WorldWideScience

Sample records for internal velocity dispersion

  1. Velocity Dispersions Across Bulge Types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabricius, Maximilian; Bender, Ralf; Hopp, Ulrich; Saglia, Roberto; Drory, Niv; Fisher, David

    2010-01-01

    We present first results from a long-slit spectroscopic survey of bulge kinematics in local spiral galaxies. Our optical spectra were obtained at the Hobby-Eberly Telescope with the LRS spectrograph and have a velocity resolution of 45 km/s (σ*), which allows us to resolve the velocity dispersions in the bulge regions of most objects in our sample. We find that the velocity dispersion profiles in morphological classical bulge galaxies are always centrally peaked while the velocity dispersion of morphologically disk-like bulges stays relatively flat towards the center--once strongly barred galaxies are discarded.

  2. A THEOREM ON CENTRAL VELOCITY DISPERSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Jin H.; Evans, N. Wyn

    2009-01-01

    It is shown that, if the tracer population is supported by a spherical dark halo with a core or a cusp diverging more slowly than that of a singular isothermal sphere (SIS), the logarithmic cusp slope γ of the tracers must be given exactly by γ = 2β, where β is their velocity anisotropy parameter at the center unless the same tracers are dynamically cold at the center. If the halo cusp diverges faster than that of the SIS, the velocity dispersion of the tracers must diverge at the center too. In particular, if the logarithmic halo cusp slope is larger than two, the diverging velocity dispersion also traces the behavior of the potential. The implication of our theorem on projected quantities is also discussed. We argue that our theorem should be understood as a warning against interpreting results based on simplifying assumptions such as isotropy and spherical symmetry.

  3. Velocity dispersion profiles of clusters of galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Struble, M.F.

    1979-01-01

    Velocity dispersion as a function of radius, called sigma/sub ls/ profiles, is presented for 13 clusters of galaxies having > or =30 radial velocities from both published and unpublished lists. A list of probable new members and possible outlying members for these clusters is also given. chi 2 and Kolmogoroff--Smirnoff one-sample tests for the goodness of fit of power laws to portions of the profiles indicate two significant structures in some profiles: (1) a local minimum corresponding to the local minimum noted in surface density or surface brightness profiles, and (2) a decrease in sigma/sub ls/ toward the cores. Both of these features are discussed in terms of a comparison with Wielen's N-body simulations. The sigma/sub ls/ profiles are placed in a new classification scheme which lends itself to interpreting clusters in a dynamical age sequence. The velocity field of galaxies at large distances from cluster centers is also discussed

  4. Velocity Segregation and Systematic Biases In Velocity Dispersion Estimates with the SPT-GMOS Spectroscopic Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayliss, Matthew. B.; Zengo, Kyle; Ruel, Jonathan; Benson, Bradford A.; Bleem, Lindsey E.; Bocquet, Sebastian; Bulbul, Esra; Brodwin, Mark; Capasso, Raffaella; Chiu, I.-non; McDonald, Michael; Rapetti, David; Saro, Alex; Stalder, Brian; Stark, Antony A.; Strazzullo, Veronica; Stubbs, Christopher W.; Zenteno, Alfredo

    2017-03-01

    The velocity distribution of galaxies in clusters is not universal; rather, galaxies are segregated according to their spectral type and relative luminosity. We examine the velocity distributions of different populations of galaxies within 89 Sunyaev Zel’dovich (SZ) selected galaxy clusters spanning 0.28GMOS spectroscopic survey, supplemented by additional published spectroscopy, resulting in a final spectroscopic sample of 4148 galaxy spectra—2868 cluster members. The velocity dispersion of star-forming cluster galaxies is 17 ± 4% greater than that of passive cluster galaxies, and the velocity dispersion of bright (m< {m}* -0.5) cluster galaxies is 11 ± 4% lower than the velocity dispersion of our total member population. We find good agreement with simulations regarding the shape of the relationship between the measured velocity dispersion and the fraction of passive versus star-forming galaxies used to measure it, but we find a small offset between this relationship as measured in data and simulations, which suggests that our dispersions are systematically low by as much as 3% relative to simulations. We argue that this offset could be interpreted as a measurement of the effective velocity bias that describes the ratio of our observed velocity dispersions and the intrinsic velocity dispersion of dark matter particles in a published simulation result. Measuring velocity bias in this way suggests that large spectroscopic surveys can improve dispersion-based mass-observable scaling relations for cosmology even in the face of velocity biases, by quantifying and ultimately calibrating them out.

  5. Evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banik, Nilanjan; Sikivie, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    We found that the infall of cold dark matter onto a galaxy produces cold collisionless flows and caustics in its halo. If a signal is found in the cavity detector of dark matter axions, the flows will be readily apparent as peaks in the energy spectrum of photons from axion conversion, allowing the densities, velocity vectors and velocity dispersions of the flows to be determined. We also discuss the evolution of velocity dispersion along cold collisionless flows in one and two dimensions. A technique is presented for obtaining the leading behaviour of the velocity dispersion near caustics. The results are used to derive an upper limit on the energy dispersion of the Big Flow from the sharpness of its nearby caustic, and a prediction for the dispersions in its velocity components

  6. Velocity Dispersion of Ionized Gas and Multiple Supernova Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasiliev E. O.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We use 3D numerical simulations to study the evolution of the Hα intensity and velocity dispersion for single and multiple supernova (SN explosions. We find that the IHα– σ diagram obtained for simulated gas flows is similar in shape to that observed in dwarf galaxies. We conclude that colliding SN shells with significant difference in age are responsible for high velocity dispersion that reaches up to ≳ 100 km s−1. Such a high velocity dispersion could be hardly obtained for a single SN remnant. Peaks of velocity dispersion in the IHα– σ diagram may correspond to several isolated or merged SN remnants with moderately different ages. Degrading the spatial resolution in the Hα intensity and velocity dispersion maps makes the simulated IHα– σ diagrams close to those observed in dwarf galaxies not only in shape, but also quantitatively.

  7. Attenuation and velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Langqiu

    In an anelastic medium, seismic waves are distorted by attenuation and velocity dispersion, which depend on petrophysical properties of reservoir rocks. The effective attenuation and velocity dispersion is a combination of intrinsic attenuation and apparent attenuation due to scattering, transmission response, and data acquisition system. Velocity dispersion is usually neglected in seismic data processing partly because of insufficient observations in the exploration seismic frequency band. This thesis investigates the methods of measuring velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band and interprets the velocity dispersion data in terms of petrophysical properties. Broadband, uncorrelated vibrator data are suitable for measuring velocity dispersion in the exploration seismic frequency band, and a broad bandwidth optimizes the observability of velocity dispersion. Four methods of measuring velocity dispersion in uncorrelated vibrator VSP data are investigated, which are the sliding window crosscorrelation (SWCC) method, the instantaneous phase method, the spectral decomposition method, and the cross spectrum method. Among them, the SWCC method is a new method and has satisfactory robustness, accuracy, and efficiency. Using the SWCC method, velocity dispersion is measured in the uncorrelated vibrator VSP data from three areas with different geological settings, i.e., Mallik gas hydrate zone, McArthur River uranium mines, and Outokumpu crystalline rocks. The observed velocity dispersion is fitted to a straight line with respect to log frequency for a constant (frequency-independent) Q value. This provides an alternative method for calculating Q. A constant Q value does not directly link to petrophysical properties. A modeling study is implemented for the Mallik and McArthur River data to interpret the velocity dispersion observations in terms of petrophysical properties. The detailed multi-parameter petrophysical reservoir models are built according to

  8. Accurate Recovery of H i Velocity Dispersion from Radio Interferometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ianjamasimanana, R. [Max-Planck Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Blok, W. J. G. de [Netherlands Institute for Radio Astronomy (ASTRON), Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Heald, George H., E-mail: roger@mpia.de, E-mail: blok@astron.nl, E-mail: George.Heald@csiro.au [Kapteyn Astronomical Institute, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 800, 9700 AV, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2017-05-01

    Gas velocity dispersion measures the amount of disordered motion of a rotating disk. Accurate estimates of this parameter are of the utmost importance because the parameter is directly linked to disk stability and star formation. A global measure of the gas velocity dispersion can be inferred from the width of the atomic hydrogen (H i) 21 cm line. We explore how several systematic effects involved in the production of H i cubes affect the estimate of H i velocity dispersion. We do so by comparing the H i velocity dispersion derived from different types of data cubes provided by The H i Nearby Galaxy Survey. We find that residual-scaled cubes best recover the H i velocity dispersion, independent of the weighting scheme used and for a large range of signal-to-noise ratio. For H i observations, where the dirty beam is substantially different from a Gaussian, the velocity dispersion values are overestimated unless the cubes are cleaned close to (e.g., ∼1.5 times) the noise level.

  9. Calibrating the Planck Cluster Mass Scale with Cluster Velocity Dispersions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amodeo, Stefania; Mei, Simona; Stanford, Spencer A.; Bartlett, James G.; Melin, Jean-Baptiste; Lawrence, Charles R.; Chary, Ranga-Ram; Shim, Hyunjin; Marleau, Francine; Stern, Daniel

    2017-08-01

    We measure the Planck cluster mass bias using dynamical mass measurements based on velocity dispersions of a subsample of 17 Planck-detected clusters. The velocity dispersions were calculated using redshifts determined from spectra that were obtained at the Gemini observatory with the GMOS multi-object spectrograph. We correct our estimates for effects due to finite aperture, Eddington bias, and correlated scatter between velocity dispersion and the Planck mass proxy. The result for the mass bias parameter, (1-b), depends on the value of the galaxy velocity bias, {b}{{v}}, adopted from simulations: (1-b)=(0.51+/- 0.09){b}{{v}}3. Using a velocity bias of {b}{{v}}=1.08 from Munari et al., we obtain (1-b)=0.64+/- 0.11, I.e., an error of 17% on the mass bias measurement with 17 clusters. This mass bias value is consistent with most previous weak-lensing determinations. It lies within 1σ of the value that is needed to reconcile the Planck cluster counts with the Planck primary cosmic microwave background constraints. We emphasize that uncertainty in the velocity bias severely hampers the precision of the measurements of the mass bias using velocity dispersions. On the other hand, when we fix the Planck mass bias using the constraints from Penna-Lima et al., based on weak-lensing measurements, we obtain a positive velocity bias of {b}{{v}}≳ 0.9 at 3σ .

  10. Illumination Profile & Dispersion Variation Effects on Radial Velocity Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieves, Nolan; Ge, Jian; Thomas, Neil B.; Ma, Bo; Li, Rui; SDSS-III

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-object APO Radial-Velocity Exoplanet Large-Area Survey (MARVELS) measures radial velocities using a fiber-fed dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) with a moderate dispersion spectrograph. This setup allows a unique insight into the 2D illumination profile from the fiber on to the dispersion grating. Illumination profile investigations show large changes in the profile over time and fiber location. These profile changes are correlated with dispersion changes and long-term radial velocity offsets, a major problem within the MARVELS radial velocity data. Characterizing illumination profiles creates a method to both detect and correct radial velocity offsets, allowing for better planet detection. Here we report our early results from this study including improvement of radial velocity data points from detected giant planet candidates. We also report an illumination profile experiment conducted at the Kitt Peak National Observatory using the EXPERT instrument, which has a DFDI mode similar to MARVELS. Using profile controlling octagonal-shaped fibers, long term offsets over a 3 month time period were reduced from ~50 m/s to within the photon limit of ~4 m/s.

  11. Dispersion of acoustic surface waves by velocity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, S. D.; Kim, H. C.

    1987-10-01

    The perturbation theory of Auld [Acoustic Fields and Waves in Solids (Wiley, New York, 1973), Vol. II, p. 294], which describes the effect of a subsurface gradient on the velocity dispersion of surface waves, has been modified to a simpler form by an approximation using a newly defined velocity gradient for the case of isotropic materials. The modified theory is applied to nitrogen implantation in AISI 4140 steel with a velocity gradient of Gaussian profile, and compared with dispersion data obtained by the ultrasonic right-angle technique in the frequency range from 2.4 to 14.8 MHz. The good agreement between experiments and our theory suggests that the compound layer in the subsurface region plays a dominant role in causing the dispersion of acoustic surface waves.

  12. Dispersion upscaling from a pore scale characterization of Lagrangian velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turuban, Régis; de Anna, Pietro; Jiménez-Martínez, Joaquín; Tabuteau, Hervé; Méheust, Yves; Le Borgne, Tanguy

    2013-04-01

    Mixing and reactive transport are primarily controlled by the interplay between diffusion, advection and reaction at pore scale. Yet, how the distribution and spatial correlation of the velocity field at pore scale impact these processes is still an open question. Here we present an experimental investigation of the distribution and correlation of pore scale velocities and its relation with upscaled dispersion. We use a quasi two-dimensional (2D) horizontal set up, consisting of two glass plates filled with cylinders representing the grains of the porous medium : the cell is built by soft lithography technique, wich allows for full control of the system geometry. The local velocity field is quantified from particle tracking velocimetry using microspheres that are advected with the pore scale flow. Their displacement is purely advective, as the particle size is chosen large enough to avoid diffusion. We thus obtain particle trajectories as well as lagrangian velocities in the entire system. The measured velocity field shows the existence of a network of preferential flow paths in channels with high velocities, as well as very low velocity in stagnation zones, with a non Gaussian distribution. Lagrangian velocities are long range correlated in time, which implies a non-fickian scaling of the longitudinal variance of particle positions. To upscale this process we develop an effective transport model, based on correlated continous time random walk, which is entirely parametrized by the pore scale velocity distribution and correlation. The model predictions are compared with conservative tracer test data for different Peclet numbers. Furthermore, we investigate the impact of different pore geometries on the distribution and correlation of Lagrangian velocities and we discuss the link between these properties and the effective dispersion behavior.

  13. Age--velocity-dispersion relation in the solar neighborhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlberg, R.G.; Dawson, P.C.; Hsu, T.; VandenBerg, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    The age--velocity-dispersion relation for stars in the solar neighborhood is examined as an indicator of the dominant acceleration mechanism of the stars and the formation history of the local disk. Twarog's sample of F stars, for which ages and photometric distances can be determined, is combined with astrometric data to obtain tangential velocities of a set of stars with a large age range. The resulting age--velocity-dispersion relation rises fairly steeply for stars less than 6 Gyr old, thereafter becoming nearly constant with age. These data are consistent with a simple model in which no local disk is initially present, following which stars are born at a constant rate in time and heated by transient spiral waves. The corresponding age-metallicity relation complements this dynamical measure of the formation history of the disk. The use of new stellar models and a revised metallicity calibration leads to quantitative differences from previous work

  14. Stellar Velocity Dispersion: Linking Quiescent Galaxies to their Dark Matter Halos

    OpenAIRE

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J.

    2018-01-01

    We analyze the Illustris-1 hydrodynamical cosmological simulation to explore the stellar velocity dispersion of quiescent galaxies as an observational probe of dark matter halo velocity dispersion and mass. Stellar velocity dispersion is proportional to dark matter halo velocity dispersion for both central and satellite galaxies. The dark matter halos of central galaxies are in virial equilibrium and thus the stellar velocity dispersion is also proportional to dark matter halo mass. This prop...

  15. The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio of the Sculptor dwarf galaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armandroff, T. E.; Da Costa, G. S.

    1986-01-01

    The radial velocity, velocity dispersion, and mass-to-light ratio for 16 K giants in the Sculptor dwarf galaxy are calculated. Spectra at the Ca II triplet are analyzed using cross-correlation techniques in order to obtain the mean velocity of + 107.4 + or - 2.0 km/s. The dimensional velocity dispersion estimated as 6.3 (+1.1, -1.3) km/s is combined with the calculated core radius and observed central surface brightness to produce a mass-to-light ratio of 6.0 in solar units. It is noted that the data indicate that the Sculptor contains a large amount of mass not found in globular clusters, and the mass is either in the form of remnant stars or low-mass dwarfs.

