WorldWideScience

Sample records for internal water curing

  1. Techniques for internal water curing of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Pietro, Lura

    2003-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of different techniques for incorporation of internal curing water in concrete. Internal curing can be used to mitigate self-desiccation and self-desiccation shrinkage. Some concretes may need 50 kg/m3 of internal curing water for this purpose. The price of the internal...

  2. Pumice aggregates for internal water curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pietro, Lura; Bentz, Dale P.; Lange, David A.

    2004-01-01

    water absorption, but they release a greater percentage of their absorbed water at the equilibrium relative humidity of practical interest in early-age concrete, above 90%. Additionally, early-age properties of mortars with different contents of saturated pumice were investigated: a reference mix......A novel concept in internal curing of High Performance Concrete is based on dispersing very small, saturated lightweight aggregates (LWA) in the concrete, containing sufficient water to counteract self-desiccation. With this approach, the amount of water in the LWA can be minimized, thus...... is saturation of the particles, which can be achieved only by immersion in boiling water or by vacuum saturation....

  3. Techniques and materials for internal water curing of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Lura, Pietro

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of different techniques for incorporation of internal curing water in concrete. Internal water curing can be used to mitigate self-desiccation and selfdesiccation shrinkage. Some concretes may need 50 kg/m3 of internal curing water for this purpose. The price...... of the internal curing water is in the approximate range 0.1–1 e/kg....

  4. Internal water curing with Liapor aggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro

    2005-01-01

    Internal water curing is a very efficient way to counteract self-desiccation and autogenous shrinkage in high performance concrete, thereby reducing the likelihood of early-age cracking. This paper deals with early-age volume changes and moisture transport in lightweight aggregate concrete realized...... with wet lightweight aggregates. Lightweight aggregate concrete mixtures with different degree of saturation and different particle size of the lightweight aggregates were studied and compared to normal weight concrete. Autogenous deformations, selfinduced stresses in fully restrained conditions, elastic...... modulus and compressive strength were measured. Early-age expansion of the mixtures was greater the higher the degree of the saturation of the lightweight aggregates and the finer their particle size. The elastic properties and the earlyage expansion of the lightweight aggregate concrete were calculated...

  5. Experimental observation of internal water curing of concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2007-01-01

    Internal water curing has a significant effect on concrete. In addition to affecting hydration and moisture distribution, it influences most concrete properties, such as strength, shrinkage, cracking, and durability. The following paper is an overview of experimental methods to study internal water...... curing of concrete and its consequences. The special techniques needed to study internal water curing are dealt with along with the consequences of this process. Examples of applications are given and new measuring techniques that may potentially be applied to this field are addressed....

  6. Mixture proportioning for internal curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, Dale P.; Pietro, Lura; Roberts, John W.

    2005-01-01

    The concept of internal concrete curing is steadily progressing from the laboratory to field practice. In terminology currently being considered by ACI Committee 308, Curing Concrete, “internal curing refers to the process by which the hydration of cement occurs because of the availability...... of additional internal water that is not part of the mixing water.” The additional internal water is typically supplied by using relatively small amounts of saturated, lightweight, fine aggregates (LWA) or superabsorbent polymer (SAP) particles in the concrete. Benefits of internal curing include increased...... hydration and strength development, reduced autogenous shrinkage and cracking, reduced permeability, and increased durability. The impact of internal curing begins immediately with the initial hydration of the cement, with benefits that are observed at ages as early as two days. Internal curing...

  7. Water Pollution, Causes and Cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manufacturing Chemists Association, Washington, DC.

    This commentary on sources of water pollution and water pollution treatment systems is accompanied by graphic illustrations. Sources of pollution such as lake bottom vegetation, synthetic organic pollutants, heat pollution, radioactive substance pollution, and human and industrial waste products are discussed. Several types of water purification…

  8. Improved Concrete Materials with Hydrogel-Based Internal Curing Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J. Krafcik

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This research article will describe the design and use of polyelectrolyte hydrogel particles as internal curing agents in concrete and present new results on relevant hydrogel-ion interactions. When incorporated into concrete, hydrogel particles release their stored water to fuel the curing reaction, resulting in reduced volumetric shrinkage and cracking and thus increasing concrete service life. The hydrogel’s swelling performance and mechanical properties are strongly sensitive to multivalent cations that are naturally present in concrete mixtures, including calcium and aluminum. Model poly(acrylic acid(AA-acrylamide(AM-based hydrogel particles with different chemical compositions (AA:AM monomer ratio were synthesized and immersed in sodium, calcium, and aluminum salt solutions. The presence of multivalent cations resulted in decreased swelling capacity and altered swelling kinetics to the point where some hydrogel compositions displayed rapid deswelling behavior and the formation of a mechanically stiff shell. Interestingly, when incorporated into mortar, hydrogel particles reduced mixture shrinkage while encouraging the formation of specific inorganic phases (calcium hydroxide and calcium silicate hydrate within the void space previously occupied by the swollen particle.

  9. Internal curing with lightweight aggregate produced from biomass-derived waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lura, Pietro; Wyrzykowski, Mateusz; Tang, Clarence; Lehmann, Eberhard

    2014-01-01

    Shrinkage of concrete may lead to cracking and ultimately to a reduction of the service life of concrete structures. Among known methods for shrinkage mitigation, internal curing with porous aggregates was successfully utilized in the last couple of decades for decreasing autogenous and drying shrinkage. In this paper, the internal curing performance of pre-saturated lightweight aggregates produced from biomass-derived waste (bio-LWA) was studied. In the first part of this paper, the microstructure of the bio-LWA is investigated, with special focus on their pore structure and on their water absorption and desorption behavior. The bio-LWA has large porosity and coarse pore structure, which allows them to release the entrained water at early age and counteract self-desiccation and autogenous shrinkage. In the second part, the efficiency of internal curing in mortars incorporating the bio-LWA is examined by neutron tomography, internal relative humidity and autogenous deformation measurements

  10. Using a centrifuge for quality control of pre-wetted lightweight aggregate in internally cured concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Albert E.

    Early age shrinkage of cementitious systems can result in an increased potential for cracking which can lead to a reduction in service life. Early age shrinkage cracking can be particularly problematic for high strength concretes, which are often specified due to their high strength and low permeability. However, these high strength concretes frequently exhibit a reduction in the internal relative humidity (RH) due to the hydration reaction (chemical shrinkage) and self-desiccation which results in a bulk shrinkage, termed autogenous shrinkage, which is substantial at early ages. Due to the low permeability of these concretes, standard external curing is not always efficient in addressing this reduction in internal RH since the penetration of water can be limited. Internal curing has been developed to reduce autogenous shrinkage. Internally cured mixtures use internal reservoirs filled with fluid (generally water) that release this fluid at appropriate times to counteract the effects of self-desiccation thereby maintaining a high internal RH. Internally cured concrete is frequently produced in North America using pre-wetted lightweight aggregate. One important aspect associated with preparing quality internally cured concrete is being able to determine the absorbed moisture and surface moisture associated with the lightweight aggregate which enables aggregate moisture corrections to be made for the concrete mixture. This thesis represents work performed to develop a test method using a centrifuge to determine the moisture state of pre-wetted fine lightweight aggregate. The results of the test method are then used in a series of worksheets that were developed to assist field technicians when performing the tests and applying the results to a mixture design. Additionally, research was performed on superabsorbent polymers to assess their ability to be used as an internal curing reservoir.

  11. Can superabsorent polymers mitigate autogenous shrinkage of internally cured concrete without compromising the strength?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasholt, Marianne Tange; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede; Kovler, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    The paper “Super absorbing polymers as an internal curing agent for mitigation of early-age cracking of high-performance concrete bridge decks” deals with different aspects of using superabsorbent polymers (SAP) in concrete to mitigate self-desiccation. The paper concludes that “Addition of SAP...... leads to a significant reduction of mechanical strength”. The experimental results are in contradiction with several publications and question the appropriateness of using SAP as internal curing agent. However, the observed strength loss – and possibly also other observations – seems to be caused...... by overestimation of SAP water absorption. This results in an increase in water/cement ratio (w/c) for concrete with SAP. It is misleading to conclude on how SAP influences concrete properties, based on comparison of concrete mixes with SAP and reference concrete without SAP, if SAP mixes have higher w/c than...

  12. Water bath accelerated curing of concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970-01-01

    Water bath methods for accelerating the strength development of portland cement concrete were investigated in a two phase study as follows. Phase I - Participation in a cooperative accelerated strength testing program sponsored by the American Societ...

  13. Cold water immersion: kill or cure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, M J; Collier, N; Massey, H; Corbett, J; Harper, M

    2017-11-01

    What is the topic of this review? This is the first review to look across the broad field of 'cold water immersion' and to determine the threats and benefits associated with it as both a hazard and a treatment. What advances does it highlight? The level of evidence supporting each of the areas reviewed is assessed. Like other environmental constituents, such as pressure, heat and oxygen, cold water can be either good or bad, threat or treatment, depending on circumstance. Given the current increase in the popularly of open cold water swimming, it is timely to review the various human responses to cold water immersion (CWI) and consider the strength of the claims made for the effects of CWI. As a consequence, in this review we look at the history of CWI and examine CWI as a precursor to drowning, cardiac arrest and hypothermia. We also assess its role in prolonged survival underwater, extending exercise time in the heat and treating hyperthermic casualties. More recent uses, such as in the prevention of inflammation and treatment of inflammation-related conditions, are also considered. It is concluded that the evidence base for the different claims made for CWI are varied, and although in most instances there seems to be a credible rationale for the benefits or otherwise of CWI, in some instances the supporting data remain at the level of anecdotal speculation. Clear directions and requirements for future research are indicated by this review. © 2017 The Authors. Experimental Physiology © 2017 The Physiological Society.

  14. International cooperation for the cure and prevention of severe hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faulkner, Lawrence B; Uderzo, Cornelio; Masera, Giuseppe

    2013-08-01

    Thalassemia major (TM) is the most frequent life-threatening noninfectious disease of childhood in the Middle East, South Asia, and Pacific Islands where it accounts for a significant proportion of childhood mortality, morbidity, and related health care expenses. In spite of major advances in supportive care during the last decade, many patients in low-income and middle-income countries still fare poorly because of high treatment costs and lack of accessible multidisciplinary teams, not to consider the risk of blood-borne infections, primarily hepatitis C. In selected low-risk patients with a compatible sibling, TM is highly curable by bone marrow transplantation (BMT), which also improves the quality of life and is cost-effective. Starting in 2008, the Cure2Children Foundation (C2C), an Italian Non-Governmental Organization, has supported a BMT network in Pakistan, which during 2012 was extended to India. The primary aim of this project was to assess feasibility, outcomes, and costs of matched-related BMT for thalassemia in young low-risk children using a well-established and tolerable strategy. A total of 100 matched-related BMTs have been performed to date by partner institutions within this C2C-supported network; in the 50 low-risk cases with TM, over 90% disease-free survival was obtained with procedure expenses within 10,000 USD/BMT, that is, an outcome comparable to that obtained in affluent countries but with a fraction of the expenses. This cure rate was also obtained in start-up BMT centers (1 in Pakistan and 1 in India) within a structured and intensive cooperation program. Twinning and other international cooperation strategies based on shared principles and a common vision may substantially facilitate access to BMT.

  15. New methods to quantify the cracking performance of cementitious systems made with internal curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitter, John L.

    The use of high performance concretes that utilize low water-cement ratios have been promoted for use in infrastructure based on their potential to increase durability and service life because they are stronger and less porous. Unfortunately, these benefits are not always realized due to the susceptibility of high performance concrete to undergo early age cracking caused by shrinkage. This problem is widespread and effects federal, state, and local budgets that must maintain or replace deterioration caused by cracking. As a result, methods to reduce or eliminate early age shrinkage cracking have been investigated. Internal curing is one such method in which a prewetted lightweight sand is incorporated into the concrete mixture to provide internal water as the concrete cures. This action can significantly reduce or eliminate shrinkage and in some cases causes a beneficial early age expansion. Standard laboratory tests have been developed to quantify the shrinkage cracking potential of concrete. Unfortunately, many of these tests may not be appropriate for use with internally cured mixtures and only provide limited amounts of information. Most standard tests are not designed to capture the expansive behavior of internally cured mixtures. This thesis describes the design and implementation of two new testing devices that overcome the limitations of current standards. The first device discussed in this thesis is called the dual ring. The dual ring is a testing device that quantifies the early age restrained shrinkage performance of cementitious mixtures. The design of the dual ring is based on the current ASTM C 1581-04 standard test which utilizes one steel ring to restrain a cementitious specimen. The dual ring overcomes two important limitations of the standard test. First, the standard single ring test cannot restrain the expansion that takes place at early ages which is not representative of field conditions. The dual ring incorporates a second restraining ring

  16. Internal curing as a new tool for infrastructural renewal : reducing repair congestion, increasing service life, and improving sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Internal curing has recently been developed as a new concrete technology that has the potential to : dramatically extend the service life of concrete infrastructure elements like bridge decks. Internal curing : uses prewetted lightweight aggregate in...

  17. International AIDS Society: Global Scientific Strategy Towards an HIV Cure 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Ross, Anna Laura; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Benkirane, Monsef; Cannon, Paula; Chomont, Nicolas; Douek, Daniel; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Lo, Ying-Ru; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Margolis, David; Mellors, John; Persaud, Deborah; Tucker, Joseph D.; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy is not curative. Given the challenges in providing life-long therapy to a global population of over 35 million people living with HIV, there is intense interest in developing a cure for HIV infection. The International AIDS Society convened a group of international experts to develop a scientific strategy for research towards an HIV cure. This Perspective summarizes the group's strategy. PMID:27400264

  18. Properties and Internal Curing of Concrete Containing Recycled Autoclaved Aerated Lightweight Concrete as Aggregate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teewara Suwan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Global warming is a vital issue addressed to every sector worldwide, including the construction industry. To achieve the concept of green technology, many attempts have been carried out to develop low-carbon footprint products. In the construction sector, Autoclaved Aerated Concrete (AAC has become more popular and been manufactured to meet the construction demand. However, errors from manufacturing process accounted for approximately 3 to 5% of the AAC production. The development of AAC waste as lightweight aggregate in concrete is one of the potential approaches which was extendedly studied in this paper. The results showed that the compressive strength of AAC-LWA concrete was decreased with an increase in volume and coarse size. The optimum mix proportion was the AAC aggregate size of 1/2′′ to 3/8′′ with 20 to 40% replacement to normal weight aggregate. Internal curing by AAC-LWA was also observed and found to provide sufficient water inside the specimens, leading to an achievement in higher compressive strength. The main goal of this study is not only utilising unwanted wastes from industry (recycling of waste materials but also building up a new knowledge of using AAC-LWA as an internal curing agent as well as the production of value-added lightweight concrete products.

  19. Effect of cementitious permanent formwork on moisture field of internal-cured concrete under drying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiahe; Zhang, Jun; Ding, Xiaoping; Zhang, Jiajia

    2018-02-01

    Drying shrinkage of concrete may still be the main source of cracking in concrete structures, even though the autogenous shrinkage of concrete can be effectively reduced by using internal curing. In the present paper, the effect of internal curing with pre-soaked lightweight aggregate and engineered cementitious composite permanent formwork (ECC-PF) on a moisture distribution in three kinds of concrete in a drying environment are investigated from both aspects of experiments and theoretical modeling. The test results show that the combination use of ECC-PF and internal curing can well maintain the humidity at a relatively high level not only at a place far from drying surface, but also at a place close to the drying surfaces. The developed model can well catch the characteristics of the moisture distribution in concrete under drying and the impacts of internal curing and ECC-PF can well be reflected as well. The model can be used for the design of concrete structures with combination use of internal curing and permanent formwork.

  20. Effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of portland composite cement (PCC) mortar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caronge, M. A.; Tjaronge, M. W.; Hamada, H.; Irmawaty, R.

    2017-11-01

    Cement manufacturing of Indonesia has been introduced Portland Composite Cement (PCC) to minimize the rising production cost of cement which contains 80% clinker and 20% mineral admixture. A proper curing is very important when the cement contains mineral admixture materials. This paper reports the results of an experimental study conducted to evaluate the effect of water curing duration on strength behaviour of PCC mortar. Mortar specimens with water to cement ratio of (W/C) 0.5 were casted. Compressive strength, flexural strength and concrete resistance were tested at 7, 28 and 91 days cured water. The results indicated that water curing duration is essential to continue the pozzolanic reaction in mortar which contributes to the development of strength of mortar made with PCC.

  1. The effect of cure conditions on the stability of cement waste forms after immersion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.; Adams, J.W.; Clinton, J.H.; Piciulo, P.L.; McDaniel, K.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effects of curing conditions on the stability of cement-solidified ion-exchange resins after immersion in water. The test specimens consisted of partially depleted mixed-bed bead resins solidified in one of three vendor-supplied Portland I cement formulations, in a reference cement formulation, or in a gypsum-based binder formulation. We cured samples prepared using each formulation in sealed containers for periods of 7, 14, or 28 days as well as in air or with an accelerated heat cure prior to 90-day immersion in water. Two cement formulations exhibited apparent Portland-cement-like behavior, i.e., compressive strength increased or stabilized with increasing cure time. Two cement formulations exhibited behavior apparently unlike that of Portland cement, i.e., compressive strength decreased with increasing cure time. Such non-Portland-cement-like behavior is correlated with higher waste loadings. The gypsum-based formulation exhibited approximately constant compressive strength with cure time. Accelerated heat cures may not give compressive strengths representative of real-time cures. Some physical deterioration (cracking, spalling) of the waste form occurs during immersion

  2. The effect of cure conditions on the stability of cement waste forms after immersion in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siskind, B.; Adams, J.W.; Clinton, J.H.; Piciulo, P.L.

    1988-01-01

    The authors investigated the effects of curing conditions on the stability of cement-solidified ion-exchange resins after immersion in water. The test specimens consisted of partially depleted mixed-bed bead resins solidified in one of three vendor-supplied Portland I cement formulations, in a reference cement formulation, or in a gypsum-based binder formulation. They cured samples prepared using each formulation in sealed containers for periods of 7, 14, or 28 days as well as in air or with an accelerated heat cure prior to 90-day immersion in water. Two cement formulations exhibited apparent Portland-cement-like behavior, i.e., compressive strength increased or stabilized with increasing cure time. Two cement formulations exhibited behavior apparently unlike that of Portland cement, i.e. compressive strength decreased with increasing cure time. Such non-Portland-cement-like behavior is correlated with higher waste loadings. The gypsum-based formulation exhibited approximately constant compressive strength with cure time. Accelerated heat cures may not give compressive strengths representative of real-time cures. Some physical deterioration (cracking, spalling) of the waste form occurs during immersion

  3. International Water Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    The urban district of Nancy and the Town of Nancy, France, have taken the initiative of creating an International Center of Water (Centre International de l'Eau à Nancy—NAN.C.I.E.) in association with two universities, six engineering colleges, the Research Centers of Nancy, the Rhine-Meuse Basin Agency, and the Chamber of Commerce and Industry. The aim of this center is to promote research and technology transfer in the areas of water and sanitation. In 1985 it will initiate a research program drawing on the experience of 350 researchers and engineers of various disciplines who have already been assigned to research in these fields. The research themes, the majority of which will be multidisciplinary, concern aspects of hygiene and health, the engineering of industrial processes, water resources, and the environment and agriculture. A specialist training program offering five types of training aimed at university graduates, graduates of engineering colleges, or experts, will start in October 1984.

  4. Activities of RILEM Technical Committee: Internal Curing of Concrete and Anticipated Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    of concrete would be deeper understanding of the absorption/desorption mechanism of super-absorbent polymers (SAP) introduced into cementitious hardening material. A new RILEM TC on use of SAP in concrete has been recently drafted to follow up on the work of the TC 196-ICC. One of the important instruments......Novel methods of shrinkage mitigation, based on special advanced methods of internal curing (IC), are currently being intensively studied in research groups in several countries. They have been the focus of the State-of-the-Art report prepared by the Technical Committee TC 196-ICC “Internal Curing...... of Concrete” of the International Union of Laboratories and Experts in Construction Materials, Systems and Structures (RILEM). The authors of this short communication served as a chair (K. Kovler) and secretary (O.M. Jensen) of the TC. The regular and corresponding members were acknowledged RILEM experts...

  5. Comparison of water sorption and solubility of Acropars and Meliodent heat cure acrylic resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golbidi F

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Water sorption and solubility are important properties of acrylic resins. Denture base acrylic resins have low solubility. This solubility results from the leaching out of unreacted monomer and water soluble additives into the oral fluids. The solubility of denture bases can cause oral soft tissue reactions. In addition, water absorbed into this material acts as a plasticizer and decreases the mechanical properties such as hardness, transverse strength, fatigue limit and also can change the color and dimensional stability. The aim of this study was to compare the water sorption and solubility of Acropars and Meliodent heat cure acrylic resins. Materials and Methods: This experimental study was performed on the basis of ADA specification No.12 and ISO No.1567 and standards NO: 2571 of Institute of Standards & Industrial Research of Iran. Six disc form samples of each acrylic resin were prepared, with the dimension of 50×0.5 mm. After desiccating, the samples were kept in an oven for 24 hours and weighed. Then they were immersed in water, kept in oven for 7 days and weighed again. After this phase, the samples were carried to a dessicator, for 24 hours and kept in an oven for drying and were weighed for the third time. Data were analyzed with Mann Whitney and one sample t-test. P<0.05 was considered as the limit of significance. Results: Water sorption mean values were 30.5±0.1 µg/mm3 or 0.76±0.01 mg/cm2 for Meliodent samples and 30.7±0.87 µg/mm3 or 0.77±0.009 mg/cm2 for Acropars samples. No significant difference was observed in water sorption of these two materials (P=0.9. Meliodent acrylic resin showed lower solubility (1.7±0.097 µg/mm3 or 0.042±0.001 mg/cm2 than Acropars acrylic resin (2.5±0.13 µg/mm3 or 0.062±0.001 mg/cm2 (P=0.002. Conclusion: Acropars heat cure acrylic resin matched well with the requirements of the international standards for water sorption, but its solubility was not favorable. This problem

  6. Water security and international law

    OpenAIRE

    Kuokkanen Tuomas

    2017-01-01

    The article explores water security from an international law point of view. The article argues that in order to better understand water security it is important to focus on the function of international water law. Even though water security is a relatively recent concept it was latent in the process of the evolution of international water law. In addition, the article examines the relationship between man and water from the point of view of water security. The article seeks to answe...

  7. Curing of Concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    surface coats, weak concrete blocks, leaky conduits and pipes illustrate defects frequently caused by improper curing .... Furthermore, water lost internally by self desiccation has to be replaced by water from outside, i.e. ... Other methods for preventing loss of moisture involve the use of liquid seal coat, or tight covers such as ...

  8. Do water based resins find their use in radiation cure applications?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravijst, J.-P.

    1995-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for UV/EB formulation without monomers. Water dilutable oligomers offer one approach to formulations of this type. Several ways to use water as a primary means of reducing oligomer viscosities are reviewed. A number of new water dilutable acrylate resins were prepared having different functionalities and properties. Depending on the structure, viscosity decreases significantly by adding water. Good reactivity, solvent and water resistance were achieved after curing

  9. Novel techniques for concrete curing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovler, Konstantin; Jensen, Ole Mejlhede

    2005-01-01

    It is known that some high-strength/high-performance concretes (HSC/HPC) are prone to cracking at an early age unless special precautions are taken. The paper deals with the methods of curing as one of the main strategies to ensure good performance of concrete. Curing by both external (convention...... of external curing and novel methods of internal curing are described. It is stressed that proper curing is a key factor to achieve durable concrete.......It is known that some high-strength/high-performance concretes (HSC/HPC) are prone to cracking at an early age unless special precautions are taken. The paper deals with the methods of curing as one of the main strategies to ensure good performance of concrete. Curing by both external (conventional......) and internal methods is reviewed and analyzed, among other methods of mitigating shrinkage and cracking of concrete. The focus is on the mitigation of autogenous shrinkage of low water to binder ratio (w/b) concrete by means of internal curing. The concepts of internal curing are based on using lightweight...

  10. Nanopigmented Acrylic Resin Cured Indistinctively by Water Bath or Microwave Energy for Dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Acosta-Torres

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highlight of this study was the synthesis of nanopigmented poly(methyl methacrylate nanoparticles that were further processed using a water bath and/or microwave energy for dentures. The experimental acrylic resins were physicochemically characterized, and the adherence of Candida albicans and biocompatibility were assessed. A nanopigmented acrylic resin cured by a water bath or by microwave energy was obtained. The acrylic specimens possess similar properties to commercial acrylic resins, but the transverse strength and porosity were slightly improved. The acrylic resins cured with microwave energy exhibited reduced C. albicans adherence. These results demonstrate an improved noncytotoxic material for the manufacturing of denture bases in dentistry.

  11. Consumptive water use to feed humanity - curing a blind spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Falkenmark

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Since in large parts of the world it is getting difficult to meet growing water demands by mobilising more water, the discourse has turned its focus to demand management, governance and the necessary concern for aquatic ecosystems by reserving an 'environmental flow' in the river. The latter calls for attention to river depletion which may be expected in response to changes in consumptive water use by both natural and anthropogenic systems. Basically, consumptive use has three faces: runoff generation influenced by land cover changes; consumptive use of water withdrawn; and evaporation from water systems (reservoirs, canals, river based cooling. After demonstrating the vulnerability to changes in consumptive use under savanna region conditions - representative of many poverty and hunger prone developing countries subject to attention in the Millennium Development Goal activities - the paper exemplifies; 1 changes in runoff generation in response to regional scale land cover changes; 2 consumptive use in large scale irrigation systems. It goes on to analyse the implications of seeing food as a human right by estimating the additional consumptive use requirements to produce food for the next two generations. Attention is paid to remaining degrees of freedom in terms of uncommitted water beyond an environmental flow reserve and to potential food trade consequences (so-called virtual water. The paper concludes that a human-right-to-food principle will have major consequences in terms of altered consumptive water use. It will therefore be essential for humanity to address river depletion to avoid loss of resilience of the life support system. This will demand a deep-going cooperation between hydrology, ecology and water governance.

  12. Water Security and International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuomas Kuokkanen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article explores water security from an international law point of view. The article argues that in order to better understand water security it is important to focus on the function of international water law. Even though water security is a relatively recent concept it was latent in the process of the evolution of international water law. In addition, the article examines the relationship between man and water from the point of view of water security. The article seeks to answer the question: how does international water law deal with that relationship? Is water only an object to be utilized and protected or has the relationship become more complex and ambivalent through the occurrence of various extreme events. Furthermore, the article places the concept of water security into a historiographical and substantive context. It explores three broad approaches by international law to water issues: general international law, the regulatory approach and the management approach. The article argues that they are all relevant to water security. Finally, the article seeks to demonstrate that even though water security has emerged as a new notion, this does not mean that international law does not include rules and principles relevant for water security. Indeed, many general principles of international law are applicable in the context of water security. In addition, specific regulations dealing with water quantity and quality issues have been developed in international environmental law, although they are not necessarily labelled as water security rules. Moreover, various risk management methods have been elaborated to deal with water-related disasters and crises. Reciprocally, water security arguments are not necessarily new notions but rather reflect already existing concepts and principles.

  13. Cure rates of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Lithuania and the benefit of joining international treatment protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goda Vaitkevičienė

    2014-01-01

    Conclusions: Cure rates of childhood ALL in Lithuania are improving steadily and are now approaching those reported by the largest international study groups. The reasons for such a positive effect are both better financial support for treatment of children with cancer in Lithuania and international collaboration with joining international treatment protocol for childhood ALL.

  14. Nanopigmented Acrylic Resin Cured Indistinctively by Water Bath or Microwave Energy for Dentures

    OpenAIRE

    L. S. Acosta-Torres; M. C. Arenas; R. E. Nuñez­-Anita; F. H. Barceló-Santana; C. A. Álvarez-Gayosso; J. Palacios-Alquisira; J. de la Fuente-Hernández; Marcos Cajero-Juárez; V. M. Castaño

    2014-01-01

    The highlight of this study was the synthesis of nanopigmented poly(methyl methacrylate) nanoparticles that were further processed using a water bath and/or microwave energy for dentures. The experimental acrylic resins were physicochemically characterized, and the adherence of Candida albicans and biocompatibility were assessed. A nanopigmented acrylic resin cured by a water bath or by microwave energy was obtained. The acrylic specimens possess similar properties to commercial acrylic resin...

  15. Growth and Water Relations of Sun-cured Tobacco Irrigated with Saline Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelino G

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the effects of saline irrigation on growth and water relations of two sun-cured tobacco genotypes, Xp102 and Px107, which belong to the Xanthia and Perustitza tobacco ecotypes, respectively. We compared three commercial sea salt concentrations of the irrigation water (0.25%, 0.5%, and 1% w/v plus a non-salinized control, corresponding to an electrical conductivity (ECw of 4.4, 8.5, 15.7, 0.5 dS m-1 and osmotic potentials of -0.22, -0.35, -0.73, -0.02 MPa, respectively. The ECsoil increased with the salinity of the irrigation water. At high salinity (1%, the soil where Px107 plants were grown showed a significantly higher salinity compared to the soil of Xp102. For both genotypes, the soil water content increased at increasing salinity and during the growth season. Increasing salinity progressively reduced the leaf turgor pressure and enhanced the cellular osmotic adjustment. The latter resulted to be more pronounced in Px107 compared to Xp102 (0.36 vs. 0.20 MPa. At higher salinity (0.5% and 1%, both genotypes showed reduced leaf surface area, dry matter accumulation, water use, net assimilation rate (NAR and crop growth rate (CGR. Px107 roots were more sensitive than shoot to salinity (3% reduction per dS m-1 and compared to Xp102 roots, which showed a reduced development only at 1% salinity. Assessment of plant salt tolerance according to the Maas and Hoffman model revealed a slope of 1-2% for both genotypes, indicating that these tobaccos are relatively more salt tolerant compared to other species.

  16. Evaluation of Portland Cement Concrete with Internal Curing Capabilities : Research Project Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Proper curing is the key to durable and sustainable concrete structures. When a concrete mixture : is designed, delivered, poured, and consolidated, curing is the last and the most critical part for : a fi nal product of great quality. Insuffi cient ...

  17. Early age compressive strength, porosity, and sorptivity of concrete using peat water to produce and cure concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivia, Monita; Ismeddiyanto, Wibisono, Gunawan; Sitompul, Iskandar R.

    2017-09-01

    Construction in peatland has faced scarce water sources for mixing and curing concrete. It is known that peat water has high organic content and low pH that can be harmful to concrete in the environment. In some remote areas in Riau Province, contractors used peat water directly without sufficient treatments to comply with SKSNI requirements of concrete mixing water. This paper presents a study of compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity of Ordinary Portland Cement (OPC) and blended OPC-Palm Oil Fuel Ash (OPC-POFA) concrete. The specimens were mixed using natural water and peat water, then some of them were cured in fresh water and peat water. Six mixtures were investigated using a variation of cement, mixing water and curing water. Tap water is used as control mixing and curing water for all specimens. The compressive strength, porosity and sorptivity were calculated at seven and 28 days. Results indicate that the use of peat water will cause low compressive strength, high porosity and sorptivity for both OPC and OPC-POFA concrete. Using peat water and curing the specimens in tap water could improve the early strength, porosity and sorptivity of OPC concrete; however, it has an adverse effect on OPC-POFA specimens. The properties of early age concrete of both types (OPC and OPC-POFA) using peat water were as good as those with tap water. Therefore, it is suggested that peat water should be considered as mixing and curing water for concrete where tap water resources are scarce. Investigation of its long-term properties, as well as extending the observed age of concrete is recommended before any use of peat water.

  18. Thermal properties, curing characteristics and water absorption of soybean oil-based thermoset

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Epoxidized soybean oil (ESO was successfully thermal-cured by using methylhexahydrophthalic anhydride (MHHPA curing agent, in the presence of tetraethylammonium bromide (TEAB catalyst of varied concentration (0.3–0.8 phr. The polyesterification process of ESO thermoset was proven and supported by Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis (GC-MS. A possible chemical reaction of the MHHPA, TEAB and ESO was proposed based on the experimental work. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA revealed that there is a positive relationship between the degree of conversion and crosslink density of ESO thermoset with TEAB concentration. The kinetics of water absorption of the ESO thermoset were found to conform to Fickian law behavior.

  19. Effect on Compressive Strength of Concrete Using Treated Waste Water for Mixing and Curing of Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Humaira Kanwal

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective utilization of the available resources is imperative approach to achieve the apex of productivity. The modern world is focusing on the conditioning, sustainability and recycling of the assets by imparting innovative techniques and methodologies. Keeping this in view, an experimental study was conducted to evaluate the strength of concrete made with treated waste water for structural use. In this study ninetysix cylinders of four mixes with coarse aggregates in combination with FW (Fresh Water, WW (Wastewater, TWW (Treated Wastewater and TS (Treated Sewagewere prepared. The workability of fresh concrete was checked before pouring of cylinders. The test cylinders were left for 7, 14, 21 and 28 days for curing. After curing, the compressive strength was measured on hardened concrete cylinders accordingly. Test results showed that workability of all the four mixes were between 25-50mm but ultimate compressive strength of concrete with WW was decreased and with TWW, TS at the age of 28 days do not change significantly. This research will open a new wicket in the horizon of recycling of construction materials. The conditioning and cyclic utilization will reduce the cost of the construction and building materials as well as minimize the use of natural resources. This novelty and calculating approach will save our natural assets and resources.

  20. Volumetric dimensional changes of dental light-cured dimethacrylate resins after sorption of water or ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M; Vouvoudi, Evagelia Ch

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of water and ethanol sorption on the volumetric dimensional changes of resins prepared by light curing of Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, UDMA, TEGDMA or D(3)MA. The resin specimens (15mm diameterx1mm height) were immersed in water or ethanol 37+/-1 degrees C for 30 days. Volumetric changes of specimens were obtained via accurate mass measurements using Archimedes principle. The specimens were reconditioned by dry storage in an oven at 37+/-1 degrees C until constant mass was obtained and then immersed in water or ethanol for 30 days. The volumetric changes of specimens were determined and compared to those obtained from the first sorption. Resins showed similar volume increase during the first and second sorptions of water or ethanol. The volume increase due to water absorption is in the following order: poly-TEGDMA>poly-Bis-GMA>poly-UDMA>poly-Bis-EMA>poly-D(3)MA. On the contrary, the order in ethanol is poly-Bis-GMA>poly-UDMA>poly-TEGDMA>poly-Bis-EMA approximately poly-D(3)MA. The volume increase was found to depend linearly on the amount of water or ethanol absorbed. In the choice of monomers for preparation of composite resin matrix the volume increase in the resin after immersion in water or ethanol must be taken into account. Resins of Bis-EMA and D(3)MA showed the lowest values.

  1. International cooperation in water resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.R.; Beall, R.M.; Giusti, E.V.

    1979-01-01

    Advancements in hydrology proceeded slowly until the late 1800's when new ventures created a surge of interest and accomplishment. Progress waned again until the middle 20th century when an International Hydrological Decade was conceived, eventually receiving wide multinational support from governmental agencies and nongovernmental institutions. Organized by UNESCO, the Decade program was launched January 1, 1965. Participation included 107 nations, six United Nations agencies, and more than a dozen international scientific organizations. The initial program emphasized scientific research, and international cooperation; the second half of the Decade, emphasized technical assistance and technology transfer, largerly through education, training and demonstration. The success of the Decade led to the establishment of the International Hydrological Program, again under the aegis of UNESCO, to continue the work of the Decade indefinitely. The five major program activities, now involving about 90 countries and several international organizations, include: the scientific program, the promotion of education and training, the enhancement of information exchange, support of technical assistance, and the enlargement of regional cooperation. A significant amount of activity related to hydrological data networks and forecasting is carried on in an Operational Hydrology Programme by the WMO, chiefly through its Commission for Hydrology. Other international governmental organizations with a strong interest in water include the UN, the UN Development Programme, the FAO, the WHO, the International Atomic Energy Agency, the UN Environment Programme, the International Standardization Organization, and developmental institutions such as the World Bank. The specialized interests of researchers outside of the governmental structure, are met through association in various scientific and technical organizations which are world wide in scope and membership. Notwithstanding a sometimes

  2. 33 CFR 2.24 - Internal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Internal waters. 2.24 Section 2.24 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL JURISDICTION Jurisdictional Terms § 2.24 Internal waters. (a) With respect to the United States, internal waters means the...

  3. Self-curing concrete with different self-curing agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopala krishna sastry, K. V. S.; manoj kumar, Putturu

    2018-03-01

    Concrete is recognised as a versatile construction material globally. Properties of concrete depend upon, to a greater extent, the hydration of cement and microstructure of hydrated cement. Congenial atmosphere would aid the hydration of cement and hence curing of concrete becomes essential, till a major portion of the hydration process is completed. But in areas of water inadequacy and concreting works at considerable heights, curing is problematic. Self-Curing or Internal Curing technique overcomes these problems. It supplies redundant moisture, for more than sufficient hydration of cement and diminish self-desiccation. Self-Curing agents substantially help in the conservation of water in concrete, by bringing down the evaporation during the hydration of Concrete. The present study focuses on the impact of self-curing agents such as Poly Ethylene Glycol (PEG), Poly Vinyl Alcohol (PVA) and Super Absorbent Polymer (SAP) on the concrete mix of M25 grade (reference mix). The effect of these agents on strength properties of Concrete such as compressive strength, split tensile strength and flexural strength was observed on a comparative basis which revealed that PEG 4000 was the most effective among all the agents.

  4. Water security and international law | Kuokkanen | Potchefstroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article explores water security from an international law point of view. The article argues that in order to better understand water security it is important to focus on the function of international water law. Even though water security is a relatively recent concept it was latent in the process of the evolution of international ...

  5. Efficiency of Sodium Polyacrylate to Improve Durability of Concrete under Adverse Curing Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanvir Manzur

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conventional external curing process requires supply of large amount of water in addition to mixing water as well as strict quality control protocol. However, in a developing country like Bangladesh, many local contractors do not have awareness and required knowledge on importance of curing which often results in weaker concrete with durability issues. Moreover, at times it is difficult to maintain proper external curing process due to nonavailability of water and skilled laborer. Internal curing can be adopted under such scenario since this method is simple and less quality intensive. Usually, naturally occurring porous light weight aggregates (LWA are used as internal curing agent. However, naturally occurring LWA are not available in many countries like Bangladesh. Under these circumstances, Super Absorbent Polymer (SAP can be utilized as an alternative internal curing agent. In this study, sodium polyacrylate (SP as SAP has been used to produce internally cured concrete. Desorption isotherm of SP has been developed to investigate its effectiveness as internal curing agent. Test results showed that internally cured concrete with SP performed better in terms of both strength and durability as compared to control samples when subjected to adverse curing conditions where supply of additional water for external curing was absent.

  6. The CURE project as an example of international and interdisciplinary cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, Augusto

    2017-01-01

    The CURE project was a European activity of biologists, epidemiologists, statisticians, mathematicians and dosimetry experts from 9 institutions in 6 European countries. The contribution summarizes the success of the project the focus of the work, the importance of European cooperative research in the field of radiation protection. Advantages and problems arising in the team work of persons from different countries and different scientific background are discussed.

  7. The CURE project as an example of international and interdisciplinary cooperation; Das CURE-Projekt als Beispiel internationaler und interdisziplinaerer Zusammenarbeit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giussani, Augusto [Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz, Oberschleissheim (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Externe und Interne Dosimetrie, Biokinetik

    2017-10-01

    The CURE project was a European activity of biologists, epidemiologists, statisticians, mathematicians and dosimetry experts from 9 institutions in 6 European countries. The contribution summarizes the success of the project the focus of the work, the importance of European cooperative research in the field of radiation protection. Advantages and problems arising in the team work of persons from different countries and different scientific background are discussed.

  8. A Cure for Insomnia: Dispelling Four Myths of International School Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, James

    2008-01-01

    Using data provided by the Council of International Schools and a literature review to contextualize the subject, this article examines the topic of international school finance. It is suggested that postgraduate programmes are not doing enough to supply financial training for teachers turned administrators, and that a lack of understanding of…

  9. Laser-light backscattering response to water content and proteolysis in dry-cured ham

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fulladosa, E.; Rubio-Celorio, M.; Skytte, Jacob Lercke

    2017-01-01

    Laser backscattering imaging (LBI) is a low-cost technology proposed to determine non-invasively composition and microstructural characteristics of agro food and dairy products. The aim of this work was to define the effect of different acquisition conditions (wavelength, object distance and angle......-cured ham was also evaluated. Results showed that a red laser (635 nm) is more convenient than a green laser (532 nm) to analyse dry-cured ham but no preferable angle or object distance to evaluate dryness or proteolysis was found. Nevertheless, light scattering parameters were modified depending...

  10. Effects of Water Volume and Nitrogen Fertilization on Yield and Quality Traits of Air-cured Burley Tobacco (Nicotianatabacum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ascione S

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on a two-year field trial in the region of Campania (Southern Italy the effects of water volume and nitrogen fertilization on the yield and quality of Burley tobacco (Nicotianatabacum L. were investigated with reference to the following traits: cured leaf yield, price index, yield value, leaf area, specific leaf weight, burning capacity, color parameters, total alkaloid, nitrate and chloride leaf content. The experimental design was a factorial comparison among three water volumes (40, 80 and 120% evapotranspiration (ET, four nitrogen fertilization levels (0, 80, 160 and 240 kg ha-1 and two genotypes (cv TN86 and the hybrid R7-11. The yield of cured leaves rose with the increase in water and nitrogen availability, albeit at a decreasing rate. With the increase in water volume, the price index, burning capacity, specific leaf weight, total alkaloid and nitrate content decreased, while leaf area and chloride content increased. Up to a rate of 160 kg ha-1, nitrogen fertilization increased the price index, yield value, burning capacity, leaf area, specific leaf weight, total alkaloid and nitrates, and reduced leaf chloride content especially at 40% ET water volume. Both, nitrogen fertilization and water volume had little influence on leaf color. The year had considerable effects on yield, leaf area and color parameters, with higher values in the rainier season. In the two years, genotype TN86 showed higher stability for yield and yield value, lower alkaloid and higher nitrate content in the leaf than the R7-11 hybrid.

  11. Internal preference mapping of cured ham with consumer's segmentation in Spain

    OpenAIRE

    Resano, H.; Sanjuan, Ana Isabel

    2008-01-01

    The overall acceptability of 202 consumers has been analysed by ANOVA, multiple means comparison, cluster analysis and internal preference mapping (MDPREF). Three clusters are found with different preference criteria. These clusters can also be characterized according to actual purchase behaviour, declared consumption habits and sociodemographic characteristics. This study demonstrates the importance for the agro-food industry of examining consumers’ individual preferences as well as average ...

  12. The influence of curing time on the shear strength of fluidized fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruchot Andrzej

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of research on the influence of compaction and air and water curing on angle of internal friction and cohesion of fluidized fly ash from “Połaniec” Power Plant. It was stated that the increase in compaction resulted in an insignificant increase of the angle of internal friction and a quite significant increase of cohesion. While the type and time of curing had a great influence on the angle of internal friction and cohesion. The highest values of angle of internal friction were obtained in the air curing, and the lowest in the water curing whereas in case of cohesion there was an inverse relation. The rise of curing time resulted in largely increased cohesion and small changes of angle of internal friction.

  13. Globalisation of water resources: International virtual water flows in relation to international crop trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Hung, P.Q.

    2005-01-01

    The water that is used in the production process of a commodity is called the ‘virtual water’ contained in the commodity. International trade of commodities brings along international flows of virtual water. The objective of this paper is to quantify the volumes of virtual water flows between

  14. K-Based Geopolymer from metakaolin: roles of K/Al ratio and water or steam Curing at different temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tawfik, A.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available K-based geopolymer binder was prepared by reacting metakaolin with alkaline solutions having different potassium contents and by water curing at room temperature and 80 °C as well as steam curing at 150 and 180 °C. The phase formation, microstructure and Al and Si nearest neighbor environments were studied using XRD, TEM and 27Al and 29Si MAS NMR spectroscopy, respectively. The results revealed that amorphous alumino-silicates were predominant in geopolymer prepared by curing up to 28 days at room temperature or at 80 °C. The amorphous alumino-silicates persisted after hydrothermal treatment at 150 °C/48 hrs and even at 180 °C/30 hrs. However, the samples cured hydrothermally at 180 °C/48 hrs revealed formation of crystalline potassium aluminum silicate and chabazite phases. The Al nearest neighbor environments was not significantly affected by increasing the K/Al ratio up to 1.55 or by the curing temperatures. On the other hand, the geopolymer reaction appears to have increased when cured at 80 °C or steam cured at 150° and 180 °C and crystalline aluminosilicates resulted when the geopolymer sample was hydrothermally treated at 180 °C/48 hrs.Se prepararon geopolímeros por reacción de metacaolín con disoluciones alcalinas con diferentes contenidos de potasio. Se realizó un curado con agua a temperatura ambiente y a 80 °C, y con vapor de agua a 150 y 180 °C. La formación de las diferentes fases así como la microestructura y entornos del Al y Si se estudiaron mediante DRX, TEM y espectroscopia de RMN MAS de 27Al y 29Si. Los aluminosilicatos amorfos fueron predominantes en aquellos geopolímeros sometidos a curado de hasta 28 días a temperatura ambiente o a 80 °C. Los aluminosilicatos amorfos persistieron tras el tratamiento hidrotermal a 150 °C/48 horas e incluso a 180 °C/30 h. Sin embargo, las muestras curadas hidrotermalmente a 180 °C/48 h revelaron la formación de fases cristalinas de silicatos de aluminio y potasio, as

  15. International Symposium on Karst Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, William

    The International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS) and the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) joined the Hacettepe University of Ankara, Turkey, in sponsoring the International Symposium on Karst Water Resources. The other sponsors of the symposium were the Karst Water Resources Research Center Project of Hacettepe University and the United Nations Development Program through the United Nations Department of Technical Cooperation for Development, in addition to the following government organizations of Turkey: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources, State Hydraulic, Works (DSI), General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA), Electrical Power Resources Survey and Development Administration (EIE) and Geological Engineering Department of the Engineering Faculty and Karst Hydrogeology Research Group (KRG) at the Hacettepe University Earth Sciences Application and Research Center. Cooperating organizations included the Turkish National Committee of the International Hydrological Program, the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), and the International Water Resources Association (IWRA). The symposium was divided into two parts: a paper presentation session held at the new Turkish National Library in Ankara during July 7-12, 1985, and a field trip from Ankara through Konya and Antalya to Izmir during July 13-18. The symposium chairman was Gultekin Gunay of the Hydrogeological Engineering Department of Ankara's Hacettepe University, and the cochairman was A. Ivan Johnson, a water resources consultant from Denver, Colo., and editor of WaterWatch. Scientists from 27 countries were represented among the 200 or so participants in attendance.

  16. Curing process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Tadashi.

    1969-01-01

    A process for the rapid curing of an electrophoretically applied coating with either compositions of aqueous dispersion or aqueous coating compositions thereof is provided by irradiating with ionizing radiations. The process comprises the steps of (a) neutralizing an aqueous alkyd resin with a base, in which the alkyd resin contains a conjugated unsaturated fatty acid or oil as one of its constituents, (b) dispersing the neutralized resin in water, (c) applying to an electroconductive material the varnishes of the dispersed composition or the dispersed coating composition, and (d) irradiating the coatings with ionizing radiations so as to harden them. The alkyd resins have an acid value of 30 to 100 and the bases are equivalent to 0.7 to 1.2. the process is suitable for coil coating. In examples, a semi-esterified product of acid value 54 was diluted with 440 parts of ethylene glycol monobutyl ether and 110 parts of butanol. Next, they were neutralized with 87 parts of dimethyl amino ethanol. Thereafter, they were mixed with 1,013 parts of water to produce an aqueous dispersion of alkyd resin varnish at a concentration of 40%. To 325 parts of the varnish were added 1.3 parts of cobalt naphthenate- 60% toluene solution and then 675 parts of water to produce water soluble varnish containing 13% of a nonvolatile substance. The varnish was applied by electrophoresis for 10 seconds. The time required for the irradiation was about 1 second. The total radiation dose was 3 Mrad of electron beams at an acceleration energy of 300 kV and 25 mA of current. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Comparative study of sorption and solubility of heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins in different solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Rajesh; Kotian, Ravindra; Madhyastha, Prashanthi; Srikant, N

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the sorption and solubility of heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins in different solutions. One heat-cure acrylic resin (Trevalon) and one self-cure acrylic resin (Rapid Repair) were studied. Five groups of square-shaped specimens (20 mm × 20 mm × 2 mm) were prepared for each acrylic resin and then immersed in five solutions: distilled water, artificial saliva, denture cleansing solution, distilled water, and denture cleaning solution for 12 h alternatively, artificial saliva and denture cleaning solution for 12 h alternatively at 37 ± 2°C, and tested sorption and solubility by weight gain/loss method, respectively, after 1, 6, and 11 weeks. The data were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance followed by post hoc Tukey's test. Water sorption mean values varied from 17.5 ± 0.88 to 27.25 ± 1.04 μg/mm 3 for heat cure and from 12.75 ± 0.55 to 19.75 ± 1.04 μg/mm 3 for self-cure in the different solutions after different interval periods of 1, 6, and 11 weeks. These values were statistically significant (Psolubility mean values varied from 0.25 ± 0.55 to 1.5 ± 0.55 μg/mm 3 for heat cure and from 1.5 ± 0.55 to 6.5 ± 0.55 μg/mm 3 for self-cure in the different solutions after different interval periods of 1, 6, and 11 weeks. These values were statistically not significant (P > 0.05). There was no linear correlation between sorption and solubility values. Overall, analysis of results showed the maximum sorption value in denture cleansing solution followed by alternative soaking in distilled water and artificial saliva. Least sorption was observed with artificial saliva followed by distilled water. Both heat-cure and self-cure acrylic resins showed varying water sorption and solubility. The results of both water sorption and solubility showed compliance with the International Standards Organization specification. No correlation was found between water sorption and solubility. Artificial saliva solution is a

  18. Preliminary observations of water movement in cement pastes during curing using X-ray absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentz, D. P.; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2000-01-01

    X-ray absorption and concurrent mass measurements are used in quantifying water movement in 4 to 5 mm thick cement paste specimens with their top surface exposed to drying. Experimental variables examined in this preliminary study include water-to-cement (wic) ratio and open vs. capped samples....... Layered specimens (e.g., 0.3 w/c ratio paste over 0.45 wic ratio paste) are also examined to monitor the preferential water movement from less dense (higher wic ratio) paste to denser paste due to capillary forces. For the open samples examined in this study, the initial drying is observed to occur...

  19. Dynamic crossover in hydration water of curing cement paste: the effect of superplasticizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hua; Chiang, Wei-Shan; Fratini, Emiliano; Ridi, Francesca; Bausi, Francesco; Baglioni, Piero; Tyagi, Madhu; Chen, Sow-Hsin

    2012-02-01

    The influence of a new comb-shaped polycarboxylate-based superplasticizer (CSSP) on the hydration kinetics and transport properties of aged cement pastes has been investigated by high-resolution quasi-elastic neutron scattering (QENS) and low temperature differential scanning calorimetry (LT-DSC). A new method of analysis of QENS spectra is proposed. By applying the refined method we were able to access to four independent physical parameters including the self-diffusion coefficient of the hydration water confined in the cement paste. Mean squared displacement (MSD) of the hydrogen atom for mobile water molecules displays a dynamic crossover temperature in agreement with DSC data. The experimental results indicate that CSSP polymer added into cement paste moderates the hydration process and decreases the dynamic crossover temperature of the hydration water.

  20. Water and saliva contamination effect on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente, Ascensión; Mena, Ana; Ortiz, Antonio José; Bravo, Luis Alberto

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of water and saliva contamination on shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a moisture-tolerant light cure system. Brackets were bonded to 240 bovine lower incisors divided into 12 groups. Four bonding procedures were evaluated, including (1) TSEP/Transbond XT, (2) TMIP/ Transbond XT, (3) TSEP/Transbond PLUS, and (4) TMIP/Transbond PLUS, each under three different bonding conditions: without contamination, with water contamination, and with saliva contamination. Shear bond strength was measured with a universal testing machine. The adhesive remnant on the teeth was quantified with the use of image analyzing equipment. Without contamination, bond strengths for the four procedures were similar (P > .05). TSEP/Tranbond PLUS and TMIP/Transbond PLUS left significantly less adhesive on the teeth after debonding than TSEP/Transbond XT and TMIP/Transbond XT (P .017), although for TMIP/ Transbond XT, both variables showed significant reductions after contamination (P < .017). TSEP/Transbond PLUS, TMIP/Transbond PLUS, and TSEP/Transbond XT showed greater tolerance to wet conditions than was shown by TMIP/Transbond XT.

  1. The culture of water cure in nineteenth-century Austria, 1800-1914

    OpenAIRE

    Steward, Jill

    2002-01-01

    This chapter was an invited contribution to an edited collection, bringing together new and international scholarship in an examination of the relationship between the modern practices of tourism and the built environment. The chapter draws on primary and secondary sources in an analysis of the ways in which Italy was perceived and experienced by British tourists during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Utilising a model for analysing tourist behaviour developed within anthropolog...

