software. Currently the interns are working to integrate new technologies and larger data sets to increase software functionality and value. In addition, both LA3D and SCEC-VIDEO allow the user to script and create movies. Thus program interns with computer science backgrounds have been writing software while interns with other interests, such as cinema, geology, and education, have been making movies that have proved of great use in scientific talks, media interviews, and education. Thus, SCEC UseIT incorporates a wide variety of scientific and human resources to create products of value to the scientific and outreach communities. The program plans to continue with its interdisciplinary approach, increasing the relevance of the

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Republic of Burundi. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrisch, W.; Chaigne, M.

    1983-06-01

    The basic objective of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation project lUREP is to 'Review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for the discovery of additional uranium resources and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the countries concerned'. Therefore, the scope of the IUREP orientation phase Mission to Burundi was to review all data on past exploration in Burundi, to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, to make an estimate of the speculative resources of the country, to make recommendation as appropriate on the best methods or techniques for evaluating the resources in the favourable areas and for estimating possible costs as well, to compile a report which could be immediately available to the Burundian authorities. This mission gives a general introduction, a geological review of Burundi, information on non-uranium mining in Burundi, the history of uranium exploration, occurrences of uranium IUREP mission field reconnaissance, favourable areas for speculative potential, the uranium resources position and recommendations for future exploration. Conclusions are the following. The IUREP Orientation -phase mission to Burundi believes that the Speculative Resources of that country fall b etween 300 and 4100 tons uranium oxide but a less speculative appraisal is more likely between 0 and 1000 tons. There has been no uranium production and no official estimates of Uranium Resources in Burundi. Past exploration mainly dating from 1969 onwards and led the UNDP Mineral project has indicated a limited number of uranium occurrences and anomalies. The speculative uranium resources are thought to be possibly associated with potential unconformity related vein-like deposits of the Lower Burundian. Other speculative uranium resources could be associated with granitic or peribatholitic

  2. What does the Development of the European Core Curriculum for Cardiovascular Nurses Mean for Australia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubeck, Lis; Lin, Stella Hsi-Man; Ferry, Cate; Gallagher, Robyn

    2016-04-01

    A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses has recently been published by the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the European Society of Cardiology. This core curriculum was envisaged to bridge the educational gap between qualification as a nurse and an advance practice role. In addition, the shared elements and international consensus on core themes creates a strong pathway for nursing career development that is directly relevant to Australia. Education programs for nurses in Australia must meet the mandatory standards of the Australian Nursing and Midwifery Accreditation Council (ANMAC), but without a national core curriculum, there can be considerable variation in the content of such courses. The core curriculum is developed to be adapted locally, allowing the addition of nationally relevant competencies, for example, culturally appropriate care of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander individuals. Two existing specialist resources could be utilised to deliver a tailored cardiovascular core curriculum; the Heart Education Assessment and Rehabilitation Toolkit (HEART) online (www.heartonline.org.au) and HeartOne (www.heartone.com.au). Both resources could be further enhanced by incorporating the core curriculum. The release of the European core curriculum should be viewed as a call to action for Australia to develop a core curriculum for cardiovascular nurses. Copyright © 2015 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. From Millennium ERM to Proquest 360 Resource Manager: Implementing a new Electronic Resources Management System ERMS in an International Graduate Research University in Saudi Arabia

    KAUST Repository

    Ramli, Rindra M.

    2017-05-17

    An overview of the Recommendation Study and the subsequent Implementation of a new Electronic Resources Management system ERMS in an international graduate research university in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. It covers the timeline, deliverables and challenges as well as lessons learnt by the Project Team.

  4. Advanced Texas Studies: Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlandale Independent School District, San Antonio, TX. Career Education Center.

    The guide is arranged in vertical columns relating curriculum concepts in Texas studies to curriculum performance objectives, career concepts and career performance objectives, suggested teaching methods, and audio-visual and resource materials. Career information is included on 24 related occupations. Space is provided for teachers' notes which…

  5. Emergency Medicine Residency Boot Camp Curriculum: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataya, Ramsey

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Establishing a boot camp curriculum is pertinent for emergency medicine (EM residents in order to develop proficiency in a large scope of procedures and leadership skills.  In this article, we describe our program’s EM boot camp curriculum as well as measure the confidence levels of resident physicians through a pre- and post-boot camp survey. Methods: We designed a one-month boot camp curriculum with the intention of improving the confidence, procedural performance, leadership, communication and resource management of EM interns. Our curriculum consisted of 12 hours of initial training and culminated in a two-day boot camp. The initial day consisted of clinical skill training and the second day included code drill scenarios followed by interprofessional debriefing.   Results: Twelve EM interns entered residency with an overall confidence score of 3.2 (1-5 scale across all surveyed skills. Interns reported the highest pre-survey confidence scores in suturing (4.3 and genitourinary exams (3.9. The lowest pre-survey confidence score was in thoracostomy (2.4. Following the capstone experience, overall confidence scores increased to 4.0. Confidence increased the most in defibrillation and thoracostomy. Additionally, all interns reported post-survey confidence scores of at least 3.0 in all skills, representing an internal anchor of “moderately confident/need guidance at times to perform procedure.” Conclusion: At the completion of the boot camp curriculum, EM interns had improvement in self-reported confidence across all surveyed skills and procedures. The described EM boot camp curriculum was effective, feasible and provided a foundation to our trainees during their first month of residency. [West J Emerg Med. 2015;16(2:356–361.

  6. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA) created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest), a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, PSEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills. PMID:27378010

  7. Integrating Space Flight Resource Management Skills into Technical Lessons for International Space Station Flight Controller Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Evelyn

    2008-01-01

    The Johnson Space Center s (JSC) International Space Station (ISS) Space Flight Resource Management (SFRM) training program is designed to teach the team skills required to be an effective flight controller. It was adapted from the SFRM training given to Shuttle flight controllers to fit the needs of a "24 hours a day/365 days a year" flight controller. More recently, the length reduction of technical training flows for ISS flight controllers impacted the number of opportunities for fully integrated team scenario based training, where most SFRM training occurred. Thus, the ISS SFRM training program is evolving yet again, using a new approach of teaching and evaluating SFRM alongside of technical materials. Because there are very few models in other industries that have successfully tied team and technical skills together, challenges are arising. Despite this, the Mission Operations Directorate of NASA s JSC is committed to implementing this integrated training approach because of the anticipated benefits.

  8. Unit costs in international economic evaluations: resource costing of the Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdahl, H; Knapp, M; Edgell, E T; Ghandi, G; Haro, J M

    2003-01-01

    We present unit costs corresponding to resource information collected in the Schizophrenia Outpatient Health Outcomes (SOHO) Study. The SOHO study is a 3-year, prospective, observational study of health outcomes associated with antipsychotic treatment in out-patients treated for schizophrenia. The study is being conducted across 10 European countries (Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the UK) and includes over 10,800 patients and over 1000 investigators. To identify the best available unit costs of hospital admissions, day care and psychiatrist out-patient visits, a tariff-based approach was used. Unit costs were obtained for nine of the 10 countries and were adjusted to 2000 price levels by consumer price indices and converted to US dollars using purchasing power parity rates (and on to Euro). The paper illustrates the need to balance the search for sound unit costs with pragmatic solutions in the costing of international economic evaluations.

  9. Dark Skies are a Universal Resource: Programs Planned for the International Year of Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Constance E.; US IYA Dark Skies Working Group

    2008-05-01

    The dark night sky is a natural resource that is being lost by much of the world's population. This loss is a growing, serious issue that impacts not only astronomical research, but also human health, ecology, safety, economics and energy conservation. One of the themes of the US Node targeted for the International Year of Astronomy (IYA) is "Dark Skies are a Universal Resource". The goal is to raise public awareness of the impact of artificial lighting on local environments by getting people involved locally in a variety of dark skies-related events. To reach this goal, activities are being developed that: 1) Teach about dark skies using new technology (e.g., an activity-based planetarium show on DVD, podcasting, social networking) 2) Provide thematic events on light pollution at star parties and observatory open houses (Dark Skies Teaching Sites, Astronomy Nights in the (National) Parks, Sidewalk Astronomy Nights) 3) Organize events in the arts (e.g., a photography contest) 4) Involve citizen-scientists in unaided-eye and digital-meter star counting programs (e.g., GLOBE at Night, "How Many Stars?” and the Great World Wide Star Count) and 5) Raise awareness about the link between light pollution and public health, economic issues, ecological consequences, energy conservation, safety and security (e.g., The Great Switch Out, Earth Hour, National Dark Skies Week, traveling exhibits and a 6-minute video tutorial on lighting issues). To deliver these programs, strategic networks have been established with the ASP's Night Sky Network's astronomy clubs, Astronomy from the Ground Up's science and nature centers and the Project and Family ASTRO programs, as well as the International Dark-Sky Association, GLOBE and the Astronomical League, among others. The poster presentation will outline the activities being developed, the plans for funding, implementation, marketing and the connections to the global cornerstone IYA project, "Dark Skies Awareness".

  10. Managing nuclear knowledge: Strategies and human resource development. Summary of an international conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. Based on the results of the conference, the key insights, lessons learned

  11. The Wellbeing of Italian Peacekeeper Military: Psychological Resources, Quality of Life and Internalizing Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yura Loscalzo

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Working as a peacekeeper is associated with the exposure to acute and/or catastrophic events and chronic stressors. Hence, the meager literature about peacekeepers’ wellbeing has mainly analyzed Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD. This study aims to deep the analysis of the wellbeing of peacekeepers military. Based on the few studies on this population, we hypothesized that Italian peacekeeper military officers and enlisted men (n = 167; 103 males, 6 females, 58 missing exhibit lower levels of internalizing symptoms (i.e., PTSD, depression, general anxiety, obsessions, and somatization as compared to a control group (n = 60; 32 males, 28 females. Moreover, we hypothesized that peacekeepers have higher levels of psychological resources (i.e., self-efficacy, self-esteem, social support and quality of life (i.e., higher life satisfaction and lower general stress. We compared the groups by means of MANOVAs on the subscales of the Psychological Treatment Inventory (PTI; Gori et al., 2015. We found that Italian peacekeepers have lower internalizing symptoms and higher levels of self-efficacy and self-esteem than the control group; however, no statistically significant differences were observed on perceived social support. Finally, peacekeepers have a higher quality of life: scores reflect higher life satisfaction and lower distress than the control group. This study is in line with previous literature supporting the claim that Italian peacekeeper military officers have sufficient psychological resources for coping with the stressful situations implied in peacekeeping missions. Future studies should deepen the analysis of the military’s psychological characteristics by comparing war veterans and peacekeeper military.

  12. Impact of a novel, resource appropriate resuscitation curriculum on Nicaraguan resident physician’s management of cardiac arrest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breena R. Taira

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Project Strengthening Emergency Medicine, Investing in Learners in Latin America (SEMILLA created a novel, language and resource appropriate course for the resuscitation of cardiac arrest for Nicaraguan resident physicians. We hypothesized that participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program would significantly improve the physician’s management of simulated code scenarios. Methods: Thirteen Nicaraguan resident physicians were evaluated while managing simulated cardiac arrest scenarios before, immediately, and at 6 months after participating in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation program. This project was completed in 2014 in Leon, Nicaragua. The Cardiac Arrest Simulation Test (CASTest, a validated scoring system, was used to evaluate performance on a standardized simulated cardiac arrest scenario. Mixed effect logistic regression models were constructed to assess outcomes. Results: On the pre-course simulation exam, only 7.7% of subjects passed the test. Immediately post-course, the subjects achieved a 30.8% pass rate and at 6 months after the course, the pass rate was 46.2%. Compared with pre-test scores, the odds of passing the CASTest at 6 months after the course were 21.7 times higher (95% CI 4.2 to 112.8, P<0.001. Statistically significant improvement was also seen on the number of critical items completed (OR=3.75, 95% CI 2.71-5.19, total items completed (OR=4.55, 95% CI 3.4-6.11, and number of “excellent” scores on a Likert scale (OR=2.66, 95% CI 1.85-3.81. Conclusions: Nicaraguan resident physicians demonstrate improved ability to manage simulated cardiac arrest scenarios after participation in the Project SEMILLA resuscitation course and retain these skills.

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Portugal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    A report has recently been published which describes the findings of the International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) mission to Portugal. The IUREP Orientation Phase mission to Portugal estimates that the Speculative Resources of that country fall within the range 20,000 to 80,000 tonnes uranium. The majority of this potential is expected to be located in intergranitic vein deposits and in pre-Ordovician schists, but other favourable geological environments include episyenites and Meso-Cainozoic continental sediments. The mission recommends that approximately US$25 million be spent on exploration in Portugal over the next 10 years. The majority of this ($18 million) would be spent on drilling, with a further $7 million on surface surveys and airborne radiometric surveys. It is the opinion of the IUREP Orientation Phase Mission that the considerable funding required for the outlined programme would most suitably be realized by inviting national or foreign commercial organisations to participate in the exploration effort under a partnership or shared production arrangements. (author)

  14. Monitoring and evaluation of human resources for health: an international perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Neeru

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the undoubted importance of human resources to the functions of health systems, there is little consistency between countries in how human resource strategies are monitored and evaluated. This paper presents an integrated approach for developing an evidence base on human resources for health (HRH to support decision-making, drawing on a framework for health systems performance assessment. Methods Conceptual and methodological issues for selecting indicators for HRH monitoring and evaluation are discussed, and a range of primary and secondary data sources that might be used to generate indicators are reviewed. Descriptive analyses are conducted drawing primarily on one type of source, namely routinely reported data on the numbers of health personnel and medical schools as covered by national reporting systems and compiled by the World Health Organization. Regression techniques are used to triangulate a given HRH indicator calculated from different data sources across multiple countries. Results Major variations in the supply of health personnel and training opportunities are found to occur by region. However, certain discrepancies are also observed in measuring the same indicator from different sources, possibly related to the occupational classification or to the sources' representation. Conclusion Evidence-based information is needed to better understand trends in HRH. Although a range of sources exist that can potentially be used for HRH assessment, the information that can be derived from many of these individual sources precludes refined analysis. A variety of data sources and analytical approaches, each with its own strengths and limitations, is required to reflect the complexity of HRH issues. In order to enhance cross-national comparability, data collection efforts should be processed through the use of internationally standardized classifications (in particular, for occupation, industry and education at the

  15. Human resources for health in southeast Asia: shortages, distributional challenges, and international trade in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanchanachitra, Churnrurtai; Lindelow, Magnus; Johnston, Timothy; Hanvoravongchai, Piya; Lorenzo, Fely Marilyn; Huong, Nguyen Lan; Wilopo, Siswanto Agus; dela Rosa, Jennifer Frances

    2011-02-26

    In this paper, we address the issues of shortage and maldistribution of health personnel in southeast Asia in the context of the international trade in health services. Although there is no shortage of health workers in the region overall, when analysed separately, five low-income countries have some deficit. All countries in southeast Asia face problems of maldistribution of health workers, and rural areas are often understaffed. Despite a high capacity for medical and nursing training in both public and private facilities, there is weak coordination between production of health workers and capacity for employment. Regional experiences and policy responses to address these challenges can be used to inform future policy in the region and elsewhere. A distinctive feature of southeast Asia is its engagement in international trade in health services. Singapore and Malaysia import health workers to meet domestic demand and to provide services to international patients. Thailand attracts many foreign patients for health services. This situation has resulted in the so-called brain drain of highly specialised staff from public medical schools to the private hospitals. The Philippines and Indonesia are the main exporters of doctors and nurses in the region. Agreements about mutual recognition of professional qualifications for three groups of health workers under the Association of Southeast Asian Nations Framework Agreement on Services could result in increased movement within the region in the future. To ensure that vital human resources for health are available to meet the needs of the populations that they serve, migration management and retention strategies need to be integrated into ongoing efforts to strengthen health systems in southeast Asia. There is also a need for improved dialogue between the health and trade sectors on how to balance economic opportunities associated with trade in health services with domestic health needs and equity issues. Copyright © 2011

  16. Efficiency Assessment of Economic International Cooperation in Development of Arctic Offshore Oil and Gas Resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polina V. Beresneva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The research is focused on efficiency assessment of economic cooperation in development of Arctic offshore oil and gas resources. The author developed an economic model based on cost-benefit analysis (CBA. CBA is used in some countries (EU, USA, Australia as an analytic tool to make public policy decisions. CBA is based on the method of discounting cash flows associated with costs and benefits of public policy. It is assumed that all public goals are equally important inter alia, hence public bodies should opt for those initiatives that maximize public benefits for every dollar spent from the state budget. There are five stages of economic modeling: 1 the definition of public benefits and costs associated with the public initiative; 2 monetary valuation of costs and benefits; 3 the definition of discounting period and discounting rate; 4 the calculation of net present value of cash flows; 5 the comparison of initiatives' net present values. The model is built with a number of hypotheses assumed. It allows making evaluation of investments into the technology to decrease the cost of Arctic offshore oil and gas development. Moreover, the model has two scenarios describing a public policy to support technology development with international economic cooperation and without it. Under given hypotheses both scenarios return positive net present value of policies which proves that governmental initiative to support Arctic technology development is economically justified. Also the model sows that the scenario with international cooperation is more efficient from economic point of view. It is explained by two factors: the higher speed of technology transfer (due W international cooperation and the opportunity to use financial leverage (attracting the funds from foreign partners. The model allows closing the existing scientific gap between the theory of CBA method and its practical use in public decision making.

  17. Which Preparatory Curriculum for the International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme Is Best? The Challenge for International Schools with Regard to Mathematics and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corlu, M. Sencer

    2014-01-01

    There are two mainstream curricula for international school students at the junior high level: the International Baccalaureate (IB) Middle Years Programme (MYP) and the Cambridge International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE). The former was developed in the mid-1990s and is currently being relaunched in a 21st-century approach.…

  18. Community as Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummins, Jim; Chow, Patricia; Schechter, Sandra R.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a project involving teachers, parents, and university researchers in collaborations to support multilingual children's development and use of language. Strategies for fostering an inclusive climate included building on the interests and resources of the local community, involving community members in curriculum development,…

  19. Monitoring and analysis of the change process in curriculum mapping compared to the National Competency-based Learning Objective Catalogue for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM at four medical faculties. Part I: Conducive resources and structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: After passing of the National Competency-based Learning Objectives Catalogue in Medicine (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, [, retrieved on 22.03.2016], the German medical faculties must take inventory and develop their curricula. NKLM contents are expected to be present, but not linked well or sensibly enough in locally grown curricula. Learning and examination formats must be reviewed for appropriateness and coverage of the competences. The necessary curricular transparency is best achieved by systematic curriculum mapping, combined with effective change management. Mapping a complex existing curriculum and convincing a faculty that this will have benefits is not easy. Headed by Tübingen, the faculties of Freiburg, Heidelberg, Mannheim and Tübingen take inventory by mapping their curricula in comparison to the NKLM, using the dedicated web-based MER-database. This two-part article analyses and summarises how NKLM curriculum mapping could be successful in spite of resistance at the faculties. The target is conveying the widest possible overview of beneficial framework conditions, strategies and results. Part I of the article shows the beneficial resources and structures required for implementation of curriculum mapping at the faculties. Part II describes key factors relevant for motivating faculties and teachers during the mapping process.Method: The network project was systematically planned in advance according to steps of project and change management, regularly reflected on and adjusted together in workshops and semi-annual project meetings. From the beginning of the project, a grounded-theory approach was used to systematically collect detailed information on structures, measures and developments at the faculties using various sources and methods, to continually analyse them and to draw a final conclusion (sources: surveys among the project participants with questionnaires, semi-structured group interviews

  20. Monitoring and analysis of the change process in curriculum mapping compared to the National Competency-based Learning Objective Catalogue for Undergraduate Medical Education (NKLM) at four medical faculties. Part I: Conducive resources and structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammerding-Koeppel, Maria; Giesler, Marianne; Gornostayeva, Maryna; Narciss, Elisabeth; Wosnik, Annette; Zipfel, Stephan; Griewatz, Jan; Fritze, Olaf

    2017-01-01

    Objective: After passing of the National Competency-based Learning Objectives Catalogue in Medicine (Nationaler Kompetenzbasierter Lernzielkatalog Medizin, [NKLM, retrieved on 22.03.2016]), the German medical faculties must take inventory and develop their curricula. NKLM contents are expected to be present, but not linked well or sensibly enough in locally grown curricula. Learning and examination formats must be reviewed for appropriateness and coverage of the competences. The necessary curricular transparency is best achieved by systematic curriculum mapping, combined with effective change management. Mapping a complex existing curriculum and convincing a faculty that this will have benefits is not easy. Headed by Tübingen, the faculties of Freiburg, Heidelberg, Mannheim and Tübingen take inventory by mapping their curricula in comparison to the NKLM, using the dedicated web-based MER LIN -database. This two-part article analyses and summarises how NKLM curriculum mapping could be successful in spite of resistance at the faculties. The target is conveying the widest possible overview of beneficial framework conditions, strategies and results. Part I of the article shows the beneficial resources and structures required for implementation of curriculum mapping at the faculties. Part II describes key factors relevant for motivating faculties and teachers during the mapping process. Method: The network project was systematically planned in advance according to steps of project and change management, regularly reflected on and adjusted together in workshops and semi-annual project meetings. From the beginning of the project, a grounded-theory approach was used to systematically collect detailed information on structures, measures and developments at the faculties using various sources and methods, to continually analyse them and to draw a final conclusion (sources: surveys among the project participants with questionnaires, semi-structured group interviews and

  1. International Comparison of Water Resources Utilization Efficiency in the Silk Road Economic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Ma, Jing; Deng, Wei; Wang, Yong

    2018-03-01

    In order to get knowledge of the standard of water utilization of the Silk Road Economic Belt from international point of view, the paper analyzes the annual variation of water resources utilization in the Silk Road Economic Belt, and compares with other typical countries. The study shows that Water resources utilization efficiency has been greatly improved in recent 20 years and the water consumption per USD 10000 of GDP has been declined 87.97%. the improvement of industrial water consumption efficiency is the key driving factors for substantial decrease in water consumption.The comparison of water utilization and human development shows that the higher HDI the country is, the more efficient water utilization the country has. water consumption per USD 10000 of GDP in country with HDI>0.9 is 194m³, being 8.5% of that in country with HDI from 0.5 to 0.6. On the premise of maintaining the stable economic and social development of the Silk Road Economic Belt, the realization of the control target of total water consumption must depend on the strict control over the disorderly expansion of irrigated area, the change in the mode of economic growth, the implementation of the development strategy for new industrialization and urbanization, vigorous development of the processing industry with low water consumption as well as the high-tech and high value-added industry. Only in this way, the control target of total water consumption can be realized in the process of completing the industrialization task.

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Uganda. Draft. November 1982 - January 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trey, Michel de; Levich, Robert A.