  16. Seismic wave attenuation and velocity dispersion in UAE carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogunsami, Abdulwaheed Remi

    Interpreting the seismic property of fluids in hydrocarbon reservoirs at low frequency scale has been a cherished goal of petroleum geophysics research for decades. Lately, there has been tremendous interest in understanding attenuation as a result of fluid flow in porous media. Although interesting, the emerging experimental and theoretical information still remain ambiguous and are practically not utilized for reasons not too obscure. Attenuation is frequency dependent and hard to measure in the laboratory at low frequency. This thesis describes and reports the results of an experimental study of low frequency attenuation and velocity dispersion on a selected carbonate reservoir samples in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). For the low frequency measurements, stress-strain method was used to measure the moduli from which the velocity is derived. Attenuation was measured as the phase difference between the applied stress and the strain. For the ultrasonic component, the pulse propagation method was employed. To study the fluid effect especially at reservoir in situ conditions, the measurements were made dry and saturated with liquid butane and brine at differential pressures of up to 5000 psi with pore pressure held constant at 500 psi. Similarly to what has been documented in the literatures for sandstone, attenuation of the bulk compressibility mode dominates the losses in these dry and somewhat partially saturated carbonate samples with butane and brine. Overall, the observed attenuation cannot be simply said to be frequency dependent within this low seismic band. While attenuation seems to be practically constant in the low frequency band for sample 3H, such conclusion cannot be made for sample 7H. For the velocities, significant dispersion is observed and Gassmann generally fails to match the measured velocities. Only the squirt model fairly fits the velocities, but not at all pressures. Although the observed dispersion is larger than Biot's prediction, the fact

  17. Velocity and Dispersion for a Two-Dimensional Random Walk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jinghui

    2009-01-01

    In the paper, we consider the transport of a two-dimensional random walk. The velocity and the dispersion of this two-dimensional random walk are derived. It mainly show that: (i) by controlling the values of the transition rates, the direction of the random walk can be reversed; (ii) for some suitably selected transition rates, our two-dimensional random walk can be efficient in comparison with the one-dimensional random walk. Our work is motivated in part by the challenge to explain the unidirectional transport of motor proteins. When the motor proteins move at the turn points of their tracks (i.e., the cytoskeleton filaments and the DNA molecular tubes), some of our results in this paper can be used to deal with the problem. (general)

  18. Shear wave crustal velocity model of the Western Bohemian Massif from Love wave phase velocity dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Málek, Jiří; Brokešová, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 1 (2011), s. 81-104 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460602; GA AV ČR IAA300460705; GA ČR(CZ) GA205/06/1780 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : love waves * phase velocity dispersion * frequency-time analysis Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 1.326, year: 2011 www.springerlink.com/content/w3149233l60111t1/

  19. Stellar Velocity Dispersion: Linking Quiescent Galaxies to Their Dark Matter Halos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahid, H. Jabran; Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J.

    2018-06-01

    We analyze the Illustris-1 hydrodynamical cosmological simulation to explore the stellar velocity dispersion of quiescent galaxies as an observational probe of dark matter halo velocity dispersion and mass. Stellar velocity dispersion is proportional to dark matter halo velocity dispersion for both central and satellite galaxies. The dark matter halos of central galaxies are in virial equilibrium and thus the stellar velocity dispersion is also proportional to dark matter halo mass. This proportionality holds even when a line-of-sight aperture dispersion is calculated in analogy to observations. In contrast, at a given stellar velocity dispersion, the dark matter halo mass of satellite galaxies is smaller than virial equilibrium expectations. This deviation from virial equilibrium probably results from tidal stripping of the outer dark matter halo. Stellar velocity dispersion appears insensitive to tidal effects and thus reflects the correlation between stellar velocity dispersion and dark matter halo mass prior to infall. There is a tight relation (≲0.2 dex scatter) between line-of-sight aperture stellar velocity dispersion and dark matter halo mass suggesting that the dark matter halo mass may be estimated from the measured stellar velocity dispersion for both central and satellite galaxies. We evaluate the impact of treating all objects as central galaxies if the relation we derive is applied to a statistical ensemble. A large fraction (≳2/3) of massive quiescent galaxies are central galaxies and systematic uncertainty in the inferred dark matter halo mass is ≲0.1 dex thus simplifying application of the simulation results to currently available observations.

  20. The Dynamics of M15: Observations of the Velocity Dispersion Profile and Fokker-Planck Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dull, J. D.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Murphy, B. W.; Seitzer, P. O.; Callanan, P. J.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Charles, P. A.

    1997-05-01

    We report a new measurement of the velocity dispersion profile within 1' (3 pc) of the center of the globular cluster M15 (NGC 7078), using long-slit spectra from the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope at La Palma Observatory. We obtained spatially resolved spectra for a total of 23 slit positions during two observing runs. During each run, a set of parallel slit positions was used to map out the central region of the cluster; the position angle used during the second run was orthogonal to that used for the first. The spectra are centered in wavelength near the Ca II infrared triplet at 8650 Å, with a spectral range of about 450 Å. We determined radial velocities by cross-correlation techniques for 131 cluster members. A total of 32 stars were observed more than once. Internal and external comparisons indicate a velocity accuracy of about 4 km s-1. The velocity dispersion profile rises from about σ = 7.2 +/- 1.4 km s-1 near 1' from the center of the cluster to σ = 13.9 +/- 1.8 km s-1 at 20". Inside of 20", the dispersion remains approximately constant at about 10.2 +/- 1.4 km s-1 with no evidence for a sharp rise near the center. This last result stands in contrast with that of Peterson, Seitzer, & Cudworth who found a central velocity dispersion of 25 +/- 7 km s-1, based on a line-broadening measurement. Our velocity dispersion profile is in good agreement with those determined in the recent studies of Gebhardt et al. and Dubath & Meylan. We have developed a new set of Fokker-Planck models and have fitted these to the surface brightness and velocity dispersion profiles of M15. We also use the two measured millisecond pulsar accelerations as constraints. The best-fitting model has a mass function slope of x = 0.9 (where 1.35 is the slope of the Salpeter mass function) and a total mass of 4.9 × 105 M⊙. This model contains approximately 104 neutron stars (3% of the total mass), the majority of which lie within 6" (0.2 pc) of the cluster center. Since the

  1. Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column by radiotracer residence time distribution analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Din, Ghiyas Ud; Chughtai, Imran Rafiq; Inayat, Mansoor Hameed; Khan, Iqbal Hussain

    2008-12-01

    Axial dispersion, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase have been investigated for a range of dispersed and continuous phase superficial velocities in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer residence time distribution (RTD) analysis. Axial dispersion model (ADM) was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of the system. It has been observed that increase in dispersed phase superficial velocity results in a decrease in its axial dispersion and increase in its slip velocity while its holdup increases till a maximum asymptotic value is achieved. An increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase increases the axial dispersion and holdup of dispersed phase until a maximum value is obtained, while slip velocity of dispersed phase is found to decrease in the beginning and then it increases with increase in superficial velocity of continuous phase.

  2. The BRAVE Program. I. Improved Bulge Stellar Velocity Dispersion Estimates for a Sample of Active Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batiste, Merida; Bentz, Misty C.; Manne-Nicholas, Emily R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, 25 Park Place, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Onken, Christopher A. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Bershady, Matthew A., E-mail: batiste@astro.gsu.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2017-02-01

    We present new bulge stellar velocity dispersion measurements for 10 active galaxies with secure M {sub BH} determinations from reverberation mapping. These new velocity dispersion measurements are based on spatially resolved kinematics from integral-field (IFU) spectroscopy. In all but one case, the field of view of the IFU extends beyond the effective radius of the galaxy, and in the case of Mrk 79 it extends to almost one half the effective radius. This combination of spatial resolution and field of view allows for secure determinations of stellar velocity dispersion within the effective radius for all 10 target galaxies. Spatially resolved maps of the first ( V ) and second ( σ {sub ⋆}) moments of the line of sight velocity distribution indicate the presence of kinematic substructure in most cases. In future projects we plan to explore methods of correcting for the effects of kinematic substructure in the derived bulge stellar velocity dispersion measurements.

  3. Implication of Broadband Dispersion Measurements in Constraining Upper Mantle Velocity Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuponiyi, A.; Kao, H.; Cassidy, J. F.; Darbyshire, F. A.; Dosso, S. E.; Gosselin, J. M.; Spence, G.

    2017-12-01

    Dispersion measurements from earthquake (EQ) data are traditionally inverted to obtain 1-D shear-wave velocity models, which provide information on deep earth structures. However, in many cases, EQ-derived dispersion measurements lack short-period information, which theoretically should provide details of shallow structures. We show that in at least some cases short-period information, such as can be obtained from ambient seismic noise (ASN) processing, must be combined with EQ dispersion measurements to properly constrain deeper (e.g. upper-mantle) structures. To verify this, synthetic dispersion data are generated using hypothetical velocity models under four scenarios: EQ only (with and without deep low-velocity layers) and combined EQ and ASN data (with and without deep low-velocity layers). The now "broadband" dispersion data are inverted using a trans-dimensional Bayesian framework with the aim of recovering the initial velocity models and assessing uncertainties. Our results show that the deep low-velocity layer could only be recovered from the inversion of the combined ASN-EQ dispersion measurements. Given this result, we proceed to describe a method for obtaining reliable broadband dispersion measurements from both ASN and EQ and show examples for real data. The implication of this study in the characterization of lithospheric and upper mantle structures, such as the Lithosphere-Asthenosphere Boundary (LAB), is also discussed.

  4. Propagation of the Semidiurnal Internal Tide: Phase Velocity Versus Group Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhongxiang

    2017-12-01

    The superposition of two waves of slightly different wavelengths has long been used to illustrate the distinction between phase velocity and group velocity. The first-mode M2 and S2 internal tides exemplify such a two-wave model in the natural ocean. The M2 and S2 tidal frequencies are 1.932 and 2 cycles per day, respectively, and their superposition forms a spring-neap cycle in the semidiurnal band. The spring-neap cycle acts like a wave, with its frequency, wave number, and phase being the differences of the M2 and S2 internal tides. The spring-neap cycle and energy of the semidiurnal internal tide propagate at the group velocity. Long-range propagation of M2 and S2 internal tides in the North Pacific is observed by satellite altimetry. Along a 3,400 km beam spanning 24°-54°N, the M2 and S2 travel times are 10.9 and 11.2 days, respectively. For comparison, it takes the spring-neap cycle 21.1 days to travel over this distance. Spatial maps of the M2 phase velocity, the S2 phase velocity, and the group velocity are determined from phase gradients of the corresponding satellite observed internal tide fields. The observed phase and group velocities agree with theoretical values estimated using the World Ocean Atlas 2013 annual-mean ocean stratification.

  5. Slow light with low group-velocity dispersion at the edge of photonic graphene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ouyang Chunfang; Dong Biqin; Liu Xiaohan; Zi Jian [Department of Physics, Key Laboratory of Micro- and Nanophotonic Structures, Ministry of Education, and Key Laboratory of Surface Physics, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Xiong Zhiqiang; Zhao Fangyuan; Hu Xinhua [Department of Material Science and Laboratory of Advanced Materials, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-07-15

    We theoretically study the light propagation at the zigzag edges of a honeycomb photonic crystal (PC), or photonic graphene. It is found that the corresponding edge states have a sinusoidal dispersion similar to those found in PC coupled resonator optical waveguides [CROWs; M. Notomi et al., Nature Photon. 2, 741 (2008)]. The sinusoidal dispersion curve can be made very flat by carefully tuning edge parameters. As a result, low group velocity and small group velocity dispersion can be simultaneously obtained for light propagating at the zigzag edge of photonic graphene. Compared with PC CROWs, our slow-light system exhibits no intrinsic radiation loss and has a larger group velocity bandwidth product. Our results could find applications in on-chip optical buffers and enhanced light-matter interaction.

  6. Modeling non-Fickian dispersion by use of the velocity PDF on the pore scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooshapur, Sheema; Manhart, Michael

    2015-04-01

    For obtaining a description of reactive flows in porous media, apart from the geometrical complications of resolving the velocities and scalar values, one has to deal with the additional reactive term in the transport equation. An accurate description of the interface of the reacting fluids - which is strongly influenced by dispersion- is essential for resolving this term. In REV-based simulations the reactive term needs to be modeled taking sub-REV fluctuations and possibly non-Fickian dispersion into account. Non-Fickian dispersion has been observed in strongly heterogeneous domains and in early phases of transport. A fully resolved solution of the Navier-Stokes and transport equations which yields a detailed description of the flow properties, dispersion, interfaces of fluids, etc. however, is not practical for domains containing more than a few thousand grains, due to the huge computational effort required. Through Probability Density Function (PDF) based methods, the velocity distribution in the pore space can facilitate the understanding and modelling of non-Fickian dispersion [1,2]. Our aim is to model the transition between non-Fickian and Fickian dispersion in a random sphere pack within the framework of a PDF based transport model proposed by Meyer and Tchelepi [1,3]. They proposed a stochastic transport model where velocity components of tracer particles are represented by a continuous Markovian stochastic process. In addition to [3], we consider the effects of pore scale diffusion and formulate a different stochastic equation for the increments in velocity space from first principles. To assess the terms in this equation, we performed Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) for solving the Navier-Stokes equation on a random sphere pack. We extracted the PDFs and statistical moments (up to the 4th moment) of the stream-wise velocity, u, and first and second order velocity derivatives both independent and conditioned on velocity. By using this data and

  7. Application of Depth-Averaged Velocity Profile for Estimation of Longitudinal Dispersion in Rivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Givehchi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available River bed profiles and depth-averaged velocities are used as basic data in empirical and analytical equations for estimating the longitudinal dispersion coefficient which has always been a topic of great interest for researchers. The simple model proposed by Maghrebi is capable of predicting the normalized isovel contours in the cross section of rivers and channels as well as the depth-averaged velocity profiles. The required data in Maghrebi’s model are bed profile, shear stress, and roughness distributions. Comparison of depth-averaged velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients observed in the field data and those predicted by Maghrebi’s model revealed that Maghrebi’s model had an acceptable accuracy in predicting depth-averaged velocity.

  8. Ultrasonic absorption and velocity dispersion of binary mixture liquid crystal MBBA/EBBA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of phase transitions and the partial magnetic alignment for liquid crystal molecules on the ultrasonic absorption and velocity dispersion has been investigated. The binary mixture of Shiff base liquid crystals MBBA/EBBA (55:45 mole %) showed anomalous ultrasonic absorption and velocity dispersion at eutectic (Tsub(m) = -20 0 C) and clearing point (Tsub(c) = 50 0 C) at the frequency range of 5 MHz, 10MHz, 15MHz and 30 MHz. The experimental data were analyzed in terms of relaxation time and Fixman theory. The anisotropy of the propagation velocity due to the magnetic alignment was about 0.9% (the deviation between velocities propagating parallel and perpendicular to the applied field). (author)

  9. Accommodating ground water velocity uncertainties in the advection-dispersion approach to geologic nuclear waste migration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, G.F.

    1994-01-01

    This note shows how uncertainties in nearfield and farfield ground water velocities affect the inventory that migrates from a geologic nuclear waste repository within the classical advection-dispersion approach and manifest themselves through both the finite variances and covariances in the activities of transported nuclides and in the apparent scale dependence of the host rock's dispersivity. Included is a demonstration of these effects for an actinide chain released from used CANDU fuel buried in a hypothetical repository. (Author)

  10. A simple measurement method of molecular relaxation in a gas by reconstructing acoustic velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ming; Liu, Tingting; Zhang, Xiangqun; Li, Caiyun

    2018-01-01

    Recently, a decomposition method of acoustic relaxation absorption spectra was used to capture the entire molecular multimode relaxation process of gas. In this method, the acoustic attenuation and phase velocity were measured jointly based on the relaxation absorption spectra. However, fast and accurate measurements of the acoustic attenuation remain challenging. In this paper, we present a method of capturing the molecular relaxation process by only measuring acoustic velocity, without the necessity of obtaining acoustic absorption. The method is based on the fact that the frequency-dependent velocity dispersion of a multi-relaxation process in a gas is the serial connection of the dispersions of interior single-relaxation processes. Thus, one can capture the relaxation times and relaxation strengths of N decomposed single-relaxation dispersions to reconstruct the entire multi-relaxation dispersion using the measurements of acoustic velocity at 2N  +  1 frequencies. The reconstructed dispersion spectra are in good agreement with experimental data for various gases and mixtures. The simulations also demonstrate the robustness of our reconstructive method.

  11. A constraint on the velocity dispersion of the missing mass in the solar neighborhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takashi

    1978-01-01

    The stability of an N-component stellar disk with finite thickness is examined with the gas dynamical approximation. The dispersion relation for marginal stability is obtained. This dispersion relation for N = 2 is applied to the missing mass problem in the solar neighborhood, where two components represent the observed mass component and the missing mass component in the solar neighborhood. From the requirement that the Galactic disk should be locally stable, it is found that the velocity dispersion of the missing mass component should be greater than about 25km/sec. The stability of an infinitesimally thin disk is also investigated and compared with the disk of finite thickness. (auth.)