  2. Cure for the nation`s water pollution problem: Section 303(d) of the Clean Water Act

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCune, J.F.

    1998-08-31

    This paper discusses federal and state implementation of the water quality-based strategy. It focuses on the development and implementation of water quality standards-based limitations (namely, total maximum daily loads or TMDLs) under section 303(d). It addresses the impact of such limitations on entities and activities that generate water pollution.

  3. Determination of application possibilities of microwave heating in the curing process of water glass molding sands with fluid esters. Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Granat

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of the experimental trial of combination of the chemical method of water glass molding sands’ curing, used in foundry industry, with an innovative microwave heating. The research objective was to indicate at new areas of microwave energy application. The sands prepared, according to recommendations for curing technology, with the use of ethylene glycol diacetate, have been subject to microwave influence. The attempt at determination of microwave influence on qualitative changes of the binding bridges created during the curing process concerned such parameters as: bending and tensile strength, permeability as well as wear resistance. Moreover,we also determined the influence of microwave curing on the phenomena accompanying the process as well as bond stability (storage time of the prepared molding and core sands. It has been found, basing on the result analysis, that the innovative microwave heating might constitute a very good supplementation of the ester curing method. The advantages of the combined chemical and microwave gelation process include, among others, improvement of the described resistance and technological parameters as well as significant decrease of preparation time of foundry moulds and cores. The subject discussed in this article will be continued in its second part.

  4. The influence of alkalinity of portland cement on the absorption characteristics of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) for use in internally cured concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabares Tamayo, Juan D.

    The concrete industry increasingly emphasizes advances in novel materials that promote construction of more resilient infrastructure. Due to its potential to improve concrete durability, internal curing (IC) of concrete by means of superabsorbent polymers (SAP) has been identified as one of the most promising technologies of the 21st century. The addition of superabsorbent polymers into a cementitious system promotes further hydration of cement by providing internal moisture during the hardening and strength development periods, and thus limits self-desiccation, shrinkage, and cracking. This thesis presents the work performed on the series of cement pastes with varying alkalinity of their pore solutions to provide a better understanding of: (1) the influence of the chemistry of the pore solution (i.e. its level of alkalinity and the type of ionic species present) on the absorption capacity of SAP, and (2) the effectiveness of SAP with different absorption capacities as an internal curing agent. This research work was divided into three stages: (a) materials characterization, (b) measurement of absorption capacity of SAP in synthetic pore solutions, and (c) evaluation of the internal curing effectiveness of SAP. During the first stage (Materials Characterization), pore solutions were extracted from the fresh (5 minutes old) cement pastes prepared using cements with three different levels of alkalinity. The pH values of the extracted solutions were determined (using the pH meter) and their chemical analysis was performed by means of titration (concentration of hydroxyl), ion chromatography (sulfates and chlorides), atomic absorption (AA) and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP) (sodium, potassium and calcium). The commercial SAP adopted for this study was used with "as-supplied" gradation and with the finer gradation obtained by grinding the original polymer in the 6850 Cryomilling Freezer/Mill. The physical properties of these SAP's, such

  5. Radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wendrinsky, J.

    1987-04-01

    In the beginning of the seventies the two types of radiation sources applied in industrial processes, electron radiation and UV, had been given rather optimistic forecasts. While UV could succeed in the field of panel and film coating, electron radiation curing seems to gain success in quite new fields of manufacturing. The listing of the suggested applications of radiation curing and a comparison of both advantages and disadvantages of this technology are followed by a number of case studies emphasizing the features of these processes and giving some examplary calculations. The data used for the calculations should provide an easy calculation of individual manufacturing costs if special production parameters, investment or energy costs are employed. (Author)

  6. Strategic importance of green water in international crop trade

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez-Aldaya, Maite; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Allan, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual water is the volume of water used to produce a commodity or service. By importing agricultural commodities and the virtual water embedded in them, a country saves the water it would have required to produce those commodities domestically. Virtual-water ‘trade’, thus, has the potential to relieve water stress and improve water security. The present research critically evaluates the strategic importance and implications of green water (soil water) in relation to international crop trade...

  7. 33 CFR 165.1192 - Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Security Zones; Waters..., California. 165.1192 Section 165.1192 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND... Security Zones; Waters surrounding San Francisco International Airport and Oakland International Airport...

  8. Sticky or Slippery Wetting: Network Formation Conditions Can Provide a One-Way Street for Water Flow on Platinum-cured Silicone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenyu; Nair, Sithara S; Veeravalli, Sharon; Moseh, Patricia; Wynne, Kenneth J

    2016-06-08

    In the course of studies on Sylgard 184 (S-PDMS), we discovered strong effects on receding contact angles (CAs), θrec, while cure conditions have little effect on advancing CAs. Network formation at high temperatures resulted in high θadv of 115-120° and high θrec ≥ 80°. After network formation at low temperatures (≤25 °C), θadv was still high but θrec was 30-50°. Uncertainty about compositional effects on wetting behavior resulted in similar experiments with a model D(V)D(H) silicone elastomer (Pt-PDMS) composed of a vinyl-terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) base and a polymeric hydromethylsilane cross-linker. Again, network formation at high temperature (∼100 °C) resulted in high CAs, while low-temperature curing retained high advancing CAs but gave low receding CAs (θrec 30-50°). These changes in receding CAs translate to strong effects on water adhesion, wp, which is the actual work required to separate a liquid (water) from a surface: wp ∝ (1 + θrec). When the values θrec 84° for high-temperature and θrec 50° for low-temperature network formation are used, wp is ∼1.5 times higher for curing at low temperature. The origin of low receding contact angles was investigated by attenuated total reflectance IR spectroscopy. Absorptions for Si-OH hydrogen-bonded to water (3350 cm(-1)) were stronger for low- versus high-temperature curing. This result is attributed to faster hydrosilylation during curing at higher temperatures that consumes Si-H before autoxidation to Si-OH. Sharp bands at 3750 and 3690 cm(-1) due to isolated -Si-OH are more prominent for Pt-PDMS than those for S-PDMS, which may be due to an effect of functionalized nanofiller. To explore the impact of wp on water droplet flow, gradient coatings of S-PDMS and Pt-PDMS elastomers were prepared by coating a slide, maintaining opposite ends at high and low temperatures and thus forming a thermal gradient. When the slide was tilted, a droplet moved easily on the high

  9. Effects of Different Water and Super Plasticizer Amount, Pre-Setting and Curing Regimes on the Behavior of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Dashti Rahmatabadi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC is an ultra high performance concrete which has superior mechanical and physical properties. The RPC is composed of cement and very fine powders such as crushed quartz (100–600 μm and silica fume with very low water/binder ratio (W/B (less than 0.20 and Super Plasticizer (SP. The RPC has a very high compressive and tensile strength with better durability properties than current high performance concretes. Application of very low water/binder ratio with a high dosage of super plasticizer, different heat curing processes and pre-setting pressure improve mechanical and physical properties of RPC. In this study, the RPC is composed of available materials in Iran. Two different mixing proportions, different water/binder ratios for preparation of samples, different super plasticizer dosages, five different (0, 25, 50, 100 and 150 MPa pre-setting pressure and 7 different curing regimes were used in samples preparation and experiments. Results showed that appropriate water/binder ratio and super plasticizer dosage, higher temperature and pre-setting pressure increase the workability, density and compressive strength of compositions.

  10. The Combined Effect of the Initial Cure and the Type of Cement on the Natural Carbonation, the Portlandite Content, and Nonevaporable Water in Blended Cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saida Boualleg

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to better understand the physical and chemical phenomena involved in hydrated mix (clinker + addition during the natural carbonation process, to characterize cement with supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs under various curing environment. The prepared cement pastes were characterized by thermogravimetric analysis. The results showed a considerable influence of the environment on the properties of mortars and cement and a perfect correlation between compressive strength, natural carbonation, nonevaporable water, and portlandite content. It was observed that the reduction of the curing period makes the mortars more sensitive. The kinetics of process was evaluated from Ca(OH2 content and nonevaporable water contained in mortars. These two parameters reflect the hydration progress of the water/cement ratio studied. The weight loss due to Ca(OH2 decomposition, calculated by DTA/TG analysis, shows the effect of the pozzolanic reaction and the natural carbonation. The supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs play a considerable role in the slowing down of the aggression environment.

  11. Cure rates of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Lithuania and the benefit of joining international treatment protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkevičienė, Goda; Matuzevičienė, Rėda; Stoškus, Mindaugas; Žvirblis, Tadas; Ragelienė, Lina; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) represents the largest group of pediatric malignancies with long-term survival rates of more than 80% achieved in developed countries. Epidemiological data and survival rates of childhood ALL in Lithuania were lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze the population-based long-term treatment results of childhood ALL in Lithuania during 1992-2012. Data of all 459 children with T-lineage and B-cell precursor ALL treated in Lithuania from 1992 to 2012 were collected and analyzed. Results were compared among four time-periods: 1992-1996 (N=132), 1997-2002 (N=136), 2003-2008 (N=109) and 2009-2012 (N=82). The incidence of childhood ALL in Lithuania was 3.2-3.6 cases per 100000 children per year during the study period. Five-year probability of event-free survival increased from 50%± 4% in 1992-1996 to 71%± 4% in 2003-2008 (Pchildhood ALL in Lithuania are improving steadily and are now approaching those reported by the largest international study groups. The reasons for such a positive effect are both better financial support for treatment of children with cancer in Lithuania and international collaboration with joining international treatment protocol for childhood ALL. Copyright © 2014 Lithuanian University of Health Sciences. Production and hosting by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  12. The effects of silica fume and hydrated lime on the strength development and durability characteristics of concrete under hot water curing condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamza Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sustainability is considered to be highly important for preserving continued industrial growth and human development. Concrete, being the world’s largest manufacturing material comprises cement as an essential binding component for strength development. However, excessive production of cement due to high degree of construction practices around the world frames cement as a leading pollutant of releasing significant amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere. To overcome this environmental degradation, silica fume and hydrated lime are used as partial replacements to cement. This paper begins with the examination of the partial replacement levels of hydrated lime and silica fume in concrete and their influence on the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete. The effect of hot water curing on concrete incorporated with both silica fume and hydrated lime is also investigated in this paper. The results reported in this paper show that the use of silica fume as a partial replacement material improved both the mechanical properties and durability characteristics of concrete due to the formation of calcium silica hydrate crystals through the pozzolanic reaction. Although the hydrated lime did not significantly contribute in the development of strength, its presence enhanced the durability of concrete especially at long-term. The results also showed that hot water curing enhanced the strength development of concrete incorporated with silica fume due to the accelerated rate of both the hydration and pozzolanic reaction that takes place between silica fume and calcium hydroxide of the cement matrix particularly at early times. The results reported in this paper have significant contribution in the development of sustainable concrete. The paper does not only address the use of alternative binders as a partial replacement material in concrete but also suggest proper curing conditions for the proposed replacement materials. These practices

  13. State Succession in International Transboundary Water Obligations ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South Sudan's independence has raised the number of Nile riparian states to eleven, and the questions of state succession and international law discourse on the issue are expected to arise in relation to South Sudan. Some of the international legal issues that may be raised in relation to Nile agreements are: whether the ...

  14. Integrated water management: Some international dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Asit K.

    1981-05-01

    With the continuing increase in world population, and rising standard of living, more and more water will be necessary to satisfy basic human needs. The global picture with regard to water use and availability is very uneven, and the policy options for major sectoral uses — rural and urban water supply, agricultural requirements and hydro-electric power generation are explored. The social and environmental implications of water development are briefly discussed. Finally, the question of the availability of adequate water to sustain future world population and development to the year 2000 is analysed. It is concluded that the major problem in the area of water-resources development is not one of the Malthusian spectre of impending scarcity, but one of instituting rational management practices.

  15. Measurement of water transport from saturated pumice aggregates to hardening cement paste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lura, Pietro; Bentz, Dale; Lange, David A.

    2006-01-01

    In internal water curing of High Performance Concrete, it is fundamental to know how and when the water contained in the internal curing agent is released into the hydrating cement paste. In this study, X-ray absorption measurements showed that considerable transport of water from saturated pumice...... the crucial factor to avoid self-desiccation shrinkage at early-age....

  16. Ensuring biological safety of drinking water at International Crops ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Potability of drinking water from various sources at the campus of International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), Patancheru, Andhra Pradesh, India had been assessed for 17 years (1994 to 2010). All four sources of drinking water at ICRISAT, including Manjeera water (Municipal corporation ...

  17. Alternative Water Systems Project (India) | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Alternative Water Systems Project seeks to develop a point-of-use safe water system incorporating natural plant-derived coagulants, simple sari cloth filtration and chlorine disinfection for the control of waterborne diseases in South Asian slums. This is a technical approach that is simple, inexpensive, makes use of ...

  18. Water Management in Islam | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2001-01-01

    Jan 1, 2001 ... In the Middle East and North Africa, water is rapidly becoming the key development issue. In response, policymakers have proposed or tried to implement policies such as higher water tariffs or privatization, but have done so without considering local culture and values. Yet culture, including religion, clearly ...

  19. Facing the water barrier | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    A world "water crisis" is poised to deliver its most devastating blow to the Middle East and North Africa — with consequences that rival any conflict — unless this arid region turns the tide on the way it manages water. SEE ALSO...

  20. Autogenous accelerated curing of concrete cylinders. Part V, ASTM Cooperative Testing Program with additional emphasis on the influence of container and storage characteristics (supplemented by data on water bath curing from an earlier council project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-01-01

    Concomitant with the Research Council's studies of accelerated curing for strength testing, Subcommittee II-i of ASTM Committee C-9 was developing and refining accelerated methods for standardization. This development included a cooperative testing p...

  1. Microwave Cure of Phenol-Formaldehyde Adhesive

    OpenAIRE

    高谷, 政広; 田平, 英敏; 岡本, 忠

    2006-01-01

    [Synopsis] Phenol-formaldehyde resin has been used as a versatile material for adhesives and coatings of a wide range of adherends because of its excellent performance in water- resistance, strength against abrasion, and so on. However, it has a drawback of slow rate of cure and relevant emission of formaldehyde gas after bonding. We studied the curing performance under irradiation of microwave for the purpose of looking for a way of accelerating the cure rate of phenol formaldehyde resin. Th...

  2. Lower internals for pressurized water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevereau, G.; Babin, M.

    1989-01-01

    The lower internals for PWR has a separating plate mounted beneath its lower core plate and defining a distribution chamber with it, peripheral mechanical connectors joining the plates separated by coolant passage and apertures in the separation plate connected to a coolant pipe [fr

  3. Divining Jordan's desert waters | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    To most people, a desert — by definition — is a place where water is practically nonexistent. But a team of researchers studying Jordan's badia — a large desert in the country's northwest corner — has uncovered a secret moving slowly beneath the area's vast arid expanses. Using satellite photos, knowledge of the local ...

  4. Himalayan Adaptation, Water, and Resilience | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Himalayan Adaptation, Water, and Resilience. This research project will serve to help poor and vulnerable women, men, and children learn to adapt to and manage climate change in Asia's Hindu Kush Himalayan region. Why the Himalayan region is important. The region, stretching from central Afghanistan to northern ...

  5. Changing the Currents of Water Management | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Avoiding a catastrophic water shortage in the coming decades will require finding new ways to control the demand for this precious resource. This is the view of participants in the Water Demand Management Forum, an initiative sponsored by the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) that brought together ...

  6. Nothing a hot bath won't cure: infection rates of amphibian chytrid fungus correlate negatively with water temperature under natural field settings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Forrest

    Full Text Available Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd. Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis, from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10-50°C, including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75-100% in water 30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications.There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them--Sylvia Plath, "The Bell Jar" (1963.

  7. Virtual water trade: an assessment of water use efficiency in the international food trade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Yang

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Amid an increasing water scarcity in many parts of the world, virtual water trade as both a policy instrument and practical means to balance the local, national and global water budget has received much attention in recent years. Building upon the knowledge of virtual water accounting in the literature, this study assesses the efficiency of water use embodied in the international food trade from the perspectives of exporting and importing countries and at the global and country levels. The investigation reveals that the virtual water flows primarily from countries of high crop water productivity to countries of low crop water productivity, generating a global saving in water use. Meanwhile, the total virtual water trade is dominated by green virtual water, which constitutes a low opportunity cost of water use as opposed to blue virtual water. A sensitivity analysis, however, suggests high uncertainties in the virtual water accounting and the estimation of the scale of water saving. The study also raises awareness of the limited effect of water scarcity on the global virtual water trade and the negative implications of the global water saving for the water use efficiency and food security in importing countries and the environment in exporting countries. The analysis shows the complexity in evaluating the efficiency gains in the international virtual water trade. The findings of the study, nevertheless, call for a greater emphasis on rainfed agriculture to improve the global food security and environmental sustainability.

  8. Radiation curing of polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randell, D.R.

    1987-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Areas of Application of UV Curing; Areas of Application of EB Curing; Laser Curing of Acrylic Coatings; A User's View of the Application of Radiation Curable Materials; Radiation Curable Offset Inks: A Technical and Marketing Overview; and UV Curable Screen Printing Inks

  9. Effect of water storage on the flexural strength of heat-cured denture base resin reinforced with stick (s glass fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ankit Galav

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Flexural strength (FS of denture base resins (DBRs had been improved by reinforcing it with different glass fibers. However, a limited data are available on the effect of glass fiber reinforcement with conventional heat-cured resin after prolonged water storage. Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the reinforcing effect of novel S-glass and nylon fibers on the FS of acrylic DBRs. It also aimed to evaluate the effect of glass fiber reinforcement on the FS of acrylic DBRs after a prolonged storage in water. Materials and Methods: One hundred and sixty identical specimens were fabricated in specially designed molds according to the manufacturer's instructions. The three experimental groups were prepared consisting of conventional (unreinforced acrylic resin, novel S-glass fiber-reinforced and nylon fiber-reinforced acrylic resin. The specimens were fabricated in a standardized fashion for each experimental group. Each group was further subdivided into two groups on the basis of storage conditions (dry and wet. FS was tested using a three-point universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Glass fiber-reinforced group was further tested after prolonged storage in distilled water. Entered data were statistically analyzed with one-way ANOVA and least significant difference post hoc test. Results: In this study, statistically significant differences were noted in the FS of all the groups. S-glass fiber-reinforced group had highest FS compared to the other two groups (P < 0.001. Nylon fiber-reinforced group had lowest FS. All the groups stored in distilled water revealed a decrease in strength compared to those stored in dry atmosphere. Among wet specimens, those stored for 3 weeks had a significantly higher FS than those stored at one and 2 weeks (P < 0.01. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this investigation, the FS of heat-cured acrylic DBR was improved after reinforcement with glass fibers. It can be

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Effect of Water Absorption on the Surface Properties of Heat Cure Acrylic: An in vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandu, G S; Asnani, Pooja; Gupta, Siddarth; Faisal Khan, Mohd.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Use of alkaline peroxide denture cleanser with different temperature of water could cause a change in surface hardness of the acrylic denture and also has a bleaching effect. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of increased water content during thermal cycling of hot water-treated acrylic on the surface hardness of acrylic denture base when compared to warm water treated acrylic. And to compare the bleaching effect of alkaline peroxide solution on the acrylic denture base on hot water and warm water treated acrylic. Materials and Methods: Forty samples (10 mm × 10 mm × 2.5 mm) were prepared. After the calculation of the initial hardness 40 samples, each was randomly assigned to two groups. Group A: 20 samples were immersed in 250 ml of warm distilled water at 40°C with alkaline peroxide tablet. Group B: 20 samples were immersed in 250 ml of hot distilled water at 100°C with alkaline peroxide tablet. The surface hardness of each test sample was obtained using the digital hardness testing machine recording the Rockwell hardness number before the beginning of the soaking cycles and after completion of 30 soak cycles and compared. Values were analyzed using paired t-test. Five samples from the Group A and five samples from Group B were put side by side and photographed using a Nikon D 40 digital SLR Camera and the photographs were examined visually to assess the change in color. Results: Acrylic samples immersed in hot water showed a statistically significant decrease of 5.8% in surface hardness. And those immersed in warm water showed a statistically insignificant increase of 0.67% in surface hardness. Samples from the two groups showed clinically insignificant difference in color when compared to each other on examination of the photographs. Conclusion: Thermocycling of the acrylic resin at different water bath temperature at 40°C and 100°C showed significant changes in the surface hardness. PMID:25954074

  11. Study on factors (pH, water activity, salt content affecting the growth of Listeria Monocytogenes in raw dried cured sausages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daskalov Hristo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Commission Regulation (EC 2073:2005 considers the factors which can support or inhibit the growth of Listeria monocytogenesin ready-to-eat foods. The aim of the experiments was to examine the values of pH, water activity (aw, salt content and level of contamination with Listeria monocytogenes of some popular in Bulgaria raw dried cured vacuum packed sausages, produced from June 2006 till May 2008. 81 vacuum-packed samples were taken from 5 different meat producing plants during the period of study. Average water activity level of the tested sausages was 0,87 ± 0,035; pH level - 5,61 ± 0,59 and salt content - 4,12 ± 1,11%. Four specimens contained Listeria spp. (two samples L.monocytogenes, one L.welshimeri and one L.innocua. All contaminated raw dried cured sausages had aw bellow ≤ 0,92 and pH ≥ 4,4 or pH ≥ 5. After 3 months of storage of the same contaminated samples at 40C, in three of them Listeria spp. (two L.monocitogenes and L.welshimeri survived and was detected. Salt content of the samples varied from 2,46 to 6,28% and was not able to affect the growth of L.monocytogenes.Data showed that the detected levels of aw could support the growth of L.monocytogenes in only 6 (7,4% of the tested samples. pH values lower than 5 were presented in three samples and only the combination with low aw was able to inhibit the growth of L.monocytogenes. The detected levels of salt content did not affect the presence and growth of L.monocytogenes. ‘Microbiological criterion’ set in COMMISSION REGULATION (EC No 2073/2005 for ready-to-eat foods unable to support the growth of L. monocytogenescan be applied to 75 (92,6% of the tested sausages.

  12. Boiling-Water Reactor internals aging degradation study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, K.H.

    1993-09-01

    This report documents the results of an aging assessment study for boiling water reactor (BWR) internals. Major stressors for BWR internals are related to unsteady hydrodynamic forces generated by the primary coolant flow in the reactor vessel. Welding and cold-working, dissolved oxygen and impurities in the coolant, applied loads and exposures to fast neutron fluxes are other important stressors. Based on results of a component failure information survey, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and fatigue are identified as the two major aging-related degradation mechanisms for BWR internals. Significant reported failures include SCC in jet-pump holddown beams, in-core neutron flux monitor dry tubes and core spray spargers. Fatigue failures were detected in feedwater spargers. The implementation of a plant Hydrogen Water Chemistry (HWC) program is considered as a promising method for controlling SCC problems in BWR. More operating data are needed to evaluate its effectiveness for internal components. Long-term fast neutron irradiation effects and high-cycle fatigue in a corrosive environment are uncertainty factors in the aging assessment process. BWR internals are examined by visual inspections and the method is access limited. The presence of a large water gap and an absence of ex-core neutron flux monitors may handicap the use of advanced inspection methods, such as neutron noise vibration measurements, for BWR

  13. Ecosystem Services and International Water Law: towards a more ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, as the methods and tools used to identify ecosystem services improve, it is likely that such an approach will offer an important means by which to reconcile competing interests over shared watercourses in the future. KEYWORDS: Ecosystem services; International water law; Trans-boundary watercourses; ...

  14. Ultrasonic cure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjevic, B. Boro

    1999-12-01

    Fiber reinforced organic matrix composites applied to large structures require inexpensive cure process control. This paper reports on work to develop simple ultrasonic NDE sensors suitable for manufacturing and in-field use. This sensor is designed around a short wave-guide ultrasonic probe that is embedded in composite for in-situ cure monitoring applications. The sensor measures changes in resin density and sound velocity during cure and can be quantitatively calibrated for determination of the final cure. The cure monitoring is based on acoustic impedance variance across a material interface and can be utilized over the full cure cycle change of the resin in the composite. Significant advantage of this method is the simplicity of the measurement, low cost of the wave-guide probe and the adaptability of the sensor configuration to various composite-processing environments

  15. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:28772498

  16. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-You Shie

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton’s jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

  17. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Ming-You; Chang, Wen-Ching; Wei, Li-Ju; Huang, Yu-Hsin; Chen, Chien-Han; Shih, Cheng-Ting; Chen, Yi-Wen; Shen, Yu-Fang

    2017-02-08

    Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is a limitation in the self-repair ability of the cartilage. Therefore, developing strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we report on a new liquid resin preparation process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid with application of the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells in this case showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and also facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

  18. Persistent contamination of heater-cooler units for extracorporeal circulation cured by chlorhexidine-alcohol in water tanks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano-Bertrand, S; Evrevin, M; Dupont, C; Frapier, J-M; Sinquet, J-C; Bousquet, E; Albat, B; Jumas-Bilak, E

    2018-01-11

    Recently, surgical site infections due to non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) have been linked to heater-cooler unit contamination. The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control and manufacturers now recommend the use of hydrogen peroxide in filtered water to fill heater-cooler unit tanks. After implementation of these measures in our hospital, heater-cooler units became heavily contaminated by opportunistic waterborne pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia. No NTM were detected but fast-growing resistant bacteria could impair their detection. The efficiency of hydrogen peroxide and chlorhexidine-alcohol was compared in situ. Chlorhexidine-alcohol treatment stopped waterborne pathogen contamination and NTM were not cultured whereas their detection efficiency was probably improved. Copyright © 2018 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. NASA's Impacts Towards Improving International Water Management Using Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toll, D. L.; Doorn, B.; Searby, N. D.; Entin, J. K.; Lawford, R. G.; Mohr, K. I.; Lee, C. M.

    2013-12-01

    Key objectives of the NASA's Water Resources and Capacity Building Programs are to discover and demonstrate innovative uses and practical benefits of NASA's advanced system technologies for improved water management. This presentation will emphasize NASA's water research, applications, and capacity building activities using satellites and models to contribute to water issues including water availability, transboundary water, flooding and droughts to international partners, particularly developing countries. NASA's free and open exchange of Earth data observations and products helps engage and improve integrated observation networks and enables national and multi-national regional water cycle research and applications that are especially useful in data sparse regions of most developing countries. NASA satellite and modeling products provide a huge volume of valuable data extending back over 50 years across a broad range of spatial (local to global) and temporal (hourly to decadal) scales and include many products that are available in near real time (see earthdata.nasa.gov). To further accomplish these objectives NASA works to actively partner with public and private groups (e.g. federal agencies, universities, NGO's, and industry) in the U.S. and internationally to ensure the broadest use of its satellites and related information and products and to collaborate with regional end users who know the regions and their needs best. The event will help demonstrate the strong partnering and the use of satellite data to provide synoptic and repetitive spatial coverage helping water managers' deal with complex issues. This presentation will outline and describe NASA's international water related research, applications and capacity building programs' efforts to address developing countries critical water challenges in Asia, African and Latin America. This will specifically highlight impacts and case studies from NASA's programs in Water Resources (e.g., drought, snow

  20. Determination of transmission factors of concretes with different water/cement ratio, curing condition, and dosage of cement and air entraining agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahin, Remzi; Polat, Recep; Icelli, Orhan; Celik, Cafer

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We determined transmission factors of parameters affecting properties of concrete. → The most important parameter is W/C ratio for attenuation of radiation of concrete. → Taguchi Method provides an appropriate methodology for parameter reduction. - Abstract: This study focuses on determination of transmission factors of main parameters affecting the properties of both normal- and heavy-weight concrete in order to increase knowledge and understanding of radiation attenuation in concrete at a later age. Water/cement (W/C) ratio, curing condition, cement quantity and air entraining agent (AEA) were selected as the main parameters. Eight energy values have been selected within the energy interval of 30.85-383.85 keV to be used in the radiation source. The Taguchi Method was used as the method of optimization. It was determined in the study that the most important parameter affecting the attenuation of the radiation of the concrete is the W/C ratio and the concretes produced with the lowest level of W/C ratio absorb more radiation. However, it was also determined that there was a combined effect between the W/C ratio and the cement dosage.

  1. Undergraduate Program Focuses on International Issues in Water Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Scott W.; Silliman, Stephen E.; Campana, Michael E.

    2004-03-01

    For the past two summers, faculty from the University of Notre Dame, the University of Nevada, Reno, and the University of New Mexico have directed a National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) site focusing on issues in international water resources. (See REU Site on Water Resources in Developing Countries, www.nd.edu/~reuwater/). The overarching objective of this project is to engage and educate U.S. students in the issues and problems facing the world's nations in water resource development and potable water supply. The stated goals of NSF's Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) program are to expand student participation in all areas of research, and specifically, to attract a diverse group of students into the fields of science and engineering, including graduate-level studies. In addition, international REU sites often seek to develop students who can be ``globally competen;'' that is, understand science and engineering in frameworks other than a North American perspective. (More information on international REU sites and site development can be found at www.nsftokyo.org/REU/ and www.nsf.gov/sbe/int/.)

  2. Cure Cycle Optimization of Rapidly Cured Out-Of-Autoclave Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqi Dong

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Out-of-autoclave prepreg typically needs a long cure cycle to guarantee good properties as the result of low processing pressure applied. It is essential to reduce the manufacturing time, achieve real cost reduction, and take full advantage of out-of-autoclave process. The focus of this paper is to reduce the cure cycle time and production cost while maintaining high laminate quality. A rapidly cured out-of-autoclave resin and relative prepreg were independently developed. To determine a suitable rapid cure procedure for the developed prepreg, the effect of heating rate, initial cure temperature, dwelling time, and post-cure time on the final laminate quality were evaluated and the factors were then optimized. As a result, a rapid cure procedure was determined. The results showed that the resin infiltration could be completed at the end of the initial cure stage and no obvious void could be seen in the laminate at this time. The laminate could achieve good internal quality using the optimized cure procedure. The mechanical test results showed that the laminates had a fiber volume fraction of 59–60% with a final glass transition temperature of 205 °C and excellent mechanical strength especially the flexural properties.

  3. Curing light burns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranley, Thomas J; Winkler, Mark; Dagate, John; Oncale, David; Strother, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    This study sought to reveal the potential heat generated by a light-emitting diode (LED) curing light, which has generally been considered to be relatively cool. It is likely that similarly designed curing lights will produce a similar level of heat and have the potential to cause damage to soft tissue.

  4. Grafting and curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.; Loo-Teck Ng; Visay Viengkhou

    1998-01-01

    Progress in radiation grafting and curing is briefly reviewed. The two processes are shown to be mechanistically related. The parameters influencing yields are examined particularly for grafting. For ionising radiation grafting systems (EB and gamma ray) these include solvents, substrate and monomer structure, dose and dose-rate, temperature and more recently role of additives. In addition, for UV grafting, the significance of photoinitiators is discussed. Current applications of radiation grafting and curing are outlined. The recent development of photoinitiator free grafting and curing is examined as well as the potential for the new excimer laser sources. The future application of both grafting and curing is considered, especially the significance of the occurrence of concurrent grafting during cure and its relevance in environmental considerations

  5. Domestic and international dimensions of transboundary water politics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Menga

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A considerable amount of research in the field of International Relations (IR has acknowledged the interplay between domestic politics and foreign policy. Few studies, however, have investigated this phenomenon in the narrower field of transboundary water politics. There is also a general lack of research exploring how the formation of a national identity can overlap with the construction of a large hydraulic infrastructure, and how this can have repercussions at the international level. This paper draws on Robert Putnam’s (1988 two-level game theory to illustrate how the interrelation between the domestic and the international dimensions matters in transboundary water politics. Perspectives from IR, political geography, and water politics serve to present a conceptual framework which is then linked to studies on nationalism. This helps to highlight the analytical relevance of such a perspective to understand the issue of large dams. The paper takes the cases of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam in Ethiopia and the Rogun Dam in Tajikistan as examples.

  6. Leaks in the internal water supply piping systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeniy Vladimirovich

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Great water losses in the internal plumbing of a building lead to the waste of money for a fence, purification and supply of water volumes in excess. This does not support the concept of water conservation and resource saving lying today in the basis of any building’s construction having plumbing. Leakage means unplanned of water losses systems in domestic water supply systems (hot or cold as a result of impaired integrity, complicating the operation of a system and leading to high costs of repair and equipment restoration. A large number of leaks occur in old buildings, where the regulatory service life of pipelines has come to an end, and the scheduled repair for some reason has not been conducted. Steel pipelines are used in the systems without any protection from corrosion and they get out of order. Leakages in new houses are also not uncommon. They usually occur as a result of low-quality adjustment of the system by workers. It also important to note the absence of certain skills of plumbers, who don’t conduct the inspections of in-house systems in time. Sometimes also the residents themselves forget to keep their pipeline systems and water fittings in their apartment in good condition. Plumbers are not systematically invited for preventive examinations to detect possible leaks in the domestic plumbing. The amount of unproductive losses increases while simultaneous use of valve tenants, and at the increase of the number of residents in the building. Water leaks in the system depend on the amount of water system piping damages, and damages of other elements, for example, water valves, connections, etc. The pressure in the leak area also plays an important role.

  7. Residual-based model diagnosis methods for mixture cure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Yingwei; Taylor, Jeremy M G

    2017-06-01

    Model diagnosis, an important issue in statistical modeling, has not yet been addressed adequately for cure models. We focus on mixture cure models in this work and propose some residual-based methods to examine the fit of the mixture cure model, particularly the fit of the latency part of the mixture cure model. The new methods extend the classical residual-based methods to the mixture cure model. Numerical work shows that the proposed methods are capable of detecting lack-of-fit of a mixture cure model, particularly in the latency part, such as outliers, improper covariate functional form, or nonproportionality in hazards if the proportional hazards assumption is employed in the latency part. The methods are illustrated with two real data sets that were previously analyzed with mixture cure models. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  8. Late-Age Properties of Concrete with Different Binders Cured under 45°C at Early Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Jin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is commonly accepted that high curing temperature (near 60°C or above results in reduced mechanical properties and durability of concrete compared to normal curing temperature. The internal temperature of concrete structures at early ages is not so high as 60°C in many circumstances. In this paper, concretes were cured at 45°C at early ages and their late-age properties were studied. The concrete cured at 20°C was employed as the reference sample. Four different concretes were used: plain cement concrete, concrete containing fly ash, concrete containing ground granulate blast furnace slag (GGBS, and concrete containing silica fume. The results show that, for each concrete, high-temperature curing after precuring does not have any adverse effect on the nonevaporable water content, compressive strength, permeability to chloride ions, and the connected porosity of concrete at late ages compared with standard curing. Additionally, high-temperature curing improves the late-age properties of concrete containing fly ash and GGBS.

  9. Muddy waters: International actors and transboundary water cooperation in the Ganges-Brahmaputra problemshed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Hanasz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The portion of the Ganges-Brahmaputra-Meghna mega-basin shared between Nepal, Bhutan, northern India, and Bangladesh is one of the poorest, most densely populated, ecologically vulnerable, and socially and politically unstable areas in the world. As such, reducing the potential for transboundary water conflict by increasing cooperation between riparian states has been of increasing interest to policy-makers and foreign aid donors. The World Bank-led South Asia Water Initiative (SAWI commenced in the mid-2000s. Yet, in more than a decade of existence, neither SAWI nor other international initiatives, have been able to improve transboundary water interactions between India, Nepal, Bhutan and Bangladesh. In part this is because of the sheer complexity of transboundary water governance, and in part because of contextual factors. Addressing transboundary water issues is not a priority for the riparian states; there is significant distrust between them and resentment about India’s hydro-hegemony; and bilateral, rather than multilateral, arrangements prevail. These factors make collective action both more urgent and more difficult. If they are to increase transboundary water cooperation, international actors should, among other things, resolve historical grievances; strengthen water-sharing institutions; build trust between riparian states; and work toward outcomes based on principles of water justice.

  10. Water permeation through the internal water pathway in activated GPCR rhodopsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsufumi Tomobe

    Full Text Available Rhodopsin is a light-driven G-protein-coupled receptor that mediates signal transduction in eyes. Internal water molecules mediate activation of the receptor in a rhodopsin cascade reaction and contribute to conformational stability of the receptor. However, it remains unclear how internal water molecules exchange between the bulk and protein inside, in particular through a putative solvent pore on the cytoplasmic. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we identified the solvent pore on cytoplasmic side in both the Meta II state and the Opsin. On the other hand, the solvent pore does not exist in the dark-adapted rhodopsin. We revealed two characteristic narrow regions located within the solvent pore in the Meta II state. The narrow regions distinguish bulk and the internal hydration sites, one of which is adjacent to the conserved structural motif "NPxxY". Water molecules in the solvent pore diffuse by pushing or sometimes jumping a preceding water molecule due to the geometry of the solvent pore. These findings revealed a total water flux between the bulk and the protein inside in the Meta II state, and suggested that these pathways provide water molecules to the crucial sites of the activated rhodopsin.

  11. Electron beam curing paint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tsutomu

    1991-04-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) type paint is paint that is specially prepared so that it can be cured and dried by electron beam irradiation. Electron beam irradiation achieves hardly any curing and drying of ordinary normal-temperature drying type paint or heat-drying type paint. The main type of paint in which an electron beam produces a curing reaction is one in which a radical polymerization reaction takes place under irradiation. The use of this EBC painting - drying system has been considered for a variety of fields since it has a number of special features such as the fact that the paint dries instantaneously, no heat is applied and no solvent is used. (Author)

  12. Upper internals arrangement for a pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singleton, Norman R; Altman, David A; Yu, Ching; Rex, James A; Forsyth, David R

    2013-07-09

    In a pressurized water reactor with all of the in-core instrumentation gaining access to the core through the reactor head, each fuel assembly in which the instrumentation is introduced is aligned with an upper internals instrumentation guide-way. In the elevations above the upper internals upper support assembly, the instrumentation is protected and aligned by upper mounted instrumentation columns that are part of the instrumentation guide-way and extend from the upper support assembly towards the reactor head in hue with a corresponding head penetration. The upper mounted instrumentation columns are supported laterally at one end by an upper guide tube and at the other end by the upper support plate.

  13. Features of internal water supply and water disposal of shopping centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeniy Vladimirovich

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pipeline from an external system should be inlet in the part of the building where a large number of water folding devices will be concentrated. As a rule, for shopping centers with a lot of water consumers it is necessary to make not less than three inputs, each of them should be connected to different areas of an external ring water supply system in order to make the work of the system more reliable.The places for water folding fittings in shopping centers are the following. The water folding devices: mixers are placed in sanitary cabins of shopping centers. Usually, for for water saving in buildings with a big pass-through capacity per hour it is reasonable to use contactless mixers, which are turned on upon raising a hand with a help of motion sensor or light sensor. Another important argument in favor of such mixers is prevention of infections spread for the reason that the consumer doesn't touch the device, so, the risk of bacteria transmission via the device decreases. Such mixer supplies water with a demanded expense and temperature. As a rule, water for such mixers moves from the centralized internal water supply system of hot water, mixing up with cold water. If there is no centralized hot water supply system, it is possible to use hot water storage heaters in case of a small number of visitors or to reject mixers at all in favor of the cranes giving water of only one temperature (cold, which is also practiced.For the branch of economic and household the water receivers are used, which are present in sanitary cabins in most cases by toilet bowls, wash basins, urinals.

  14. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglart, H. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Nuclear Reactor Technology; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnik

    2008-06-15

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4{sup th} generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  15. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglart, H.; Laurien, E.; Schulenberg, T.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4 th generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6 th Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  16. Internal doses to Ukrainian populations using Dnieper River water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkovski, V.; Ratia, G.; Nasvit, O.

    1996-01-01

    The dynamics of internal doses from 137 Cs and 90 Sr as a consequence of the use of Dnieper River water were calculated. Local peculiarities of municipal tap, irrigation, and fish consumption in the Ukraine were considered. The dynamics of 90 Sr accumulation in human bone as a result of the use of Dnieper water is simulated. The dose predictions are based on de facto data and the stochastic forecast of radionuclide concentrations in Dnieper reservoirs. A large array of statistical data on the age-structures of exposed populations, food consumption rate, agricultural production, fish contamination, and site-specific parameters were used. Exposures are estimated for 12 regions of the Dnieper basin and the Crimea Republic. The maximal individual annual committed effective doses are 1.7 x 10 -5 and 2.7 x 10 -5 Sv from 90 Sr and 137 Cs, respectively, due to the use of water in 1986 by members of the population in the Kievska region. Commercial fishermen on the Kievska reservoir, who consumed 360 kg y -1 of fish in 1986, received 4.7 x 10 -4 and 5 x 10 -3 Sv from 90 Sr and 137 Cs, respectively. The contributions to the collective (over 70 6) effective dose of irrigation, municipal tap water, and fish consumption for members of the general public, respectively, are 18%, 43%,39% in the Kievska region; 8%,25%,67% in the Poltavska region; 50% 50%, 0% (no Dnieper fish consumed) in the Crimea Republic. The predicted contribution of 90 Sr to collective dose resulting from the use of water is 80%. The collective dose to the population of the Dnieper regions (32.5 million people) is 3,000 person-Sv, due to the use of water. 14 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  17. Upgrades to the International Space Station Water Recovery System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayatin, Matthew J.; Pruitt, Jennifer M.; Nur, Mononita; Takada, Kevin C.; Carter, Layne

    2017-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Water Recovery System (WRS) includes the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) and the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The WRS produces potable water from a combination of crew urine (first processed through the UPA), crew latent, and Sabatier product water. Though the WRS has performed well since operations began in November 2008, several modifications have been identified to improve the overall system performance. These modifications aim to reduce resupply and improve overall system reliability, which is beneficial for the ongoing ISS mission as well as for future NASA manned missions. The following paper details efforts to improve the WPA through the use of reverse osmosis membrane technology to reduce the resupply mass of the WPA Multi-filtration Bed and improved catalyst for the WPA Catalytic Reactor to reduce the operational temperature and pressure. For the UPA, this paper discusses progress on various concepts for improving the reliability of the system, including the implementation of a more reliable drive belt, improved methods for managing condensate in the stationary bowl of the Distillation Assembly, and evaluating upgrades to the UPA vacuum pump.

  18. Radiation curing in the eighties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vrancken, A.

    1984-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction; what is radiation curing; history; radiation curable resins (with properties of products); ultraviolet and electron beam curing; photoinitiation and the ultraviolet light curing process; electron beam curing (initiation; electron beam accelerators); end uses (graphic arts; wood finishing; paper upgrading; adhesives; metal finishing; electronic chemical; floor coatings). (U.K.)

  19. Curing depth of composite resin light cured by LED and halogen light-curing units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calixto, L. R.; Lima, D. M.; Queiroz, R. S.; Rastelli, A. N. S.; Bagnato, V. S.; Andrade, M. F.

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the polymerization effectiveness of a composite resin (Z-250) utilizing microhardness testing. In total, 80 samples with thicknesses of 2 and 4 mm were made, which were photoactivated by a conventional halogen light-curing unit, and light-curing units based on LED. The samples were stored in water distilled for 24 h at 37°C. The Vickers microhardness was performed by the MMT-3 microhardness tester. The microhardness means obtained were as follows: G1, 72.88; G2, 69.35; G3, 67.66; G4, 69.71; G5, 70.95; G6, 75.19; G7, 72.96; and G8, 71.62. The data were submitted to an analysis of variance (ANOVA’s test), adopting a significance level of 5%. The results showed that, in general, there were no statistical differences between the halogen and LED light-curing units used with the same parameters.

  20. Effect of Particular Breed on the Chemical Composition, Texture, Color, and Sensorial Characteristics of Dry-cured Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Pil Nam; Park, Kuyng Mi; Kang, Sun Moon; Kang, Geun Ho; Cho, Soo Hyun; Park, Beom Young; Van Ba, Hoa

    2014-08-01

    The present study demonstrates the impact of specific breed on the characteristics of dry-cured ham. Eighty thighs from Korean native pig (KNP), crossbreed (Landrace×Yorkshire)♀×Duroc♂ (LYD), Berkshire (Ber), and Duroc (Du) pig breeds (n = 10 for each breed) were used for processing of dry-cured ham. The thighs were salted with 6% NaCl (w/w) and 100 ppm NaNO2, and total processing time was 413 days. The effects of breed on the physicochemical composition, texture, color and sensory characteristics were assessed on the biceps femoris muscle of the hams. The results revealed that the highest weight loss was found in the dry-cured ham of LYD breed and the lowest weight loss was found in Ber dry-cured ham. The KNP dry-cured ham contain higher intramuscular fat level than other breed hams (pham made from KNP breed had the lowest water activity value and highest salt content, while the LYD dry-cure ham had higher total volatile basic nitrogen content than the Ber and Du hams (pham while polyunsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in Du ham when compared to other breed hams (pham possessed higher Commission International de l'Eclairage (CIE) a* value, while the Du dry-cured ham had higher L*, CIE b* and hue angle values (phams with higher scores for color, aroma and taste found in KNP dry-cured ham as compared to other breed hams (phams. These data could be useful for meat processors to select the suitable breeds for economical manufacturing of high quality dry-cured hams.

  1. Effect of Particular Breed on the Chemical Composition, Texture, Color, and Sensorial Characteristics of Dry-cured Ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pil Nam Seong

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study demonstrates the impact of specific breed on the characteristics of dry-cured ham. Eighty thighs from Korean native pig (KNP, crossbreed (Landrace×Yorkshire♀×Duroc♂ (LYD, Berkshire (Ber, and Duroc (Du pig breeds (n = 10 for each breed were used for processing of dry-cured ham. The thighs were salted with 6% NaCl (w/w and 100 ppm NaNO2, and total processing time was 413 days. The effects of breed on the physicochemical composition, texture, color and sensory characteristics were assessed on the biceps femoris muscle of the hams. The results revealed that the highest weight loss was found in the dry-cured ham of LYD breed and the lowest weight loss was found in Ber dry-cured ham. The KNP dry-cured ham contain higher intramuscular fat level than other breed hams (p<0.05. It was observed that the dry-cured ham made from KNP breed had the lowest water activity value and highest salt content, while the LYD dry-cure ham had higher total volatile basic nitrogen content than the Ber and Du hams (p<0.05. Zinc, iron and total monounsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in KNP ham while polyunsaturated fatty acids levels were higher in Du ham when compared to other breed hams (p<0.05. Additionally, the KNP dry-cured ham possessed higher Commission International de l’Eclairage (CIE a* value, while the Du dry-cured ham had higher L*, CIE b* and hue angle values (p<0.05. Furthermore, breed significantly affected the sensory attributes of dry-cured hams with higher scores for color, aroma and taste found in KNP dry-cured ham as compared to other breed hams (p<0.05. The overall outcome of the study is that the breed has a potential effect on the specific chemical composition, texture, color and sensorial properties of dry-cured hams. These data could be useful for meat processors to select the suitable breeds for economical manufacturing of high quality dry-cured hams.

  2. Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kimura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Curing reaction of bisphenol-A based benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin and the properties of the cured thermosetting resin were investigated. The cure behavior of benzoxazine with cyanate ester resin was monitored by model reaction using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR. As a result of the model reaction, the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring and thermal self-cyclotrimerization of cyanate ester group occurred, and then the phenolic hydoroxyl group generated by the ring opening reaction of benzoxazine ring co-reacted with cyanate ester group. The properties of the cured thermosetting resin were estimated by mechanical properties, electrical resistivity, water resistance and heat resistance. The cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and cyanate ester resin showed good heat resistance, high electrical resistivity and high water resistance, compared with the cured thermosetting resin from benzoxazine and epoxy resin.

  3. Effect of curing conditions and ionic additives on properties of fly ash ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Ca(OH)2 and formed C–S–H (Farry et al 1989; Pietersen et al 1990). The hydrates formed possess cementitious ... to 325 kg/cm. 2. ). The test compacts were cured under two different conditions. In water curing the test specimens were immersed in water at ambient temperature. For steam curing the samples were kept in a.

  4. The Clay that Cures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 2. Hydrotalcite - The Clay that Cures. N Bejoy. General Article Volume 6 Issue 2 February 2001 pp 57-61. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/006/02/0057-0061. Author Affiliations.

  5. Beam in on curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, Dr.

    1981-01-01

    Electron beam curing of paints and allied materials is discussed. Examples of applications are: silicone papers; painting of metal; bonding of flake adhesives; bonding of grinding media (binders); paints for external uses; painting shaped parts; bi-reactive painting systems. An example is given of the calculation of the cost of irradiation. (U.K.)

  6. Influence of site curing on bond properties of reinforced lightweight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... the requirements for structural lightweight concrete. The developed compressive strength and pull-out strength under both site curing conditions were relatively lower than full water curing condition but still were higher than minimum requirement as per standard. Journal of Civil Engineering Research and Practice Vol.

  7. effect of curing methods on the compressive strength of concrete

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Civil Engineering, Federal University of Technology Yola, Nigeria. aEmail: gadzymo@yahoo.com (corresponding author). Abstract. Different curing methods are .... ing materials are commonly used for concrete curing. [6] stated that as hydration progresses, the amount of water in mortar pores reduces and.

  8. Water saving through international trade of agricultural products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapagain, Ashok; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Savenije, H.H.G.

    2006-01-01

    Many nations save domestic water resources by importing water-intensive products and exporting commodities that are less water intensive. National water saving through the import of a product can imply saving water at a global level if the flow is from sites with high to sites with low water

  9. Status of radiation curing in South America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, L.D.B.; Rotta, A.C.; Petrie, I.

    2007-01-01

    In August 2006, an agreement between the Rad tech International North America and the ATBCR, the Brazillian Technical Association for Radiation cure, turns ATCBR into RadTech South America. This new institution starts with already 10 years of history and pioneering technical experience and achievements in UV and EB radiation cure. Both RadTech institutions have asserted a whole cooperation and information exchange to continue with the initial ATBCR compromise in promoting UV and EB curing technology and to make it available to professionals, enterprise and other organizations. The RadTech South America has it's headquarter at the Energy and Nuclear Research Institute, IPEN, in Sao Paulo, Brazil, from whom also gets sponsorship. (Author)

  10. [Nonnius and the Spa cure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecomte, J; Lemli, J; Marganne, M H; Melard, M

    1996-01-01

    The 12th of July 1635, Jan van Beverwyck wrote a letter from Dordrecht to his esteemed friend Luis Nunez, in Antwerp. He asked him for indications about the cure of kidney stones of which he was suffering. He had just passed two calculi very painfully. Nunez answered on July 31. His letter summarized his own experience with this disease. In such cases, temperate diuretics and emollients are well indicated: ingestion of light decoctions of Malva and Viola, Caerefolium and Parieteria as well as Marshmallow syrup. No purge and no 'chemicals'. However, the best remedy was drinking Spa water. Usually the best way to absorb it is to come to the springs, in the Ardennes, part of the independent Principality of Liège. However, considering the horrors of the war (the Thirty Years War) endangering the country, van Beverwyck would be wise to drink imported water during 40 or 50 days, while staying home quietly, in Dordrecht. The letter points out the importance of provoked diuresis in the treatment of kidney stones. On the other hand the letter is an illustration of the continuing contacts between the United Provinces and the Spanish territories and of the commercial traffic between Antwerp, Dordrecht and Spa. The exported water was bottled from many 'pouhons'. It was acid, ferruginous, sulfurous and saturated with carbon dioxide; no pathogen germs, at least at the spring. Nunez quoted the large number of his patients cured with Spa water in Antwerp. This is an illustration of its commercial expansion even during this critical period.

  11. Realizing Conflict, Negotiation, and Cooperation Concepts in the Context of International Water Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinar, Ariel; McKinney, Daene

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we offer a negotiation and cooperative game theory application to international water in the classroom. A simulation game was developed for the Aral Sea water dispute as part of a textbook prepared for teaching a diverse group of students a graduate-level International Water course. A condensed version of the Aral Sea Basin water…

  12. The cytotoxicity of resin composites cured with three light curing units at different curing distances

    OpenAIRE

    Ergün, Gülfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Cekic Nagas, Isil

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of light curing distance on the cytotoxicity of five resin composites cured with three high-power light curing units. Study design: Seven cylindrical discs of each material (Grandio ®, Voco; Filtek ? Z250, 3M ESPE; Clearfil ? AP-X, Kuraray Co. Ltd.; Aelite ? LS, Bisco Inc. and Simile ®, Pentron) were cured. For curing, soft-up mode of quartz-tungsten-halogen, exponential mode of light emitting diode for 20 s, and ramp-curing m...

  13. Recent advances in cured raw ham manufacture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosse Née Danz, Ramona; Müller, Anne; Gibis, Monika; Weiss, Agnes; Schmidt, Herbert; Weiss, Jochen

    2018-03-04

    Cured raw hams are a valuable and popular group of meat products. The consumption and international trade have increased during the last years, therefore new technologies to accelerate the production process and to increase product quality and safety are needed. In the current review, an overview of European protected cured raw hams is presented. Furthermore, traditional methods for cured raw ham production together with recent advantages in the techniques for pretreatment (trimming, blade tenderization, and freeze-thawing), curing/salting (tumbling, vacuum impregnation, pulsed pressure, ultrasound, pulsed electric fields, simultaneous thawing/salting), drying/ripening (Quick-Dry-Slice-process, oil drop application, high temperature short time process) and postprocessing (vacuum and modified atmosphere packaging, high hydrostatic pressure, high pressure carbon dioxide, high pressure carbon dioxide with ultrasound) are described. Moreover, application techniques and effects of protective cultures and starter cultures, such as molds, yeasts, coagulase-negative staphylococci and lactic acid bacteria, on cured raw ham quality and safety are reviewed.