    1983-02-01

    At present, there are no reasonably assured resources of uranium in Uganda in any price category. Speculative resources are restricted to 2,400 metric tons of uranium in an apatite deposit, which in the past has been actively mined for phosphate. The possible recovery of this uranium is dependent upon a number of economic and technological conditions which have never been thoroughly studied. Although the geology of Uganda holds some interesting possibilities for hosting uranium deposits, the studies conducted between 1949 and 1979 were limited to known radioactive occurrences and anomalies in limited areas which had little economic significance. Vast areas, less known and less accessible were completely ignored. Uranium exploration must therefore be started again in a systematic manner using modern methods. The current economic situation in Uganda is so critical that International technical and financial assistance is vitally needed to help rehabilitate the Geological Survey and Mines Department. Uganda currently can offer only very restricted services. The transportation system is quite deficient: the railway does not presently cross the frontier with Kenya, and all equipment and goods must be transported from Mombasa by road. Housing is in very short supply, and many basic commodities are often unobtainable. Any organization or private company which begins an exploration program in Uganda must plan to import essentially all the equipment and supplies it shall require. It shall also have to construct offices and staff housing, and import and stockpile fuel and staple goods, so as not to be at the mercy of the (at times) inadequate local supplies. It shall most probably also have to provide basic local and imported food to its Ugandan staff and should plan to pay much higher local salaries than is customary. Lastly, it will have to provide its own fleet of trucks and organize its own transport system. (author)

  3. International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. Unedited papers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    The nuclear industry is knowledge based, similar to other highly technical industries, and relies heavily on the accumulation of knowledge. Recent trends such as workforce ageing and declining student enrolment numbers, and the risk of losing accumulated knowledge and experience, have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. In 2002 the IAEA General Conference adopted a resolution on nuclear knowledge, which was reiterated in 2003; the resolution emphasized the importance of nuclear knowledge and information management and urged both the IAEA and Member States to strengthen their activities and efforts in this regard. Consequently, the International Conference on Nuclear Knowledge Management: Strategies, Information Management and Human Resource Development, which was held on 7-10 September 2004 in Saclay, was organized by the IAEA and the Government of France through the Commissariat a l'energie atomique in cooperation with the European Commission, OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, European Atomic Forum, Japan Atomic Industrial Forum, World Council of Nuclear Workers, World Nuclear University and European Association of Information Services. The conference was attended by 250 experts, scientists and officials from 54 Member States and nine international organizations, giving the conference a very broad representation of the nuclear sector. The objective of the conference was to reach a clear and common understanding of the issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology and to define a strategic framework for developing IAEA cross-cutting knowledge management activities. The conference provided a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, government and academia, as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors. The unedited papers are presented in this report

  4. Strategic establishment of an International Pharmacology Specialty Laboratory in a resource-limited setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtisi, Takudzwa J; Maponga, Charles; Monera-Penduka, Tsitsi G; Mudzviti, Tinashe; Chagwena, Dexter; Makita-Chingombe, Faithful; DiFranchesco, Robin; Morse, Gene D

    2018-01-01

    A growing number of drug development studies that include pharmacokinetic evaluations are conducted in regions lacking a specialised pharmacology laboratory. This necessitated the development of an International Pharmacology Specialty Laboratory (IPSL) in Zimbabwe. The aim of this article is to describe the development of an IPSL in Zimbabwe. The IPSL was developed collaboratively by the University of Zimbabwe and the University at Buffalo Center for Integrated Global Biomedical Sciences. Key stages included infrastructure development, establishment of quality management systems and collaborative mentorship in clinical pharmacology study design and chromatographic assay development and validation. Two high performance liquid chromatography instruments were donated by an instrument manufacturer and a contract research organisation. Laboratory space was acquired through association with the Zimbabwe national drug regulatory authority. Operational policies, standard operating procedures and a document control system were established. Scientists and technicians were trained in aspects relevant to IPSL operations. A high-performance liquid chromatography method for nevirapine was developed with the guidance of the Clinical Pharmacology Quality Assurance programme and approved by the assay method review programme. The University of Zimbabwe IPSL is engaged with the United States National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Division of AIDS research networks and is poised to begin drug assays and pharmacokinetic analyses. An IPSL has been successfully established in a resource-limited setting through the efforts of an external partnership providing technical guidance and motivated internal faculty and staff. Strategic partnerships were beneficial in navigating challenges leading to laboratory development and training new investigators. The IPSL is now engaged in clinical pharmacology research.

  5. The International Database of Efficient Appliances (IDEA): A New Resource for Global Efficiency Policy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerke, Brian F; McNeil, Michael A; Tu, Thomas; Xu, Feiyang

    2017-09-06

    A major barrier to effective appliance efficiency program design and evaluation is a lack of data for determination of market baselines and cost-effective energy savings potential. The data gap is particularly acute in developing countries, which may have the greatest savings potential per unit GDP. To address this need, we are developing the International Database of Efficient Appliances (IDEA), which automatically compiles data from a wide variety of online sources to create a unified repository of information on efficiency, price, and features for a wide range of energy-consuming products across global markets. This paper summarizes the database framework and demonstrates the power of IDEA as a resource for appliance efficiency research and policy development. Using IDEA data for refrigerators in China and India, we develop robust cost-effectiveness indicators that allow rapid determination of savings potential within each market, as well as comparison of that potential across markets and appliance types. We discuss implications for future energy efficiency policy development.

  6. School Curriculum in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Chie

    2016-01-01

    This article examines Japanese education system especially relevant to the school curriculum, which might support Japanese high performance in the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), mainly through Japanese policy documents. The Japanese education systems have been constructed by the local context of society and politics,…

  7. Evaluating International Curriculum Development: Cooperation and Self-Reliance in the Social Studies of Peru, Colombia, and Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Douglas

    Educational evaluation is ideally much broader than the examination of students' work at stipulated intervals. It addresses the selection of objectives, the methodology, the capability of management, the adequacy of data sources, the resources required, and even the alternative educational purposes that could be served. This study evaluates the…

  8. Special issue of International journal of human resource management: Conceptual and empirical discoveries in successful HRM implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Mireia Valverde; Tanya Bondarouk; Jordi Trullen

    2016-01-01

    Special issue of International journal of human resource management: Conceptual and empirical discoveries in successful HRM implementation DOI: 10.1080/09585192.2016.1154378 URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/09585192.2016.1154378 Filiació URV: SI Inclòs a la memòria: SI Paraules clau en blanc [No abstract available

  9. The Impact of Internal and External Resources, and Strategic Actions in Business Networks on Firm Performance in the Software Industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anggraeni, E.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the variance in firm performance has been an important topic in the strategic management literature. In the last two decades it has become particularly interesting as business networks increasingly have become an integrated part of a firm's environment. Besides the internal resources,

  10. Should we Google it? Resource use by internal medicine residents for point-of-care clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duran-Nelson, Alisa; Gladding, Sophia; Beattie, Jim; Nixon, L James

    2013-06-01

    To determine which resources residents use at the point-of-care (POC) for decision making, the drivers for selection of these resources, and how residents use Google/Google Scholar to answer clinical questions at the POC. In January 2012, 299 residents from three internal medicine residencies were sent an electronic survey regarding resources used for POC decision making. Resource use frequency and factors influencing choice were determined using descriptive statistics. Binary logistic regression analysis was performed to determine relationships between the independent variables. A total of 167 residents (56%) responded; similar numbers responded at each level of training. Residents most frequently reported using UpToDate and Google at the POC at least daily (85% and 63%, respectively), with speed and trust in the quality of information being the primary drivers of selection. Google, used by 68% of residents, was used primarily to locate Web sites and general information about diseases, whereas Google Scholar, used by 30% of residents, tended to be used for treatment and management decisions or locating a journal article. The findings suggest that internal medicine residents use UpToDate most frequently, followed by consultation with faculty and the search engines Google and Google Scholar; speed, trust, and portability are the biggest drivers for resource selection; and time and information overload appear to be the biggest barriers to resources such as Ovid MEDLINE. Residents frequently used Google and may benefit from further training in information management skills.

  11. Internal and External Resources as Determinants of Health and Quality of Life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfriede Greimel

    Full Text Available The salutogenic model has been established as a health promoting resource that is related to a strong sense of coherence (SOC, positive subjective health and quality of life (QoL. The aim of the study was to compare internal and external resources, life style factors, perceived health and QoL in Japan and Austria and to determine associations among these factors.A survey was conducted in a Japanese (N = 460 and an Austrian (N = 421 student sample using the following self-report health questionnaires: Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13, Social and Gender Role Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS, Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ, SF-12 Health Survey, and the Cross-cultural Health Survey. Analyses of data showed that age (ß -0.12, and stress (ß -0.21 were negatively related and SOC (ß 0.47, family support are (ß -0.35 positively related to mental QoL. Significant predictors for emotional strain, were female gender (ß -0.24, older age (ß-0.14, lower SOC (ß 0.28, less traditional gender and social role patterns (ß 0.10, more restrained eating (ß -0.20, more alcohol intake (ß -0.16, and more stress (ß -0.25 explaining 42% of the variance in Austrian students. In Japan stress (ß -0.38 was negatively related and SOC (ß 0.37 positively related to mental QoL. Older age (ß -0.20, lower SOC (ß 0.29 and more stress (ß -0.33 were identified as significant predictors explaining 35% of the variance in Japanese students.SOC and stress are strongly associated with QoL and perceived health in Austria as well as in Japan. SOC seems to be a crucial predictor for stress, and emotional health independent of the cultural context. A major challenge of cross-cultural research is to understand perceived health and QoL and the extent in which it is individually, socially, or culturally determined.

  12. Internal and External Resources as Determinants of Health and Quality of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greimel, Elfriede; Kato, Yoshiko; Müller-Gartner, Maria; Salchinger, Beate; Roth, Roswith; Freidl, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    The salutogenic model has been established as a health promoting resource that is related to a strong sense of coherence (SOC), positive subjective health and quality of life (QoL). The aim of the study was to compare internal and external resources, life style factors, perceived health and QoL in Japan and Austria and to determine associations among these factors. A survey was conducted in a Japanese (N = 460) and an Austrian (N = 421) student sample using the following self-report health questionnaires: Sense of Coherence Scale (SOC-13), Social and Gender Role Scale, Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MSPSS), Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ), SF-12 Health Survey, and the Cross-cultural Health Survey. Analyses of data showed that age (ß -0.12), and stress (ß -0.21) were negatively related and SOC (ß 0.47), family support are (ß -0.35) positively related to mental QoL. Significant predictors for emotional strain, were female gender (ß -0.24), older age (ß-0.14), lower SOC (ß 0.28), less traditional gender and social role patterns (ß 0.10), more restrained eating (ß -0.20), more alcohol intake (ß -0.16), and more stress (ß -0.25) explaining 42% of the variance in Austrian students. In Japan stress (ß -0.38) was negatively related and SOC (ß 0.37) positively related to mental QoL. Older age (ß -0.20), lower SOC (ß 0.29) and more stress (ß -0.33) were identified as significant predictors explaining 35% of the variance in Japanese students. SOC and stress are strongly associated with QoL and perceived health in Austria as well as in Japan. SOC seems to be a crucial predictor for stress, and emotional health independent of the cultural context. A major challenge of cross-cultural research is to understand perceived health and QoL and the extent in which it is individually, socially, or culturally determined.

  13. Enhancing the International Business Curriculum through Partnership with the United States Department of Commerce: The "E" Award Internship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Jeffrey A.

    2006-01-01

    Management education has been subjected to scrutiny and criticism over its lack of relevance to the "real world" of management practice. In response, many institutions have developed and, in some cases, require students to complete an internship as part of their degree requirements. International business is a field of study where internships can…

  14. An Empirical Study on the Curriculum Construction of Business English for International Trade Based on the Case of GDUFS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhong, Zhu; Cheng, Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Business English education concern is of great significance. Business English for International Trade in Guangdong University of Foreign Studies (GDUFS) is widely acclaimed, and it is also a popular major. GDUFS has adopted the slogan "Learn from East and West, moral integrity and direct behavior". It is a famous cradle of learning,…

  15. Culture as Curriculum: Education and the International Expositions (1876-1904). History of Schools and Schooling. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The great International Expositions of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries brought together the world's political, intellectual, and industrial leaders for the exchange of information and ideas. They also promoted specific cultural values and belief systems. In this book, Eugene F. Provenzo, Jr. looks specifically at the educational…

  16. Implementation and evaluation of the International Electrotechnical Commission specification for tidal stream energy resource assessment: A case study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramos, V.; Ringwood, John V.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The utility of the International Electrotechnical Commission standards for tidal stream resource assessment were analysed. • The Orkney Region (N Scotland) was used as a case study. • A sensitivity analysis in terms of accuracy vs computational times was carried out for different mesh resolutions. • Modelling the operation of a tidal energy converter becomes essential for an appropriate estimation of the tidal resource. • Practical recommendations are proposed for future editions of the technical standard. - Abstract: Over the next decades, tidal stream energy aims to become a fully commercially viable energy source. For this purpose, complete knowledge regarding tidal stream resource assessment is essential. In this context, the International Electrotechnical Commission has developed a technical standard for the assessment of the tidal stream resource, “IEC 62600-201 TS: Marine energy - Wave, tidal and other water current converters - Part 201: Tidal energy resource assessment and characterisation”, offering a vast set of recommendations in the fields of data collection, numerical modelling, data analysis and reporting of the results with the purpose of standardising tidal stream resource characterisation. The standard divides resource assessments into two different classes: feasibility and layout design. The model setup procedure (mesh resolution, boundary conditions) and the computational effort required vary significantly from one class to another. For these reasons, the objective of the present work is to explore the proposed standard using the Orkney Region (N Scotland) as a case study. Overall, it was found that the standard works well, offering a detailed characterisation of the tidal resource; however, in order to improve its manageability, some aspects related to the grid resolution requirements and the approach to model a tidal energy converter could be revisited for future editions.

  17. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Cameroon. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trey, Michel de; Leney, George W.

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of the International Uranium Resource Evaluation Project (IUREP) missions to host nations is to: R eview the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for the discovery of additional resources, and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising areas in collaboration with the countries concerned. Guidance in the achievement of these goals is provided through a check list of desired relevant information on: general background, the potential role of nuclear energy, and organizations involved, information on the mining industry, technical manpower employed or available, available maps, aerial photographs, and publications, national geological survey and organizations involved in uranium, private organizations involved in uranium exploration and mining, results of previous exploration, known uranium occurrences, plans for further work, legal and administrative requirements for exploration and logistical information on facilities available. The economy of CAMEROON is sound and continues to expand with an annual growth rates of 5-6%. Emphasis is placed on private investment with government participation in major development projects. The overall investment climate is good. Minerals exploration is carried out under nonexclusive Prospecting License and exclusive Exploration License that may later be converted to a Mining Lease or Mining Concession. Many of the conditions must be negotiated. Uranium is classified as a strategic mineral, and may be subject to special review. There is no defined policy on uranium development. Two government organizations are concerned with geology and mining. The INSTITUT DE RECHERCHES GEOLOGIQUES ET MINIERES (IRGM) conducts programs of geologic mapping and research, mineralogy, hydrology, and alternate energy sources. The DEPARTMENT OF MINES AND GEOLOGY (DMG) is responsible for all minerals exploration and mining. It includes a

  18. Rethinking the mathematics curriculum

    CERN Document Server

    Hoyles, Celia; Woodhouse, Geoffrey

    1998-01-01

    At a time when political interest in mathematics education is at its highest, this book demonstrates that the issues are far from straightforward. A wide range of international contributors address such questions as: What is mathematics, and what is it for? What skills does mathematics education need to provide as technology advances? What are the implications for teacher education? What can we learn from past attempts to change the mathematics curriculum? Rethinking the Mathematics Curriculum offers stimulating discussions, showing much is to be learnt from the differences in culture, national expectations, and political restraints revealed in the book. This accessible book will be of particular interest to policy makers, curriculum developers, educators, researchers and employers as well as the general reader.

  19. Developing the International Business Curriculum: Results and Implications of a Delphi Study on the Futures of Teaching and Learning in International Business

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zettinig, Peter; Vincze, Zsuzsanna

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the results of a Delphi study concerning the futures of teaching and learning in International Business (IB), a topic that has been receiving a lot of discussion during recent years. Based on our findings we identify two dimensions which may be at the core and instrumental for developing the value proposition of IB. The first…

  20. The intellectual structure of human resource management research: A bibliometric study of The International Journal of Human Resource Management, 2000-2012

    OpenAIRE

    García Lillo, Francisco; Úbeda García, Mercedes; Marco-Lajara, Bartolomé

    2015-01-01

    El propósito del presente trabajo de investigación es tratar de identificar las principales corrientes de investigación dentro del campo o dominio científico de la dirección de recursos humanos analizando todos los artículos de investigación publicados en la revista The International Journal of Human Resource Management (IJHRM) durante el período comprendido entre los años 2000 y 2012. En otras palabras o dicho de otro modo, la «estructura intelectual» de la disciplina analizada (the HRM disc...

  1. The Role of Information Technology as Moderating Variable and Internal Control Effectiveness as intervening in the Relationship between Human Resource Competency and Internal Auditor Service Quality on of Report

    OpenAIRE

    Haliah, Hamid,Irdam

    2015-01-01

    in general, this research is intended to investigate factors that effect quality of report of local government in west Sulawesi province, Indonesia. Human resource competence and quality of services of internal auditor have indirect effect through the effectiveness of internal control to the quality of the report. These results indicate that the effectiveness of internal control serves as an intervening variable on the relationship of competence of human resources and internal auditor service...

  2. Core curriculum illustration: rib fractures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunham, Gregor M; Perez-Girbes, Alexandre; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-06-01

    This is the 24th installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  3. 78 FR 29199 - Avani International Group, Inc., Birch Mountain Resources Ltd., Capital Reserve Canada Ltd...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-17

    ... Mountain Resources Ltd., Capital Reserve Canada Ltd., Dynasty Gaming, Inc. (n/k/a Blue Zen Memorial Parks, Inc.), IXI Mobile, Inc., Laureate Resources & Steel Industries Inc., Millennium Energy Corp., Shannon... a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Dynasty Gaming, Inc. (n/k/a...

  4. 1st International Ocean Technology Congress on EEZ Resources : Technology Assessment

    CERN Document Server

    Champ, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Today western nations consume annually only a small percentage of their resources from the sea, despite the proclamation of Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) by many. In contrast, most Pacific Basin Countries obtain more than a quarter of their annual needs from the ocean. Determination of greater rewards from the development of marine resources is markedly inhibited by the limited technical abilities available to locate and assess them. Knowledge of Exclusive Economic Zone resources is schematic and generalised, and a detailed understanding of the geology and processes relating to the economic use of the seafloor is both fragmentary and very basic. Technology for mapping the mineral resources of continental shelves and ocean areas, except in active offshore hydrocarbon provinces, has been largely developed in pursuit of scientific objectives and competence to rapidly appraise economic potential is limited. Similarly, the capability to characterise and evaluate the other resources of the seas is rudimentary. The...

  5. Remarks at the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, Dale E.

    2012-01-01

    Thank you and good morning, everyone. I am pleased to be in Abu Dhabi, which I have heard so much about but have never visited before. During my tenure at the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission as Chairman and now as a Commissioner, I have traveled extensively across the globe in support of international nuclear safety and security and visited a number of countries. So, I can say with some experience that this is one of the most impressive examples of modern development that I have encountered anywhere in my travels. I congratulate the UAE for its commitment to national development, to this location, and to the ideal of progress toward a bright future. The topic of this conference - human resources development and the expansion of nuclear power - is about the commitment and investment in people. The importance of this 'human side' of modern technology is sometimes forgotten or assumed to develop on its own once basic educational programs and institutions are put in place. In my view, the development and maintenance of a skilled national workforce is critical to the development of a stable, successful national nuclear power program. As many of you know, I am on leave from the University of Texas and will soon be returning there. And because of my academic background, I have made the need to expand scientific and engineering education and to promote technological development a recurring theme in my numerous presentations while serving at the U.S. NRC. So I am pleased to participate in this conference today and to share the podium for this keynote address session with my distinguished and honorable colleague from India, Mr. Rajagopala Chidambaram. I also want to commend the International Atomic Energy Agency for convening this special conference on this vital subject. The subject of highly qualified, nuclear trained people has been a significant theme in my speeches and private conversations. There is little doubt that ensuring there will be enough trained and

  6. Development of user-centered interfaces to search the knowledge resources of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Josette; Harris, Marcelline; Bagley-Thompson, Cheryl; Root, Jane

    2003-01-01

    This poster describes the development of user-centered interfaces in order to extend the functionality of the Virginia Henderson International Nursing Library (VHINL) from library to web based portal to nursing knowledge resources. The existing knowledge structure and computational models are revised and made complementary. Nurses' search behavior is captured and analyzed, and the resulting search models are mapped to the revised knowledge structure and computational model.

  7. Landscape design and allocation for demonstrating the distinctive germplasm resources of SHNU offers in 2015 Shanghai International Flower Show

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Jiaying

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Combing with its theme——″The Delicate Horticulture & The Beautiful Homeland″,the 2015 Shanghai International Flower Show offers SHNU a special outdoor stand for distinctive germplasm resources to shine in different aspects of subject creativity.Many properties of the landscaping,such as landscape arrangement,season reflection,color configuration,personal training,identification,landscaping,season reflection,afforested maintenance,were discused and analyzed in this study.A proposal on how to improve the achievements in scientific research and application of the splendid germplasm resources to a further step was provided as well.The practice of the doemonstration for SHNU′s of germplasm resources in the show gave us a lot of inspirations such as doing more study and develop more plant varieties in order to meeting the social demands,furthermore,promoting the development of the horticulture industry.

  8. Proceedings of international symposium on selection and human resources management in nuclear industries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The twelve papers presented at the symposium cover the following topics: the professional, legal and ethical issues raised by behavioral screening for unescorted access to nuclear power plants; a psychologically developed system for access screening of vendor and owner applicants; validity generalization and situational specificity for reactor operators; a managers' activity survey; a management assessment center for utility managers; the TVA Management Development Plan; Goodyear Atomic Corporation's Management Development Program; a strategy for the enhancement of management and communications in nuclear power plants; curriculum guides for career path training for plant operations personnel; a series of training programs in technical supervisory skills for plant personnel; and proposed standards for the evaluation of industrial and academic credits in operator readiness. Course guidelines are included; surveys are depicted in tables and graphs

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Somalia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levich, Robert A.; Muller-Kahle, Eberhard

    1983-04-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Somalia suggests that in addition to the reasonably assured resources (RAR) of 5 000 t uranium and estimated additional resources (EAR) of 11 000 t uranium in calcrete deposits, the speculative resources (SR) could be within the wide range of 0 - 150 000 t uranium. The majority of these speculative resources are related to sandstone and calcrete deposits. The potential for magmatic hydrothermal deposits is relatively small. The Mission recommends an exploration programme of about US $ 22 000 000 to test the uranium potential of the country which is thought to be excellent. The Mission also suggests a reorganization of the Somalia Geological Survey in order to improve its efficiency. Recommended methods include geological mapping, Landsat Imagery Interpretation, airborne and ground scintillometer surveys, and geochemistry. Follow-up radiometric surveys, exploration geophysics, mineralogical studies, trenching and drilling are proposed in favourable areas

  10. International Students' Perception of Library Services and Information Resources in Chinese Academic Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nzivo, Charles N.; Chuanfu, Chen

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of international student enrollment in Chinese universities, user perception has become an area of developing research in academic libraries. China's policy of opening up has led to the education and economic reforms allowing major universities to enroll international students. These changes have created an increasing need for…

  11. A cross-sectional ecological analysis of international and sub-national health inequalities in commercial geospatial resource availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotse-Gborgbortsi, Winfred; Wardrop, Nicola; Adewole, Ademola; Thomas, Mair L H; Wright, Jim

    2018-05-23

    Commercial geospatial data resources are frequently used to understand healthcare utilisation. Although there is widespread evidence of a digital divide for other digital resources and infra-structure, it is unclear how commercial geospatial data resources are distributed relative to health need. To examine the distribution of commercial geospatial data resources relative to health needs, we assembled coverage and quality metrics for commercial geocoding, neighbourhood characterisation, and travel time calculation resources for 183 countries. We developed a country-level, composite index of commercial geospatial data quality/availability and examined its distribution relative to age-standardised all-cause and cause specific (for three main causes of death) mortality using two inequality metrics, the slope index of inequality and relative concentration index. In two sub-national case studies, we also examined geocoding success rates versus area deprivation by district in Eastern Region, Ghana and Lagos State, Nigeria. Internationally, commercial geospatial data resources were inversely related to all-cause mortality. This relationship was more pronounced when examining mortality due to communicable diseases. Commercial geospatial data resources for calculating patient travel times were more equitably distributed relative to health need than resources for characterising neighbourhoods or geocoding patient addresses. Countries such as South Africa have comparatively high commercial geospatial data availability despite high mortality, whilst countries such as South Korea have comparatively low data availability and low mortality. Sub-nationally, evidence was mixed as to whether geocoding success was lowest in more deprived districts. To our knowledge, this is the first global analysis of commercial geospatial data resources in relation to health outcomes. In countries such as South Africa where there is high mortality but also comparatively rich commercial geospatial

  12. 建構國際教育融入課程的教師專業成長團體規劃模式:三所偏鄉學校策略聯盟的經驗Constructing a Curriculum Design Model for Infusion of International Education: A Case of Strategic Aliance among Three Rural Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    洪雯柔 ( 通訊作者)Wen-Jou Hung (Corresponding Author

    2012-09-01

    . The last part is to display the characteristics of this model. In the context of internationalization and globalization, to cultivate the literacy of international understanding, global citizenship, appreciation of crosscultural communication, and comprehension of global issues is important. That makes international education a necessity in education systems nowadays. For the underprivileged schools, they need more resources to implement international education. This project help three elementary schools with implementing curriculum design of international education. At the first stage, the curriculum design focused on promoting teachers’ professional development of international education. Through the reflective and reciprocal professional dialogue in a professional development community, teachers learn how to integrate international education into the given curriculum. At the second stage, the core is to design curriculum around the competencies students need in the international education activities. The traits of this model are as follows: 1 The aim of this model is to cultivate students international/global perspectives and cross-cultural attitudes and skills; 2 The participant schools are of Education Priority Area; 3 The way for designing international education curriculum is through the professional and reflective dialogue in a professional development community; 4 The model includes multi disciplines and cooperation cross disciplines; 5 This model uses multi-level leadership to guide the curriculum design.