  12. A software to measure phase-velocity dispersion from ambient-noise correlations and its application to the SNSN data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur

    2017-04-01

    Graphical software for phase-velocity dispersion measurements of surface waves in noise-correlation traces, called GSpecDisp, is presented. It is an interactive environment for the measurements and presentation of the results. It measures phase-velocity dispersion curves in the frequency domain based on matching of the real part of the cross-correlation spectrum with the appropriate Bessel function. The inputs are time-domain cross-correlations in SAC format. It can measure two types of phase-velocity dispersion curves; 1- average phase-velocity of a region, and 2- single-pair phase velocity. The average phase-velocity dispersion curve of a region can be used as a reference curve to automatically select the dispersion curves from each single-pair cross-correlation in that region. It also allows the users to manually refine the selections. Therefore, no prior knowledge is needed for an unknown region. GSpecDisp can measure the phase velocity of Rayleigh and Love waves from all possible components of the noise correlation tensor, including diagonal and off-diagonal components of the tensor. First, we explain how GSpecDisp is applied to measure phase-velocity dispersion curves. Then, we demonstrate measurement results on synthetic and real data from the Swedish National Seismic Network (SNSN). We compare the results with two other methods of phase-velocity dispersion measurements. Finally, we compare phase-velocity dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves obtained from different components of the correlation tensor.

  13. Central velocity dispersion in elliptical and lenticular galaxies as an extragalactic distance indicator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    de Vaucouleurs, G.; Olson, D.W.

    1982-01-01

    The Faber-Jackson relation between absolute magnitude M/sub T/ 0 and central velocity dispersion sigma/sub upsilon/ is reexamined for a sample of 157 normal, noninteracting galaxies, 82 ellipticals (T = -5, -4), and 75 lenticulars (T = -3, -2, -1). The values of sigma/sub upsilon/ are weighted means from various sources reduced to a uniform system

  14. COSMIC EVOLUTION OF SIZE AND VELOCITY DISPERSION FOR EARLY-TYPE GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, L.; Lapi, A.; Bressan, A.; De Zotti, G.; Danese, L.; Bernardi, M.

    2010-01-01

    Massive (stellar mass M * ∼> 3 x 10 10 M sun ), passively evolving galaxies at redshifts z ∼> 1 exhibit on average physical sizes smaller, by factors ∼3, than local early-type galaxies (ETGs) endowed with the same stellar mass. Small sizes are in fact expected on theoretical grounds, if dissipative collapse occurs. Recent results show that the size evolution at z ∼ 1, where both compact and already extended galaxies are observed and the scatter in size is remarkably larger than it is locally. The presence at high redshift of a significant number of ETGs with the same size as their local counterparts, as well as ETGs with quite small size (∼ H (z). We demonstrate that the projected mass of compact, high-redshift galaxies and that of local ETGs within the same physical radius, the nominal half-luminosity radius of high-redshift ETGs, differ substantially in that the high-redshift ETGs are on average significantly denser. This result suggests that the physical mechanism responsible for the size increase should also remove mass from central galaxy regions (r ∼ 1, we predict the local velocity dispersion distribution function. On comparing it to the observed one, we show that velocity dispersion evolution of massive ETGs is fully compatible with the observed average evolution in size at constant stellar mass. Less massive ETGs (with stellar masses M * ∼ 10 M sun ) are expected to evolve less both in size and in velocity dispersion, because their evolution is essentially determined by supernova feedback, which cannot yield winds as powerful as those triggered by quasars. The differential evolution is expected to leave imprints in the size versus luminosity/mass, velocity dispersion versus luminosity/mass, and central black hole mass versus velocity dispersion relationships, as observed in local ETGs.

  15. Terminal velocity of liquids and granular materials dispersed by a high explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, J.; Pontalier, Q.; Milne, A. M.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-04-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles or a layer of liquid surrounding a spherical high-explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. Shock compression of the material layer during the initial acceleration may partially consolidate the material, leading to the formation of jet-like structures when the layer fragments and sheds particles upon release. Similarly, release of a shock-compressed liquid shell causes the nucleation of cavitation sites, leading to the radial breakup of the shell and the formation of jets upon expansion. In the current study, a wide variety of granular materials and liquids were explosively dispersed. The maximum terminal jet tip or shell velocity was measured using high-speed videography. Charges were constructed using thin-walled glass bulbs of various diameters and contained a central C-4 charge surrounded by the material to be dispersed. This permitted variation of the ratio of material mass to charge mass (M/C) from 4 to 300. Results indicated that material velocity broadly correlates with predictions of the Gurney model. For liquids, the terminal velocity was accurately predicted by the Gurney model. For granular materials, Gurney over-predicted the terminal velocity by 25-60%, depending on the M/C ratio, with larger M/C values exhibiting larger deficits. These deficits are explained by energy dissipation during the collapse of voids in the granular material bed. Velocity deficits were insensitive to the degree of jetting and granular material properties. Empirical corrections to the Gurney model are presented with improved agreement with the dry powder experimental velocities.

  16. Terminal velocity of liquids and granular materials dispersed by a high explosive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loiseau, J.; Pontalier, Q.; Milne, A. M.; Goroshin, S.; Frost, D. L.

    2018-05-01

    The explosive dispersal of a layer of solid particles or a layer of liquid surrounding a spherical high-explosive charge generates a turbulent, multiphase flow. Shock compression of the material layer during the initial acceleration may partially consolidate the material, leading to the formation of jet-like structures when the layer fragments and sheds particles upon release. Similarly, release of a shock-compressed liquid shell causes the nucleation of cavitation sites, leading to the radial breakup of the shell and the formation of jets upon expansion. In the current study, a wide variety of granular materials and liquids were explosively dispersed. The maximum terminal jet tip or shell velocity was measured using high-speed videography. Charges were constructed using thin-walled glass bulbs of various diameters and contained a central C-4 charge surrounded by the material to be dispersed. This permitted variation of the ratio of material mass to charge mass ( M/ C) from 4 to 300. Results indicated that material velocity broadly correlates with predictions of the Gurney model. For liquids, the terminal velocity was accurately predicted by the Gurney model. For granular materials, Gurney over-predicted the terminal velocity by 25-60%, depending on the M/ C ratio, with larger M/ C values exhibiting larger deficits. These deficits are explained by energy dissipation during the collapse of voids in the granular material bed. Velocity deficits were insensitive to the degree of jetting and granular material properties. Empirical corrections to the Gurney model are presented with improved agreement with the dry powder experimental velocities.

  17. All-optical control of group velocity dispersion in tellurite photonic crystal fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lai; Tian, Qijun; Liao, Meisong; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Guanshi; Ohishi, Yasutake; Qin, Weiping

    2012-12-15

    We demonstrate all-optical control of group velocity dispersion (GVD) via optical Kerr effect in highly nonlinear tellurite photonic crystal fibers. The redshift of the zero-dispersion wavelength is over 307 nm, measured by soliton self-frequency shift cancellation, when the pump peak power of a 1.56 μm femtosecond fiber laser is increased to 11.6 kW. The all-optical control of GVD not only offers a new platform for constructing all-optical-control photonic devices but also promises a new class of experiments in nonlinear fiber optics and light-matter interactions.

  18. A catalogue of masses, structural parameters and velocity dispersion profiles of 112 Milky Way globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgardt, H.; Hilker, M.

    2018-05-01

    We have determined masses, stellar mass functions and structural parameters of 112 Milky Way globular clusters by fitting a large set of N-body simulations to their velocity dispersion and surface density profiles. The velocity dispersion profiles were calculated based on a combination of more than 15,000 high-precision radial velocities which we derived from archival ESO/VLT and Keck spectra together with ˜20, 000 published radial velocities from the literature. Our fits also include the stellar mass functions of the globular clusters, which are available for 47 clusters in our sample, allowing us to self-consistently take the effects of mass segregation and ongoing cluster dissolution into account. We confirm the strong correlation between the global mass functions of globular clusters and their relaxation times recently found by Sollima & Baumgardt (2017). We also find a correlation of the escape velocity from the centre of a globular cluster and the fraction of first generation stars (FG) in the cluster recently derived for 57 globular clusters by Milone et al. (2017), but no correlation between the FG star fraction and the global mass function of a globular cluster. This could indicate that the ability of a globular cluster to keep the wind ejecta from the polluting star(s) is the crucial parameter determining the presence and fraction of second generation stars and not its later dynamical mass loss.

  19. National and International Income Dispersion and Aggregate Expenditures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Fillat; J.F. François (Joseph)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractWe examine linkages between aggregate household income, distribution of that income, and aggregate cross-country expenditure patterns. We are able to decompose income effects into international income dispersion effects (from variations in average income) and national income dispersion

  20. Branch migration and the international dispersal of families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, N; Lucas, D; Mok, M

    2000-01-01

    This paper discusses the dispersal of facilities where family members migrate to different destination countries. Terminology for internationally dispersed families is proposed, and the term branch migration is suggested for the migration of related people from the same source country to different destination countries. Data from two 1993 surveys of senior secondary students show that 22% of Sydney students and 20% of Hong Kong students have relatives in two or more other countries. The data suggest that many Asian migrant families have branched between the US, Canada, Australia and other migrant-receiving nations. The causes and implications of the international dispersal of families are discussed.

  1. Hindrance Velocity Model for Phase Segregation in Suspensions of Poly-dispersed Randomly Oriented Spheroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faroughi, S. A.; Huber, C.

    2015-12-01

    Crystal settling and bubbles migration in magmas have significant effects on the physical and chemical evolution of magmas. The rate of phase segregation is controlled by the force balance that governs the migration of particles suspended in the melt. The relative velocity of a single particle or bubble in a quiescent infinite fluid (melt) is well characterized; however, the interplay between particles or bubbles in suspensions and emulsions and its effect on their settling/rising velocity remains poorly quantified. We propose a theoretical model for the hindered velocity of non-Brownian emulsions of nondeformable droplets, and suspensions of spherical solid particles in the creeping flow regime. The model is based on three sets of hydrodynamic corrections: two on the drag coefficient experienced by each particle to account for both return flow and Smoluchowski effects and a correction on the mixture rheology to account for nonlocal interactions between particles. The model is then extended for mono-disperse non-spherical solid particles that are randomly oriented. The non-spherical particles are idealized as spheroids and characterized by their aspect ratio. The poly-disperse nature of natural suspensions is then taken into consideration by introducing an effective volume fraction of particles for each class of mono-disperse particles sizes. Our model is tested against new and published experimental data over a wide range of particle volume fraction and viscosity ratios between the constituents of dispersions. We find an excellent agreement between our model and experiments. We also show two significant applications for our model: (1) We demonstrate that hindered settling can increase mineral residence time by up to an order of magnitude in convecting magma chambers. (2) We provide a model to correct for particle interactions in the conventional hydrometer test to estimate the particle size distribution in soils. Our model offers a greatly improved agreement with

  2. Travel Times, Streamflow Velocities, and Dispersion Rates in the Yellowstone River, Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    The Yellowstone River is a vital natural resource to the residents of southeastern Montana and is a primary source of water for irrigation and recreation and the primary source of municipal water for several cities. The Yellowstone River valley is the primary east-west transportation corridor through southern Montana. This complex of infrastructure makes the Yellowstone River especially vulnerable to accidental spills from various sources such as tanker cars and trucks. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, initiated a dye-tracer study to determine instream travel times, streamflow velocities, and dispersion rates for the Yellowstone River from Lockwood to Glendive, Montana. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of this study and summarize data collected at each of the measurement sites between Lockwood and Glendive. This report also compares the results of this study to estimated travel times from a transport model developed by the USGS for a previous study. For this study, Rhodamine WT dye was injected at four locations in late September and early October 2008 during reasonably steady streamflow conditions. Streamflows ranged from 3,490 to 3,770 cubic feet per second upstream from the confluence of the Bighorn River and ranged from 6,520 to 7,570 cubic feet per second downstream from the confluence of the Bighorn River. Mean velocities were calculated for each subreach between measurement sites for the leading edge, peak concentration, centroid, and trailing edge at 10 percent of the peak concentration. Calculated velocities for the centroid of the dye plume for subreaches that were completely laterally mixed ranged from 1.83 to 3.18 ft/s within the study reach from Lockwood Bridge to Glendive Bridge. The mean of the completely mixed centroid velocity for the entire study reach, excluding the subreach between Forsyth Bridge and Cartersville Dam, was 2.80 ft/s. Longitudinal

  3. Dispersal of volcaniclasts during deep-sea eruptions: Settling velocities and entrainment in buoyant seawater plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreyre, Thibaut; Soule, S. Adam; Sohn, Robert A.

    2011-08-01

    We use tank experiments to measure settling rates of deep-sea volcaniclastic material recovered from the Arctic (85°E Gakkel Ridge) and Pacific (Juan de Fuca Ridge, Loihi seamount) Oceans. We find that clast size and shape exert a strong influence on settling velocity, with velocities of ~ 30 cm/s for large (~ 8 mm), blocky clasts, compared to velocities of ~ 2.5 cm/s for small (Pele) entrained in a megaplume could be advected as far as a few kilometers from a source region. These results indicate that entrainment in buoyant seawater plumes during an eruption may play an important role in clast dispersal, but it is not clear if this mechanism can explain the distribution of volcaniclastic material at the sites on the Gakkel and Juan de Fuca Ridges where our samples were acquired. In order to understand the dispersal of volcaniclastic material in the deep-sea it will be necessary to rigorously characterize existing deposits, and develop models capable of incorporating explosive gas phases into the eruption plume.

  4. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We then observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  5. The shape of velocity dispersion profiles and the dynamical state of galaxy clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, A. P.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.; de Carvalho, R. R.

    2018-01-01

    Motivated by the existence of the relationship between the dynamical state of clusters and the shape of the velocity dispersion profiles (VDPs), we study the VDPs for Gaussian (G) and non-Gaussian (NG) systems for a subsample of clusters from the Yang catalogue. The groups cover a redshift interval of 0.03 ≤ z ≤ 0.1 with halo mass ≥1014 M⊙. We use a robust statistical method, Hellinger Distance, to classify the dynamical state of the systems according to their velocity distribution. The stacked VDP of each class, G and NG, is then determined using either Bright or Faint galaxies. The stacked VDP for G groups displays a central peak followed by a monotonically decreasing trend which indicates a predominance of radial orbits, with the Bright stacked VDP showing lower velocity dispersions in all radii. The distinct features we find in NG systems are manifested not only by the characteristic shape of VDP, with a depression in the central region, but also by a possible higher infall rate associated with galaxies in the Faint stacked VDP.

  6. Picosecond phase-velocity dispersion of hypersonic phonons imaged with ultrafast electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremons, Daniel R.; Du, Daniel X.; Flannigan, David J.

    2017-12-01

    Here, we describe the direct imaging—with four-dimensional ultrafast electron microscopy—of the emergence, evolution, dispersion, and decay of photoexcited, hypersonic coherent acoustic phonons in nanoscale germanium wedges. Coherent strain waves generated via ultrafast in situ photoexcitation were imaged propagating with initial phase velocities of up to 35 km/s across discrete micrometer-scale crystal regions. We observe that, while each wave front travels at a constant velocity, the entire wave train evolves with a time-varying phase-velocity dispersion, displaying a single-exponential decay to the longitudinal speed of sound (5 km/s) and with a mean lifetime of 280 ps. We also find that the wave trains propagate along a single in-plane direction oriented parallel to striations introduced during specimen preparation, independent of crystallographic direction. Elastic-plate modeling indicates the dynamics arise from excitation of a single, symmetric (dilatational) guided acoustic mode. Further, by precisely determining the experiment time-zero position with a plasma-lensing method, we find that wave-front emergence occurs approximately 100 ps after femtosecond photoexcitation, which matches well with Auger recombination times in germanium. We conclude by discussing the similarities between the imaged hypersonic strain-wave dynamics and electron/hole plasma-wave dynamics in strongly photoexcited semiconductors.