  14. Strategic importance of green water in international crop trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Aldaya, Maite; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Allan, J.A.

    Virtual water is the volume of water used to produce a commodity or service. By importing agricultural commodities and the virtual water embedded in them, a country saves the water it would have required to produce those commodities domestically. Virtual-water ‘trade’, thus, has the potential to

  15. Strategic importance of green water in international crop trade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Aldaya, Maite; Allan, J.A.; Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert

    2010-01-01

    Virtual water is the volume of water used to produce a commodity or service. Hitherto, most virtual water 'trade' studies have focused on its potential contribution to saving water, especially in water short regions. Very little, however, has been said about the opportunity cost of the associated

  16. Beam in on curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holl, Dr.

    1981-01-01

    This third part of an article on the electron beam curing of paints covers the following aspects: inertising equipment; working without inert gas; increase in temperature when irradiating; irradiating plants; laboratory plants; plant operating from coil to coil; plant for shaped parts; possible applications; decorative films, paper, PVC; packaging material; metallisation of paper films; film bonding; strengthening of flock; coating; pressure sensitive adhesives. (U.K.)

  17. Sunshine and saris equals safe drinking water | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-09

    Jun 9, 2016 ... Researchers from Canada and India funded by IDRC have found that filtering water through sari-cloth before purifying it in the sun's heat makes polluted water safe to drink. Polluted water is often the only source of drinking water for many low-income households in India. To kill the germs, people pour ...

  18. Working to reverse a water deficit | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Fayez Bataineh's desire to become a water engineer began when he was a young boy. "Even at a young age I saw the people suffering from a lack of water," he recalls. "I was sometimes obligated to go to the city to bring back water for my family. So I was always dreaming about water." SEE ALSO...

  19. Critical parameters for electron beam curing of cationic epoxies and property comparison of electron beam cured cationic epoxies versus thermal cured resins and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Norris, R.E.; Yarborough, K.; Lopata, V.J.

    1997-01-01

    Electron beam curing of composites is a nonthermal, nonautoclave curing process offering the following advantages compared to conventional thermal curing: substantially reduced manufacturing costs and curing times; improvements in part quality and performance; reduced environmental and health concerns; and improvements in material handling. In 1994 a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), sponsored by the Department of Energy Defense Programs and 10 industrial partners, was established to advance electron beam curing of composites. The CRADA has successfully developed hundreds of new toughened and untoughened resins, offering unlimited formulation and processing flexibility. Several patent applications have been filed for this work. Composites made from these easily processable, low shrinkage material match the performance of thermal cured composites and exhibit: low void contents comparable to autoclave cured composites (less than 1%); superb low water absorption values in the same range as cyanate esters (less than 1%); glass transition temperatures rivaling those of polyimides (greater than 390 C); mechanical properties comparable to high performance, autoclave cured composites; and excellent property retention after cryogenic and thermal cycling. These materials have been used to manufacture many composite parts using various fabrication processes including hand lay-up, tow placement, filament winding, resin transfer molding and vacuum assisted resin transfer molding

  20. Mechanical properties of provisional crown and bridge materials: chemical-curing versus dual-curing systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkenhol, Markus; Mautner, Meike Christina; Ferger, Paul; Wöstmann, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the flexural strength (FS) and flexural modulus (FM) of provisional crown and bridge materials at different storage times after mixing using materials with different curing mechanisms (dual-curing vs. self-curing). FS and FM of four proprietary materials (Trim, Luxatemp AM Plus, Luxatemp AM Plus Solar and Cool Temp Natural) were tested in a 3-point bending test according to EN ISO 4049:2000 at various times after mixing (37 degrees C dry/water) including thermocycling (5000x, 5-55 degrees C). Mean values of all measurements were calculated and subjected to the Games-Howell test (p=0.05) as well as a regression analysis (p=0.05). A two-way ANOVA (p=0.05) was used to identify the influence of the curing mechanism and chemical nature of the materials used. FS ranged between 11.1 and 24.0 MPa and FM between 82.5 and 548.2 MPa for all tested materials except for the dual-curing material (FS: 82.4 MPa; FM: 2060 MPa) 10 min after mixing. The r2-values, describing the goodness-of-fit of the regression curve for the relation between the mechanical properties and storage time, ranged from 0.701 to 0.979 for the composite based materials and 0.671 to 0.685 for the methacrylate resin. The chemical nature and curing mechanism significantly influenced (p<0.001) the mechanical properties, however, the influence of the curing mechanism disappeared at progressive points in time after mixing comparing Luxatemp AM Plus versus Luxatemp AM Plus Solar. FS and FM significantly depend on the time after mixing. Composite resin based materials are preferred versus methacrylate resins due to more favourable mechanical properties. If a high mechanical strength is indispensable directly after fabrication, a dual-curing provisional material is recommended.

  1. Accounting for Cured Patients in Cost-Effectiveness Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othus, Megan; Bansal, Aasthaa; Koepl, Lisel; Wagner, Samuel; Ramsey, Scott

    2017-04-01

    Economic evaluations often measure an intervention effect with mean overall survival (OS). Emerging types of cancer treatments offer the possibility of being "cured" in that patients can become long-term survivors whose risk of death is the same as that of a disease-free person. Describing cured and noncured patients with one shared mean value may provide a biased assessment of a therapy with a cured proportion. The purpose of this article is to explain how to incorporate the heterogeneity from cured patients into health economic evaluation. We analyzed clinical trial data from patients with advanced melanoma treated with ipilimumab (Ipi; n = 137) versus glycoprotein 100 (gp100; n = 136) with statistical methodology for mixture cure models. Both cured and noncured patients were subject to background mortality not related to cancer. When ignoring cured proportions, we found that patients treated with Ipi had an estimated mean OS that was 8 months longer than that of patients treated with gp100. Cure model analysis showed that the cured proportion drove this difference, with 21% cured on Ipi versus 6% cured on gp100. The mean OS among the noncured cohort patients was 10 and 9 months with Ipi and gp100, respectively. The mean OS among cured patients was 26 years on both arms. When ignoring cured proportions, we found that the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) when comparing Ipi with gp100 was $324,000/quality-adjusted life-year (QALY) (95% confidence interval $254,000-$600,000). With a mixture cure model, the ICER when comparing Ipi with gp100 was $113,000/QALY (95% confidence interval $101,000-$154,000). This analysis supports using cure modeling in health economic evaluation in advanced melanoma. When a proportion of patients may be long-term survivors, using cure models may reduce bias in OS estimates and provide more accurate estimates of health economic measures, including QALYs and ICERs. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics

  2. Therapeutic Endoscopic Retrograde Cholangiopancreatography in Pediatric Patients With Acute Recurrent and Chronic Pancreatitis: Data From the INSPPIRE (INternational Study group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troendle, David M; Fishman, Douglas S; Barth, Bradley A; Giefer, Matthew J; Lin, Tom K; Liu, Quin Y; Abu-El-Haija, Maisam; Bellin, Melena D; Durie, Peter R; Freedman, Steven D; Gariepy, Cheryl; Gonska, Tanja; Heyman, Melvin B; Himes, Ryan; Husain, Sohail Z; Kumar, Soma; Lowe, Mark E; Morinville, Veronique D; Ooi, Chee Y; Palermo, Joseph; Pohl, John F; Schwarzenberg, Sarah Jane; Werlin, Steven; Wilschanski, Michael; Zimmerman, M Bridget; Uc, Aliye

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize utilization and benefit of therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) in children with acute recurrent pancreatitis (ARP) or chronic pancreatitis (CP). From August 2012 to February 2015, 301 children with ARP or CP were enrolled in the INSPPIRE (INternational Study group of Pediatric Pancreatitis: In search for a cuRE) study. Physicians reported utilization and benefit of therapeutic ERCP at enrollment. Differences were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. One hundred seventeen children (38.9%) underwent at least 1 therapeutic ERCP. The procedure was more commonly performed in children with CP compared with those with ARP (65.8% vs 13.5%, P < 0.0001). Utility of therapeutic ERCP was reported to be similar between ARP and CP (53% vs 56%, P = 0.81) and was found to be helpful for at least 1 indication in both groups (53/99 patients [53.5%]). Predictors for undergoing therapeutic ERCP were presence of obstructive factors in ARP and CP, Hispanic ethnicity, or white race in CP. Therapeutic ERCP is frequently utilized in children with ARP or CP and may offer benefit in selected cases, specifically if ductal obstruction is present. Longitudinal studies are needed to clarify the efficacy of therapeutic ERCP and to explore subgroups that might have increased benefit from such intervention.

  3. The cytotoxicity of resin composites cured with three light curing units at different curing distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergun, Gulfem; Egilmez, Ferhan; Cekic-Nagas, Isil

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of light curing distance on the cytotoxicity of five resin composites cured with three high-power light curing units. Seven cylindrical discs of each material (Grandio®, Voco; Filtek™ Z250, 3M ESPE; Clearfil™ AP-X, Kuraray Co. Ltd.; Aelite™ LS, Bisco Inc. and Simile®, Pentron) were cured. For curing, soft-up mode of quartz-tungsten-halogen, exponential mode of light emitting diode for 20 s, and ramp-curing mode of plasma arc light curing units for 6 s were used. The curing tip distances were determined as 2 and 9 mm and controlled via the use of metal rings. After ageing the samples for 24 and 72 hours in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium/Ham's F12 (DMEM/F12), cytotoxicity of the extracts to cultured fibroblasts (L 929) was measured by using MTT (tetrazolium salt 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The degree of cytotoxicity for each sample was determined according to the reference value represented by the cells in a pure culture medium. Statistical significance was determined using multifactorial analysis of variance. The type of resin composite (p light curing unit (p curing tip distance (p light emitting diode and plasma arc light curing units were used (p=0.184, F=1.448). The results of this study suggest that the light curing units and resin composites should be harmonized to one another and the curing distance between the tip of the light curing unit and the restoration surface should be as close as possible in order to achieve maximal biocompatibility.

  4. ecosystem services and international water law: towards a more ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alistair Rieu-Clarke

    Global Water Partnership Technical Advisory Committee Integrated Water Resources. Management. 2 .... Principle 5: Conservation of ecosystem structure and functioning, in order to maintain ecosystem services, should be a ..... ecosystems act as sources for the largest supply of renewable fresh water, serving at least two ...

  5. International water and sanitation technology transfers, experiences from Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krozer, Yoram; Hophmayer Tokich, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Possibilities of transferring cost-effective, innovative water and wastewater technologies on public water markets are discussed based on experiences of the Dutch water business cluster in the Central and Eastern European Countries. These transfers evolved under suitable conditions, among others

  6. in_focus - Water: Local-level Management | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Today, more than 1 billion people lack access to safe drinking water. Within the next 25 years, fully one-third of the world's population will experience severe water scarcity. It is clear that disparities in the availability and supply of fresh water are truly a matter of life and death, and constitute one of the great governance ...

  7. Coping with water crisis in Cuba | IDRC - International Development ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Over the past ten years, Cuba's economic decline has led to a slow but steady deterioration of water supplies and sanitation services — and a resulting increase in water-borne disease. When water shortages in parts of Cuba reached crisis proportions last year, two communities solved the problem by taking matters in their ...

  8. Smart solutions to a worsening water crisis | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-01-23

    Jan 23, 2013 ... Innovative policies and new technologies that reduce water waste are helping countries across the Middle East and North Africa deal with chronic water shortages. Those advances spring from the simple idea that preventing water loss is effectively the same as giving parched countries new sources of ...

  9. Analyses of impacts of China's international trade on its water resources and uses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Y. Zhang

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available This study provides an insight into the impact of China's international trade of goods and services on its water resources and uses. Virtual water flows associated with China's international trade are quantified in an input-output framework. The analysis is scaled down to the sectoral and provincial levels to trace the origins and destinations of virtual water flows associated with the international trade. The results show that China is a net virtual water exporter of 4.8 × 1010 m3 yr−1, accounting for 2.1% of its renewable water resources and 8.6% of the total water use. Water scarce regions tend to have higher percentages of virtual water export relative to their water resources and water uses. In the water scarce Huang-Huai-Hai region, the net virtual water export accounts for 8.0% of the region's water resources and 11.3% of its water uses. For individual sectors, major net virtual water exporters are those where agriculture provides raw materials in the initial process of the production chain. The results suggest that China's economic gains from being a world "manufacture factory" have come at a high cost to its water resources.

  10. Characterization of Moisture Diffusion in Cured Concrete Slabs at Early Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the characterization of moisture diffusion inside early-age concrete slabs subjected to curing. Time-dependent relative humidity (RH distributions of three mixture proportions subjected to three different curing methods (i.e., air curing, water curing, and membrane-forming compounds curing and sealed condition were measured for 28 days. A one-dimensional nonlinear moisture diffusion partial differential equation (PDE based on Fick’s second law, which incorporates the effect of curing in the Dirichlet boundary condition using a concept of curing factor, is developed to simulate the diffusion process. Model parameters are calibrated by a genetic algorithm (GA. Experimental results show that the RH reducing rate inside concrete under air curing is greater than the rates under membrane-forming compound curing and water curing. It is shown that the effect of water-to-cement (w/c ratio on self-desiccation is significant. Lower w/c ratio tends to result in larger RH reduction. RH reduction considering both effect of diffusion and self-desiccation in early-age concrete is not sensitive to w/c ratio, but to curing method. Comparison between model simulation and experimental results indicates that the improved model is able to reflect the effect of curing on moisture diffusion in early-age concrete slabs.

  11. Modeling HIV Cure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelson, Alan; Conway, Jessica; Cao, Youfang

    A large effort is being made to find a means to cure HIV infection. I will present a dynamical model of post-treatment control (PTC) or ``functional cure'' of HIV-infection. Some patients treated with suppressive antiviral therapy have been taken off of therapy and then spontaneously control HIV infection such that the amount of virus in the circulation is maintained undetectable by clinical assays for years. The model explains PTC occurring in some patients by having a parameter regime in which the model exhibits bistability, with both a low and high steady state viral load being stable. The model makes a number of predictions about how to attain the low PTC steady state. Bistability in this model depends upon the immune response becoming exhausted when over stimulated. I will also present a generalization of the model in which immunotherapy can be used to reverse immune exhaustion and compare model predictions with experiments in SIV infected macaques given immunotherapy and then taken off of antiretroviral therapy. Lastly, if time permits, I will discuss one of the hurdles to true HIV eradication, latently infected cells, and present clinical trial data and a new model addressing pharmacological means of flushing out the latent reservoir. Supported by NIH Grants AI028433 and OD011095.

  12. Internal radiation doses from radioactivity of drinking water in Finland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahlos, H.; Asikainen, M.

    1980-01-01

    A study of the radioactivity of drinking water in Finland was carried out from 1974 to 1978. Samples were collected from nearly all water supply plants with more than 200 users and from privately dug or drilled wells. This paper considers drinking water as a factor in increasing the natural radiation exposure of the population and estimates the collective and per capita dose rates caused by the 222 Rn present in water. Instead of performing dose calculations, the significance of 226 Ra and uranium is assessed by means of daily intake. The assessment is made for both the whole population and three subgroups using the water from water supply plants and privately dug or drilled wells. (author)

  13. The situation of radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Weixiu

    1988-01-01

    Radiation curing is a branch of radiation processing. It has developed significantly and its annual growth rate exceeds 10% in the nineteen eighties. Several products were manufactured by radiation curing, such as magnetic media, release coating, floor tile, printing flates, optical fiber, electronics, lithography and pressure sensitive adhesives etc. The chemistry of radiation curing is often considered ahead. The safe handling of UV/EB curable material, the regulation of industial and the patent protection for development in radiation curing were introduced. The equipment and processes of this field have got progress recently

  14. Emerging risks from ballast water treatment: The run-up to the International Ballast Water Management Convention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Werschkun, B.; Banerji, S.; Basurko, O.C.; David, M.; Fuhr, F; Gollasch, S.; Grummt, T.; Haarich, M.; Jha, A.N.; Kacan, S.; Kehrer, A.; Linders, J.; Mesbahi, E.; Pughiuc, D.; Richardson, S.D.; Schwarz-Schulz, B.; Shah, A.; Theobald, N.; von Gunten, U.; Wieck, S.; Hofer, T.

    2014-01-01

    Uptake and discharge of ballast water by ocean-going ships contribute to the worldwide spread of aquatic invasive species, with negative impacts on the environment, economies, and public health. The International Ballast Water Management Convention aims at a global answer. The agreed standards for

  15. Internal Corrosion Control of Water Supply Systems Code of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    This Code of Practice is part of a series of publications by the IWA Specialist Group on Metals and Related Substances in Drinking Water. It complements the following IWA Specialist Group publications: 1. Best Practice Guide on the Control of Lead in Drinking Water 2. Best Prac...

  16. Water Demand Management for Social Justice | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-01-18

    Jan 18, 2012 ... Women and men have different interests in, and derive different benefits from, the availability, use and management of water. Research evidence is supporting the notion that involving women, along with men, in the design and management of water projects enhances the intended results of projects and ...

  17. Water Balances in the Eastern Mediterranean | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The roots of destabilization, migration, and local conflict around the world can often be traced to a lack of fresh water. As a result, the importance of fresh water to economic development, quality of life, ecosystem sustainability, and political stability is gaining renewed global recognition. In the Middle East and the countries of ...

  18. Science helps to calm water conflicts | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-08

    Dec 8, 2010 ... Cutting-edge computer modelling and consultation with local communities allowed Bolivia's Agua Sustentable to find political solutions to potentially disastrous clashes over water.Within Bolivia, the IDRC-supported research organization supplied the science underlying a 2004 national water law that ...

  19. Using water wisely to feed growing cities | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tunisia is helping to feed its growing cities by developing more efficient and sustainable agriculture that uses rainwater and recycled urban wastewater. The article Optimising Use of Water for Urban Agriculture: Responding to the challenge of growing water scarcity in Tunisia by Boubaker Houman and Bouraoui Moez, ...

  20. Influence of curing conditions on the sorptivity and weight change characteristics of self-compacting concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caliskan, S.

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports on a study carried out to investigate the influence of curing conditions on the capillary water absorption and weight change characteristics of self compacting concrete (SCC). Specimens were prepared using three types of concrete (SCC, Portland cement (PC), Fly ash (FA) concretes) and were cured under three different curing conditions (20C water and 20C and 40C air cure) for 28 days. Weight gain (water intake) in water curing and weight loss (water loss) in 20C and 40C air curing were recorded throughout the curing period. Compressive strength, water absorption and capillary water absorption tests were carried out at 28 days. The results indicated that FA concrete gained about 0.5% whilst PC and self-compacting concretes gained about 1.0% of the initial weight. This indicates that due to the slower reaction process more free water remains within FA concrete avoiding further water intake. In the weight loss study, FA concrete lost about 4.0% and 6.0% of the initial weight at 20C and 40C air curing, respectively; whereas SCC and PC concretes (both had almost identical values) lost about 3.2 and 5.2% at 20C and 40C, respectively. The absorption test results indicated that SCC gave the lowest captivity coefficient values followed by PC and FA concretes in all curing conditions. (author)

  1. Delayed cure bismaleimide resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Johnnie E.; Jamieson, Donald R.

    1984-08-07

    Polybismaleimides prepared by delayed curing of bis-imides having the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, Cl or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the --(CH.sub.2).sub.n -- group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine.

  2. Cure og giggle micturition..

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklebank, J T; Meadow, S R

    1981-01-01

    Two boys, aged 11 and 13, had involuntary, unstoppable, and complete emptying of the bladder on laughter. In one the wetting occurred only when standing and in company, but in the other occurred regardless of posture or company. One boy had a strong family history of wetting including a grandmother who had giggle micturition as a teenager. The symptoms had been present for between 1 and 2 years. However, unlike cases previously reported, each boy was cured--one within 6 weeks and the other within 6 months. It is not clear how much of the success was due to the general sympathetic and confidence-building measures used, advice about posture, or to the drug propantheline. PMID:7212764

  3. Introduction to reactor internal materials for pressurized water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Woo Suk; Hong, Joon Hwa; Jee, Se Hwan; Lee, Bong Sang; Kuk, Il Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-06-01

    This report reviewed the R and D states of reactor internal materials in order to be a reference for researches and engineers who are concerning on localization of the materials in the field or laboratory. General structure of PWR internals and material specification for YGN 3 and 4 were reviewed. States-of-arts on R and D of stainless steel and Alloy X-750 were reviewed, and degradation mechanisms of the components were analyzed. In order to develop the good domestic materials for reactor internal, following studies would be carried out: microstructure, sensitization behavior, fatigue property, irradiation-induced stress corrosion cracking/radiation-induced segregation, radiation embrittlement. (Author) 7 refs., 14 figs., 5 tabs.,.

  4. Water security - Nation state and international security implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, James A.; Andrew A. Campbell,

    2009-01-01

    A terrorist attack such as poisoning and sabotage of the national water supply and water-quality infrastructure of the continental United States or any country, could disrupt the delivery of vital human services, threaten both public health and the environment, potentially cause mass casualties and pose grave public concern for homeland security. Most significantly, an attack on water resources would weaken social cohesion and trust in government. A threat to continuity of services is a potential threat to continuity of government since both are necessary for continuity of operations. Water infrastructure is difficult to protect, as it extends over vast areas across the U.S. and for which ownership is overwhelmingly nonfederal (approximately 85 percent). Since the 9111 attacks, federal dam operators and water and wastewater utilities have established counter measures. Similar measures have been taken in countries around the world. These include enhanced physical security, improved coordination between corporate ownership, Department of Homeland Security, and local law enforcement, and research into risk assessment and vulnerability analysis to ensure greater system safety. A key issue is the proportionate additional resources directed at public and private sector specific priorities. Agencies that have the scientific and technological ability to leverage resources, exploit integrated science approaches, focus on interdisciplinary practices, utilize informatics expertise and employ a wide use of evolving technologies should play a key role in water security and related issues.

  5. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  6. Curing efficiency of dual-cure resin cement under zirconia with two different light curing units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gultekin, Pınar; Pak Tunc, Elif; Ongul, Deger; Turp, Volkan; Bultan, Ozgur; Karataslı, Burcin

    2015-01-01

    Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm) were prepared. For each group (n=12) resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED) or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT) light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96). The values of depth of cure (in mm) and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN) were evaluated for each specimen. The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (punit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (pLight curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  7. CURING EFFICIENCY OF DUAL-CURE RESIN CEMENT UNDER ZIRCONIA WITH TWO DIFFERENT LIGHT CURING UNITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar GÜLTEKİN

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Adequate polymerization is a crucial factor in obtaining optimal physical properties and a satisfying clinical performance from composite resin materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the polymerization efficiency of dual-cure resin cement cured with two different light curing units under zirconia structures having differing thicknesses. Materials and Methods: 4 zirconia discs framework in 4 mm diameter and in 0.5 mm, 1 mm and 1.5 mm thickness were prepared using computer-aided design system. One of the 0.5 mm-thick substructures was left as mono-layered whereas others were layered with feldspathic porcelain of same thickness and ceramic samples with 4 different thicknesses (0.5, 1, 1.5 and 2.0 mm were prepared. For each group (n=12 resin cement was light cured in polytetrafluoroethylene molds using Light Emitting Diode (LED or Quartz-Tungsten Halogen (QHT light curing units under each of 4 zirconia based discs (n=96. The values of depth of cure (in mm and the Vickers Hardness Number values (VHN were evaluated for each specimen. Results: The use of LED curing unit produced a greater depth of cure compared to QTH under ceramic discs with 0.5 and 1 mm thickness (p<0.05.At 100μm and 300 μm depth, the LED unit produced significantly greater VHN values compared to the QTH unit (p<0.05. At 500 μm depth, the difference between the VHN values of LED and QTH groups were not statistically significant. Conclusion: Light curing may not result in adequate resin cement polymerization under thick zirconia structures. LED light sources should be preferred over QTH for curing dual-cure resin cements, especially for those under thicker zirconia restorations.

  8. Internal Corrosion Direct Assessment Detection of Water (WP #205)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-12

    Internal corrosion of natural gas pipelines is the result of interaction between the inside pipe wall and impurities in the product being transported. Such interactions can lead to an overall loss of material thereby thinning the pipe wall and thus r...

  9. Water security of nations: how international trade affects national water scarity and dependency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Arjen Ysbert; Jones, J. Anthony A.; Vardanian, Trahel G.; Hakopian, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Import of water in virtual form, i.e. in the form of agricultural and industrial commodities, can be an effective means for water-scarce countries to preserve their domestic water resources. On the other hand, export of water-intensive commodities will increase the use and thus the scarcity of water

  10. Towards an HIV cure: a global scientific strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deeks, Steven G.; Autran, Brigitte; Berkhout, Ben; Benkirane, Monsef; Cairns, Scott; Chomont, Nicolas; Chun, Tae-Wook; Churchill, Melissa; Di Mascio, Michele; Katlama, Christine; Lafeuillade, Alain; Landay, Alan; Lederman, Michael; Lewin, Sharon R.; Maldarelli, Frank; Margolis, David; Markowitz, Martin; Martinez-Picado, Javier; Mullins, James I.; Mellors, John; Moreno, Santiago; O'Doherty, Una; Palmer, Sarah; Penicaud, Marie-Capucine; Peterlin, Matija; Poli, Guido; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Rouzioux, Christine; Silvestri, Guido; Stevenson, Mario; Telenti, Amalio; van Lint, Carine; Verdin, Eric; Woolfrey, Ann; Zaia, John; Barré-Sinoussi, Françoise

    2012-01-01

    Given the limitations of antiretroviral therapy and recent advances in our understanding of HIV persistence during effective treatment, there is a growing recognition that a cure for HIV infection is both needed and feasible. The International AIDS Society convened a group of international experts

  11. The Cross-fertilization between the Sustainable Development Goals and International Water Law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spijkers, O.

    2016-01-01

    Are the main principles of international water law, as reflected in the Watercourses Convention, sufficiently equipped to motivate States to sustainably manage their freshwater resources? This article suggests that a more pronounced sustainable approach to these principles is desirable. The

  12. The effect of curing conditions on the dentin bond strength of two dual-cure resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Atsuko; Takahashi, Rena; Nikaido, Toru; Tagami, Junji

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the curing condition (i.e., the curing mode and restoration thickness) on the tensile bond strength of a dual-cure resin cement applied to dentin. Indirect composite resin disks (1, 2, and 3mm in thickness) were prepared. The irradiance of a halogen light curing unit through each disk was measured by a curing radiometer. A measurement was also taken for the condition with no disk. Following this, two dual-cure resin cements, Panavia F2.0 and Panavia V5, were polymerized in either dual-cure mode or self-cure mode to bond the composite resin disk to the flat dentin surface. The specimens were sectioned and subjected to a microtensile bond strength (μTBS) test after 24h of water storage. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA followed with multiple comparisons by post-hoc Tukey's test (α=0.05). The irradiance values [mW/cm 2 ] measured through indirect composite resin disks were 600 (0mm), 200 (1mm), 90 (2mm), and not detected (3mm). Two-way ANOVA indicated that both the curing condition and the type of resin cement affected the μTBS (pPanavia V5 bonded to dentin were significantly higher than those of Panavia F2.0 bonded to dentin (pPanavia V5, showed higher dentin bonding than Panavia F2.0 in both dual- and self-cure modes. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Internals segmentation at Shoreham 850 MWe boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirsch, D.J.; Garvey, T.F.

    1993-01-01

    The decommissioning of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station required the removal and segmentation of the reactor internals. PCI Energy Services, a contractor specialising in remote cutting, machining, and welding performed this work. To make the required cuts, twenty-five different tools were designed, fabricated, assembled, and qualified. The tools included an internals work platform for cutting components in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), a Wet Cutting Station with a 15' long Plasma Arc Cutting torch delivery mast for segmenting components after removal from the Reactor Pressure Vessel, and a Dry Cutting Station for in-air segmenting of less contaminated components. Other tools included remote-operated torch delivery tools, remote vision systems, filtration systems, and airborne contaminant catchment systems. The work started in mid-June 1992 and was completed in November 9 1992, ahead of schedule and below the ALARA goal. (author)

  14. A home-based clean water revolution | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-08

    Dec 8, 2010 ... Highly effective yet simple BioSand Filters are providing clean water in more than 300000 homes around the world. Early support from IDRC helped launch the devices, which have improved the lives of countless people by freeing them from the constant threat of gastrointestinal disease.

  15. Virtual Water and Food Security in Tunisia | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Tunisia is an arid country, where water scarcity significantly limits agricultural production. As a result, the country imports most of its basic foods and all of its livestock feed, focusing its own agricultural production on high-value crops for export. Liberalization of agricultural trade and dependency on the world grain market has ...

  16. The Pampas are vanishing under water | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Today, 373,000 hectares of the province (nearly 5%) are under water. And that's only the tip of the iceberg: all of these vast and fertile grassy lowlands, known as the Pampas, are in the eye of the storm. "Flooding is the greatest natural disaster threatening Argentina. It accounts for 60% of current disasters and 95% of ...

  17. Excimer UV curing in printing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehnert, R.

    1999-01-01

    It is the aim of this study to investigate the potential of 308 run excimer UV curing in web and sheet fed offset printing and to discuss its present status. Using real-time FTIR-ATR and stationary or pulsed monochromatic (313 nm) irradiation chemical and physical factors affecting the curing speed of printing inks such as nature and concentration of photo-initiators, reactivity of the ink binding system, ink thickness and pigmentation, irradiance in the curing plane, oxygen concentration and nitrogen inerting, multiple pulse exposure, the photochemical dark reaction and temperature dependence were studied. The results were used to select optimum conditions for excimer UV curing in respect to ink reactivity, nitrogen inerting and UV exposure and to build an excimer UV curing unit consisting of two 50 W/cm 308 run excimer lamps, power supply, cooling and inerting unit. The excimer UV curing devices were tested under realistic conditions on a web offset press zirkon supra forte and a sheet fed press Heidelberg GTO 52. Maximum curing speeds of 300 m/min in web offset and 8000 sheets per hour in sheet fed offset were obtained

  18. Effects of internal waves on sound propagation in the shallow waters of the continental shelves

    OpenAIRE

    Ong, Ming Yi

    2016-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Sound waves propagating through the oceans are refracted by internal waves. In the shallow waters of the continental shelves, an additional downward refraction of sound waves due to internal waves can cause them to interact more often with the seabed, resulting in additional energy from the sound waves being dissipated into the seabed. This study investigates how internal waves affect sound propagation on the continental shelves. It fi...

  19. Water Rights in Bolivia — After the Water War | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-12-08

    Dec 8, 2010 ... Achieving Water Rights Consensus in Bolivia This was the challenge: help broker broad-based consensus on water legislation in Bolivia in the wake of violent social conflict over water rights — and after 32 previous attempts at introducing water legislation had failed. A daunting task, yet IDRC-supported ...

  20. Nuclear desalination of sea water. Proceedings of an international symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    About 250 participants from 24 Member States and seven international organizations took part in the Symposium. A wide variety of topics related to nuclear desalination were reviewed and discussed. These covered the activities of some organizations and institutes, the experience gained in existing nuclear desalination plants and their facilities, national and bilateral programmes, including research, design and development, forecasts for the future and the challenges that lie ahead. It is hoped that the Proceedings will be of value to technical, financial and regulatory decision makers associated with nuclear desalination

  1. The irradiation curing of coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Autio, T.

    1974-01-01

    The electron beam irradiation curing of coatings has been technically feasible for over a decade. A brief description of the process is presented. The progress in this field has been astonishingly slow in comparison with the use of UV lamps as radiation source. The primary reason for this has been the great advantage in terms of capital cost of the UV curing lines and their ready adaptability to low or high production rates. A literature survey is given concerning basic and applied research in the electron curing area, patents, economics and existing installations around the world. (author)

  2. Self-Shrinkage Behaviors of Waste Paper Fiber Reinforced Cement Paste considering Its Self-Curing Effect at Early-Ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengwu Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper was to study how the early-age self-shrinkage behavior of cement paste is affected by the addition of the waste paper fibers under sealed conditions. Although the primary focus was to determine whether the waste paper fibers are suitable to mitigate self-shrinkage as an internal curing agent under different adding ways, evaluating their strength, pore structure, and hydration properties provided further insight into the self-cured behavior of cement paste. Under the wet mixing condition, the waste paper fibers could mitigate the self-shrinkage of cement paste and, at additions of 0.2% by mass of cement, the waste paper fibers were found to show significant self-shrinkage cracking control while providing some internal curing. In addition, the self-curing efficiency results were analyzed based on the strength and the self-shrinkage behaviors of cement paste. Results indicated that, under a low water cement ratio, an optimal dosage and adding ways of the waste paper fibers could enhance the self-curing efficiency of cement paste.

  3. Storage of Eggs in Water Affects Internal Egg Quality, Embryonic Development, and Hatchling Quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Reijrink, I.A.M.; Hoekstra, L.A.; Kemp, B.

    2008-01-01

    In a series of experiments, effects of storage of eggs in water on internal egg quality, embryonic development, and hatchling quality were investigated. In experiment 1, unfertilized eggs were stored for 4 to 14 d in water (W) or air (control; C). In experiment 2, fertilized eggs were stored for 3

  4. Industrial application of radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    The contents are advantages of radiation processes - a solvent-free system, less energy consumative, higher production rate, processability at ambient temperature; electron beams vs. ultraviolet curing; applications -broad spectrum of markets use radiation curable materials

  5. Effect of curing mode on the micro-mechanical properties of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilie, Nicoleta; Simon, Alexander

    2012-04-01

    Light supplying to luting resin cements is impeded in several clinical situations, causing us to question whether materials can properly be cured to achieve adequately (or adequate) mechanical properties. The aim of this study was therefore to analyse the effect of light on the micro-mechanical properties of eight popular dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements by comparing them with two conventional, also dual-cured, resin cements. Four different curing procedures were applied: auto-polymerisation (dark curing) and light curing (LED unit, Freelight 2, 20 s) by applying the unit directly on the samples' surface, at a distance of 5 and 10 mm. Twenty minutes after curing, the samples were stored for 1 week at 37°C in a water-saturated atmosphere. The micro-mechanical properties-Vickers hardness, modulus of elasticity, creep and elastic/plastic deformation-were measured. Data were analysed with multivariate ANOVA followed by Tukey's test and partial eta-squared statistics (p micro-mechanical properties was measured, whereas the influence of the curing procedure and type of cement-conventional or self-adhesive-was generally low. The influence of light on the polymerisation process was material dependent, with four different behaviour patterns to be distinguished. As a material category, significantly higher micro-mechanical properties were measured for the conventional compared to the self-adhesive resin cements, although this difference was low. Within the self-adhesive resin cements group, the variation in micro-mechanical properties was high. The selection of suitable resin cements should be done by considering, besides its adhesive properties, its micro-mechanical properties and curing behaviour also.

  6. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito Corcione, Carola; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-01-01

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness. PMID:28788215

  7. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, Carola Esposito; Freuli, Fabrizio; Frigione, Mariaenrica

    2014-09-22

    The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness.

  8. Cold-Curing Structural Epoxy Resins: Analysis of the Curing Reaction as a Function of Curing Time and Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carola Esposito Corcione

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The curing reaction of a commercial cold-curing structural epoxy resin, specifically formulated for civil engineering applications, was analyzed by thermal analysis as a function of the curing time and the sample thickness. Original and remarkable results regarding the effects of curing time on the glass transition temperature and on the residual heat of reaction of the cold-cured epoxy were obtained. The influence of the sample thickness on the curing reaction of the cold-cured resin was also deeply investigated. A highly exothermal reaction, based on a self-activated frontal polymerization reaction, was supposed and verified trough a suitable temperature signal acquisition system, specifically realized for this measurement. This is one of the first studies carried out on the curing behavior of these peculiar cold-cured epoxy resins as a function of curing time and thickness.

  9. Cure Terapeutiche Residenziali

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Whittaker, James K.; Holmes, Lisa; del Valle, Jorge F.; Ainsworth, Frank; Andreassen, Tore; Anglin, James P.; Bellonci, Christopher; Berridge, David; Bravo, Amaia; Canali, Cinzia; Courtney, Mark; Currey, Laurah; Daly, Daniel L.; Gilligan, Robbie; Grietens, Hans; Harder, Annemiek T.; Holden, Martha J.; James, Sigrid; Kendrick, Andrew; Knorth, Erik J.; Lausten, Mette; Lyons, John S.; Martin, Eduardo; McDermid, Samantha; McNamara, Patricia; Palareti, Laura; Ramsey, Susan; Sisson, Kari M.; Small, Richard W.; Thoburn, June; Thompson, Ronald; Zeira, Anat

    2017-01-01

    In many developed countries around the world residential care interventions for children and adolescents have come under increasing scrutiny. Against this background an international summit was organised in England (spring 2016) with experts from 13 countries to reflect on therapeutic residential

  10. Sustainable access to safe drinking water: fundamental human right in the international and national scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Maran de Oliveira

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Access to potable water is absolutely essential to the maintenance of life, as well as to provide regular exercise of other human rights. The lack of access to water in sufficient quantity or access to non-potable water may cause serious and irreparable damage to people. This paper investigates the evolution of international and national recognition of this fundamental human right, whether implicit or explicit. This was accomplished by the study of international human rights treaties, bibliographic information on water resources and their corresponding legal systems, national and international. The results suggest that sustainable access to drinking water is a fundamental human right in the context of international relations and the State. Further, even without explicitly stating this right in the Constitution of 1988, Brazil has incorporated the main international provisions on the subject, but this right must be acknowledged according to the principles of non-typical fundamental rights and the dignity of the human person. This right should be universally guaranteed by the Government in sufficient quantity and quality, regardless of the economic resources of individuals.

  11. Depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedalino, Inaam; Hartup, Grant R; Vandewalle, Kraig S

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, manufacturers have introduced flowable composite resins that reportedly can be placed in increments of 4 mm or greater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the depth of cure of bulk-fill flowable composite resins (SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Venus Bulk Fill) and a conventional flowable composite resin (Revolution Formula 2). Depth of cure was measured in terms of bottom-maximum Knoop hardness number (KHN) ratios and the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 4049 scrape technique. Shades A2 and A3 of SureFil SDR Flow, Grandio Flow, and Revolution Formula 2 were tested. Venus Bulk Fill was tested in its only available shade (universal). Specimens in thicknesses of 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 mm were polymerized for 20 or 40 seconds, and a hardness tester was used to determine the hardness ratios for each shade at each thickness. For the scraping technique, after specimens were exposed to the curing light, unpolymerized composite resin was removed with a plastic instrument, the polymerized composite was measured, and the length was divided by 2 per ISO guidelines. According to the KHN ratios and the scrape test, Venus Bulk Fill predictably exceeded the manufacturer's claim of a 4-mm depth of cure at both 20 and 40 seconds of curing time. The overall results for depth of cure showed that Venus Bulk Fill ≥ SureFil SDR Flow ≥ Grandio Flow ≥ Revolution Formula 2.

  12. Room Temperature Curing Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    UJ LU LU LU UJ LU W -Q U "O 26 -- - -■- — ■ ■- ■ MBti ^L. IIIIIIII.IHI.I|.UHI,IW’I»;I.!I"IT,U» mpwi«ŕ "^Wl be 190,000 psi which is consistent...was added to the mixture. After 1 hour benzene and water were added and the mixture was stirred until the salt was dissolved. The organic ...for 15 minutes and then cooled to room temperature. The mixture was extracted with two 100 ml portions of water. The organic layer was dried (MgS04

  13. Cure Schedule for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 11.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCoy, John D. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Henkel technical data sheet (TDS) for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 11 lists three alternate cure schedules for the material, each of which would result in a different state of reaction and different material properties. Here, a cure schedule that attains full reaction of the material is defined. The use of this cure schedule will eliminate variance in material properties due to changes in the cure state of the material, and the cure schedule will serve as the method to make material prior to characterizing properties. The following recommendation was motivated by (1) a desire to cure at a single temperature for ease of manufacture and (2) a desire to keep the cure temperature low (to minimize residual stress build-up associated with the cooldown from the cure temperature to room temperature) without excessively limiting the cure reaction due to vitrification (i.e., material glass transition temperature, Tg, exceeding cure temperature).

  14. Emerging risks from ballast water treatment: the run-up to the International Ballast Water Management Convention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werschkun, Barbara; Banerji, Sangeeta; Basurko, Oihane C; David, Matej; Fuhr, Frank; Gollasch, Stephan; Grummt, Tamara; Haarich, Michael; Jha, Awadhesh N; Kacan, Stefan; Kehrer, Anja; Linders, Jan; Mesbahi, Ehsan; Pughiuc, Dandu; Richardson, Susan D; Schwarz-Schulz, Beatrice; Shah, Amisha; Theobald, Norbert; von Gunten, Urs; Wieck, Stefanie; Höfer, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Uptake and discharge of ballast water by ocean-going ships contribute to the worldwide spread of aquatic invasive species, with negative impacts on the environment, economies, and public health. The International Ballast Water Management Convention aims at a global answer. The agreed standards for ballast water discharge will require ballast water treatment. Systems based on various physical and/or chemical methods were developed for on-board installation and approved by the International Maritime Organization. Most common are combinations of high-performance filters with oxidizing chemicals or UV radiation. A well-known problem of oxidative water treatment is the formation of disinfection by-products, many of which show genotoxicity, carcinogenicity, or other long-term toxicity. In natural biota, genetic damages can affect reproductive success and ultimately impact biodiversity. The future exposure towards chemicals from ballast water treatment can only be estimated, based on land-based testing of treatment systems, mathematical models, and exposure scenarios. Systematic studies on the chemistry of oxidants in seawater are lacking, as are data about the background levels of disinfection by-products in the oceans and strategies for monitoring future developments. The international approval procedure of ballast water treatment systems compares the estimated exposure levels of individual substances with their experimental toxicity. While well established in many substance regulations, this approach is also criticised for its simplification, which may disregard critical aspects such as multiple exposures and long-term sub-lethal effects. Moreover, a truly holistic sustainability assessment would need to take into account factors beyond chemical hazards, e.g. energy consumption, air pollution or waste generation. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Benefits of Sealed-Curing on Compressive Strength of Fly Ash-Based Geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujeong; van Riessen, Arie; Chon, Chul-Min

    2016-01-01

    There is no standardized procedure for producing geopolymers; therefore, many researchers develop their own procedures for mixing and curing to achieve good workability and strength development. The curing scheme adopted is important in achieving maximum performance of resultant geopolymers. In this study, we evaluated the impact of sealed and unsealed curing on mechanical strength of geopolymers. Fly ash-based geopolymers cured in sealed and unsealed moulds clearly revealed that retention of water during curing resulted in superior strength development. The average compressive strength of sealed-cured geopolymers measured after 1 day of curing was a modest 50 MPa, while after 7 day curing the average compressive strength increased to 120~135 MPa. In the unsealed specimens the average compressive strength of geopolymers was lower; ranging from 60 to 90 MPa with a slight increase as the curing period increased. Microcracking caused by dehydration is postulated to cause the strength decrease in the unsealed cured samples. These results show that water is a crucial component for the evolution of high strength three-dimensional cross-linked networks in geopolymers. PMID:28773720

  16. Virtual water flows in the international trade of agricultural products of China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Jinhe; Tang, Guorong; Chen, Min; Wang, Lachun

    2016-07-01

    With the rapid development of the economy and population, water scarcity and poor water quality caused by water pollution have become increasingly severe in China. Virtual water trade is a useful tool to alleviate water shortage. This paper focuses on a comprehensive study of China's international virtual water flows from agricultural products trade and completes a diachronic analysis from 2001 to 2013. The results show that China was in trade surplus in relation to the virtual water trade of agricultural products. The exported virtual water amounted to 29.94billionm(3)/yr. while 155.55billionm(3)/yr. was embedded in imported products. The trend that China exported virtual water per year was on the decline while the imported was on a rising trend. Virtual water trade of China was highly concentrated. Not all of the exported products had comparative advantages in virtual water content. Imported products were excessively concentrated on water intensive agricultural products such as soya beans, cotton, and palm oil. The exported virtual water mainly flowed to the Republic of Korea, Hong Kong of China and Japan, while the imported mainly flowed from the United States of America, Brazil and Argentina. From the ethical point of view, the trade partners were classified into four types in terms of "net import" and "water abundance": mutual benefit countries, such as Australia and Canada; unilateral benefit countries, such as Mongolia and Norway; supported countries, such as Egypt and Singapore; and double pressure countries, such as India and Pakistan. Virtual water strategy refers to water resources, agricultural products and human beings. The findings are beneficial for innovating water resources management system, adjusting trade structure, ensuring food security in China, and promoting the construction of national ecological security system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effective drinking water collaborations are not accidental: interagency relationships in the international water utility sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalba, D I; Cromar, N J; Pollard, S J T; Charrois, J W; Bradshaw, R; Hrudey, S E

    2014-02-01

    The role that deficient institutional relationships have played in aggravating drinking water incidents over the last 30 years has been identified in several inquiries of high profile drinking water safety events, peer-reviewed articles and media reports. These indicate that collaboration between water utilities and public health agencies (PHAs) during normal operations, and in emergencies, needs improvement. Here, critical elements of these interagency collaborations, that can be integrated within the corporate risk management structures of water utilities and PHAs alike, were identified using a grounded theory approach and 51 semi-structured interviews with utility and PHA staff. Core determinants of effective interagency relationships are discussed. Intentionally maintained functional relationships represent a key ingredient in assuring the delivery of safe, high quality drinking water. © 2013.

  18. Effect of curing conditions on the mechanical properties of mortars with superabsorbent polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Esteves, L. P.; Paiva, H.; Ferreira, V. M.; Cachim, P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the effect of curing conditions on the mechanical properties of mortars containing superabsorbent polymers (SAP). Curing temperature and relative humidity were varied from 20 to 40 ºC and 30 to 95%, respectively, in mixes with different water/cement and cement/aggregate ratios. Tensile and compressive strength tests were performed at several ages. Weight loss over time was measured and related to curing conditions and strength. The addition of SAPs was found to effectivel...

  19. Effect of In-Situ Curing on Compressive Strength of Reactive Powder Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bali Ika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A development of Reactive Powder Concrete (RPC currently is the use of quartz powder as a stabilizing agent with the content to cement ratio of 30% and steam curing method in an autoclave temperature of 250ºC which produced a high compressive strength of 180 MPa. That RPC can be generated due to one reason for using the technique of steam curing in an autoclave in the laboratory. This study proposes in-situ curing method in order the curing can be applied in the field and with a reasonable compressive strength results of RPC. As the benchmarks in this study are the curing methods in laboratory that are steam curing of 90°C for 8 hours (C1, and water curing for 28 days (C2. For the in-situ curing methods that are covering with tarpaulins and flowed steam of 3 hours per day for 7 days (C3, covering with wet sacks for 28 days (C4, and covering with wet sacks for 28 days for specimen with unwashed sand as fine aggregate (C5. The comparison of compressive strength of the specimens in this study showed compressive strength of RPC with in-situ steam curing (101.64 MPa close to the compressive strength of RPC with steam curing in the laboratory with 8.2% of different. While in-situ wet curing compared with the water curing in laboratory has the different of 3.4%. These results indicated that the proposed in-situ curing methods are reasonable good in term of the compressive strength that can be achieved.

  20. UV-Cured Inkjet-Printed Silver Gate Electrode with Low Electrical Resistivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Honglong; Zhou, Yicong; Fang, Zhiqiang; Yao, Rihui; Tao, Ruiqiang; Chen, Jianqiu; Cai, Wei; Zhu, Zhennan; Yang, Caigui; Wei, Jinglin; Wang, Lei; Peng, Junbiao

    2017-09-01

    Inkjet-printed silver gate electrode with low electrical resistivity was fabricated by UV curing method. By adjusting the UV curing time and the distance between the samples and UV lamp, the effects of UV curing conditions on the electrical resistivity of the silver films were studied, and the lowest electrical resistivity of 6.69 × 10-8 Ω·m was obtained. Besides, the UV-cured silver films have good adhesion to the glass substrates, with adhesion strength of 4B (ASTM international standard). Our work offered an easy and low temperature approach to fabricate inkjet-printed silver electrodes with low electrical resistivity.

  1. Influence of the curing cycles on the fatigue performance of unidirectional glass fiber reinforced epoxy composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hüther, Jonas; Brøndsted, Povl

    2016-01-01

    During the manufacturing process of fiber reinforced polymers the curing reaction of the resin results in shrinkage of the resin and introduces internal stresses in the composites. When curing at higher temperatures in order to shorten up the processing time, higher curing stresses and thermal...... stresses are built up and frozen, as residual stresses occur. In the present work, a glass fiber reinforced epoxy composite laminate with an unidirectional architecture based on non-crimp fabrics with backing fibers is investigated. Three different curing cycles (time-temperature cycles) are used, leading...

  2. Effect of prestorage curing on storage life, internal and external qualities of sweet orange (Citrus sinensis Efeito da cura antes do armazenameto no prazo de conservação, qualidades internas e externas da laranja doce (Citrus sinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abiola Titilola Aborisade

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Orange fruits from two seasons, in April and August 2006 representing late 2005 and early 2006 harvests respectively were cured in hot air at 36-37(0C to 1%, 3%, 5% and 7% weight loss before storage at 28(0C and 86% relative humidity (RH. The fruits were observed for incidence of decay, further weight loss, juice content, firmness or softening of the peel, total soluble solids (TSS, pH, titratable acidity, and colour during storage. Curing reduced the incidence of decay. All control fruits were rotten by day 21 in August harvest while 22.5% of the control was rotten by day 56 in the April harvest. Storage life was extended beyond 56 days in fruits cured with 1, 3, 5 and 7% in April harvest as there was no decay throughout, while decay incidence in August harvest was 88.9, 61.1, 22.2 and 31.3% in 1, 3, 5 and 7% respectively. Penicillium digitatum, Phytophthora sp., Alternaria citri and Collectotrichum gloeosporioides were among decay causing moulds detected. Control fruits lost more weight during storage than cured fruits did. Fruit rind hardening was more noticed in the control and those cured to 1% weight loss, especially from the April harvest. It was insignificant in other treatments in both trials. Titratable acidity, pH, juice content and TSS were not affected by the treatment. Colour change to yellow was however retarded by curing. Curing to 5% weight loss was best for decay control and quality retention.Frutos de laranjas de duas safras, de Abril e de Agosto de 2006 representando colheitas do final de 2005 e começo de 2006 respectivamente foram curados em ar quente a 36-37(0C até a perda de peso de 1%, 3%, 5% e 7% antes do armazenamento a 28(0C e 86% de umidade relativa (UR. Os frutos foram observados quanto à incidência de apodrecimento, mais tarde perda de peso, conteúdo de suco, firmeza ou amolecimento da casca, sólidos solúveis totais (TSS, pH, acidez titúlavel, e coloração durante o armazenamento. A cura diminuiu a incid

  3. Health risk assessment of haloacetonitriles in drinking water based on internal dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Han, Xuemei; Niu, Zhiguang

    2018-05-01

    To estimate the health risk of haloacetonitriles in different kinds of drinking water, the concentrations of haloacetonitriles in tap water, boiled water and direct drinking water were detected. The physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model was used to calculate internal dose in the human body for haloacetonitriles through ingestion, and the probability distributions of the non-carcinogenic risk of haloacetonitriles for human via drinking water were assessed. This study found that the mean concentrations of dichloroacetonitrile (DCAN) in tap water, boiled water and direct drinking water were 0.955 μg/L, 0.207 μg/L and 0.127 μg/L, and those of dibromoacetonitrile (DBAN) were 0.221 μg/L, 0.104 μg/L, 0.089 μg/L, respectively. In China, direct drinking water is used most frequently, so the concentrations of haloacetonitriles in direct drinking water were used to obtain data on the internal dose of haloacetonitriles. In addition, the simulation results for the PBPK model showed that the highest and lowest concentrations of DCAN occurred in the liver and venous blood, respectively. The peak concentrations of DBAN in each tissue were in the decreasing order liver > rapidly perfused tissue > kidney > slowly perfused tissues > fat > arterial blood (venous blood). In addition, the highest 95th percentile hazard quotients (HQ) value of haloacetonitriles via drinking water for humans was 8.89 × 10 -3 , much lower than 1. The 95th percentile hazard index (HI) was 0.046, which was also lower than 1, suggesting that there was no obvious non-carcinogenic risk. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The UN Convention on International Watercourses and integrated water management: A bridge built

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzatzaki, Vasiliki-Maria

    2008-11-01

    The UN Convention on the Law of the Non Navigational Uses of International Watercourses incorporates principles regarding the management of international water resources. The most important principles are the duty of the riparian states to cooperate, not to cause significant harm, to protect the aquatic environment and to utilize the watercourses reasonably and equitably. The lack of hierarchy between these principles signifies that the necessary step for the sound management of shared natural resources is an integrated approach, which takes into account economic development, human needs and environmental protection. Moreover, the UN Convention proved to be useful for the International Court of Justice (hereinafter ICJ) in the settlement of the Gabcikovo- Nagymaros dispute between Hungary and Slovakia for the Danube River. The Court highlighted the importance of the Convention by reminding the riparian states of their obligation to abide by its principles. On the other hand, the ICJ has used the principles of the Convention in the pending case of Pulp Mills between Uruguay and Argentina. This paper is going to show that the UN Convention is an international legal framework with general guidelines in order to create regional conventions, which promotes integrated water management as a solution to the emerging challenges of international water law and potential future conflicts.