  13. Incorporation of web-based applications and online resources in undergraduate medical education in the Irish Republic. Can new changes be incorporated in the current medical curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhatt, Karanvir Singh; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran

    2014-07-01

    Significant change has been happening in the introduction of technology in medical teaching all over the world. We aim to determine if the undergraduate medical students and teachers are open to incorporating changes in the current medical curriculum or if there is a need for the same in the Republic of Ireland. A cross-sectional study involving 202 participants of whom 152 were medical students and 50 medical professionals (teachers and hospital doctors) were carried out involving three different medical universities namely; University College Cork (UCC), University College Dublin (UCD), and National University of Ireland in Galway (NUIG). Participants were requested to answer a series of 15 questions designed incorporating various fields of technology necessary for the study. The data was collected and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) software to determine statistical significance. The participants overall had a positive attitude toward the utility of modern technology and web-based applications in current medical curriculum. Ninety-one percent of the participants preferred the introduction of modern technology into medical education and 7% were against the idea and a further 2% of them remained undecided. There seems to be a "technology gap" in the current undergraduate medical curriculum in Ireland. A large-scale study involving more participants from all the medical schools in Ireland is recommended. We believe, changes can be brought into the current medical teaching and learning to make the process more fruitful and successful.

  14. Developing a Telecommunications Curriculum for Students with Physical Disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandell, Terry S.; Laufer, Dorothy

    1993-01-01

    A telecommunications curriculum was developed for students (ages 15-21) with physical disabilities. Curriculum content included an internal mailbox program (Mailbox), interactive communication system (Blisscom), bulletin board system (Arctel), and a mainframe system (Compuserv). (JDD)

  15. Integrated Curriculum and Subject-based Curriculum: Achievement and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Victoria

    The research conducted for this mixed-method study, qualitative and quantitative, analyzed the results of an academic year-long study to determine whether the use of an integrated fourth grade curriculum would benefit student achievement in the areas of English language arts, social studies, and science more than a subject-based traditional curriculum. The research was conducted based on the international, national, and state test scores, which show a slowing or lack of growth. Through pre- and post-assessments, student questionnaires, and administrative interviews, the researcher analyzed the phenomenological experiences of the students to determine if the integrated curriculum was a beneficial restructuring of the curriculum. The research questions for this study focused on the achievement and attitudes of the students in the study and whether the curriculum they were taught impacted their achievement and attitudes over the course of one school year. The curricula for the study were organized to cover the current standards, where the integrated curriculum focused on connections between subject areas to help students make connections to what they are learning and the world beyond the classroom. The findings of this study indicated that utilizing the integrated curriculum could increase achievement as well as students' attitudes toward specific content areas. The ANOVA analysis for English language arts was not determined to be significant; although, greater growth in the students from the integrated curriculum setting was recorded. The ANOVA for social studies (0.05) and the paired t-tests (0.001) for science both determined significant positive differences. The qualitative analysis led to the discovery that the experiences of the students from the integrated curriculum setting were more positive. The evaluation of the data from this study led the researcher to determine that the integrated curriculum was a worthwhile endeavor to increase achievement and attitudes

  16. Internal and external market orientation as organizational resources - consequences for market and financial performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Snoj

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The concept of internal marketing has been discussed in marketing literature for over 30 years. Despite this fact there is little theoretical and empirical evidence of the way in which the internal market orientation impacts market and financial performance. On the other hand, there is considerable empirical evidence concerning the impact of the external market orientation on market and financial performance. Consequently, very few research projects have dealt with the impact of both market orientations on the performance of companies. In this paper a structural model was constructed, consisting of the internal market orientation, external market orientation, market performance and financial performance. With the help of the structural equation model the hypothesis that the internal market orientation is a significant predecessor of the external market orientation was confirmed. The external market orientation was found to significantly influence market as well as financial performance.

  17. Cooperation at different scales: challenges for local and international water resource governance in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mirumachi, N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available . This paper examines how the cooperative principle has influenced stakeholder interaction at the local and international scales of water governance in South Africa. Water policies and initiatives have been set up to promote multi-level governance...

  18. Internal and external market orientation as organizational resources - consequences for market and financial performance

    OpenAIRE

    Boris Snoj; Vladimir Gabrijan; Borut Milfelner

    2010-01-01

    The concept of internal marketing has been discussed in marketing literature for over 30 years. Despite this fact there is little theoretical and empirical evidence of the way in which the internal market orientation impacts market and financial performance. On the other hand, there is considerable empirical evidence concerning the impact of the external market orientation on market and financial performance. Consequently, very few research projects have dealt with the impact of both market o...

  19. International Trade Drives Global Resource Use: A Structural Decomposition Analysis of Raw Material Consumption from 1990-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Barbara; Eisenmenger, Nina; Schaffartzik, Anke; Wiedenhofer, Dominik

    2018-04-03

    Globalization led to an immense increase of international trade and the emergence of complex global value chains. At the same time, global resource use and pressures on the environment are increasing steadily. With these two processes in parallel, the question arises whether trade contributes positively to resource efficiency, or to the contrary is further driving resource use? In this article, the socioeconomic driving forces of increasing global raw material consumption (RMC) are investigated to assess the role of changing trade relations, extended supply chains and increasing consumption. We apply a structural decomposition analysis of changes in RMC from 1990 to 2010, utilizing the Eora multi-regional input-output (MRIO) model. We find that changes in international trade patterns significantly contributed to an increase of global RMC. Wealthy developed countries play a major role in driving global RMC growth through changes in their trade structures, as they shifted production processes increasingly to less material-efficient input suppliers. Even the dramatic increase in material consumption in the emerging economies has not diminished the role of industrialized countries as drivers of global RMC growth.

  20. International Collaboration and the Management of Linguistic Resources at a Diaspora Festival in Okinawa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucci, Peter R.; Miyahira, Katsuyuki

    2009-01-01

    This article uses Jernudd and Neustupny's (1987) theory of language management to address the planning, management and distribution of linguistic resources at the 4th Worldwide Uchinaanchu Festival (WUF), a diaspora festival held in Okinawa, Japan. WUF organizers--from Okinawa and diaspora communities abroad--were concerned with both international…

  1. Y.E.S. International Entomology Resource Guide. Second Edition. Special Publication No. 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Gary A., Comp.

    This resource guide is designed to provide Young Entomologists' Society (Y.E.S.) members and other interested entomologists with information on people and companies that sell entomological equipment, supplies, services, preserved and dried specimens, livestock, books, publications, slides and other visuals, gift or novelty items, and…

  2. Wheelbarrows full of frogs: social learning in rural resource management : international research and reflections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwis, C.; Pyburn, R.; Röling, N.G.

    2002-01-01

    Standing in contrast to technological interventions and economics, ‘social learning’ reflects the idea that the shared learning of interdependent stakeholders is a key mechanism for arriving at more desirable solutions to complex problems in rural environments. Degradation of natural resources,

  3. 77 FR 59690 - Titan Resources International, Corp.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    ... a lack of current and accurate information concerning the securities of Titan Resources... concerning Titan's business operations and financial condition. The Commission is of the opinion that the public interest and the protection of investors require a suspension of trading in the securities of...

  4. Exposure Factors Resources: Contrasting EPA’s Exposure Factors Handbook with International Sources (Journal Article)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to compile and standardize exposure human factors have resulted in the development of a variety of resources available to the scientific community. For example, the U.S. EPA developed the Exposure Factors Handbook and Child-specific Exposure Factors Handbook to promote c...

  5. Comparative international management of human resources and human resources management in Brazil: An analysis in view of the calculative and collaborative models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiani dos Santos Zuppani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the adoption of calculative and collaborative practices dominating comparative international human resources management, according to the different profiles of the areas of Human Resources Management (HRM of private organizations operating in Brazil. The method employed was a Survey, operated by means of an electronic questionnaire on HRM practices and organizational characteristics. A total of 326 respondents was obtained. Initially a cluster was conducted, in which respondents were clustered into four groups with different HRM profiles. The use of calculative and collaborative practices was compared in the four groups formed through the ANOVA (analysis of variance collection of statistical models. The main findings showed that the strategic group was the one with the highest average of adoption of calculative and collaborative practices. The Communicative HRM group showed a higher propensity to collaborative practices and the Formalized HRM group would adopt calculative practices, although none of the groups showed an average of adoption than the Strategic HRM group. This suggests that it is necessary to learn how to deal with different aspects of the management of people in organizations operating in Brazil.

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Colombia. February - March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cameron, J.; Meunier, A.R.; Tauchid, M.

    1980-01-01

    The basic objective of IUREP is to 'review the present body of knowledge pertinent to the existence of uranium resources, to review and evaluate the potential for discovery of additional uranium resources, and to suggest new exploration efforts which might be carried out in promising new areas in collaboration with the countries concerned'. Following the initial bibliographic study, which formed Phase I of IUREP, it was envisaged that a further assessment in co-operation with the country in question would lead to a better delineation of areas of high potential and a more reliable estimate as to the degree of favourability for the discovery of additional uranium resources. It was planned that such work would be accomplished through field missions to the country and that these field missions and the resulting report would constitute the IUREP Orientation Phase. The purpose of the Orientation Mission to Colombia was (i) to develop a better understanding of the uranium potential of the country, (ii) to delineate areas favourable for the discovery of speculative uranium resources, (iii) to make recommendations, as appropriate, on the best methods for evaluating the favourable areas, operating procedures and estimated possible costs, (iv) to develop the logistical data required to carry out any possible further work, and (v) to compile a report that would be immediately available to the Colombian authorities. Uranium exploration in Colombia is of very recent date, with the majority of activities getting under way only after 1970. In spite of the limited work that has been done, however, over 1300 radioactive anomalies have been recorded. The total number of uranium mineral occurrences resulting from follow-up work is still very small, and some are unusual in world terms. Topographic and geographic conditions in Colombia make geological and exploration work very difficult and costly, especially in the Cordilleras and the Interior Zone (Llanos Orientales). There are, at

  7. The international Genome sample resource (IGSR): A worldwide collection of genome variation incorporating the 1000 Genomes Project data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Laura; Fairley, Susan; Zheng-Bradley, Xiangqun; Streeter, Ian; Perry, Emily; Lowy, Ernesto; Tassé, Anne-Marie; Flicek, Paul

    2017-01-04

    The International Genome Sample Resource (IGSR; http://www.internationalgenome.org) expands in data type and population diversity the resources from the 1000 Genomes Project. IGSR represents the largest open collection of human variation data and provides easy access to these resources. IGSR was established in 2015 to maintain and extend the 1000 Genomes Project data, which has been widely used as a reference set of human variation and by researchers developing analysis methods. IGSR has mapped all of the 1000 Genomes sequence to the newest human reference (GRCh38), and will release updated variant calls to ensure maximal usefulness of the existing data. IGSR is collecting new structural variation data on the 1000 Genomes samples from long read sequencing and other technologies, and will collect relevant functional data into a single comprehensive resource. IGSR is extending coverage with new populations sequenced by collaborating groups. Here, we present the new data and analysis that IGSR has made available. We have also introduced a new data portal that increases discoverability of our data-previously only browseable through our FTP site-by focusing on particular samples, populations or data sets of interest. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Welding Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Div. of Adult and Vocational Education.

    This competency-based curriculum guide is a handbook for the development of welding trade programs. Based on a survey of Alaskan welding employers, it includes all competencies a student should acquire in such a welding program. The handbook stresses the importance of understanding the principles associated with the various elements of welding.…

  9. International symposium on advances in isotope hydrology and its role in sustainable water resources management (IHS-2007). Book of abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The quadrennial IAEA isotope hydrology symposia provide an international forum for a comprehensive review of the state of the art and recent advances in this field. The symposia also facilitate the transfer of information, knowledge and interactions between developed and developing countries. Isotopes are increasingly being used to address many of the challenges in sustainable water resources management. The integration of these tools with classical methods and spatial information technologies has been growing rapidly over the past sel years. These have provided unsurpassed capabilities to apply nuclear and geochemical techniques in complex hydrological systems. The main objectives of this symposium are to: - Review the state of the art in isotope hydrology; - Outline recent developments in the application of isotope techniques for water resources management; - Identify future trends and developments for research and applications.

  10. International symposium on advances in isotope hydrology and its role in sustainable water resources management (IHS-2007). Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    The quadrennial IAEA isotope hydrology symposia provide an international forum for a comprehensive review of the state of the art and recent advances in this field. The symposia also facilitate the transfer of information, knowledge and interactions between developed and developing countries. Isotopes are increasingly being used to address many of the challenges in sustainable water resources management. The integration of these tools with classical methods and spatial information technologies has been growing rapidly over the past several years. These have provided unsurpassed capabilities to apply nuclear and geochemical techniques in complex hydrological systems. The main objectives of this symposium are to: - Review the state of the art in isotope hydrology; - Outline recent developments in the application of isotope techniques for water resources management; - Identify future trends and developments for research and applications

  11. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Ghana. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guelpa, Jean-Paul; Vogel, Wolfram

    1982-12-01

    The Republic of Ghana has no claimed uranium resources in the categories Reasonably Assured and Estimated Additional. The only occurrences known are within pegmatites and are of no economic importance. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana estimates that the Speculative Resources of the country fall between 15,000 and 40,000 tonnes uranium. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Ghana believes that the Panafrican Mobile Belt has the highest uranium potential of all geological units of the country. The Obosum beds are the priority number two target. A three years exploration programme is recommended for a total cost of US $ 5,000,000. The Ghana Atomic Energy Commission and the Ghana Geological Survey provide a basic infrastructure for uranium exploration. Any future uranium development in Ghana should be embedded in a well defined national uranium policy. It is recommended that such a policy be draw, up by the Ghanaian authorities

  12. Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. Summary of an International Conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-01-01

    Currently, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. More than fifty Member States, with support from the IAEA, are considering the introduction of nuclear power, and human resource development is one of the crucial areas in terms of requests for support. The need for human resources in the nuclear sector is not only experienced by countries embarking on new nuclear power programmes, but also by countries with existing programmes that are considering expansion, as many current professionals are approaching retirement age and the number of newly trained staff is generally not sufficient to meet the potential demand. The IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes was held from 14 to 18 March 2010 in Abu Dhabi, hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates. This conference was organized to address work force issues faced by countries which are embarking on new nuclear power programmes, expanding current programmes or planning to supply nuclear technology to other countries. The situation is different for each country; some need to develop their own local expertise, while others need to scale up existing educational and training programmes to increase the number of professionals. The purpose of this conference was to bring together Member States to help formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management to help support each country's nuclear power programme. In addition, the IAEA can facilitate better use of other educational opportunities, including research reactors and development of training facilities. These proceedings highlight the key findings and recommendations of the meeting and the conclusions of the chairperson. All papers presented and discussed during the meeting are included on the attached CD-ROM. To access the papers, click on 'Index' on the CD-ROM.

  13. Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. Summary of an International Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-10-15

    Currently, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. More than fifty Member States, with support from the IAEA, are considering the introduction of nuclear power, and human resource development is one of the crucial areas in terms of requests for support. The need for human resources in the nuclear sector is not only experienced by countries embarking on new nuclear power programmes, but also by countries with existing programmes that are considering expansion, as many current professionals are approaching retirement age and the number of newly trained staff is generally not sufficient to meet the potential demand. The IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes was held from 14 to 18 March 2010 in Abu Dhabi, hosted by the Government of the United Arab Emirates. This conference was organized to address work force issues faced by countries which are embarking on new nuclear power programmes, expanding current programmes or planning to supply nuclear technology to other countries. The situation is different for each country; some need to develop their own local expertise, while others need to scale up existing educational and training programmes to increase the number of professionals. The purpose of this conference was to bring together Member States to help formulate country specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management to help support each country's nuclear power programme. In addition, the IAEA can facilitate better use of other educational opportunities, including research reactors and development of training facilities. These proceedings highlight the key findings and recommendations of the meeting and the conclusions of the chairperson. All papers presented and discussed during the meeting are included on the attached CD-ROM. To access the papers, click on 'Index' on the CD-ROM.

  14. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-12-01

    The Republic of Korea, occupies the southern end of the Korean peninsula. It has a long history of mining and mineral production, and has an active and fairly well equipped Geological Survey. The country in general is quite highly mineralized with many minerals including uranium although there has been no uranium production from it yet. Uranium occurs in granites, schists, and in black carbonaceous shales. The Korean Geological survey has estimated that one ore body contains 650 tonnes U in 1,600,000 tons of ore at an average grade of 0.047 percent U 3 O 8 . Many recent reports also indicate very large resources of uranium in very low grade ranges. The uranium potential for the Republic of Korea is considered in Category 2 (1,000 - 10,000 tonnes U) in the normal IUREP context. However, a very large resource may exist in the very low grades in black shales of the country. This resource is considered as in category 6 (500,000 to 1,000,000 tonnes U). (author)

  15. A Review of International Cross-Cultural Mixed Messages and Their Implications for Human Resource Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a literature review on the concept of international cross-cultural mixed messages. Although there is limited literature on this topic, the review suggests that messages from one's home culture and a second culture can result in conflicting expectations for one's own behavior and for the behavior of others. Double bind theory is…

  16. The effects of international acquisitions in Serbia on status and engagement of human resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Branko Rakita

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the past few decades globalization and deregulation of international economy has been noticeably accelerated. Consequently, new globalized business environment with numerous business opportunities as well as growing business risks has been made. The new business environment opened the door to intensive implementation of acquisitions as a market entry strategy. Foreign direct investments (FDI in most of transition countries, including Serbia, predominantly come in the form of international acquisitions. There is a wide theoretical analysis of the effects of FDIs on target country economy. The overall conclusion is that green field projects, in comparison with international acquisitions, have more favorable effects on all aspects of host country’s economy. This paper examines the effects of international acquisitions in Serbia on work practices, wages and productivity using the analysis of the financial statements and the results of survey carried out among the foreign investors. It was found that decline of employment; productivity growth and increase in real wages are the results of the acquisitions. The survey also shows that the foreign investors invested in training and development of the acquired employees.

  17. Management Development: Using Internal or External Resources in Developing Core Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espedal, Bjarne

    2005-01-01

    This article defines management as a source of organizational competitive advantage and from the view that managers are some of the employees most vital to a firm. According to influential theories in the field of strategic management, such human assets should be protected, governed, and developed internally. In contrast to the traditional view of…

  18. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Sudan. February-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kneupper, G.; Scivetti, N.

    1981-01-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to the Democratic Republic of the Sudan believes that the Speculative Resources of the country might fall between 20,000 and 40,000 tonnes uranium and more. This indicates that the Speculative Resources of the Sudan could be significantly higher than previously estimated (7,500 tonnes uranium) by the NEA/IAEA Steering Group on the Uranium Resources - IUREP Phase I. The Government is willing to consider valid exploration programmes presented by prospective partners as long as they serve the interests of both parties. Within the general six-year (1977/78-1982/83) plan for development of the country's mineral resources, the Ministry of Energy and Mining has set up certain priorities which it would like to see expeditiously implemented: uranium exploration and production stands high on the list of priorities. On the basis of very limited information on regional geology and on previous exploration which was available to the Mission, it is estimated that the greatest potential for the Speculative Resources of possible economic significance will prove to occur in the following geological environments of the Sudan (Red Sea Hills area is not included): precambrian basement complex, palaeozoic-mesozoic-tertiary sedimentary basins and the tertiary to recent calcretes. The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission believes that some 20 Million US$ (very rough estimate) will be needed to (1) check the validity of the basic geological concepts formulated on the uranium potential of the selected areas, (2) accumulate diagnostic geological, geophysical, geochemical data indicative of a true uranium potential there, (3) study the basement complex rocks and the sedimentary formations at least on a broad structural-stratigraphic reconnaissance basis (a tremendous amount of valuable water drilling data has accumulated over the last years for some of the selected sedimentary basins) and (4) determine the most appropriate investigation techniques to be utilized

  19. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India's Education Development Committee (EDC) White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India - Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar; Kalra, Om Prakash; Bhalla, Ashish; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Sundarakumar, Sundarajan

    2014-07-01

    Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM) has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI) has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers' eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India) has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE's Education Development Committee (EDC) was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE) to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM.

  20. The 2014 Academic College of Emergency Experts in India′s Education Development Committee (EDC White Paper on establishing an academic department of Emergency Medicine in India - Guidelines for Staffing, Infrastructure, Resources, Curriculum and Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Aggarwal

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Emergency medicine services and training in Emergency Medicine (EM has developed to a large extent in developed countries but its establishment is far from optimal in developing countries. In India, Medical Council of India (MCI has taken great steps by notifying EM as a separate specialty and so far 20 medical colleges have already initiated 3-year training program in EM. However, there has been shortage of trained faculty, and ambiguity regarding curriculum, rotation policy, infrastructure, teachers′ eligibility qualifications and scheme of examination. Academic College of Emergency Experts in India (ACEE-India has been a powerful advocate for developing Academic EM in India. The ACEE′s Education Development Committee (EDC was created to chalk out guidelines for staffing, infrastructure, resources, curriculum, and training which may be of help to the MCI and the National Board of Examinations (NBE to set standards for starting 3-year training program in EM and develop the departments of EM as centers of quality education, research, and treatment across India. This paper has made an attempt to give recommendations so as to provide a uniform framework to the institutions, thus guiding them towards establishing an academic Department of EM for starting the 3-year training program in the specialty of EM.

  1. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Peru. August - October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetland, Donald L.; Michie, Uisdean McL.