  7. The age-velocity dispersion relation of the Galactic discs from LAMOST-Gaia data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jincheng; Liu, Chao

    2018-03-01

    We present the age-velocity dispersion relation (AVR) in three dimensions in the solar neighbourhood using 3564 commonly observed sub-giant/red giant branch stars selected from The Large Sky Area Multi-Object Fiber Spectroscopic Telescope, which gives the age and radial velocity, and Gaia, which measures the distance and proper motion. The stars are separated into metal-poor ([Fe/H] -0.2 dex) groups, so that the metal-rich stars are mostly α-poor, while the metal-poor group are mostly contributed by α-enhanced stars. Thus, the old and metal-poor stars likely belong to the chemically defined thick disc population, while the metal-rich sample is dominated by the thin disc. The AVR for the metal-poor sample shows an abrupt increase at ≳7 Gyr, which is contributed by the thick disc component. On the other hand, most of the thin disc stars with [Fe/H] > -0.2 dex display a power-law-like AVR with indices of about 0.3-0.4 and 0.5 for the in-plane and vertical dispersions, respectively. This is consistent with the scenario that the disc is gradually heated by the spiral arms and/or the giant molecular clouds. Moreover, the older thin disc stars (>7 Gyr) have a rounder velocity ellipsoid, i.e. σϕ/σz is close to 1.0, probably due to the more efficient heating in vertical direction. Particularly for the old metal-poor sample located with |z| > 270 pc, the vertical dispersion is even larger than its azimuthal counterpart. Finally, the vertex deviations and the tilt angles are plausibly around zero with large uncertainties.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of standard deviations of group velocity dispersion in optical fibre using parametric amplification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rishøj, Lars Søgaard; Svane, Ask Sebastian; Lund-Hansen, Toke

    2014-01-01

    A numerical model for parametric amplifiers, which include stochastic variations of the group velocity dispersion (GVD), is presented. The impact on the gain is investigated, both with respect to the magnitude of the variations and by the effect caused by changing the wavelength of the pump. It i....... It is demonstrated that the described model is able to predict the experimental results and thereby provide a quantitative evaluation of the standard deviation of the GVD. For the investigated fibre, a standard deviation of 0.01 ps/(nm km) was found....

  9. Seismic velocity site characterization of 10 Arizona strong-motion recording stations by spectral analysis of surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayen, Robert E.; Carkin, Brad A.; Corbett, Skye C.

    2017-10-19

    Vertical one-dimensional shear wave velocity (VS) profiles are presented for strong-motion sites in Arizona for a suite of stations surrounding the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station. The purpose of the study is to determine the detailed site velocity profile, the average velocity in the upper 30 meters of the profile (VS30), the average velocity for the entire profile (VSZ), and the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) site classification. The VS profiles are estimated using a non-invasive continuous-sine-wave method for gathering the dispersion characteristics of surface waves. Shear wave velocity profiles were inverted from the averaged dispersion curves using three independent methods for comparison, and the root-mean-square combined coefficient of variation (COV) of the dispersion and inversion calculations are estimated for each site.

  10. Dependence of the clustering properties of galaxies on stellar velocity dispersion in the Main galaxy sample of SDSS DR10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin-Fa; Song, Jun; Chen, Yi-Qing; Jiang, Peng; Ding, Ying-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Using two volume-limited Main galaxy samples of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10), we investigate the dependence of the clustering properties of galaxies on stellar velocity dispersion by cluster analysis. It is found that in the luminous volume-limited Main galaxy sample, except at r=1.2, richer and larger systems can be more easily formed in the large stellar velocity dispersion subsample, while in the faint volume-limited Main galaxy sample, at r≥0.9, an opposite trend is observed. According to statistical analyses of the multiplicity functions, we conclude in two volume-limited Main galaxy samples: small stellar velocity dispersion galaxies preferentially form isolated galaxies, close pairs and small group, while large stellar velocity dispersion galaxies preferentially inhabit the dense groups and clusters. However, we note the difference between two volume-limited Main galaxy samples: in the faint volume-limited Main galaxy sample, at r≥0.9, the small stellar velocity dispersion subsample has a higher proportion of galaxies in superclusters ( n≥200) than the large stellar velocity dispersion subsample.

  11. Correlation between centre offsets and gas velocity dispersion of galaxy clusters in cosmological simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming-Hua; Zhu, Weishan; Zhao, Dong

    2018-05-01

    The gas is the dominant component of baryonic matter in most galaxy groups and clusters. The spatial offsets of gas centre from the halo centre could be an indicator of the dynamical state of cluster. Knowledge of such offsets is important for estimate the uncertainties when using clusters as cosmological probes. In this paper, we study the centre offsets roff between the gas and that of all the matter within halo systems in ΛCDM cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. We focus on two kinds of centre offsets: one is the three-dimensional PB offsets between the gravitational potential minimum of the entire halo and the barycentre of the ICM, and the other is the two-dimensional PX offsets between the potential minimum of the halo and the iterative centroid of the projected synthetic X-ray emission of the halo. Haloes at higher redshifts tend to have larger values of rescaled offsets roff/r200 and larger gas velocity dispersion σ v^gas/σ _{200}. For both types of offsets, we find that the correlation between the rescaled centre offsets roff/r200 and the rescaled 3D gas velocity dispersion, σ _v^gas/σ _{200} can be approximately described by a quadratic function as r_{off}/r_{200} ∝ (σ v^gas/σ _{200} - k_2)2. A Bayesian analysis with MCMC method is employed to estimate the model parameters. Dependence of the correlation relation on redshifts and the gas mass fraction are also investigated.

  12. Depletion velocities for atmospheric pollutants oriented To improve the simplified regional dispersion modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanchez Gacita, Madeleine; Turtos Carbonell, Leonor; Rivero Oliva, Jose de Jesus

    2005-01-01

    The present work is aimed to improve externalities assessment using Simplified Methodologies, through the obtaining of depletion velocities for primary pollutants SO 2 , NO X and TSP (Total Suspended Particles) and for sulfate and nitrate aerosols, the secondary pollutants created from the first ones. The main goal proposed was to estimate these values for different cases, in order to have an ensemble of values for the geographic area, among which the most representative could be selected for using it in future studies that appeal to a simplified methodology for the regional dispersion assessment, taking into account the requirements of data, qualified manpower and time for a detailed approach. The results where obtained using detailed studies of the regional dispersion that were conduced for six power facilities, three from Cuba (at the localities of Mariel, Santa Cruz and Tallapiedra) and three from Mexico (at the localities of Tuxpan, Tula and Manzanillo). The depletion velocity for SO 2 was similar for all cases. Results obtained for Tallapiedra, Santa Cruz, Mariel and Manzanillo were similar. For Tula and Tuxpan a high uncertainty was found

  13. The Mean and Scatter of the Velocity Dispersion-Optical Richness Relation for MaxBCG Galaxy Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, M.R.; McKay, T.A.; /Michigan U.; Koester, B.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Wechsler, R.H.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Rozo, E.; /Ohio State U.; Evrard, A.; /Michigan U. /Michigan U., MCTP; Johnston, D.; /Caltech, JPL; Sheldon, E.; /New York U.; Annis, J.; /Fermilab; Lau, E.; /Chicago U., Astron. Astrophys. Ctr.; Nichol, R.; /Portsmouth U., ICG; Miller, C.; /Michigan U.

    2007-06-05

    The distribution of galaxies in position and velocity around the centers of galaxy clusters encodes important information about cluster mass and structure. Using the maxBCG galaxy cluster catalog identified from imaging data obtained in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, we study the BCG--galaxy velocity correlation function. By modeling its non-Gaussianity, we measure the mean and scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness. The mean velocity dispersion increases from 202 {+-} 10 km s{sup -1} for small groups to more than 854 {+-} 102 km s{sup -1} for large clusters. We show the scatter to be at most 40.5{+-}3.5%, declining to 14.9{+-}9.4% in the richest bins. We test our methods in the C4 cluster catalog, a spectroscopic cluster catalog produced from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR2 spectroscopic sample, and in mock galaxy catalogs constructed from N-body simulations. Our methods are robust, measuring the scatter to well within one-sigma of the true value, and the mean to within 10%, in the mock catalogs. By convolving the scatter in velocity dispersion at fixed richness with the observed richness space density function, we measure the velocity dispersion function of the maxBCG galaxy clusters. Although velocity dispersion and richness do not form a true mass--observable relation, the relationship between velocity dispersion and mass is theoretically well characterized and has low scatter. Thus our results provide a key link between theory and observations up to the velocity bias between dark matter and galaxies.

  14. Flow time, flow velocity and longitudinal dispersion in Moselle and Weser rivers; Fliesszeit, Fliessgeschwindigkeit und Longitudinale Dispersion in Mosel und Weser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, W.J.; Krinitzky, T.; Cremer, M. [Bundesanstalt fuer Gewaesserkunde (BfG), Koblenz (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Since 1980, the Federal Institute of Hydrology has performed dispersion investigations with tritium as a tracer on Federal Waterways. The aim was to establish dispersion prognoses, i.e. forecasts of the longitudinal dispersion of concentrations of noxious substances in the water column. Characteristic parameters like discharge-relevant flow velocities, dispersion and elimination constants of emittent sites and selected river sections will be determined. They will serve as basis for a mathematical model permitting to forecast discharge-relevant flow velocities, expected impact times, concentration maxima and the duration of critical concentration increases. In the following, the results obtained at the Moselle river and the investigations carried out on the Weser river will be shortly described. (orig.)

  15. Preparation of Dispersion-Hardened Copper by Internal Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Povl; Sørensen, Ole Toft

    1978-01-01

    Internal oxidation experiments in CO2/CO atmospheres on Cu-Al alloys for preparation of dispersion-hardened Cu are described. The oxygen pressures of the atmospheres used in the experiments were controlled with a solid electrolyte oxygen cell based on ZrO2 (CaO). The particle size distributions o...

  16. GSpecDisp: A matlab GUI package for phase-velocity dispersion measurements from ambient-noise correlations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghisorkhani, Hamzeh; Gudmundsson, Ólafur; Tryggvason, Ari

    2018-01-01

    We present a graphical user interface (GUI) package to facilitate phase-velocity dispersion measurements of surface waves in noise-correlation traces. The package, called GSpecDisp, provides an interactive environment for the measurements and presentation of the results. The selection of a dispersion curve can be done automatically or manually within the package. The data are time-domain cross-correlations in SAC format, but GSpecDisp measures phase velocity in the spectral domain. Two types of phase-velocity dispersion measurements can be carried out with GSpecDisp; (1) average velocity of a region, and (2) single-pair phase velocity. Both measurements are done by matching the real part of the cross-correlation spectrum with the appropriate Bessel function. Advantages of these two types of measurements are that no prior knowledge about surface-wave dispersion in the region is needed, and that phase velocity can be measured up to that period for which the inter-station distance corresponds to one wavelength. GSpecDisp can measure the phase velocity of Rayleigh and Love waves from all possible components of the noise correlation tensor. First, we briefly present the theory behind the methods that are used, and then describe different modules of the package. Finally, we validate the developed algorithms by applying them to synthetic and real data, and by comparison with other methods. The source code of GSpecDisp can be downloaded from: https://github.com/Hamzeh-Sadeghi/GSpecDisp

  17. Uncertainty Estimation of Shear-wave Velocity Structure from Bayesian Inversion of Microtremor Array Dispersion Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosso, S. E.; Molnar, S.; Cassidy, J.

    2010-12-01

    Bayesian inversion of microtremor array dispersion data is applied, with evaluation of data errors and model parameterization, to produce the most-probable shear-wave velocity (VS) profile together with quantitative uncertainty estimates. Generally, the most important property characterizing earthquake site response is the subsurface VS structure. The microtremor array method determines phase velocity dispersion of Rayleigh surface waves from multi-instrument recordings of urban noise. Inversion of dispersion curves for VS structure is a non-unique and nonlinear problem such that meaningful evaluation of confidence intervals is required. Quantitative uncertainty estimation requires not only a nonlinear inversion approach that samples models proportional to their probability, but also rigorous estimation of the data error statistics and an appropriate model parameterization. A Bayesian formulation represents the solution of the inverse problem in terms of the posterior probability density (PPD) of the geophysical model parameters. Markov-chain Monte Carlo methods are used with an efficient implementation of Metropolis-Hastings sampling to provide an unbiased sample from the PPD to compute parameter uncertainties and inter-relationships. Nonparametric estimation of a data error covariance matrix from residual analysis is applied with rigorous a posteriori statistical tests to validate the covariance estimate and the assumption of a Gaussian error distribution. The most appropriate model parameterization is determined using the Bayesian information criterion (BIC), which provides the simplest model consistent with the resolving power of the data. Parameter uncertainties are found to be under-estimated when data error correlations are neglected and when compressional-wave velocity and/or density (nuisance) parameters are fixed in the inversion. Bayesian inversion of microtremor array data is applied at two sites in British Columbia, the area of highest seismic risk in

  18. Crustal structure of northern Egypt from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Hegazi, Mona; Gaber, Hanan; Korrat, Ibrahim

    2018-01-01

    In this study, we used a combined inversion of body wave receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements to provide constraints on the crustal structure of northern Egypt. The two techniques are complementary to each other: receiver functions (RFs) are sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts, while surface wave dispersion (SWD) measurements are sensitive to finite variations of shear-wave velocity with depth. A database of 122 teleseismic events digitally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN) stations has been used as well. To enhance the resulting RFs at each ENSN station, the H-k stacking method was applied. A joint inversion process between the resulting receiver functions and the surface wave dispersion curves was applied as well. We have produced three averaged velocity structure models for distinct geographic and tectonic provinces namely Sinai, eastern desert, and western desert from east to the west respectively. These models will deeply help in estimation the epicenter distance of earthquake, focal mechanism solutions, and earthquake hazard analysis in northern Egypt. An obvious image of the subsurface structure has been determined which shows that generally the crustal structure of northern Egypt consists of three layers covered with a sequence of sediments that differs in thickness from across the region except in the Sharm area where the sedimentary cover is absent. The obtained results indicate that crustal thickness differs from east to west and reaches its maximum value of about 36 km at Siwa station (SWA) in the western desert and its minimum value of about 28 km at Sharm station (SHR) of the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula. The Vp/Vs ratio varies between 1.71 and 2.07 in northern Egypt. Generally, the high values (1.93) of (Vp/Vs) at SWA station may reflect the well-known rich aquifer with fully saturated sediments of the Swia Oasis in the Western Desert. Moreover, the highest value (2.07) of (Vp/Vs) at

  19. Crustal structure of northern Egypt from joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave dispersion velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Ahmed; Hegazi, Mona; Gaber, Hanan; Korrat, Ibrahim

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we used a combined inversion of body wave receiver functions and surface wave dispersion measurements to provide constraints on the crustal structure of northern Egypt. The two techniques are complementary to each other: receiver functions (RFs) are sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts, while surface wave dispersion (SWD) measurements are sensitive to finite variations of shear-wave velocity with depth. A database of 122 teleseismic events digitally recorded by the Egyptian National Seismological Network (ENSN) stations has been used as well. To enhance the resulting RFs at each ENSN station, the H-k stacking method was applied. A joint inversion process between the resulting receiver functions and the surface wave dispersion curves was applied as well. We have produced three averaged velocity structure models for distinct geographic and tectonic provinces namely Sinai, eastern desert, and western desert from east to the west respectively. These models will deeply help in estimation the epicenter distance of earthquake, focal mechanism solutions, and earthquake hazard analysis in northern Egypt. An obvious image of the subsurface structure has been determined which shows that generally the crustal structure of northern Egypt consists of three layers covered with a sequence of sediments that differs in thickness from across the region except in the Sharm area where the sedimentary cover is absent. The obtained results indicate that crustal thickness differs from east to west and reaches its maximum value of about 36 km at Siwa station (SWA) in the western desert and its minimum value of about 28 km at Sharm station (SHR) of the southern tip of the Sinai Peninsula. The Vp/Vs ratio varies between 1.71 and 2.07 in northern Egypt. Generally, the high values (1.93) of (Vp/Vs) at SWA station may reflect the well-known rich aquifer with fully saturated sediments of the Swia Oasis in the Western Desert. Moreover, the highest value (2.07) of (Vp/Vs) at

  20. Group-velocity dispersion effects on quantum noise of a fiber optical soliton in phase space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Heongkyu; Lee, Euncheol

    2010-01-01

    Group-velocity dispersion (GVD) effects on quantum noise of ultrashort pulsed light are theoretically investigated at the soliton energy level, using Gaussian-weighted pseudo-random distribution of phasors in phase space for the modeling of quantum noise properties including phase noise, photon number noise, and quantum noise shape in phase space. We present the effects of GVD that mixes the different spectral components in time, on the self-phase modulation(SPM)-induced quantum noise properties in phase space such as quadrature squeezing, photon-number noise, and tilting/distortion of quantum noise shape in phase space, for the soliton that propagates a distance of the nonlinear length η NL = 1/( γP 0 ) (P 0 is the pulse peak power and γ is the SPM parameter). The propagation dependence of phase space quantum noise properties for an optical soliton is also provided.