  5. Changes in the Characteristics of Water-in-Oil-based High Internal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Changes in the Characteristics of Water-in-Oil-based High Internal Phase Emulsion Containing Moringa Leaves Extract at Various Storage Conditions. ... Conclusion: Moringa HIPE showed stability and can be guided exclusively to protect skin against ultraviolet radiation-mediated oxidative damage. Keywords: Moringa ...

  6. The effect of curing conditions on the durability of high performance concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumanis, G.; Bajare, D.

    2017-10-01

    This study researches compressive strength and durability of the high strength self-compacting concrete (SCC) impacted at early stage by the curing conditions. The mixture compositions of metakaolin containing waste and cenospheres as partial cement replacement (15 wt%) were compared to reference SCC with 100% cement. The specimens prepared in advance were demoulded 24h after casting of the SCC and the specific curing conditions were applied for up to 28 days: standard water curing at 20°C (i); indoor curing at 20°C, RH 60% (ii) and low temperature air curing (2°C) at RH 60% (iii). Results indicate that at early stage (14 days) indoor curing conditions increase compressive strength of the SCC whilst no strength loss has been detected even at a low temperature curing. The further strength gain has been substantially reduced for samples cured indoor and at a low temperature with significant variation observed for long term compressive strength (180 days). The metakaolin containing waste has proved to be an effective partial cement replacement and it has improved strength gain even at a low temperature curing. Meanwhile cenospheres have reduced the SCC strength and with no positive effect on strength observed within the standard term. Freeze-thaw durability and resistance to the chloride penetration have been improved for the SCC cured at low temperature. The SCC with metakaolin containing waste has proved to be the most durable thus demonstrating importance of effective micro filler use.

  7. Simulated localized wear of resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems with different curing mode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Watanabe, Hidehiko; Johnson, William W; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2018-01-29

    This study evaluated the simulated localized wear of resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems using different curing modes. Five resin luting cements for universal adhesive systems were evaluated and subsequently subjected to wear challenge in a Leinfelder-Suzuki wear simulation device. Overall, 20 specimens from each resin luting cement were photo-cured for 40 s (dual-cure group), and 20 specimens of each material were not photo-cured (chemical-cure group). Simulated localized wear was generated using a stainless steel ball-bearing antagonist in water slurry of polymethylmethacrylate beads. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations of resin luting cements and wear facets were conducted. Significant differences in simulated wear and SEM observations of wear facets were evident among the materials in the dual- and chemical-cure groups. The simulated wear and SEM observations of wear facets of G-CEM LinkForce and Panavia V5 were not influenced by the curing mode. SEM observations of resin luting cements were material dependent. In most cases, dual curing appears to ensure greater wear resistance of resin luting cements than chemical curing alone. The wear resistance of some resin luting cements appears to be material dependent and is not influenced by the curing mode.

  8. Advances in spot curing technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burga, R.

    1999-01-01

    A brief review of spot curing technology was presented. The process which a spot of energy of a specific wavelength bandwidth and irradiance is used to cause a coating, encapsulant or adhesive to change from a liquid to a solid state

  9. Electron beam curing of coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujioka, S.; Fujikawa, Z.

    1974-01-01

    Electron beam curing (EBC) method, by which hardened coating film is obtained by polymerizing and cross-linking paint with electron beam, has finally reached industrialized stage. While about seven items such as short curing time, high efficiency of energy consumption, and homogeneous curing are enumerated as the advantages of EBC method, it has limitations of the isolation requirement from air needing the injection of inert gas, and considerable amount of initial investment. In the electron accelerators employed in EBC method, the accelerating voltage is 250 to 750 kV, and the tube current is several tens of mA to 200 mA. As an example of EBC applications, EBC ''Erio'' steel sheet was developed by the cooperative research of Nippon Steel Corp., Dai-Nippon Printing Co. and Toray Industries, Inc. It is a high-class pre-coated metal product made from galvanized steel sheets, and the flat sheets with cured coating are sold, and final products are fabricated by being worked in various shapes in users. It seems necessary to develop the paint which enables to raise added value by adopting the EBC method. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Cure shrinkage in casting resins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, J. Brock [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    A method is described whereby the shrinkage of a casting resin can be determined. Values for the shrinkage of several resin systems in frequent use by Sandia have been measured. A discussion of possible methods for determining the stresses generated by cure shrinkage and thermal contraction is also included.

  11. Light curing through glass ceramics: effect of curing mode on micromechanical properties of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate micromechanical properties of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes including light curing through glass ceramic materials. Vickers hardness (VH) and indentation modulus (Y HU) of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA were measured after 1 week of storage (37 °C, 100 % humidity). The resin cements were tested following self-curing or light curing with the second-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit Elipar FreeLight 2 in Standard Mode (1,545 mW/cm(2)) or with the third-generation LED curing unit VALO in High Power Mode (1,869 mW/cm(2)) or in XtraPower Mode (3,505 mW/cm(2)). Light curing was performed directly or through glass ceramic discs of 1.5 or 3 mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. VH and Y HU were analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). RelyX Unicem 2 Automix resulted in the highest VH and Y HU followed by BeautiCem SA, BisCem, SpeedCEM, and finally Panavia F2.0. Self-curing of RelyX Unicem 2 Automix and SpeedCEM lowered VH and Y HU compared to light curing whereas self-curing of Panavia F2.0, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA led to similar or significantly higher VH and Y HU compared to light curing. Generally, direct light curing resulted in similar or lower VH and Y HU compared to light curing through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. Light curing through 3-mm-thick discs of IPS e.max CAD generally reduced VH and Y HU for all resin cements except SpeedCEM, which was the least affected by light curing through ceramic discs. The resin cements responded heterogeneously to changes in curing mode. The applied irradiances and light curing times adequately cured the resin cements even through 1.5-mm-thick ceramic discs. When light curing resin cements through thick glass ceramic restorations, clinicians should consider to prolong the light curing times even with LED curing units providing high

  12. Influence of curing regimes on compressive strength of ultra high ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present paper is aimed to identify an efficient curing regime for ultra high performance concrete (UHPC), to achieve a target compressive strength more than 150 MPa, using indigenous materials. The thermal regime plays a vital role due to the limited fineness of ingredients and low water/binder ratio. By activation of the ...

  13. Internal hydraulic control in the Little Belt, Denmark - observations of flow configurations and water mass formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtegaard Nielsen, Morten; Vang, Torben; Chresten Lund-Hansen, Lars

    2017-12-01

    Internal hydraulic control, which occurs when stratified water masses are forced through an abrupt constriction, plays an enormous role in nature on both large and regional scales with respect to dynamics, circulation, and water mass formation. Despite a growing literature on this subject surprisingly few direct observations have been made that conclusively show the existence of and the circumstances related to internal hydraulic control in nature. In this study we present observations from the Little Belt, Denmark, one of three narrow straits connecting the Baltic Sea and the North Sea. The observations (comprised primarily of along-strait, detailed transects of salinity and temperature; continuous observations of flow velocity, salinity, and temperature at a permanent station; and numerous vertical profiles of salinity, temperature, fluorescence, and flow velocity in various locations) show that internal hydraulic control is a frequently occurring phenomenon in the Little Belt. The observations, which are limited to south-going flows of approximately two-layered water masses, show that internal hydraulic control may take either of two configurations, i.e. the lower or the upper layer being the active, accelerating one. This is connected to the depth of the pycnocline on the upstream side and the topography, which is both deepening and contracting toward the narrow part of the Little Belt. The existence of two possible flow configurations is known from theoretical and laboratory studies, but we believe that this has never been observed in nature and reported before. The water masses formed by the intense mixing, which is tightly connected with the presence of control, may be found far downstream of the point of control. The observations show that these particular water masses are associated with chlorophyll concentrations that are considerably higher than in adjacent water masses, showing that control has a considerable influence on the primary production and

  14. Dynamics of Proton Transfer to Internal Water during the Photosynthetic Oxygen-Evolving Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmachari, Udita; Barry, Bridgette A

    2016-11-10

    In photosynthesis, the light-driven oxidation of water is a sustainable process, which converts solar to chemical energy and produces protons and oxygen. To enable biomimetic strategies, the mechanism of photosynthetic oxygen evolution must be elucidated. Here, we provide information concerning a critical step in the oxygen-evolving, or S-state, cycle. During this S 3 -to-S 0 transition, oxygen is produced, and substrate water binds to the manganese-calcium catalytic site. Our spectroscopic and H 2 18 O labeling experiments show that this S 3 -to-S 0 step is associated with the protonation of an internal water cluster in a hydrogen-bonding network, which contains calcium. When compared to the protonated water cluster, formed during a preceding step, the S 1 -to-S 2 transition, the S 3 -to-S 0 hydronium ion is likely to be coordinated by additional water molecules. This evidence shows that internal water and the hydrogen bonding network act as a transient proton acceptor at multiple points in the oxygen-evolving cycle.

  15. Trends in the wide web converting markets for UV curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.

    1999-01-01

    As we prepare to enter a new decade, the use of ultraviolet (UV) energy to initiate the polymerization of coatings in the wide web segment of the Converting industry continues to increase. As is typical in the Converting industry, while many of the significant advances in technology have been developed around the world, they have been driven initially by the Western European markets. This was true with regards to the introduction of water-borne Pressure Sensitive Adhesives and thermal curing 100% solids silicone release coatings during the late 1970s and early 1980s, but this trend has changed with regards to the current state-of-the-art in UV curing

  16. Internal waves and surf zone water quality at Huntington Beach, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, H.; Santoro, A.; Nidzieko, N. J.; Hench, J. L.; Boehm, A. B.

    2011-12-01

    This study characterized diurnal, semi-diurnal, and high-frequency internal wave field at Huntington Beach, California, USA and the connection between internal waves and surf zone water quality. An array of oceanographic moorings was deployed in the summer of 2005 and 2006 at 10-20 meter depths offshore of the beach to observe internal waves and cross-shore exchange. Concurrently, surf zone water quality was assessed twice daily at an adjacent station (Huntington State Beach) with measurements of phosphate, dissolved inorganic nitrogen, silicate, chlorophyll a, fecal indicator bacteria, and the human-specific fecal DNA marker in Bacteroidales. Spectral analysis of water temperature shows well-defined spectral peaks at diurnal and semi-diurnal frequencies. Complex Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis of observed currents reveals that the baroclinic component (summation of second to fifth principal components) accounted for 30% of the total variance in the currents in both years, indicating the importance of density-driven flow during the summer when the water column was stratified. The major axis of the first principal component was oriented alongshore, whereas that of the second and third principal components made an angle of 25 to 55 degree with the cross-shore direction. Arrival of cold subthermocline water in the very near shore (within 1 km of the surf zone) was characterized by strong onshore flow near the bottom of the water column. The near bottom, baroclinic, cross-shore current was significantly lag-correlated with the near bottom temperature data along a cross-shore transect towards shore, indicative of shoreward transport of cold subthermocline water. Wavelet analysis of temperature data showed that non-stationary temperature fluctuations were correlated with buoyancy frequency and the near bottom cross-shore baroclinic current. During periods of large temperature fluctuations, the majority of the variance was within the semi-diurnal band; however, the

  17. International Comparison of Water Resources Utilization Efficiency in the Silk Road Economic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Long; Ma, Jing; Deng, Wei; Wang, Yong

    2018-03-01

    In order to get knowledge of the standard of water utilization of the Silk Road Economic Belt from international point of view, the paper analyzes the annual variation of water resources utilization in the Silk Road Economic Belt, and compares with other typical countries. The study shows that Water resources utilization efficiency has been greatly improved in recent 20 years and the water consumption per USD 10000 of GDP has been declined 87.97%. the improvement of industrial water consumption efficiency is the key driving factors for substantial decrease in water consumption.The comparison of water utilization and human development shows that the higher HDI the country is, the more efficient water utilization the country has. water consumption per USD 10000 of GDP in country with HDI>0.9 is 194m³, being 8.5% of that in country with HDI from 0.5 to 0.6. On the premise of maintaining the stable economic and social development of the Silk Road Economic Belt, the realization of the control target of total water consumption must depend on the strict control over the disorderly expansion of irrigated area, the change in the mode of economic growth, the implementation of the development strategy for new industrialization and urbanization, vigorous development of the processing industry with low water consumption as well as the high-tech and high value-added industry. Only in this way, the control target of total water consumption can be realized in the process of completing the industrialization task.

  18. Is There a Cure for Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... also is possible that a person cured of Cushing disease might not recover their previous mental strength, including ... impairments in patients with long-term cure of Cushing’s disease. Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, 95 (6), ...

  19. Radiation sources EB and UV curing machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takashi Sasaki

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes electron beam processors and related technologies for curing applications to facilitate those industrial personals who are trying to understand and evaluate the applicability and benefits of radiation curing to their products. 4 tabs., 10 figs

  20. Survival of selected foodborne pathogens on dry cured pork loins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Partera, Ángela M; Cardoso-Toset, Fernando; Jurado-Martos, Francisco; Astorga, Rafael J; Huerta, Belén; Luque, Inmaculada; Tarradas, Carmen; Gómez-Laguna, Jaime

    2017-10-03

    The safety of ready-to-eat products such as cured pork loins must be guaranteed by the food industry. In the present study, the efficacy of the dry curing process of pork loins obtained from free-range pigs in the reduction of three of the most important foodborne pathogens is analysed. A total of 28 pork loin segments, with an average weight of 0.57±0.12kg, were divided into four groups with three being inoculated by immersion with 7logCFU/ml of either Salmonella Typhimurium, Campylobacter coli or Listeria innocua and the last one inoculated by immersion with sterile medium (control group). The loin segments were treated with a seasoning mixture of curing agents and spices, packed in a synthetic sausage casing and cured for 64days. Microbiological analysis, pH and water activity (a w ) were assessed at four stages. The values of pH and a w decreased with curing time as expected. S. Typhimurium and C. coli dropped significantly (3.28 and 2.14 log units, respectively), but limited reduction of L. innocua (0.84 log unit) was observed along the curing process. In our study, three factors were considered critical: the initial concentration of the bacteria, the progressive reduction of pH and the reduction of a w values. Our results encourage performing periodic analysis at different stages of the manufacturing of dry cured pork loins to ensure the absence of the three evaluated foodborne pathogens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Coal-water slurry fuel internal combustion engine and method for operating same

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillian, Michael H.

    1992-01-01

    An internal combustion engine fueled with a coal-water slurry is described. About 90 percent of the coal-water slurry charge utilized in the power cycle of the engine is directly injected into the main combustion chamber where it is ignited by a hot stream of combustion gases discharged from a pilot combustion chamber of a size less than about 10 percent of the total clearance volume of main combustion chamber with the piston at top dead center. The stream of hot combustion gases is provided by injecting less than about 10 percent of the total coal-water slurry charge into the pilot combustion chamber and using a portion of the air from the main combustion chamber that has been heated by the walls defining the pilot combustion chamber as the ignition source for the coal-water slurry injected into the pilot combustion chamber.

  2. 3. SEGMITE International Symposium on Sustainable Development of Surface and Ground Water Resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tabrez, A.R.

    1999-01-01

    The Society of Economic Geologist and Mineral Technologist (SEGMITE), National Institute of Oceanography (NIO) and Association of Geo-scientists for International Development with the collaboration of Export Promotion Bureau, Government of Pakistan has organised this symposium. The third Segmite International Symposium on Sustainable Development of surface and ground water resources was held on 8-10 march 1999 at Karachi, Pakistan. This book gives the conference information, brochure and abstracts of papers presented in the conference. There are about 38 abstracts submitted for the conference and related nature of the materials. Out of these 38 papers 16 are of nuclear oriented which are presented here separately. (A.B.)

  3. The fog problem in Central Asia - Deficiencies in international community research to support water and food security

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Froebrich, J.; Wegerich, K.

    2007-01-01

    Central Asian water planning following international policy recommendations and `blue prints¿ has caused more harm rather than benefiting local communities. International research has not been sufficient to contribute in practical terms to water and food security. This paper reflects potential

  4. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser On-Orbit Functionality Versus Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Lovell, Randal W.

    2010-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently provides potable water dispensing for rehydrating crewmember food and drinking packages. There is one system located in the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and one system in the Russian Segment. Shuttle mission STS-126 delivered the USOS Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) to ISS on ULF2; subsequent activation occurred on November 2008. The PWD is capable of supporting an ISS crew of six, but nominally supplies only half this crew size. The PWD design provides incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to US food and beverage packages. PWD receives iodinated water from the US Water Recovery System (WRS) Fuel Cell Water Bus, which feeds from the Water Processing Assembly (WPA). The PWD removes the biocidal iodine to make the water potable prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit supplies up to 2.0 L of hot water (65 to 93 ?C) every 30 min. During a single meal, this quantity of water supports three to four crewmembers? food rehydration and beverages. The unit design has a functional life expectancy of 10 years, with replacement of limited life items, such as filters. To date, the PWD on-orbit performance is acceptable. Since activation of the PWD, there were several differences between on-orbit functionality and expected performance of hardware design. The comparison of on-orbit functionality to performance of hardware design is discussed for the following key areas: 1) microbial contamination, 2) no-dispense and water leakage scenarios, and 3) under-dispense scenarios.

  5. Influence of seawater mixing and curing on strength characteristics and porosity of ground granulated blast-furnace slag concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adiwijaya; Hamada, H.; Sagawa, Y.; Yamamoto, D.

    2017-11-01

    Generally, in the concrete industry, several billion tons of fresh water are annually used for mixing water, curing water and cleaning water. Nevertheless, the utilization of seawater in the concrete industry is prohibited, because it increases the risk of corrosion of steel bars in concrete. This study presents strength characteristics and porosity of seawater mixed concrete and tap water mixed concrete incorporating Ground Granulated Blast-Furnace Slag (GGBS) with water-binder ratio (W/B) of 40%, 50% and 60%. The influence of seawater mixing, GGBS and curing conditions such as tap water curing (TC), seawater curing (SC) and air curing (AC) on the strength and porosity of concrete were evaluated. Based on investigation result, it was shown that there is no significant influence of seawater mixing in improving strength of GGBS concrete up to 365 days in TC and SC. Effectiveness of seawater-mixing on strength enhancement of GGBS concrete is larger in air curing than in water curing. Porosity of seawater-mixed concrete is decreased compared to tap water-mixed concrete in all curing conditions.

  6. Cities and Water Security in the Anthropocene: Research Challenges and Opportunities for International Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Castro Pereira

    Full Text Available Abstract Cities have become important actors in international relations, and integral to security and environmental politics. We are living in an increasingly urban world, dominated by human settlements and activities. The central role now played by humans in shaping the planet has led us into an uncertain, unstable, and dangerous geological epoch – the Anthropocene – that poses great and additional challenges to security. Local and global spheres are connected as never before, generating ‘glocal’ issues in which water plays a central role. Water is the element that interconnects the complex web of food, energy, climate, economic growth, and human security. In a rapidly urbanising world, cities influence the hydrological cycle in major but uncertain ways, affecting water resources beyond their boundaries. There is no doubt that these issues are highly relevant to the discipline of International Relations (IR. However, IR scholars have been slow to engage with them, and most academic studies of cities and water security still emanate from the natural sciences. This article examines the ways in which cities in the Anthropocene challenge water security, and why IR needs to reinvent itself if it wants to sustain its contribution to global security.

  7. Effect of bench cooling on the dimensional accuracy of heat-cured acrylic denture base material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Suguru; Kobayashi, Norihiko; Kobayashi, Kihei; Kawara, Misao

    2005-01-01

    In order to obtain an insight on the internal stress caused by both polymerization and thermal shrinkage during the fabrication process of heat-cured denture resin, the effect of bench cooling on the dimensional accuracy of a heat-cured denture base resin was examined. A dimensional change of a dumbbell-shaped specimen during the fabrication process was measured directly by using the strain gauge method. After polymerization, the specimens were treated in one of the following two processing methods: (1) rapid cooling: the specimen was removed from a stone mold within a container of boiling water at 100 degrees C and then left to cool in a thermo-stabilized room of 20+/-1 degrees C; (2) bench cooling: the flask was left to cool in a thermo-stabilized room of 20+/-1 degrees C for 140min, after which, the specimen was removed from the stone mold. The strain from deflasking was derived from the difference in the strain, before and after the removal of the specimen from the stone mold. The strain differential, before and after cooling, was determined as the total strain. The bench cooling for the heat-cured denture base resin reduced the strain caused by thermal shrinkage during the fabrication process. The observed reduction in the strain was 26% for the C(L) (direction of center's length), 11% for the E(L) (direction of left-edge's length), and 12% for the E(W) (direction of left-edge's width), when compared with the results obtained from the rapid-cooling method. The flask should be slowly cooled to room temperature, since the internal stress developed by thermal shrinkage will be relaxed during the cooling process.

  8. Water droplets' internal fluidity during horizontal motion on a superhydrophobic surface with an external electric field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Munetoshi; Kono, Hiroki; Nakajima, Akira; Sakai, Hideki; Abe, Masahiko; Fujishima, Akira

    2010-02-02

    On a superhydrophobic surface, the internal fluidity of water droplets with different volumes (15, 30 microL) and their horizontal motion in an external electric field were evaluated using particle image velocimetry (PIV). For driving of water droplets on a superhydrophobic coating between parallel electrodes, it was important to place them at appropriate positions. Droplets moved with slipping. Small droplets showed deformation that is more remarkable. Results show that the dielectrophoretic force induced the initial droplet motion and that the surface potential gradient drove the droplets after reaching the middle point between electrodes.

  9. International symposium and field seminar on karst waters and environmental impacts. Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunay, G.; Tezcan, L.; Atilla, A.O.

    1995-01-01

    The international symposium and field seminar on karst waters and environmental impacts was held on 10-20 September 1995 in Beldibi,Antalya, Turkey. The specialists discussed COST Action 65, Environmental Impact sand Legal Aspects, Engineering and Environmental Impacts of Karst, Research Methods, Tracing Techniques, Hydro chemistry, Environmental Isotopes in Karst, Transport Processing, Modeling and Flow Systems, Karst Morphology and Paleoenvironment, Regional Karst Systems, James F. Quinlay Pollution Control and Karst Water Protection Session and Hydrology. Almost 140 papers were presented in the meeting

  10. The curing behavior and properties of phthalonitrile resins using ionic liquids as a new class of curing agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Cheng

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Binary blends composed of 1,3-bis (3,4-dicyanophenoxy benzene (3BOCN and ionic liquids (ILs with different molecular structures were prepared. The curing behavior of these 3BOCN/ILs blends were studied by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC and rheological analysis. The study suggested that the blends possessed a wide processing window and the structures of ILs (anion, cation and alkyl chain length at cation had an effect on curing behavior. The 3BOCN/[EPy]BF4 resins were prepared at elevated temperature. IR spectra of the resins showed that there were triazine and isoindoline formed in curing process. The TGA and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA revealed that the resins have excellent thermal stability together with high storage modulus and high glass transition temperature (Tg. Dielectric properties, long term oxidative aging and water uptake measurements of the resins suggested the IL brought some unique properties to the resins.

  11. An International Survey of Electric Storage Tank Water Heater Efficiency and Standards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Alissa; Lutz, James; McNeil, Michael A.; Covary, Theo

    2013-11-13

    Water heating is a main consumer of energy in households, especially in temperate and cold climates. In South Africa, where hot water is typically provided by electric resistance storage tank water heaters (geysers), water heating energy consumption exceeds cooking, refrigeration, and lighting to be the most consumptive single electric appliance in the home. A recent analysis for the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) performed by the authors estimated that standing losses from electric geysers contributed over 1,000 kWh to the annual electricity bill for South African households that used them. In order to reduce this burden, the South African government is currently pursuing a programme of Energy Efficiency Standards and Labelling (EES&L) for electric appliances, including geysers. In addition, Eskom has a history of promoting heat pump water heaters (HPWH) through incentive programs, which can further reduce energy consumption. This paper provides a survey of international electric storage water heater test procedures and efficiency metrics which can serve as a reference for comparison with proposed geyser standards and ratings in South Africa. Additionally it provides a sample of efficiency technologies employed to improve the efficiency of electric storage water heaters, and outlines programs to promote adoption of improved efficiency. Finally, it surveys current programs used to promote HPWH and considers the potential for this technology to address peak demand more effectively than reduction of standby losses alone

  12. Aging considerations for PWR [pressurized water reactor] control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes age-related degradation mechanisms affecting life extension of pressurized water reactor control rod drive mechanisms and reactor internals. The major sources of age-related degradation for control rod drive mechanisms are thermal transients such as plant heatups and cooldowns, latchings and unlatchings, long-term aging effects on electrical insulation, and the high temperature corrosive environment. Flow induced loads, the high-temperature corrosive environment, radiation exposure, and high tensile stresses in bolts all contribute to aging related degradation of reactor internals. Another problem has been wear and fretting of instrument guide tubes. The paper also discusses age-related failures that have occurred to date in pressurized water reactors

  13. Influence of internal tides on Antarctic Bottom Water propagation through abyssal channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Eugene

    2010-05-01

    Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW) propagates in the Atlantic Ocean from the Weddell Sea to the north through narrow passages in submarine ridges. Submarine ridges are regions of strong internal tide generation in the ocean that causes mixing and eventually AABW loses its distinguishing properties such as low temperature and salinity. The Vema Fracture Zone (11 N) and Romanche Fracture Zone (equator) in the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) are pathways for AABW to the Northeast Atlantic. The deep basin of the Northeast Atlantic (Canary Basin and Gambia Abyssal Plain) are filled with the bottom water propagating through the Vema FZ rather than through the equatorial fracture zones because strong internal tides and mixing over the slopes of the MAR near the equator cause warming of AABW and decrease of its density. Further propagation of AABW through the Kane Gap is low. Recent field measurements in the fracture zones confirm this concept based on modeling results. Results of recent cruises are presented.

  14. UV-cured polymer optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñón, Victor; Santiago, Freddie; Vogelsberg, Ashten; Davenport, Amelia; Cramer, Neil

    2017-10-01

    Although many optical-quality glass materials are available for use in optical systems, the range of polymeric materials is limited. Polymeric materials have some advantages over glass when it comes to large-scale manufacturing and production. In smaller scale systems, they offer a reduction in weight when compared to glass counterparts. This is especially important when designing optical systems meant to be carried by hand. We aimed to expand the availability of polymeric materials by exploring both crown-like and flint-like polymers. In addition, rapid and facile production was also a goal. By using UV-cured thiolene-based polymers, we were able to produce optical materials within seconds. This enabled the rapid screening of a variety of polymers from which we down-selected to produce optical flats and lenses. We will discuss problems with production and mitigation strategies in using UV-cured polymers for optical components. Using UV-cured polymers present a different set of problems than traditional injection-molded polymers, and these issues are discussed in detail. Using these produced optics, we integrated them into a modified direct view optical system, with the end goal being the development of drop-in replacements for glass components. This optical production strategy shows promise for use in lab-scale systems, where low-cost methods and flexibility are of paramount importance.

  15. Freud's psychoanalysis: a moral cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, Johan

    2014-08-01

    That psychoanalytical treatment in its classical Freudian sense is primarily a moral or ethical cure is not a very controversial claim. However, it is far from obvious how we are to understand precisely the moral character of psychoanalysis. It has frequently been proposed that this designation is valid because psychoanalysis strives neither to cure psychological symptoms pharmaceutically, nor to superficially modify the behaviour of the analysand, but to lead the analysand through an interpretive process during which he gradually gains knowledge of the unconscious motives that determine his behaviour, a process that might ideally liberate him to obtain, in relation to his inner desires, the status of a moral agent. There resides something appealing in these claims. But it is the author's belief that there is an even deeper moral dimension applying to psychoanalytical theory and praxis. Freudian psychoanalysis is a moral cure due to its way of thematizing psychological suffering as moral suffering. And this means that the moral subject - the being that can experience moral suffering - is not primarily something that the psychoanalytical treatment strives to realize, but rather the presupposition for the way in which psychoanalysis theorizes psychological problems as such. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  16. Electron beam-cured coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kishi, Naoyuki

    1976-01-01

    The method for hardening coatings by the irradiation with electron beams is reviewed. The report is divided into seven parts, namely 1) general description and characteristics of electron beam-cured coating, 2) radiation sources of curing, 3) hardening conditions and reaction behaviour, 4) uses and advantages, 5) latest trends of the industry, 6) practice in the field of construction materials, and 7) economy. The primary characteristics of the electron beam hardening is that graft reaction takes place between base resin and coating to produce strong adhesive coating without any pretreatment. A variety of base resins are developed. High class esters of acrylic acid monomers and methacrylic acid monomers are mainly used as dilutants recently. At present, scanning type accelerators are used, but the practical application of the system producing electron beam of curtain type is expected. The dose rate dependence, the repetitive irradiation and the irradiation atmosphere are briefly described. The filed patent applications on the electron beam hardening were analyzed by the officer of Japan Patent Agency. The production lines for coatings by the electron beam hardening in the world are listed. In the electron beam-cured coating, fifty percent of given energy is consumed effectively for the electron beam hardening, and the solvents discharged from ovens and polluting atmosphere are not used, because the paints of high solid type is used. The running costs of the electron beam process are one sixth of the thermal oven process. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Dataset of producing and curing concrete using domestic treated wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadollahfardi, Gholamreza; Delnavaz, Mohammad; Rashnoiee, Vahid; Fazeli, Alireza; Gonabadi, Navid

    2016-03-01

    We tested the setting time of cement, slump and compressive and tensile strength of 54 triplicate cubic samples and 9 cylindrical samples of concrete with and without a Super plasticizer admixture. We produced concrete samples made with drinking water and treated domestic wastewater containing 300, 400 kg/m(3) of cement before chlorination and then cured concrete samples made with drinking water and treated wastewater. Second, concrete samples made with 350 kg/m(3) of cement with a Superplasticizer admixture made with drinking water and treated wastewater and then cured with treated wastewater. The compressive strength of all the concrete samples made with treated wastewater had a high coefficient of determination with the control concrete samples. A 28-day tensile strength of all the samples was 96-100% of the tensile strength of the control samples and the setting time was reduced by 30 min which was consistent with a ASTMC191 standard. All samples produced and cured with treated waste water did not have a significant effect on water absorption, slump and surface electrical resistivity tests. However, compressive strength at 21 days of concrete samples using 300 kg/m(3) of cement in rapid freezing and thawing conditions was about 11% lower than concrete samples made with drinking water.

  18. Cure Schedule for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 9.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); McCoy, John D. [New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    2017-11-01

    The Emerson & Cuming technical data sheet (TDS) for Stycast 2651/Catalyst 9 lists three alternate cure schedules for the material, each of which would result in a different state of reaction and different material properties. Here, a cure schedule that attains full reaction of the material is defined. The use of this cure schedule will eliminate variance in material properties due to changes in the cure state of the material, and the cure schedule will serve as the method to make material prior to characterizing properties. The following recommendation uses one of the schedules within the TDS and adds a “post cure” to obtain full reaction.

  19. Problem statement: international safeguards for a light-water reactor fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.; Hakkila, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Darby, J.L.

    1979-03-01

    This report considers the problem of developing international safeguards for a light-water reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing/conversion facility that combines the Purex process with conversion of plutonium nitrate to the oxide by means of plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation and calcination. Current international safeguards systems are based on the complementary concepts of materials accounting and containment and surveillance, which are designed to detect covert, national diversion of nuclear material. This report discusses the possible diversion threats and some types of countermeasures, and it represents the first stage in providing integrated international safeguards system concepts that make optimum use of available resources. The development of design methodology to address this problem will constitute a significant portion of the subsequent effort. Additionally, future technology development requirements are identified. 8 figures, 1 table

  20. Analysis on traditional fishing grounds in Indonesia`s Natuna waters under International Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurniaty, R.; Ikaningtyas; Ruslijanto, P. A.

    2018-04-01

    This paper examines the boundary tension between Indonesia and China regarding traditional fishing ground in Natuna. Indonesia`s Natuna island is claimed by the China government as its traditional fishing zone/ground. The inclusion of Natuna territory into China`s traditional fishing zone brings new problems to Indonesia, especially with the Chinese ships docked and entered Indonesia`s exclusive economic zone, as well as several cases of illegal fishing over the territorial waters of Indonesia. Claims on traditional fishing zones have the potential to threaten the sovereignty of the Indonesian territory. This study aims to analyze the claims of the traditional fishing rights of China over the waters of the Natuna Islands under international law, especially UNCLOS 1982. This study revealed that the china`s argument of traditional fishing ground in Natuna to the nine dash line map is a unilateral claim, there is no international legal norm that can be used as the legal basis. Indonesia and some ASEAN countries have Internationally validated bilateral agreement on the continental shelf (i.e. Indonesia-Vietnam and Indonesia-Malaysia) thus the inclusion of Natuna into China`s nine dash line map rejects the legal status of Indonesian water under UNCLOS 1982.

  1. Mode pattern of internal flow in a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hun; Lim, Hee-Chang

    2015-06-04

    The objective of this study is to understand the mode pattern of the internal flow in a water droplet placed on a hydrophobic surface that periodically and vertically vibrates. As a result, a water droplet on a vibrating hydrophobic surface has a typical shape that depends on each resonance mode, and, additionally, we observed a diversified lobe size and internal flows in the water droplet. The size of each lobe at the resonance frequency was relatively greater than that at the neighboring frequencies, and the internal flow of the nth order mode was also observed in the flow visualization. In general, large symmetrical flow streams were generated along the vertical axis in each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top, and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In contrast, modes 2 and 4 generated a Y-shaped flow pattern, in which the flow moved to the node point in the lower part of the droplet, but modes 6 and 8 had similar patterns, with only a little difference. In addition, as a result of the PIV measurement, while the flow velocity of mode 4 was faster than that of model 2, those of modes 6 and 8 were almost similar.

  2. Ambient Cured Alkali Activated Flyash Masonry Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venugopal, K.; Radhakrishna; Sasalatti, Vinod M.

    2016-09-01

    Geopolymers belong to a category of non-conventional and non-Portland cement based cementitious binders which are produced using industrial by products like fly ash and ground granulated blast furnace slag (GGBFS). This paper reports on the development of geopolymer mortars for production of masonry units. The geopolymer mortars were prepared by mixing various by products with manufactured sand and a liquid mixture of sodium silicate and sodium hydroxide solutions. After curing at ambient conditions, the masonry units were tested for strength properties such as water absorption, initial rate of absorption, compression, shear- bond, and stress-strain behaviour etc. It was observed that the flexural strength of the blocks is more than 2 MPa and shear bond strength is more than 0.4MPa. It was found that the properties of geopolymer blocks were superior to the traditional masonry units. Hence they can be recommended for structural masonry.

  3. Quantifying Asphalt Emulsion-Based Chip Seal Curing Times Using Electrical Resistance Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-15

    Chip sealing typically consists of covering a pavement surface with asphalt emulsion into which aggregate chips are embedded. The asphalt emulsion cures through the evaporation of water, thus providing mechanical strength to adhere to the pavement wh...

  4. Photo-Curing: UV Radiation curing of polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inman, Christina A.

    2004-01-01

    The Polymers Branch of the Materials Division is dedicated to the development of high-performance for a variety of applications. Areas of significant interest include high- temperature polymers, low density, and high strength insulating materials, conductive polymers, and high density polymer electrolytes. This summer our group is working diligently on a photo-curing project. There is interest in the medical community feel the need for a new and improved balloon that will be used for angioplasty (a form of heart surgery). This product should maintain flexibility but add many other properties. Like possibly further processability and resistance to infection. Our group intends on coming up with this product by using photo-enolization (or simply, photo-curing) by Diels-Alder trapping. The main objective was to synthesize a series of new polymers by Diels-Alder cycloaddition of photoenols with more elastomeric properties. Our group was responsible for performing the proper photo-curing techniques of the polymers with diacrylates and bismaleimides, synthesizing novel monomers, and evaluating experimental results. We attempted to use a diacrylate to synthesize the polymer because of previous research done within the Polymers Branch here at NASA. Most acrylates are commercially available, have more elastometric properties than a typical rigid aromatic structure has and they contain ethylene oxides in the middle of their structure that create extensive flexibility. The problem we encountered with the acrylates is that they photo chemically and thermally self polymerize and create diradicals at low temperatures; these constraints caused a lot of unnecessary side reactions. We want to promote solely, diketone polymerization because this type of polymerization has the ability to cause very elastic polymers. We chose to direct our attention towards the usage of maleimides because they are known for eliminating these unnecessary side reactions.

  5. Drinking water treatment using a submerged internal-circulation membrane coagulation reactor coupled with permanganate oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongguo; Liu, Dan; Qian, Yu; Wu, Yue; He, Peiran; Liang, Shuang; Fu, Xiaozheng; Li, Jiding; Ye, Changqing

    2017-06-01

    A submerged internal circulating membrane coagulation reactor (MCR) was used to treat surface water to produce drinking water. Polyaluminum chloride (PACl) was used as coagulant, and a hydrophilic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) submerged hollow fiber microfiltration membrane was employed. The influences of trans-membrane pressure (TMP), zeta potential (ZP) of the suspended particles in raw water, and KMnO 4 dosing on water flux and the removal of turbidity and organic matter were systematically investigated. Continuous bench-scale experiments showed that the permeate quality of the MCR satisfied the requirement for a centralized water supply, according to the Standards for Drinking Water Quality of China (GB 5749-2006), as evaluated by turbidity (water flux, the removal of turbidity, TOC and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the raw water also increased with increasing TMP in the range of 0.01-0.05MPa. High ZP induced by PACl, such as 5-9mV, led to an increase in the number of fine and total particles in the MCR, and consequently caused serious membrane fouling and high permeate turbidity. However, the removal of TOC and DOC increased with increasing ZP. A slightly positive ZP, such as 1-2mV, corresponding to charge neutralization coagulation, was favorable for membrane fouling control. Moreover, dosing with KMnO 4 could further improve the removal of turbidity and DOC, thereby mitigating membrane fouling. The results are helpful for the application of the MCR in producing drinking water and also beneficial to the research and application of other coagulation and membrane separation hybrid processes. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. International Space Station USOS Potable Water Dispenser On-Orbit Functionality vs Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toon, Katherine P.; Lovell, Randal W.

    2009-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) currently provides potable water dispensing for rehydrating crewmembers food and drinking packages with one system located in the United States On-orbit Segment (USOS) and one system in the Russian Segment. The USOS Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) was delivered to ISS on ULF2, Shuttle Mission STS-126, and was subsequently activated in November 2008. The PWD activation on ISS is capable of supporting an ISS crew of six but nominally supplies only half the crew. The PWD is designed to provide incremental quantities of hot and ambient temperature potable water to US style food packages. PWD receives iodinated water from the US Laboratory Fuel Cell Water Bus, which is fed from the Water Processing Assembly (WPA). The PWD removes the biocidal iodine to make the water potable prior to dispensing. A heater assembly contained within the unit supplies up to 2.0 liters of hot water (65 to 93oC) every thirty minutes. This quantity supports three to four crewmembers to rehydrate their food and beverages from this location during a single meal. The unit is designed to remain functional for up to ten years with replacement of limited life items such as filters. To date, the PWD on-orbit performance has been acceptable. Since activation of the PWD, there have been several differences between on-orbit functionality and expected performance of hardware design. The comparison of on-orbit functionality to performance of hardware design is outlined for the following key areas: microbiology, PWD to food package water leakage, no-dispense scenarios, under-dispense scenarios, and crewmember feedback on actual on-orbit use.

  7. Low internal pressure in femtoliter water capillary bridges reduces evaporation rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kun; Hwang, In Gyu; Kim, Yeseul; Lim, Su Jin; Lim, Jun; Kim, Joon Heon; Gim, Bopil; Weon, Byung Mook

    2016-01-01

    Capillary bridges are usually formed by a small liquid volume in a confined space between two solid surfaces. They can have a lower internal pressure than the surrounding pressure for volumes of the order of femtoliters. Femtoliter capillary bridges with relatively rapid evaporation rates are difficult to explore experimentally. To understand in detail the evaporation of femtoliter capillary bridges, we present a feasible experimental method to directly visualize how water bridges evaporate between a microsphere and a flat substrate in still air using transmission X-ray microscopy. Precise measurements of evaporation rates for water bridges show that lower water pressure than surrounding pressure can significantly decrease evaporation through the suppression of vapor diffusion. This finding provides insight into the evaporation of ultrasmall capillary bridges. PMID:26928329

  8. A Computational Study of Internal Flows in a Heated Water-Oil Emulsion Droplet

    KAUST Repository

    Sim, Jaeheon

    2015-01-05

    The vaporization characteristics of water-oil emulsion droplets are investigated by high fidelity computational simulations. One of the key objectives is to identify the physical mechanism for the experimentally observed behavior that the component in the dispersed micro-droplets always vaporizes first, for both oil-in-water and water-in-oil emulsion droplets. The mechanism of this phenomenon has not been clearly understood. In this study, an Eulerian-Lagrangian method was implemented with a temperature-dependent surface tension model and a dynamic adaptive mesh refinement in order to effectively capture the thermo-capillary effect of a micro-droplet in an emulsion droplet efficiently. It is found that the temperature difference in an emulsion droplet creates a surface tension gradient along the micro-droplet surface, inducing surface movement. Subsequently, the outer shear flow and internal flow circulation inside the droplet, referred to as the Marangoni convection, are created. The present study confirms that the Marangoni effect can be sufficiently large to drive the micro-droplets to the emulsion droplet surface at higher temperature, for both water-in-oil and oil-and-water emulsion droplets. A further parametric study with different micro-droplet sizes and temperature gradients demonstrates that larger micro-droplets move faster with larger temperature gradient. The oil micro-droplet in oil-in-water emulsion droplets moves faster due to large temperature gradients by smaller thermal conductivity.

  9. Physical properties of self-, dual-, and light-cured direct core materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rüttermann, Stefan; Alberts, Ian; Raab, Wolfgang H M; Janda, Ralf R

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate flexural strength, flexural modulus, compressive strength, curing temperature, curing depth, volumetric shrinkage, water sorption, and hygroscopic expansion of two self-, three dual-, and three light-curing resin-based core materials. Flexural strength and water sorption were measured according to ISO 4049, flexural modulus, compressive strength, curing temperature, and curing depth according to well-proven, literature-known methods, and the volumetric behavior was determined by the Archimedes' principle. ANOVA was calculated to find differences between the materials' properties, and correlation of water sorption and hygroscopic expansion was analysed according to Pearson (p hygroscopic expansion (0.0 ± 0.2 vol.%). Clearfil Photo Core and Encore SuperCure Contrast demonstrated the lowest shrinkage (≈2.1 ± 0.1 vol.%). Water sorption and hygroscopic expansion had a very strong positive correlation. The investigated core materials significantly differed in the tested properties. The performance of the materials depended on their formulation, as well as on the respective curing process.

  10. Temperature and curing time affect composite sorption and solubility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrício Luscino Alves de Castro

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the effect of temperature and curing time on composite sorption and solubility. Material and Methods: Seventy five specimens (8×2 mm were prepared using a commercial composite resin (ICE, SDI. Three temperatures (10°C, 25°C and 60°C and five curing times (5 s, 10 s, 20 s, 40 s and 60 s were evaluated. The specimens were weighed on an analytical balance three times: A: before storage (M1; B: 7 days after storage (M2; C: 7 days after storage plus 1 day of drying (M3. The storage solution consisted of 75% alcohol/25% water. Sorption and solubility were calculated using these three weights and specimen dimensions. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U Tests (α=5%. Results: The results showed that time, temperature and their interaction influenced the sorption and solubility of the composite (p0.05. The 60°C composite temperature led to lower values of sorption for all curing times when compared with the 10°C temperature (p0.05. Solubility was similar at 40 s and 60 s for all temperatures (p>0.05, but was higher at 10°C than at 60°C for all curing times (p0.05. Conclusions: In conclusion, higher temperatures or longer curing times led to lower sorption and solubility values for the composite tested; however, this trend was only significant in specific combinations of temperature and curing times.

  11. The induction of water to the inlet air as a means of internal cooling in aircraft-engine cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothrock, Addison M; Krsek, Alois, Jr; Jones, Anthony W

    1943-01-01

    Report presents the results of investigations conducted on a full-scale air-cooled aircraft-engine cylinder of 202-cubic inch displacement to determine the effects of internal cooling by water induction on the maximum permissible power and output of an internal-combustion engine. For a range of fuel-air and water-fuel ratios, the engine inlet pressure was increased until knock was detected aurally, the power was then decreased 7 percent holding the ratios constant. The data indicated that water was a very effective internal coolant, permitting large increases in engine power as limited by either knock or by cylinder temperatures.

  12. Internal flow and evaporation characteristic inside a water droplet on a vertical vibrating hydrophobic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim Hun; Lim, Hee Chang

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to understand the internal flow and the evaporation characteristics of a deionized water droplet subjected to vertical forced vibrations. To predict and evaluate its resonance frequency, the theories of Lamb, Strani, and Sabetta have been applied. To visualize the precise mode, shape, and internal flow inside a droplet, the experiment utilizes a combination of a high-speed camera, macro lens, and continuous laser. As a result, a water droplet on a hydrophobic surface has its typical shape at each mode, and complicated vortices are observed inside the droplet. In particular, large symmetrical flow streams are generated along the vertical axis at each mode, with a large circulating movement from the bottom to the top and then to the triple contact line along the droplet surface. In addition, a bifurcation-shaped flow pattern is formed at modes 2 and 4, whereas a large ellipsoid-shape flow pattern forms at modes 6 and 8. Mode 4 has the fastest internal flow speed and evaporation rate, followed by modes 8 then 6, with 2 having the slowest of these properties. Each mode has the fastest evaporation rate amongst its neighboring frequencies. Finally, the droplet evaporation under vertical vibration would lead to more rapid evaporation, particularly for mode 4

  13. Releases from the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam for calculating properties of steam, ordinary and heavy water substance and seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrov, A. A.; Orlov, K. A.; Butakova, M. V.

    2017-11-01

    An overview of the developed in recent years documents from the working group on thermophysical properties of water and steam from the International Association for the Properties of Water and Steam (www.iapws.org) is given. Not only brief description of each Formulation is given, but also information about relationship between them is provided. Most of listed documents are international and Russian state standards.

  14. NRC experiences in hydrocoin: An international project for studying ground-water flow modeling strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, T.J.; McCartin, T.J.; Davis, P.A.; Beyeler, W.

    1987-01-01

    The ''Hydrologic Code Intercomparison Study'' (HYDROCOIN) is an international study designed to investigate various ground-water modeling strategies used to analyze the performance of high-level waste disposal sites. The various ground-water models considered are to be used for safety assessments of low- and high-level radioactive waste facilities. The work completed to date has been simulations of test cases developed to verify and validate the numerical codes chosen by the individual project teams. Twenty-five computer codes were tested during the verification phase of the HYDROCOIN effort. To test the codes, seven cases, which include both saturated and unsaturated conditions in both fractured and porous media, were simulated. Simulation results from the 22 international project teams were then intercompared as well as compared to analytical solutions wherever possible. Current work deals with validation of ground-water flow models. After an exhaustive background study, it was determined that validation of complex ground-water flow models based upon a comprehensive data base is presently not possible. Therefore, the test cases accepted for the validation phase are for relatively simple ground-water flow systems where comparison of the simulation results are with limited field or laboratory data. Additionally, work dealing with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses has recently begun. This work explores appropriate ways of using hydrogeologic models in performance assessment by examining uncertainties in the conceptual models and the hydrogeologic parameters. Valuable lessons have been learned from the HYDROCOIN experiences in understanding limitations of the models, available data sets, and modeling strategies

  15. IWRM: for sustainable use of water; 50 years of international experience with the concept of integrated water resources management; background document to the FAO/Netherlands conference on water for food an ecosystems, The Hague, 31 January - 5 February 2005

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snellen, W.B.; Schrevel, A.

    2004-01-01

    Since the concept was explained in detail at the Dublin Conference in 1992 (International Conference on Water and the Environment: Development Issues for the 21st Century), Integrated Water Resources Management has been at the core of thinking on water resource development. Today, integrated water

  16. Biological effects of tritium on fish cells in the concentration range of international drinking water standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuart, Marilyne; Festarini, Amy; Schleicher, Krista; Tan, Elizabeth; Kim, Sang Bog; Wen, Kendall; Gawlik, Jilian; Ulsh, Brant

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate whether the current Canadian tritium drinking water limit is protective of aquatic biota, an in vitro study was designed to assess the biological effects of low concentrations of tritium, similar to what would typically be found near a Canadian nuclear power station, and higher concentrations spanning the range of international tritium drinking water standards. Channel catfish peripheral blood B-lymphoblast and fathead minnow testis cells were exposed to 10-100,000 Bq l(-1) of tritium, after which eight molecular and cellular endpoints were assessed. Increased numbers of DNA strand breaks were observed and ATP levels were increased. There were no increases in γH2AX-mediated DNA repair. No differences in cell growth were noted. Exposure to the lowest concentrations of tritium were associated with a modest increase in the viability of fathead minnow testicular cells. Using the micronucleus assay, an adaptive response was observed in catfish B-lymphoblasts. Using molecular endpoints, biological responses to tritium in the range of Canadian and international drinking water standards were observed. At the cellular level, no detrimental effects were noted on growth or cycling, and protective effects were observed as an increase in cell viability and an induced resistance to a large challenge dose.

  17. Cogeneration of Electricity and Potable Water Using The International Reactor Innovative And Secure (IRIS) Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ingersoll, D.T.; Binder, J.L.; Kostin, V.I.; Panov, Y.K.; Polunichev, V.; Ricotti, M.E.; Conti, D.; Alonso, G.

    2004-01-01

    The worldwide demand for potable water has been steadily growing and is projected to accelerate, driven by a continued population growth and industrialization of emerging countries. This growth is reflected in a recent market survey by the World Resources Institute, which shows a doubling in the installed capacity of seawater desalination plants every ten years. The production of desalinated water is energy intensive, requiring approximately 3-6 kWh/m3 of produced desalted water. At current U.S. water use rates, a dedicated 1000 MW power plant for every one million people would be required to meet our water needs with desalted water. Nuclear energy plants are attractive for large scale desalination application. The thermal energy produced in a nuclear plant can provide both electricity and desalted water without the production of greenhouse gases. A particularly attractive option for nuclear desalination is to couple a desalination plant with an advanced, modular, passively safe reactor design. The use of small-to-medium sized nuclear power plants allows for countries with smaller electrical grid needs and infrastructure to add new electrical and water capacity in more appropriate increments and allows countries to consider siting plants at a broader number of distributed locations. To meet these needs, a modified version of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS) nuclear power plant design has been developed for the cogeneration of electricity and desalted water. The modular, passively safe features of IRIS make it especially well adapted for this application. Furthermore, several design features of the IRIS reactor will ensure a safe and reliable source of energy and water even for countries with limited nuclear power experience and infrastructure. The IRIS-D design utilizes low-quality steam extracted from the low-pressure turbine to boil seawater in a multi-effect distillation desalination plant. The desalination plant is based on the horizontal

  18. [Improvement of light-cured indirect inlays durability by means of electromagnetic field].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nidzel'skiĭ, M Ia; Korotetskaia-Zinkevich, V L

    2014-01-01

    The main strength characteristics of light-cured resins used for replacement of dental hard tissues defects are destructive stress by compression, microhardness, resistance to abrasion, impact and water absorption. The study focuses on some strength features of composite materials for inlays processed by electromagnetic field. Four sample series of light cured resin (Charisma, Heraus Kulzer, Germany) were used to assess strength features changes in various curing methods: 10 control samples were polymerized by conventional light-curing device, while 30 were additionally processed by electromagnetic field of various intensity (60, 80 and 100 Oe, 10 samples for each group). The obtained results confirm the positive effects of electromagnetic field on strength features of light-cured resins which improves the quality of inlays.

  19. Multiple imputation for cure rate quantile regression with censored data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuanshan; Yin, Guosheng

    2017-03-01

    The main challenge in the context of cure rate analysis is that one never knows whether censored subjects are cured or uncured, or whether they are susceptible or insusceptible to the event of interest. Considering the susceptible indicator as missing data, we propose a multiple imputation approach to cure rate quantile regression for censored data with a survival fraction. We develop an iterative algorithm to estimate the conditionally uncured probability for each subject. By utilizing this estimated probability and Bernoulli sample imputation, we can classify each subject as cured or uncured, and then employ the locally weighted method to estimate the quantile regression coefficients with only the uncured subjects. Repeating the imputation procedure multiple times and taking an average over the resultant estimators, we obtain consistent estimators for the quantile regression coefficients. Our approach relaxes the usual global linearity assumption, so that we can apply quantile regression to any particular quantile of interest. We establish asymptotic properties for the proposed estimators, including both consistency and asymptotic normality. We conduct simulation studies to assess the finite-sample performance of the proposed multiple imputation method and apply it to a lung cancer study as an illustration. © 2016, The International Biometric Society.