    1981-01-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Peru believes that the Speculative Resources of that country fall between 6,000 and 11,000 tonnes uranium. There has been no uranium production in Peru and there are no official estimates of uranium resources. Past exploration in Peru (dating from about 1952) has indicated a paucity of valid uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies. Only recently (1980) have anomalous areas been identified, (Macusani-Picotani). The identified Speculative Resources are mainly in Late Tertiary ignimbrites and associated sediments in the high Andes of southern Peru. Geologically, there are direct parallels between these resources and deposits of the Los Frailes areas of neighbouring Bolivia. Other minor Speculative Resources may be present in calcretes developed from Tertiary volcanogenic sources over the Precambrian in the Pacific Coastal desert of southern Peru but no positive indications have been recognised. Hercynian sub-volcanic granites in the eastern cordillera of southern Peru may have some associated Speculative Resources both intra and extra granitic. No Speculative Potential could be identified in Permo-Triassic or Tertiary post tectonic continental sediments anywhere in Peru. Such potential may exist but further reconnaissance of the continental late Tertiary basins, with positive indications would be required before inclusion of potential in this category. Recent discoveries in the volcanogenic environment of southern Peru have been by carborne, helicopter borne and on on-foot reconnaissance of isolated areas. It is recommended that there be a more systematic, integrated study of the entire volcanic district assisted by volcanic petrographic examination. Assessment of the known occurrences requires immediate subsurface study by drilling and exploration audits to assess their continuity, grade variation and thickness. This phase will be significantly more expensive than previous exploration. Non-core drilling should supplement

  2. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Madagascar. September-October 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer, John H.; Brinck, Johan W.

    1981-01-01

    This study, resulting from the IUREP Orientation Mission to Madagascar, includes the reported information on infrastructure, mining regulations and conditions made available to the Mission. Within the structure of the centrally planned economic system, uranium exploration and mining is considered the exclusive activity of OMNIS, an organization founded by the State for that purpose (Office Militaire National pour les Industries Strategiques). Madagascar has a long history of prospection and small-scale exploitation of uranium (thorium and radium). Some of this activity dates back to 1909, culminating in significant production of both uranium and thorium (in excess of 5900 tonnes of uranothorianite) by the CEA and private contractors in the Fort Dauphin area from 1955 to 1968. Past exploration and development work in a number of areas, notably by the CEA, OMNIS and the IAEA/UNDP, is reviewed and the uranium resources and mineral indications reported. The areas rated at present as the more important and which continue to be investigated (by OMNIS, in conjunction with IAEA/UNDP projects) in the order of priority are: the Fort Dauphin area, the Karroo formation and the Neogene lacustrine basin at Antsirabe. The Mission estimates that Madagascar has a moderate potential for undiscovered resources; it is estimated that such speculative resources could lie within the range of 4000 - 38000 tonnes U. In addition there are areas with as yet untested environments and with no known occurrences which may be favourable but which will require prospection. Modifications to existing programmes and new programmes are suggested. Policy alternatives are reviewed

  3. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: People's Republic of China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    China with an area close to 10,000,000 sq km and a fifth of the world's population, has a history of mining and, in fact is quite self sufficient in most of it's needs for the more basic mineral products.However, there is a dearth of knowledge of its resources of uranium. One can however, make the assumption that geologically, there are probably several areas that contain the combination of favourable host rocks and source. The speculative potential of China is estimated to be in Category 5, 100,000 to 500,000 tonnes U. (author)

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Venezuela. Draft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hetland, Donald L.; Obellianne, Jean-marie

    1981-04-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Venezuela believes that the Speculative Uranium Resources of that country fall between 2,000 and 42,000 tonnes. This assumes that a part of the Speculative Resources would be extracted as by-product uranium from wet-process phosphoric acid production. Past exploration in Venezuela has resulted in the discovery of very few uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies except for the many airborne anomalies recorded on the Guayana Shield. To date no economic deposits or significant uranium occurrences have been found in Venezuela except for the uraniferous phosphorites in the Cretaceous Navey Formation which are very low grade. The uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies can be divided according to host rock into: (1) Precambrian crystalline and sedimentary rocks, (2) Cretaceous phosphorite beds, (3) continental sandstone, and (4) granitic rocks. The greatest geological potential for further uranium resources is believed to exist in the crystalline and sedimentary Precambrian rocks of the Guayana Shield, but favorable geological potential also exist in younger continental sandstones. Since the Guayana Shield is the most promising for the discovery of economic uranium deposits most of the proposed exploration effort is directed toward that area. Considerable time, effort and capital will be required however, because of the severe logistical problems of exploration in this vast, rugged and inaccessable area, Meager exploration work done to date has been relatively negative suggesting the area is more of a thorium rather than a uranium province. However because of the possibility of several types of uranium deposits and because so little exploration work has been done, the Mission assigned a relatively small speculative potential to the area, i.e. 0 to 25,000 tonnes uranium. A small speculative potential (0 to 2,000 tonnes) was assigned to the El Baul area in Cojedes State, in the Llanos Province. This potential is postulated

  5. Course Resource Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    England, Robert G.

    The Mountain-Plains Course Resource List is presented by job title for 26 curriculum areas. For each area the printed materials, audiovisual aids, and equipment needed for the course are listed. The 26 curriculum areas are: mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution,…

  6. Managing nuclear knowledge: IAEA activities and international coordination. Including resource material full text CD-ROM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The present CD-ROM summarizes some activities carried out by the Departments of Nuclear Energy and Nuclear Safety and Security in the area of nuclear knowledge management in the period 2003-2005. It comprises, as open resource, most of the relevant documents in full text, including policy level documents, reports, presentation material by Member States and meeting summaries. The collection starts with a reprint of the report to the IAEA General Conference 2004 on Nuclear Knowledge [GOV/2004/56-GC(48)/12] summarizing the developments in nuclear knowledge management since the 47th session of the General Conference in 2003 and covers Managing Nuclear Knowledge including safety issues and Information and Strengthening Education and Training for Capacity Building. It contains an excerpt on Nuclear Knowledge from the General Conference Resolution [GC(48)/RES/13] on Strengthening the Agency's Activities Related to Nuclear Science, Technology and Applications. On the CD-ROM itself, all documents can easily be accessed by clicking on their titles on the subject pages (also printed at the end of this Working Material). Part 1 of the CD-ROM covers the activities in the period 2003-2005 and part 2 presents a resource material full text CD-ROM on Managing Nuclear Knowledge issued in October 2003

  7. EVALUASI HIDDEN CURRICULUM DI SMP NEGERI BOJA, KABUPATEN KENDAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neni Lestari

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the implementation and impact of Hidden Curriculum, as well as the determinant factors of success and sustainability in SMPN 2 Boja Kendal. This study was an evaluative research using qualitative approach. The data collected by using observation, interviews, and documentation. Data analyzed by collecting and selecting to be deduce. Validity used triangulation data that combined the result of observation, interviews, and documentation. The results of the study were: 1 The activities of hidden curriculum development at SMPN 2 Boja Kendal, namely: flag ceremony, school environmental management, establishing and enforcing discipline, special religious worship, smiles, greetings and courtesies, exemplary, relationship among students and principal, teachers, and staff, school canteen services. 2 The impact of the hidden curriculum development was the changing of school community’s behavior being better, created clean and beautiful school environment, the improvement of public trust to the school toward their kids’ education. Development of the hidden curriculum could establish students good character and an optimal achievement as well as a good school culture. 3 Internal supporting factors including: qualified human resources, the availability of school facilities, school environment was clean and beautiful. External supporting factors occur in the form of endorsement of the parents, school committees and communities in establishing good and virtuous character for the students.

  8. Development of a Comprehensive Communication Skills Curriculum for Pediatrics Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Eleanor B; Boland, Kimberly A; Bryant, Kristina A; McKinley, Tara F; Porter, Melissa B; Potter, Katherine E; Calhoun, Aaron W

    2016-12-01

    Effective communication is an essential element of medical care and a priority of medical education. Specific interventions to teach communication skills are at the discretion of individual residency programs. We developed the Resident Communication Skills Curriculum (RCSC), a formal curriculum designed to teach trainees the communication skills essential for high-quality practice. A multidisciplinary working group contributed to the development of the RCSC, guided by an institutional needs assessment, literature review, and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education core competencies. The result was a cohesive curriculum that incorporates didactic, role play, and real-life experiences over the course of the entire training period. Methods to assess curricular outcomes included self-reporting, surveys, and periodic faculty evaluations of the residents. Curricular components have been highly rated by residents (3.95-3.97 based on a 4-point Likert scale), and residents' self-reported communication skills demonstrated an improvement over the course of residency in the domains of requesting a consultation, providing effective handoffs, handling conflict, and having difficult conversations (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.0 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  ≤ .002). Faculty evaluations of residents have also demonstrated improvement over time (intern median 3.0, graduate median 4.5 based on a 5-point Likert scale, P  communication skills curriculum for pediatrics residents was implemented, with a multistep evaluative process showing improvement in skills over the course of the residency program. Positive resident evaluations and informal comments from faculty support its general acceptance. The use of existing resources makes this curriculum feasible.

  9. Statement to International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Mr. President, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a pleasure for me to open this IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. I am very grateful to the Government of the United Arab Emirates for hosting this important event. As you know, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. The IAEA has projects on introducing nuclear power with no fewer than fifty-eight of our Member States. We expect between 10 and 25 new countries to bring their first nuclear power plants on-line by 2030. These are momentous changes. However, some countries are concerned about a possible shortage of skilled professionals in the nuclear field in the coming decades. The generation of professionals who built and led the nuclear power industry for much of the past 50 years is approaching retirement and in some countries there are not enough students coming up through the educational system to take their place. Naturally, we at the IAEA want to do all we can to help Member States address this issue. That is why we have organized this conference. The situation is different in different countries. For countries with expanding nuclear power programmes, the challenge is to scale up their existing education and training in order to have the required qualified workforce on time. Countries planning to supply nuclear technology to others not only have to meet their national human resource needs, but must also be able to transfer education and training capacity together with the technology they provide. Finally, countries embarking on nuclear power cannot become too dependent on their technology supplier and need to develop their own home-grown expertise and skills base. The Agency would be happy to help interested States to formulate country-specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management in support of nuclear power programmes. We could also help countries make better

  10. Statement to international conference on human resource development for introducing and expanding nuclear power programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Y.

    2010-03-01

    Full text: Mr. President, Excellencies, Ladies and Gentlemen, It is a pleasure for me to open this IAEA conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes. I am very grateful to the Government of the United Arab Emirates for hosting this important event. As you know, the world is witnessing a resurgence of interest in nuclear power. The IAEA has projects on introducing nuclear power with no fewer than fifty-eight of our Member States. We expect between 10 and 25 new countries to bring their first nuclear power plants on-line by 2030. These are momentous changes. However, some countries are concerned about a possible shortage of skilled professionals in the nuclear field in the coming decades. The generation of professionals who built and led the nuclear power industry for much of the past 50 years is approaching retirement and in some countries there are not enough students coming up through the educational system to take their place. Naturally, we at the IAEA want to do all we can to help Member States address this issue. That is why we have organized this conference. The situation is different in different countries. For countries with expanding nuclear power programmes, the challenge is to scale up their existing education and training in order to have the required qualified workforce on time. Countries planning to supply nuclear technology to others not only have to meet their national human resource needs, but must also be able to transfer education and training capacity together with the technology they provide. Finally, countries embarking on nuclear power cannot become too dependent on their technology supplier and need to develop their own home-grown expertise and skills base. The Agency would be happy to help interested States to formulate country-specific policies on human resource development, education, training and knowledge management in support of nuclear power programmes. We could also help countries

  11. Quality of life outcomes' in early motherhood in Austria : The impact of internal and external resources

    OpenAIRE

    Mautner, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to provide results of two studies, which were conducted in Austria to examine the impact of internal and external factors on quality of life and depressive symptoms in early motherhood. In general early motherhood may be a critical life event for a woman and their partner and can lead to decreased well-being. Emotional aspects such as depression affects not only the quality of life of the mothers but also her new-born child, her other children, partner and relati...

  12. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission summary report: Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-01-01

    The IURBP Orientation Phase Mission assesses the Speculative Uranium Resources in Thailand to be within the range of 1 500 to 38 500 tonnes U. Geological environments which are considered by the Mission to be favourable for uranium occurrences include the following: sandstones of Jurassic to Triassic age; Tertiary sedimentary basins (northern Thailand); Tertiary sedimentary basins (southern Thailand); associated with fluorite deposits; granitic rocks; black shales and graphitic slates of the Palaeozoic; associated with sedimentary phosphate deposits; and associated with monazite sands. Physical conditions in Thailand, including a wet tropical climate, dense forest growth and rugged terrain in some areas and relative inaccessibility, make exploration difficult and costly. There is currently no ready accessibility to detailed topographic and geological maps and other basic data. This lack of availability is a severe constraint to systematic exploration. The lack of skilled personnel experienced in uranium studies and the low level of technical support is a serious hindrance to exploration in Thailand. (author)

  13. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Turkey. September to November 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziehr, H.; Komura, A.

    1985-02-01

    The IUREP Orientation Phase Mission to Turkey estimates the Speculative Resources of the country to lie between 21 000 and 55 000 tonnes uranium. Past exploration in Turkey, dating from 1953, has indicated a very high number of uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies, but ore deposits of significant size and grade have not been found. Present reserves amount to 4 600 tonnes uranium which can be allocated to approximately 15 sandstone type deposits in Neogene continental sediments. Several hundreds of other occurrences and radioactive anomalies exist where ore reserves have not been delineated. The uranium occurrences and radioactive anomalies can be divided according to host rock into (a) crystalline massif and (b) Tertiary continental sediment. The greatest geological potential for further resources is estimated to exist in the above mentioned two geological terrains. The most favourable geological potential exists in Neogene continental sedimentary basins near the crystalline massifs. Because surface exploration in the known favourable areas such as the Koepruebasi Basin has been so systematic, extensive, and successful, it is improbable that additional surface work will have much effect in increasing the number of new radioactive anomalies or uranium occurrences detected at the surface in these areas. Surface survey work in these areas should be mainly designed to assist the understanding of structures at depth. Surface reconnaissance survey work is, however, required in other parts of the above mentioned two geological terrains in this country. Before starting such a reconnaissance survey in new areas, the Mission suggests that a careful and extensive library study be conducted in close co-operation with sedimentologists, petrologists, and remote sensing specialists. The Mission suggests that in the medium term, 8 to 10 years, some 85 - 110 million U.S. Dollars be spent on airborne and ground surveys, including geological, radiometric, geochemical, and

  14. International symposium on isotope hydrology and integrated water resources management. Unedited proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Global effects to overcome the growing challenge of freshwater availability have been at the forefront of the world development agenda for nearly three decades. For developing policies towards sustainable management of freshwater resources, an improved understanding of the Earth's water cycle bas been widely recognized as one of the key elements of scientific information. The IAEA has played a crucial role in promoting and expanding the field of isotope hydrology. Starting in 1963, the IAEA's quadrennial symposia on isotope hydrology have played a central role in developing this scientific discipline. This publication contains 174 extended abstracts of papers and posters presented during 11 technical sessions of the 11th symposium in the series that was convened during 19-23 May 2003 in Vienna. Nearly 275 participants from 69 countries participated in the symposium to discuss the past, present and future of isotope applications in hydrology and climate research. Each of the papers and poster presentations have been analysed and indexed separately

  15. 1st International Conference on Hydraulic Design in Water Resources Engineering : Channels and Channel Control Structures

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    The development of water resources has proceeded at an amazing speed around the world in the last few decades. The hydraulic engineer has played his part: in constructing much larger artificial channels than ever before, larger and more sophisticated control structures, and systems of irrigation, drainage and water supply channels in which the flow by its nature is complex and unsteady requiring computer-based techniques at both the design and operation stage. It seemed appropriate to look briefly at some of the developments in hydraulic design resulting from this situation. Hence the idea of the Conference was formed. The Proceedings of the Conference show that hydraulic engineers have been able to acquire a very substantial base of design capability from the experience of the period referred to. The most outstanding development to have occurred is in the combination of physical and mathematical modelling, which in hydraulic engineering has followed a parallel path to that in other branches of engineering sc...

  16. Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) Is the International Resource for Information on the Laboratory Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, MeiYee; Shaw, David R

    2018-01-01

    Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI, http://www.informatics.jax.org/ ) web resources provide free access to meticulously curated information about the laboratory mouse. MGI's primary goal is to help researchers investigate the genetic foundations of human diseases by translating information from mouse phenotypes and disease models studies to human systems. MGI provides comprehensive phenotypes for over 50,000 mutant alleles in mice and provides experimental model descriptions for over 1500 human diseases. Curated data from scientific publications are integrated with those from high-throughput phenotyping and gene expression centers. Data are standardized using defined, hierarchical vocabularies such as the Mammalian Phenotype (MP) Ontology, Mouse Developmental Anatomy and the Gene Ontologies (GO). This chapter introduces you to Gene and Allele Detail pages and provides step-by-step instructions for simple searches and those that take advantage of the breadth of MGI data integration.

  17. Human resources for health: task shifting to promote basic health service delivery among internally displaced people in ethnic health program service areas in eastern Burma/Myanmar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Low

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. Methods: A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations’ (EHOs and community-based organizations’ (CBHOs service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Findings: Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Conclusion: Despite the chronic conflict in

  18. Human resources for health: task shifting to promote basic health service delivery among internally displaced people in ethnic health program service areas in eastern Burma/Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Sharon; Tun, Kyaw Thura; Mhote, Naw Pue Pue; Htoo, Saw Nay; Maung, Cynthia; Kyaw, Saw Win; Shwe Oo, Saw Eh Kalu; Pocock, Nicola Suyin

    2014-01-01

    Burma/Myanmar was controlled by a military regime for over 50 years. Many basic social and protection services have been neglected, specifically in the ethnic areas. Development in these areas was led by the ethnic non-state actors to ensure care and the availability of health services for the communities living in the border ethnic-controlled areas. Political changes in Burma/Myanmar have been ongoing since the end of 2010. Given the ethnic diversity of Burma/Myanmar, many challenges in ensuring health service coverage among all ethnic groups lie ahead. A case study method was used to document how existing human resources for health (HRH) reach the vulnerable population in the ethnic health organizations' (EHOs) and community-based organizations' (CBHOs) service areas, and their related information on training and services delivered. Mixed methods were used. Survey data on HRH, service provision, and training were collected from clinic-in-charges in 110 clinics in 14 Karen/Kayin townships through a rapid-mapping exercise. We also reviewed 7 organizational and policy documents and conducted 10 interviews and discussions with clinic-in-charges. Despite the lack of skilled medical professionals, the EHOs and CBHOs have been serving the population along the border through task shifting to less specialized health workers. Clinics and mobile teams work in partnership, focusing on primary care with some aspects of secondary care. The rapid-mapping exercise showed that the aggregate HRH density in Karen/Kayin state is 2.8 per 1,000 population. Every mobile team has 1.8 health workers per 1,000 population, whereas each clinic has between 2.5 and 3.9 health workers per 1,000 population. By reorganizing and training the workforce with a rigorous and up-to-date curriculum, EHOs and CBHOs present a viable solution for improving health service coverage to the underserved population. Despite the chronic conflict in Burma/Myanmar, this report provides evidence of the substantive

  19. "Content without Context Is Noise": Looking for Curriculum Harmony in Primary Arts Education in Western Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Sian; Wright, Peter; Pascoe, Robin

    2018-01-01

    Arts education in Western Australian primary schools consist of learning opportunities outlined by mandated curriculum. However, assumptions underlying this curriculum involving access, resources and support impact schools' capacity to implement the curriculum without them being adequately addressed by the written curriculum. Drawing on the policy…

  20. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) orientation phase mission report: Thailand. February-March 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inazumi, Satoru; Meyer, John H.

    1981-01-01

    The I.U.R.E.P. Orientation Phase Mission assesses the Speculative Uranium Resources in Thailand to be within the range of 1,500 to 38,500 tonnes U. This range is higher than the previous assessment in Phase I because the Mission recognizes additional favourable geological environments. At the same time, the untested and therefore the unknown degree of mineralization in some of these environments is acknowledged. Past exploration, dating from 1977, has been mainly confined to ground surveys of a small mineralized area and to airborne gamma-ray surveys of two small test areas. Ground reconnaissance work and prospecting has recognized some mineralization in several different host rocks and environments. Geological environments considered by the Mission to be favourable for uranium occurrences include sandstone of Jurassic to Triassic age, tertiary sedimentary basins (northern Thailand), tertiary sedimentary basins (southern Thailand), associated with fluorite deposits, granitic rocks, black shales and graphitic slates of the Paleozoic, associated with sedimentary phosphate deposits and associated with monazite sands. It is recommended that exploration for uranium resources in Thailand should continue. Planners of future exploration programmes should take the following activities into consideration. Rapid extension of carborne surveys to cover, without excessive overburdening, all areas having sufficient road density. Airborne gamma-ray surveys should be carried out in certain selected areas. In the selection of such areas, the considerable higher cost factor attendant on this method of surveying dictates that airborne surveys should only be carried out where carborne surveys prove ineffective (lack of adequate road network.) and where the topography is sufficiently even to assure a low but safe clearance and meaningful results. In certain areas, including the Khorat Plateau and the Tertiary Basins in northern and southern Thailand, there is a need for widely spaced

  1. How Much Do Engineering Students Know about Sustainable Development? The Findings of an International Survey and Possible Implications for the Engineering Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azapagic, Adisa; Perdan, Slobodan; Shallcross, David

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the issue of engineering education for sustainable development. In an attempt to facilitate a better integration of sustainability teaching into the engineering curriculum, it seeks to provide answers to the following fundamental questions: (1) How much do engineering students know about sustainable development? (2) What are…

  2. Towards a Culturally Inclusive, Integrated, and Transdisciplinary Media Education Curriculum: Case Study of an International MA Program at the University of Lapland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasi, Paivi; Ruokamo, Heli; Maasiita, Mari

    2017-01-01

    Internationalization presents both opportunities and challenges for higher education policies and curricula, as well as for teaching and learning methods. This article describes and discusses ongoing exploration and development of the planned curriculum of the MA in Media Education at the Faculty of Education at the University of Lapland, Finland,…

  3. Culture Matters in Successful Curriculum Change: An International Study of the Influence of National and Organizational Culture Tested With Multilevel Structural Equation Modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jippes, M.; Driessen, E.W.; Broers, N.J.; Majoor, G.D.; Gijselaers, W.H.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: National culture has been shown to play a role in curriculum change in medical schools, and business literature has described a similar influence of organizational culture on change processes in organizations. This study investigated the impact of both national and organizational culture on

  4. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: United Kingdom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    Although uranium prospecting was commenced in the United Kingdom (area 244,813 km) at the end of the last century and was resumed just after the Second World War, it does not seem, for various reasons, despite the level of competence of its specialists and the level of instrumentation available, that the country has been adequately prospected for uranium. The small reserves discovered to date, some 7400t U for all the official NEA/lAEA categories, probably do not reflect the true uranium potential of the United Kingdom. However, they do indicate without doubt that the resources remaining to be discovered are so located that detection will be difficult. The most promising areas of investigation in our opinion are the Old Red Sandstones of the Devonian period on the one hand and the districts where the uraniferous black shales of the Cambro-Ordovician and Namurian have suffered perturbations which may have led to immobilization of their uranium content (in particular, granitizations). All the considerations put forward in this analysis lead us to place the United Kingdom in category 4 of the classification adopted for IUREP. (author)

  5. The Neotoma Paleoecology Database: An International Community-Curated Resource for Paleoecological and Paleoenvironmental Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. W.; Grimm, E. C.; Ashworth, A. C.; Blois, J.; Charles, D. F.; Crawford, S.; Davis, E.; Goring, S. J.; Graham, R. W.; Miller, D. A.; Smith, A. J.; Stryker, M.; Uhen, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    The Neotoma Paleoecology Database supports global change research at the intersection of geology and ecology by providing a high-quality, community-curated data repository for paleoecological data. These data are widely used to study biological responses and feedbacks to past environmental change at local to global scales. The Neotoma data model is flexible and can store multiple kinds of fossil, biogeochemical, or physical variables measured from sedimentary archives. Data additions to Neotoma are growing and include >3.5 million observations, >16,000 datasets, and >8,500 sites. Dataset types include fossil pollen, vertebrates, diatoms, ostracodes, macroinvertebrates, plant macrofossils, insects, testate amoebae, geochronological data, and the recently added organic biomarkers, stable isotopes, and specimen-level data. Neotoma data can be found and retrieved in multiple ways, including the Explorer map-based interface, a RESTful Application Programming Interface, the neotoma R package, and digital object identifiers. Neotoma has partnered with the Paleobiology Database to produce a common data portal for paleobiological data, called the Earth Life Consortium. A new embargo management is designed to allow investigators to put their data into Neotoma and then make use of Neotoma's value-added services. Neotoma's distributed scientific governance model is flexible and scalable, with many open pathways for welcoming new members, data contributors, stewards, and research communities. As the volume and variety of scientific data grow, community-curated data resources such as Neotoma have become foundational infrastructure for big data science.