  1. Velocity dispersions in galaxies. V. The nuclei of M31 and M32

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morton, D.C.; Elmergreen, B.G.

    1976-01-01

    Stigmatic spectra between 4160 and 4385 A with 0.7 A resolution have been obtained of the central regions of M31 and M32, including their starlike nuclei, and the KO III star 51 Ori using an SEC TV sensor and the coude spectrograph of the Hale telescope. Line-of-sight velocity dispersions of sigma=130 +- 20 and 55(+10, -15) km s -1 have been determined for the nuclei of M31 and M32, respectively, by direct comparision with the star spectrum broadened by various Gaussian widths. This KO III star is a poor match in the nucleus of M31, but represents rather well the spectrum of the nucleus of M32 and the bulge of M31 at 10'' from the center

  2. Shear wave velocity model beneath CBJI station West Java, Indonesia from joint inversion of teleseismic receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simanungkalit, R. H.; Anggono, T.; Syuhada; Amran, A.; Supriyanto

    2018-03-01

    Earthquake signal observations around the world allow seismologists to obtain the information of internal structure of the Earth especially the Earth’s crust. In this study, we used joint inversion of receiver functions and surface wave group velocities to investigate crustal structure beneath CBJI station in West Java, Indonesia. Receiver function were calculated from earthquakes with magnitude more than 5 and at distance 30°-90°. Surface wave group velocities were calculated using frequency time analysis from earthquakes at distance of 30°- 40°. We inverted shear wave velocity model beneath the station by conducting joint inversion from receiver functions and surface wave dispersions. We suggest that the crustal thickness beneath CBJI station, West Java, Indonesia is about 35 km.

  3. Determination of Groundwater Velocity and Dispersion Parameters by Borehole Wall Multielectrode Geoelectrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessels, W.; Wuttke, M. W.

    2007-05-01

    A single well technique to determine groundwater flow values and transport parameters is presented. Multielectrode arrays are placed at the filtered casing depth by an inflatable packer or are installed on the borehole wall behind the casing.Tracer water with a higher or lower specific electrical conductivity (salinity) which is injected between the electrodes. This tracer plume then moves into the natural groundwater flow field. The observation of this movement by geoelectric logging enables the determination of the groundwater velocity and salinity. The transport parameters "effective porosity" and "dispersion length" can also be derived. The geoelectric logging uses n borehole electrodes and two grounding electrodes. Thus, either n independent two point measurements or n*(n-1)/2 pole-to-pole measurements can be conducted to obtain a full set of geoelectric measurements. This set is used to derive all electrode combinations by applying the law of superposition and reciprocity. The tracer distribution around the borehole during and after injection depends on the hydraulic and transport parameters of the aquifer and the filter sand. The transport parameter "porosity" plus the total injected tracer volume determines the tracer distribution around the borehole. The transport parameter "dispersivity" determines the abruptness of the tracer front. The method was tested by undertaking measurements in a lab aquifer filled with sand. The results are discussed and the limitations of the method are shown. Multielectrode installations behind casing were tested in situ in the two scientific boreholes CAT-LUD-1 and CAT- LUD-1A drilled in the northern part of Germany. A multielectrode packer system was designed, built and tested in these boreholes. The results are compared with colloid observations in the borehole and hydraulic triangulation in surrounded observation wells. Here, the interpretation of these in situ measurements is mainly restricted to two point geoelectric

  4. CORRECTING FOR INTERPLANETARY SCATTERING IN VELOCITY DISPERSION ANALYSIS OF SOLAR ENERGETIC PARTICLES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laitinen, T.; Dalla, S.; Huttunen-Heikinmaa, K.; Valtonen, E.

    2015-01-01

    To understand the origin of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs), we must study their injection time relative to other solar eruption manifestations. Traditionally the injection time is determined using the Velocity Dispersion Analysis (VDA) where a linear fit of the observed event onset times at 1 AU to the inverse velocities of SEPs is used to derive the injection time and path length of the first-arriving particles. VDA does not, however, take into account that the particles that produce a statistically observable onset at 1 AU have scattered in the interplanetary space. We use Monte Carlo test particle simulations of energetic protons to study the effect of particle scattering on the observable SEP event onset above pre-event background, and consequently on VDA results. We find that the VDA results are sensitive to the properties of the pre-event and event particle spectra as well as SEP injection and scattering parameters. In particular, a VDA-obtained path length that is close to the nominal Parker spiral length does not imply that the VDA injection time is correct. We study the delay to the observed onset caused by scattering of the particles and derive a simple estimate for the delay time by using the rate of intensity increase at the SEP onset as a parameter. We apply the correction to a magnetically well-connected SEP event of 2000 June 10, and show it to improve both the path length and injection time estimates, while also increasing the error limits to better reflect the inherent uncertainties of VDA

  5. Theoretical Re-evaluations of Scaling Relations between SMBHs and Their Host Galaxies–2. Importance of AGN Feedback Suggested by Stellar Age–Velocity Dispersion Relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirakata, Hikari; Kawaguchi, Toshihiro; Okamoto, Takashi; Ishiyama, Tomoaki

    2017-01-01

    We present the galactic stellar age—velocity dispersion relation obtained from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We divide galaxies into two populations: galaxies which have over-massive/under-massive black holes (BHs) against the best-fitting BH mass—velocity dispersion relation. We find that galaxies with larger velocity dispersion have older stellar ages. We also find that galaxies with over-massive BHs have older stellar ages. These results are consistent with observational results obtained from Martín-Navarro et al. (2016). We tested the model with weak AGN feedback and find that galaxies with larger velocity dispersion have a younger stellar age.

  6. Theoretical Re-evaluations of Scaling Relations between SMBHs and Their Host Galaxies–2. Importance of AGN Feedback Suggested by Stellar Age–Velocity Dispersion Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirakata, Hikari [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kawaguchi, Toshihiro [Department of Economics, Management and Information Science, Onomichi City University, Onomichi, Hiroshima (Japan); Okamoto, Takashi [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Ishiyama, Tomoaki, E-mail: shirakata@astro1.sci.hokudai.ac.jp [Institute of Management and Information Technologies, Chiba University, Chiba (Japan)

    2017-09-12

    We present the galactic stellar age—velocity dispersion relation obtained from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We divide galaxies into two populations: galaxies which have over-massive/under-massive black holes (BHs) against the best-fitting BH mass—velocity dispersion relation. We find that galaxies with larger velocity dispersion have older stellar ages. We also find that galaxies with over-massive BHs have older stellar ages. These results are consistent with observational results obtained from Martín-Navarro et al. (2016). We tested the model with weak AGN feedback and find that galaxies with larger velocity dispersion have a younger stellar age.

  7. Diversity in the stellar velocity dispersion profiles of a large sample of brightest cluster galaxies z ≤ 0.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loubser, S. I.; Hoekstra, H.; Babul, A.; O'Sullivan, E.

    2018-06-01

    We analyse spatially resolved deep optical spectroscopy of brightestcluster galaxies (BCGs) located in 32 massive clusters with redshifts of 0.05 ≤ z ≤ 0.30 to investigate their velocity dispersion profiles. We compare these measurements to those of other massive early-type galaxies, as well as central group galaxies, where relevant. This unique, large sample extends to the most extreme of massive galaxies, spanning MK between -25.7 and -27.8 mag, and host cluster halo mass M500 up to 1.7 × 1015 M⊙. To compare the kinematic properties between brightest group and cluster members, we analyse similar spatially resolved long-slit spectroscopy for 23 nearby brightest group galaxies (BGGs) from the Complete Local-Volume Groups Sample. We find a surprisingly large variety in velocity dispersion slopes for BCGs, with a significantly larger fraction of positive slopes, unique compared to other (non-central) early-type galaxies as well as the majority of the brightest members of the groups. We find that the velocity dispersion slopes of the BCGs and BGGs correlate with the luminosity of the galaxies, and we quantify this correlation. It is not clear whether the full diversity in velocity dispersion slopes that we see is reproduced in simulations.

  8. Velocity model of the Hronov-Poříčí Fault Zone from Rayleigh wave dispersion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kolínský, Petr; Valenta, Jan; Málek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2014), s. 617-635 ISSN 1383-4649 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/09/1244; GA MŠk LM2010008 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : Bohemian Massif * surface waves * phase-velocity * dispersion curve Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.386, year: 2014

  9. Perturbation theory in Lagrangian hydrodynamics for a cosmological fluid with velocity dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatekawa, Takayuki; Suda, Momoko; Maeda, Kei-ichi; Morita, Masaaki; Anzai, Hiroki

    2002-01-01

    We extensively develop a perturbation theory for nonlinear cosmological dynamics, based on the Lagrangian description of hydrodynamics. We solve the hydrodynamic equations for a self-gravitating fluid with pressure, given by a polytropic equation of state, using a perturbation method up to second order. This perturbative approach is an extension of the usual Lagrangian perturbation theory for a pressureless fluid, in view of the inclusion of the pressure effect, which should be taken into account on the occurrence of velocity dispersion. We obtain the first-order solutions in generic background universes and the second-order solutions in a wider range of a polytropic index, whereas our previous work gives the first-order solutions only in the Einstein-de Sitter background and the second-order solutions for the polytropic index 4/3. Using the perturbation solutions, we present illustrative examples of our formulation in one- and two-dimensional systems, and discuss how the evolution of inhomogeneities changes for the variation of the polytropic index

  10. Using velocity dispersion to estimate halo mass: Is the Local Group in tension with ΛCDM?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahi, Pascal J.; Power, Chris; Lagos, Claudia del P.; Poulton, Rhys; Robotham, Aaron S. G.

    2018-06-01

    Satellite galaxies are commonly used as tracers to measure the line-of-sight (LOS)velocity dispersion (σLOS) of the dark matter halo associated with their central galaxy, and thereby to estimate the halo's mass. Recent observational dispersion estimates of the Local Group, including the Milky Way and M31, suggest σ ˜50 km s-1, which is surprisingly low when compared to the theoretical expectation of σ ˜100 km s-1 for systems of their mass. Does this pose a problem for Lambda cold dark matter (ΛCDM)? We explore this tension using the SURFS suite of N-body simulations, containing over 10000 (sub)haloes with well tracked orbits. We test how well a central galaxy's host halo velocity dispersion can be recovered by sampling σLOS of subhaloes and surrounding haloes. Our results demonstrate that σLOS is biased mass proxy. We define an optimal window in vLOS and projected distance (Dp) - 0.5 ≲ Dp/Rvir ≲ 1.0 and vLOS ≲ 0.5Vesc, where Rvir is the virial radius and Vesc is the escape velocity - such that the scatter in LOS to halo dispersion is minimized - σLOS = (0.5 ± 0.1)σv, H. We argue that this window should be used to measure LOS dispersions as a proxy for mass, as it minimises scatter in the σLOS-Mvir relation. This bias also naturally explains the results from McConnachie (2012), who used similar cuts when estimating σLOS, LG, producing a bias of σLG = (0.44 ± 0.14)σv, H. We conclude that the Local Group's velocity dispersion does not pose a problem for ΛCDM and has a mass of log M_{LG, vir}/M_{⊙}=12.0^{+0.8}_{-2.0}.

  11. IN-SYNC. II. VIRIAL STARS FROM SUBVIRIAL CORES—THE VELOCITY DISPERSION OF EMBEDDED PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STARS IN NGC 1333

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foster, Jonathan B.; Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R.; Covey, Kevin R.; Arce, Héctor G.; Nidever, David L.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Da Rio, Nicola; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steven R.; Skrutskie, Michael; Wilson, John C.; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Rebull, Luisa; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Zasowski, Gail

    2015-01-01

    The initial velocity dispersion of newborn stars is a major unconstrained aspect of star formation theory. Using near-infrared spectra obtained with the APOGEE spectrograph, we show that the velocity dispersion of young (1-2 Myr) stars in NGC 1333 is 0.92 ± 0.12 km s –1 after correcting for measurement uncertainties and the effect of binaries. This velocity dispersion is consistent with the virial velocity of the region and the diffuse gas velocity dispersion, but significantly larger than the velocity dispersion of the dense, star-forming cores, which have a subvirial velocity dispersion of 0.5 km s –1 . Since the NGC 1333 cluster is dynamically young and deeply embedded, this measurement provides a strong constraint on the initial velocity dispersion of newly formed stars. We propose that the difference in velocity dispersion between stars and dense cores may be due to the influence of a 70 μG magnetic field acting on the dense cores or be the signature of a cluster with initial substructure undergoing global collapse

  12. THEORY OF DISPERSED FIXED-DELAY INTERFEROMETRY FOR RADIAL VELOCITY EXOPLANET SEARCHES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Eyken, Julian C.; Ge Jian; Mahadevan, Suvrath

    2010-01-01

    The dispersed fixed-delay interferometer (DFDI) represents a new instrument concept for high-precision radial velocity (RV) surveys for extrasolar planets. A combination of a Michelson interferometer and a medium-resolution spectrograph, it has the potential for performing multi-object surveys, where most previous RV techniques have been limited to observing only one target at a time. Because of the large sample of extrasolar planets needed to better understand planetary formation, evolution, and prevalence, this new technique represents a logical next step in instrumentation for RV extrasolar planet searches, and has been proven with the single-object Exoplanet Tracker (ET) at Kitt Peak National Observatory, and the multi-object W. M. Keck/MARVELS Exoplanet Tracker at Apache Point Observatory. The development of the ET instruments has necessitated fleshing out a detailed understanding of the physical principles of the DFDI technique. Here we summarize the fundamental theoretical material needed to understand the technique and provide an overview of the physics underlying the instrument's working. We also derive some useful analytical formulae that can be used to estimate the level of various sources of error generic to the technique, such as photon shot noise when using a fiducial reference spectrum, contamination by secondary spectra (e.g., crowded sources, spectroscopic binaries, or moonlight contamination), residual interferometer comb, and reference cross-talk error. Following this, we show that the use of a traditional gas absorption fiducial reference with a DFDI can incur significant systematic errors that must be taken into account at the precision levels required to detect extrasolar planets.

  13. EVOLUTION OF QUIESCENT AND STAR-FORMING GALAXIES SINCE z ∼ 1.5 AS A FUNCTION OF THEIR VELOCITY DISPERSIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bezanson, Rachel; Van Dokkum, Pieter; Franx, Marijn

    2012-01-01

    We measure stellar masses and structural parameters for 5500 quiescent and 20,000 star-forming galaxies at 0.3 < z ≤ 1.5 in the Newfirm Medium Band Survey COSMOS and UKIDSS UDS fields. We combine these measurements to infer velocity dispersions and determine how the number density of galaxies at fixed inferred dispersion, or the velocity dispersion function (VDF), evolves with time for each population. We show that the number of galaxies with high velocity dispersions appears to be surprisingly stable with time, regardless of their star formation history. Furthermore, the overall VDF for star-forming galaxies is constant with redshift, extending down to the lowest velocity dispersions probed by this study. The only galaxy population showing strong evolution are quiescent galaxies with low inferred dispersions, whose number density increases by a factor of ∼4 since z = 1.5. This buildup leads to an evolution in the quiescent fraction of galaxies such that the threshold dispersion above which quiescent galaxies dominate the counts moves to lower velocity dispersion with time. We show that our results are qualitatively consistent with a simple model in which star-forming galaxies quench and are added to the quiescent population. In order to compensate for the migration into the quiescent population, the velocity dispersions of star-forming galaxies must increase, with a rate that increases with dispersion.

  14. Transport of temperature-velocity covariance in gas-solid flow and its relation to the axial dispersion coefficient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Shankar; Sun, Bo

    2015-11-01

    The presence of solid particles in a steady laminar flow generates velocity fluctuations with respect to the mean fluid velocity that are termed pseudo-turbulence. The level of these pseudo-turbulent velocity fluctuations has been characterized in statistically homogeneous fixed particle assemblies and freely evolving suspensions using particle-resolved direct numerical simulation (PR-DNS) by Mehrabadi et al. (JFM, 2015), and it is found to be a significant contribution to the total kinetic energy associated with the flow. The correlation of these velocity fluctuations with temperature (or a passive scalar) generates a flux term that appears in the transport equation for the average fluid temperature (or average scalar concentration). The magnitude of this transport of temperature-velocity covariance is quantified using PR-DNS of thermally fully developed flow past a statistically homogeneous fixed assembly of particles, and the budget of the average fluid temperature equation is presented. The relation of this transport term to the axial dispersion coefficient (Brenner, Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. A, 1980) is established. The simulation results are then interpreted in the context of our understanding of axial dispersion in gas-solid flow. NSF CBET 1336941.