  20. Proceedings of the Fourteenth International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellmann, Roland [Institute for Earth Sciences - ISTerre, CNRS UMR 5275 Grenoble (France); Pitsch, Helmut [IRSN, DSDP, SPIIC, BP17, 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France)

    2013-07-01

    The 14. edition of the International Symposium on Water-Rock Interaction was held from 9-14 June 2013 in the Palais des Papes in the historic city of Avignon, located in southeastern France. As is the tradition with WRI symposia, earth scientists and guests from around the world convened over a week's time to exchange the latest ideas, advances, and data covering some of the most important aspects of rock-water interactions. The research that was presented in both oral and poster format covered studies derived from experimental and laboratory work, modeling and theoretical approaches, and field measurements. The presentations at the symposium showed the immense range of conditions associated with natural, experimental, and theoretical rock-water systems, encompassing a wide range of pH, as well as temperature and pressure conditions ranging from ambient to beyond the critical point of water. In addition, as can be evidenced from the presentations, many water-rock systems are increasingly being described in terms of control by both abiotic and biogeochemical processes. Advances in fundamental WRI research are also making significant contributions to better understanding current environmental problems, which are quite often highlighted in today's media headlines. Reflecting the importance of these environmental and societal challenges, an important number of presentations in this symposium described the current state of the knowledge concerning acid mine drainage, geological CO{sub 2} sequestration, shale gas extraction, aquifer salinization and diminishing potable water resources, and nuclear waste storage. Some 260 manuscripts were submitted to WRI-14 by scientists from 37 countries. Each manuscript was peer reviewed for scientific content by two reviewers. In the end, 230 manuscripts were accepted for either oral or poster presentation at the symposium. Each one of these papers can be found in this special symposium volume. The WRI-14 symposium has been

  1. Radiation cured silicone rubber articles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DuPont, J.G.; Goodwin, P.A.

    1984-01-01

    A process for making radiation cured silicone rubber articles is disclosed wherein a hydroxyl-terminated polysilaxane having a molecular weight from about 50,000 to about 2,000,000, optionally modified by mixing with up to 85% of an end-stopped silicone rubber, is mixed with from about 10 to about 70 parts per hundred of rubber of a finely divided silica filler with a particle size in the reinforcing range and other inert fillers as determined by desired final properties; the composition so prepared is formed into the desired shape at room temperature; the article so formed is precured to improve the mechanical properties of the material with which it is made by exposure to ammonia gas, ammonium hydroxide, or to the vapors or solutions of a volatile amine at room temperature; and the precured article is irradiated with high energy electrons or gamma radiation to effect a permanent cure of the material from which the article is formed

  2. ASRM test report: Autoclave cure process development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbar, D. L.; Mitchell, Suzanne

    1992-01-01

    ASRM insulated segments will be autoclave cured following insulation pre-form installation and strip wind operations. Following competitive bidding, Aerojet ASRM Division (AAD) Purchase Order 100142 was awarded to American Fuel Cell and Coated Fabrics Company, Inc. (Amfuel), Magnolia, AR, for subcontracted insulation autoclave cure process development. Autoclave cure process development test requirements were included in Task 3 of TM05514, Manufacturing Process Development Specification for Integrated Insulation Characterization and Stripwind Process Development. The test objective was to establish autoclave cure process parameters for ASRM insulated segments. Six tasks were completed to: (1) evaluate cure parameters that control acceptable vulcanization of ASRM Kevlar-filled EPDM insulation material; (2) identify first and second order impact parameters on the autoclave cure process; and (3) evaluate insulation material flow-out characteristics to support pre-form configuration design.

  3. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Nitinol 60 for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2016-01-01

    A stress corrosion cracking (SCC) evaluation of Nitinol 60 was performed because this alloy is considered a candidate bearing material for the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS), specifically in the Urine Processing Assembly of the International Space Station. An SCC evaluation that preceded this one during the 2013-2014 timeframe included various alloys: Inconel 625, Hastelloy C-276, titanium (Ti) commercially pure (CP), Ti 6Al-4V, extra-low interstitial (ELI) Ti 6Al-4V, and Cronidur 30. In that evaluation, most specimens were exposed for a year. The results of that evaluation were published in NASA/TM-2015-218206, entitled "Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System,"1 available at the NASA Scientific and Technical Information program web page: http://www.sti.nasa.gov. Nitinol 60 was added to the test program in 2014.

  4. How visible light curing came into dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, N H F

    2016-01-01

    The present paper details the history of the introduction of visible light curing into dentistry. This history provides an excellent example of 'out of the box', lateral thinking translation of innovative scientific technology into dentistry. Visible light curing is an important UK contribution to the recent history and current practice of dentistry, with several million visible light curing procedures being carried out globally on a daily basis.

  5. International Space Station (ISS) Potable Water Dispenser (PWD) Beverage Adapter (BA) Redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgerly, Rachel; Benoit, Jace; Shindo, David

    2012-01-01

    The Potable Water Dispenser used on the International Space Station (ISS) interfaces with food and drink packages using the Beverage Adapter and Needle. Unexpected leakage has been seen in this interface. The Beverage Adapter used on ]orbit was returned to the ground for Test, Teardown, and Evaluation. The results of that investigation prompted a redesign of the Beverage Adapter and Needle. The Beverage Adapter materials were changed to be more corrosion resistant, and the Needle was redesigned to preclude leakage. The redesigns have been tested and proven.

  6. Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and the Continental-scale International Project (GCIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vane, Deborah

    1993-01-01

    A discussion of the objectives of the Global Energy and Water Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) and the Continental-scale International Project (GCIP) is presented in vugraph form. The objectives of GEWEX are as follows: determine the hydrological cycle by global measurements; model the global hydrological cycle; improve observations and data assimilation; and predict response to environmental change. The objectives of GCIP are as follows: determine the time/space variability of the hydrological cycle over a continental-scale region; develop macro-scale hydrologic models that are coupled to atmospheric models; develop information retrieval schemes; and support regional climate change impact assessment.

  7. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N I; Glebov, V B

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network. (paper)

  8. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Glebov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network.

  9. Some Durability Aspects of Ambient Cured Bottom Ash Geopolymer Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravanakumar R.

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study examines some durability aspects of ambient cured bottom ash geopolymer concrete (BA GPC due to accelerated corrosion, sorptivity, and water absorption. The bottom ash geopolymer concrete was prepared with sodium based alkaline activators under ambient curing temperatures. The sodium hydroxide used concentration was 8M. The performance of BA GPC was compared with conventional concrete. The test results indicate that BA GPC developes a strong passive layer against chloride ion diffusion and provides better protection against corrosion. Both the initial and final rates of water absorption of BA GPC were about two times less than those of conventional concrete. The BA GPC significantly enhanced performance over equivalent grade conventional concrete (CC.

  10. UV/EB curing market in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hilmy, N.; Danu, S.

    1999-01-01

    The most application of UV curing of surface coating in Indonesia are on fancy plywood, furniture and wood flooring industry. Other application are on papers, printing ink/labelling, printed circuit board/PCB and dental materials. At present, application of EB curing coating is still in a pilot plant scale due to the high cost of production. Limited number of application of EB curing by using low energy electron beam machine are on wood panels, ceramics and marbles. This paper describes the market and the problem faced by the largest user of radiation curing systems such as the secondary process plywood, furniture and paper industries

  11. Liming of acidified waters: issues and research - a report of the International Liming Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, R. Kent

    1982-01-01

    Acidic deposition is a problem of significant national and international concern. It is strongly suspected that acidic deposition has adversely affected aquatic resources in Scandinavia and North America. While substantial resources are being devoted to understanding the causative factors associated with surface water acidification, much less research is being conducted on mitigative strategies. Mitigative techniques involving liming may be useful for short-term protection of specific component of aquatic communities or for renovation of seriously impacted aquatic ecosystems. The selection of effective liming strategies is based on an integrated understanding of the following key factors: biological systems, water chemistry, sediment chemistry, hydrology, and watershed characteristics, effectiveness of neutralizing materials, and application techniques. Research in Scandinavia, Canada, and the U.S. has led to a partial understanding of some of the key factors for successful neutralization of surface waters (Bengtsson, 1982; Fraser and Britt, 1982). However, conflicting results of liming operations and experiments have been reported. (Fraser et al., 1982; Fraser and Britt, 1982; Sverdrup and Bjerle, 1982). Additional research is required to improve the ability of scientists and resource managers to select effective liming strategies. An International Liming workshop was convened during 19-25 September 1982 at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories. The major objective of this workshop were: - To identify the most critical deficiencies in the scientific understanding of liming techniques and their long-term consequences. - To develop and document a research strategy to address information deficiencies that are pertinent to the protection or renovation of acidic surface waters in the United States. The participants who contributed to this workshop are listed in Table 1.

  12. Influence of curing rate of resin composite on the bond strength to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, A R; Asmussen, E; Peutzfeldt, A

    2007-01-01

    This study determined whether the strength with which resin composite bonds to dentin is influenced by variations in the curing rate of resin composites. Resin composites were bonded to the dentin of extracted human molars. Adhesive (AdheSE, Ivoclar Vivadent) was applied and cured (10 seconds @ 1000 mW/cm2) for all groups. A split Teflon mold was clamped to the treated dentin surface and filled with resin composite. The rate of cure was varied, using one of four LED-curing units of different power densities. The rate of cure was also varied using the continuous or pulse-delay mode. In continuous curing mode, in order to give an energy density totaling 16 J/cm2, the power densities (1000, 720, 550, 200 mW/cm2) emitted by the various curing units were compensated for by the light curing period (16, 22, 29 or 80 seconds). In the pulse-delay curing mode, two seconds of light curing at one of the four power densities was followed by a one-minute interval, after which light cure was completed (14, 29, 27 or 78 seconds), likewise, giving a total energy density of 16 J/cm2. The specimens produced for each of the eight curing protocols and two resin composites (Tetric EvoCeram, Ivoclar Vivadent; Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) were stored in water at 37 degrees C for seven days. The specimens were then either immediately subjected to shear bond strength testing or subjected to artificial aging (6,000 cycles between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C baths) prior to testing. Failure modes were also assessed. The shear bond strengths were submitted to factorial analysis of variance, and the failure modes were submitted to a Chi-square test (alpha = 0.05). All but power density (curing mode, resin composite material and mode of aging) significantly affected shear bond strength. The curing mode and resin composite material also influenced the failure mode. At the selected constant energy density, pulse-delay curing reduced bonding of the resin composite to dentin.

  13. Sebastian Kneipp and the Natural Cure Movement of Germany: Between Naturalism and Modern Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Youkyung

    2016-12-01

    This study discusses the historical significance of the Natural Cure Movement of Germany, centering on the Kneipp Cure, a form of hydrotherapy practiced by Father Sebastian Kneipp (1821-1897). The Kneipp Cure rested on five main tenets: hydrotherapy, exercise, nutrition, herbalism, and the balance of mind and body. This study illuminates the reception of the Kneipp Cure in the context of the trilateral relationship among the Kneipp Cure, the Natural Cure Movement in general, and modern medicine. The Natural Cure Movement was ideologically based on naturalism, criticizing industrialization and urbanization. There existed various theories and methods in it, yet they shared holism and vitalism as common factors. The Natural Cure Movement of Germany began in the early 19th century. During the late 19th century and the early 20th century, it became merged in the Lebensreformbewegung (life reform movement) which campaigned for temperance, anti-tobacco, and anti-vaccination. The core of the Natural Cure Movement was to advocate the world view that nature should be respected and to recognize the natural healing powers of sunlight, air, water, etc. Among varied natural therapies, hydrotherapy spread out through the activities of some medical doctors and amateur healers such as Johann Siegmund Hahn and Vincenz Prie βnitz. Later, the supporters of hydrotherapy gathered together under the German Society of Naturopathy. Sebastian Kneipp, one of the forefathers of hydrotherapy, is distinguished from other proponents of natural therapies in two aspects. First, he did not refuse to employ vaccination and medication. Second, he sought to be recognized by the medical world through cooperating with medical doctors who supported his treatment. As a result, the Kneipp cure was able to be gradually accepted into the medical world despite the "quackery" controversy between modern medicine and the Natural Cure Movement. Nowadays, the name of Sebastian Kneipp remains deeply engraved on

  14. Sebastian Kneipp and the Natural Cure Movement of Germany: Between Naturalism and Modern Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youkyung KO

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses the historical significance of the Natural Cure Movement of Germany, centering on the Kneipp Cure, a form of hydrotherapy practiced by Father Sebastian Kneipp (1821-1897. The Kneipp Cure rested on five main tenets: hydrotherapy, exercise, nutrition, herbalism, and the balance of mind and body. This study illuminates the reception of the Kneipp Cure in the context of the trilateral relationship among the Kneipp Cure, the Natural Cure Movement in general, and modern medicine. The Natural Cure Movement was ideologically based on naturalism, criticizing industrialization and urbanization. There existed various theories and methods in it, yet they shared holism and vitalism as common factors. The Natural Cure Movement of Germany began in the early 19th century. During the late 19th century and the early 20th century, it became merged in the Lebensreformbewegung (life reform movement which campaigned for temperance, anti-tobacco, and anti-vaccination. The core of the Natural Cure Movement was to advocate the world view that nature should be respected and to recognize the natural healing powers of sunlight, air, water, etc. Among varied natural therapies, hydrotherapy spread out through the activities of some medical doctors and amateur healers such as Johann Siegmund Hahn and Vincenz Prie β nitz. Later, the supporters of hydrotherapy gathered together under the German Society of Naturopathy. Sebastian Kneipp, one of the forefathers of hydrotherapy, is distinguished from other proponents of natural therapies in two aspects. First, he did not refuse to employ vaccination and medication. Second, he sought to be recognized by the medical world through cooperating with medical doctors who supported his treatment. As a result, the Kneipp cure was able to be gradually accepted into the medical world despite the “quackery” controversy between modern medicine and the Natural Cure Movement. Nowadays, the name of Sebastian Kneipp

  15. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoon-Sang Chang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. RESULTS: The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. CONCLUSION: In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  16. Thermal analysis of bulk filled composite resin polymerization using various light curing modes according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Hoon-Sang; Cho, Kyu-Jeong; Park, Su-Jung; Lee, Bin-Na; Hwang, Yun-Chan; Oh, Won-Mann; Hwang, In-Nam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the polymerization temperature of a bulk filled composite resin light-activated with various light curing modes using infrared thermography according to the curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall. Composite resin (AeliteFlo, Bisco, Schaumburg, IL, USA) was inserted into a Class II cavity prepared in the Teflon blocks and was cured with a LED light curing unit (Dr's Light, GoodDoctors Co., Seoul, Korea) using various light curing modes for 20 s. Polymerization temperature was measured with an infrared thermographic camera (Thermovision 900 SW/TE, Agema Infra-red Systems AB, Danderyd, Sweden) for 40 s at measurement spots adjacent to the cavity wall and in the middle of the cavity from the surface to a 4 mm depth. Data were analyzed according to the light curing modes with one-way ANOVA, and according to curing depth and approximation to the cavity wall with two-way ANOVA. The peak polymerization temperature of the composite resin was not affected by the light curing modes. According to the curing depth, the peak polymerization temperature at the depth of 1 mm to 3 mm was significantly higher than that at the depth of 4 mm, and on the surface. The peak polymerization temperature of the spots in the middle of the cavity was higher than that measured in spots adjacent to the cavity wall. In the photopolymerization of the composite resin, the temperature was higher in the middle of the cavity compared to the outer surface or at the internal walls of the prepared cavity.

  17. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Pestana Passos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured, light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED, and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling. All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h and sectioned (n = 10: G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC, and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%. The bond strength values (MPa were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH. There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  18. Effects of cement-curing mode and light-curing unit on the bond durability of ceramic cemented to dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Sheila Pestana; Souza, Rodrigo Othávio Assunção; Michida, Silvia Masae Araújo; Zamboni, Sandra Costa; Oliveira, Simone Helena Gonçalves de

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of different light-curing units and resin cement curing types on the bond durability of a feldspathic ceramic bonded to dentin. The crowns of 40 human molars were sectioned, exposing the dentin. Forty ceramic blocks of VITA VM7 were produced according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The ceramic surface was etched with 10% hydrofluoric acid / 60s and silanized. The dentin was treated with 37% phosphoric acid / 15s, and the adhesive was applied. The ceramic blocks were divided and cemented to dentin according to resin cement / RC curing type (dual- and photo-cured), light-curing unit (halogen light / QTH and LED), and storage conditions (dry and storage / 150 days + 12,000 cycles / thermocycling). All blocks were stored in distilled water (37°C / 24h) and sectioned (n = 10): G1 - QTH + RC Photo, G2 - QTH + RC Dual, G3 - LED + RC Photo, G4 - LED + RC Dual. Groups G5, G6, G7, and G8 were obtained exactly as G1 through G4, respectively, and then stored and thermocycled. Microtensile bond strength tests were performed (EMIC), and data were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). The bond strength values (MPa) were: G1 - 12.95 (6.40)ab; G2 - 12.02 (4.59)ab; G3 - 13.09 (5.62)ab; G4 - 15.96 (6.32)a; G5 - 6.22 (5.90)c; G6 - 9.48 (5.99)bc; G7 - 12.78 (11.30)ab; and G8 - 8.34 (5.98)bc. The same superscript letters indicate no significant differences. Different light-curing units affected the bond strength between ceramic cemented to dentin when the photo-cured cement was used, and only after aging (LED > QTH). There was no difference between the effects of dual- and photo-cured resin-luting agents on the microtensile bond strength of the cement used in this study.

  19. CUREs in biochemistry—where we are and where we should go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jessica K.; Eckdahl, Todd T.; Hecht, David A.; Killion, Patrick J.; Latzer, Joachim; Mans, Tamara L.; Rakus, John F.; Siebrasse, Erica A.; Ellis Bell, J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Integration of research experience into classroom is an important and vital experience for all undergraduates. These course‐based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have grown from independent instructor lead projects to large consortium driven experiences. The impact and importance of CUREs on students at all levels in biochemistry was the focus of a National Science Foundation funded think tank. The state of biochemistry CUREs and suggestions for moving biochemistry forward as well as a practical guide (supplementary material) are reported here. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):7–12, 2017. PMID:27357379

  20. An Evaluation of Technology to Remove Problematic Organic Compounds from the International Space Station Potable Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rector, Tony; Metselaar, Carol; Peyton, Barbara; Steele, John; Michalek, William; Bowman, Elizabeth; Wilson, Mark; Gazda, Daniel; Carter, Layne

    2014-01-01

    Since activation of the Water Processor Assembly (WPA) on the International Space Station (ISS) in November of 2008, there have been three events in which the TOC (Total Organic Carbon) in the product water has increased to approximately 3 mg/L and has subsequently recovered. Analysis of the product water in 2010 identified the primary component of the TOC as dimethylsilanediol (DMSD). An investigation into the fate of DMSD in the WPA ultimately determined that replacement of both Multifiltration (MF) Beds is the solution to recovering product water quality. The MF Beds were designed to ensure that ionic breakthrough occurs before organic breakthrough. However, DMSD saturated both MF Beds in the series, requiring removal and replacement of both MF Beds with significant life remaining. Analysis of the MF Beds determined that the adsorbent was not effectively removing DMSD, trimethylsilanol, various polydimethylsiloxanes, or dimethylsulfone. Coupled with the fact that the current adsorbent is now obsolete, the authors evaluated various media to identify a replacement adsorbent as well as media with greater capacity for these problematic organic contaminants. This paper provides the results and recommendations of this collaborative study.

  1. Evaluation of Electrochemically Generated Potable Water Disinfectants for Use on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriquez, Branelle; Anderson, Molly; Adams, Niklas; Vega, Leticia; Botkin, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Microbial contamination and subsequent growth in spacecraft water systems are constant concerns for missions involving human crews. The current potable water disinfectant for the International Space Station (ISS) is iodine; however, with the end of the Space Shuttle Program, there is a need to develop redundant biocide systems that do not require regular up-mass dependencies. Throughout the course of a year, four different electrochemical systems were investigated as a possible biocide for potable water on the ISS. Research has indicated that a wide variability exists with regards to efficacy in both concentration and exposure time of these disinfectants; therefore, baseline efficacy values were established. This paper describes a series of tests performed to establish optimal concentrations and exposure times for four disinfectants against single and mixed species planktonic and biofilm bacteria. Results of the testing determined whether these electrochemical disinfection systems are able to produce a sufficient amount of chemical in both concentration and volume to act as a biocide for potable water on the ISS.

  2. Curing efficiency of three light emitting diode units at different curing profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Verma

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: Reduction of exposure time to 6 s with high-intensity curing light seemed to be clinically acceptable and should be recommended. Curing of metal brackets with single exposure from buccal side showed lower shear bond strength values.

  3. The World Court’s Ongoing Contribution to International Water Law: The Pulp Mills Case between Argentina and Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Owen McIntyre

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The judgment of the International Court of Justice in the Pulp Mills (Argentina v. Uruguay case makes a very important contribution to international law relating to shared international water resources and to international environmental law more generally. It does much to clarify the relationship between procedural and substantive rules of international environmental law. The Court linked interstate notification of new projects to the satisfaction of the customary due diligence obligation to prevent significant transboundary harm. It found that environmental impact assessment (EIA is an essential requirement of customary international law in respect of activities having potential transboundary effects. The real significance of the judgment is that it held that the duty to notify, and the related duty to conduct an EIA taking account of transboundary impacts, exist in customary international law and thus apply to all states, not just those that have concluded international agreements containing such obligations. The Court confirmed that for shared international water resources, the principle of equitable and reasonable utilisation, universally accepted as the cardinal rule of international water law, is virtually synonymous with the concept of sustainable development, and suggests that considerations of environmental protection are absolutely integral to the equitable balancing of interests involved. The judgment makes it clear that the principle of equitable utilisation ought to be understood as a process, rather than a normatively determinative rule. This ought to help to address widespread confusion about the nature of the key rules and principles of international water resources law and its role in the resolution of water resources disputes and in environmental diplomacy more generally.

  4. Pre-cure freezing affects proteolysis in dry-cured hams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bañón, S; Cayuela, J M; Granados, M V; Garrido, M D

    1999-01-01

    Several parameters (sodium chloride, moisture, intramuscular fat, total nitrogen, non-protein nitrogen, white precipitates, free tyrosine, L* a* b* values and acceptability) related with proteolysis during the curing were compared in dry-cured hams manufactured from refrigerated and frozen/thawed raw material. Pre-cure freezing increased the proteolysis levels significantly (pmeat, although it does not significantly affect the sensory quality of the dry-cured ham.

  5. Curing performance of a new-generation light-emitting diode dental curing unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, Kim M; Hartung, Martin; Althoff, Olaf; Wastian, Christine; Mitra, Sumita B

    2004-10-01

    BACKGROUND; Recent technological advances have resulted in the marketing of high-powered, or HP, battery-operated light-emitting diode, or LED, dental curing lights. The authors examine the curing efficiency and peak polymerization temperature, or Tp, of a new HP LED curing light. The authors studied four visible light-curing, or VLC, units: HP LED (A), first-generation LED (B), conventional halogen (C) and high-intensity halogen (D). They determined the depth of cure, or DOC; adhesion; and Tp of three types of VLC resin-based composites after exposure to each light. The exposure times for units A and D were one-half those for units B and C. The power density of unit A was 1,000 milliwatts per square centimeter, which was comparable to that of unit D with turbo charge. The DOC and adhesion attained for all three resin-based composites after being light cured by unit A for a 10-second exposure time were equivalent to those after being light cured by unit D for a 10-second exposure time and to those after being light cured by units B and C for 20-second exposure times. The resin-based composites light cured by unit A attained significantly lower Tps than did those light cured by unit D at equivalent cure, or exposure, times and by unit C at twice the cure time. The authors found that Unit A effectively cured the resin-based composites at one-half the cure time of units B and C and at the same time as unit D, while maintaining low Tp. The battery-operated HP LED curing light might be an effective, time-saving alternative for clinicians to use in light curing resin-based composites.

  6. Microhardness of heat cure acrylic resin after treatment with disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Faiza; Rehman, Abdur; Abbas, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of disinfectants and distilled water on the micro-hardness of heat cure acrylic resins. The case-control study was conducted at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences, and Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from April to October 2011. Specimens were fabricated from heat cure acrylic resin material and they were divided into four equal groups. Group 1 was evaluated at baseline and was taken as the control group. Group 2 was immersed in distilled water for 20 minutes, Group 3 in1% sodium hypochlorite for 20 minutes, and Group 4 in 2% alkaline gluteraldehyde for 10 minutes. All specimens were polished, stored in distilled water for 24 hours prior to experiment. All the specimens were immersed twice daily for a total of 60 days after which they were tested for Vickers micro-hardness test. Statistical analysis was conducted with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (a=0.05). There were 72 specimens divided into four groups of 18(25%) each. Statistically significant differences were found among all groups (pacrylic resins. Group 4 showed the most reduction in the hardness value which was followed by Group 3. The hardness of heat cure acrylic resin was affected by disinfectants.

  7. Pressurized water reactor vessel internals guide tube guide card wear aging management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed

    2011-01-01

    In order for the pressurized water reactors to qualify for life extension, they have to meet the requirements of MRP-277 (Reference 1). MRP-227 lists the various reactor internals components that need to be inspected in order for a plant to qualify for life extension; the upper internals guide tube guide cards are one such component. Aggressive guide card wear in a plant can lead to violation of plant technical specifications, safety issues in the event of insertion, failure of one or more rod cluster control assemblies, or even result in plant shutdown or outage extensions. Owing to the criticality of the guide card wear, as discussed above, the Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group (PWROG) initiated a guide card wear measurement project, led by Westinghouse. Under this program, wear of the guide cards at three identified lead plants was observed and measured, and, an engineering review of the wear data was completed, and plant specific recommendations based on the engineering reviews was provided. To support this program, Westinghouse also developed criteria to prevent or mitigate guide card wear, which governs the guide card wear measurement. In addition, preliminary root cause analysis was performed for one of the aggressively wearing plants, where some wear aggravating causes and mitigating techniques were determined. Therefore, this paper will discuss Westinghouse's guide card wear criteria and measurement technique, guide card wear trends obtained from measurements conducted in the guide card wear program, possible guide card wear aggravating causes and guide card wear mitigating techniques. (author)

  8. International approaches to the hydraulic control of surface water runoff in mitigating flood and environmental risks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballard Bridget Woods

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper compares and contrasts a number of international approaches to the hydraulic control of surface water runoff from new development and redevelopment, known as sustainable drainage systems (SuDS or low impact development (LID. The paper provides a commentary on the progress and current status of national standards for SuDS in the UK to control the frequency, flow rate and volume of runoff from both frequent and extreme rainfall events, and the best practice design criteria presented in the revised UK CIRIA SuDS Manual, published in November 2015. The paper then compares these design criteria and standards with those developed and applied in China, USA, France and Germany and also looks at the drivers behind their development. The benefits of these different approaches are assessed in the context of flood risk mitigation, climate resilience and wider environmental protection objectives, including water quality, morphology and ecology. The paper also reviews the design approaches promoted by the new SuDS Manual and internationally for delivering additional benefits for urban spaces (such as recreation, visual character, education and economic growth through multi-functional urban design.

  9. Silver bonded, internally water-cooled monochromators for CHESS wiggler beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smolenski, Karl W.; Shen Qun; Doing, Park

    1997-01-01

    Intense synchrotron radiation from high power wiggler sources has long been a difficult high-heat-load problem to the design of properly cooled x-ray optics. Large, high power and very intense beams thermally distort crystal optics, reducing throughput and broadening rocking curves. An internally cooled silicon monochromator has been fabricated which demonstrated the capability of diffracting wiggler radiation of unprecedented power without significant degradation of the beam. Cooling water flows through rectangular cooling channels 1 mm wide, 1 mm below the diffracting surface, fed by a manifold bonded to the underside of the diffracting crystal. A novel silver diffusion bond was used to ensure leak-tight UHV performance. Recent test results at wiggler station F2 show a linear behavior of the x-ray flux with increasing storage ring current up to a total power of 3 kW and a peak surface power density of 5 W/mm 2 . The improved monochromator has led to an increase of x-ray flux by a factor of six over previous contact-cooled designs and shows that internal water-cooling can be an effective solution to high-heat-load problems at high power wiggler stations

  10. Prevention is better than cure

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    Throughout the year, members of the Safety Inspections Services section of HSE Unit devote themselves to ensuring the safety of all infrastructure and equipment that represent a specific hazard within the Organization. They regularly comb through all CERN's infrastructure to forestall any accidents and their potential impact, true to the adage that prevention is better than cure.   This site has a few (!) slight safety problems... Spot the mistakes! (Details of the game below.) Ensuring that an HV electrical installation is properly earthed, that a system under pressure has no weak points, that an item of lifting equipment can be used without risk, that safety valves operate at the right pressure threshold as well as checking that a heavy object that could inflict injury if it fell is not stored on top of a cupboard: such are the types of inspections performed by the Safety Inspection Service (DGS-SEE-SIS). "These checks reassure those in charge of equipment and infrastruct...

  11. Economic evaluation of five curing processes for wood coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez M, I.

    1996-01-01

    In this work we study the economic feasibility of five methods for curing coatings over sheet wood products. Each year, Mexico is producing more than 40 millions of square meters of wood panels, but the demand is of the range of 58 millions of square meters of this product. Two millions are expended after they are coated, and 38 millions without coating, they are coated artisanilly when they are used to make pieces of furniture. The technical characteristics and the costs involved in each one of five methods of curing, are described. Investments involved with each method are processed to establish: fixed costs, variable costs, equilibrium point, and others. Initial investment, coasts and revenues are processed to determine the income statement pro-form, the projected statement of change in financial position, the projected working capital, the projected balance sheet, the cash-flow, and some economical and financial indicators for each one of the five curing methods. With this information, the internal rate of return (IRR) is determined, and used to compare the economic worth of each of the five methods. The five methods are profitable, because all they have a IRR greater than the opportunity cost of capital (15%) of projects with similar characteristics. Despite, with each one of the five methods, the capital invested is recoverable, and profits can be obtained; curing by ultraviolet light or by electron beam, let recover the investment in less than two years, require fewer dollars for investment, and have a IRR of 135% and 111% respectively. Besides ultraviolet light or electron beam curing processes, pollute less with volatile solvents, use the energy efficiently, have greater production rate, and the coating obtained have better quality than with the other three methods. (Author)

  12. Assessment of the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins for artificial eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Aline Ursula Rocha; Portugal, Aline; Veloso, Letícia Rocha; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Santos, Daniela Micheline dos

    2009-01-01

    Prosthetic eyes are artificial substitutes for the eyeball, made of heat-curing acrylic resin, serving to improve the esthetic appearance of the mutilated patient and his/her inclusion in society. The aim of this study was to assess the flexural strength of two heat-curing acrylic resins used for manufacturing prosthetic eyes. Thirty-six specimens measuring 64 x 10 x 3.3 mm were obtained and divided into four groups: acrylic resin for artificial sclera N1 (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GI) and microwave-cured (GII); colorless acrylic resin for prosthetic eyes (Artigos Odontológicos Clássico, São Paulo, SP, Brazil), heat-cure water technique (GIII) and microwave-cured (GIV). Mechanical tests using three point loads were performed in a test machine (EMIC, São José dos Pinhais, PR, Brazil). The analysis of variance and the Tukey test were used to identify significant differences (p < 0.01). Groups GII and GIV presented, respectively, the highest (98.70 +/- 11.90 MPa) and lowest means (71.07 +/- 8.93 MPa), with a statistically significant difference. The cure method used for the prosthetic eye resins did not interfere in their flexural strength. It was concluded that all the resins assessed presented sufficient flexural strength values to be recommended for the manufacture of prosthetic eyes.

  13. Projects for People: An International Exchange Focused on Drinking Water Quality in Rural Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weathers, T. S.; Tarazona Vasquez, F.; Bailey, E.; Duong, V.; Gonzales Vera, R.; LaPorte, D.; Rojas Cala, B.; Torres Atencia, S.; Vasquez Auqui, J.

    2016-12-01

    The integration of human-centered design with technical engineering in a classroom setting can be challenging but immensely rewarding if coupled with a community-focused experience. Undergraduate students participated in an international exchange to address drinking water quality in the community of Huamancaca, located in the Junin region of Peru. Technical research and experimentation often comes easily to students in undergraduate engineering programs, however, implementation within a community requires a social license to operate. The objectives of this study were to address the technical challenges of designing a sustainable and effective water filtration system while also ensuring community support and education, coupled with user ownership of the process. In tandem with filter media experimentation with biochar and activated carbon produced using locally available agricultural waste from potatoes and carrots, we visited the people of Huamancaca to understand their needs and concerns. This direct communication with the community was invaluable; we observed that many of the residents' water quality problems could be solved with education. For example, proper sanitation techniques and appropriate addition of bleach or sufficient boiling time may make up for inconsistent water quality provided by the local distribution system. An education plan may also be developed for water treatment plant operators covering chlorine dosage for effective residual treatment within the distribution network in addition to filtration. Upon site visitation and sample collection, we realized that open communication with city officials, operators, business owners, and residents in both technical and social settings is essential for continued collaboration within this community. Solving a tangible problem or designing a product that can be effectively adopted is not a concept that is rigorously addressed in undergraduate education, however the setbacks, challenges, and triumphs

  14. Design of a supercritical water-cooled reactor. Pressure vessel and internals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Kai

    2008-08-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions which has been investigated within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and as coolant, flows as a single phase through the core and can be directly fed to the turbine. Using the technology of coal fired power plants with supercritical steam conditions, the heat-up in the core is done in several steps to achieve the targeted high steam outlet temperature of 500.C without exceeding available cladding material limits. Based on a first design of a fuel assembly cluster for a HPLWR with a single pass core, the surrounding internals and the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) are dimensioned for the first time, following the safety standards of the nuclear safety standards commission in Germany. Furthermore, this design is extended to the incorporation of core arrangements with two and three passes. The design of the internals and the RPV are verified using mechanical or, in the case of large thermal deformations, combined mechanical and thermal stress analyses. Additionally, a passive safety component for the feedwater inlet of the RPV of the HPLWR is designed. Its purpose is the reduction of the mass flow rate in case of a LOCA for a feedwater line break until further steps are executed. Starting with a simple vortex diode, several steps are executed to enhance the performance of the diode and adapt it to this application. Then, this first design is further optimized using combined 1D and 3D flow analyses. Parametric studies determine the performance and characteristic for changing mass flow rates for this backflow limiter. (orig.)

  15. Comparison of temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh Ebenezar, A V; Anilkumar, R; Indira, R; Ramachandran, S; Srinivasan, M R

    2010-07-01

    This in vitro study was designed to measure and compare the temperature rise in the pulp chamber with different light curing units. The study was done in two settings-in-vitro and in-vivo simulation. In in-vitro setting, 3mm and 6mm acrylic spacers with 4mm tip diameter thermocouple was used and six groups were formed according to the light curing source- 3 Quartz-Tungsten-Halogen (QTH) units and 3 Light-Emitting-Diode (LED) units. For the LED units, three modes of curing like pulse-cure mode, fast mode and ramp mode were used. For in-vivo simulation, 12 caries free human third molar tooth with fused root were used. K-type thermocouple with 1 mm tip diameter was used. Occlusal cavity was prepared, etched, rinsed with water and blot dried; bonding agent was applied and incremental curing of composite was done. Thermal emission for each light curing agent was noted. Temperature rise was very minimal in LED light cure units than in QTH light cure units in both the settings. Temperature rise was minimal at 6mm distance when compared to 3 mm distance. Among the various modes, fast mode produces the less temperature rise. Temperature rise in all the light curing units was well within the normal range of pulpal physiology. Temperature rise caused due to light curing units does not result in irreversible pulpal damage.

  16. Radiation methods for purification of water, wastewater and flue gases at international chemical congress of Pacific basic societies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pikaev, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Content of report, presented at the symposium Ecological applications of ionizing radiation (water, waste water and technological waste products), which took place within the frames of the International Chemical Congress of the Pacific Ocean Region counters (the PacifiChem'95, December 17-22, 1995, Honolulu, Hawaii, USA) is briefly presented. The problems on electron-radiation purification of natural water, domestic and technological waste waters, flue gases and contaminated soils, radiation treatment of the waste water sediments, ionizing radiation sources, applied in this area of technology and economics of radiation purification methods were discussed

  17. Translating Genomic Discoveries to Cure Ultrahypermutant ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Translating Genomic Discoveries to Cure Ultrahypermutant Mismatch Repair Deficient Brain Tumours. Malignant brain tumours are the most common cause of death among children with cancer, but there is no known cure. This project will advance research in this important field. Inherited mutations and childhood cancer.

  18. Animal models for HIV cure research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Bruno Policicchio

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for HIV infection will require multiple tools and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure. Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new nonhuman primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, have the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal.

  19. Animal Models for HIV Cure Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Policicchio, Benjamin B; Pandrea, Ivona; Apetrei, Cristian

    2016-01-01

    The HIV-1/AIDS pandemic continues to spread unabated worldwide, and no vaccine exists within our grasp. Effective antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been developed, but ART cannot clear the virus from the infected patient. A cure for HIV-1 is badly needed to stop both the spread of the virus in human populations and disease progression in infected individuals. A safe and effective cure strategy for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection will require multiple tools, and appropriate animal models are tools that are central to cure research. An ideal animal model should recapitulate the essential aspects of HIV pathogenesis and associated immune responses, while permitting invasive studies, thus allowing a thorough evaluation of strategies aimed at reducing the size of the reservoir (functional cure) or eliminating the reservoir altogether (sterilizing cure). Since there is no perfect animal model for cure research, multiple models have been tailored and tested to address specific quintessential questions of virus persistence and eradication. The development of new non-human primate and mouse models, along with a certain interest in the feline model, has the potential to fuel cure research. In this review, we highlight the major animal models currently utilized for cure research and the contributions of each model to this goal.

  20. 7 CFR 29.6010 - Cured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured. 29.6010 Section 29.6010 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing... INSPECTION Standards Definitions § 29.6010 Cured. Tobacco dried of its sap by either natural or artificial...

  1. 9 CFR 319.103 - Cured beef tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured beef tongue. 319.103 Section 319... Cured beef tongue. In preparing “Cured Beef Tongue,” the application of curing solution to the fresh beef tongue shall not result in an increase in the weight of the cured beef tongue of more than 10...

  2. Determinant of flexible Parametric Estimation of Mixture Cure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. OLIVER OSUAGWA

    2015-12-01

    Dec 1, 2015 ... derived from therapy. This study was intended at determining the flexible Parametric Cure Fraction. Model for Gastric cancer Data. Suitability of four parametric mixture cure models were considered namely; Log Normal (LN) cure fraction model, Log Logistic (LL) cure fraction model, Weibull (W) cure fraction ...

  3. Exhaust gas heat recovery through secondary expansion cylinder and water injection in an internal combustion engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nassiri Toosi Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available To enhance thermal efficiency and increase performance of an internal combustion engine, a novel concept of coupling a conventional engine with a secondary 4-stroke cylinder and direct water injection process is proposed. The burned gases after working in a traditional 4-stroke combustion cylinder are transferred to a secondary cylinder and expanded even more. After re-compression of the exhaust gases, pre-heated water is injected at top dead center. The evaporation of injected water not only recovers heat from exhaust gases, but also increases the mass of working gas inside the cylinder, therefore improves the overall thermal efficiency. A 0-D/1-D model is used to numerically simulate the idea. The simulations outputs showed that the bottoming cycle will be more efficient at higher engines speeds, specifically in a supercharged/turbocharged engine, which have higher exhaust gas pressure that can reproduce more positive work. In the modeled supercharged engine, results showed that brake thermal efficiency can be improved by about 17%, and brake power by about 17.4%.

  4. Cure Chemistry of Phenylethynyl Terminated Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen H.; Orwoll, Robert A.; Young, Philip R.; Jensen, Brian J.; McNair, Harold M.

    1997-01-01

    The ability to process high performance polymers into quality, void-free composites has been significantly advanced using oligomers terminated with reactive groups which cure or crosslink at elevated temperature without the evolution of volatile byproducts. Several matrix resin systems of considerable interest to the aerospace community utilize phenylethynyl-terminated imide (PETI) technology to achieve this advantage. The present paper addresses the cure chemistry of PETI oligomers. The thermal cure of a low molecular weight model compound was studied using a variety of analytical techniques including differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The studies indicate an extremely complex cure process. Many stable products were isolated and this paper reports current work on identification of those products. The intent of this research is to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of the cured PETI engineering materials so that performance and durability can be more fully assessed.

  5. EB/UV curing market in Malaysia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khairul Zaman Dahlan; Nik Ghazali Nik Salleh; Mohd Hilmi Mahmood

    1999-01-01

    Radiation curing of coatings of wood based products is expanding and being used for curing of coatings of table tops, parquet, wood panel, furniture, curtain railing, etc. UV curing of over print varnish is still the main application of UV curing in printing industry. However, curing of printing ink has also been extended in the printing of CD and VCD in addition to other printing such as paper, magazine, label on bottles, metal-can, etc. In the electronic industry, the manufacturer of printed circuit board is still the main consumer of UV curable resins. On the other hand, low energy electron beam machine is used mainly for cross-linking of heat shrink films

  6. Factors influencing EB curing of epoxy matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Fengmei; Bao Jianwen; Chen Xiangbao; Bao Huaying; Wang Huiliang

    2002-01-01

    The effectiveness of electron beam (EB) curing of epoxy resins was found to be influenced by catalyst. In the presence of iodonium salt (diaryl iodonium hexafluoroantimonate, C3), the EB curing of epoxy resin is easier than in the presence of triaryl sulfonium hexafluoroantimonate (C1), or triaryl sulfonium hexafluorophosphate (C2), or iron arene containing cationic catalyst (Irgacure 261). The epoxy 616 (diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A) and 648 (diglycidyl ether of phenolic novolacs) can be cured by the above onium salts catalysts C1-C3. The epoxy with glycidyl amino epoxide group (such as AG 80; AFG 90) could not be cured by onium salts catalyst. The influence of irradiation dose, temperature and the effect of impurities on curing reaction were investigated

  7. Curing agent for polyepoxides and epoxy resins and composites cured therewith. [preventing carbon fiber release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P.; Vannucci, R. D. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A curing for a polyepoxide is described which contains a divalent aryl radical such as phenylene a tetravalent aryl radical such as a tetravalent benzene radical. An epoxide is cured by admixture with the curing agent. The cured epoxy product retains the usual properties of cured epoxides and, in addition, has a higher char residue after burning, on the order of 45% by weight. The higher char residue is of value in preventing release to the atmosphere of carbon fibers from carbon fiber-epoxy resin composites in the event of burning of the composite.

  8. Online monitoring method of degree of cure during non-isothermal microwave curing process

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yongxi; Li, Yingguang; Li, Nanya; Hao, Xiaozhong

    2018-02-01

    Curing rate is the variation rate of degree of cure with time, which is a crucial issue in the curing process of composite structures since it has a significant influence on the generation of voids and residual stresses. In this paper, an online monitoring method of degree of cure was presented based on refractive index measurement. The influence of cure and temperature variation on the refractive index of composite was separated in real time with a step-temperature refractive index separation method. Non-isothermal microwave curing process of carbon fiber/epoxy composite was monitored, and the degree of cure was obtained with a low measurement error of ±1.5% compared with that determined by off-line DSC measurement. The online monitoring method is a promising technology for smart manufacturing of composite structures.

  9. International patent analysis of water source heat pump based on orbit database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na

    2018-02-01

    Using orbit database, this paper analysed the international patents of water source heat pump (WSHP) industry with patent analysis methods such as analysis of publication tendency, geographical distribution, technology leaders and top assignees. It is found that the beginning of the 21st century is a period of rapid growth of the patent application of WSHP. Germany and the United States had done researches and development of WSHP in an early time, but now Japan and China have become important countries of patent applications. China has been developing faster and faster in recent years, but the patents are concentrated in universities and urgent to be transferred. Through an objective analysis, this paper aims to provide appropriate decision references for the development of domestic WSHP industry.

  10. The Role of Technology Spillovers in the Process of Water Pollution Abatement for Large International Firms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Aldieri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the effects of technology externalities stemming from different technological sectors for international firms engaged both in water pollution abatement and in dirty activities. We present a theoretical framework and an empirical analysis based upon a dataset composed of worldwide R&D-intensive firms. In order to identify the technological proximity between the firms, we construct an original Mahalanobis environmental industry weight matrix, based on the construction of technological vectors for each firm, with European ecological patents distributed across more technology classes. Opportune econometric techniques that deal with the firms’ unobserved heterogeneity and the weak exogeneity of the explanatory variables are implemented. The findings show significant spillover effects on the productivity and environmental performance of the firms.

  11. A comparative evaluation of curing depth and compressive strength of dental composite cured with halogen light curing unit and blue light emitting diode: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, C N Vijaya; Gururaj, M; Paul, Joseph

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the curing depth and compressive strength of dental composite using halogen light curing unit and light emitting diode light curing unit. Eighty cylindrical composite specimens were prepared using posterior composite P60(3M). Forty specimens, out of which 20 samples (group A) cured with halogen light and 20 samples (group B) cured using light emitting diode (LED) light were checked for curing depth according to ISO 4049. Remaining 40 samples out of which 20 samples (group I) cured using halogen light and 20 samples (group II) cured using LED light were checked for compressive strength using Instron universal testing machine. Twenty samples (group A) cured with halogen light showed better curing depth than 20 samples (group B) cured with LED light. Twenty samples (group I) cured with halogen light showed almost similar results as 20 samples (group II) cured with LED light for compressive strength. Halogen light commonly used to cure composite resin have greater depth of cure, when compared to LED light, while both the lights produced compressive strength which is almost similar. Lower depth of cure with the LED unit, compared to the QTH unit, is associated with different light scattering due to differences in spectral emission. LED technology differs from QTH by the spectral emission that favorably matches the absorption spectrum of camphorquinone.

  12. Providing International Research Experiences in Water Resources Through a Distributed REU Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, J.; Sahrawat, K.; Mylavarapu, R.

    2012-12-01

    Research experiences for undergraduates offer training in problem solving and critical thinking via hands-on projects. The goal of the distributed Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Program in the Agricultural and Biological Engineering Department (ABE) at the University of Florida (UF) is to provide undergraduate students a unique opportunity to conduct research in water resources using interdisciplinary approaches, integrating research and extension, while the cohort is not co-located. The eight-week REU Program utilizes the extensive infrastructure of UF - Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences (IFAS) through the Research and Education Centers (RECs). To provide international research and extension experience, two students were located at the International Crop Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT), in India. Prior to the beginning of the Program, the students worked closely with their research mentors at University of Florida and ICRISAT to develop a project plan for understanding the water quality issues in two watersheds. The students were co-located during the Orientation week at the University of Florida. During the Program, they achieved an enriching cohort experience through social networking, daily blogs, and weekly video conferences to share their research and other REU experiences. The group meetings and guest lectures are conducted via synchronously through video conferencing. The students who were distributed across Florida benefited from the research experiences of the students who were located in India, as their project progressed. They described their challenges and achievements during the group meetings and in the blogs. This model of providing integrated research and extension opportunities in hydrology where not all the REU participants are physically co-located, is unique and can be extended to other disciplines.

  13. Water Polo Game-Related Statistics in Women’s International Championships: Differences and Discriminatory Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, Yolanda; Saavedra, Jose M.; Tella, Victor; Mansilla, Mirella; García-Hermoso, Antonio; Dominguez, Ana M.

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were (i) to compare women’s water polo game-related statistics by match outcome (winning and losing teams) and phase (preliminary, classificatory, and semi-final/bronze medal/gold medal), and (ii) identify characteristics that discriminate performances for each phase. The game-related statistics of the 124 women’s matches played in five International Championships (World and European Championships) were analyzed. Differences between winning and losing teams in each phase were determined using the chi-squared. A discriminant analysis was then performed according to context in each of the three phases. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each phase of an international championship. The differentiating variables were both offensive (centre goals, power-play goals, counterattack goal, assists, offensive fouls, steals, blocked shots, and won sprints) and defensive (goalkeeper-blocked shots, goalkeeper-blocked inferiority shots, and goalkeeper-blocked 5-m shots). The discriminant analysis showed the game-related statistics to discriminate performance in all phases: preliminary, classificatory, and final phases (92%, 90%, and 83%, respectively). Two variables were discriminatory by match outcome (winning or losing teams) in all three phases: goals and goalkeeper-blocked shots. Key pointsThe preliminary phase that more than one variable was involved in this differentiation, including both offensive and defensive aspects of the game.The game-related statistics were found to have a high discriminatory power in predicting the result of matches with shots and goalkeeper-blocked shots being discriminatory variables in all three phases.Knowledge of the characteristics of women’s water polo game-related statistics of the winning teams and their power to predict match outcomes will allow coaches to take these characteristics into account when planning training and match preparation. PMID

  14. Curing the stigma of leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafferty, Joy

    2005-06-01

    The stigma of leprosy is a real phenomenon in many people's lives that affects their physical, psychological, social and economical well-being. There are many causes for this damaging image of leprosy. There is no one easy answer to dispelling this image; it is something that has to be done in partnership with communities and patients. Many papers document the effects of stigma, but few discuss or trial solutions. Education and media campaigns counteract false beliefs about leprosy and raise awareness of new advances in the field. Leprosy care is increasingly provided in an integrated setting showing patients and their communities that leprosy is not a disease apart. Physical and socio-economic rehabilitation is worthwhile in restoring self worth and status in the community and helps patients to find employment. Group counselling can allow those with leprosy to talk about their feelings and experiences to empower one another. Gradually attitudes towards leprosy are changing, but there is still much to be done if the underlying menace of stigma is to be dealt with. We as health professionals must be prepared to make the first move and give that first touch. Certainly more research is needed. In the highly endemic countries the road to elimination may yet be long. Perhaps with effort we will one day be able not only to treat the disease, but also to cure the stigma of leprosy, and make that road an easier one.

  15. Hypoxanthine enhances the cured meat taste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yukinobu; Yoshida, Yuka; Hattori, Akihito

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We evaluated the enhancement of cured meat taste during maturation by sensory analysis. We focused on the heat‐stable sarcoplasmic fraction (HSSF) to identify the factors related to cured meat taste. Because the dry matter of HSSF contained more than 30% nitrogen, nitrogen compounds such as free amino acids, small peptides and adenosine triphosphate‐related compounds seemed to be the important components of HSSF. The samples cured with HSSF for 2 h exhibited the same taste profile as ones cured without HSSF for 168 h. Therefore, the changes in the amount and fractions of nitrogen compounds were examined in HSSF during incubation from 0 to 168 h. The concentration of hypoxanthine (Hx) gradually increased, while inosine‐5′‐monophosphate decreased during the incubation. The samples cured with pickles containing various concentrations of Hx were subjected to sensory analysis. The addition of Hx, in a dose‐dependent fashion, enhanced cured meat taste by maturation for 2 h. It was concluded that Hx is essential for the enhancement of cured meat taste. PMID:27169902

  16. Curing of natural rubber and epoxy adhesive

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matawie, A.M.; Sadek, E.M.

    2001-01-01

    Low molecular weight epoxy resin based on diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A was synthesized and mixed at constant percentages with natural rubber. The rubber epoxy system was cured with various types of curing agents such as ethylene diamine, maleic anhydride as well as the prepared resole phenol formaldehyde. A study of the photo-induced crosslinking of the prepared elastic adhesives and film samples was carried out by exposure to ultraviolet lamp (300 w) for 2 weeks at 20 deg. C. Samples containing ethylene diamine were cured at 25 + - 1 deg. C. for 24 h while samples containing maleic anhydride or resole phenol formaldehyde resins were thermally cured at 150-170 deg. C. for 10 min. Cured adhesive compositions were tested mechanically and physically and evaluated as wood adhesives. While hardness, chemical resistance as well as heat stability of the prepared cured film sample were investigated. The obtained data indicate that the highest epoxy resin content and the presence of resole phenol formaldehyde resin in composition improve the tensile strength and adhesion properties on wood. While their cured film sample have the best hardness properties, chemical resistance and heat stability. (author)

  17. WATER POLO GAME-RELATED STATISTICS IN WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS: DIFFERENCES AND DISCRIMINATORY POWER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Escalante

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were (i to compare women's water polo game-related statistics by match outcome (winning and losing teams and phase (preliminary, classificatory, and semi-final/bronze medal/gold medal, and (ii identify characteristics that discriminate performances for each phase. The game-related statistics of the 124 women's matches played in five International Championships (World and European Championships were analyzed. Differences between winning and losing teams in each phase were determined using the chi-squared. A discriminant analysis was then performed according to context in each of the three phases. It was found that the game-related statistics differentiate the winning from the losing teams in each phase of an international championship. The differentiating variables were both offensive (centre goals, power-play goals, counterattack goal, assists, offensive fouls, steals, blocked shots, and won sprints and defensive (goalkeeper-blocked shots, goalkeeper-blocked inferiority shots, and goalkeeper-blocked 5-m shots. The discriminant analysis showed the game-related statistics to discriminate performance in all phases: preliminary, classificatory, and final phases (92%, 90%, and 83%, respectively. Two variables were discriminatory by match outcome (winning or losing teams in all three phases: goals and goalkeeper-blocked shots

  18. DTU International Energy Report 2016: The Energy-Water-Food Nexus - from local to global aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Energy, water, and food systems are closely interlinked in the Energy-Water-Food Nexus. Water is of paramount importance for the energy sector. Fossil fuels require water for extraction, trans-port and processing. Thermal power plants require water for cooling, whether they use nuclear, fossil or......-users. The waste water is often returned to the environment after energy requiring waste water management.......Energy, water, and food systems are closely interlinked in the Energy-Water-Food Nexus. Water is of paramount importance for the energy sector. Fossil fuels require water for extraction, trans-port and processing. Thermal power plants require water for cooling, whether they use nuclear, fossil...