  6. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: The Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The Netherlands is part of the lowlands of Western Europe formed by negative crustal movements that have been offset by sedimentation. This specific area stretching from western Belgium into north-western Germany forms part of an epicontinental area that has been relatively stable since the end of the Hercynian orogeny. In Holland the subsidence has generally been small through- out the Mesozonic and Cenozoic though interrupted by short periods of erosion and non-subsidence. Thus the general geology of the Netherlands is dominated by the fact that throughout the Tertiary and Quaternary what now comprises the Netherlands formed part of a subsiding basin. Most of the surface geology of the country is dominated by f luvio-glacial shallow marine and lacoustine deposits. Prospecting for radioactive minerals in the Netherlands has been very limited. Some work has been carried out by the Geological Survey and by private consultants but this was very preliminary. To-date no uranium reserves or resources have been identified in the Netherlands. One small uranium occurrence has been recorded in Zeeland near Walcheren where some small uranium concentrations were found in association with phosphatic nodules. Apart from very limited targets in the Cretaceous and small phosphatic uranium associations there are no apparent uranium exploration targets in the Netherlands. On this basis we would, at this time, place the uranium potential of the Netherlands in Group I of the IUREP classification

  7. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: El Salvador

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-08-01

    No information is available on past uranium exploration in El Salvador. The foetallogenic map of Central America (ICAITI, 1970) shows no uranium occurrences, and no descriptions of occurrences are available for this study. Information on current uranium exploration in El Salvador is not available. The 1922 mining code, as amended, covers all minerals, with special rules applicable to phosphates, petroleum and other hydrocarbons. The state owns all minerals, including phosphates, except for salt and other common materials. Mineral and surface rights are distinct. Both citizens and aliens may acquire mineral rights. There is a possibility of uranium potential in the clastic sediments containing interbedded volcanics, particularly where the latter are tuffaceous. These rocks occur chiefly in the north western part of the country and are of limited areal extent. The possibility of uranium occurrences associated with acid volcanics cannot be discounted, but it is difficult to evaluate rocks of this type for uranium with the present state of knowledge. Accordingly, potential resources are estimated at between 0 and 1,000 tonnes uranium

  8. Curriculum Design for Inquiry: Preservice Elementary Teachers' Mobilization and Adaptation of Science Curriculum Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Cory T.; Davis, Elizabeth A.

    2010-01-01

    Curriculum materials are crucial tools with which teachers engage students in science as inquiry. In order to use curriculum materials effectively, however, teachers must develop a robust capacity for pedagogical design, or the ability to mobilize a variety of personal and curricular resources to promote student learning. The purpose of this study…

  9. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-10-01

    The Federal Republic of Germany is situated in Central Europe. It covers an area of 250,000 square kilometres and has a population of 60 millions. The Federal Republic consists of 10 individual states. The capital of the country is Bonn. The northern and northwestern parts of the country are formed of flat lowlands, the Norddeutsche Tiefebene. Towards the south follow hilly and mountainous regions with elevations not exceeding 1000 m. In the southwestern and southeastern regions the elevations may reach 1500m in the Black Forest and Bayerischer Wald. The foreland of the Alps and the northern part of the Alps itself with elevations close to 3000 m make up the southern part of the Federal Republic. The main rivers - Rhine, Weser and Elbe - are directed towards northwest and drain the country to the North Sea. Only the southern part is drained by the southeast running river Danube. The climate is moderate, generally with frequent snow during the winter season and warm periods during the summer. The precipitation is distributed uniformly throughout the year. Due to the high industrialization a dense network of railroads, highways and motorroads exists.According to what is geologically known about the country, the chances for the discovery of large quantities of low-coast uranium resources must be considered to be limited. The potential for new discoveries of those deposits can be estimated to be around 10 000 t U. The potential for very low-grade uranium ore, such as granites, low-grade sedimentary rocks (sandstones, shales) can be estimated to range between 10,000 - 50,000 t U or possibly more taking into account very low-grade concentrations in shales. This material is not mineable under present conditions. Environmental considerations may prevent mining in the future

  10. International Uranium Resources Evaluation Project (IUREP) national favourability studies: Denmark (Greenland)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-11-01

    The report deals almost exclusively with Greenland. A major omission is any broad description of the geology of the island. One which can be recommended is 'A survey of the economic geology of Greenland' by B.J. Nielsen published by the Geological Survey of Greenland. Nielsen has also published several articles on the uranium occurrences in Greenland, some of which are noted in the references. A review of the geology is necessary in order to determine how the known occurrences fit into the pattern of uranium mineralisation in the North Atlantic regions and Canada, and to suggest further potential by analogy with these regions. Maps are significantly also lacking and three suitable examples are attached. Additions to the general map would be the areas examined and the extent of airborne radiometry. A further major omission is a definition of the meaning of potential resources, especially as 250,000 tonnes are claimed for the lujavrites at present and a future potential of 500,000 tonnes. I presume that this is the contained uranium which can be calculated as being present in the rock units, rather than any estimate of the amount of uranium which could be recovered economically. The figures for RAH and EAR at Kvanefjeld could conveniently be updated (Nov. 77) to RAH 15,750 t U, EAR 10,000 t U, TOTAL 25,750 t U. As these alkalic rocks are confined to the Garder province of the Ketilidian mobile belt some more definite indication of similar uraniferous types could be made from the excellent published maps and lead to more realistic estimates using the NURE formulae

  11. Envisioning Curriculum as Six Simultaneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Hanin; Conner, Lindsey; Mayo, Elaine

    2014-01-01

    This paper uses the discourse of complexity thinking to envision curriculum as six partial and coupled facets that exist simultaneously: curriculum as structure, curriculum as process, curriculum as content, curriculum as teaching, curriculum as learning and curriculum as activity. Such a curriculum is emergent and self-organising. It is emergent…

  12. Many worlds, one ethic: design and development of a global research ethics training curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Roberto; Borasky, David; Rice, Robert; Carayon, Florence

    2005-05-01

    The demand for basic research ethics training has grown considerably in the past few years. Research and education organizations face the challenge of providing this training with limited resources and training tools available. To meet this need, Family Health International (FHI), a U.S.-based international research organization, recently developed a Research Ethics Training Curriculum (RETC). It was designed as a practical, user-friendly tool that provides basic, up-to-date, standardized training on the ethics of human research. The curriculum can easily be adapted to different audiences and training requirements. The RETC was reviewed by a group of international experts and field tested in five countries. It is available in English, French, and Spanish as a three-ring binder and CD-ROM, as well as on the Web. It may be used as either an interactive self-study program or for group training.

  13. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  14. Distributed Problem Based Learning in a Low Resources Setting: The design and evaluation of a problem-based, web-based curriculum for training family doctors in Brazil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.C. Tomaz (Cisne)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This thesis explored the use of distributed PBL in health professional education in a low-resources context. Three central questions were studied in this thesis: (a) Is distance education an acceptable educational strategy to train family health professionals in the

  15. The African Guide: One Year Impact and Outcomes from the Implementation of a School Mental Health Literacy Curriculum Resource in Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutcher, Stanley; Wei, Yifeng; Gilberds, Heather; Brown, Adena; Ubuguyu, Omary; Njau, Tasiana; Sabuni, Norman; Magimba, Ayoub; Perkins, Kevin

    2017-01-01

    Despite the need for improving mental health literacy (MHL) among young people in low- and middle-income countries little research is available. Schools are an ideal location in which to address mental health literacy. A Canadian school-based mental health literacy resource was adapted for application in sub-Saharan Africa called the African Guide…

  16. Manpower Requirements for Pollution Control and Water Resources in Indiana and a Related Pollution Control Technology Curriculum. Manpower Report 69-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN. Office of Manpower Studies.

    The purpose of this study was to identify the trained manpower needed to cope with Indiana's mounting problems in air and water pollution control, liquid and solid waste disposal, and water supply and resources. This report contains data concerning the present employment, current job opportunities, and projected manpower needs for related…

  17. Requirements, Resource Planning and Management for Decrewing/Recrewing Scenarios of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, David A.; Brand, Susan N.; Hasbrook, Peter V.

    2013-09-01

    Following the failure of 44 Progress (44P) on launch in August 2011, and the subsequent grounding of all Russian Soyuz rocket based launches, the International Space Station (ISS) ground teams engaged in an effort to determine how long the ISS could remain crewed, what would be required to safely configure the ISS for decrewing, and what would be required to recrew the ISS upon resumption of Soyuz rocket launches if decrewing became necessary. This White Paper was written to capture the processes and lessons learned from real-time time events and to provide a reference and training document for ISS Program teams in the event decrewing of the ISS is needed.Through coordination meetings and assessments, teams identified six decrewing priorities for ground and crew operations. These priorities were integrated along with preflight priorities through the Increment re-planning process. Additionally, the teams reviewed, updated, and implemented changes to the governing documentation for the configuration of the ISS for a contingency decrewing event. Steps were taken to identify critical items for disposal prior to decrewing, as well as identifying the required items to be strategically staged or flown with the astronauts and cosmonauts who would eventually recrew the ISS.After the successful launches and dockings of both 45P and 28 Soyuz (28S), the decrewing team transitioned to finalizing and publishing the documentation for standardizing the decrewing flight rules. With the continued launching of crews and cargo to the ISS, utilization and science is again a high priority; both Increment pairs 29 and 30, and Increment 31 and 32 reaching the milestone of at least 35 hours per week average utilization.

  18. Requirements, Resource Planning, and Management for Decrewing/Recrewing Scenarios of the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bach, David A.; Brand, Susan N.; Hasbrook, Peter V.

    2013-01-01

    Following the failure of 44 Progress (44P) on launch in August 2011, and the subsequent grounding of all Russian Soyuz rocket based launches, the International Space Station (ISS) ground teams engaged in an effort to determine how long the ISS could remain crewed, what would be required to safely configure the ISS for decrewing, and what would be required to recrew the ISS upon resumption of Soyuz rocket launches if decrewing became necessary. This White Paper was written to capture the processes and lessons learned from real-time time events and to provide a reference and training document for ISS Program teams in the event decrewing of the ISS is needed. Through coordination meetings and assessments, teams identified six decrewing priorities for ground and crew operations. These priorities were integrated along with preflight priorities through the Increment re-planning process. Additionally, the teams reviewed, updated, and implemented changes to the governing documentation for the configuration of the ISS for a contingency decrewing event. Steps were taken to identify critical items for disposal prior to decrewing, as well as identifying the required items to be strategically staged or flown with the astronauts and cosmonauts who would eventually recrew the ISS. After the successful launches and dockings of both 45P and 28 Soyuz (28S), the decrewing team transitioned to finalizing and publishing the documentation for standardizing the decrewing flight rules. With the continued launching of crews and cargo to the ISS, utilization and science is again a high priority; both Increment pairs 29 and 30, and Increment 31 and 32 reaching the milestone of at least 35 hours per week average utilization.

  19. International conference on nuclear knowledge management: Strategies, information management and human resource development. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    In recent years, a number of trends have drawn attention to the need for better management of nuclear knowledge. Depending on region and country, they include an ageing workforce, declining student enrolment figures, the risk of losing nuclear knowledge accumulated in the past, the need for capacity building and transfer of knowledge and recognition of achieving added value through knowledge sharing and networking. The objective of this conference is to reach a clear and common understanding of issues related to nuclear knowledge management for sustaining knowledge and expertise in nuclear science and technology. The conference will provide a forum for professionals and decision makers in the nuclear sector, comprising industry, governments and academia as well as professionals in the knowledge management and information technology sectors; to exchange information and share experience on nuclear knowledge management, comprising strategies, information management and human resource development; to identify lessons learned and to embark on the development of new initiatives and concepts for nuclear knowledge management in IAEA Member States; for the INIS session, to discuss the present status and future developments of INIS. The conference comprised the following topical sessions: Session 1: Nuclear knowledge management - policies and strategies; Managing nuclear information - policies and strategies; Managing nuclear information - case studies; Human resources for the nuclear sector; Networking nuclear education and training. Special sessions were held on: the International Nuclear Information System (INIS); Young Generation in the Nuclear Sector; and 'Innovation and Nuclear Knowledge'.

  20. Investment choice and perceived mating intentions regulated by external resource cues and internal fluctuation in blood glucose levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Li-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Tian; Li, Shu

    2014-01-01

    We examined resource allocation priorities in the framework of an updated Maslow hierarchy of fundamental human needs. In Experiment 1, the participants in the food abundance priming condition viewing photos of high-calorie food allocated more money to savings than to spending. However, the participants preferred spending to savings under the condition of mating availability priming with romantic photographs. In Experiment 2, before and after drinking either water or a sugary beverage, fasting participants rated photos of a conversation between a man and a woman. Water drinking lowered the rating scores of mating intentions as well as blood glucose (BG) levels. The sugary drink buffered this decline in sexual perceptivity. Overall, the change in BG levels was positively associated with changes in the ratings of mating intentions but was not associated with other likelihood ratings. These results suggest that both external cues of food and mating resources and internal BG fluctuation regulate the cognitive priority of physiological needs vs. mate acquisition and retention.

  1. Investment Choice and Perceived Mating Intentions Regulated by External Resource Cues and Internal Fluctuation in Blood Glucose Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Lin eRao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined resource allocation priorities in the framework of an updated Maslow hierarchy of fundamental human needs. In Experiment 1, the participants in the food abundance priming condition viewing photos of high-calorie food allocated more money to savings than to spending. However, the participants preferred spending to savings under the condition of mating availability priming with romantic photographs. In Experiment 2, before and after drinking either water or a sugary beverage, fasting participants rated photos of a conversation between a man and a woman. Water drinking lowered the rating scores of mating intentions as well as blood glucose (BG levels. The sugary drink buffered this decline in sexual perceptivity. Overall, the change in BG levels was positively associated with changes in the ratings of mating intentions but was not associated with other likelihood ratings. These results suggest that both external cues of food and mating resources and internal BG fluctuation regulate the cognitive priority of physiological needs versus mate acquisition and retention.

  2. Student approaches for learning in medicine: what does it tell us about the informal curriculum?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianzhen; Peterson, Raymond F; Ozolins, Ieva Z

    2011-10-21

    It has long been acknowledged that medical students frequently focus their learning on that which will enable them to pass examinations, and that they use a range of study approaches and resources in preparing for their examinations. A recent qualitative study identified that in addition to the formal curriculum, students are using a range of resources and study strategies which could be attributed to the informal curriculum. What is not clearly established is the extent to which these informal learning resources and strategies are utilized by medical students. The aim of this study was to establish the extent to which students in a graduate-entry medical program use various learning approaches to assist their learning and preparation for examinations, apart from those resources offered as part of the formal curriculum. A validated survey instrument was administered to 522 medical students. Factor analysis and internal consistence, descriptive analysis and comparisons with demographic variables were completed. The factor analysis identified eight scales with acceptable levels of internal consistency with an alpha coefficient between 0.72 and 0.96. Nearly 80% of the students reported that they were overwhelmed by the amount of work that was perceived necessary to complete the formal curriculum, with 74.3% believing that the informal learning approaches helped them pass the examinations. 61.3% believed that they prepared them to be good doctors. A variety of informal learning activities utilized by students included using past student notes (85.8%) and PBL tutor guides (62.7%), and being part of self-organised study groups (62.6%), and peer-led tutorials (60.2%). Almost all students accessed the formal school resources for at least 10% of their study time. Students in the first year of the program were more likely to rely on the formal curriculum resources compared to those of Year 2 (p = 0.008). Curriculum planners should examine the level of use of informal

  3. Hispanic Folk Arts and the Environment: An Interdisciplinary Curriculum Guide. A New Mexican Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Alejandro

    This interdisciplinary, bilingual curriculum resource, contains a 29-minute videotape program, 20 colorplate posters, and a curriculum guide. The resource presents an examination of the folklife and folklore expressions of the Hispanic people of New Mexico. The focus of the curriculum is the relationship of survival-based folk activities to the…

  4. Strengthening the Impact and Value of International Marketing Curriculum outcomes: A Comparative Study of Turkish and European Business Students Perception of coursework and careers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hollensen, Svend; Gegez, Ercan; Venable, Beverly

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of business school students regarding international marketing courses and careers. A comparative study of Turkish and Northern European students' perceptions towards international marketing courses and international marketing careers...... was conducted. Results of the study indicated significant differences between Turkish and Northern European students regarding their perceptions of international marketing both in terms of course work and careers. Turkish students in this study perceived international courses as being exiting, trendy...

  5. Developing human technology curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teija Vainio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available During the past ten years expertise in human-computer interaction has shifted from humans interacting with desktop computers to individual human beings or groups of human beings interacting with embedded or mobile technology. Thus, humans are not only interacting with computers but with technology. Obviously, this shift should be reflected in how we educate human-technology interaction (HTI experts today and in the future. We tackle this educational challenge first by analysing current Master’s-level education in collaboration with two universities and second, discussing postgraduate education in the international context. As a result, we identified core studies that should be included in the HTI curriculum. Furthermore, we discuss some practical challenges and new directions for international HTI education.

  6. Engineering the curriculum: Towards an adaptive curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns-Boast, Lynette Frances

    The curriculum is one of the most important artefacts produced by higher education institutions, yet it is one of the least studied. Additionally, little is known about the decision-making of academics when designing and developing their curricula, nor how they make use of them. This research investigates how 22 Australian higher education engineering, software engineering, computer science, and information systems academics conceive of curriculum, what approaches they take when designing, and developing course and program curricula, and what use they make of the curriculum. It also considers the implications of these conceptions and behaviour upon their curricula. Data were collected through a series of one-to-one, in-depth, qualitative interviews as well as small focus group sessions and were analysed following Charmaz’ (2006) approach to grounded theory. In this thesis, I argue that the development of curricula for new higher degree programs and courses and / or the updating and innovating of an existing curriculum is a design problem. I also argue that curriculum is a complex adaptive system. Surrounding the design and development of a curriculum is a process of design that leads to the creation of a designed object - the official-curriculum. The official-curriculum provides the guiding principles for its implementation, which involves the design and development of the curriculum-in-use, its delivery, and evaluation. Data show that while the participants conceive of curriculum as a problem of design involving a design process leading to the development of the official-curriculum, surprisingly, their behaviour does not match their conceptions. Over a very short period, their behaviour leads to a process I have called curriculum drift where the official-curriculum and the curriculum-in-use drift away from each other causing the curriculum to lose its integrity. Curricular integrity is characterised through the attributes of alignment, coherence, and

  7. The Relationships between Human Fatigue and Public Health: A Brief Commentary on Selected Papers from the 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health

    OpenAIRE

    Charli Sargent; Paul Roberts; Drew Dawson; Sally Ferguson; Lynn Meuleners; Libby Brook; Gregory D. Roach

    2016-01-01

    The 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue in Transportation, Resources and Health was held in Fremantle, Western Australia in March 2015. The purpose of the conferences in this series is to provide a forum for industry representatives, regulators, and scientists to discuss recent advances in the field of fatigue research. We have produced a Special Issue of the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health based on papers from the conference that were focused on...

  8. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayley, Cheryl Ann

    Often students and educators view assessments as an obligation and finality for a unit. In the current climate of high-stakes testing and accountability, the balance of time, resources and emphasis on students' scores related to assessment have been slanted considerably toward the summative side. This tension between assessment for accountability and assessment to inform teaching strains instruction and educators' ability to use that information to design learning opportunities that help students develop deeper conceptual understanding. A substantive body of research indicates that formative and reflective assessment can significantly improve student learning. Biology Reflective Assessment Curriculum (BRAC) examines support provided for high school science students through assessment practices. This investigation incorporates the usage of reflective assessments as a guiding practice for differentiated instruction and student choice. Reflective assessment is a metacognitive strategy that promotes self-monitoring and evaluation. The goals of the curriculum are to promote self-efficacy and conceptual understanding in students learning biology through developing their metacognitive awareness. BRAC was implemented in a high school biology classroom. Data from assessments, metacognitive surveys, self-efficacy surveys, reflective journals, student work, a culminating task and field notes were used to evaluate the effectiveness of the curriculum. The results suggest that students who develop their metacognitive skills developed a deeper conceptual understanding and improved feelings of self-efficacy when they were engaged in a reflective assessment unit embedded with student choice. BRAC is a tool for teachers to use assessments to assist students in becoming metacognitive and to guide student choice in learning opportunities.

  9. Emergency medicine clerkship curriculum in a high-income developing country: methods for development and application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Arif Alper; Cakal, Elif Dilek; Abu-Zidan, Fikri M

    2018-06-07

    The published recommendations for international emergency medicine curricula cover the content, but exclude teaching and learning methods, assessment, and evaluation. We aim to provide an overview on available emergency medicine clerkship curricula and report the development and application experience of our own curriculum. Our curriculum is an outcome-based education, enriched by e-learning and various up-to-date pedagogic principles. Teaching and learning methods, assessment, and evaluation are described. The theory behind our practice in the light of recent literature is discussed aiming to help other colleagues from developing countries to have a clear map for developing and tailoring their own curricula depending on their needs. The details of our emergency medicine clerkship will serve as an example for developing and developed countries having immature undergraduate emergency medicine clerkship curricula. However, these recommendations will differ in various settings depending on available resources. The main concept of curriculum development is to create a curriculum having learning outcomes and content relevant to the local context, and then align the teaching and learning activities, assessments, and evaluations to be in harmony. This may assure favorable educational outcome even in resource limited settings.