  15. Risk methodology for geologic disposal of radioactive waste: The distributed velocity method of solving the convective-dispersion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, James E; Longsine, Dennis E [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico (United States); Reeves, Mark [INTERA Environmental Consultants, Inc. Houston, TX (United States)

    1980-06-01

    A new method is proposed for treating convective-dispersive transport. The motivation for developing this technique arises from the demands of performing a risk assessment for a nuclear waste repository. These demands include computational efficiency over a relatively large range of Peclet numbers and the ability to handle chains of decaying radionuclides with rather extreme contrasts in both solution velocities and half lives. To the extent it has been tested to date, the Distributed Velocity Method (DVM) appears to satisfy these demands. Included in this paper are the mathematical theory, numerical implementation, an error analysis employing statistical sampling and regression analysis techniques, and comparisons of DVM with other methods for convective-dispersive transport. (author)

  16. Influence of Complete Coriolis Force on the Dispersion Relation of Ocean Internal-wave in a Background Currents Field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yongjun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this thesis, the influence of complete Coriolis force (the model includes both the vertical and horizontal components of Coriolis force on the dispersion relation of ocean internal-wave under background currents field are studied, it is important to the study of ocean internal waves in density-stratified ocean. We start from the control equation of sea water movement in the background of the non-traditional approximation, and the vertical velocity solution is derived where buoyancy frequency N(z gradually varies with the ocean depth z. The results show that the influence of complete Coriolis force on the dispersion relation of ocean internal-wave under background currents field is obvious, and these results provide strong evidence for the understanding of dynamic process of density stratified ocean internal waves.

  17. A Universal Velocity Dispersion Profile for Pressure Supported Systems: Evidence for MONDian Gravity across Seven Orders of Magnitude in Mass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durazo, R.; Hernandez, X.; Sánchez, S. F. [Instituto de Astronomía, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Apartado Postal 70-264 C.P. 04510 México D.F., México (Mexico); Sodi, B. Cervantes [Instituto de Radioastronomía y Astrofísica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Campus Morelia, A.P. 3-72, C.P. 58089 Michoacán, México (Mexico)

    2017-03-10

    For any MONDian extended theory of gravity where the rotation curves of spiral galaxies are explained through a change in physics rather than the hypothesis of dark matter, a generic dynamical behavior is expected for pressure supported systems: an outer flattening of the velocity dispersion profile occurring at a characteristic radius, where both the amplitude of this flat velocity dispersion and the radius at which it appears are predicted to show distinct scalings with the total mass of the system. By carefully analyzing the dynamics of globular clusters and elliptical galaxies, we are able to significantly extend the astronomical diversity of objects in which MONDian gravity has been tested, from spiral galaxies to the much larger mass range covered by pressure supported systems. We show that a universal projected velocity dispersion profile accurately describes various classes of pressure supported systems, and further, that the expectations of extended gravity are met across seven orders of magnitude in mass. These observed scalings are not expected under dark matter cosmology, and would require particular explanations tuned at the scales of each distinct astrophysical system.

  18. Kinetic transverse dispersion relation for relativistic magnetized electron-positron plasmas with Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López, Rodrigo A. [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad de Concepción, Concepción (Chile); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, DC 20064 (United States); Muñoz, Víctor [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Valdivia, J. Alejandro [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de la Nanociencia y la Nanotecnología, CEDENNA, Santiago (Chile)

    2014-09-15

    We use a kinetic treatment to study the linear transverse dispersion relation for a magnetized isotropic relativistic electron-positron plasma with finite relativistic temperature. The explicit linear dispersion relation for electromagnetic waves propagating along a constant background magnetic field is presented, including an analytical continuation to the whole complex frequency plane for the case of Maxwell-Jüttner velocity distribution functions. This dispersion relation is studied numerically for various temperatures. For left-handed solutions, the system presents two branches, the electromagnetic ordinary mode and the Alfvén mode. In the low frequency regime, the Alfvén branch has two dispersive zones, the normal zone (where ∂ω/∂k > 0) and an anomalous zone (where ∂ω/∂k < 0). We find that in the anomalous zone of the Alfvén branch, the electromagnetic waves are damped, and there is a maximum wave number for which the Alfvén branch is suppressed. We also study the dependence of the Alfvén velocity and effective plasma frequency with the temperature. We complemented the analytical and numerical approaches with relativistic full particle simulations, which consistently agree with the analytical results.

  19. Differences in the size-internal velocity relation of galactic and extragalactic HII regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odell, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The nature of the size-internal velocity relation in extragalactic HII regions is examined in order to improve their use as distance determinants. The relation between the linear size and the internal velocity was compared for HII regions in the Galaxy and in external galaxies. Data for the former are from the researcher's own studies at high spatial resolution, while the latter have been the subject of spectroscopy that includes almost the entire objects. The Galactic HII regions are corrected to values of the internal velocity that would be observed if they were at extragalactic distances. A very different size-internal velocity relation was found for the two types of objects in the sense that the extragalactic objects are some ten times larger at the same internal velocity. This is interpreted to mean that the extragalactic HII regions are actually complexes of small HII regions comparable in size to their Galactic counterparts

  20. Particle dispersion and mixing induced by breaking internal gravity waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouruet-Aubertot, Pascale; Koudella, C.; Staquet, C.; Winters, K. B.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze diapycnal mixing induced by the breaking of an internal gravity wave — the primary wave — either standing or propagating. To achieve this aim we apply two different methods. The first method consists of a direct estimate of vertical eddy diffusion from particle dispersion while the second method relies upon potential energy budgets [Winters, K.B., Lombard, P.N., Riley, J.J., D'Asaro, E.A., 1995. J. Fluid Mech. 289, 115-128; Winters, K.B., D'Asaro, E.A., 1996. J. Fluid Mech. 317, 179-193]. The primary wave we consider is of small amplitude and is statically stable, a case for which the breaking process involves two-dimensional instabilities. The dynamics of the waves have been previously analyzed by means of two-dimensional direct numerical simulations [Bouruet-Aubertot, P., Sommeria, J., Staquet, C., 1995. J. Fluid Mech. 285, 265-301; Bouruet-Aubertot, P., Sommeria, J., Staquet, C., 1996. Dyn. Atmos. Oceans 29, 41-63; Koudella, C., Staquet, C., 1998. In: Davis, P. (Ed.), Proceedings of the IMA Conference on Mixing and Dispersion on Stably-stratified Flows, Dundee, September 1996. IMA Publication]. High resolution three-dimensional calculations of the same wave are also reported here [Koudella, C., 1999]. A local estimate of mixing is first inferred from the time evolution of sets of particles released in the flow during the breaking regime. We show that, after an early evolution dominated by shear effects, a diffusion law is reached and the dispersion coefficient is fairly independent of the initial seeding location of the particles in the flow. The eddy diffusion coefficient, K, is then estimated from the diapycnal diffusive flux. A good agreement with the value inferred from particle dispersion is obtained. This finding is of particular interest regarding the interpretation of in situ estimates of K inferred either from tracer dispersion or from microstructure measurements. Computation of the Cox number, equal to the

  1. Theoretical Re-evaluations of Scaling Relations between SMBHs and Their Host Galaxies–2. Importance of AGN Feedback Suggested by Stellar Age–Velocity Dispersion Relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hikari Shirakata

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the galactic stellar age—velocity dispersion relation obtained from a semi-analytic model of galaxy formation. We divide galaxies into two populations: galaxies which have over-massive/under-massive black holes (BHs against the best-fitting BH mass—velocity dispersion relation. We find that galaxies with larger velocity dispersion have older stellar ages. We also find that galaxies with over-massive BHs have older stellar ages. These results are consistent with observational results obtained from Martín-Navarro et al. (2016. We tested the model with weak AGN feedback and find that galaxies with larger velocity dispersion have a younger stellar age.

  2. Determination of dispersion coefficients and average flow velocities in rivers radioactive tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.A.G. de; Moreira, R.M.

    1984-01-01

    The determination of the dispersion characteristics and residence time distribution in a series of adjoining stretches of a river with one single tracer injection, are presented. The method allows minimizing the amount of work and tracer expenditure in the measurement of fluvial transport over long or heterogeneous river courses. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Heat transfer to a dispersed two-phase flow and detailed quench front velocity research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, T.C. de; Molen, S.B. van der

    1985-01-01

    A programme to obtain a data base for 'Boildown and Reflood' computer code development and to obtain information on the influence of non-uniform temperature and/or power profile on the quench front velocity and prequench heat transfer, including unheated wall and grid effects, has been undertaken. It is in two parts. In the first (for the tube, annulus and a 4-rod bundle) an early wetting of the unheated shroud is shown. This leads to an increase in quench front velocity and in liquid transport downstream from the quench front. For the inverted annular flow regime the extended Bromley correlation gives good agreement with the experimental data. In the second part (36-rod bundle reflood test programme) the wall-temperature differences in the radial direction gives rise to heat transfer processes which are described and explained. (U.K.)

  4. STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION MEASUREMENTS IN HIGH-LUMINOSITY QUASAR HOSTS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THE AGN BLACK HOLE MASS SCALE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grier, C. J.; Martini, P.; Peterson, B. M.; Pogge, R. W.; Zu, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 W 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Watson, L. C. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Dasyra, K. M. [Observatoire de Paris, LERMA (CNRS:UMR8112), 61 Avenue de l' Observatoire, F-75014, Paris (France); Dietrich, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45601 (United States); Ferrarese, L. [Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria BV V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-08-20

    We present new stellar velocity dispersion measurements for four luminous quasars with the Near-Infrared Integral Field Spectrometer instrument and the ALTAIR laser guide star adaptive optics system on the Gemini North 8 m telescope. Stellar velocity dispersion measurements and measurements of the supermassive black hole (BH) masses in luminous quasars are necessary to investigate the coevolution of BHs and galaxies, trace the details of accretion, and probe the nature of feedback. We find that higher-luminosity quasars with higher-mass BHs are not offset with respect to the M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation exhibited by lower-luminosity active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with lower-mass BHs, nor do we see correlations with galaxy morphology. As part of this analysis, we have recalculated the virial products for the entire sample of reverberation-mapped AGNs and used these data to redetermine the mean virial factor (f) that places the reverberation data on the quiescent M{sub BH}-{sigma}{sub *} relation. With our updated measurements and new additions to the AGN sample, we obtain (f) = 4.31 {+-} 1.05, which is slightly lower than, but consistent with, most previous determinations.

  5. Dispersion of a Passive Scalar Fluctuating Plume in a Turbulent Boundary Layer. Part I: Velocity and Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nironi, Chiara; Salizzoni, Pietro; Marro, Massimo; Mejean, Patrick; Grosjean, Nathalie; Soulhac, Lionel

    2015-09-01

    The prediction of the probability density function (PDF) of a pollutant concentration within atmospheric flows is of primary importance in estimating the hazard related to accidental releases of toxic or flammable substances and their effects on human health. This need motivates studies devoted to the characterization of concentration statistics of pollutants dispersion in the lower atmosphere, and their dependence on the parameters controlling their emissions. As is known from previous experimental results, concentration fluctuations are significantly influenced by the diameter of the source and its elevation. In this study, we aim to further investigate the dependence of the dispersion process on the source configuration, including source size, elevation and emission velocity. To that end we study experimentally the influence of these parameters on the statistics of the concentration of a passive scalar, measured at several distances downwind of the source. We analyze the spatial distribution of the first four moments of the concentration PDFs, with a focus on the variance, its dissipation and production and its spectral density. The information provided by the dataset, completed by estimates of the intermittency factors, allow us to discuss the role of the main mechanisms controlling the scalar dispersion and their link to the form of the PDF. The latter is shown to be very well approximated by a Gamma distribution, irrespective of the emission conditions and the distance from the source. Concentration measurements are complemented by a detailed description of the velocity statistics, including direct estimates of the Eulerian integral length scales from two-point correlations, a measurement that has been rarely presented to date.

  6. Spatially Extended and High-Velocity Dispersion Molecular Component in Spiral Galaxies: Single-Dish Versus Interferometric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Schruba, Andreas; Walter, Fabian; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of the molecular medium in nearby galaxies have provided mounting evidence that the molecular gas can exist in two phases: one that is clumpy and organized as molecular clouds and another one that is more diffuse. This last component has a higher velocity dispersion than the clumpy one. In order to investigate these two molecular components further, we compare the fluxes and line widths of CO in NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, two nearby spiral galaxies for which high-quality interferometric as well as single-dish data sets are available. Our analysis leads to two main results: (1) employing three different methods, we determine the flux recovery of the interferometer as compared to the single-dish to be within a range of 35%-74% for NGC 4736 and 81%-92% for NGC 5055, and (2) when focusing on high (S/N ≥ 5) lines of sight (LOSs), the single-dish line widths are larger by ˜(40 ± 20)% than the ones derived from interferometric data, which is in agreement with stacking all LOSs. These results point to a molecular gas component that is distributed over spatial scales larger than 30″(˜1 kpc), and is therefore filtered out by the interferometer. The available observations do not allow us to distinguish between a truly diffuse gas morphology and a uniform distribution of small clouds that are separated by less than the synthesized beam size (˜3″ or ˜100 pc), as they would both be invisible for the interferometer. This high velocity dispersion component has a dispersion similar to what is found in the atomic medium, as traced through observations of the H i line.

  7. Spatially extended and high-velocity dispersion molecular component in spiral galaxies: Single-dish versus interferometric observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldú-Primo, Anahi; Walter, Fabian; Schruba, Andreas; Leroy, Adam; Bolatto, Alberto D.; Vogel, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of the molecular medium in nearby galaxies have provided mounting evidence that the molecular gas can exist in two phases: one that is clumpy and organized as molecular clouds and another one that is more diffuse. This last component has a higher velocity dispersion than the clumpy one. In order to investigate these two molecular components further, we compare the fluxes and line widths of CO in NGC 4736 and NGC 5055, two nearby spiral galaxies for which high-quality interferometric as well as single-dish data sets are available. Our analysis leads to two main results: (1) employing three different methods, we determine the flux recovery of the interferometer as compared to the single-dish to be within a range of 35%–74% for NGC 4736 and 81%–92% for NGC 5055, and (2) when focusing on high (S/N ≥ 5) lines of sight (LOSs), the single-dish line widths are larger by ∼(40 ± 20)% than the ones derived from interferometric data, which is in agreement with stacking all LOSs. These results point to a molecular gas component that is distributed over spatial scales larger than 30″(∼1 kpc), and is therefore filtered out by the interferometer. The available observations do not allow us to distinguish between a truly diffuse gas morphology and a uniform distribution of small clouds that are separated by less than the synthesized beam size (∼3″ or ∼100 pc), as they would both be invisible for the interferometer. This high velocity dispersion component has a dispersion similar to what is found in the atomic medium, as traced through observations of the H i line.

  8. On the mass-metallicity relation, velocity dispersion and gravitational well depth of GRB host galaxies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arabsalmani, Maryam; Møller, Palle; Fynbo, Johan P. U.

    2015-01-01

    -DLA samples and compare the measured stellar masses for the four hosts where stellar masses have been determined from SED fits. We find excellent agreement and conclude that, on basis of all available data and tests, long duration GRB-DLA hosts and intervening QSO-DLAs are consistent with being drawn from...... away from the metallicity in the centre of the galaxy, second the path of the sightline through different parts of the potential well of the dark matter halo will cause different velocity fields to be sampled. We report evidence suggesting that this second effect may have been detected....

  9. Dry deposition models for radionuclides dispersed in air: a new approach for deposition velocity evaluation schema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.; Cervone, A.; De Rosa, F.; Lombardo, C.; Casamirra, M.

    2017-11-01

    In the framework of a National Research Program funded by the Italian Minister of Economic Development, the Department of Energy, Information Engineering and Mathematical Models (DEIM) of Palermo University and ENEA Research Centre of Bologna, Italy are performing several research activities to study physical models and mathematical approaches aimed at investigating dry deposition mechanisms of radioactive pollutants. On the basis of such studies, a new approach to evaluate the dry deposition velocity for particles is proposed. Comparisons with some literature experimental data show that the proposed dry deposition scheme can capture the main phenomena involved in the dry deposition process successfully.