  19. Water Quality Research Program: Abstracts of the International Symposium on Gas Transfer at Water Surfaces (2nd) Held in Minneapolis, Minnesota on 11-14 September 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-08-01

    summer water heating in daytime, when the greater part of solar radiation is absorbed by the surface water layer. When more heat is lost for...Schulz, 1.E. (1989). Estudos Preliminares sobre a Variacao da Dissipacao de Energia nos Casos de Escoamento Turbulento. Internal Report...due to direct solar radiation are potentially sensitive to oxygen deficits. A study was conducted of seven small streams in western Oregon during low

  20. Influence of Curing Units and Indirect Restorative Materials on the Hardness of Two Dual-curing Resin Cements Evaluated by the Nanoindentation Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuguimiya, Rosiane Noqueira; Rode, Kátia Martins; Carneiro, Paula Mendes Acatauassú; Aranha, Ana Cecilia Corrêa; Turbino, Miriam Lacalle

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the hardness of a dual-curing self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX U200) and a conventional dual-curing resin cement (RelyX ARC) cured with different light curing units of different wavelengths (Elipar Freelight 2 LED [430 to 480 nm, conventional], Bluephase LED [380 to 515 nm, polywave], AccuCure 3000 Laser [488 nm]) by means of the nanoindentation test. Bovine incisors were cleaned and then sectioned at the cementoenamel junction to remove the crown. After embedding in acrylic, dentin surfaces of the specimens were exposed and ground flat to standardize the surfaces. To simulate clinically placing indirect restorations, ceramic (IPS e.maxPress/Ivoclar Vivadent) or indirect composite resin (SR Adoro/Ivoclar Vivadent) slabs were cemented on dentin surfaces. The specimens were sectioned longitudinally at low speed under constant irrigation and then polished. In the positive control group, the cement was light cured without the interposition of indirect restorative material; in the negative control group, after the indirect restorative material was cemented, no light curing was performed, allowing only chemical polymerization of the cement. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days. Nanoindentadion hardness of the cement layer was measured under a 100-mN load. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test (p resin cements evaluated was negatively influenced by the interposition of an indirect restorative material; only the LEDs were able to maintain the same degree of cement polymerization when an indirect restorative material was used. The photoactivation step is required during the cementation of indirect restorations to ensure adequate polymerization of dual-curing resin cements.

  1. Simulation of water flow in fractured porous medium by using discretized virtual internal bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shujun; Zhang, Zhennan; Li, Chunfang; He, Guofu; Miao, Guoqing

    2017-12-01

    The discretized virtual internal bond (DVIB) is adopted to simulate the water flow in fractured porous medium. The intact porous medium is permeable because it contains numerous micro cracks and pores. These micro discontinuities construct a fluid channel network. The representative volume of this fluid channel network is modeled as a lattice bond cell with finite number of bonds in statistical sense. Each bond serves as a fluid channel. In fractured porous medium, many bond cells are cut by macro fractures. The conductivity of the fracture facet in a bond cell is taken over by the bonds parallel to the flow direction. The equivalent permeability and volumetric storage coefficient of a micro bond are calibrated based on the ideal bond cell conception, which makes it unnecessary to consider the detailed geometry of a specific element. Such parameter calibration method is flexible and applicable to any type of element. The accuracy check results suggest this method has a satisfying accuracy in both the steady and transient flow simulation. To simulate the massive fractures in rockmass, the bond cells intersected by fracture are assigned aperture values, which are assumed random numbers following a certain distribution law. By this method, any number of fractures can be implicitly incorporated into the background mesh, avoiding the setup of fracture element and mesh modification. The fracture aperture heterogeneity is well represented by this means. The simulation examples suggest that the present method is a feasible, simple and efficient approach to the numerical simulation of water flow in fractured porous medium.

  2. Overview of UV and EB curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: UV and EB are complementary techniques in radiation curing. In the proposed paper, a brief review of both fields will be given. This will include principles of the process, the chemistry of the systems including monomers/oligomers/polymers used, additives required where necessary such as photoinitiators for UV, flow aids, adhesion promoters and the like. The types of equipment used in such processes will also be discussed including low energy electron beam utilisation and excimer curing. The advantages and disadvantages of both techniques will be examined. Mechanistic aspects of both curing systems will be discussed. Applications of the technology including developments in the banknote printing field will be summarised

  3. Radiation curing - twenty five years on

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garnett, J.L.

    1995-01-01

    Progress in UV/EB curing during the past twenty five years is briefly reviewed. During this time developments in unique polymer chemistry, novel equipment design and the introduction of relevant educational programmes has enabled radiation curing to become an established technology with specific strengths in certain industries. Possible reasons for the emergence of the technology in these niche markets are discussed. Despite the worldwide recession, radiation curing is shown to be expanding at 5% per annum with the prospect of higher growth with improving economic conditions. (Author)

  4. [Is it possible to cure HIV infection?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, Carolina; Madrid, Nadia P; Moreno, Santiago

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy has significantly improved the life expectancy in HIV-infected people, but it cannot cure the disease by itself. Several barriers have been identified for the cure of HIV infection, including a reservoir of latently infected cells, persistent viral replication in tissues, and anatomical sanctuaries. The main strategy proposed for the cure of HIV consists on the administration of drugs that, through the reactivation of latent HIV, would eliminate the cell reservoir. Ongoing clinical trials have shown the proof of concept, but the efficacy of these drugs in decreasing the reservoir size has not been proved so far.

  5. Traditional, complementary, and alternative medical cures for HIV: rationale and implications for HIV cure research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xin; Zhang, Alice; Henderson, Gail E; Rennie, Stuart; Liu, Chuncheng; Cai, Weiping; Wu, Feng; Tucker, Joseph D

    2017-12-13

    Traditional, complementary, and alternative medicine (TCAM) has been used by some people living with HIV (PLHIV) in an attempt to cure HIV. This article reviews the main factors influencing their decision to choose TCAM to cure HIV and discusses implications for HIV cure research. Those who decide to pursue traditional, complementary, and alternative medical cures may be influenced by the health system, cultural, and social dynamics, and their own individual beliefs and preferences. These same factors may impact participation in HIV cure research. People who search for traditional, complementary, and alternative medical cures may face special challenges as they are recruited, consented, and retained within HIV cure research studies. To address these potential challenges, we have suggested solutions focusing on culturally tailored communication and education, formative social science research, and community partnerships with key stakeholders. The social conditions that have promoted traditional, complementary and alternative medical cures will likely impact how PLHIV participate and experience HIV remission trials. Despite the potential challenges, it will be crucial to involve those who have previously sought out traditional cures for HIV in HIV cure research.

  6. Dimensional change of heat-cured acrylic resin dentures with three different cooling regimes following a standard curing cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moturi, Bhanodaya; Juszczyk, Andrzej S; Radford, David R; Clark, Robert K F

    2005-12-01

    The aim of the study was to compare dimensional changes in poly(methylmethacrylate) complete denture bases resulting from three different cooling regimens following a standard heating cycle. Changes in three separate dimensions were measured on ten dentures within each cooling regimen after curing, and before and after removing the denture from the cast using a computer imaging system. No consistent differences occurred as a result of removing the denture from the cast. The results indicated that there was greater change in dimension of dentures with the quenching cooling method than with either overnight cooling in the water bath or bench cooling. This was particularly evident after removal from the cast after curing (p<0.001). It is concluded that slow cooling results in less dimensional change.

  7. Toxoplasma gondii in raw and dry-cured ham: The influence of the curing process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Laura; Gracia, María Jesús; Pérez-Arquillué, Consuelo; Lázaro, Regina; Herrera, Antonio; Bayarri, Susana

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze Toxoplasma gondii in raw hams by mouse bioassay and to evaluate the effect of curing on the viability of the parasite to assess the risk of infection from eating dry-cured ham. After a serology study of 1200 pigs in Aragón (Spain), forty-one naturally infected pigs with different serological titers against T. gondii were selected. Two cured periods (9 and 12 months) were evaluated as well as the influence of the physicochemical composition of hams on T. gondii survival. Although the parasite burden was low, a high number of seropositive pigs with Toxoplasma tissues cysts in raw hams were found (31.6%). Viability of T. gondii was influenced by the curing, with statistically significant differences between fresh and cured hams (p hams cured for 9 months compared to those cured for 12 months. However, this period of curing resulted in the reduction but not in a complete elimination of the risk. Thus, from a public health point of view, under the conditions of this study it is safer to consume dry-cured ham with periods of curing higher than 12 months. Analysis of physicochemical results did not identify any variable with significant influence on the presence and viability of T. gondii in cured ham, but loss of viability of T. gondii was observed in hams with a lower fat content. Further research is required to validate combinations of salts concentration and time of curing that can be used as preventive measures in the HACCP system of dry-cured ham industry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Marine nitrous oxide emissions: An unknown liability for the international water sector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Short, Michael D.; Peters, Gregory M.; Peirson, William L.; Ashbolt, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • IPCC methodology for indirect marine nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions does not exist. • The water sector has an unknown N 2 O emissions liability from marine sewage disposal. • We model global sewage-nitrogen (N) emissions to coastal oceans during 1970–2050. • Emission factors for marine N 2 O will enable water sector N 2 O emissions accounting. • Industry benefits will include future revenue streams and better N emissions policy. -- Abstract: Reliable estimates of anthropogenic greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are essential for setting effective climate policy at both the sector and national level. Current IPCC Guidelines for calculating nitrous oxide (N 2 O) emissions from sewage management are both highly uncertain and incomplete; a major methodological gap relates to the calculation of indirect N 2 O emissions from sewage disposed to marine environments. Here we apply a novel approach to estimate past and future global sewage-nitrogen emissions to coastal oceans and the potential marine N 2 O emissions linked to this nitrogen source. Then, by estimating the future cost associated with this largely uncharacterized emission source, we demonstrate the industry significance of developing a methodology for estimating N 2 O emissions from marine receiving environments. The capacity to accurately estimate, monitor and report GHG emissions has important consequences for informing future policy decisions regarding both mitigation and adaptation. A robust N 2 O emissions estimation methodology for sewage-nitrogen disposed to coastal oceans will allow the international water sector to more accurately and comprehensively inventory its N 2 O emissions. This will in turn allow for proper accounting of related future emissions liabilities while also enabling the sector to capitalize on any future economic returns linked to this source – providing much-needed capital to support the sector's future infrastructure and climate change adaptation challenges

  9. Targeting the brain reservoirs: towards an HIV cure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celine Marban

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the top research priorities of the international AIDS society by the action Towards an HIV Cure is the purge or the decrease of the pool of all latently infected cells. This strategy is based on reactivation of latently reservoirs (the shock followed by an intensifying Combination Antiretroviral Therapy (cART to kill them (the kill. The Central Nervous System (CNS has potential latently infected cells i.e. perivascular macrophages, microglial cells and astrocytes which will need to be eliminate. However the CNS has several characteristics that may preclude the achievement of a cure. In this review we discuss several limitations to the eradication of brain reservoirs and how we could circumvent these limitations by making it efforts in 4 directions: (i designing efficient Latency-Reversal Agents for CNS-cell types (ii improving cART by targeting HIV transcription (iii improving delivery of HIV drugs in the CNS and in the CNS-cell types (iv developing therapeutic immunization. As a prerequisite to these efforts we also believe that a better comprehension of molecular mechanisms involved in establishment and persistence of HIV latency in brain reservoirs are essential to design new molecules for strategies aiming to achieve a cure for instance the shock and kill strategy.

  10. Electron beam curing of aramid fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.B.; Singh, A.; Lopata, V.J.; Boyer, G.D.; Kremers, W.; Mason, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    High strength- and stiffness-to-weight ratios have allowed fiber-reinforced composites to be used for many applications, including aircraft and aerospace products, sporting goods and automotive components. Electron beam (EB) processing involves using electrons to initiate polymerization and/or crosslinking reactions in suitable polymer substrates to enhance specific physical and chemical properties. The advantages of using EB processing rather than thermal curing techniques for composites, include reduced internal stresses, a result of curing at ambient temperature, greatly reduced curing times, and better control of energy absorption. The penetration limit for a 10-MeV electron beam is about 4 cm for one-sided treatment of unit-density material, making EB processing suitable for many applications. The penetration limit is inversely proportional to the density of the material. This paper reports on the authors' research program to study EB-curable aramid fiber-reinforced composites. The program objective is to design and manufacture EB-curable composites that meet mechanical and physical property specifications for selected applications. The suitability of standard fabrication methods, such as filament winding and hand lay-up, to EB processing is also discussed

  11. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  12. NONA Cure of Prepreg Structures, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — CRG's no-oven, no-autoclave (NONA) cure of OoA or autoclave prepreg materials allows the manufacture of large composite structures without the expensive and...

  13. The prevention of losses in cured fish

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1981-01-01

    The paper reviews problems of the post-harvest losses in cured fish. The importance of this commodity in the tropics and existing methods of its handling, processing, storage and distribution are discussed...

  14. Radtech Asia'95 radiation curing conference proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Radtech Asia'95 Radiation Curing Conference was held in November, 20-24, 1995 in Guilin, China. The subjects include chemistry, application, Measurement and Equipment, and Material modification. Out of 86 titles, some 30 papers are in INIS scope

  15. Gamma and electron beam curing of polymers and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, C.B.; Dickson, L.W.; Singh, A.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation polymerization has helped us understand polymer chemistry, and is also playing an increasing role in the field of practical applications. Radiation curing has a present market share of about 5% of the total market for curing of polymers and composites and the annual growth rate of the radiation curing market is ≥20% per year. Advantages of radiation curing over thermal or chemical curing methods include: improved control of the curing rate, reduced curing times, curing at ambient temperatures, curing without the need for chemical initiators, and complete (100%) curing with minimal toxic chemical emissions. Radiation treatment may also be used to effect crosslinking and grafting of polymer and composite materials. The major advantage in these cases is the ability to process products in their final shape. Cable insulation, automotive and aircraft components, and improved construction materials are some of the current and near-future industrial applications of radiation curing and crosslinking. 19 refs

  16. Effect of cure cycle on curing process and hardness for epoxy resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3-dimensional finite element model is developed to simulate and analyze the temperature and degree of cure field of epoxy casting part during cure process. The present model based on general finite element software ABAQUS is verified by literature example and experimental data. The numerical results show good agreement with literature example and measured data, and are even more accurate than the simulation of literature. After modeling successfully, the influence of temperature cure cycle ramps have on the temperature and degree of cure gradient is investigated. Moreover, the effect of non-uniform temperature and degree of cure field within epoxy casting part on hardness is demonstrated. The present model provides an accurate and novel method that allows further insight into the process of cure for epoxy resin.

  17. Flexural behaviour of post-cured composites at oral-simulating temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, C T; Vijayaraghavan, T V; Lee, S Y; Tsai, A; Huang, H M; Pan, L C

    2001-07-01

    Post-curing treatments have been known to improve the mechanical stability of visible light-cured composites. After individual post-curing treatment, the flexural strength (FS) of four commercial direct/indirect placement composite materials which differ greatly in composition [oligocarbonate dimethacrylate (OCDMA)-based Conquest C & B (CQT), Bisphenol-A glycidyl dimethacrylate (BisGMA)-based Charisma, urethane dimethacrylate (UDMA)-based Concept (CCT), and BisGMA/UDMA-based Dentacolor] was evaluated under water in the temperature range of 12-50 degrees C. A control series was tested in air at room temperature (25 +/- 1 degrees C). Data were analysed using ANOVA and Duncan's test. Flexural strengths overall decreased (20-40%, P OCDMA-based materials. Post-cured composites can be significantly affected by exposure to oral environments. Different composition determines the degree of influence.

  18. Fast Curing of Composite Wood Products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Arthur J. Ragauskas

    2006-04-26

    The overall objective of this program is to develop low temperature curing technologies for UF and PF resins. This will be accomplished by: • Identifying the rate limiting UF and PF curing reactions for current market resins; • Developing new catalysts to accelerate curing reactions at reduced press temperatures and times. In summary, these new curing technologies will improve the strength properties of the composite wood products and minimize the detrimental effects of wood extractives on the final product while significantly reducing energy costs for wood composites. This study is related to the accelerated curing of resins for wood composites such as medium density fiberboard (MDF), particle board (PB) and oriented strandboard (OSB). The latter is frequently manufactured with a phenol-formaldehyde resin whereas ureaformaldehyde (UF) resins are usually used in for the former two grades of composite wood products. One of the reasons that hinder wider use of these resins in the manufacturing of wood composites is the slow curing speed as well as inferior bondability of UF resin. The fast curing of UP and PF resins has been identified as an attractive process development that would allow wood to be bonded at higher moisture contents and at lower press temperatures that currently employed. Several differing additives have been developed to enhance cure rates of PF resins including the use of organic esters, lactones and organic carbonates. A model compound study by Conner, Lorenz and Hirth (2002) employed 2- and 4-hydroxymethylphenol with organic esters to examine the chemical basis for the reported enhanced reactivity. Their studies suggested that the enhance curing in the presence of esters could be due to enhanced quinone methide formation or enhanced intermolecular SN2 reactions. In either case the esters do not function as true catalysts as they are consumed in the reaction and were not found to be incorporated in the polymerized resin product. An

  19. Water quality - Determination of tritium activity concentration - Liquid scintillation counting method (International Standard Publication ISO 9698:1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanik, J.

    1999-01-01

    This International Standard specifies a method for the determination of tritiated water ([ 3 H]H 2 O) activity concentration in water by liquid scintillation counting. The method is applicable to all types of water including seawater with tritium activity concentrations of up to 10 6 Bq/m 3 when using 20 ml counting vials. Below tritium activity concentrations of about 5 x 10 4 Bq/m 3[ 8], a prior enrichment step and/or the measurement of larger sample volumes can significantly improve the accuracy of the determination and lower the limit of detection. Tritium activity concentrations higher than 10 6 Bq/m 3 may be determined after appropriate dilution with distilled water of proven low tritium content. An alternative method for the determination of these higher activities involves increasing the tritium activity concentrations of the internal standard solution. The method is not applicable to the analysis of organically bound tritium; its determination requires an oxidative digestion

  20. Introduction: achieving sustainable and adaptive fresh water management : Selective studies of international, European, Dutch and Chinese water law

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rijswick, Marleen; Wouters, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    China and Europe face serious water challenges. Europe has developed a comprehensive and adaptive legal framework for addressing water-related management issues. China continues to go forward with its water management schemes. While China and Europe may seem unlikely comparative settings, this

  1. Radiation cured coatings for high performance products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkins, J.C.; Teesdale, D.H.

    1984-01-01

    Development over the past ten years of radiation curable coating and lacquer systems and the means of curing them has led to new products in the packaging, flooring, furniture and other industries. Solventless lacquer systems formulated with acrylates and other resins enable high levels of durability, scuff resistance and gloss to be achieved. Ultra violet and electron beam radiation curing are used, the choice depending on the nature of the coating, the product and the scale of the operation. (author)

  2. Cycloaliphatic epoxide resins for cationic UV - cure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschueren, K.; Balwant Kaur

    1999-01-01

    This paper introduces the cyclo - aliphatic epoxide resins used for the various applications of radiation curing and their comparison with acrylate chemistry. Radiation curable coatings and inks are pre - dominantly based on acrylate chemistry but over the last few years, cationic chemistry has emerged successfully with the unique properties inherent with cyclo - aliphatic epoxide ring structures. Wide variety of cationic resins and diluents, the formulation techniques to achieve the desired properties greatly contributes to the advancement of UV - curing technology

  3. International symposium on nuclear techniques in integrated plant nutrient, water and soil management. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-10-01

    This document contains extended synopsis of 92 papers presented at the International Symposium on Nuclear Techniques in Integrated Plant Nutrient, Water, and Soil Management held in Vienna, Austria, 16-20 October 2000. The efficient use of plant nutrient and fertilizer using carbon 13 and nitrogen 15 tracers; plant water use using oxygen 18 and moisture gauges, as well as soil and plant radioactivity monitoring, are some of the major subjects covered by these papers

  4. Additive effects in radiation grafting and curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viengkhou, V.; Ng, L.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: Detailed studies on the accelerative effect of novel additives in radiation grafting and curing using acrylated monomer/oligomer systems have been performed in the presence of ionising radiation and UV as sources. Methyl methacrylate (MMA) is used as typical monomer for these grafting studies in the presence of the additives with model backbone polymers, cellulose and propropylene. Additives which have been found to accelerate these grafting processes are: mineral acid, occlusion compounds like urea, thermal initiators and photoinitiators as well as multifunctional monomers such as multifunctional acrylates. The results from irradiation with gamma rays have also been compared with irradiation from a 90W UV lamp. The role of the above additives in accelerating the analogous process of radiation curing has been investigated. Acrylated urethanes, epoxies and polyesters are used as oligomers together with acrylated monomers in this work with uv lamps of 300 watts/inch as radiation source. In the UV curing process bonding between film and substrate is usually due to physical forces. In the present work the presence of additives are shown to influence the occurrence of concurrent grafting during cure thus affecting the nature of the bonding of the cured film. The conditions under which concurrent grafting with UV can occur will be examined. A mechanism for accelerative effect of these additives in both grafting and curing processes has been proposed involving radiation effects and partitioning phenomena

  5. High Power UV LED Industrial Curing Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlicek, Robert, F., Jr; Sargent, Robert

    2012-05-14

    UV curing is a green technology that is largely underutilized because UV radiation sources like Hg Lamps are unreliable and difficult to use. High Power UV LEDs are now efficient enough to replace Hg Lamps, and offer significantly improved performance relative to Hg Lamps. In this study, a modular, scalable high power UV LED curing system was designed and tested, performing well in industrial coating evaluations. In order to achieve mechanical form factors similar to commercial Hg Lamp systems, a new patent pending design was employed enabling high irradiance at long working distances. While high power UV LEDs are currently only available at longer UVA wavelengths, rapid progress on UVC LEDs and the development of new formulations designed specifically for use with UV LED sources will converge to drive more rapid adoption of UV curing technology. An assessment of the environmental impact of replacing Hg Lamp systems with UV LED systems was performed. Since UV curing is used in only a small portion of the industrial printing, painting and coating markets, the ease of use of UV LED systems should increase the use of UV curing technology. Even a small penetration of the significant number of industrial applications still using oven curing and drying will lead to significant reductions in energy consumption and reductions in the emission of green house gases and solvent emissions.

  6. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    OpenAIRE

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday; Yusuf Ziya Bayindir; Funda Bayindir; Aysel Gurpinar

    2013-01-01

    Background/purpose: Several factors may affects microhardness of resin cement under veneering materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different veneering materials, light-curing units and curing times (20/3, 40/6) on the microhardness of dual-cured resin cement. Materials and methods: We pressed dual-cured resin cement specimens (Clearfil SA cement, 5 mm diameter, 1 mm thick) between two microscopic glass slides covered with transparent polystyrene matrix strips to r...

  7. Effect of curing agent type, cure treatment and organophilic clay on thermal properties of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leal, A.S.C.; Araujo, C.J. de; Silva, S.M.L.

    2010-01-01

    The effect of curing agent kind, curing conditions, and the incorporation of small amount of organoclay on the thermal properties of DGEBA epoxy resin was evaluated in order to develop an epoxy system for application as matrix in active composites (composites whose dispersed phase consists of shape memory alloy wires).The DGEBA resin was prepared using three amine derivatives as hardeners (TETA, DETA and DDS) under varied curing conditions, in the absence and presence of organoclay. Epoxy systems were characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis, optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction. According to results, the cured epoxy systems at elevated temperatures (DETA and DDS) showed higher glass transition temperature (T g ) and thermal stability values than the system cured at low temperature (TETA). In addition, when the post-cure treatment was used, the increases were superior. When 1 phr of organoclay was incorporated in DETA and DDS cured epoxy systems and post-cured, either the increase in the T g or thermal stability values were more significant, especially for the system cured with DDS. Hence, the epoxy/DDS/organoclay system (exfoliated nanocomposite) is the most appropriate to be used as matrix in the preparation of active composites since this matrix is thermally stable in the Ni-Ti shape memory alloy working range whose phase transformation occurs between 70-80 deg C. (author)

  8. Composition of mortar as a function of distance to the brick-mortar interface : A study on the formation of cured mortar structure in masonry using NMR, PFM and XRD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brocken, H.J.P.; Larbi, J.A.; Pel, L.; Pers, N.M. van der

    1999-01-01

    The formation of cured mortar structure in masonry was studied using multiple experimental techniques. Starting with fresh mortar, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was used to measure the water extraction during brick laying. After curing, the composition of cured mortar was investigated with

  9. Integration of seawater and grey water reuse to maximize alternative water resource for coastal areas: the case of the Hong Kong International Airport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, R W K; Li, D C H; Yu, W K; Chui, H K; Lee, T O; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Chen, G H

    2012-01-01

    Development, population growth and climate change have pressurized water stress in the world. Being an urbanized coastal city, Hong Kong has adopted a dual water supply system since the 1950s for seawater toilet flushing for 80% of its 7 million inhabitants. Despite its success in saving 750,000 m(3)/day of freshwater, the saline sewage (consisting of about 20-30% of seawater) appears to have sacrificed the urban water cycle in terms of wastewater reuse and recycling. Can seawater toilet flushing be applied without affecting the urban water cycle with respect to sustainable water resource management? To address this issue, we examined the entire urban water cycle and developed an innovative water resource management system by integrating freshwater, seawater and reclaimed grey water into a sustainable, low-freshwater demand, low-energy consumption, and low-cost triple water supply (TWS) system. The applicability of this novel system has been demonstrated at the Hong Kong International Airport which reduced 52% of its freshwater demand.

  10. Effect of high temperature curing on the compressive strength of concrete incorporating large volumes of fly ash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera-Villarreal, R. [Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Monterrey (Mexico)

    2001-07-01

    The effect of using different types of heat treatment on the compressive strength of concrete with and without large volumes of fly ash was studied. Curing of concrete is important to obtain a good quality concrete, but it is important to keep concrete from drying until the originally water-filled space in fresh cement paste has been filled to the desired extent by the products of hydration. In hot weather, high temperature promotes faster drying of concrete so a given degree of hydration is reached more rapidly than at lower temperatures. The provision of moist curing is advantageous because of a gradual gain in strength and because of reduced plastic shrinkage and drying shrinkage-cracking. The portland cement content in all the mixtures used in this study was 200 kg per cubic metre and the amount of fly ash varied from 0 to 33, 43, 50 and 56 per cent by mass of the total binder. A superplasticizer was used to obtain 200-220 mm slump. The compressive strength was tested at 3, 7, 14, 28, 56 days and at 6 months. Results showed that, using ASTM standard curing, the compressive strength of portland cement concrete made at 35 degrees C was reduced by about 12 per cent at 28 days compared to that of the concrete made at 23 degrees C. The AASHTO curing strength was found to be a bit higher than with the ASTM curing. The concrete made at 35 degrees C showed no loss of strength when continuous moist-curing was applied. The fly ash concrete mixtures that were cast at 35 degrees C were cured by covering them with membrane curing compounds and placed under ambient conditions. It was crucial to allow enough curing water to promote the pozzolanic reaction. The membrane curing did not allow the ingress of water to the concrete mass. 6 refs., 4 tabs., 13 figs.

  11. Report: EPA Lacks Internal Controls to Prevent Misuse of Emergency Drinking Water Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report #11-P-0001, October 12, 2010. EPA cannot accurately assess the risk of public water systems delivering contaminated drinking water from emergency facilities because of limitations in Safe Drinking Water Information System (SDWIS) data management.

  12. Q-PCR based bioburden assessment of drinking water throughout treatment and delivery to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newcombe, David; Stuecker, Tara; La Duc, Myron; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies indicated evidence of opportunistic pathogens samples obtained during missions to the International Space Station (ISS). This study utilized TaqMan quantitative PCR to determine specific gene abundance in potable and non-potable ISS waters. Probe and primer sets specific to the small subunit rRNA genes were used to elucidate overall bacterial rRNA gene numbers. while those specific for Burkholderia cepacia and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia were optimized and used to probe for the presence of these two opportunistic pathogens. This research builds upon previous microbial diversity studies of ISS water and demonstrates the utility of Q-PCR tool to examine water quality.

  13. Particle Size Characterization of Water-Elutriated Libby Amphibole 2000 and RTI International Amosite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowers, Heather; Bern, Amy M.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data on particle characterization analyzed by scanning electron microscopy on Libby amphibole collected by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2000 (LA2000) and amosite material collected by RTI International (RTI amosite). The particle characterization data were generated to support a portion of the Libby Action Plan. Prior to analysis, the raw LA2000 and RTI amosite materials were subjected to a preparation step. Each sample was water-elutriated by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Office of Research and Development, Research Triangle Park using the methods generally described in another published report and then delivered to the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Microbeam Laboratory for analysis. Data presented here represent analyses performed by the U.S. Geological Survey, Denver Microbeam Laboratory and USEPA National Enforcement Investigations Center. This report consists of two Excel spreadsheet files developed by USEPA, Region 8 Superfund Technical Assistance Unit and describe the particle size characterization of the LA2000 and RTI amosite, respectively. Multiple tabs and data entry cells exist in each spreadsheet and are defined herein.

  14. A history of diabetes insipidus: paving the road to internal water balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eknoyan, Garabed

    2010-12-01

    Diabetes insipidus is an ancient disease considered under the rubric of diabetes, the Greek descriptive term for polyuria, which was unrecognized even after the sweetness of urine was reported as a characteristic of diabetes mellitus in the 17th century. It would be another century before diabetes insipidus was identified from the insipid rather than saccharine taste of urine in cases of polyuria. After its increased recognition, pathologic observations and experimental studies connected diabetes insipidus to the pituitary gland in the opening decades of the 20th century. Simultaneously, posterior pituitary lobe extracts were shown to be vasoconstrictive (vasopressin) and antidiuretic (antidiuretic hormone). As vasopressin was purified and synthesized and its assay became available, it was shown to be released in response to both osmotic and volume stimuli that are integrated in the hypothalamus, and vasopressin thereby was essential to maintaining internal water balance. The antidiuretic properties of vasopressin to treat the rare cases of diabetes insipidus were of limited clinical utility until its vasoconstrictive effects were resuscitated in the 1970s, with the consequent increasing wider use of vasopressin for the treatment of compromised hemodynamic states. In addition, the discovery of antidiuretic hormone receptor blockers has led to their increasing use in managing hypo-osmolar states. Copyright © 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Separation of heavy metals from water by functionalized glycidyl methacrylate poly (high internal phase emulsions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huš, Sebastjan; Kolar, Mitja; Krajnc, Peter

    2016-03-11

    Removal of silver, lead and cadmium ions from both model solutions and real contaminated water was achieved, in a flow through manner, by using highly porous functionalized poly(glycidyl methacrylate) materials, prepared by the polymerisation of high internal phase emulsions (polyHIPE), with significant sorption differences between metals allowing for selective removal. PolyHIPEs, initially prepared from glycidyl methacrylate as a functional monomer, were functionalized with pentaerythritol tetrakis(3-mercaptopropionate), 1,9-nonanedithiol and 2-aminobenzenethiol via the epoxy ring opening on the polymer supports and applied in a flow-through manner via encasements into dedicated disk holders. Capacity of 21.7mg Ag per gram of polymer was found for 1,9-nonanedithiol functionalized polymers, while the capacity was decreasing with the decreasing ionic radius of the metal; the dynamics of sorption also depended on metal ion size and furthermore on the thiol used for the polymer functionalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The development of reactor vessel internal heavy forging for 1000 MW pressurized-water reactor nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Zhifeng; Chen Yongbo; Ding Xiuping; Zhang Lingfang

    2012-01-01

    This Paper introduced the development of Reactor Vessel Internal (RVI) heavy forgings for 1000 MW Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant, analyzed the manufacture difficulties and technical countermeasures. The testing result of the product indicated that the performance of RVI heavy forgings manufactured by Shanghai Heavy Machinery Plant Ld. (SHMP) is outstanding and entirely satisfy the technical requirements for RVI product. (authors)

  17. X-ray-cured carbon-fiber composites for vehicle use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herer, Arnold; Galloway, Richard A.; Cleland, Marshall R.; Berejka, Anthony J.; Montoney, Daniel; Dispenza, Dan; Driscoll, Mark

    2009-07-01

    Carbon-fiber-reinforced composites were cured in molds using X-rays derived from a high-energy, high-current electron beam. X-rays could penetrate the mold walls as well as the fiber reinforcements and polymerize a matrix system. Matrix materials made from modified epoxy-acrylates were tailored to suitably low viscosity so that fiber wetting and adhesion could be attained. Techniques similar to vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) and conventional vacuum bagging of wet lay-ups were used. Inexpensive reinforced polyester molds were used to fabricate vehicle fenders. Moderately low-dose X-ray exposure was sufficient to attain functional properties, such as resistance to heat distortion at temperatures as high as 180 °C. The matrix system contained an impact additive which imparted toughness to the cured articles. "Class A" high gloss surfaces were achieved. Thermo-analytical techniques were used on small-sized samples of X-ray-cured matrix materials to facilitate selection of a system for use in making prototypes of vehicle components. X-rays-penetrated metal pieces that were placed within layers of carbon-fiber twill, which were cured and bonded into a structure that could be mechanically attached without concern over fracturing the composite. X-ray curing is a low temperature process that eliminates residual internal stresses which are imparted by conventional thermo-chemical curing processes.

  18. CUREs in biochemistry-where we are and where we should go.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Jessica K; Eckdahl, Todd T; Hecht, David A; Killion, Patrick J; Latzer, Joachim; Mans, Tamara L; Provost, Joseph J; Rakus, John F; Siebrasse, Erica A; Ellis Bell, J

    2017-01-02

    Integration of research experience into classroom is an important and vital experience for all undergraduates. These course-based undergraduate research experiences (CUREs) have grown from independent instructor lead projects to large consortium driven experiences. The impact and importance of CUREs on students at all levels in biochemistry was the focus of a National Science Foundation funded think tank. The state of biochemistry CUREs and suggestions for moving biochemistry forward as well as a practical guide (supplementary material) are reported here. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 45(1):7-12, 2017. © 2016 The Authors Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Education published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  19. Rational designing of the internal water supply system in reconstructed residential buildings of mass standard series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlov Evgeny

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issues of water supply system reconstruction in mass series buildings are reviewed with consideration of water- and resource saving. Principal points for location of plumbing cells in apartments, arrangement of water devices and wastewater receivers, selection of pipelines for reconstructed water line are described. Comparative analysis of design variants of inner water line before and following reconstruction are given. It was found that applying the developed system design approaches the head losses in the inner water supply line will be significantly decreased as well as the water mains length will be decreased with material and installation saving. Based on the data the conclusions on necessity to review standard arrangement solutions of water supply systems in the reconstructed buildings were made. Recommendations on water loss reduction in the system by installation of special water saving fittings on water devices and touchless faucets.

  20. Physicochemical Characteristics of Beef Jerky Cured with Salted-fermented Anchovy and Shrimp

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Gap-Don; Go, Gwang-woong; Lim, Hyun-Jung; Jung, Eun-Young; Seo, Hyun-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Yeon; Joo, Seon-Tea; Yang, Han-Sul

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the availability of salted and fermented fish (SFF) including salted and fermented anchovy (SFA) and shrimp (SFS) as a marinade of beef jerky. In curing solutions, half (SFA 1 and SFS 1) or whole (SFA 2 and SFS 2) salt-water was replaced with SFF juices. Higher water activity (aw) was found in the beef jerky cured with SFFs than the control (C) (p< 0.05). The SFFs had the effect of causing a decrease in hardness and an increase in cohesiveness (p

  1. Shear bond strength of dual-cured and self-cured resin composites to dentin using different bonding agents and techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leevailoj, C; Ua-wutthikrerk, P; Poolthong, S

    2007-01-01

    This study determined the effects of bonding agents on the shear bond strength of dual- and self-cured resin composites to dentin. Two light-cured dentin bonding agents (Excite and One-Step) and a dual-cured bonding agent (Excite DSC) were compared. Light activation of the bonding agents prior to placement of the resin composites was also evaluated. This in vitro study was performed on 120 extracted non-carious human third molars. The occlusal part of the crowns was removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The teeth were then randomly divided into three major groups for Excite, One-Step and Excite DSC as bonding agents. The specimens in each adhesive group were divided into four subgroups: with and without light activation of the bonding agent and with dual-cured (Luxacore Dualcure, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) or light-cured resin (Luxacore, DMG, Hamburg, Germany) composites. After placing the restorations, the specimens were kept in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours before being tested for shear bond strength on an Instron universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/minute. The results showed that the shear bond strength of dual-cured resin composite to dentin was significantly higher than that of self-cured resin composite (p = 0.017). Light activation of the bonding agents prior to applying the resin composites led to a significantly higher shear bond strength of the resin composites to dentin, compared to no light activation (p < 0.05).

  2. Comparison of hardness of three temporary filling materials cured by two light-curing devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodrumlu, E; Koçak, M M; Hazar Bodrumlu, E; Ozcan, S; Koçak, S

    2014-01-01

    Polymerization ability of light-curing devices can affect the light-cured material hardness. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate and compare the hardness of three temporary filling materials that had been light-cured by either a light emitting diode (LED) or a halogen light-curing unit. The temporary filling materials, First Fill, Voco Clip and Bioplic, were placed in wells in a Teflon plate. The 24 specimens of each material were divided into two groups (N.=12/group) for photo-activation by either of the two light-curing units. The LED or halogen device was applied for 40s to the top surface of each specimen. A Knoop hardness test was performed on the top and bottom surface of each specimen, with five measurements per specimen. The highest hardness values for both the LED and halogen treated groups were observed for First Fill and the lowest values were for Voco Clip in top and bottom surfaces. The hardness obtained for the three materials with the halogen unit were significantly higher than the values obtained with the LED unit in both surfaces (Plight-cured temporary material exhibited the highest hardness values on the top and bottom surfaces than Voco Clip and Bioplic temporary materials. The hardness of light-cured temporary filling materials can be affected by the type of light-curing unit.

  3. Proceedings of workshop on surface finishing by radiation curing technology: radiation curing for better finishing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This book compiled the paper presented at this workshop. The papers discussed are 1. Introduction to radiation curing, 2. Radiation sources -ultraviolet and electron beams, 3. UV/EB curing of surface coating - wood and nonwood substrates, 4. Development of EPOLA (epoxidised palm oil products acrylate) and its application, 5. Development of radiation-curable resin based natural rubber

  4. Survey of naturally and conventionally cured commercial frankfurters, ham, and bacon for physio-chemical characteristics that affect bacterial growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Gary A; Jackson-Davis, Armitra L; Schrader, Kohl D; Xi, Yuan; Kulchaiyawat, Charlwit; Sebranek, Joseph G; Dickson, James S

    2012-12-01

    Natural and organic food regulations preclude the use of sodium nitrite/nitrate and other antimicrobials for processed meat products. Consequently, processors have begun to use natural nitrate/nitrite sources, such as celery juice/powder, sea salt, and turbinado sugar, to manufacture natural and organic products with cured meat characteristics but without sodium nitrite. The objective of this study was to compare physio-chemical characteristics that affect Clostridium perfringens and Listeria monocytogenes growth in naturally cured and traditionally cured commercial frankfurters, hams, and bacon. Correlations of specific product characteristics to pathogen growth varied between products and pathogens, though water activity, salt concentration, and product composition (moisture, protein and fat) were common intrinsic factors correlated to pathogen growth across products. Other frequently correlated traits were related to curing reactions such as % cured pigment. Residual nitrite and nitrate were significantly correlated to C. perfringens growth but only for the ham products. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Enhancing our Understanding of the Arctic Atmospheric Hydrological Cycle using Observations from an International Arctic Water Vapor Isotope Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson-Delmotte, V.; Steen-Larsen, H. C.; Werner, M.

    2014-12-01

    Due to the role of water vapor and clouds in positive feedback mechanisms, water vapor is a key player in the future of Arctic climate. Ecosystems and human societies are vulnerable to climate change through even minor changes in precipitation patterns, including the occurrence of extreme events. It is therefore essential to monitor, understand and model correctly the mechanisms of transport of moisture, at the regional scale. Water isotopes - the relative abundance of heavy and light water in the atmosphere - hold the key to understanding the physical processes influencing future Arctic climate. Water isotope observations in the atmosphere are a modern analog to the Rosetta Stone for understanding the processes involved in evaporation, moisture transport, cloud formation and to track moisture origin. Indeed, technological progress now allows continuous, in situ or remote sensing monitoring of water isotopic composition. In parallel, a growing number of atmospheric circulation models are equipped with the explicit modeling of water stable isotopes, allowing evaluation at the process scale. We present here data obtained through national or bi-national initiatives from stations onboard an icebreaker and land based stations in Greenland, Iceland, Svalbard, and Siberia - together forming an emerging international Arctic water vapor isotope network. Using water tagging and back trajectories we show water vapor of Arctic origin to have a high d-excess fingerprint. This show the potential of using water vapor isotopes as tracer for changes in the Arctic hydrological cycle. Using the network of monitoring stations we quantify using the isotopes advection of air masses and the key processes affecting the water vapor en-route between stations. We have successfully used the obtained atmospheric water vapor isotope observations to benchmark isotope-enabled general circulation models. This comparison allows us to address key processes of the atmospheric hydrological cycle for

  6. Thermal expansion and swelling of cured epoxy resin used in graphite/epoxy composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    The paper presents results of experiments in which the thermal expansion and swelling behavior of an epoxy resin system and two graphite/epoxy composite systems exposed to water were measured. It was found that the cured epoxy resin swells by an amount slightly less than the volume of the absorbed water and that the swelling efficiency of the water varies with the moisture content of the polymer. Additionally, the thermal expansion of cured epoxy resin that is saturated with water is observed to be more than twice that of dry resin. Results also indicate that cured resin that is saturated with 7.1% water at 95 C will rapidly increase in moisture content to 8.5% when placed in 1 C water. The mechanism for this phenomenon, termed reverse thermal effect, is described in terms of a slightly modified free-volume theory in conjunction with the theory of polar molecule interaction. Nearly identical behavior was observed in two graphite/epoxy composite systems, thus establishing that this behavior may be common to all cured epoxy resins.

  7. Responding to the challenges of water security: the Eighth Phase of the International Hydrological Programme, 2014–2021

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jimenez-Cisneros

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the major water challenges at global, regional and local levels, including the need to adapt to climate change. It relates how the International Hydrological Programme (IHP – an intergovernmental scientific programme – will respond in its Eighth Phase to the water-related risks and seize potential opportunities, thereby contributing to ensure Water Security at all levels. The Member States of UNESCO IHP periodically define priorities for research, technological development, innovation and education. To implement the priorities in a coordinated manner, the Member States can count on the team and the projects of IHP based at UNESCO, as well as on the "UNESCO Water Family|, consisting to date of a Category 1 centre UNESCO-IHE located in the Netherlands; the World Water Assessment Programme, based in Italy, which produces the World Water Development Report of the United Nations; 30 Category 2 water centres under the auspices of UNESCO; and 35 water chairs in various parts of the world. Governments can access the powerful network of the UNESCO Water Family through IHP and its Intergovernmental Council.

  8. The International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM): The United States' Contribution to UNESCO IHP's Global Network of Water Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, W. S.

    2015-12-01

    The concept of a "category 2 center"—i.e., one that is closely affiliated with UNESCO, but not legally part of UNESCO—dates back many decades. However, only in the last decade has the concept been fully developed. Within UNESCO, the International Hydrological Programme (IHP) has led the way in creating a network of regional and global water-related centers.ICIWaRM—the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management—is one member of this network. Approved by UNESCO's General Conference, the center has been operating since 2009. It was designed to fill a niche in the system for a center that was backed by an institution with on-the-ground water management experience, but that also had strong connections to academia, NGOs and other governmental agencies. Thus, ICIWaRM is hosted by the US Army Corps of Engineers' Institute for Water Resources (IWR), but established with an internal network of partner institutions. Three main factors have contributed to any success that ICIWaRM has achieved in its global work: A focus on practical science and technology which can be readily transferred. This includes the Corps' own methodologies and models for planning and water management, and those of our university and government partners. Collaboration with other UNESCO Centers on joint applied research, capacity-building and training. A network of centers needs to function as a network, and ICIWaRM has worked together with UNESCO-affiliated centers in Chile, Brazil, Paraguay, the Dominican Republic, Japan, China, and elsewhere. Partnering with and supporting existing UNESCO-IHP programs. ICIWaRM serves as the Global Technical Secretariat for IHP's Global Network on Water and Development Information in Arid Lands (G-WADI). In addition to directly supporting IHP, work through G-WADI helps the center to frame, prioritize and integrate its activities. With the recent release of the United Nation's 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, it is clear that

  9. Identification and control of moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alía, Alberto; Andrade, María J; Rodríguez, Alicia; Reyes-Prieto, Mariana; Bernáldez, Victoria; Córdoba, Juan J

    2016-12-01

    The aims of this work were to identify moulds responsible for black spot spoilage in the drying and cellar stages of dry-cured ham processing and evaluate the effectiveness of preventive actions for controlling this alteration. Four mould strains isolated from spoiled hams were identified by morphological characteristics and the ITS and β-tubulin sequencing. Two of them were Cladosporium oxysporum, one was C. cladosporioides and the remaining one was C. herbarum. These spoiling strains reproduced the black spots on dry-cured ham-based media and ham slices. Additionally, the effect of water activity (aw) conditions reached throughout dry-cured ham ripening and the activity of the protective culture Penicillium chrysogenum CECT 20922 against the spoiling moulds were evaluated. In the dry-cured ham model system the growth of the Cladosporium strains was minimised when the aw approaches 0.84 or in P. chrysogenum CECT 20922 inoculated dry-cured ham slices. Therefore such combination could be used to avoid the black spot formation in dry-cured ham. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Marcos Daniel Septimio; Andreeta, Marcello Rubens Barsi; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins De

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®). Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (pcrowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic. PMID:29211292

  11. Is the fresh water fish consumption a significant determinant of the internal exposure to perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denys, Sébastien; Fraize-Frontier, Sandrine; Moussa, Oumar; Le Bizec, Bruno; Veyrand, Bruno; Volatier, Jean-Luc

    2014-12-01

    PFAS are man-made compounds that are highly spread in the environment. Human dietary exposure to such contaminants is of high concern as they may accumulate in the food chain. Different studies already demonstrated the importance of the fish consumption in the dietary exposure of these molecules and the potential increase of internal doses of PFAS following the consumption of PFAS. However, so far few study aimed to study the link between the consumption of fresh water fishes and the internal exposure to PFAS. Objectives of this study were (i) to estimate the internal exposure of populations that are potentially high consumers of fresh water fishes and (ii) to determine whether the consumption of fish caught from fresh water is a significant determinant of the internal exposure of PFAS. In this work, a large sample of adult freshwater anglers from the French metropolitan population (478 individuals) was constituted randomly from participants lists of anglers associations. Questionnaires provided social and demographic information and diet information for each subject. In addition, analyses of blood serum samples provided the internal concentration of 14 PFAS. The survey design allowed to extrapolate the data obtained on the 478 individuals to the freshwater angler population. Descriptive data regarding internal levels of PFAS were discussed at the population level, whereas identification of the determinants were done at the 478 individuals level as sufficient contrast was required in terms of fresh water fish consumption. Only molecules for which the detection frequency were above 80% in blood were considered, i.e., PFOS, PFOA, PFHxS, PFNA, PFHpS, and PFDA. Distribution profiles showed log-normal distribution and PFOS and PFOA were the main contributors of the PFAS sum. For PFOS, the results obtained on the 478 individuals showed that upper percentiles were higher as compared to upper percentiles obtained on occidental general population. This confirmed an over

  12. The Maritime Environment - International Conference and Exhibition on Ballast Water, Waste Water and Sewage Treatment on Ships and in Ports Held in Bremerhaven, Germany on 12-14 September 2001. Conference Proceedings

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2001-01-01

    The Maritime International Conference on Ballast Water, Waste Water and Sewage Treatment on Ships and in Ports held in Bremerhaven, Germany on 12-14 September 2001 was cosponsored by Deerberg-Systems...

  13. Residual Stress Developed During the Cure of Thermosetting Polymers: Optimizing Cure Schedule to Minimize Stress.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kropka, Jamie Michael; Stavig, Mark E.; Jaramillo, Rex

    2016-06-01

    When thermosetting polymers are used to bond or encapsulate electrical, mechanical or optical assemblies, residual stress, which often affects the performance and/or reliability of these devices, develops within the structure. The Thin-Disk-on-Cylinder structural response test is demonstrated as a powerful tool to design epoxy encapsulant cure schedules to reduce residual stress, even when all the details of the material evolution during cure are not explicitly known. The test's ability to (1) distinguish between cohesive and adhesive failure modes and (2) demonstrate methodologies to eliminate failure and reduce residual stress, make choices of cure schedules that optimize stress in the encapsulant unambiguous. For the 828/DEA/GMB material in the Thin-Disk-on-Cylinder geometry, the stress associated with cure is significant and outweighs that associated with cool down from the final cure temperature to room temperature (for measured lid strain, Scure I > I I e+h erma * II) * The difference between the final cure temperature and 1 1 -- the temperature at which the material gels, Tf-T ge i, was demonstrated to be a primary factor in determining the residual stress associated with cure. Increasing T f -T ge i leads to a reduction in cure stress that is described as being associated with balancing some of the 828/DEA/GMB cure shrinkage with thermal expansion. The ability to tune residual stress associated with cure by controlling T f -T ge i would be anticipated to translate to other thermosetting encapsulation materials, but the times and temperatures appropriate for a given material may vary widely.

  14. Efforts to Reduce International Space Station Crew Maintenance for the Management of the Extravehicular Mobility Unit Transport Loop Water Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John W.; Etter, David; Rector, Tony; Boyle, Robert; Vandezande, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The EMU (Extravehicular Mobility Unit) contains a semi-closed-loop re-circulating water circuit (Transport Loop) to absorb heat into a LCVG (Liquid Coolant and Ventilation Garment) worn by the astronaut. A second, single-pass water circuit (Feed-water Loop) provides water to a cooling device (Sublimator) containing porous plates, and that water sublimates through the porous plates to space vacuum. The cooling effect from the sublimation of this water translates to a cooling of the LCVG water that circulates through the Sublimator. The quality of the EMU Transport Loop water is maintained through the use of a water processing kit (ALCLR Airlock Cooling Loop Remediation) that is used to periodically clean and disinfect the water circuit. Opportunities to reduce crew time associated with on-orbit ALCLR operations include a detailed review of the historical water quality data for evidence to support an extension to the implementation cycle. Furthermore, an EMU returned after 2-years of use on the ISS (International Space Station) is being used as a test bed to evaluate the results of extended and repeated ALCLR implementation cycles. Finally, design, use and on-orbit location enhancements to the ALCLR kit components are being considered to allow the implementation cycle to occur in parallel with other EMU maintenance and check-out activities, and to extend the life of the ALCLR kit components. These efforts are undertaken to reduce the crew-time and logistics burdens for the EMU, while ensuring the long-term health of the EMU water circuits for a post-Shuttle 6-year service life.

  15. Multiple scattering of light by water cloud droplets with external and internal mixing of black carbon aerosols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hai-Hua; Sun Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    The mixture of water cloud droplets with black carbon impurities is modeled by external and internal mixing models. The internal mixing model is modeled with a two-layered sphere (water cloud droplets containing black carbon (BC) inclusions), and the single scattering and absorption characteristics are calculated at the visible wavelength of 0.55 μm by using the Lorenz—Mie theory. The external mixing model is developed assuming that the same amount of BC particles are mixed with the water droplets externally. The multiple scattering characteristics are computed by using the Monte Carlo method. The results show that when the size of the BC aerosol is small, the reflection intensity of the internal mixing model is bigger than that of the external mixing model. However, if the size of the BC aerosol is big, the absorption of the internal mixing model will be larger than that of the external mixing model. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  16. UV curing of nanoparticle reinforced acrylates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, F.; Flyunt, R.; Czihal, K.; Ernst, H.; Naumov, S.; Buchmeiser, M. R.

    2007-12-01

    To improve the surface hardness of radiation cured acrylate coatings, both silica nanoparticles and alumina particles with a few microns in size have been embedded into acrylate formulations. Regular mixing of nanoparticles into acrylate formulations, however, leads to highly viscous solutions inappropriate for coating procedures. The incompatibility of inorganic fillers and organic polymers can be avoided by surface modification of nanoparticles using trialkoxysilanes, which provide an interface between the two dissimilar materials. Nanoparticles modified by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MEMO) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMO), both having polymerisation-active groups, may be crosslinked with the acrylate resin. UV curing of the nanocomposites revealed an unexpected lower reactivity of the vinyl groups of VTMO modified silica compared to MEMO grafted on silica. For VTMO modification, DFT calculations showed a decrease of Mulliken atomic charge for the olefinic carbons pointing to a lower reactivity. For UV cured nano/microhybrid composites, a significant improvement of abrasion resistance was obtained.