  10. Sustainability Infused Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, D. L.

    2015-12-01

    The Independent Schools Foundation Academy (ISF) in Hong Kong established a sustainability policy in 2015, which explicitly states, "an experimentally integrated, environmentally and ethically sustainable system of science education and conservation practices based on the 2012 Jeju Declaration of the World Conservation Congress will be implemented through the school". ISF Academy is a private Chinese bilingual school in Hong Kong serving over 1500 students K-12, following the framework and curriculum of the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO). The strategy behind the implementation of this policy includes: development of a scientific sustainable curriculum that is age appropriate; establish a culture of sustainability within the ISF community and beyond to the wider HK community; install sustainable infrastructure that allows students to learn; and learn first hand sustainable living practices. It is well understood that solutions to the environmental challenges facing Hong Kong and our planet will require multiple disciplines. The current sustainability programs at ISF include: a) a whole school aerobic food waste composting system and organic farming, b) energy consumption monitoring of existing buildings, c) upcoming installation of an air pollution monitoring equipment that will correlate with the AQHI data collected by the Hong Kong government, d) a Renewable Energy Education Center (REEC) that will teach students about RE and also produce solar energy for classroom consumption, and e) student lead environmental group that manages the paper and used cooking oil recycling on campus. The Shuyuan Science and Sustainability faculty work closely with classroom teachers to ensure that the above mentioned projects are incorporated into the curriculum throughout the school. Interdisciplinary units (IDU) of study are being developed that encourage faculty and students to work across subject areas. Projects include Personal Projects, Extended Essays

  11. Mid-level healthcare personnel training: an evaluation of the revised, nationally-standardized, pre-service curriculum for clinical officers in Mozambique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl Feldacker

    Full Text Available Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG, in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009-2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH, University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1 if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2 do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum?T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the p<0.05 level. Qualitative interviews and focus groups inform interpretation.We found no significant differences in sex, marital status and age between the 112 and 189 TMGs in initial and revised curriculum, respectively. Mean scores at graduation of initial curriculum TMGs were 56.7%, 63.5%, and 49.1% on the clinical cases, knowledge test, and physical exam, respectively. Scores did not differ significantly from TMGs in the revised curriculum. Results from linear regression models find that training institute was the most significant predictor of TMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam.TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may

  12. Curriculum Redesign in Veterinary Medicine: Part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaney, Kristin P; Macik, Maria L; Turner, Jacqueline S; Korich, Jodi A; Rogers, Kenita S; Fowler, Debra; Scallan, Elizabeth M; Keefe, Lisa M

    Curricular review is considered a necessary component for growth and enhancement of academic programs and requires time, energy, creativity, and persistence from both faculty and administration. At Texas A&M College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Sciences (TAMU), the faculty and administration partnered with the university's Center for Teaching Excellence to create a faculty-driven, data-enhanced curricular redesign process. The 8-step process begins with the formation of a dedicated faculty curriculum design team to drive the redesign process and to support the college curriculum committee. The next steps include defining graduate outcomes and mapping the current curriculum to identify gaps and redundancies across the curriculum. Data are collected from internal and external stakeholders including veterinary students, faculty, alumni, and employers of graduates. Data collected through curriculum mapping and stakeholder engagement substantiate the curriculum redesign. The guidelines, supporting documents, and 8-step process developed at TAMU are provided to assist other veterinary schools in successful curricular redesign. This is the first of a two-part report that provides the background, context, and description of the process for charting the course for curricular change. The process involves defining expected learning outcomes for new graduates, conducting a curriculum mapping exercise, and collecting stakeholder data for curricular evaluation (steps 1-4). The second part of the report describes the development of rubrics that were applied to the graduate learning outcomes (steps 5-8) and engagement of faculty during the implementation phases of data-driven curriculum change.

  13. Mid-level healthcare personnel training: an evaluation of the revised, nationally-standardized, pre-service curriculum for clinical officers in Mozambique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldacker, Caryl; Chicumbe, Sergio; Dgedge, Martinho; Augusto, Gerito; Cesar, Freide; Robertson, Molly; Mbofana, Francisco; O'Malley, Gabrielle

    2014-01-01

    Mozambique suffers from a critical shortage of healthcare workers. Mid-level healthcare workers, (Tecnicos de Medicina Geral (TMG)), in Mozambique require less money and time to train than physicians. From 2009-2010, the Mozambique Ministry of Health (MoH) and the International Training and Education Center for Health (I-TECH), University of Washington, Seattle, revised the TMG curriculum. To evaluate the effect of the curriculum revision, we used mixed methods to determine: 1) if TMGs meet the MoH's basic standards of clinical competency; and 2) do scores on measurements of clinical knowledge, physical exam, and clinical case scenarios differ by curriculum? T-tests of differences in means examined differences in continuous score variables between curriculum groups. Univariate and multivariate linear regression models assess curriculum-related and demographic factors associated with assessment scores on each of the three evaluation methods at the pTMG scores on both the clinical cases and physical exam. TMGs trained in either curriculum may be inadequately prepared to provide quality care. Curriculum changes are a necessary, but insufficient, part of improving TMG knowledge and skills overall. A more comprehensive, multi-level approach to improving TMG training that includes post-graduation mentoring, strengthening the pre-service internship training, and greater resources for training institute faculty may result in improvements in TMG capacity and patient care over time.

  14. Assessing medical student knowledge and attitudes about shared decision making across the curriculum: protocol for an international online survey and stakeholder analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Marie-Anne; Yen, Renata; Barr, Paul J; Cochran, Nan; Aarts, Johanna; Légaré, France; Reed, Malcolm; James O'Malley, A; Scalia, Peter; Painchaud Guérard, Geneviève; Elwyn, Glyn

    2017-06-23

    Shared decision making (SDM) is a goal of modern medicine; however, it is not currently embedded in routine care. Barriers include clinicians’ attitudes, lack of knowledge and training and time constraints. Our goal is to support the development and delivery of a robust SDM curriculum in medical education. Our objective is to assess undergraduate medical students’ knowledge of and attitudes towards SDM in four countries. The first phase of the study involves a web-based cross-sectional survey of undergraduate medical students from all years in selected schools across the United States (US), Canada and undergraduate and graduate students in the Netherlands. In the United Kingdom (UK), the survey will be circulated to all medical schools through the UK Medical School Council. We will sample students equally in all years of training and assess attitudes towards SDM, knowledge of SDM and participation in related training. Medical students of ages 18 years and older in the four countries will be eligible. The second phase of the study will involve semistructured interviews with a subset of students from phase 1 and a convenience sample of medical school curriculum experts or stakeholders. Data will be analysed using multivariable analysis in phase 1 and thematic content analysis in phase 2. Method, data source and investigator triangulation will be performed. Online survey data will be reported according to the Checklist for Reporting the Results of Internet E-Surveys. We will use the COnsolidated criteria for REporting Qualitative research for all qualitative data. The study has been approved for dissemination in the US, the Netherlands, Canada and the UK. The study is voluntary with an informed consent process. The results will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will help inform the inclusion of SDM-specific curriculum in medical education worldwide. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article

  15. A Curriculum for Teaching Information Technology Investigative Techniques for Auditors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grover S. Kearns

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent prosecutions of highly publicized white-collar crimes combined with public outrage have resulted in heightened regulation of financial reporting and greater emphasis on systems of internal control. Because both white-collar and cybercrimes are usually perpetrated through computers, internal and external auditors’ knowledge of information technology (IT is now more vital than ever. However, preserving digital evidence and investigative techniques, which can be essential to fraud examinations, are not skills frequently taught in accounting programs and instruction in the use of computer assisted auditing tools and techniques – applications that might uncover fraudulent activity – is limited. Only a few university-level accounting classes provide instruction in IT investigative techniques. This paper explains why such a course would be beneficial to the program, the college, and the student. Additionally, it presents a proposed curriculum and suggests useful resources for the instructor and student.

  16. International use of an academic nephrology World Wide Web site: from medical information resource to business tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kevin C; Oliver, David K; Boal, Thomas R; Gadiyak, Grigorii; Boocks, Carl; Yuan, Christina M; Welch, Paul G; Poropatich, Ronald K

    2002-04-01

    Studies of the use of the World Wide Web to obtain medical knowledge have largely focused on patients. In particular, neither the international use of academic nephrology World Wide Web sites (websites) as primary information sources nor the use of search engines (and search strategies) to obtain medical information have been described. Visits ("hits") to the Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC) Nephrology Service website from April 30, 2000, to March 14, 2001, were analyzed for the location of originating source using Webtrends, and search engines (Google, Lycos, etc.) were analyzed manually for search strategies used. From April 30, 2000 to March 14, 2001, the WRAMC Nephrology Service website received 1,007,103 hits and 12,175 visits. These visits were from 33 different countries, and the most frequent regions were Western Europe, Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Pacific Islands, and South America. The most frequent organization using the site was the military Internet system, followed by America Online and automated search programs of online search engines, most commonly Google. The online lecture series was the most frequently visited section of the website. Search strategies used in search engines were extremely technical. The use of "robots" by standard Internet search engines to locate websites, which may be blocked by mandatory registration, has allowed users worldwide to access the WRAMC Nephrology Service website to answer very technical questions. This suggests that it is being used as an alternative to other primary sources of medical information and that the use of mandatory registration may hinder users from finding valuable sites. With current Internet technology, even a single service can become a worldwide information resource without sacrificing its primary customers.

  17. [Chicano Counselor Training: Curriculum and Beyond Curriculum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleman, Ramon

    The particulars of the evolved curriculum and how the training has evolved around the change-agent concept are stressed in this presentation. The measure of success achieved in attempting to influence the staff and course of studies of the regular guidance department is also emphasized. The curriculum of this counselor training institute has, from…

  18. Diabetes - resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resources - diabetes ... The following sites provide further information on diabetes: American Diabetes Association -- www.diabetes.org Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation International -- www.jdrf.org National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion -- ...

  19. Lack of agreement over the use and ownership of the internationally shared resources (such as air space, outer space and the oceans) leading to international conflict

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-01-01

    The lack of adequate institutional mechanisms to regulate, monitor and govern the use of commonly owned world resources appears to be politically destabilizing and subject to socioeconomic pressures of overpopulation, food shortages, cartelism, terrorism, and wealth distribution to developing countries. The capacity and propensity to wage war and its potential consequences are elaborated. It is shown that technology is one of the dominant factors affecting the exploration and management of commonly shared resources.

  20. TO THE TOPIC ON THE CONTRIBUTION OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS TO THE PRESERVATION OF THE BIO-RESOURCES STOCKS OF THE CASPIAN SEA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. T. Asanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The purpose of the work was to assess the activity of international organizations and determine theirs contribution to the preservation and rational use of water biological resources of the Caspian Sea and their inhabitant in the period after 1991.Results. The work presents a high management level of the state of water-biological resources during the history of the fishery basin. The management level of stocks, carried out by one country, including protection measures and artificial reproduction, allows to quickly respond to the dangers till the end of the XX century. It is shown that the activity of many out-regional and (or non-state international organizations, heightened during the last the last-day period, is limited to piece of information, comprised of data collection about basin and preparing of the base for the adoption of binding decisions in the international legal field , often there is in a negative context for the Russian Federation. It is noted the leading input of specialized state departments, institutes and organizations to the protection, reproduction, researching of water bio-resources and their inhabitant, the results of which were integrated in the frames of work of the Commission on water bio-resources of the Caspian Sea.Main conclusions. The abstract presents suggestions on activity of designated global institution taking into account the beginning of the Agreement on protection and rational use of water biological resources of the Caspian Sea. The article presents proposals for the activity of international organizations at the Caspian basin. 

  1. Resident Education Curriculum in Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology: The Short Curriculum 2.0.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Hina J; Karjane, Nicole; Teelin, Karen; Abraham, Margaret; Holt, Stephanie; Chelvakumar, Gayaythri; Dumont, Tania; Huguelet, Patricia S; Conner, Lindsay; Wheeler, Carol; Fleming, Nathalie

    2018-04-01

    The degree of exposure to pediatric and adolescent gynecology (PAG) varies across residency programs in obstetrics and gynecology and pediatrics. Nevertheless, these programs are responsible for training residents and providing opportunities within their programs to fulfill PAG learning objectives. To that end, the North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology has taken a leadership role in PAG resident education by creating and systematically updating the Short Curriculum. This curriculum outlines specific learning objectives that are central to PAG education and lists essential resources for learners' reference. This updated curriculum replaces the previous 2014 publication with added content, resources, and updated references. Additionally, attention to the needs of learners in pediatrics and adolescent medicine is given greater emphasis in this revised North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology Short Curriculum 2.0. Copyright © 2017 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Curriculum Development in Geomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Kenneth J.

    1988-01-01

    Examines the context of present curriculum development in geomorphology and the way in which it has developed in recent years. Discusses the content of the geomorphology curriculum in higher education and the consequences of curriculum development together with a consideration of future trends and their implications. (GEA)

  3. Creating a National HIV Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spach, David H; Wood, Brian R; Karpenko, Andrew; Unruh, Kenton T; Kinney, Rebecca G; Roscoe, Clay; Nelson, John

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the HIV care provider workforce has not kept pace with an expanding HIV epidemic. To effectively address this HIV workforce shortage, a multipronged approach is needed that includes high-quality, easily accessible, up-to-date HIV education for trainees and practicing providers. Toward this objective, the University of Washington, in collaboration with the AIDS Education and Training Center National Coordinating Resource Center, is developing a modular, dynamic curriculum that addresses the entire spectrum of the HIV care continuum. Herein, we outline the general principles, content, organization, and features of this federally funded National HIV Curriculum, which allows for longitudinal, active, self-directed learning, as well as real-time evaluation, tracking, and feedback at the individual and group level. The online curriculum, which is in development, will provide a free, comprehensive, interactive HIV training and resource tool that can support national efforts to expand and strengthen the United States HIV clinical care workforce. Copyright © 2016 Association of Nurses in AIDS Care. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Advanced Marketing Core Curriculum. Test Items and Assessment Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Clifton L.; And Others

    This document contains duties and tasks, multiple-choice test items, and other assessment techniques for Missouri's advanced marketing core curriculum. The core curriculum begins with a list of 13 suggested textbook resources. Next, nine duties with their associated tasks are given. Under each task appears one or more citations to appropriate…

  5. Survey and Research on Continuing Education Curriculum Construction for Primary and Secondary School Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Chao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuing education curriculum construction is the key work to complete the teachers’ continuing education system, it is also an important part of the teachers’ specialization. This study aims to master the main problems of the current primary and secondary school teachers’ continuing education curriculum construction and put forward the corresponding improvement countermeasures. Research in Yunnan province of China as a case, through the Questionnaire Method, Interview Method and Factors Analysis Method, this study make an thorough analysis on the prominent questions of the curriculum resources informationization level, curriculum structure, curriculum practicability, curriculum management and curriculum evaluation mechanism of the primary and secondary school teachers continuing education curriculums construction. Study found that the curriculum construction should also increase the intensity of curriculum resources informatization, develop diversified curriculum resources, complete six modules, carry out a standardized and scientific management and diversified curriculum evaluation mechanism. Research data and conclusions both enrich the theory of the con-struction of the teachers continuing education curriculum, and also provide a practical reference for the admin-istrative department of education and teacher training institutions to formulate measures.

  6. What are the minimum requirements for ketogenic diet services in resource-limited regions? Recommendations from the International League Against Epilepsy Task Force for Dietary Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H; Al-Macki, Nabil; Cervenka, Mackenzie C; Kim, Heung D; Liao, Jianxiang; Megaw, Katherine; Nathan, Janak K; Raimann, Ximena; Rivera, Rocio; Wiemer-Kruel, Adelheid; Williams, Emma; Zupec-Kania, Beth A

    2015-09-01

    Despite the increasing use of dietary therapies for children and adults with refractory epilepsy, the availability of these treatments in developing countries with limited resources remains suboptimal. One possible contributory factor may be the costs. There is often reported a significant perceived need for a large ketogenic diet team, supplements, laboratory studies, and follow-up visits to provide this treatment. The 2009 Epilepsia Consensus Statement described ideal requirements for a ketogenic diet center, but in some situations this is not feasible. As a result, the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) Task Force on Dietary Therapy was asked to convene and provide practical, cost-effective recommendations for new ketogenic diet centers in resource-limited regions of the world. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 International League Against Epilepsy.

  7. Digestive oncologist in the gastroenterology training curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Chris Jacob Johan; Peeters, Marc; Cats, Annemieke; Dahele, Anna; Droste, Jochim Terhaar sive

    2011-01-01

    Until the late 1980s, gastroenterology (GE) was considered a subspecialty of Internal Medicine. Today, GE also incorporates Hepatology. However, Digestive Oncology training is poorly defined in the Hepatogastroenterology (HGE)-curriculum. Therefore, a Digestive Oncology curriculum should be developed and this document might be a starting point for such a curriculum. HGE-specialists are increasingly resisting the paradigm in which they play only a diagnostic and technical role in the management of digestive tumors. We suggest minimum end-points in the standard HGE-curriculum for oncology, and recommend a focus year in the Netherlands for Digestive Oncology in the HGE-curriculum. To produce well-trained digestive oncologists, an advanced Digestive Oncology training program with specific qualifications in Digestive Oncology (2 years) has been developed. The schedule in Belgium includes a period of at least 6 mo to be spent in a medical oncology department. The goal of these programs remains the production of well-trained digestive oncologists. HGE specialists are part of the multidisciplinary oncological teams, and some have been administering chemotherapy in their countries for years. In this article, we provide a road map for the organization of a proper training in Digestive Oncology. We hope that the World Gastroenterology Organisation and other (inter)national societies will support the necessary certifications for this specific training in the HGE-curriculum. PMID:21556128

  8. Forest economics and policy in a changing environment: how market, policy, and climate transformations affect forests -- Proceedings of the 2016 Meeting of the International Society of Forest Resource Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory E. Frey; Prakash Nepal

    2016-01-01

    Economics can affect decisions about forest resource management and utilization, and in turn, the ecosystem benefits received. In a time of market, policy, and climate transformations, economic analyses are critical to help policy-makers and resource managers make appropriate decisions. At the 2016 Meeting of the International Society of Forest Resource Economics (...

  9. Environmental information systems based on enterprise resource planning. Selected papers of 3rd international symposium on logistics, Padua, Italia, 1997

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lambert, A.J.D.; Jansen-Vullers, M.H.; Splinter, M.A.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the consequences of the integration of environmental information within enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems. The state-of-the art of dedicated environmental information systems is briefly discussed. Essentials and peculiarities of environmental information are

  10. High-level radioactive waste curriculum usage, evaluation, and customer focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, G.P.

    1994-01-01

    In August 1992, the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) issued for educator use, a secondary school resource curriculum entitled open-quotes Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Wasteclose quotes. This resource curriculum was developed in response to years and thousands of teacher, student, and general public requests for facts about nuclear waste -- specifically, what the United States was doing and why. The curriculum materials when issued were the result of six years of development and testing by science and social studies teachers as well as multi-state field-testing and international critique. The curriculum is provided only to educators who specifically request it; and in the first one-and-a-half years following its availability more than 500,000 curriculum documents have been requested. Of all the requests for information received by OCRWM for any information or materials, most requests received are from educators or students. So one might consider educators and students to be open-quotes customerclose quotes, that is, as the business world might define customers: anyone expecting a product or a service from us. To determine usefulness and content for future editions of open-quotes Science, Society, and America's Nuclear Wasteclose quotes, the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has undertaken a usage evaluation to ensure that it focuses on the needs of the open-quotes customerclose quotes; that is, those who need and request it. This paper presents preliminary findings based on a formal evaluation provided to and requested from educators, unsolicited comments received from educator requesters of the material, and comments from others

  11. Investigation of School-Based Staff Development Programs as a Means to Promote International Cooperation in Curriculum Improvement Through Teacher Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, John C.

    This study explores the feasibility of utilizing school-focused staff development programs in promoting international cooperation through transferability and/or adaptation of relevant aspects of this type of inservice education by foreign countries. The objective of this presentation is to develop interest in ways in which teachers in various…

  12. Curriculum reform and the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    A neo-liberal discourse in the 2000s has been prevalent not only in international and Danish educational policy contexts, but also within a specific area, namely the education of adult immigrants in Denmark. With the adoption of a new law in 2003 high-stakes testing, standards, new market economy...... in Denmark. Based on studies of curriculum reform and research about headmasters’ and teachers’ attitudes the article addresses paradoxes rising in the wake of the neo-liberal education policy. Despite the intention of high-stakes testing to increase adult migrants’ language and employment related....... Teachers furthermore find the new working conditions stressing. It is discussed whether a neo-liberal discourse in adult teaching is ‘dumping down’ the intentions of curriculum and education reform....

  13. Curriculum reform and the market

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Karen Bjerg

    2012-01-01

    A neo-liberal discourse in the 2000s has been prevalent not only in international and Danish educational policy contexts, but also within a specific area, namely the education of adult immigrants in Denmark. With the adoption of a new law in 2003 high-stakes testing, standards, new market economy...... in Denmark. Based on studies of curriculum reform and research about headmasters’ and teachers’ attitudes the article addresses paradoxes rising in the wake of the neo-liberal education policy. Despite the intention of high-stakes testing to increase adult migrants’ language and employment related....... Teachers furthermore find the new working conditions stressing. It is discussed whether a neo-liberal discourse in adult teaching is ‘dumping down’ the intentions of curriculum and education reform....

  14. Curriculum Guide for Fashion Merchandising (Fashion Salesperson).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Margaret R.

    This curriculum guide is designed to help teachers teach a course in fashion merchandising to high school students. The guide contains eight performance-based learning modules, each consisting of one to seven units. Each unit teaches a job-relevant task, and includes performance objectives, performance guides, resources, learning activities,…

  15. Ornamental Horticulture Production Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reneau, Fred; And Others

    This curriculum guide contains guidesheets for the ornamental horticulture production occupations. Each guidesheet provides a job-relevant task; performance objective, with task, performance standard, source of standard, and conditions for performance of task; enabling objectives; a list of resources; teaching activities; a criterion-referenced…

  16. The standing of the curriculum for consumer studies as school ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... systems that consistently perform well in international benchmarking tests. The findings of the research point to the standing of the current Consumer Studies curriculum and its perceived impact in the South African context. Recommendations are made regarding the strengthening of the curriculum and its implementation.

  17. Internationalisation of the Sport Management Curriculum: Academic and Student Reflections

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Haan, Donna; Sherry, Emma

    2012-01-01

    Internationalisation of the sport industry has resulted in a demand for integration of international perspectives into the sport management higher education curriculum, to produce graduates capable of working within this rapidly developing global industry. Internationalisation of the curriculum can occur both abroad (i.e., study tour) or at home…

  18. Surviving the Implementation of a New Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Beverly; Appleton, Ken

    2015-01-01

    Queensland schools are currently teaching with the first National Curriculum for Australia. This new curriculum was one of a number of political responses to address the recurring low scores in literacy, mathematics, and science that continue to hold Australia in poor international rankings. Teachers have spent 2 years getting to know the new…

  19. Patient characteristics, resource use and outcomes associated with general internal medicine hospital care: the General Medicine Inpatient Initiative (GEMINI) retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Amol A; Guo, Yishan; Kwan, Janice L; Lapointe-Shaw, Lauren; Rawal, Shail; Tang, Terence; Weinerman, Adina; Cram, Peter; Dhalla, Irfan A; Hwang, Stephen W; Laupacis, Andreas; Mamdani, Muhammad M; Shadowitz, Steven; Upshur, Ross; Reid, Robert J; Razak, Fahad

    2017-12-11

    The precise scope of hospital care delivered under general internal medicine services remains poorly quantified. The purpose of this study was to describe the demographic characteristics, medical conditions, health outcomes and resource use of patients admitted to general internal medicine at 7 hospital sites in the Greater Toronto Area. This was a retrospective cohort study involving all patients who were admitted to or discharged from general internal medicine at the study sites between Apr. 1, 2010, and Mar. 31, 2015. Clinical data from hospital electronic information systems were linked to administrative data from each hospital. We examined trends in resource use and patient characteristics over the study period. There were 136 208 admissions to general internal medicine involving 88 121 unique patients over the study period. General internal medicine admissions accounted for 38.8% of all admissions from the emergency department and 23.7% of all hospital bed-days. Over the study period, the number of admissions to general internal medicine increased by 32.4%; there was no meaningful change in the median length of stay or cost per hospital stay. The median patient age was 73 (interquartile range [IQR] 57-84) years, and the median number of coexisting conditions was 6 (IQR 3-9). The median acute length of stay was 4.6 (IQR 2.5-8.6) days, and the median total cost per hospital stay was $5850 (IQR $3915-$10 061). Patients received at least 1 computed tomography scan in 52.2% of admissions. The most common primary discharge diagnoses were pneumonia (5.0% of admissions), heart failure (4.7%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (4.1%), urinary tract infection (4.0%) and stroke (3.6%). Patients admitted to general internal medicine services represent a large, heterogeneous, resource-intensive and growing population. Understanding and improving general internal medicine care is essential to promote a high-quality, sustainable health care system. Copyright 2017

  20. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  1. What stage are low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) at with patient safety curriculum implementation and what are the barriers to implementation? A two-stage cross-sectional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Liane R; Dhingra-Kumar, Neelam; Donaldson, Liam J

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The improvement of safety in healthcare worldwide depends in part on the knowledge, skills and attitudes of staff providing care. Greater patient safety content in health professional education and training programmes has been advocated internationally. While WHO Patient Safety Curriculum Guides (for Medical Schools and Multi-Professional Curricula) have been widely disseminated in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs) over the last several years, little is known about patient safety curriculum implementation beyond high-income countries. The present study examines patient safety curriculum implementation in LMICs. Methods Two cross-sectional surveys were carried out. First, 88 technical officers in Ministries of Health and WHO country offices were surveyed to identify the pattern of patient safety curricula at country level. A second survey followed that gathered information from 71 people in a position to provide institution-level perspectives on patient safety curriculum implementation. Results The majority, 69% (30/44), of the countries were either considering whether to implement a patient safety curriculum or actively planning, rather than actually implementing, or embedding one. Most organisations recognised the need for patient safety education and training and felt a safety curriculum was compatible with the values of their organisation; however, important faculty-level barriers to patient safety curriculum implementation were identified. Key structural markers, such as dedicated financial resources and relevant assessment tools to evaluate trainees’ patient safety knowledge and skills, were in place in fewer than half of organisations studied. Conclusions Greater attention to patient safety curriculum implementation is needed. The barriers to patient safety curriculum implementation we identified in LMICs are not unique to these regions. We propose a framework to act as a global standard for patient safety curriculum implementation

  2. Examining the Perceptions of Curriculum Leaders on Primary School Reform: A Case Study of Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Alan C. K.; Yuen, Timothy W. W.