  10. Internal properties assessment in agar wood trees using ultrasonic velocity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohd Noorul Ikhsan Mohamed; Mohamad Pauzi Ismail; Mat Rasol Awang; Mohd Fajri Osman; Fakhruzi, M.; Hashim, M.M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents the application of ultrasonic velocity in agar wood trees (Aquilaria crassna) with the purpose of evaluating the relationship of the ultrasonic velocity to the variations of internal properties of trees. In this study, three circular cross-sectional discs from the freshly cut tree were selected as samples. First sample with a big hole (decay) in the middle, second sample with internal resinous and the last one is the sample with no defects. The through transmission ultrasonic testing method was carried out using Tico ultrasonic pulse velocity tester which is from Switzerland. Two-dimensional image of internal properties evaluation by an ultrasonic investigation was obtained using Matlab. The results showed that the ultrasonic wave cannot pass through the internal decay or resinous so that the wave went round it and thus ultrasonic wave velocity significantly decreased by increasing the hole or resinous. The difference in color of the image generated by Matlab software based on variation of ultrasonic velocity between the internal decay area and its surrounding area was obvious. Therefore, the properties of internal properties of the three could be detected by ultrasonic line imaging technique. (author)

  11. Combustion Velocity of Benzine-Benzol-Air Mixtures in High-Speed Internal-Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnauffer, Kurt

    1932-01-01

    The present paper describes a device whereby rapid flame movement within an internal-combustion engine cylinder may be recorded and determined. By the aid of a simple cylindrical contact and an oscillograph the rate of combustion within the cylinder of an airplane engine during its normal operation may be measured for gas intake velocities of from 30 to 35 m/s and for velocities within the cylinder of from 20 to 25 m/s. With it the influence of mixture ratios, of turbulence, of compression ratio and kind of fuel on combustion velocity may be determined. Besides the determination of the influence of the above factors on combustion velocity, the degree of turbulence may also be determined. As a unit of reference in estimating the degree of turbulence, the intake velocity of the charge is chosen.

  12. Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA): small-scale anisotropic galaxy clustering and the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loveday, J.; Christodoulou, L.; Norberg, P.; Peacock, J. A.; Baldry, I. K.; Bland-Hawthorn, J.; Brown, M. J. I.; Colless, M.; Driver, S. P.; Holwerda, B. W.; Hopkins, A. M.; Kafle, P. R.; Liske, J.; Lopez-Sanchez, A. R.; Taylor, E. N.

    2018-03-01

    The galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion (PVD) can provide important tests of non-standard gravity and galaxy formation models. We describe measurements of the PVD of galaxies in the Galaxy and Mass Assembly (GAMA) survey as a function of projected separation and galaxy luminosity. Due to the faint magnitude limit (r PVD to smaller scales (r⊥ = 0.01 h - 1 Mpc) than previous work. The measured PVD at projected separations r⊥ ≲ 1 h - 1 Mpc increases near monotonically with increasing luminosity from σ12 ≈ 200 km s - 1 at Mr = -17 mag to σ12 ≈ 600 km s - 1 at Mr ≈ -22 mag. Analysis of the Gonzalez-Perez et al. (2014) GALFORM semi-analytic model yields no such trend of PVD with luminosity: the model overpredicts the PVD for faint galaxies. This is most likely a result of the model placing too many low-luminosity galaxies in massive haloes.

  13. Heat transfer to a dispersed two phase flow and detailed quench front velocity research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boer, T.C.; Van der Molen, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    During the blow-down phase of a loss-off coolant accident (LOCA) in a pressurized water reactor the core will heat up dramatically. Water will be injected in the system, and by bottom flooding the core will be cooled. The use of one-dimensional computer models for the calculation of the reflood process in a bundle needs a better justification. The influence of an unheated shroud on prequench heat transfer is investigated in a tube, an annulus and a 4 rod bundle. By using a glass shroud for the annulus, optical analysis of the dispersed two-phase flow regime has been performed. The ECN 36-rod bundle tests as performed with axial uniform power profile are reflood and boil-down at 0.2 MPa pressure executed for different conditions. The experiment yield a data base suitable for code validation and development. Better understanding is obtained for the influence of the radial non-uniform temperature and/or power distributions on the reflood process. Heat transfer improvement induced by the presence of spacer grids is observed. 72 refs.; 220 figs.

  14. Internal and External Dispersal of Plants by Animals: An Aquatic Perspective on Alien Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Casper H. A. van Leeuwen

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Many alien plants use animal vectors for dispersal of their diaspores (zoochory. If alien plants interact with native disperser animals, this can interfere with animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores. Interference by alien species is known for frugivorous animals dispersing fruits of terrestrial plants by ingestion, transport and egestion (endozoochory. However, less attention has been paid to possible interference of alien plants with dispersal of diaspores via external attachment (ectozoochory, epizoochory or exozoochory, interference in aquatic ecosystems, or positive effects of alien plants on dispersal of native plants. This literature study addresses the following hypotheses: (1 alien plants may interfere with both internal and external animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores; (2 interference also occurs in aquatic ecosystems; (3 interference of alien plants can have both negative and positive effects on native plants. The studied literature revealed that alien species can comprise large proportions of both internally and externally transported diaspores. Because animals have limited space for ingested and adhering diaspores, alien species affect both internal and external transport of native diaspores. Alien plant species also form large proportions of all dispersed diaspores in aquatic systems and interfere with dispersal of native aquatic plants. Alien interference can be either negative (e.g., through competition with native plants or positive (e.g., increased abundance of native dispersers, changed disperser behavior or attracting additional disperser species. I propose many future research directions, because understanding whether alien plant species disrupt or facilitate animal-mediated dispersal of native plants is crucial for targeted conservation of invaded (aquatic plant communities.

  15. Dispersion Energy Analysis of Rayleigh and Love Waves in the Presence of Low-Velocity Layers in Near-Surface Seismic Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Binbin; Xia, Jianghai; Shen, Chao; Wang, Limin

    2018-03-01

    High-frequency surface-wave analysis methods have been effectively and widely used to determine near-surface shear (S) wave velocity. To image the dispersion energy and identify different dispersive modes of surface waves accurately is one of key steps of using surface-wave methods. We analyzed the dispersion energy characteristics of Rayleigh and Love waves in near-surface layered models based on numerical simulations. It has been found that if there is a low-velocity layer (LVL) in the half-space, the dispersion energy of Rayleigh or Love waves is discontinuous and ``jumping'' appears from the fundamental mode to higher modes on dispersive images. We introduce the guided waves generated in an LVL (LVL-guided waves, a trapped wave mode) to clarify the complexity of the dispersion energy. We confirm the LVL-guided waves by analyzing the snapshots of SH and P-SV wavefield and comparing the dispersive energy with theoretical values of phase velocities. Results demonstrate that LVL-guided waves possess energy on dispersive images, which can interfere with the normal dispersion energy of Rayleigh or Love waves. Each mode of LVL-guided waves having lack of energy at the free surface in some high frequency range causes the discontinuity of dispersive energy on dispersive images, which is because shorter wavelengths (generally with lower phase velocities and higher frequencies) of LVL-guided waves cannot penetrate to the free surface. If the S wave velocity of the LVL is higher than that of the surface layer, the energy of LVL-guided waves only contaminates higher mode energy of surface waves and there is no interlacement with the fundamental mode of surface waves, while if the S wave velocity of the LVL is lower than that of the surface layer, the energy of LVL-guided waves may interlace with the fundamental mode of surface waves. Both of the interlacements with the fundamental mode or higher mode energy may cause misidentification for the dispersion curves of surface

  16. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyas Ud Din; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Hameed Inayat, Mansoor; Hussain Khan, Iqbal

    2009-01-01

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and (99m)Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a (99)Mo/(99m)Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer (99m)Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  17. Study of axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase in a pulsed sieve plate extraction column using radiotracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghiyas Ud Din; Imran Rafiq Chughtai; Mansoor Hameed Inayat; Iqbal Hussain Khan

    2009-01-01

    Axial mixing, holdup and slip velocity of dispersed phase which are parameters of fundamental importance in the design and operation of liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate columns have been investigated. Experiments for residence time distribution (RTD) analysis have been carried out for a range of pulsation frequency and amplitude in a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column with water as dispersed and kerosene as continuous phase using radiotracer technique. The column was operated in emulsion region and 99m Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate eluted from a 99 Mo/ 99m Tc generator was used to trace the dispersed phase. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition and two points measurement method was used to simulate the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase. It has been observed that the axial mixing and holdup of dispersed phase increases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until a maximum value is achieved while slip velocity decreases with increase in pulsation frequency and amplitude until it approaches a minimum value. Short lived and low energy radiotracer 99m Tc in the form of sodium pertechnetate was found to be a good water tracer to study the hydrodynamics of a liquid-liquid extraction pulsed sieve plate column operating with two immiscible liquids, water and kerosene. Axial dispersed plug flow model with open-open boundary condition was found to be a suitable model to describe the hydrodynamics of dispersed phase in the pulsed sieve plate extraction column.

  18. Experimental study of the propgation and dispersion of internal atmospheric gravity waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballard, K.A.

    1981-01-01

    Traveling ionospheric disturbances (TID's) appear as large-scale transverse waves in the F-region (150 to 1000 km altitude), with frequencies on the order of 0.005 to 0.005 cycles per minute, which propagate horizontally over hundreds or even thousands of kilometers. These disturbances have been observed by various radiowave techniques over the past thirty-five years and are now generally accepted as being the manifestation, in the ionized medium, of internal atmospheric gravity waves. A model describing the propagation of gravity waves in an isothermal atmosphere is presented here. The dispersion relation is derived from fundamental principles, and the relation between phase velocity and group velocity is examined. The effects of the Coriolis force and horizontally stratified winds on wave propagation are also analyzed. Conservation of energy in the gravity wave requires increasing amplitude with increasing altitude, inasmuch as the atmospheric density decreases with height. However, this is counteracted by dissipation of wave energy by ion drag, thermal conductivity, and viscous damping. The production of TID's (in the ionized medium) by gravity waves (in the neutral medium) is discussed in quantitative terms, and the vertical predictive function is derived. Dartmouth College has operated a three-station ionosonde network in northern New Hampshire and Vermont on an intermittent basis since 1968. Seven large TID's, found in the 1969 data, are reexamined here in an exhaustive and successful comparison with the gravity wave model. Iso-true-height contours of electron density are used to determine several pertinent TID wave parameters as a function of height

  19. Supermassive Black Holes in Active Galactic Nuclei. II. Calibration of the Black Hole Mass-Velocity Dispersion Relationship for Active Galactic Nuclei

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Onken, Christopher A.; Ferrarese, Laura; Merritt, David

    2004-01-01

    We calibrate reverberation-based black hole masses in active galactic nuclei (AGNs) by using the correlation between black hole mass, M, and bulge/spheroid stellar velocity dispersion, sigma. We use new measurements of sigma for 6 AGNs and published velocity dispersions for 10 others......, in conjunction with improved reverberation mapping results, to determine the scaling factor required to bring reverberation-based black hole masses into agreement with the quiescent galaxy M-sigma relationship. The scatter in the AGN black hole masses is found to be less than a factor of 3. The current...

  20. Differences in vertical jumping and mae-geri kicking velocity between international and national level karateka

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Balsalobre-Fernández

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Lower limb explosive strength and mae-geri kicking velocity are fundamental in karate competition; although it is unclear whether these variables could differentiate the high-level athletes. The objective of this research is to analyze the differences in the mae-geri kicking velocity and the counter-movement jump (CMJ between a group of international top level karateka and another group of national-level karateka.Methods: Thirteen international-level karateka and eleven national-level karateka participated in the study. After a standard warm-up, CMJ height (in cm and mae-geri kicking velocity (in m/s was measured using an IR-platform and a high-speed camera, respectively.Results: Proceeding with MANCOVA to analyze the differences between groups controlling the effect of age, the results show that the international-level karateka demonstrated significantly higher levels of CMJ than national-level competitors (+22.1%, F = 9.47, p = 0.006, η2 = 0.311. There were no significant differences between groups in the mae-geri kicking velocity (+5,7%, F=0.80; p=0.38; η2=0.03.Conclusion: Our data shows, first, the importance of CMJ assessment as a tool to detect talent in karate and, second, that to achieve international-level in karate it may be important to increase CMJ levels to values ​​similar to those offered here.

  1. Slurry dispersion state as a parameter to control internal structure of alumina green compact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, M.; Shui, A.; Tanaka, S.; Uchida, N.; Uematsu, K. [Nagaoka Univ. of Technology, Niigata (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    The dispersion state of slurry must be controlled to produce granules with appropriated properties for pressing. In this study dispersion state of alumina slurry is changed to form granules with different morphology, deformation property and packing density, and the influence on the internal structure of green compact are presented. Novel methods applying liquid immersion technique coupled with different type of microscopy were used to characterize the internal structures of green compacts. Two types of granules were obtained: dimpled, hard and dense granule, and spherical, soft and loose granule. The respective internal structures of green compacts were totally different. (orig.)

  2. A lithospheric velocity model for the flat slab region of Argentina from joint inversion of Rayleigh-wave dispersion and teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammirati, J. B.; Alvarado, P. M.; Beck, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Receiver Function (RF) analyses using teleseismic P waveforms is a technique to isolate P to S conversions from seismic discontinuities in the lithosphere. Using earthquakes with a good azimuthal distribution, RFs recorded at a three-component seismic station can be inverted to obtain detailed lithospheric velocity structures. The technique, however presents a velocity-depth trade-off, which results in a non-unique model because RFs do not depend on the absolute seismic velocities but rather on relative velocity contrasts. Unlike RF, surface wave dispersion is sensitive to the average shear-wave velocity which makes it well suited for studying long period variations of the lithospheric seismic velocities. We performed a joint inversion of RF and Rayleigh-wave phase velocity dispersion to investigate the structure beneath the SIEMBRA network, a 43-broadband-seismic-station array deployed in the Pampean flat slab region of Argentina. Our results indicate: 1) The presence of several mid-crustal discontinuities probably related with terrane accretion; 2) A high seismic velocity in the lower crust suggesting partial eclogitization; 3) A thicker crust (> 50 km) beneath the western Sierras Pampeanas with an abrupt change in the relative timing of the Moho signal indicating a thinner crust to the east; 4) The presence of the subducting oceanic crust lying at ~100 km depth. We then built a 1D regional velocity model for the flat slab region of Argentina and used it for regional moment tensor inversions for local earthquakes. This technique is notably dependent on small-scale variations of Earth structure when modeling higher frequency seismic waveforms. Eighteen regional focal mechanisms have been determined. Our solutions are in good agreement with GCMT source estimations although our solutions for deep earthquakes systematically resulted in shallower focal depths suggesting that the slab seismicity could be concentrated at the top of the subducting Nazca plate. Solutions

  3. Velocity dispersions in the bulges of spiral and SO galaxies. II. Further observations and a simple three-component model for spiral galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitmore, B.C.; Kirshner, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    We have obtained velocity dispersions for 24 galaxies in the Virgo cluster to supplement our earlier results. A 2000 channel intensified Reticon scanner has again been used on the 1.3 m telescope of McGraw-Hill Observatory, and a Fourier quotient technique has been employed to yield dispersions. We have confirmed our earlier result that spiral bulges exhibit a relation between total luminosity and velocity dispersion with the form L proportional sigma 4 , but with velocity dispersions that are 17 +- 8% smaller than elliptical galaxies at the same absolute magnitude. However, possible systematic errors may still affect the reality of this gap. The scatter in the L proportional sigma 4 relationship is substantially larger for the spiral bulges than for the elliptical galaxies. This larger scatter probably indicates that spiral bulges comprise a more heterogeneous sample than do elliptical galaxies. we also find that the bulge components of SO galaxies follow a L proportional sigma 4 relation with no gap with the ellipticals. The similarity in this relation for the spheroidal components of spiral, SO, and elliptical galaxies indicates that the systems are dynamically similar

  4. Determination of continuous complex refractive index dispersion of biotissue based on internal reflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhichao; Wang, Jin; Ye, Qing; Sun, Tengqian; Zhou, Wenyuan; Mei, Jianchun; Zhang, Chunping; Tian, Jianguo

    2016-01-01

    The complex refractive index dispersion (CRID), which contains the information on the refractive index dispersion and extinction coefficient spectra, is an important optical parameter of biotissue. However, it is hard to perform the CRID measurement on biotissues due to their high scattering property. Continuous CRID measurement based on internal reflection (CCRIDM-IR) is introduced. By using a lab-made apparatus, internal reflectance spectra of biotissue samples at multiple incident angles were detected, from which the continuous CRIDs were calculated based on the Fresnel formula. Results showed that in 400- to 750-nm range, hemoglobin solution has complicated dispersion and extinction coefficient spectra, while other biotissues have normal dispersion properties, and their extinction coefficients do not vary much with different wavelengths. The normal dispersion can be accurately described by several coefficients of dispersion equations (Cauchy equation, Cornu equation, and Conrady equation). To our knowledge, this is the first time that the continuous CRID of scattering biotissue over a continuous spectral region is measured, and we hereby have proven that CCRIDM-IR is a good method for continuous CRID research of biotissue.