  17. UV curing of nanoparticle reinforced acrylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, F. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany)], E-mail: frank.bauer@iom-leipzig.de; Flyunt, R.; Czihal, K. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany); Ernst, H. [University of Leipzig, Department of Experimental Physics I, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany); Naumov, S. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany); Buchmeiser, M.R. [Leibniz-Institut fuer Oberflaechenmodifizierung, Permoserstr. 15, Leipzig D-04318 (Germany); University of Leipzig, Institute of Technical Chemistry, Leipzig D-04103 (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    To improve the surface hardness of radiation cured acrylate coatings, both silica nanoparticles and alumina particles with a few microns in size have been embedded into acrylate formulations. Regular mixing of nanoparticles into acrylate formulations, however, leads to highly viscous solutions inappropriate for coating procedures. The incompatibility of inorganic fillers and organic polymers can be avoided by surface modification of nanoparticles using trialkoxysilanes, which provide an interface between the two dissimilar materials. Nanoparticles modified by methacryloxypropyltrimethoxysilane (MEMO) and vinyltrimethoxysilane (VTMO), both having polymerisation-active groups, may be crosslinked with the acrylate resin. UV curing of the nanocomposites revealed an unexpected lower reactivity of the vinyl groups of VTMO modified silica compared to MEMO grafted on silica. For VTMO modification, DFT calculations showed a decrease of Mulliken atomic charge for the olefinic carbons pointing to a lower reactivity. For UV cured nano/microhybrid composites, a significant improvement of abrasion resistance was obtained.

  18. Cabri - water loop a new IPSN-OECD international research program; Cabri - boucle a eau: nouveau programme de recherche international IPSN/OCDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2001-02-01

    In 1993, the Institut de Protection et de Surete Nucleaire (IPSN, the French Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection Institute) working with EDF (electric utilities) and backed by the NRC (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, USA) launched a research program, dubbed Cabri REP Na addressing uranium oxide-based fuels and MOX fuels. So far twelve tests have been conducted including eight on UO{sub 2} fuel and four on MOX fuel. More testing is now required to determine fuel performance at higher specific burn-up levels in typical PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) conditions, the purpose being to determine the acceptance criteria for tomorrow's fuels. IPSN has defined a new research program for the Cabri reactor. The OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency is quarterbacking the international program called 'Cabri-Water Loop'. (authors)

  19. Nursing the cure: A phonetic analysis of /ʊə/ in South African English1

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    KateH

    inclined towards smoothing (and in some cases full monophthongisation) with the quality of the resultant vowel mostly dependent ... post-palatal, word-internal CURE, however, the smoothed realisations are further back in phonetic space. ..... of the temporal midpoint of each vowel or vowel allophone. More methodological ...

  20. Sensitivity of emergent sociohydrologic dynamics to internal system properties and external sociopolitical factors: Implications for water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elshafei, Y.; Tonts, M.; Sivapalan, M.; Hipsey, M. R.

    2016-06-01

    It is increasingly acknowledged that effective management of water resources requires a holistic understanding of the coevolving dynamics inherent in the coupled human-hydrology system. One of the fundamental information gaps concerns the sensitivity of coupled system feedbacks to various endogenous system properties and exogenous societal contexts. This paper takes a previously calibrated sociohydrology model and applies an idealized implementation, in order to: (i) explore the sensitivity of emergent dynamics resulting from bidirectional feedbacks to assumptions regarding (a) internal system properties that control the internal dynamics of the coupled system and (b) the external sociopolitical context; and (ii) interpret the results within the context of water resource management decision making. The analysis investigates feedback behavior in three ways, (a) via a global sensitivity analysis on key parameters and assessment of relevant model outputs, (b) through a comparative analysis based on hypothetical placement of the catchment along various points on the international sociopolitical gradient, and (c) by assessing the effects of various direct management intervention scenarios. Results indicate the presence of optimum windows that might offer the greatest positive impact per unit of management effort. Results further advocate management tools that encourage an adaptive learning, community-based approach with respect to water management, which are found to enhance centralized policy measures. This paper demonstrates that it is possible to use a place-based sociohydrology model to make abstractions as to the dynamics of bidirectional feedback behavior, and provide insights as to the efficacy of water management tools under different circumstances.

  1. Radiation curing applications of palm oil acrylates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Hilmi Mahmood; Khairul Zaman; Rida, Anak Tajau; Mek Zah Salleh; Rosley Che Ismail

    2007-01-01

    Various palm oil based urethan acrylate prepolymers (UP) were prepared from palm oil based polyols, diisocyanate compounds and hydroxyl terminated acrylate monomers by following procedure derived from established methods. The products were compared with each other in term of their molecular weights (MW), viscosities, curing speed by UV irradiation, gel contents and film hardness. The molecular structure of diisocyanate compounds and hydroxyl acrylate monomers were tend to determine the molecular weights and hence viscosities of the final products of urethan acrylate prepolymers (UP), whereas, the MW of the UP has no direct effects on the UV curing properties of the prepolymers. (author)

  2. UV/EB curing in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woods, R.; Garnett, J.; Loo Teck Ng

    1999-01-01

    Progress in LTV/EB curing is reviewed in Australia. Generally the technology is used by those industries where curing is well developed in Europe and North America, however the scale is an order of magnitude lower due to the smaller market size. The Asian economic crisis does not appear to have affected expansion of the technology in Australia. EB continues to be successfully used in the packaging and foam fields whilst in UV, security devices, particularly banknotes are steadily expanding especially in export markets have been studied

  3. A Decomposition and Comparison Analysis of International Water Footprint Time Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Roson

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the construction, decomposition and comparison of water footprint time series in 40 countries and one aggregate macro-region, in the period 1995–2009. The analysis of the different “footpaths” allows us to investigate the possible causes behind the time evolution of water footprints in the various countries. We notice that the physical and economic impact of economic growth on water resources has been significantly lower than what it could have been, for several reasons. First, both production and consumption patterns are shifting away from water-intensive goods. Second, a large part of consumed water is actually not blue water, susceptible to alternative uses. Finally, we do not find strong evidence of gains in the economic productivity of water (dollars per water unit in many countries, but we do find evidence of indirect efficiency gains, related to a composition of factors in the production processes.

  4. Water quality monitoring of an international wetland at Harike, Punjab and its impact on biological systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Jasmit; Walia, Harpreet; Mabwoga, Samson Okongo; Arora, Saroj

    2017-06-01

    The present study entails the investigation of mutagenic and genotoxic effect of surface water samples collected from 13 different sites of the Harike wetland using the histidine reversion point mutation assay in Salmonella typhimurium (TA98) strain and plasmid nicking assay using pBR322, respectively. The physicochemical characterization of water samples using different parameters was conducted for water quality monitoring. Heavy metal analysis was performed to quantify the toxic components present in water samples. It was observed that although the water samples of all the sites demonstrated mutagenic as well as genotoxic activity, the effect was quite significant with the water samples from sites containing water from river Satluj, i.e., site 1 (upstream Satluj river), site 2 (Satluj river) and site 3 (reservoir Satluj). The high level of pollution due to industrial effluents and agricultural run-off at these sites may engender the genotoxicity and mutagenicity of water samples.

  5. IDRC and water: A matter of life and death | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-02-25

    Feb 25, 2011 ... Water. It is essential to life. But throughout the developing world, countless communities lack an adequate, safe, and affordable supply, making water also a source of disease and conflict.

  6. Impact of internal water reservoirs on shrinkage of high strength concrete

    OpenAIRE

    Drčar, Grega

    2013-01-01

    High strength concrete has lower water-cement ratio compared to regular concrete, which allows higher strength of the concrete. Because of low water-cement ratio, there is a lack of water during the process of hydration.During the transport of water from the capillary pores of concrete, high forces to the structure of the hardening cement paste were created. Because of this forces, the concrete shrinks, which creates cracks and therefore reduces durability of the concrete elements. In this...

  7. Water security at risk in peri-urban India | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-06-22

    Jun 22, 2016 ... The majority of India's population lives in water-stressed regions. Access to water is worsening in the face of population growth, increased demand, inefficient usage, overexploitation of groundwater, pollution, and climate change. The India Infrastructure Report 2011 focuses on conflicts within the water ...

  8. Strength of Geopolymer Cement Curing at Ambient Temperature by Non-Oven Curing Approaches: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanachai, Pitiwat; Suwan, Teewara

    2017-06-01

    At the present day, a concept of environmentally friendly construction materials has been intensively studying to reduce the amount of releasing greenhouse gases. Geopolymer is one of the cementitious binders which can be produced by utilising pozzolanic wastes (e.g. fly ash or furnace slag) and also receiving much more attention as a low-CO2 emission material. However, to achieve excellent mechanical properties, heat curing process is needed to apply to geopolymer cement in a range of temperature around 40 to 90°C. To consume less oven-curing energy and be more convenience in practical work, the study on geopolymer curing at ambient temperature (around 20 to 25°C) is therefore widely investigated. In this paper, a core review of factors and approaches for non-oven curing geopolymer has been summarised. The performance, in term of strength, of each non-oven curing method, is also presented and analysed. The main aim of this review paper is to gather the latest study of ambient temperature curing geopolymer and to enlarge a feasibility of non-oven curing geopolymer development. Also, to extend the directions of research work, some approaches or techniques can be combined or applied to the specific properties for in-field applications and embankment stabilization by using soil-cement column.

  9. Curing kinetics of visible light curing dental resin composites investigated by dielectric analysis (DEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Johannes; Hausnerova, Berenika; Haenel, Thomas; Großgarten, Mandy; Möginger, Bernhard

    2014-03-01

    During the curing process of light curing dental composites the mobility of molecules and molecule segments is reduced leading to a significant increase of the viscosity as well as the ion viscosity. Thus, the kinetics of the curing behavior of 6 different composites was derived from dielectric analysis (DEA) using especially redesigned flat sensors with interdigit comb electrodes allowing for irradiation at the top side and measuring the ion viscosity at the bottom side. As the ion viscosities of dental composites change 1-3 orders of magnitude during the curing process, DEA provides a sensitive approach to evaluate their curing behavior, especially in the phase of undisturbed chain growth. In order to determine quantitative kinetic parameters a kinetic model is presented and examined for the evaluation of the ion viscosity curves. From the obtained results it is seen that DEA might be employed in the investigation of the primary curing process, the quality assurance of ingredients as well as the control of processing stability of the light curing dental composites. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Regional variation in water-related impacts of shale gas development and implications for emerging international plays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauter, Meagan S; Alvarez, Pedro J J; Burton, Allen; Cafaro, Diego C; Chen, Wei; Gregory, Kelvin B; Jiang, Guibin; Li, Qilin; Pittock, Jamie; Reible, Danny; Schnoor, Jerald L

    2014-01-01

    The unconventional fossil fuel industry is expected to expand dramatically in coming decades as conventional reserves wane. Minimizing the environmental impacts of this energy transition requires a contextualized understanding of the unique regional issues that shale gas development poses. This manuscript highlights the variation in regional water issues associated with shale gas development in the U.S. and the approaches of various states in mitigating these impacts. The manuscript also explores opportunities for emerging international shale plays to leverage the diverse experiences of U.S. states in formulating development strategies that minimize water-related impacts within their environmental, cultural, and political ecosystem.

  11. Second meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Helsinki, 6-9 June 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The Second Meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) was held in Helsinki, Finland, from 6-9 June 1988. The Summary Report (Part II) contains the papers which review the national programmes since the first meeting of IWGATWR in May 1987 in the field of Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors and other presentations at the Meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these 12 papers presented at the meeting. Figs and tabs

  12. Colloborative International Resesarch on the Water Energy Nexus: Lessons Learned from the Clean Energy Research Center - Water Energy Technologies (CERC-WET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remick, C.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S.-China Clean Energy Research Center - Water and Energy Technologies (CERC-WET) is a global research partnership focused on developing and deploying technologies that to allow the U.S. and China to thrive in a future with constrained energy and water resources in a changing global climate. This presentation outlines and addresses the opportunities and challenges for international research collaboration on the so called "water-energy nexus", with a focus on industrial partnership, market readiness, and intellectual property. The U.S. Department of Energy created the CERC program as a research and development partnership between the United States and China to accelerate the development and deployment of advanced clean energy technologies. The United States and China are not only the world's largest economies; they are also the world's largest energy producers and energy consumers. Together, they account for about 40% of annual global greenhouse gas emissions. The bilateral investment in CERC-WET will total $50 million over five years and will target on the emerging issues and cut-edge research on the topics of (1) water use reduction at thermoelectric plants; (2) treatment and management of non-traditional waters; (3) improvements in sustainable hydropower design and operation; (4) climate impact modeling, methods, and scenarios to support improved understanding of energy and water systems; and (5) data and analysis to inform planning and policy.

  13. Focal hand dystonia cured by removal of clinoid meningioma-case report-.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Satoshi; Ohira, Takayuki; Shido, Satoka; Kawase, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    A 40-year-old Asian female presented with an unusual case of focal hand dystonia caused by contralateral clinoid meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that the tumor compressed the caudate nucleus, lentiform nucleus, cerebral peduncle, internal capsule, and a large portion of the white matter surrounding the basal ganglia. The tumor was gross totally removed via a frontotemporal approach with zygomatic osteotomy, resulting in cure of the focal hand dystonia. Magnetic resonance imaging after surgery showed that the compression of the surrounding brain was released. This case shows that secondary focal hand dystonia caused by extra-axial brain tumor can be cured by surgical removal.

  14. Investigation on frictional pressure drop of steam-water two-phase flow in an internally ribbed tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yongxing; Chen Tingkuan; Li Huixiong

    2005-01-01

    Within the range of pressures from 9 to 22 MPa, mass velocities from G 600 to 1200 kg/(m 2 ·s), and heat fluxes from x 0 to 1.0, experiments had performed to investigate the frictional pressure drop of the steam-water two-phase flow in a six-head internally ribbed tube with the outer diameter of 38.1 mm and the thickness of 7.5 mm. The test section was thermally insulated as horizontal direction. Based on the experimental results, it was found that pressure had a noticeable effect on the frictional pressure drop of the mental results, and that pressure had a noticeable effect on the frictional pressure drop of the steam-water two-phase flow, and the frictional pressure drop factor of the steam-water two-phase flow decreased with an increase in pressure. The frictional pressure drop factor of the steam-water two-phase flow tends to one near the critical pressure. As steam quality increased, the frictional pressure drop factor of the steam-water two-phase flow first increased, and then it had a decreasing tendency. With an increase in mass velocity, the frictional pressure drop factor of the steam-water two-phase flow decreased. Correlations of the frictional pressure drop factor of the steam-water two-phase flow had been provided. (authors)

  15. Inspiring students in International Land and Water Management: a field course in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keesstra, S. D.

    2012-04-01

    Even though students work more and more in an individual and virtual environment where they sometimes can do courses on physical processes in earth science from behind their computer screen at home, field courses are a component of curricula that cannot be replaced. Field courses, it being excursions or fieldwork courses, are of vital importance to bring the real world to life in the heads of the students. The GIS map needs to become a real world; a discharge measurement needs have tried to push you over in the river. At Wageningen University, the 1st year MSc students of the curriculum International Land and Water Management have a special kind of field course to conclude their course work year (the second year is largely allocated for internship and thesis work). During a four week intensive course the students get to choose a mini-thesis with a group of 4 to 5 students. The topics of the cases differ from year to year and are chosen on the basis of interest of the lecturers and/or interest of contacts we have in the fieldwork area in the Valencia region in Spain. In the first week of the course, when we are still in Wageningen, the student write a proposal for the work they intend to do. Some experts are flown in from Spain, and literature is searched for. A lot of literature gathered in previous years is available in an interactive GIS database, where the students can also look into research of student groups of earlier years. In cooperation with the supervisor the proposal is made into a feasible workload for the remaining 3 weeks of the course. In the second week the students are introduced to the larger area during several excursions and to their specific research area and finalize their proposal in the first days in Spain and start the data collection and data analysis period. In the third week they finish the data collection and write their report. The reports are reviewed by the supervisors and finalized with using the feedback given by the supervisors

  16. Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The incorporation of nanoparticles of iron in a natural rubber matrix leads to flexible magnetorheolog- ical (MR) materials. Rod-shaped MR elastomers based on natural rubber and nanosized iron have been moulded both with and without the application of an external magnetic field during curing. These MR elastomer rods ...

  17. Curing reactions of palm oil alkyd enamels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan Boon Yeow; Gan Seng Neon

    2000-01-01

    Amino resins are the most popularly used cross-linking agents for thermosetting coatings. The most common amino resins are those derived from melamine, 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-triazine and formaldehyde. They are attractive for developing high performance and low cost coatings to improve performances of other film-forming resins with reactive functional groups such as hydroxyl, carboxylic, and amide groups. Alkyds modified with melamine are mainly used in industrial baking enamels for metal surfaces. Short-oil alkyds containing 38-45% phthalic anhydride and a high proportion of hydroxyl values in the alkyd resins render good compatibility with melamine-formaldehyde resins. However, the actual mechanisms and pathways of the curing reactions involved are still not fully understood. This paper describes three palm oil alkyds, synthesized with high hydroxyl values. Clear coating enamels were made by mixing 4 parts; of alkyd resin with 1 part of a methylated melamine resin. The complex curing reactions of the clear enamel can be illustrated qualitatively by using DSC (Differential Scanning Calorimeter). Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to set suitable curing temperatures without degradation. The dry hard time with various curing temperatures was examined. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has been used to follow the changes in functional group concentrations as a function of time and temperature. (author)

  18. Magnetoactive elastomeric composites: Cure, tensile, electrical and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    frequency is due to the hopping of charge carriers (Papa- thanassiou 2002). 5. Conclusions. Magnetoactive composites containing nickel in poly- chloroprene and nitrile matrices have been prepared. The cure characteristics reveal that the processability and flexibility of the matrix is not affected much even up to a maximum ...

  19. Adhesive curing options for photonic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Steven C.; Hubert, Manfred; Tam, Robin

    2002-06-01

    Varying the intensity of illumination used to cure photoactivated adhesives has been applied in medical and dental applications to improve the performance of polymer materials. For example, it has been observed that dental polymer composite materials express reduced shrinkage, important for durability of non-amalgam restorations, by introducing a phased time-intensity cure schedule. This work identified that curing conditions could influence the final properties of materials, and suggested the possibility of extending the characteristics that could be influenced beyond shrinkage to humidity resistance, Tg, outgassing and other important material properties. Obviously, these results have important ramifications for the photonic industry, with current efforts focused on improved manufacturing techniques. Improvement in low cost packaging solutions, including adhesives, will have to be made to bring the component cost down to address the needs of Metro and similar markets. However, there are perceived problems with the widespread use of adhesives, the most prevalent of these involving long term durability of the bond. Devices are typically aligned to sub-micron precision using active feedback and then must be locked in position to maintain performance. In contrast to traditional fastening methods, adhesive bonding is a highly attractive option due to the ease of deployment, lower equipment costs, and improved flexibility. Moreover, using methods analogous to those employed in dental applications, materials properties of photonic adhesives may be tailored using a programmed cure approach.

  20. Campus Violence: Kinds, Causes, and Cures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Leighton C., Ed.; Pollard, Jeffrey W., Ed.

    This volume offers 14 papers on the types, sources, and possible cures of violence on college campuses from prominent workers in higher education. Following a preface the titles are: (1) "Conceptualizing Campus Violence: Definitions, Underlying Factors, and Effects" by Mary L. Roark; (2) "Administrative Perspectives on Disruptive…

  1. Creep measurements on curing epoxy systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer, Charlotte; Szabo, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The chemical curing of a stoichiometric mixture of the diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A and a 1,3-bis-(aminomethyl)-cyclohexane is studied.Creep experiments are combined with measurements in a Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) to determine the change in bulk viscosity due to network formation....

  2. Enhanced microactuation with magnetic field curing of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The incorporation of nanoparticles of iron in a natural rubber matrix leads to flexible magnetorheological (MR) materials. Rod-shaped MR elastomers based on natural rubber and nanosized iron have been moulded both with and without the application of an external magnetic field during curing. These MR elastomer rods ...

  3. Electron-beam curing of epoxy resins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron-beam (e-beam) induced polymerization of epoxy resins proceeds via cationic mechanism in presence of suitable photoinitiator. Despite good thermal properties and significant processing advantages, epoxy-based composites manufactured using e-beam curing suffer from low compressive strength, poor ...

  4. Hydrologic Geospatial Fabric as Community Cyberinfrastructure: International standardization best practices and the U.S. Open Water Data Initiative implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blodgett, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Recent prolonged droughts, catastrophic flooding, and the need to protect and restore aquatic ecosystems, has increased the emphasis on information sharing in the water resources science and engineering domains. Internationally the joint World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Hydrology Domain Working Group (HDWG) has been working toward a comprehensive system of standards and best practices for the Hydrology Domain. In the U.S. the multi-agency led and open to all U.S. Advisory Committee on Water Information (ACWI) was tasked to implement an Open Water Data Initiative (OWDI), "that will integrate currently fragmented water information into a connected, national water data framework"[1]. The status of both will be presented with focus on a community hydrologic geospatial fabric. Hydrology observations data standardization was the emphasis of the first 5 years of the HDWG. This work included WaterML 2.0 parts 1 - timeseries and part 2 - ratings and gagings. In 2016, the first of two new hydrographic feature models, GroundwaterML2, was completed and the second, for surface water features, was in active development. The WMO Commission for Hydrology is considering adoption of all these standards and their adoption is central to the U.S. OWDI. OWDI participants have produced a special collection in the Journal of American Water Resources Association and several initiative working groups have concluded their activities. One early deliverable from the OWDI was a new easier to use structure for the NHDPlus dataset. Building on this, a project to create a national Network Linked Data Index (NLDI) is being undertaken as an open-source community endeavor. The NLDI centralizes river network data, network navigation tools, crawlers that index data to the network, and utilities to register or remove data from the network. Research that informed the design of the NLDI will be presented along with recent development and findings of the project

  5. In vitro evaluation of microleakage under ceramic and metal brackets bonded with LED and plasma arc curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Yassaei, Soghra; Karandish, Mariam; Zarghami, Fateme

    2012-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate these two high intensity light curing units regarding microleakage beneath metal and ceramic brackets. A total of 60 freshly extracted human premolar teeth were randomly divided into four groups of 15 samples; group I: Metal bracket + LED cured, group II: Ceramic bracket + LED cured, group III: Metal bracket + plasma arc cured, group IV: Ceramic bracket + plasma arc cured. After photopolymerization, the teeth were immersed in water and thermocycled (500 cycles between 5 and 55). Specimens were further sealed with nail varnish and stained with 5% basic fuchsin for 24 hours. All of the teeth were sectioned with two parallel longitudinal occlusogingival cuts and examined under a stereomicroscope. The microleakage was measured with a digital caliper and scored from 0 to 3 for marginal microleakage at the bracket-adhesive and adhesive-enamel interfaces from both the occlusal and gingival margins. Microleakage was detected in all groups. The plasma arc cured group showed less microleakage than light emitting diode (LED) cured in all samples at the enamel-adhesive interface at the gingival margin (ceramic brackets, p = 0.009 and metal brackets, p = 0.005). The plasma arc cured samples showed less microleakage than LED cured in metal brackets at the adhesive-brackets interface at the occlusal margin (p = 0.033). While curing with an LED unit, ceramic brackets displayed significantly less microleakage than metal ones at the gingival margin of adhesive-enamel interface (p = 0.013). The gingival margin in all groups exhibited higher microleakage compared with those observed in occlusal sides in all sample groups (p white spot lesions beneath the bracket base.

  6. 'Every disease has its cure': faith and HIV therapies in Islamic northern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tocco, Jack Ume

    2010-12-01

    Northern Nigeria has one of the highest levels of HIV prevalence among societies that are predominantly Muslim. In the last decade the region has experienced marked expansion of religiously-oriented healing practices following the formal adoption of Islamic sharia law. Since 2005, international funding has also made antiretroviral therapy (ART) more widely available throughout Nigeria. This study uses ethnographic data collected in Kano, northern Nigeria's largest city, to examine Muslims' perspectives on HIV treatment in the context of popular health beliefs and expanding therapeutic options. The research found that passages from classical Islamic texts are regularly cited by both HIV/AIDS practitioners and patients, especially when talking about the supposition that Allah sends a cure to humankind for every disease. Some religious scholar-practitioners (malamai) working in the Islamic traditions of prophetic medicine insist that HIV can be completely cured given sufficient faith in the supernatural power of the Quran; others claim that the natural ingredients prescribed in Islamic texts can cure HIV. Such assertions contradict the mainstream biomedical position that, with the proper therapeutic regimen, infection with HIV can be managed as a chronic illness, although not cured. Thus, these assertions constitute a challenge to the increasing therapeutic hegemony of antiretroviralbased care in Nigeria. Without falsifying the proposition that a divine cure for HIV exists, many Muslim patients on ART, and the predominantly Muslim biomedical staff who treat them, express scepticism about whether the cure has yet to be revealed to humans. These findings suggest that despite recent efforts in Nigeria to assert a unified Islamic perspective on HIV and AIDS, substantive disagreements persist over the causes, treatments and curability of the disease. The healing systems in which practitioners and patients operate influence how they interpret Islamic texts concerning the

  7. LMFBR large valve development. Task II. IHTS isolation valve internals water test. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeWall, L.; Perschler, J.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this program was to perform proof-of-principle (POP) testing in water of a reduced bore rotating offset ball valve as required by AEC Contract No. AT(04-3)-1035. The water POP test article is shown on AMCO Drawing 16-E-4020, Sheets 1 through 4, dated 3-18-74. This report presents the water flow test results and the leakage results for one of the three seal designs.

  8. Process water reduction in a wire milling operation. 1989 summer intern report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alberg, J.

    1989-12-31

    Johnson Filtration Systems is a company located in New Brighton, Minnesota which employs 256 people. The focus of the project was to reduce the water usage of the wire milling operation. Water in the milling process is used to clean the wire and cool the mill components. Total annual water usage for this operation is six million gallons. The milling process changes the cross sectional shape of the wire by using flattening hammers and rollers. A synthetic coolant is used to enhance this process and remove heat. The coolant is removed from the wire as it is pulled through a squeegee, washed it with water and dried with an air knife.

  9. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Minton, John M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time environmental monitoring on ISS is necessary to provide data in a timely fashion and to help ensure astronaut health. Current real-time water TOC monitoring provides high-quality trending information, but compound-specific data is needed. The combination of ETV with the AQM showed that compounds of interest could be liberated from water and analyzed in the same manner as air sampling. Calibration of the AQM using water samples allowed for the quantitative analysis of ISS archival samples. Some calibration issues remain, but the excellent accuracy of DMSD indicates that ETV holds promise for as a sample introduction method for water analysis in spaceflight.

  10. Options for decoupling economic growth from water use and water pollution: A report of the Water Working Group of the International Resource Panel Options for decoupling economic growth from water use and water pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Global trends have pointed to a relative decoupling of water – that is, the rate of water resource use is increasing at a rate slower than that of economic growth. Despite this progress at the global level, it is projected that by 2030 there will be a 40% gap between water supply and water demand if...

  11. International Senior Design Service Learning Project: Creating a Water System for Kuna Nega in Panama City, Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budny, Dan

    2013-11-01

    International service-learning projects are an effective educational tool for universities striving to meet the ABET engineering criterion, while also providing transformational experiences to their students and a service to needy populations in the world. This student poster discusses the benefits of an international service-learning project in Panama City, Panama. The presentation will discuss the design and installation of a water distribution system including a two pressure system, two ground storage tanks, a pump station and the various control systems to fill the tanks. To meet the water demand with the limited supply additional individual rain water collection systems were also installed at individual houses to provide a gray water system for bathing. The year-long process of development design and construction will be described and how it fits within the Swanson School of Engineering Department of Civil Engineering senior design course. This project was a collaboration between the senior design course, and a local chapter of Engineers Without Borders.

  12. An emerging alternative to thermal curing: Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, A.; Saunders, C.B.; Lopata, V.J.; Kremers, W.; Chung, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electron curing of fiber-reinforced composites to produce materials with good mechanical properties has been demonstrated by the authors' work, and by Aerospatiale. The attractions of this technology are the technical and processing advantages offered over thermal curing, and the projected cost benefits. Though the work so far has focused on the higher value composites for the aircraft and aerospace industries, the technology can also be used to produce composites for the higher volume industries, such as transportation and automotive

  13. Water resources for agriculture in a changing climate: international case studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenzweig, Cynthia [NASA/Goddard Inst. for Space Studies, New York, NY (United States); Strzepek, Kenneth M.; McCluskey, Alyssa [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States); Major, David C.; Iglesias, Ana; Hillel, Daniel [Columbia Univ., Center for Climate Systems Research, New York, NY (United States); Yates, David N. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2004-12-01

    This integrated study examines the implications of changes in crop water demand and water availability for the reliability of irrigation, taking into account changes in competing municipal and industrial demands, and explores the effectiveness of adaptation options in maintaining reliability. It reports on methods of linking climate change scenarios with hydrologic, agricultural, and planning models to study water availability for agriculture under changing climate conditions, to estimate changes in ecosystem services, and to evaluate adaptation strategies for the water resources and agriculture sectors. The models are applied to major agricultural regions in Argentina, Brazil, China, Hungary, Romania, and the US, using projections of climate change, agricultural production, population, technology, and GDP growth. For most of the relatively water-rich areas studied, there appears to be sufficient water for agriculture given the climate change scenarios tested. Northeastern China suffers from the greatest lack of water availability for agriculture and ecosystem services both in the present and in the climate change projections. Projected runoff in the Danube Basin does not change substantially, although climate change causes shifts in environmental stresses within the region. Northern Argentina's occasional problems in water supply for agriculture under the current climate may be exacerbated and may require investments to relieve future tributary stress. In Southeastern Brazil, future water supply for agriculture appears to be plentiful. Water supply in most of the US Cornbelt is projected to increase in most climate change scenarios, but there is concern for tractability in the spring and water-logging in the summer. Adaptation tests imply that only the Brazil case study area can readily accommodate an expansion of irrigated land under climate change, while the other three areas would suffer decreases in system reliability if irrigation areas were to be

  14. Effect of curing on clinical retention. A 7-year evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Dijken, Jan WV; Pallesen, Ulla

    subjects with a compomer (Dyract AP;68) or resin composite (Tetric Ceram:67) and cured for 40s with continuous, soft-start and pulse-delay modes. The restorations were evaluated with slightly modified USPHS criteria yearly during 7 years. Results: Of 135 restorations evaluated at 7 years, 29 were lost, 17...... compomer (25%) and 12 Tetric Ceram (18%). The cumulative loss rates for the compomer and resin composite restorations cured with the three curing modes were. continuous cure: 26.1%/18.2%, soft-start: 22.7%/19.0%, pulse delay: 26.1%/16.7%. No statistical difference were seen between the curing modes......Objective: To evaluate in a prospective evaluation the retention of Class V compomer and hybrid resin composite restorations placed with a 1-step self etch system and cured with continuous, soft-start and pulse-delay curing. Methods: 139 Class V restorations were placed and cured at random in 60...

  15. Influence of curing protocol and ceramic composition on the degree of conversion of resin cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Daniel Septimio Lanza

    Full Text Available Abstract Due to increasing of aesthetic demand, ceramic crowns are widely used in different situations. However, to obtain long-term prognosis of restorations, a good conversion of resin cement is necessary. Objective: To evaluate the degree of conversion (DC of one light-cure and two dual-cure resin cements under a simulated clinical cementation of ceramic crowns. Material and Methods: Prepared teeth were randomly split according to the ceramic's material, resin cement and curing protocol. The crowns were cemented as per manufacturer's directions and photoactivated either from occlusal suface only for 60 s; or from the buccal, occlusal and lingual surfaces, with an exposure time of 20 s on each aspect. After cementation, the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37°C for 7 days. Specimens were transversally sectioned from occlusal to cervical surfaces and the DC was determined along the cement line with three measurements taken and averaged from the buccal, lingual and approximal aspects using micro-Raman spectroscopy (Alpha 300R/WITec®. Data were analyzed by 3-way ANOVA and Tukey test at =5%. Results: Statistical analysis showed significant differences among cements, curing protocols and ceramic type (p<0.001. The curing protocol 3x20 resulted in higher DC for all tested conditions; lower DC was observed for Zr ceramic crowns; Duolink resin cement culminated in higher DC regardless ceramic composition and curing protocol. Conclusion: The DC of resin cement layers was dependent on the curing protocol and type of ceramic.

  16. Thermal and Cure Kinetics of Epoxy Molding Compounds Cured with Thermal Latency Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chean-Cheng Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The cure kinetics and mechanisms of a biphenyl type epoxy molding compounds (EMCs with thermal latency organophosphine accelerators were studied using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Although the use of triphenylphosphine-1,4-benzoquinone (TPP-BQ and triphenylphosphine (TPP catalysts in biphenyl type EMCs exhibited autocatalytic mechanisms, thermal latency was higher in the TPP-BQ catalyst in EMCs than in the TPP catalyst in EMCs. Analyses of thermal characteristics indicated that TPP-BQ is inactive at low temperatures. At high temperatures, however, TPP-BQ increases the curing rate of EMC in dynamic and isothermal curing experiments. The reaction of EMCs with the TPP-BQ latent catalyst also had a higher temperature sensitivity compared to the reaction of EMCs with TPP catalyst. In resin transfer molding, EMCs containing the TPP-BQ thermal latency accelerator are least active at a low temperature. Consequently, EMCs have a low melt viscosity before gelation, and the resins and filler are evenly mixed in the kneading process. Additionally, flowability is increased before the EMCs form a network structure in the molding process. The proposed kinetic model adequately describes curing behavior in EMCs cured with two different organophosphine catalysts up to the rubber state in the progress of curing.

  17. 5. International seminar on primary and secondary side water chemistry of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    The major subjects of the meetings are: water chemistry of primary and secondary coolant circuits of PWR type reactors (mainly WWER types), corrosion of steam generators, decontamination processes, treatment of radioactive waste waters and related subjects. All the 29 papers were individually indexed and abstracted for the INIS database. (R.P.)

  18. Tourism and water use: Supply, demand, and security. An international review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gössling, S.; Peeters, P.M.; Hall, C.M.; Ceron, J.P.; Dubois, G.; Lehmann, L.V.; Scott, D.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews direct freshwater consumption in tourism from both quantitative and qualitative viewpoints to assess the current water demand of the tourism sector and to identify current and future management challenges. The article concludes that even though tourism increases global water

  19. In vitro study of mean loads and modes of failure of all-ceramic crowns cemented with light-cured or dual-cured luting cement, after 1 and 30 d of storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Good, Melissa-L; Orr, John F; Mitchell, Christina A

    2008-02-01

    This study compared the mean loads and modes of failure of teeth restored with all-ceramic crowns (ACCs) cemented with dual-cured (RelyX ARC; 3M ESPE) or light-cured (RelyX Veneer; 3M ESPE) luting cements. Clinically, there are advantages of light-cured cements over the recommended dual-cured cements, namely increased working time, improved handling, colour stability, and a homogenous mix. Forty, sound, extracted, human, premolar teeth underwent a standardized preparation for ACCs. IPS Empress (Ivoclar-Vivadent) crowns of standard dimensions were fabricated and 20 were cemented with each cement. The crowns were stored for 1 or 30 d in water and subjected to a compressive load to failure at 0.017 mm s(-1). There were no significant differences in loads at failure, between each cement group, at each storage period, and there were no significant differences in loads at failure, for each cement, at 1 and 30 d of storage. There were also no significant differences in modes of failure between each cement group. Before recommending light-cured cement as an alternative to dual-cured cement for the cementation of all-ceramic crowns, further research is required to establish the depth of ceramic at which light-cured lutes fail to polymerize completely.

  20. Ultrasonic and thermo-kinetic characterization of curing epoxy resin

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Sheikh Mohammod

    2013-01-01

    This study combines cure kinetics modelling and thermal and ultrasonic cure monitoring to characterize the cure state of a complex commercial modified epoxy thermosetting system of industrial importance containing two epoxies, diethylene triamine hardener, external catalyst, aliphatic reactive diluent, and mica. Both catalyst and reactive diluent in the formulation of two epoxy resin mixture keep this complex system odd from others and to some extent a new one to report cure kinetics to the b...

  1. Electron Beam Curing of Polymer Matrix Composites - CRADA Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janke, C. J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howell, Dave [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Norris, Robert E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1997-05-01

    The major cost driver in manufacturing polymer matrix composite (PMC) parts and structures, and one of the elements having the greatest effect on their quality and performance, is the standard thermal cure process. Thermal curing of PMCs requires long cure times and high energy consumption, creates residual thermal stresses in the part, produces volatile toxic by-products, and requires expensive tooling that is tolerant of the high cure temperatures.

  2. An Assessment of the Interindividual Variability of Internal Dosimetry during Multi-Route Exposure to Drinking Water Contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Valcke

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate inter-individual variability in absorbed and internal doses after multi-route exposure to drinking water contaminants (DWC in addition to the corresponding variability in equivalent volumes of ingested water, expressed as liter-equivalents (LEQ. A multi-route PBPK model described previously was used for computing the internal dose metrics in adults, neonates, children, the elderly and pregnant women following a multi-route exposure scenario to chloroform and to tri- and tetra-chloroethylene (TCE and PERC. This scenario included water ingestion as well as inhalation and dermal contact during a 30-min bathroom exposure. Monte Carlo simulations were performed and distributions of internal dose metrics were obtained. The ratio of each of the dose metrics for inhalation, dermal and multi-route exposures to the corresponding dose metrics for the ingestion of drinking water alone allowed computation of LEQ values. Mean BW-adjusted LEQ values based on absorbed doses were greater in neonates regardless of the contaminant considered (0.129–0.134 L/kg BW, but higher absolute LEQ values were obtained in average adults (3.6–4.1 L, elderly (3.7–4.2 L and PW (4.1–5.6 L. LEQ values based on the parent compound’s AUC were much greater than based on the absorbed dose, while the opposite was true based on metabolite-based dose metrics for chloroform and TCE, but not PERC. The consideration of the 95th percentile values of BW-adjusted LEQ did not significantly change the results suggesting a generally low intra-subpopulation variability during multi-route exposure. Overall, this study pointed out the dependency of the LEQ on the dose metrics, with consideration of both the subpopulation and DWC.

  3. Energy and water tradeoffs in enhancing food security: A selective international assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mushtaq, Shahbaz; Maraseni, Tek Narayan; Maroulis, Jerry; Hafeez, Mohsin

    2009-01-01

    Rice is the major staple food in most Asian countries. However, with rapidly growing populations, sustained high productivity and yields through improving water productivity is critically important. Increasingly complex energy-agriculture relationships require an in-depth understanding of water and energy tradeoffs. This study contributes to energy and food policies by analysing the complex energy, water and economics dynamics across a selection of major rice growing countries. The results show that tradeoffs exist between yield and energy inputs with high yield attributed to higher levels of energy input. The selected developed countries show higher energy productivity, relative to all other energy inputs, compared to the selected developing counties, owing to enhanced mechanisation, on-farm technology and improved farm management. Among all countries, China has the highest water productivity due to water-saving irrigation practices. These practices offer opportunities for developed and developing countries to increase water productivity at the same time taking advantage of economic and energy benefits of reduced pumping. Sustained production from agriculture is vital to food security. Improved irrigation practices can offset environmental footprints in the short run but their large-scale implementation remains an issue. In the long run, investments are needed to buffer the negative impacts of food production on the environment. Investments to boost water productivity and improved energy use efficiency in crop production are two pathways to reduce energy dependency, enhanced natural resource sustainability and ensuring future food security.

  4. Surface energy and wettability of polymers light-cured by two different systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namen, Fatima Maria; Ferrandini, Eduardo; Galan Junior, João

    2011-10-01

    This study evaluated the surface energy and wettability of composite resins polymerized by different light-curing units to ascertain the good wetting of tooth surfaces to achieve adhesion. Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE), Admira (VOCO) and Grandio (VOCO) resins were selected for the testing procedures. The resins were light cured using LED and Halogen devices. Contact angles were measured goniometrically (Ramé-Hart F100) using water and glycerol as test liquids. Surface energy values were calculated with a software program (DROPimage Standard) that uses the harmonic mean method applied to the acid-base theory. The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test with a significance of 0.05. No statistically significant differences were found between the values of surface energy. The measured wettability differed statistically in most combinations as a function of the type of composite resin, type of light-curing unit, and the test liquid.

  5. 9 CFR 319.104 - Cured pork products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION DEFINITIONS AND STANDARDS OF IDENTITY OR COMPOSITION Cured Meats, Unsmoked and... in the following chart: Type of cured pork product Minimum meat PFF percentage 1 Product name and... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cured pork products. 319.104 Section...

  6. Radiation curing technology progress and its industrial applications in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ukachi, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    Optics, electronics and display industries are now the driving forces for the Japanese radiation curing technology. The purpose of this paper is to overview the newly developed radiation curing technology in Japan, in particular, its industrial applications, and to present the market figures in radiation curing applications, which were surveyed by RadTech Japan in 2002 afresh. (author)

  7. effect of light intensity on the cure characteristics of photo

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-05

    May 5, 2012 ... of material factors on the variables being measured. Light curing units in the sampled clinics were used to cure the composite specimens, which were all cylindrical. The one for micro-hardness evaluation measured eight millimetres in diameter and three millimetres in height while the other for depth of cure.

  8. Studying Room Temperature Curing of Phenolic Resin and their Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H. Beheshty

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic resins are synthetic low molecular weight thermoset resins which are polymerized and cured to higher molecular weights by condensation method. These resins have high weathering resistance, high oxidative thermal properties and good chemical resistance. Phenolic resins can be cured thermally or by acid curing. The most common method of curing phenolic resin is by thermal curing that takes place in the range of 130-180oC. At room temperature, however, phenolic resins are cured by acid catalysts. In this paper, room temperature curing of resol phenolic resin by para toluene sulphonic acid has been investigated. The acid quantity has been determined for room temperature curing of two types of resols to achieve a reasonable hardness and gelation time. Temperature curing and thermal stability of respective resins have been investigated by DSC and TGA, respectively. A glass-phenolic composite plate has been prepared and cured by these two methods. The results show that the optimum amount of acid is 20% by weight. Optimum mechanical properties, chemical resistance and thermal properties have been achieved for acid cured system. The hot cured resin, however, has better properties.

  9. 7 CFR 30.12 - Fire-cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fire-cure. 30.12 Section 30.12 Agriculture Regulations... AND STANDARDS Classification of Leaf Tobacco Covering Classes, Types and Groups of Grades § 30.12 Fire-cure. To cure tobacco under artificial atmospheric conditions by the use of open fires, the smoke and...

  10. Determinant of flexible Parametric Estimation of Mixture Cure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AIC, mean time to cure), variance and cure fraction (c) were used to determine the flexible Parametric Cure Fraction Model among the considered models. Gastric Cancer data from 76 patients received adjuvant CRT and 125 receiving resection (surgery) alone were used to confirm the suitability of the models. The data was ...

  11. Effect of curing time on microstructure and mechanical strength ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this paper is to study the influence of curing time on the microstructure and mechanical strength development of alkali activated binders based on vitreous calcium aluminosilicate (VCAS). Mechanical strength of alkali activated mortars cured at 65 °C was assessed for different curing times (4–168 h) using 10 ...

  12. Characterization of volatile compounds, physico-chemical and sensory characteristics of smoked dry-cured ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marušić Radovčić, Nives; Vidaček, Sanja; Janči, Tibor; Medić, Helga

    2016-11-01

    Volatile compounds from smoked dry-cured ham were isolated by using headspace-solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Samples of biceps femoris were also evaluated for sensory physical and chemical characteristics. Eighty seven volatile aroma compounds of smoked dry-cured ham were identified. Chemical groups identified were aldehydes (35.6%), phenols (34.3%), alcohols (13.8%), terpenes (6.4%), aromatic hydrocarbons (2.6%), alkanes (2.2%), ketones (2.2%), esters (1.7%) and acids (0.7%). Except volatile compounds derived from lipolysis and proteolysis the second most abundant constituents were phenols that originate from smoking phase of the production process. The most abundant phenols were: 4-methylphenol, 3-methylphenol, 2-metoxy-4-methylphenol, 2-methylphenol, 2,6-dimethoxyphenol and 4-ethyl-2 methoxyphenol. Principal components analysis showed that NaCl and ash content positively correlated with the salty taste while fat content was correlated to marbling. Water content and a w value were negatively correlated with hardness of dry-cured ham while phenols were positively corelated with smoky aroma. Due to the different volatile composition and pronounced smoky aroma, smoked dry-cured ham can be distinguished from other types of dry-cured hams.

  13. The effect of steam curing on chloride penetration in geopolymer concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaya Ekaputri Januarti

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present the result of our study on the effect of steam curing to chloride ion penetration in geopolymer concrete. Class F fly ash was activated using sodium hydroxide (NaOH and sodium silicate (Na2SiO3. The concrete specimens were then steam-cured at 40°C, 60°C, 80°C and room temperature at 24 hours. The treatment was followed by wet curing for 28 days, and then followed by immersion of all specimens in salt water for the durations of 30, 60, and 90 days. Cylindrical specimens were then prepared for compressive strength, chloride ion penetration, pH, and porosity tests. A 16 mm-steel bar was fixed at the center of the specimen concrete blocks (specimen size: 10cm × 10cm × 15cm. Corrosion probability was determined by conducting Half Cell Potential test. Our result showed that increasing the curing temperature to 80°C induced chloride ion penetration into the concrete’s effective pores, despite improvements in compressive strength. We also found that chloride ingress on the geopolymer concrete increases commensurately with the increase of the curing temperature. The corrosion potential measurement of geopolymer concrete was higher than OPC concrete even if corrosion was not observed in reinforcing. Based on our result, we suggest that the corrosion categorization for geopolymer concretes needs to be adjusted.

  14. The Effects of Different Curing Methods on the Compressive Strength of Terracrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Alake

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This research evaluated the effects of different curing methods on the compressive strength of terracrete. Several tests that included sieve analysis were carried out on constituents of terracrete (granite and laterite to determine their particle size distribution and performance criteria tests to determine compressive strength of terracrete cubes for 7 to 35 days of curing. Sand, foam-soaked, tank and open methods of curing were used and the study was carried out under controlled temperature. Sixty cubes of 100 × 100 × 100mm sized cubes were cast using a mix ratio of 1 part of cement, 1½ part of latrite, and 3 part of coarse aggregate (granite proportioned by weight and water – cement ratio of 0.62. The result of the various compressive strengths of the cubes showed that out of the four curing methods, open method of curing was the best because the cubes gained the highest average compressive strength of 10.3N/mm2 by the 35th day.

  15. Influence of Curing Mode on the Surface Energy and Sorption/Solubility of Dental Self-Adhesive Resin Cements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun-Jin Kim

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of curing mode (dual- or self-cure on the surface energy and sorption/solubility of four self-adhesive resin cements (SARCs and one conventional resin cement. The degree of conversion (DC and surface energy parameters including degree of hydrophilicity (DH were determined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and contact angle measurements, respectively (n = 5. Sorption and solubility were assessed by mass gain or loss after storage in distilled water or lactic acid for 60 days (n = 5. A linear regression model was used to correlate between the results (%DC vs. DH and %DC/DH vs. sorption/solubility. For all materials, the dual-curing consistently produced significantly higher %DC values than the self-curing (p < 0.05. Significant negative linear regressions were established between the %DC and DH in both curing modes (p < 0.05. Overall, the SARCs showed higher sorption/solubility values, in particular when immersed in lactic acid, than the conventional resin cement. Linear regression revealed that %DC and DH were negatively and positively correlated with the sorption/solubility values, respectively. Dual-curing of SARCs seems to lower the sorption and/or solubility in comparison with self-curing by increased %DC and occasionally decreased hydrophilicity.

  16. The role of oxygen inhibition of a self-etch adhesive on self-cure resin composite bonding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, Tatsuo; Finger, Werner J; Hoffmann, Marcus; Kanehira, Masafumi; Komatsu, Masashi

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the bond strengths on enamel and dentin with a self-etch adhesive (iBond), with or without oxygen-inhibited surface layer, or covered with intermediate self-curing resin, in combination with chemical-cured composite (Core Paste). Bond strengths on human enamel and dentin (n = 8) were determined according to the following procedures: 1. Adhesive cured under ambient air. 2. Inhibited surface wiped with ethanol. 3. Adhesive cured under nitrogen. 4. Adhesive covered with glycerol during activation. 5. Adhesive coated with glycerol for 1 minute after activation. 6. As 5, but covered for 5 minutes. 7. Cured adhesive coated with intermediate self-curing resin. 8. As 7, but intermediate resin's amine component loaded with anion exchange resin in OH- form. Shear bond strengths (SBS) were measured after 24-hour storage in 37 degrees C water. SBSs on enamel (7.1 to 25.6 MPa) were, by ranking order (Presin group (mean 19.6 MPa), showed bond strengths resin was low, irrespective of the presence of an oxygen-inhibited layer. Deprotonization of the acidic adhesive monomer with an admixed anion exchange compound, added to an intermediate self-cured resin, was effective at overcoming the incompatibility.

  17. The effects of Exposure Times and Light Curing Sources on Surface Micro-Hardness of a Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iman Parisay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influenceof different light curing systems and curing times on the micro-hardness of aresin modified glass ionomer. Methods: Forty two samples of ResinModified Glass Ionomer (RMGI were prepared using stainless steel cylindrical mold(8 × 2 mm and randomly divided into six groups of seven. Three groups werecured with a Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH light cure unit and the other threegroups were polymerized with LED unit for 20, 30 and 40 seconds. All sampleswere stored in distilled water for 24 hours. The micro-hardness was measured onthe top and bottom surfaces of the samples by Vickers hardness tester. Datawere analyzed by two–way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results: Two-wayANOVA showed that QTH light-cure unit had higher percentage in depth of curethan LED light-curing unit in both surfaces; whereas, the application time hasno significant effect on it. There was no interaction between two variables. Inboth light-curing groups, the values of top and bottom surfaces micro-hardnesswere increased as the application time increased, but there was not anystatistically significant difference among these groups except for 40-second groupof LED light-curing unit which was significantly higher than 20-second and30-second groups (P

  18. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  19. Cooperation at different scales: challenges for local and international water resource governance in South Africa

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mirumachi, N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Theory on environmental governance and water governance emphasises decentralised, devolved forms of interaction between stakeholders. As previously excluded actors are empowered to take part in governance, new forms of cooperation are created...

  20. Modelling and Internal Fuzzy Model Power Control of a Francis Water Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klemen Nagode

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents dynamic modelling of a Francis turbine with a surge tank and the control of a hydro power plant (HPP. Non-linear and linear models include technical parameters and show high similarity to measurement data. Turbine power control with an internal model control (IMC is proposed, based on a turbine fuzzy model. Considering appropriate control responses in the entire area of turbine power, the model parameters of the process are determined from a fuzzy model, which are further included in the internal model controller. The results are compared to a proportional-integral (PI controller tuned with an integral absolute error (IAE objective function, and show an improved response of internal model control.

  1. Estimation of metastatic cure after radionuclide therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, P; Forssell-Aronsson, E

    2007-12-01

    Targeted radionuclide therapy of disseminated tumor disease involves many factors that will affect the therapeutic outcome. For optimization of such therapy, it is important to know how these factors affect the therapeutic outcome. In this paper, the metastatic cure probability (MCP) model is described. The MCP model is a valuable tool for analyses of the various factors influencing the metastatic cure. The factors discussed are: 1) the physical parameters (the energy and range of emitted particles, absorbed dose-distributions, and cross-irradiation of tumors from the surrounding normal tissue) and 2) the biological parameters (radiosensitivity of tumors, tumor distributions, tumor growth rate, metastasis formation rate, variable tumor activity concentration and non-homogeneous tumor activity distributions).

  2. Environmental and conservation considerations for electron curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nablo, S.V.; Fletcher, P.M.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews the more important features of electron curing pertaining to environmental protection and conservation. The high electrical conversion efficiencies of these devices measured at output power levels to 200 kilowatts are reviewed with attention to energy transport to the product. The comparative energetics of free radical initiated addition chemistry with that of the more conventional condensation polymerized systems are presented. Some details of recent studies of the repulpability and de-inkability of electron cured products are presented with mill scale trials showing successful recycling with up to 75 % EB processed material in the waste. The ability of energetic electrons to effectively replace toxic chemicals such as H 2 O 2 and ethylene oxide in product sterilization will be presented with a discussion of the regulatory aspects of this process for medical device applications. (author)

  3. Light-Curing Adhesive Repair Tapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allred, Ronald; Haight, Andrea Hoyt

    2009-01-01

    Adhesive tapes, the adhesive resins of which can be cured (and thereby rigidized) by exposure to ultraviolet and/or visible light, are being developed as repair patch materials. The tapes, including their resin components, consist entirely of solid, low-outgassing, nonhazardous or minimally hazardous materials. They can be used in air or in vacuum and can be cured rapidly, even at temperatures as low as -20 C. Although these tapes were originally intended for use in repairing structures in outer space, they can also be used on Earth for quickly repairing a wide variety of structures. They can be expected to be especially useful in situations in which it is necessary to rigidize tapes after wrapping them around or pressing them onto the parts to be repaired.