    2017-01-01

    In an effort to enhance the quality of teachers and teaching, and to lead internal curriculum development in primary schools, the Hong Kong Education Bureau created a new curriculum leader post entitled primary school master/mistress (curriculum development) or PSMCD for short. The main purpose of the study was to examine the perceptions of these…

  3. Sustainable development strategies in international business: The case of resource-based firms in the Andean Region of Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Percy Luis

    This research possesses four relevant characteristics with a potential to contribute to the international business literature. First, it was conducted in three Latin American countries: Peru, Chile and Ecuador (emerging economies) where little research in international business, in comparison with other regions, has been conducted. Second, it was conducted in two industries: mining and oil and gas, which have different ways of organizing and operating in comparison with production and manufacturing industries. Third, it was conducted in remote and sensitive environmental and social areas, where stakeholders and their concerns are different from those of production and manufacturing industries. And fourth, it integrates sustainable development strategies into the field of international business. This thesis provides an in-depth discussion of three case studies and presents conclusions and implications for theory development, managers, and policy makers. The purpose of this research is to contribute to mainstream of the literature on international business by describing and analyzing the incorporation of sustainable development into management strategies.

  4. Surviving the Implementation of a New Science Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Beverly; Appleton, Ken

    2015-12-01

    Queensland schools are currently teaching with the first National Curriculum for Australia. This new curriculum was one of a number of political responses to address the recurring low scores in literacy, mathematics, and science that continue to hold Australia in poor international rankings. Teachers have spent 2 years getting to know the new science curriculum through meetings, training, and exploring the new Australian curriculum documents. This article examines the support and preparation for implementation provided in two regional schools, with a closer look at six specific teachers and their science teaching practices as they attempted to implement the new science curriculum. The use of a survey, field observations, and interviews revealed the schools' preparation practices and the teachers' practices, including the support provided to implement the new science curriculum. A description and analysis of school support and preparation as well as teachers' views of their experiences implementing the new science curriculum reveal both achievements and shortcomings. Problematic issues for the two schools and teachers include time to read and comprehend the curriculum documents and content expectations as well as time to train and change the current processes effectively. The case teachers' experiences reveal implications for the successful and effective implementation of new curriculum and curriculum reform.

  5. The International News Journal, Inc. Teacher Resource Manual [and] Student Activities. Second Edition. Exploring the Marketplace Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, Robert; McGuire, Margit; Reinke, Diane Wilcox

    This teacher resource manual and student activities economics education unit provides students with the opportunity to use economic content and related skills as they learn about the U.S. economic system and its relationship to the world economy. The lessons link to economic content and other subject areas traditionally taught in grades 5, 6, and…

  6. Resources for GCSE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderton, Alain

    1987-01-01

    Argues that new resources are needed to help teachers prepare students for the new General Certificate in Secondary Education (GCSE) examination. Compares previous examinations with new examinations to illustrate the problem. Presents textbooks, workbooks, computer programs, and other curriculum materials to demonstrate the gap between resources…

  7. The curriculum ideology of the South African secondary school Biology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nelson Mandela stated that education is the tool that can be used to change the world. ... the overarching objective of the South African school's curriculum, with specific reference to ..... International journal of historical learning, teaching and.

  8. Leading curriculum change: Reflections on how Abakhwezeli stoked ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Delport, Aletta (Prof) (Summerstrand Campus South)

    2016-11-24

    Nov 24, 2016 ... School for Initial Teacher Education, Faculty of Education, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University ... 'Abakhwezeli', in stoking the fires of curriculum change in the Nelson Mandela ...... NY: Continuum International Publishing.

  9. the development of a new chemistry curriculum in the netherlands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IICBA01

    teaching in the upper level of secondary school is given. [AJCE 4(2), Special ... For all subjects this lead to major changes in the curriculum. Most specifically in ..... International Conference on Chemical Education, Mauritius. 12. Graaf, A. v.

  10. Methods of Assessing the Resource of the Crankshaft Bearing of Internal Combustion Engine Based on the Calculation of Hydro-Mechanical Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.G. Levanov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to develop a tool to assess the theoretical resource crankshaft bearings of internal combustion engine. As a result, two methods for evaluating of the theoretical resource crankshaft bearings have been developed on the basis of the calculation of hydro-mechanical characteristics of bearings: the minimum film thickness and the extent of the zone of boundary friction. Under the theoretical resource of crankshaft bearing it is understood that during his work an increase of the radial clearance in the area of potential exposure (boundary friction is over the limit. The first technique is based on the bearing life dependence on the ratio between the minimum film thickness and its maximum allowable value. The second technique is based on the molecular-mechanical theory of friction and wear fatigue theory. Thus, these techniques may be used to estimate the resource of the crankshaft journal bearings at the design and finishing stage. However, some parameters of mathematical models have to be determined from the experimental test. The use of molecular-mechanical theory of friction and wear fatigue theory takes into account the influence of the physical and mechanical properties of a bearing material on his life.

  11. A Resource Guide for Signs of Sexual Assault. A Supplement to: Preventing Sexual Abuse of Persons with Disabilities: A Curriculum for Hearing Impaired, Physically Disabled, Blind and Mentally Retarded Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Bonnie

    Part of a curriculum unit on preventing sexual abuse of persons with disabilities, the manual is intended to help instructors present the material to hearing impaired students. Illustrations of sign language are presented for such terms as sexual contact, sexual assault, incest, same sex assault (man/woman), rape (acquaintance/marital), exposer,…

  12. Internal resources as applied to differential competitive adaptation process in strategic business sector hotels in Curitiba: comparative study of cases

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Antônio João Hocayen da; Teixeira, Rivanda Meira

    2010-01-01

    Curitiba’s hotel sector has become very attractive to both national and international hotel chains due to the settling of several car-makers in the late 90’s, once accomodation was widely on demand. Therefore organizations part of the hotel industry were inserted in a highly competitive environment in which small, medium and large traditional companies in the hotel business as well as national and international hotel chains have settled in Curitiba for the past few years are all part of. Thus...

  13. Contextualising Curriculum Design and Recontextualising Its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    by the SADC Regional Environmental Education Programme (REEP), with ... ideological, to the curriculum, to the teaching and classroom levels; or from the transnational ... trajectory starts from the contextual profile and ends at the end of the first series of one-week ..... International training programme for higher education.

  14. Business Principles and Management. Curriculum Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemson Univ., SC. Vocational Education Media Center.

    This senior high school curriculum guide offers a general overview of the American business system and a study of various forms of business ownership, internal organization and management functions of business, and the financing of business. Ten areas are explored in the course: (1) capitalism; (2) money, credit, and banking; (3) government and…

  15. Limited and time-delayed internal resource allocation generates oscillations and chaos in the dynamics of citrus crops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, Xujun; Sakai, Kenshi

    2013-01-01

    Alternate bearing or masting is a yield variability phenomenon in perennial crops. The complex dynamics in this phenomenon have stimulated much ecological research. Motivated by data from an eight-year experiment with forty-eight individual trees, we explored the mechanism inherent to these dynamics in Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.). By integrating high-resolution imaging technology, we found that the canopy structure and reproduction output of individual citrus crops are mutually dependent on each other. Furthermore, it was revealed that the mature leaves in early season contribute their energy to the fruiting of the current growing season, whereas the younger leaves show a delayed contribution to the next growing season. We thus hypothesized that the annual yield variability might be caused by the limited and time-delayed resource allocation in individual plants. A novel lattice model based on this hypothesis demonstrates that this pattern of resource allocation will generate oscillations and chaos in citrus yield

  16. From Conflict to Co-co-operation in International Water Resources Management: Challenges and Opportunities in Sub-Saharan Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onyango, O.W

    2006-01-01

    Water and life are interdependent and inseparable. In order to achieve effective water management strategies ought to be premised on good understanding of ecosystems within the environment. Fresh water resources experience a lot of stress due to high competition which results in local, national and regional conflicts due to lack of co-ordinated water management system. The fresh water basins comprise nearly half of the territory and population of the world. In 2002, the World Summit on Sustainable development held in Johannesburg pointed out that, due to looming water shortage other sectors of life like health, human rights, environment, welfare politics and culture. On the other hand, due to diminishing trans-boundary water resources and their variable occurrence in space and time, there is a likelihood of inter-state tensions with possibilities of armed conflict. The paper therefore recommended for integrated, cooperative and culturally adapted solutions which take into account the diversity of human interactions with water

  17. Limited and time-delayed internal resource allocation generates oscillations and chaos in the dynamics of citrus crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Xujun, E-mail: yexujun@cc.hirosaki-u.ac.jp [College of Biosystems Engineering and Food Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Hirosaki University, Aomori 036-8561 (Japan); Sakai, Kenshi, E-mail: ken@cc.tuat.ac.jp [Environmental and Agricultural Engineering Department, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Tokyo 183-8509 (Japan)

    2013-12-15

    Alternate bearing or masting is a yield variability phenomenon in perennial crops. The complex dynamics in this phenomenon have stimulated much ecological research. Motivated by data from an eight-year experiment with forty-eight individual trees, we explored the mechanism inherent to these dynamics in Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu Marc.). By integrating high-resolution imaging technology, we found that the canopy structure and reproduction output of individual citrus crops are mutually dependent on each other. Furthermore, it was revealed that the mature leaves in early season contribute their energy to the fruiting of the current growing season, whereas the younger leaves show a delayed contribution to the next growing season. We thus hypothesized that the annual yield variability might be caused by the limited and time-delayed resource allocation in individual plants. A novel lattice model based on this hypothesis demonstrates that this pattern of resource allocation will generate oscillations and chaos in citrus yield.

  18. 6. Strategies for Modelling the Educational Process from the Perspective of Internal Resources Stimulation of the Child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zolotariov Elena

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article reflects an attempt to rethink the methodology of organizing the pedagogical process, oriented towards the development of “the humane in the person”, shifting its focus onto stimulating children’s inner resources. The emphasis is shifted from the teaching, learning and assessment processes, focused on research of the surrounding reality towards the exploitation of the child's innate potentials, the ability to know his inner world.

  19. Adaptation of water resources systems to changing society and environment: a statement by the International Association of Hydrological Sciences

    OpenAIRE

    Serena Ceola; Alberto Montanari; Tobias Krueger; Fiona Dyer; H. Kreibich; Ida Westerberg; Gemma Carr; Christophe Cudennec; Amin Elshorbagy; Hubert Savenije; Pieter van der Zaag; Dan Rosbjerg; Hafzullah Aksoy; Francesco Viola; Guido Petrucci

    2016-01-01

    We explore how to address the challenges of adaptation of water resources systems under changing conditions by supporting flexible, resilient and low-regret solutions, coupled with on-going monitoring and evaluation. This will require improved understanding of the linkages between biophysical and social aspects in order to better anticipate the possible future co-evolution of water systems and society. We also present a call to enhance the dialogue and foster the actions of governments, the i...

  20. Opening remarks at the International Conference on Human Resource Development for Introducing and Expanding Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, D.E.

    2010-03-01

    The topic of this conference - human resources development and the expansion of nuclear power - is about the commitment and investment in people. The importance of this 'human side' of modern technology is sometimes forgotten or assumed to develop on its own once basic educational programs and institutions are put in place. In my view, the development and maintenance of a skilled national workforce is critical to the development of a stable, successful national nuclear power program

  1. Interdisciplinary Climate Change Curriculum Materials based on the Next Generation Science Standards and The Earth Charter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A.; Robertson, W. H.

    2013-12-01

    In the 2012, the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academies' reported that one of the major issues associated with the development of climate change curriculum was the lack of interdisciplinary materials that also promoted a correlation between science standards and content. Therefore, in order to respond to this need, our group has developed an interdisciplinary climate change curriculum that has had as its fundamental basis the alignment with the guidelines presented by the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and the ones presented by the international document entitled The Earth Charter. In this regards, while the alignment with NGSS disciplinary core ideas, cross-concepts and students' expectations intended to fulfill the need for the development of climate change curriculum activities that were directly associated with the appropriate set of NGSS guidelines, the alignment with The Earth Charter document intended to reinforce the need the for the integration of sociological, philosophical and intercultural analysis of the theme 'climate change'. Additionally, our curriculum was also developed as part of a collaborative project between climate scientists and engineers, who are responsible for the development of a Regional Arctic Simulation Model (RASM). Hence, another important curriculum constituent was the feedback, suggestions and reviews provided by these professionals, who have also contributed to these pedagogical materials' scientific accuracy by facilitating the integration of datasets and visualizations developed by RASM. Furthermore, our group has developed a climate change curriculum for two types of audience: high school and early undergraduate students. Each curriculum unit is divided into modules and each module contains a set of lesson plans. The topics selected to compose each unit and module were designated according to the surveys conducted with scientists and engineers involved with the development of the climate change

  2. Effectively Adapting the Sport Management Curricula: Harnessing Internal and External Resources to Address Industry-Specific Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braunstein-Minkove, Jessica R.; DeLuca, Jaime R.

    2015-01-01

    Academic programs must constantly evolve in order to ensure that students are best prepared for success in internships and subsequent post-collegiate endeavors within the dynamic, rapidly changing sport industry. Based upon qualitative research, this work assesses and recommends areas of development in sport management curricula using internal and…

  3. The Role of a Short-Term Education Programme in International Nuclear Human Resource Development and Knowledge Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, K.; Uesaka, M.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: The Nuclear Energy Management School is proposed as a good tool to structure the experiences of industries. The importance of a short-term international education programme for gathering knowledge regarding nuclear embarkation projects is discussed in this paper. The results of evaluating education efficiency from 2013 to 2016 will also be introduced in this presentation (or poster). (author

  4. Electromechanical Engineering Technology Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgia State Univ., Atlanta. Dept. of Vocational and Career Development.

    This guide offers information and procedures necessary to train electromechanical engineering technicians. Discussed first are the rationale and objectives of the curriculum. The occupational field of electromechanical engineering technology is described. Next, a curriculum model is set forth that contains information on the standard…

  5. Mountain-Plains Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mountain-Plains Education and Economic Development Program, Inc., Glasgow AFB, MT.

    The document lists the Mountain-Plains curriculum by job title (where applicable), including support courses. The curriculum areas covered are mathematics skills, communication skills, office education, lodging services, food services, marketing and distribution, welding support, automotive, small engines, career guidance, World of Work, health…

  6. Solar Technology Curriculum, 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward County Community Coll., Liberal, KS.

    This curriculum guide contains lecture outlines and handouts for training solar technicians in the installation, maintenance, and repair of solar energy hot water and space heating systems. The curriculum consists of four modular units developed to provide a model through which community colleges and area vocational/technical schools can respond…

  7. The Galapagos Jason Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Teachers Association, Arlington, VA.

    The JASON Curriculum Project materials are designed to prepare teachers and students for an exploration around the Galapagos Islands via satellite transmission of live images and sound. This curriculum package contains five units, 25 lesson plans, and over 50 activities, along with teacher background material, student worksheets and readings, a…

  8. The International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM): The United States' Contribution to UNESCO IHP's Global Network of Water Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a "category 2 center"—i.e., one that is closely affiliated with UNESCO, but not legally part of UNESCO—dates back many decades. However, only in the last decade has the concept been fully developed. Within UNESCO, the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) has led the way in creating a network of regional and global water-related centers.ICIWaRM—the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management—is one member of this network. Approved by UNESCO's General Conference, the center has been operating since 2009. It was designed to fill a niche in the system for a center that was backed by an institution with on-the-ground water management experience, but that also had strong connections to academia, NGOs and other governmental agencies. Thus, ICIWaRM is hosted by the US Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources (IWR), but established with an internal network of partner institutions. Three main factors have contributed to any success that ICIWaRM has achieved in its global work: A focus on practical science and technology which can be readily transferred. This includes the Corps' own methodologies and models for planning and water management, and those of our university and government partners. Collaboration with other UNESCO Centers on joint applied research, capacity-building and training. A network of centers needs to function as a network, and ICIWaRM has worked together with UNESCO-affiliated centers in Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, the Dominican Republic, Japan, China, and elsewhere. Partnering with and supporting existing UNESCO-IHP programs. ICIWaRM serves as the Global Technical Secretariat for IHP's Global Network on Water and Development Information in Arid Lands (G-WADI). In addition to directly supporting IHP, work through G-WADI helps the center to frame, prioritize and integrate its activities. With the recent release of the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is clear that

  9. Reform in Turkish Elementary Mathematics Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    BABADOĞAN, Cem; OLKUN, Sinan

    2006-01-01

    Disappointed from such major international studies as TIMSS, PISA, PIRLS andsome internal indicators such as national university entrance examination, the Turkish Ministry ofNational Education initiated a massive reform movement in education. These reforms includedeveloping new curricula for both elementary and secondary education and developing teachercompetencies. The purpose of this paper is to present an evaluation of the elementary schoolmathematics curriculum, which is a part of the ref...

  10. International Programme for Resource Use in Critical Care (IPOC)--a methodology and initial results of cost and provision in four European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrini, D; Sheppard, L; Mills, G H; Jacobs, P; Rapoport, J; Bourne, R S; Guidet, B; Csomos, A; Prien, T; Anderson, G; Edbrooke, D L

    2006-01-01

    A standardized top-down costing method is not currently available internationally. An internally validated method developed in the UK was modified for use in critical care in different countries. Costs could then be compared using the World Health Organization's Purchasing Power Parities (WHO PPPs). This was an observational, retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentre study set in four European countries: France, UK, Germany and Hungary. A total of 329 adult intensive care units (ICUs) participated in the study. The costs are reported in international dollars ($) derived from the WHO PPP programme. The results show significant differences in resource use and costs of ICUs over the four countries. On the basis of the sum of the means for the major components, the average cost per patient day in UK hospitals was $1512, in French hospitals $934, in German hospitals $726 and in Hungarian hospitals $280. The reasons for such differences are poorly understood but warrant further investigation. This information will allow us to better adjust our measures of international ICU costs.

  11. 17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

    CERN Multimedia

    Mona Schweizer

    2008-01-01

    17 April 2008 - Head of Internal Audit Network meeting visiting the ATLAS experimental area with CERN ATLAS Team Leader P. Fassnacht, ATLAS Technical Coordinator M. Nessi and ATLAS Resources Manager M. Nordberg.

  12. Trade, traffic and management of botanical resources in agriculture: review lecture presented at the international symposium on sustainable use of plant biodiversity to promote new opportunities for horticultural production development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogers, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    The maintenance of biological diversity is of importance for various reasons (genetic resources, ecosystem resilience, source of income, cultural heritage). The international trade in plants from wild source may have negative consequences for biodiversity (habitat alteration, introduction of

  13. 'Soft' human resource management in small international joint ventures:Cases from the Danish-Vietnamese context

    OpenAIRE

    Dao, Li

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the value creation aspects of HRM in international joint ventures of a relatively small size and their implications for strategic management. We assume that HRM in this context is rather a process than a function, and a ‘soft’ – humanistic rather than a ‘hard’, instrumentalist managerial approach. Using cases from a modest sample of Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, we propose that HRM is significantly associated with creating a healthy and adaptive environment for mutua...

  14. Teaching Geoethics Across the Geoscience Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogk, David; Bruckner, Monica; Kieffer, Susan; Geissman, John; Reidy, Michael; Taylor, Shaun; Vallero, Daniel

    2015-04-01

    Training in geoethics is an important part of pre-professional development of geoscientists. Professional societies, governmental agencies, and employers of the geoscience workforce increasingly expect that students have had some training in ethics to guide their professional lives, and the public demands that scientists abide by the highest standards of ethical conduct. The nature of the geosciences exposes the profession to ethical issues that derive from our work in a complex, dynamic Earth system with an incomplete geologic record and a high degree of uncertainty and ambiguity in our findings. The geosciences also address topics such as geohazards and resource development that have ethical dimensions that impact on the health, security, public policies, and economic well-being of society. However, there is currently no formal course of study to integrate geoethics into the geoscience curriculum and few faculty have the requisite training to effectively teach about ethics in their classes, or even informally in mentoring their research students. To address this need, an NSF-funded workshop was convened to explore how ethics education can be incorporated into the geoscience curriculum. The workshop addressed topics such as where and how should geoethics be taught in a range of courses including introductory courses for non-majors, as embedded modules in existing geoscience courses, or as a dedicated course for majors on geoethics; what are the best pedagogic practices in teaching ethics, including lessons learned from cognate disciplines (philosophy, biology, engineering); what are the goals for teaching geoethics, and what assessments can be used to demonstrate mastery of ethical principles; what resources currently exist to support teaching geoethics, and what new resources are needed? The workshop also explored four distinct but related aspects of geoethics: 1) Geoethics and self: what are the internal attributes of a geoscientist that establish the ethical

  15. IWRM: for sustainable use of water; 50 years of international experience with the concept of integrated water resources management; background document to the FAO/Netherlands conference on water for food an ecosystems, The Hague, 31 January - 5 February 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, W.B.; Schrevel, A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the concept was explained in detail at the Dublin Conference in 1992 (International Conference on Water and the Environment: Development Issues for the 21st Century), Integrated Water Resources Management has been at the core of thinking on water resource development. Today, integrated water

  16. Medical Education and Curriculum Reform: Putting Reform Proposals in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kam Yin Chan, MD, MB.BS, MHA

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to elaborate criteria by which the principles of curriculum reform can be judged. To this end, the paper presents an overview of standard critiques of medical education and examines the ways medical curriculum reforms have responded to these critiques. The paper then sets out our assessment of these curriculum reforms along three parameters: pedagogy, educational context, and knowledge status. Following on from this evaluation of recent curriculum reforms, the paper puts forward four criteria with which to gauge the adequacy medical curriculum reform. These criteria enable us to question the extent to which new curricula incorporate methods and approaches for ensuring that its substance: overcomes the traditional opposition between clinical and resource dimensions of care; emphasizes that the clinical work needs to be systematized in so far as that it feasible; promotes multi-disciplinary team work, and balances clinical autonomy with accountability to non-clinical stakeholders.