  4. Hydraulic activity of belite cement from class C coal fly ash. Effect of curing and admixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Goñi, S., Guerrero, A.

    2006-01-01

    [EN] The effect of curing method and a water-reducing additive on the hydraulic activity of high lime content (ASTM type C) fly ash belite cement (FABC-2-W) is reported. A class C fly ash was subjected to hydrothermal treatment and subsequent calcination to synthesize FABC. Hydraulic activity was evaluated in the cement paste over 180 days from the physically bound water content as determined by thermogravimetric analysis and the degree of hydration, in turn found with...

  5. Carbon, land, and water footprint accounts for the European Union: consumption, production, and displacements through international trade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen-Olsen, Kjartan; Weinzettel, Jan; Cranston, Gemma; Ercin, A Ertug; Hertwich, Edgar G

    2012-10-16

    A nation's consumption of goods and services causes various environmental pressures all over the world due to international trade. We use a multiregional input-output model to assess three kinds of environmental footprints for the member states of the European Union. Footprints are indicators that take the consumer responsibility approach to account for the total direct and indirect effects of a product or consumption activity. We quantify the total environmental pressures (greenhouse gas emissions: carbon footprint; appropriation of biologically productive land and water area: land footprint; and freshwater consumption: water footprint) caused by consumption in the EU. We find that the consumption activities by an average EU citizen in 2004 led to 13.3 tCO(2)e of induced greenhouse gas emissions, appropriation of 2.53 gha (hectares of land with global-average biological productivity), and consumption of 179 m(3) of blue water (ground and surface water). By comparison, the global averages were 5.7 tCO(2)e, 1.23 gha, and 163 m(3) blue water, respectively. Overall, the EU displaced all three types of environmental pressures to the rest of the world, through imports of products with embodied pressures. Looking at intra-EU displacements only, the UK was the most important displacer overall, while the largest net exporters of embodied environmental pressures were Poland (greenhouse gases), France (land), and Spain (freshwater).

  6. Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... www.girlshealth.gov/ Home Nutrition Nutrition basics Water Water Did you know that water makes up more ... to drink more water Other drinks How much water do you need? top Water is very important, ...

  7. What do we need to do to cure HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siliciano, Robert F

    2010-01-01

    Finding a cure for HIV infection requires methods to stop ongoing viral replication, to identify all reservoirs in which nonreplicating HIV persists, and to eliminate each of these reservoirs. Current antiretroviral therapy largely stops ongoing viral replication. This is a reflection of the extremely high antiviral activity of some classes of antiretroviral drugs as revealed in a novel index, the inhibitory potential, which incorporates the slope parameter of the dose-response curve. This index may aid in the rational selection of fully suppressive therapy. At least 2 stable reservoirs of latently infected cells have been identified, and attempts are under way to identify compounds that selectively reactivate latent HIV and allow elimination of these reservoirs. This article summarizes a presentation made by Robert F. Siliciano, MD, PhD, at the International AIDS Society-USA continuing medical education program held in Atlanta in March 2010.

  8. Coating and curing apparatus and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Brenor L; Maghsoodi, Sina; Neyman, Patrick J; Gonsalves, Peter R; Hirsch, Jeffrey G; Yang, Yu S

    2015-02-24

    Disclosed are coating apparatus including flow coating and roll-coating that may be used for uniform sol-gel coating of substrates such as glass, solar panels, windows or part of an electronic display. Also disclosed are methods for substrate preparation, flow coating and roll coating. Lastly systems and methods for skin curing sol-gel coatings deposited onto the surface of glass substrates using a high temperature air-knife are disclosed.

  9. Cure Behavior and Thermal Properties of Diepoxidized Cardanol Resin Cured by Electron Beam Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Donghwan; Cheon, Jinsil

    2013-01-01

    Thermal curing of epoxy resin requires high temperature, time-consuming process and the volatilization of hardener. It has known that electron beam curing of epoxy resin is a fast process and occurs at low or room temperature that help reduce residual mechanical stresses in thermosetting polymers. Diepoxidized cardanol (DEC) can be synthesized by an enzymatic method from cashew nut shell liquid (CNSL), that constitutes nearly one-third of the total nut weight. A large amount of CNSL can be formed as a byproduct of the mechanical processes used to render the cashew kerneledible and its total production approaches one million tons annually, which can be bio-degradable and replace the industrial thermosetting plastics. It is expected that DEC may be cured as in an epoxy resin, which was constituted on two epoxide group and long alkyl chain, and two-types of onium salts (cationic initiator) were used as a photo-initiator. The experimental variables of this study are type and concentration of photo-initiators and electron beam dosage. In this study, the effects of initiator type and concentration on the cure behavior and the thermal properties of DEC resin processed by using electron beam technology were studied using FT-IR, TGA, TMA, DSC, and DMA. Figure 1 is the FT-IR results, showing the change of chemical structure of pure DEC and electron beam cured DEC. The characteristic absorption peak of epoxide group appeared at 850cm -1 . The shape and the height were reduced when the sample was irradiated with electron beam. From this result, the epoxide groups is DEC were opened by electron beam and cured. After then, electron beam cured DEC was investigated the effect of forming 3-dimensional network

  10. Curing profile of bulk-fill resin-based composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Pongprueksa, Pong; Van Meerbeek, Bart; De Munck, Jan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the curing profile of bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBC) using micro-Raman spectroscopy (μRaman). Four bulk-fill RBCs were compared to a conventional RBC. RBC blocks were light-cured using a polywave LED light-curing unit. The 24-h degree of conversion (DC) was mapped along a longitudinal cross-section using μRaman. Curing profiles were constructed and 'effective' (>90% of maximum DC) curing parameters were calculated. A statistical linear mixed effects model was constructed to analyze the relative effect of the different curing parameters. Curing efficiency differed widely with the flowable bulk-fill RBCs presenting a significantly larger 'effective' curing area than the fibre-reinforced RBC, which on its turn revealed a significantly larger 'effective' curing area than the full-depth bulk-fill and conventional (control) RBC. A decrease in 'effective' curing depth within the light beam was found in the same order. Only the flowable bulk-fill RBCs were able to cure 'effectively' at a 4-mm depth for the whole specimen width (up to 4mm outside the light beam). All curing parameters were found to statistically influence the statistical model and thus the curing profile, except for the beam inhomogeneity (regarding the position of the 410-nm versus that of 470-nm LEDs) that did not significantly affect the model for all RBCs tested. Most of the bulk-fill RBCs could be cured up to at least a 4-mm depth, thereby validating the respective manufacturer's recommendations. According to the curing profiles, the orientation and position of the light guide is less critical for the bulk-fill RBCs than for the conventional RBC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Tools for Visualizing HIV in Cure Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niessl, Julia; Baxter, Amy E; Kaufmann, Daniel E

    2018-02-01

    The long-lived HIV reservoir remains a major obstacle for an HIV cure. Current techniques to analyze this reservoir are generally population-based. We highlight recent developments in methods visualizing HIV, which offer a different, complementary view, and provide indispensable information for cure strategy development. Recent advances in fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques enabled key developments in reservoir visualization. Flow cytometric detection of HIV mRNAs, concurrently with proteins, provides a high-throughput approach to study the reservoir on a single-cell level. On a tissue level, key spatial information can be obtained detecting viral RNA and DNA in situ by fluorescence microscopy. At total-body level, advancements in non-invasive immuno-positron emission tomography (PET) detection of HIV proteins may allow an encompassing view of HIV reservoir sites. HIV imaging approaches provide important, complementary information regarding the size, phenotype, and localization of the HIV reservoir. Visualizing the reservoir may contribute to the design, assessment, and monitoring of HIV cure strategies in vitro and in vivo.

  12. International Arid Lands Consortium: Better land stewardship in water and watershed management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter F. Ffolliott; James T. Fisher; Menachem Sachs; Darrell W. DeBoer; Jeffrey O. Dawson; Timothy E. Fulbright; John Tracy

    2000-01-01

    The International Arid Lands Consortium (IALC) was established in 1990 to promote research, education, and training for the development, management, and restoration of arid and semi-arid lands throughout the world. One activity of IALC members and cooperators is to support research and development and demonstration projects that enhance management of these fragile...

  13. Study on the heat-resistant EB curing composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Jianwen; Li Yang; Li Fengmei

    2000-01-01

    There are many advantages in the EB-curing process of composites. Heat-resistant EB-curing composites could substitute for polyimide composites used in aeronautical engine. The effects of catalyst and dose on the cured resin were investigated. The heat-resistance of the resin cured by EB was evaluated by dynamic mechanical thermal analysis (DMTA). The experiment result shows that the mechanical property of the composites cured by EB could meet the needs of the aeronautical engine in 250degC. (author)

  14. International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology. Summary report of the 14. plenary meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-01-01

    The fourteenth Plenary Meeting of the International Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT) was held at IAEA Headquarters, Vienna, from 21 to 23 May 1997. Twenty-seven participants, from twenty two Member States and two international organizations, attended the meeting. These presentations generally gave: The general situation of the nuclear industry in the country; Fuel fabrication; Fuel performance, high burnup fuel (including MOX) operational experience; Status and trends in fuel research programmes directed to achievement sufficient safety margins at high burnups with regard to normal and transient operational conditions. Majority of countries reported on the stable situation of the nuclear fuel industry, i.e. without significant additions/cuts in nuclear power plant and fuel fabrication plant (NPP) capacities. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Globalization of water and food through international trade: impacts on food security, resilience and justice

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Odorico, P.; Carr, J. A.; Seekell, D. A.; Suweis, S. S.

    2015-12-01

    The global distribution of water resources in general depends on geographic conditions but can be (virtually) modified by humans through mechanisms of globalization, such as trade, that make food commodities available to populations living far from the production regions. While trade is expected to improve access to food and (virtual) water, its impact on the global food system and its vulnerability to shocks remains poorly understood. It is also unclear who benefits from trade and whether it contributes to inequality and justice in resource redistribution. We reconstruct the global patterns of food trade and show with a simple model how the ongoing intensification of imports and exports has eroded the resilience of the global food system. Drawing on human rights theory, we investigate the relationship between inequality and injustice in access to water and food. We assess the fulfillment of positive and negative water and food rights and evaluate the obligations arising from the need to ensure that these rights are met throughout the world. We find that trade enhances the vulnerability to shocks but overall increase the number of people whose water and food rights are met.

  16. Influência da imersão em água na resistência mecânica de misturas solo-grits compactadas e curadas com vistas a aplicações em estradas florestais Influence of water submersion on the mechanical strength of compacted and cured soil-grits mixtures for forest roads applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reginaldo Sérgio Pereira

    2007-01-01

    ranging from 4 to 28 %, compacted at the intermediate and modified compaction efforts, and cured during 0, 7 and 28 days. Laboratory tests were performed as follow: (i CBR: tests were performed following the standard procedure, i.e. after 4 days water submersion before specimen penetration, and without submersion; and (ii UCS: tests were performed following the Brazilian standard procedure, i.e. after 4 hours specimen submersion before testing, and without water submersion. The laboratory testing program data support that water submersion significantly influenced the tested mechanical strength parameters, which were dependent of the type of assay and soil, percentage of grits waste, compaction effort and cure.

  17. Report of International Workshop on tracing isotopic composition of past and present precipitation - opportunities for climate and water studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Workshop on Tracing Isotopic Composition of Past and Present Precipitation - Opportunities for Climate and Water Studies, was jointly organized by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Past Global Changes (PAGES) - a core project of the International Geosphere - Biosphere Programme (IGBP), and the International Association of Hydrological Sciences (IAHS). The Global Network ''Isotopes in Precipitation'' (GNIP) was initiated by IAEA in 1958 and became operational in 1961. The main objective was to collect systematic data on isotopic content of precipitation on a global scale and to establish temporal and spatial variations of environmental isotopes in precipitation. The network is now expected to serve additional purposes, namely as a benchmark for the interpretation of paleo-records, as a validation tool for Global Circulation Models, and for establishing large-scale regional (and continental-scale) waster balances. Furthermore, the structure of GNIP should be strengthened. This includes the build-up of: stations located close to major natural climatic archives (e.g. Greenland, mountain areas); stations which represent climatically sensitive areas (indicated by GCM's and biome models). Isotope monitoring of river outflow from major continental basins should be initiated. This could be realized in co-operation with the UNEP/WHO Global Environmental Monitoring System-Water (GEMS-Water). The deuterium excess parameter (δ) is of particular importance in climate modelling and in the understanding of hydro-meteorological pathways. The use of the deuterium excess imposes strict requirements on the accuracy of deuterium and oxygen-18 analysis. A GNIP-based worldwide documentation of quality control regarding sampling, shipping and measurements is needed. The IAEA/WMO database and other isotope data sets should be included in the World Data Center A for palaeo-climatology. Refs, figs, tabs

  18. Accurate Cure Modeling for Isothermal Processing of Fast Curing Epoxy Resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bernath

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In this work a holistic approach for the characterization and mathematical modeling of the reaction kinetics of a fast epoxy resin is shown. Major composite manufacturing processes like resin transfer molding involve isothermal curing at temperatures far below the ultimate glass transition temperature. Hence, premature vitrification occurs during curing and consequently has to be taken into account by the kinetic model. In order to show the benefit of using a complex kinetic model, the Kamal-Malkin kinetic model is compared to the Grindling kinetic model in terms of prediction quality for isothermal processing. From the selected models, only the Grindling kinetic is capable of taking into account vitrification. Non-isothermal, isothermal and combined differential scanning calorimetry (DSC measurements are conducted and processed for subsequent use for model parametrization. In order to demonstrate which DSC measurements are vital for proper cure modeling, both models are fitted to varying sets of measurements. Special attention is given to the evaluation of isothermal DSC measurements which are subject to deviations arising from unrecorded cross-linking prior to the beginning of the measurement as well as from physical aging effects. It is found that isothermal measurements are vital for accurate modeling of isothermal cure and cannot be neglected. Accurate cure predictions are achieved using the Grindling kinetic model.

  19. Rubber curing chemistry governing the orientation of layered silicate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of curing systems on the orientation and the dispersion of the layered silicates in acrylonitrile butadiene rubber nanocomposite is reported. Significant differences in X-ray diffraction pattern between peroxide curing and sulfur curing was observed. Intense X-ray scattering values in the XRD experiments from peroxide cured vulcanizates indicate an orientation of the layers in a preferred direction as evinced by transmission electron micrographs. However, sulfur cured vulcanizates show no preferential orientation of the silicate particles. Nevertheless, a closer inspection of transmission electron microscopy (TEM images of peroxide and sulfur cured samples shows exfoliated silicate layers in the acrylonitrile butadiene rubber (NBR matrix. It was revealed in the prevailing study that the use of an excess amount of stearic acid in the formulation of the sulfur curing package leads to almost exfoliated type X-ray scattering pattern.

  20. A cure for HIV: is it in sight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Matthew; Frater, John

    2014-07-01

    HIV is a devastating disease affecting millions of people worldwide despite the advent of successful antiretroviral therapy (ART). However, ART does not result in a cure and has to be taken for life. Accordingly, researchers are turning towards cure efforts, particularly in the light of two patients whose HIV has been seemingly eradicated. Numerous approaches and strategies have been considered for curing HIV, but no scalable and safe solution has yet been reached. With newly discovered difficulties in measuring the HIV reservoir, the main barrier to a cure, the only true test of cure is to stop ART and see whether the virus becomes detectable. However, it is possible that this treatment interruption may be associated with certain risks for patients. Here, we compare the current major approaches and recent advances for curing HIV, as well as discuss ways of evaluating HIV cure and the safety concerns involved.

  1. A Numerical and Experimental Investigation of the Internal Flow of a Freezing Water Droplet

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Linn

    2015-01-01

    The overarching aim of this work is to study the freezing process of a single water droplet freezing on a cold surface, which is an interesting and important phenomenon with possible applications in many areas. Understanding the freezing process of a single water droplet is for example an important step when preventing unwanted icing, e.g. in the case of airplane wings and propellers, wind turbine rotor blades, and road surfaces.As a step in understanding the freezing process, the study speci...

  2. First meeting of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors, Vienna, 18-21 May 1987. (Pt. 1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-12-01

    The first meeting of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors was held in Vienna, Austria from 18-21 May 1987. Part I of the Summary Report contains the minutes of the meeting

  3. Microbiology of aquatic environments: Characterizations of the microbiotas of municipal water supplies, the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System's heat transport fluid, and US Space Shuttle drinking water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, James Nicholas, III

    An understanding of the microbiota within life support systems is essential for the prolonged presence of humans in space. This is because microbes may cause disease or induce biofouling and/or corrosion within spacecraft water systems. It is imperative that we develop effective high-throughput technologies for characterizing microbial populations that can eventually be used in the space environment. This dissertation describes testing and development of such methodologies, targeting both bacteria and viruses in water, and examines the bacterial and viral diversity within two spacecraft life support systems. The bacterial community of the International Space Station Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) was examined using conventional culture-based and advanced molecular techniques including adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and Limulus Amebocyte Lysate (LAL) assays, direct microscopic examination, and analyses of 16S rRNA gene libraries from the community metagenome. The cultivable heterotrophs of the IATCS fluids ranged from below detection limit to 1.1x10 5/100 ml, and viable cells, measured by ATP, ranged from 1.4x10 3/100 ml to 7.7x105/100 ml. DNA extraction, cloning, sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis of the clones from 16S RNA gene libraries showed members of the firmicutes, alpha, beta, and gamma-proteobacteria to be present in the fluids. This persistent microbial bioburden and the presence of probable metal reducers, biofilm formers, and opportunistic pathogens illustrate the need for better characterization of bacterial communities present within spacecraft fluids. A new methodology was developed for detection of viruses in water using microarrays. Samples were concentrated by lyophilization, resuspended and filtered (0.22microm). Viral nucleic acids were then extracted, amplified, fluorescently labeled and hybridized onto a custom microarray with probes for ˜1000 known viruses. Numerous virus signatures were observed. Human Adenovirus C and

  4. Bottom attenuation estimation using sound intensity fluctuations due to mode coupling by nonlinear internal waves in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorev, Valery A; Katsnelson, Boris G; Lynch, James F

    2016-11-01

    Analyses of fluctuations of low frequency signals (300 ± 30 Hz) propagating in shallow water in the presence of nonlinear internal waves (NIWs) in the Shallow Water 2006 experiment are carried out. Signals were received by a vertical line array at a distance of ∼20 km from the source. A NIW train was moving totally inside of the acoustic track, and the angle between the wave front of the NIW and the acoustic track in the horizontal plane was ∼10°. It is shown that the spectrum of the sound intensity fluctuations contains peaks corresponding to the coupling of pairs of propagating modes. Analysis of spectra at different hydrophone depths, and also summed over depth allows the authors to estimate attenuation in the bottom sediments.

  5. Summary of principles for intervention in food and drinking water in a radiological emergency developed by several international organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Hideo

    1994-01-01

    After the Chernobyl accident in April 1986 it became clear that the guidelines on the management of the consequence of a nuclear accident were needed for action over long time scales and for dealing with the widespread radioactive contamination that affected many countries at distances far from the accident site. One of the major difficulties in area away from the site of a nuclear accident concerns decisions on the safety of contaminated food and drinking water. International organizations, ICRP, IAEA, WHO and several other organizations, have considered it appropriate to develop guidelines to assist national authorities in making decisions on the control of food in the event of widespread contamination by radionuclides in a radiological emergency. These guidelines and the recommendations for intervention in food and drinking water by WHO, ICRP and CEC are summarized, and the considerations and problems to adopt the guidelines are proposed in this paper. (author)

  6. Mechanistic aspects of polymer chemistry for radiation curing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickson, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The chemistry of polymer production has been reviewed for the purpose of identifying suitable uses for high-energy electron accelerators in the plastics industry. High-energy radiation produces free radicals, electrons and ions in irradiated materials. These species initiate polymerization and cross-linking reactions in a manner analogous to that of chemical agents. The chemical mechanisms of radiation-induced polymerization, co-polymerization and cross-linking are compared with those of chemical and thermal initiation. Radiation polymerization can be a very fast process, but the polymerization reactions are quite exothermic, and temperature increases of up to 400 degrees Celcius may result if insufficient cooling is provided. Several approaches to reducing the temperature increase during radiation curing are presented. Chemical kinetic simulations of the radiation-induced cationic polymerization of styrene have shown that the effect of water inhibition on the rate of polymerization may be eliminated at the high dose rates available from high power accelerators. 25 refs

  7. Acoustic observations of internal tides and tidal currents in shallow water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgut, Altan; Mignerey, Peter C; Goldstein, David J; Schindall, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-01

    Significant acoustic travel-time variability and frequency shifts of acoustic intensity level curves in broadband signal spectrograms were measured in the East China Sea during the summer of 2008. The broadband pulses (270-330 Hz) were transmitted from a fixed source and received at a bottomed horizontal array, located at the 33 km range. The acoustic intensity level curves of the received signals indicate regular frequency shifts that are well correlated with the measured internal tides. Similarly, regular travel-time shifts of the acoustic mode arrivals correlate well with the barotropic tides and can be explained by tidal currents along the acoustic propagation track. These observations indicate the potential of monitoring internal tides and tidal currents using low-frequency acoustic signals propagating at long ranges.

  8. CURING OF POLYMERIC COMPOSITES USING MICROWAVE RESIN TRANSFER MOULDING (RTM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. YUSOFF

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is to compare the difference between microwave heating and conventional thermal heating in fabricating carbon/epoxy composites. Two types of epoxy resin systems were used as matrices, LY5052-HY5052 and DGEBA-HY917-DY073. All composite samples were fabricated using resin transfer moulding (RTM technique. The curing of the LY5052-HY5052-carbon and the DGEBA-HY917-DY073-carbon composite systems, were carried out at 100 °C and 120 °C, respectively. Microwave heating showed better temperature control than conventional heating, however, the heating rate of the microwave cured samples were slower than the conventionally cured samples. This was attributed to the lower power (250 W used when heating with microwaves compared to 2000 W used in conventional heating. Study of thermal characteristics as curing progressed showed that the polymerisation reaction occurred at a faster rate during microwave curing than in conventional curing for both the DGEBA and the LY/HY5052 carbon composite systems. The actual cure cycle was reduced from 60 minutes to 40 minutes when using microwaves for curing DGEBA-carbon composites. As for LY/HY5052-carbon composites, the actual cure cycle was reduced from 3 hours to 40 minutes. Both conventional and microwave heating yielded similar glass transition temperatures (120 °C for DGEBA systems and 130 °C for LY/HY5052 systems. Microwave cured composites had higher void contents than conventionally cured composites (2.2-2.8% and 1.8-2.4% for DGEBA and LY/HY5052 microwave cured composites, respectively, compared to 0.2-0.4% for both DGEBA and LY/HY5052 thermally cured composites. C-scan traces showed that all composites, regardless of methods of curing, had minimal defects.

  9. Development of an international harmonization scheme for salt water fish toxicity tests

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, E.; Amavis, R.; Cabridenc, R.; Gilliard, C.; Schubert, R.

    1984-01-01

    The proceeding deterioration of the marine environment demonstrates the need and the urgency to take appropriate measures. To obtain significant results all the practical efforts made so far must be sustained by national and international conventions and wherever necessary even by more strict regulations. One of the major objectives of the administrative and scientific authorities involved is to establish an harmonized scheme for toxicity testing on marine organisms under controlled laborator...

  10. Designing performance incentives, an international benchmark study in the water sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, K.; Marques, R.C.

    2010-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons avoid the unsteady equilibrium in which regulators have to balance between economies of scale and a sufficient number of remaining comparable utilities. By the use of data envelopment analysis, we compare the efficiency of the drinking water sector in the Netherlands,

  11. Designing incentives in local public utilities, an international comparison of the drinking water sector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Witte, K.; Marques, R.C.

    2007-01-01

    Cross-country comparisons avoid the unsteady equilibrium in which regulators have to balance between economies of scale and a sufficient number of remaining comparable utilities. By the use of Data Envelopment Analysis (DEA), we compare the efficiency of the drinking water sector in the Netherlands,

  12. System International d'Unites: Metric Measurement in Water Resources Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingeman, Peter C.

    This pamphlet gives definitions and symbols for the basic and derived metric units, prefixes, and conversion factors for units frequently used in water resources. Included are conversion factors for units of area, work, heat, power, pressure, viscosity, flow rate, and others. (BB)

  13. Fish out of Water: Refugee and International Students in Mainstream Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumenden, Iris E.; English, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the authors combine Pierre Bourdieu's concept of hysteresis (the "fish out of water" experience) with the discourse historical approach to critical discourse analysis (CDA) as a theoretical and analytical framework through which they examine specific moments in the schooling experiences of one refugee student and one…

  14. The fourth international and (Dutch) national trial with reference materials for water microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Havelaar AH; van Strijp-Lockefeer NGWM; Heisterkamp SH

    1991-01-01

    A fourth trial with reference materials for water microbiology was organized. Forty-one Dutch laboratories and 37 laboratories of the EC participated. Each laboratory received four capsules of batches of reference materials with the test strains WR63 Enterococcus faecium and WR51 Staphylococcus

  15. The fifth international and (Dutch) national trial with reference materials for water microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Havelaar AH; van Strijp-Lockefeer NGWM; Heisterkamp SH

    1992-01-01

    Thirty-nine Dutch laboratories and 33 laboratories of the EC participated in a fifth trial with reference materials for water microbiology. Reference materials with the test strains WR63 Enterococcus faecium and WR52 Staphylococcus warneri were used. The materials were analysed for total aerobic

  16. The third international and (Dutch) national trial with reference for water microbiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooijman KA; Havelaar AH; Heisterkamp SH; van Strijp-Lockefeer NGWM

    1991-01-01

    A third trial with reference materials for water microbiology was organized. Thirty-eight Dutch laboratories and 39 laboratories of the EC participated. The design of the trial was the same as in the first and the second trial. Also the test strains were the same: WR1 Escherichia coli and WR3

  17. 3. International conference on oxidation technologies for water and wastewater treatment. Special topic: AOP's for recycling and reuse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogelpohl, A.

    2003-01-01

    With the increasing pressure on a more effective and sustainable use of water resources, those water treatment technologies become more and more important which will allow for a recycling of wastewater for agricultural and/or industrial purposes. The so-called advanced oxidation processes (AOP's) belong to these technologies as they offer the potential of a complete conversion of the water pollutants to carbon dioxide, water and mineral salts. Despite the progress that has been achieved in understanding and applying AOP's, the most significant disadvantages of the oxidation technologies are the high investment and operating costs. As these technologies are the high investment and operating costs. As these technologies are based on radical reactions, more effective means of producing radicals and a deeper insight in the reaction pathways will be the key for generating radicals at lower costs as well as choosing the optimum process conditions and defining the applications where AOP's are most competitive. Two national, three international conferences with the publication of their papers in water science and technology (1997 and 2001) as well as the foundation of the IWA Specialist Group on AOP's in 2001 demonstrate the success and the necessity of this conference series. It is designed to bring forward the most recent advances in the fundamentals as well as the development and the application of AOP's especially in the field of water recycling reuse. It will help to disseminate new achievements in these areas and to identify future research and development needs. The increased number of interesting papers submitted will be the basis for a successful, fruitful and hopefully critical conference in Goslar. (orig.)

  18. SPARC Data Initiative: Comparison of water vapor climatologies from international satellite limb sounders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegglin, M. I.; Tegtmeier, S.; Anderson, J.; Froidevaux, L.; Fuller, R.; Funke, B.; Jones, A.; Lingenfelser, G.; Lumpe, J.; Pendlebury, D.; Remsberg, E.; Rozanov, A.; Toohey, M.; Urban, J.; von Clarmann, T.; Walker, K. A.; Wang, R.; Weigel, K.

    2013-10-01

    Within the SPARC Data Initiative, the first comprehensive assessment of the quality of 13 water vapor products from 11 limb-viewing satellite instruments (LIMS, SAGE II, UARS-MLS, HALOE, POAM III, SMR, SAGE III, MIPAS, SCIAMACHY, ACE-FTS, and Aura-MLS) obtained within the time period 1978-2010 has been performed. Each instrument's water vapor profile measurements were compiled into monthly zonal mean time series on a common latitude-pressure grid. These time series serve as basis for the "climatological" validation approach used within the project. The evaluations include comparisons of monthly or annual zonal mean cross sections and seasonal cycles in the tropical and extratropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere averaged over one or more years, comparisons of interannual variability, and a study of the time evolution of physical features in water vapor such as the tropical tape recorder and polar vortex dehydration. Our knowledge of the atmospheric mean state in water vapor is best in the lower and middle stratosphere of the tropics and midlatitudes, with a relative uncertainty of ±2-6% (as quantified by the standard deviation of the instruments' multiannual means). The uncertainty increases toward the polar regions (±10-15%), the mesosphere (±15%), and the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere below 100 hPa (±30-50%), where sampling issues add uncertainty due to large gradients and high natural variability in water vapor. The minimum found in multiannual (1998-2008) mean water vapor in the tropical lower stratosphere is 3.5 ppmv (±14%), with slightly larger uncertainties for monthly mean values. The frequently used HALOE water vapor data set shows consistently lower values than most other data sets throughout the atmosphere, with increasing deviations from the multi-instrument mean below 100 hPa in both the tropics and extratropics. The knowledge gained from these comparisons and regarding the quality of the individual data sets in different regions

  19. Requirements and international co-operation in nuclear safety for evolutionary light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carnino, A.

    1999-01-01

    The principles of safety are now well known and implemented world-wide, leading to a situation of harmonisation in accordance with the Convention on Nuclear Safety. Future reactors are expected not only to meet current requirements but to go beyond the safety level presently accepted. To this end, technical safety requirements, as defined by the IAEA document Safety Fundamentals, need be duly considered in the design, the risks to workers and population must be decreased, a stable, transparent and objective regulatory process, including an international harmonisation with respect to licensing of new reactors, must be developed, and the issue of public acceptance must be addressed. Well-performing existing installations are seen as a prerequisite for an improved public acceptability; there should be no major accidents, the results from safety performance indicators must be unquestionable, and compliance with internationally harmonised criteria is essential. Economical competitiveness is another factor that influences the acceptability; the costs for constructing the plant, for its operation and maintenance, for the fuel cycle, and for the final decommissioning are of paramount importance. Plant simplification, longer fuel cycles, life extension are appealing options, but safety will have first priority. The IAEA can play an important role in this field, by providing peer reviews by teams of international experts and assistance to Member States on the use of its safety standards. (author)

  20. Internal exposure monitoring of personnel of a nuclear power plant with pressurized-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, F.W.; Poulheim, K.F.; Rueger, G.; Schreiter, W.D.

    1982-01-01

    In the GDR a programme for monitoring the internal radiation exposure of personnel has been established in the Bruno Leuschner Nuclear Power Plant, Greifswald, which allows one to estimate the effective dose equivalent in the way recommended by the ICRP. The measuring equipment used, and the methods of calibration and of evaluation of results are described. At present about 400 persons are monthly monitored with a thorax monitor in the nuclear power plant. If an investigation level - corresponding to an effective dose equivalent of 0.3mSv/month - is exceeded, a more exact measurement is made in the whole-body counter at the National Board for Nuclear Safety and Radiation Protection of the GDR. In addition, a selected group of 50 persons is measured twice yearly in the whole-body counter. The measurements show the high effectiveness of the protective measures against radionuclide intake by workers in the nuclear power plant, resulting in a contribution of less than 1% to the collective dose of the personnel. A correlation has been found between external and internal exposure indicating that, in general, there will be a higher intake only under conditions resulting also in higher external exposures. The highest individual values of internal exposure found are below 0.5mSv/month and thus within the range of the lower detection limit of dosimeter films used for monitoring the external exposure. (author)

  1. Modeling the curing process of thick-section autoclave cured composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, A. C.; Dara, P. H.

    1985-01-01

    Temperature gradients are significant during cure of large area, thick-section composites. Such temperature gradients result in nonuniformly cured parts with high void contents, poor ply compaction, and variations in the fiber/resin distribution. A model was developed to determine the temperature distribution in thick-section autoclave cured composites. Using the model, long with temperature measurements obtained from the thick-section composites, the effects of various processing parameters on the thermal response of the composites were examined. A one-dimensional heat transfer model was constructed for the composite-tool assembly. The governing differential equations and associated boundary conditions describing one-dimensional unsteady heat-conduction in the composite, tool plate, and pressure plate are given. Solution of the thermal model was obtained using an implicit finite difference technique.

  2. Performance of maleated castor oil based plasticizer on rubber: rheology and curing characteristic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indrajati, I. N.; Dewi, I. R.

    2017-07-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the performance of maleated castor oil (MACO) as plasticizer on natural rubber (NR), ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM), and nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR). The parameter studied were involving rheological, curing and swelling properties. The MACOs were prepared by an esterification reaction between castor oil (CO) and maleic anhydride (MAH) with the help of xylene as water entrainer to improve water removal. Resulting oils then applied as a plasticizer in each of those rubbers within a fixed loading of 5 phr. Comparison has been made to evaluate the performance of MACO and conventional plasticizer (paraffinic oil for NR and EPDM, DOP for NBR) on each rubber. Rheology, curing characteristic and swelling of each rubber were studied. The results showed that rubber (NR/EPDM/NBR) plasticized with MACO had given similar flow characteristic to conventional plasticizers. MACO exhibited slow curing, confirmed by higher t90, but the scorch safety was of the same magnitude. MAH loading tended to decrease the flow properties and curing rate, while scorch time (ts2) was independent.

  3. Polyurethane acrylate networks including cellulose nanocrystals: a comparison between UV and EB- curing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtak-Wrona, K.; Kozik-Ostrówka, P.; Jadwiszczak, K.; Maigret, J. E.; Aguié-Béghin, V.; Coqueret, X.

    2018-01-01

    A water-based polyurethane (PUR) acrylate water emulsion was selected as a radiation curable matrix for preparing nanocomposites including cellulose nanocrystals (CNC) prepared by controlled hydrolysis of Ramie fibers. Cross-linking polymerization of samples prepared in the form of films or of 1 mm-thick bars was either initiated by exposure to the 395 nm light of a high intensity LED lamp or by treatment with low energy electron beam (EB). The conversion level of acrylate functions in samples submitted to increasing radiation doses was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR). Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) were used to characterize changes in the glass transition temperature of the PUR-CNC nanocomposites as a function of acrylate conversion and of CNC content. Micromechanical testing indicates the positive effect of 1 wt% CNC on Young's modulus and on the tensile strength at break (σ) of cured nanocomposites. The presence of CNC in the PUR acrylate matrix was shown to double the σ value of the nanocomposite cured to an acrylate conversion level of 85% by treatment with a 25 kGy dose under EB, whereas no increase of σ was observed in UV-cured samples exhibiting the same acrylate conversion level. The occurrence of grafting reactions inducing covalent linkages between the polysaccharide nanofiller and the PUR acrylate matrix during the EB treatment is advanced as an explanation to account for the improvement observed in samples cured under ionizing radiation.

  4. Curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through different ceramic thicknesses and curing time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Won; Cha, Hyun-Suk

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE The aim of this in vitro study was to examine the curing efficiency of various resin-based materials polymerized through ceramic restorations with 3 different thicknesses. Curing efficiency was evaluated by determining the surface microhardness (VHN) of the resin specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS Four kinds of resin materials were used. Z350 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z350: A2 Shade), Z250 (3M ESPE Filtek™ Z250: A2 Shade) and Variolink® II (VL: Ivoclar vivadent, base: transparent) either with or without a self-curing catalyst (VLC: Ivoclar vivadent, catalyst: low viscosity/transparent) were filled into the silicone mold (10 mm diameter, 1 mm thick). They were cured through ceramic discs (IPS e.max Press MO-0 ingot ivoclar vivadent, 10 mm diameter, 0.5, 1 and 2 mm thicknesses) by LED light-curing units for 20 and 40 seconds. Vicker's microhardness numbers (VHNs) were measured on the bottom surfaces by a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using a 3- way analysis of variance (ANOVA) at a significance level of 0.05. RESULTS The thickness of ceramic disc increased, the VHNs of all four resin types were decreased (Plight cured for 40 seconds were significantly higher than that of LED for 20 seconds in all four resin materials (Pcuring time resulted higher VHN values of all resin materials. The use of a catalyst produced a greater hardness with all polymerization methods. Restorative resin materials (Z350, Z250) showed higher VHN values than resin cement materials (VL, VLC). PMID:22053242

  5. Comparative evaluation of sealing ability of light cure glass ionomer cement and light cure composite as coronal sealing material: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pragya Jaiswal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To compare and evaluate the sealing ability of light cure composite and light cure GIC as coronal sealing materials. Materials and Methods: 30 extracted human teeth were divided into three experimental groups of 10 teeth each. The teeth in group I are obturated without coronal seal, teeth in group II are obturated with light cure GIC (3M ESPE VITREMER as coronal seal and teeth in group III are obturated with light cure composite(3M ESPE filtek z250 as coronal seal, after removing 2mm of coronal gutta percha. These teeth (crown portion are then suspended in methylene blue, sealed and kept for 72 hours, to observe the amount of dye penetration. After 72 hours teeth were removed, washed under running water, dried and sectioned longitudinally, separating buccal and lingual halves. The linear extent of dye penetration was measured from cavosurface margin of the access cavity to the most apical extent of dye penetration point. The length from the cavosurface margin to the apex of the tooth was also measured and percentage linear micro leakage was estimated. Statistical Analysis: Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA followed by Post-Hoc Multiple comparison (Bonferroni. Results: In the present study specimens in group I showed the maximum percentage of linear microleakage of 31.51 percent. The specimens in group II showed the minimal amount of linear micro leakage of 6.49 percent. Conclusion: It can be concluded coronal seal reduces the micro leakage, and light cure GIC has better coronal sealing ability.

  6. Internal conditions of a bubble containing radio-frequency plasma in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukasa, Shinobu; Nomura, Shinfuku; Toyota, Hiromichi; Maehara, Tsunehiro; Yamashita, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed the gas generated by a radio-frequency plasma in water and found that the ratio of oxygen to hydrogen in it was approximately 0.7-11%. Numerical simulations of the chemical reactions occurring inside and outside the bubble with increasing energy supply in the concentric volume in it were carried out. Thermal conduction and diffusion occurring inside and outside the bubble, and evaporation (condensation) and solution of gases at the surface were taken into consideration. After terminating the energy supply, we found that nearly all the oxygen within the bubble was consumed but that hydrogen remained, and that oxygen in the water produced from dissolved chemical species diffused into the bubble. Good agreement with experiment results was obtained for reducing the production rate of hydrogen and the oxygen-hydrogen ratio that occurred with a pressure increase. We found that in comparison with experimental results the hydrogen production rate was underestimated by approximately 35%.

  7. Quench of molten aluminum oxide associated with in-vessel debris retention by RPV internal water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Yu; Yamano, Norihiro; Moriyama, Kiyofumi; Park, Hyun Sun; Kudo, Tamotsu; Yang, Yanhua; Sugimoto, Jun

    1999-01-01

    In-vessel debris coolability experiments were performed in ALPHA program at JAERI. Molten aluminum oxide (Al 2 O 3 ) was poured into a pool of water in a lower head experimental vessel. Post-test observation and measurement using an ultrasonic technique indicated the formation of the interfacial gap between the solidified Al 2 O 3 and the vessel wall. Thermal responses of the vessel wall implied that the interfacial gap acted initially as a thermal resistance and water subsequently penetrated into the interfacial gap. The maximum heat flux at the inner surface of the vessel facing to the solidified Al 2 O 3 was roughly evaluated to be ranged from 320 kW/m 2 to 600 kW/m 2 . A post-test analysis was conducted with CAMP code. The influence of the interfacial gap on thermal behavior of Al 2 O 3 and the vessel wall was examined. (authors)

  8. 1st International Conference on Hydraulic Design in Water Resources Engineering : Channels and Channel Control Structures

    CERN Document Server

    1984-01-01

    The development of water resources has proceeded at an amazing speed around the world in the last few decades. The hydraulic engineer has played his part: in constructing much larger artificial channels than ever before, larger and more sophisticated control structures, and systems of irrigation, drainage and water supply channels in which the flow by its nature is complex and unsteady requiring computer-based techniques at both the design and operation stage. It seemed appropriate to look briefly at some of the developments in hydraulic design resulting from this situation. Hence the idea of the Conference was formed. The Proceedings of the Conference show that hydraulic engineers have been able to acquire a very substantial base of design capability from the experience of the period referred to. The most outstanding development to have occurred is in the combination of physical and mathematical modelling, which in hydraulic engineering has followed a parallel path to that in other branches of engineering sc...

  9. On the necessity for evaluation of the limits of radioactive waste disposal into water systems of international importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gedeonov, L.I.; Blinov, V.A.; Gustova, L.I.; Ivanova, L.M.; Lazarev, L.N.; Vakulovskij, S.M.; Chumichev, V.B.; Rakov, N.A.

    1977-01-01

    The paper considers the IAEA criteria for determination of the concept of high-level radioactive waste, the disposal of which into the oceans is forbidden according to the London Convention of 1972. It is proposed that this concept be revised every five years, using the experience which may be acquired from the present practice of disposal in the Atlantic. Data on the assessment of global fallout quantities introduced into the Atlantic and on the dilution of contamination in its waters are given. The problem is discussed of the principles of international collaboration in accepting limiting rates of disposal into water systems of international importance. It is shown that in the Irish Sea and the North Sea sources of radioactive contamination have arisen which are dangerous for the Baltic. Co-operative research of the Baltic within the CEC framework is reported. A review and evaluation of radiation conditions and their trends in the Baltic Sea is given. The problem of mutual co-operation in limiting radioactive pollution of the Danube between countries in the Danube Catchment Area is discussed. A review and a forecast of trends of radiation conditions in the Danube area are given. (author)

  10. Effect of Curing Environment on the Performance Properties of Saltstone - 13335

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reigel, Marissa M.; Pickenheim, Bradley R.; Daniel, William E.

    2013-01-01

    At the Savannah River Site (SRS), the low level radioactive waste (LLW) salt solution is immobilized as a cementitious waste form known as Saltstone. Depending on the Saltstone formulation, disposal unit size, environmental conditions and pour schedule, the waste form temperature, due to exothermic hydration reactions, can gradually increase by 30 deg. C to 50 deg. C above the starting temperature. Previous studies at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) have shown that curing temperature has a negative impact on the hydraulic conductivity and other performance properties of Saltstone; specifically, these studies have shown that curing at elevated temperatures results in faster hydraulic conductivities than what is modeled in the Saltstone Performance Assessment (PA). SRNL is currently testing the performance of laboratory prepared Saltstone cured under controlled conditions (i.e. controlling relative humidity). The PA assumes that the Saltstone remains saturated; therefore, some samples are being kept completely saturated while others have a surface exposed to a high humidity environment. The formulation of these samples has been varied to continue studying the impact of processing parameters on the performance properties of Saltstone. The final water to premix (w/p) ratio of the Saltstone formulation does affect the density, porosity, and compressive strength of the cured Saltstone. The Saltstone formulations with 0.59 w/p ratios and lower had higher densities, lower porosities, and higher compressive strength than samples formulated at a higher w/p ratio. There is a general trend that the samples formulated at high w/p ratios (0.67 and higher) have the lowest density, highest porosity and lowest strength. However, for hydraulic conductivity, the curing environment had a greater effect on the results than the formulation. Therefore, the impact of elevated temperature is not as detrimental to the performance of the waste form as originally concluded, provided

  11. International experience and status of fuel element performance and modelling for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gittus, J.H.

    1982-04-01

    Current knowledge concerning water reactor fuel performance and technology is reviewed (212 references). The emphasis is on aspects of in-reactor performance including behaviour in accidents. Computer models for predicting fuel behaviour during the ordinary running of the reactor and during accidents are described. These codes include COMETHE, HOTROD, SLEUTH-SEER and FRAPCON. Their agreement with experimental data is examined. (U.K.)

  12. Light curing through glass ceramics with a second- and a third-generation LED curing unit: effect of curing mode on the degree of conversion of dual-curing resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Lussi, Adrian; Hickel, Reinhard; Ilie, Nicoleta

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the degree of conversion (DC) of five dual-curing resin cements after different curing modes with a second- and a third-generation light-emitting diode (LED) curing unit. Additionally, irradiance of both light curing units was measured at increasing distances and through discs of two glass ceramics for computer-aided design/manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Irradiance and spectra of the Elipar FreeLight 2 (Standard Mode (SM)) and of the VALO light curing unit (High Power Mode (HPM) and Xtra Power Mode (XPM)) were measured with a MARC radiometer. Irradiance was measured at increasing distances (control) and through discs (1.5 to 6 mm thickness) of IPS Empress CAD and IPS e.max CAD. DC of Panavia F2.0, RelyX Unicem 2 Automix, SpeedCEM, BisCem, and BeautiCem SA was measured with an attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectrometer when self-cured (negative control) or light cured in SM for 40 s, HPM for 32 s, or XPM for 18 s. Light curing was performed directly (positive control) or through discs of either 1.5- or 3-mm thickness of IPS Empress CAD or IPS e.max CAD. DC was analysed with Kruskal-Wallis tests followed by pairwise Wilcoxon rank sum tests (α = 0.05). Maximum irradiances were 1,545 mW/cm(2) (SM), 2,179 mW/cm(2) (HPM), and 4,156 mW/cm(2) (XPM), and all irradiances decreased by >80 % through discs of 1.5 mm, ≥95 % through 3 mm, and up to >99 % through 6 mm. Generally, self-curing resulted in the lowest DC. For some cements, direct light curing did not result in higher DC compared to when light cured through ceramic discs. For other cements, light curing through ceramic discs of 3 mm generally reduced DC. Light curing was favourable for dual-curing cements. Some cements were more susceptible to variations in curing mode than others. When light curing a given cement, the higher irradiances of the third-generation LED curing unit resulted in similar DC compared to the second-generation one, though at shorter

  13. Stress Corrosion Evaluation of Various Metallic Materials for the International Space Station Water Recycling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, P. D.

    2015-01-01

    A stress corrosion evaluation was performed on Inconel 625, Hastelloy C276, titanium commercially pure (TiCP), Ti-6Al-4V, Ti-6Al-4V extra low interstitial, and Cronidur 30 steel as a consequence of a change in formulation of the pretreatment for processing the urine in the International Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Urine Processing Assembly from a sulfuric acid-based to a phosphoric acid-based solution. The first five listed were found resistant to stress corrosion in the pretreatment and brine. However, some of the Cronidur 30 specimens experienced reduction in load-carrying ability.

  14. Dismantling of JPDR internals using under water plasma arc cutting technique operated by robotic manipulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yanagihara, S.; Asida, S.; Usui, H.

    1989-01-01

    Technology of underwater plasma cutting and design of robotic manipulator, successfully used for the dismantling of Japanese power demonstration JPDR reactor internals are considered. Of all time consumption which was 882 man-days, the 124 man-days were spent for preparation, 220 - for equipment mounting, 368 - for dismantling, 89 - for equipment disassembling and 81 - for decontamination. Labour consumption for dismantling of 1 t of the structures constituted 2200 man-days. Total dose of personnel irradiation does not exceed 0.05 R (10 -4 Sv)

  15. Electron beam curing of polymer matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janke, C.J.; Wheeler, D.; Saunders, C.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of the CRADA was to conduct research and development activities to better understand and utilize the electron beam PMC curing technology. This technology will be used to replace or supplement existing PMC thermal curing processes in Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Programs (DP) projects and American aircraft and aerospace industries. This effort involved Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc./Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corp. (Contractor), Sandia National Laboratories, and ten industrial Participants including four major aircraft and aerospace companies, three advanced materials companies, and three electron beam processing organizations. The technical objective of the CRADA was to synthesize and/or modify high performance, electron beam curable materials that meet specific end-use application requirements. There were six tasks in this CRADA including: Electron beam materials development; Electron beam database development; Economic analysis; Low-cost Electron Beam tooling development; Electron beam curing systems integration; and Demonstration articles/prototype structures development. The contractor managed, participated and integrated all the tasks, and optimized the project efforts through the coordination, exchange, and dissemination of information to the project participants. Members of the Contractor team were also the principal inventors on several electron beam related patents and a 1997 R and D 100 Award winner on Electron-Beam-Curable Cationic Epoxy Resins. The CRADA achieved a major breakthrough for the composites industry by having successfully developed high-performance electron beam curable cationic epoxy resins for use in composites, adhesives, tooling compounds, potting compounds, syntactic foams, etc. UCB Chemicals, the world's largest supplier of radiation-curable polymers, has acquired a license to produce and sell these resins worldwide

  16. A perspective on "cure" for Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Angus John; Abdala Sheikh, Ana Paula

    2018-04-02

    The reversal of the Rett syndrome disease process in the Mecp2 mouse model of Guy et al. (2007) has motivated families and researchers to work on this condition. The reversibility in adult mice suggests that there is potentially much to be gained from rational treatments applied to patients of any age. However, it may be difficult to strike the right balance between enthusiasm on the one hand and realism on the other. One effect of this has been a fragmentation of the "Rett syndrome community" with some groups giving priority to work aimed at a cure while fewer resources are devoted to medical or therapy-based interventions to enhance the quality of life of affected patients or provide support for their families.Several possible therapeutic approaches are under development that, it is claimed and hoped, may lead to a "cure" for patients with Rett syndrome. While all have a rationale, there are potential obstacles to each being both safe and effective. Furthermore, any strategy that succeeded in restoring normal levels of MECP2 gene expression throughout the brain carries potential pitfalls, so that it will be of crucial importance to introduce any clinical trials of such therapies with great care.Expectations of families for a radical, rational treatment should not be inflated beyond a cautious optimism. This is particularly because affected patients with us now may not be able to reap the full benefits of a "cure". Thus, interventions aimed at enhancing the quality of life of affected patients should not be forgone and their importance should not be minimised.

  17. Curing of Thick Thermoset Composite Laminates: Multiphysics Modeling and Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anandan, S.; Dhaliwal, G. S.; Huo, Z.; Chandrashekhara, K.; Apetre, N.; Iyyer, N.

    2017-11-01

    Fiber reinforced polymer composites are used in high-performance aerospace applications as they are resistant to fatigue, corrosion free and possess high specific strength. The mechanical properties of these composite components depend on the degree of cure and residual stresses developed during the curing process. While these parameters are difficult to determine experimentally in large and complex parts, they can be simulated using numerical models in a cost-effective manner. These simulations can be used to develop cure cycles and change processing parameters to obtain high-quality parts. In the current work, a numerical model was built in Comsol MultiPhysics to simulate the cure behavior of a carbon/epoxy prepreg system (IM7/Cycom 5320-1). A thermal spike was observed in thick laminates when the recommended cure cycle was used. The cure cycle was modified to reduce the thermal spike and maintain the degree of cure at the laminate center. A parametric study was performed to evaluate the effect of air flow in the oven, post cure cycles and cure temperatures on the thermal spike and the resultant degree of cure in the laminate.

  18. The International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH): reflecting on 60 years of contributions to groundwater science and water management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Struckmeier, Willi; Howard, Ken; Chilton, John

    2016-08-01

    The 60th anniversary of the founding of the International Association of Hydrogeologists (IAH) is an important milestone that allows pause for reflection on how the association has evolved over the years and the contributions it has made to groundwater science and water management. IAH was founded in 1956 at the 20th International Geological Congress and developed rapidly during the 1980s and 1990s in response to a growing global interest in groundwater mapping and in sound approaches to resource protection and sustainable aquifer management. Incorporated in 2000, IAH has now secured its position as the world's leading international association specialising in groundwater with over 4,100 members in 131 countries. Much credit for this success must go to members, past and present, whose individual efforts and collaboration with sister institutions are documented here. These members have shaped the association's goals and contributed selflessly to its scientific programmes, publications and educational and charitable activities. Looking ahead to the next 60 years, it is essential that IAH does not rest on past achievements but listens and adjusts to the needs of members while continuing to pursue its mission of furthering the understanding, wise use and protection of groundwater resources throughout the world.

  19. HIV Infection: Advances Toward a Cure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douek, Daniel C

    2018-04-01

    Achieving cure of HIV infection requires eliminating all replication-competent virus from the reservoir of latently infected cells or completely inhibiting infected cells from emerging from latency. Strategies include very early use of antiretroviral therapy; hematopoietic stem cell transplantation; "shock-and-kill" approaches; immune therapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors; gene therapy, including use of CC chemokine receptor 5-modified CD4+ T cells; and broadly neutralizing antibody therapy. Success is likely to require a combination of approaches. This article summarizes a presentation by Daniel C. Douek, MD, PhD, at the IAS-USA continuing education program held in Berkeley, California, in May 2017.

  20. The cure for employee malaise--motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, K M; Dawson, S N

    1991-01-01

    Although working conditions, hours, pay, and advancement opportunities are better now than in the 1950s--the "golden age" of American business--today's workers are significantly less satisfied. Why? The authors believe the cause of this malaise is lack of motivation. This article examines several techniques to cure employee malaise and discusses the long-term benefits of these techniques, which include empowerment, recognition, career development, the Pygmalion effect, incentives, and rewards. By making a commitment to these motivational techniques, managers will boost the morale and enthusiasm of their employees and their organization. This motivational process is not quick and easy; developing your employees is an ongoing process.