  17. Thematic curriculum approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šefer Jasmina P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Thematic curriculum combines disciplines and media. The process is problem-oriented and the scenario most often follows the logic of exploring or storytelling. Those two approaches to teaching are appropriate because they fit into interdisciplinary and creative open-ended problem solving through play, as insisted upon by thematic curriculum. The matrix, where seven types of abilities intersect with five types of problems according to their degree of openness, defines well the outcomes of teaching. However, it did not prove to be suitable for planning the majority of activities in thematic curriculum, for it follows with difficulty the process of exploring or storytelling i.e. it disrupts the subject matter coherence of thematic curriculum. Therefore, it is suggested that matrix should be used for disciplinary curriculum planning but for that of thematic curriculum only in exclusive cases. The matrix should be used primarily as a framework for evaluating the distribution of various types of abilities and problem situations in teaching. The logic of diverse approaches to teaching reflects itself in the manner of planning and organizing the teaching process. Conceptual, visual-graphic, structural and other aids employed during educational process planning should suit the nature of the approach chosen. On the basis of qualitative investigations of educational process, in the present paper considerations are given to various approaches to teaching development of various drafts for the planning of teaching, and recognition of the logic of storytelling and exploring in thematic curriculum.

  18. International Neurocognitive Normative Study: Neurocognitive Comparison Data in Diverse Resource Limited Settings: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5271

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, K; Jiang, H; Evans, SR; Marra, CM; Berzins, B; Hakim, J; Sacktor, N; Silva, M Tulius; Campbell, TB; Nair, A; Schouten, J; Kumwenda, J; Supparatpinyo, K; Tripathy, S.; Kumarasamy, N; La Rosa, A; Montano, S; Mwafongo, A; Firnhaber, C; Sanne, I; Naini, L.; Amod, F; Walawander, A

    2016-01-01

    Summary ACTG A5271 collected neurocognitive normative comparison test data in 2400 at-risk HIV seronegative participants from Brazil, India, Malawi, Peru, South Africa, Thailand and Zimbabwe. The participants were enrolled in strata by site (10 levels), age (2 levels), education (2 levels), and gender (2 levels). These data provide necessary normative data infrastructure for future clinical research and care in these diverse resource limited settings. Infrastructure for conducting neurological research in resource limited settings (RLS) is limited. The lack of neurological and neuropsychological (NP) assessment, and normative data needed for clinical interpretation impede research and clinical care. Here we report on ACTG 5271, which provided neurological training of clinical site personnel, and collected neurocognitive normative comparison data in diverse settings. At 10 sites in seven RLS countries, we provided training for NP assessments. We collected normative comparison data on HIV- participants from Brazil (n=240), India (n=480), Malawi (n=481), Peru (n=239), South Africa (480), Thailand (n=240) and Zimbabwe (n=240). Participants had a negative HIV test within 30 days before standardized NP exams were administered at baseline, and 770 at six-months. Participants were enrolled in 8 strata, gender (female and male), education (<10 years and ≥ 10 years), and age (<35 years and ≥35 years). Of 2400 enrolled, 770 completed the six-month follow up. As expected, significant between-country differences were evident in all the neurocognitive test scores (p<.0001). There was variation between the age, gender and education strata on the neurocognitive tests. Age and education were important variables for all tests; older participants had poorer performance and those with higher education had better performance. Women had better performance on verbal learning/memory and speed of processing tests, while men performed better on motor tests. This study provides the

  19. Italy-Japan international project-based learning for developing human resources using design of welfare equipment as a subject.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafusa, A; Komeda, T; Ito, K; Zobel, P Beomonte

    2015-08-01

    Project-based learning (PBL) is effective for developing human resources of young students. The design of welfare equipment, such as wheelchairs and gait assistive devices, is taken as the subject in this study because these devices must be fit to their environment, users, and method of use; students must consider the circumstances of each country concerned. The program commenced in 2012 at L'Aquila, Italy, and the Shibaura Institute of Technology, Japan and has been continuing for three years. Students were divided into four groups and discussions were held on how to adapt the equipment to the user and environment. After discussion, they designed and simulated a model of the equipment using CAD. Finally, they presented their designs to each other. Through the program, students had fruitful discussions, exchanged ideas from different cultures, and learned from each other. Furthermore, friendships among the students were nurtured. It is believed that the objective of the program was satisfactorily accomplished.

  20. Engaging Stakeholders in Curriculum Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Jo Nell

    2010-01-01

    This article investigates the importance of parent and community engagement in curriculum development, along with curriculum leadership, engaging stakeholders, and the importance of curriculum. Parent and community member engagement is examined in light of curriculum committee participation as reported by Missouri superintendents. Survey responses…

  1. Resource Mobilization

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    constitute endorsement of the product and is given only for information. ..... point where they could significantly impact an organization's financial viability. This alternative ... putting in place internal systems and processes that enable the resource .... control over the incorporation of non-profit organizations. ..... Accounting.

  2. Global Health Security Demands a Strong International Health Regulations Treaty and Leadership From a Highly Resourced World Health Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkle, Frederick M

    2015-10-01

    If the Ebola tragedy of West Africa has taught us anything, it should be that the 2005 International Health Regulations (IHR) Treaty, which gave unprecedented authority to the World Health Organization (WHO) to provide global public health security during public health emergencies of international concern, has fallen severely short of its original goal. After encouraging successes with the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) pandemic, the intent of the legally binding Treaty to improve the capacity of all countries to detect, assess, notify, and respond to public health threats has shamefully lapsed. Despite the granting of 2-year extensions in 2012 to countries to meet core surveillance and response requirements, less than 20% of countries have complied. Today it is not realistic to expect that these gaps will be solved or narrowed in the foreseeable future by the IHR or the WHO alone under current provisions. The unfortunate failures that culminated in an inadequate response to the Ebola epidemic in West Africa are multifactorial, including funding, staffing, and poor leadership decisions, but all are reversible. A rush by the Global Health Security Agenda partners to fill critical gaps in administrative and operational areas has been crucial in the short term, but questions remain as to the real priorities of the G20 as time elapses and critical gaps in public health protections and infrastructure take precedence over the economic and security needs of the developed world. The response from the Global Outbreak Alert and Response Network and foreign medical teams to Ebola proved indispensable to global health security, but both deserve stronger strategic capacity support and institutional status under the WHO leadership granted by the IHR Treaty. Treaties are the most successful means the world has in preventing, preparing for, and controlling epidemics in an increasingly globalized world. Other options are not sustainable. Given the gravity of ongoing

  3. Adopting digital skills in an international project in teacher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Nordseth

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available  The aim of the CoTech project was to develop a concept of using ICT tools for international cooperation in teacher education, and the output result was to develop and test a pilot project for an online course. Our pilot shows that it is possible to implement an integrated curriculum using a variety of ICT tools for the development and deployment of video-based learning resources, as well as collaboration between international groups of students in teacher education without these students meeting physically or using coeducation. At each location, it is important to provide training in the appropriate ICT tools to be used.

  4. Blueprint for an Undergraduate Primary Care Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Sara B; Demasi, Monica; Farren, Erin; Frankl, Susan; Gottlieb, Barbara; Hoy, Jessica; Johnson, Amanda; Kasper, Jill; Lee, Patrick; McCarthy, Claire; Miller, Kathe; Morris, Juliana; O'Hare, Kitty; Rosales, Rachael; Simmons, Leigh; Smith, Benjamin; Treadway, Katherine; Goodell, Kristen; Ogur, Barbara

    2016-12-01

    In light of the increasing demand for primary care services and the changing scope of health care, it is important to consider how the principles of primary care are taught in medical school. While the majority of schools have increased students' exposure to primary care, they have not developed a standardized primary care curriculum for undergraduate medical education. In 2013, the authors convened a group of educators from primary care internal medicine, pediatrics, family medicine, and medicine-pediatrics, as well as five medical students to create a blueprint for a primary care curriculum that could be integrated into a longitudinal primary care experience spanning undergraduate medical education and delivered to all students regardless of their eventual career choice.The authors organized this blueprint into three domains: care management, specific areas of content expertise, and understanding the role of primary care in the health care system. Within each domain, they described specific curriculum content, including longitudinality, generalism, central responsibility for managing care, therapeutic alliance/communication, approach to acute and chronic care, wellness and prevention, mental and behavioral health, systems improvement, interprofessional training, and population health, as well as competencies that all medical students should attain by graduation.The proposed curriculum incorporates important core features of doctoring, which are often affirmed by all disciplines but owned by none. The authors argue that primary care educators are natural stewards of this curriculum content and can ensure that it complements and strengthens all aspects of undergraduate medical education.

  5. The double meaning of control: three-way interactions between internal resources, job control, and stressors at work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Laurenz L; Semmer, Norbert K; Elfering, Achim; Jacobshagen, Nicola

    2008-07-01

    The Job Demand-Control model postulates that job control attenuates the effects of job demands on health and well-being. Support for this interactive effect is rather weak. Conceivably, it holds only when there is a match between job control and individual characteristics that relate to exercising control options, such as locus of control, or self-efficacy. This three-way interaction was tested in a sample of 96 service employees, with affective strain and musculoskeletal pain as dependent variables. As hypothesized, job control attenuated the effects of stressors only for people with an internal locus of control. For people with an external locus of control, job control actually predicted poorer well-being and health as stressors increased. For self-efficacy, the corresponding three-way interaction was significant with regard to affective strain. Copyright (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  6. Curriculum Guidelines for Periodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Dental Education, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Guidelines describe the interrelationships of this and other dental fields, give an overview of the curriculum and its primary educational objectives, and outline the suggested prerequisites, core content, specific behavioral objectives, sequencing, and faculty requirements. (MSE)

  7. Curriculum and Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenstein, Joseph

    1971-01-01

    Paper presented at the Summer Meeting of the Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf held in Philadelphia, June 24-27, 1970. Discussed are concepts of curriculum development, cognitive development, and educational methods with implications for the handicapped. (CB)

  8. Multi-Cultural Adaptations of International Heliophysical Year (IHY) Education Resources: A Perspective of a Developing Country

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faiyetole, A. A.

    2006-12-01

    The world is made up of people of varied cultures and we speak different languages. In Africa and, to be more specific, in Nigeria, we have a wide diversity of languages and customs. Nigeria has over 200 tribes and ethnic social units, to the extent that just a few of the populace have an effective understanding of English, the nation's official language. Hence, most communications are carried out in our local languages. In order to efficiently communicate the heliophysical and other scientific and technological phenomena to the general public, quite a lot would have to be done in the cultural and language context. In a nutshell, there shall be a need to adequately involve the social scientists in the education and public outreach programmes relating to space science and technology. This paper will therefore attempt to look at various ways in which languages, and diversity in cultures can be harnessed to more effectively communicate science. The paper will also discuss how the various IHY education resources can be adapted to a multi-cultural society, therefore, able to reach all the people in the world.

  9. ASER core curriculum illustration project: aortic intramural hematoma (IMH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Girbes, Alexandre; Dunham, Gregor M; Linnau, Ken F

    2017-04-01

    This is the 23rd installment of a series that will highlight one case per publication issue from the bank of cases available online as part of the American Society of Emergency Radiology (ASER) educational resources. Our goal is to generate more interest in and use of our online materials. To view more cases online, please visit the ASER Core Curriculum and Recommendations for Study online at http://www.aseronline.org/curriculum/toc.htm .

  10. Analyzing the Curriculum of the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira using Harden's 10 questions framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Yasar Albushra; Alneel, Salma

    2017-04-01

    Despite the importance of curriculum analysis for internal refinement of a programme, the approach for such a step in under-described in the literature. This article describes the analysis of the medical curriculum at the Faculty of Medicine, University of Gezira (FMUG). This analysis is crucial in the era of innovative medical education since introducing new curricula and curricular changes has become a common occurrence in medical education worldwide. The curriculum analysis was qualitatively approached using descriptive analysis and adopting Harden's 10 Questions of curriculum development framework approach. Answering Harden's questions reflects the fundamental curricular components and how the different aspects of a curriculum framework fit together. The key features highlighted in the curriculum-related material and literature have been presented. The analysis of the curriculum of FMUG reveals a curriculum with interactive components. Clear structured objectives and goals reflect the faculty's vision. The approach for needs assessment is based on a scientific ground, and the curriculum integrated contents have been set to meet national and international requirements. Adopting SPICES strategies helps FMUG and students achieve the objectives of the curriculum. Multiple motivated instructional methods are adopted, fostering coping with the programme objectives and outcomes. A wide range of assessment methods has been adopted to assess the learning outcomes of the curriculum correctly, reliably, and in alignment with the intended outcomes. The prevailing conducive educational environment of FMUG is favourable for its operation and profoundly influences the outcome of the programme. And there is a well-defined policy for curriculum management, monitoring and evaluation. Harden's 10 questions are satisfactorily addressed by the multi-disciplinary and well-developed FMUG curriculum. The current curriculum supports the well-written faculty missions and educational

  11. Creating a charter of collaboration for international university partnerships: the Elmina Declaration for Human Resources for Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Frank; Donkor, Peter; de Vries, Raymond; Appiah-Denkyira, Ebenezer; Dakpallah, George Fidelis; Rominski, Sarah; Hassinger, Jane; Lou, Airong; Kwansah, Janet; Moyer, Cheryl; Rana, Gurpreet K; Lawson, Aaron; Ayettey, Seth

    2014-08-01

    The potential of international academic partnerships to build global capacity is critical in efforts to improve health in poorer countries. Academic collaborations, however, are challenged by distance, communication issues, cultural differences, and historical context. The Collaborative Health Alliance for Reshaping Training, Education, and Research project (funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation and implemented through academic medicine and public health and governmental institutions in Michigan and Ghana) took a prospective approach to address these issues. The project had four objectives: to create a "charter for collaboration" (CFC), to improve data-driven policy making, to enhance health care provider education, and to increase research capacity. The goal of the CFC was to establish principles to guide the course of the technical work. All participants participated at an initial conference in Elmina, Ghana. Nine months later, the CFC had been revised and adopted. A qualitative investigation of the CFC's effects identified three themes: the CFC's unique value, the influence of the process of creating the CFC on patterns of communication, and the creation of a context for research and collaboration. Creating the CFC established a context in which implementing technical interventions became an opportunity for dialogue and developing a mutually beneficial partnership. To increase the likelihood that research results would be translated into policy reforms, the CFC made explicit the opportunities, potential problems, and institutional barriers to be overcome. The process of creating a CFC and the resulting document define a new standard in academic and governmental partnerships.

  12. Curriculum Reform in 3D: A Panel of Experts Discuss the New HPE Curriculum in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickey, Chris; Kirk, David; Macdonald, Doune; Penney, Dawn

    2014-01-01

    This paper was developed at the request of the Organising Committee for the 27th Australian Council for Health, Physical Education and Recreation International Conference, in Melbourne, 2013. Its genesis was as a feature forum, wherein a panel of curriculum experts were bought together to discuss the emergence of the Australian Health and Physical…

  13. International law and the use of maritime hydrocarbon resources. Theme paper for the IFRI/CIEP project for TF3 IGU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lefeber, Rene

    2015-06-01

    In the 'New Dimensions of Geopolitics and Natural Gas', both opportunities for and hindrances to the development of the natural gas business are emphasised, in the context of new geopolitical realities. Sometimes opportunities and hindrances have regional or local origins, while other times wider geopolitical issues play a role. Opportunities arise from settling potential disputes over cross-border deposits in an amicable manner, while also in situations where disputes have already flared up remedies can be found on political or legal grounds. In this topical paper the focus is on remedies offered by international law regarding maritime hydrocarbon resources. Currently, disputes among coastal states about sovereignty over maritime hydrocarbon resources in the South China Sea, the East China Sea, and the Eastern Mediterranean Sea regularly feature in news headlines. In the Persian/Arabian Gulf as well, delimitation issues remain outstanding. But also in other areas, delimitations of exclusive economic zones have had to be settled before the expansion of offshore production could ensue. International law often offers solutions to coastal states, but sometimes countries do not accept the outcome for historic or geopolitical reasons and/or refuse to go to arbitration. In these situations other solutions are often found, such as joint production. The agreement between Norway and Russia is an example of a bilateral agreement in which two states settled their dispute amicably and opened up the potential for hydrocarbon exploitation in the previously contested area. Other examples attest to similar conflict resolution successes among states that wish to embrace their offshore hydrocarbon potential. In some cases wider geopolitical and economic interests get in the way of finding a workable solution. The attempts of the coastal states of the South China Sea to come to a multilateral solution has so far not been embraced by China; China prefers bilateral agreements with

  14. Strenghtening local curricular capacity in international development cooperation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, C.K.S.

    2017-01-01

    Many curriculum development interventions carried out in international development cooperation lack sustainable outcomes, often as a result of a too narrow focus on curriculum and its development. Implementation of effective and encompassing approaches with an aligned focus on capacity development

  15. Curriculum reform at Chinese medical schools: what have we learned?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lei; Cheng, Liming; Cai, Qiaoling; Kosik, Russell Olive; Huang, Yun; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Guo-Tong; Su, Tung-Ping; Chiu, Allen Wen-Hsiang; Fan, Angela Pei-Chen

    2014-12-01

    Curriculum reform at Chinese medical schools has attracted a lot of attention recently. Several leading medical schools in China have undergone exploratory reforms and in so doing, have accumulated significant experience and have made considerable progress. An analysis of the reforms conducted by 38 Chinese medical colleges that were targeted by the government for upgrade was performed. Drawing from both domestic and international literature, we designed a questionnaire to determine what types of curricular reforms have occurred at these institutions and how they were implemented. Major questions touched upon the purpose of the reforms, curricular patterns, improvements in teaching methods post-reform, changes made to evaluation systems post-reform, intra-university reform assessment, and what difficulties the schools faced when instituting the reforms. Besides the questionnaire, relevant administrators from each medical school were also interviewed to obtain more qualitative data. Out of the 38 included universities, twenty-five have undergone major curricular reforms. Among them, 60.0% adopted an organ system-based curriculum model, 32.0% adopted a problem-based curriculum model, and 8.0% adopted a hybrid curriculum model. About 60.0% of the schools' reforms involved both the "pre-clinical" and the "clinical" curricula, 32.0% of the schools' reforms were limited to the "pre-clinical" curricula, and 8.0% of the schools' reforms only involved the "clinical" curricula. Following curricular reform, 60.0% of medical schools experienced an overall reduction in teaching hours, 76.0% reported an increase in their students' clinical skills, and 60.0% reported an increase in their students' research skills. Medical curricular reform is still in its infancy in China. The republic's leading medical schools have engaged in various approaches to bring innovative teaching methods to their respective institutions. However, due to limited resources and the shackle of traditional

  16. Patients' education, and its impact on care outcomes, resource consumption and working conditions: data from the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardino, J J; Aschner, P; Baik, S H; Chan, J; Chantelot, J M; Ilkova, H; Ramachandran, A

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the impact of diabetes education provided to patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in non-controlled studies ("real-world conditions") on quality of care, resource consumption and conditions of employment. This cross-sectional study and longitudinal follow-up describe the data (demographic and socioeconomic profiles, clinical characteristics, treatment of hyperglycaemia and associated cardiovascular risk factors, resource consumption) collected during the second phase (2006) of the International Diabetes Management Practices Study (IDMPS). Patients received diabetes education directly from the practice nurse, dietitian or educator, or were referred to ad hoc group-education programmes; all programmes emphasized healthy lifestyle changes, self-care and active participation in disease control and treatment. Educated vs non-educated T2DM patients (n=5692 in each group), paired by age, gender and diabetes duration, were randomly recruited for the IDMPS by participating primary-care physicians from 27 countries in Eastern Europe, Asia, Latin America and Africa. Outcome measures included clinical (body weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure, foot evaluation), metabolic (HbA(1c) levels, blood lipid profile) and biochemical control measures. Treatment goals were defined according to American Diabetes Association guidelines. T2DM patients' education significantly improved the percentage of patients achieving target values set by international guidelines. Educated patients increased their insulin use and self-care performance, had a lower rate of chronic complications and a modest increase in cost of care, and probably higher salaries and slightly better productivity. Diabetes education is an efficient tool for improving care outcomes without having a major impact on healthcare costs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Laboratory capacity building for the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]) in resource-poor countries: the experience of the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masanza, Monica Musenero; Nqobile, Ndlovu; Mukanga, David; Gitta, Sheba Nakacubo

    2010-12-03

    Laboratory is one of the core capacities that countries must develop for the implementation of the International Health Regulations (IHR[2005]) since laboratory services play a major role in all the key processes of detection, assessment, response, notification, and monitoring of events. While developed countries easily adapt their well-organized routine laboratory services, resource-limited countries need considerable capacity building as many gaps still exist. In this paper, we discuss some of the efforts made by the African Field Epidemiology Network (AFENET) in supporting laboratory capacity development in the Africa region. The efforts range from promoting graduate level training programs to building advanced technical, managerial and leadership skills to in-service short course training for peripheral laboratory staff. A number of specific projects focus on external quality assurance, basic laboratory information systems, strengthening laboratory management towards accreditation, equipment calibration, harmonization of training materials, networking and provision of pre-packaged laboratory kits to support outbreak investigation. Available evidence indicates a positive effect of these efforts on laboratory capacity in the region. However, many opportunities exist, especially to support the roll-out of these projects as well as attending to some additional critical areas such as biosafety and biosecuity. We conclude that AFENET's approach of strengthening national and sub-national systems provide a model that could be adopted in resource-limited settings such as sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. Assessment of the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in relevant human resources development in Sudan during the period 1999-2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awadalla, S.A.

    2006-02-01

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the role of International Atomic Energy Agency in human resources development. The Agency is believed to be one of the specialized U N organizations aiming at peaceful applications of atomic energy in areas such as human health, animal health, agriculture, industry. Sudan joined the Agency in 1958 to make use of assistance provided to establish human development projects in the country through technical cooperation. Through this study, the role of research projects has been highlighted and the impact on human resources development and service enhancement is discussed. The annual reports from the Agency and the competent authority were the secondary sources. The primary source was personal interviews with national coordinators and director general of Sudan Atomic Energy Commission. The study concluded that the technical assistance from the Agency played a significant role in development through technology transfer especially in waste management, non-destructive testing, and human health. The role of Sudan Atomic Energy Commission in management of such projects is acknowledged.(Author)

  19. Assessment of the role of the International Atomic Energy Agency in relevant human resources development in Sudan during the period 1999-2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Awadalla, S A [Development Studies and Research Institute, University of Khartoum, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2006-02-15

    The objective of the study is to evaluate the role of International Atomic Energy Agency in human resources development. The Agency is believed to be one of the specialized U N organizations aiming at peaceful applications of atomic energy in areas such as human health, animal health, agriculture, industry. Sudan joined the Agency in 1958 to make use of assistance provided to establish human development projects in the country through technical cooperation. Through this study, the role of research projects has been highlighted and the impact on human resources development and service enhancement is discussed. The annual reports from the Agency and the competent authority were the secondary sources. The primary source was personal interviews with national coordinators and director general of Sudan Atomic Energy Commission. The study concluded that the technical assistance from the Agency played a significant role in development through technology transfer especially in waste management, non-destructive testing, and human health. The role of Sudan Atomic Energy Commission in management of such projects is acknowledged.(Author)

  20. Evolution across the Curriculum: Microbiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alita R. Burmeister

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An integrated understanding of microbiology and evolutionary biology is essential for students pursuing careers in microbiology and healthcare fields. In this Perspective, we discuss the usefulness of evolutionary concepts and an overall evolutionary framework for students enrolled in microbiology courses. Further, we propose a set of learning goals for students studying microbial evolution concepts. We then describe some barriers to microbial evolution teaching and learning and encourage the continued incorporation of evidence-based teaching practices into microbiology courses at all levels. Next, we review the current status of microbial evolution assessment tools and describe some education resources available for teaching microbial evolution. Successful microbial evolution education will require that evolution be taught across the undergraduate biology curriculum, with a continued focus on applications and applied careers, while aligning with national biology education reform initiatives.