  5. IN-SYNC. III. THE DYNAMICAL STATE OF IC 348—A SUPER-VIRIAL VELOCITY DISPERSION AND A PUZZLING SIGN OF CONVERGENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cottaar, Michiel; Meyer, Michael R.; Covey, Kevin R.; Foster, Jonathan B.; Tan, Jonathan C.; Rio, Nicola da; Nidever, David L.; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Majewski, Steve; Skrutskie, Michael F.; Wilson, John C.; Zasowski, Gail; Flaherty, Kevin M.; Frinchaboy, Peter M.

    2015-01-01

    Most field stars will have encountered the highest stellar density and hence the largest number of interactions in their birth environment. Yet the stellar dynamics during this crucial phase are poorly understood. Here we analyze the radial velocities measured for 152 out of 380 observed stars in the 2–6 Myr old star cluster IC 348 as part of the SDSS-III APOGEE. The radial velocity distribution of these stars is fitted with one or two Gaussians, convolved with the measurement uncertainties including binary orbital motions. Including a second Gaussian improves the fit; the high-velocity outliers that are best fit by this second component may either (1) be contaminants from the nearby Perseus OB2 association, (2) be a halo of ejected or dispersing stars from IC 348, or (3) reflect that IC 348 has not relaxed to a Gaussian velocity distribution. We measure a velocity dispersion for IC 348 of 0.72 ± 0.07 km s −1 (or 0.64 ± 0.08 km s −1 if two Gaussians are fitted), which implies a supervirial state, unless the gas contributes more to the gravitational potential than expected. No evidence is found for a dependence of this velocity dispersion on distance from the cluster center or stellar mass. We also find that stars with lower extinction (in the front of the cloud) tend to be redshifted compared with stars with somewhat higher extinction (toward the back of the cloud). This data suggest that the stars in IC 348 are converging along the line of sight. We show that this correlation between radial velocity and extinction is unlikely to be spuriously caused by the small cluster rotation of 0.024 ± 0.013 km s −1 arcmin −1 or by correlations between the radial velocities of neighboring stars. This signature, if confirmed, will be the first detection of line of sight convergence in a star cluster. Possible scenarios for reconciling this convergence with IC 348's observed supervirial state include: (a) the cluster is fluctuating around a new virial

  6. Determination of flow times, flow velocities and longitudinal dispersion in the Middle and Lower Rhine River using 3HHO as a tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, J.; Mundschenk, H.

    1994-01-01

    Flow times, flow velocities and parameters describing the longitudinal dispersion in the Middle and Lower Rhine river under natural conditions were determined by use of intermittent emissions of tritated wastewater from nuclear power plants during normal operation situated on the Upper Rhine. In cases of accidental releases of radioactive materials, these data would be the basis of prognoses by which the dispersion behaviour of contaminated sections along the course of river Rhine can be described and radiological consequences within the socalled critical impact areas estimated. (orig.) [de

  7. Parametric and Internal Resonances of an Axially Moving Beam with Time-Dependent Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamadev Sahoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear vibration of a travelling beam subjected to principal parametric resonance in presence of internal resonance is investigated. The beam velocity is assumed to be comprised of a constant mean value along with a harmonically varying component. The stretching of neutral axis introduces geometric cubic nonlinearity in the equation of motion of the beam. The natural frequency of second mode is approximately three times that of first mode; a three-to-one internal resonance is possible. The method of multiple scales (MMS is directly applied to the governing nonlinear equations and the associated boundary conditions. The nonlinear steady state response along with the stability and bifurcation of the beam is investigated. The system exhibits pitchfork, Hopf, and saddle node bifurcations under different control parameters. The dynamic solutions in the periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic forms are captured with the help of time history, phase portraits, and Poincare maps showing the influence of internal resonance.

  8. THE STELLAR VELOCITY DISPERSION OF A COMPACT MASSIVE GALAXY AT z = 1.80 USING X-SHOOTER: CONFIRMATION OF THE EVOLUTION IN THE MASS-SIZE AND MASS-DISPERSION RELATIONS ,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van de Sande, Jesse; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Kriek, Mariska; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Bezanson, Rachel; Whitaker, Katherine E.; Brammer, Gabriel; Groot, Paul J.; Kaper, Lex

    2011-01-01

    Recent photometric studies have shown that early-type galaxies at fixed stellar mass were smaller and denser at earlier times. In this Letter, we assess that finding by deriving the dynamical mass of such a compact quiescent galaxy at z = 1.8. We have obtained a high-quality spectrum with full UV-NIR wavelength coverage of galaxy NMBS-C7447 using X-Shooter on the Very Large Telescope. We determined a velocity dispersion of 294 ± 51 km s -1 . Given this velocity dispersion and the effective radius of 1.64 ± 0.15 kpc (as determined from Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Camera 3 F160W observations) we derive a dynamical mass of (1.7 ± 0.5) x 10 11 M sun . Comparison of the full spectrum with stellar population synthesis models indicates that NMBS-C774 has a relatively young stellar population (0.40 Gyr) with little or no star formation and a stellar mass of M * ∼ 1.5 x 10 11 M sun . The dynamical and photometric stellar masses are in good agreement. Thus, our study supports the conclusion that the mass densities of quiescent galaxies were indeed higher at earlier times, and this earlier result is not caused by systematic measurement errors. By combining available spectroscopic measurements at different redshifts, we find that the velocity dispersion at fixed dynamical mass was a factor of ∼1.8 higher at z = 1.8 compared with z = 0. Finally, we show that the apparent discrepancies between the few available velocity dispersion measurements at z > 1.5 are consistent with the intrinsic scatter of the mass-size relation.

  9. Existence and switching behavior of bright and dark Kerr solitons in whispering-gallery mode resonators with zero group-velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talla Mbé, Jimmi H.; Milián, Carles; Chembo, Yanne K.

    2017-07-01

    We use the generalized Lugiato-Lefever model to investigate the phenomenon of Kerr optical frequency comb generation when group-velocity dispersion is null. In that case, the first dispersion term that plays a leading role is third-order dispersion. We show that this term is sufficient to allow for the existence of both bright and dark solitons. We identify the areas in the parameter space where both kind of solitons can be excited inside the resonator. We also unveil a phenomenon of hysteretic switching between these two types of solitons when the power of the pump laser is cyclically varied. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  10. Internal seed dispersal by parrots: an overview of a neglected mutualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Blanco

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that parrots (Psitacifformes are generalist apex frugivores, they have largely been considered plant antagonists and thus neglected as seed dispersers of their food plants. Internal dispersal was investigated by searching for seeds in faeces opportunistically collected at communal roosts, foraging sites and nests of eleven parrot species in different habitats and biomes in the Neotropics. Multiple intact seeds of seven plant species of five families were found in a variable proportion of faeces from four parrot species. The mean number of seeds of each plant species per dropping ranged between one and about sixty, with a maximum of almost five hundred seeds from the cacti Pilosocereus pachycladus in a single dropping of Lear’s Macaw (Anodorhynchus leari. All seeds retrieved were small (<3 mm and corresponded to herbs and relatively large, multiple-seeded fleshy berries and infrutescences from shrubs, trees and columnar cacti, often also dispersed by stomatochory. An overview of the potential constraints driving seed dispersal suggest that, despite the obvious size difference between seeds dispersed by endozoochory and stomatochory, there is no clear difference in fruit size depending on the dispersal mode. Regardless of the enhanced or limited germination capability after gut transit, a relatively large proportion of cacti seeds frequently found in the faeces of two parrot species were viable according to the tetrazolium test and germination experiments. The conservative results of our exploratory sampling and a literature review clearly indicate that the importance of parrots as endozoochorous dispersers has been largely under-appreciated due to the lack of research systematically searching for seeds in their faeces. We encourage the evaluation of seed dispersal and other mutualistic interactions mediated by parrots before their generalized population declines contribute to the collapse of key ecosystem processes.

  11. Internal structure and interfacial velocity development for bubbly two-phase flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocamustafaogullari, G.; Huang, W.D.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental study of the internal structure of air-water flowing horizontally. The double-sensor resistivity probe technique was applied for measurements of local interfacial parameters, including void fraction, interfacial area concentration, bubble size distributions, bubble passing frequency and bubble interface velocity. Bubbly flow patterns at several flow conditions were examined at three axial locations, L/D=25, 148 and 253, in which the first measurement represents the entrance region where the flow develops, and the second and third may represent near fully developed bubbly flow patterns. The experimental results are presented in three-dimensional perspective plots of the interfacial parameters over the cross-section. These multi-dimensional presentations showed that the local values of the void fraction, interfacial area concentration and bubble passing frequency were nearly constant over the cross-section at L/D=25, with slight local peaking close to the channel wall. Although similar local peakings were observed at the second and third locations, the internal flow structure segregation due to buoyancy appeared to be very strong in the axial direction. A simple comparison of profiles of the interfacial parameters at the three locations indicated that the flow pattern development was a continuous process. Finally, it was shown that the so-called ''fully developed'' bubbly two-phase flow pattern cannot be established in a horizontal pipe and that there was no strong correspondence between void fraction and interface velocity profiles. ((orig.))

  12. Engineering the Frequency Spectrum of Bright Squeezed Vacuum via Group Velocity Dispersion in an SU(1,1) Interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Lemieux, Samuel; Manceau, Mathieu; Sharapova, Polina R.; Tikhonova, Olga V.; Boyd, Robert W.; Leuchs, Gerd; Chekhova, Maria V.

    2016-01-01

    Bright squeezed vacuum, a promising tool for quantum information, can be generated by high-gain parametric down-conversion. However, its frequency and angular spectra are typically quite broad, which is undesirable for applications requiring single-mode radiation. We tailor the frequency spectrum of high-gain parametric down-conversion using an SU(1,1) interferometer consisting of two nonlinear crystals with a dispersive medium separating them. The dispersive medium allows us to select a narr...

  13. Coordination in International Manufacturing: The Role of Competitive Priorities and the Focus of Globally Dispersed Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sayem

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this era of globalization, network integration has received great attention, as it certainly has implications for the competitiveness in international manufacturing. A key issue in integration is to coordinate activities of dispersed facilities in a way to align the target of locating abroad and the priorities to be competitive. This study explores and clarifies the effect of competitive priority and focus of dispersed facilities on coordinating the activities in intra-firm network manufacturing. Based on a multiple case study involving four different companies manufacturing in globally dispersed facilities, the results confirm that both competitive priorities and specific focus of global manufacturing are important for selecting mechanisms to coordinate overseas facilities, with the competitive priorities ‘quality’ and ‘flexibility’ being the more important. Furthermore, the findings reveal that companies place emphasis on informal mechanisms to coordinate the low-cost focused facilities. In turn, the importance of formal mechanisms seems equal for coordinating both low-cost focused facilities and those focused on capturing a local market. Finally, the findings of this paper suggest that elements of competitive priority, as well as the focus of dispersed facilities, should be considered towards making the choice for mechanisms of coordination. The findings bear important implications for the effective coordination of activities in international manufacturing.

  14. Solute transport along a single fracture in a porous rock: a simple analytical solution and its extension for modeling velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Longcheng; Neretnieks, Ivars; Shahkarami, Pirouz; Meng, Shuo; Moreno, Luis

    2018-02-01

    A simple and robust solution is developed for the problem of solute transport along a single fracture in a porous rock. The solution is referred to as the solution to the single-flow-path model and takes the form of a convolution of two functions. The first function is the probability density function of residence-time distribution of a conservative solute in the fracture-only system as if the rock matrix is impermeable. The second function is the response of the fracture-matrix system to the input source when Fickian-type dispersion is completely neglected; thus, the effects of Fickian-type dispersion and matrix diffusion have been decoupled. It is also found that the solution can be understood in a way in line with the concept of velocity dispersion in fractured rocks. The solution is therefore extended into more general cases to also account for velocity variation between the channels. This leads to a development of the multi-channel model followed by detailed statistical descriptions of channel properties and sensitivity analysis of the model upon changes in the model key parameters. The simulation results obtained by the multi-channel model in this study fairly well agree with what is often observed in field experiments—i.e. the unchanged Peclet number with distance, which cannot be predicted by the classical advection-dispersion equation. In light of the findings from the aforementioned analysis, it is suggested that forced-gradient experiments can result in considerably different estimates of dispersivity compared to what can be found in natural-gradient systems for typical channel widths.

  15. Addendum: ``The Dynamics of M15: Observations of the Velocity Dispersion Profile and Fokker-Planck Models'' (ApJ, 481, 267 [1997])

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dull, J. D.; Cohn, H. N.; Lugger, P. M.; Murphy, B. W.; Seitzer, P. O.; Callanan, P. J.; Rutten, R. G. M.; Charles, P. A.

    2003-03-01

    It has recently come to our attention that there are axis scale errors in three of the figures presented in Dull et al. (1997, hereafter D97). This paper presented Fokker-Planck models for the collapsed-core globular cluster M15 that include a dense, centrally concentrated population of neutron stars and massive white dwarfs. These models do not include a central black hole. Figure 12 of D97, which presents the predicted mass-to-light profile, is of particular interest, since it was used by Gerssen et al. (2002) as an input to their Jeans equation analysis of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) STIS velocity measurements reported by van der Marel et al. (2002). On the basis of the original, incorrect version of Figure 12, Gerssen et al. (2002) concluded that the D97 models can fit the new data only with the addition of an intermediate-mass black hole. However, this is counter to our previous finding, shown in Figure 6 of D97, that the Fokker-Planck models predict the sort of moderately rising velocity dispersion profile that Gerssen et al. (2002) infer from the new data. Baumgardt et al. (2003) have independently noted this apparent inconsistency. We appreciate the thoughtful cooperation of Roeland van der Marel in resolving this issue. Using our corrected version of Figure 12 (see below), Gerssen et al. (2003) now find that the velocity dispersion profile that they infer from the D97 mass-to-light ratio profile is entirely consistent with the velocity dispersion profile presented in Figure 6 of D97. Gerssen et al. (2003) further find that there is no statistically significant difference between the fit to the van der Marel et al. (2002) velocity measurements provided by the D97 intermediate-phase model and that provided by their model, which supplements this D97 model with a 1.7+2.7-1.7×103Msolar black hole. Thus, the choice between models with and without black holes will require additional model predictions and observational tests. We present corrected versions of

  16. The Lyα properties of faint galaxies at z ∼ 2-3 with systemic redshifts and velocity dispersions from Keck-MOSFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erb, Dawn K. [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, 1900 East Kenwood Boulevard, Milwaukee, WI 53211 (United States); Steidel, Charles C.; Trainor, Ryan F.; Strom, Allison L.; Konidaris, Nicholas P.; Matthews, Keith [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1216 East California Boulevard, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bogosavljević, Milan [Astronomical Observatory, Volgina 7, 11060 Belgrade (Serbia); Shapley, Alice E.; Nestor, Daniel B.; Mace, Gregory; McLean, Ian S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kulas, Kristin R. [NASA Ames Research Center, Bldg. 211, Room 112, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Law, David R. [Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Toronto, 50 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H4 (Canada); Rudie, Gwen C. [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Reddy, Naveen A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, 900 University Avenue, Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Pettini, Max, E-mail: erbd@uwm.edu [Institute of Astronomy, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-01

    We study the Lyα profiles of 36 spectroscopically detected Lyα-emitters (LAEs) at z ∼ 2-3, using Keck MOSFIRE to measure systemic redshifts and velocity dispersions from rest-frame optical nebular emission lines. The sample has a median optical magnitude R=26.0, and ranges from R≃23 to R>27, corresponding to rest-frame UV absolute magnitudes M {sub UV} ≅ –22 to M {sub UV} > –18.2. Dynamical masses range from M {sub dyn} < 1.3 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉} to M {sub dyn} = 6.8 × 10{sup 9} M {sub ☉}, with a median value of M {sub dyn} = 6.3 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}. Thirty of the 36 Lyα emission lines are redshifted with respect to the systemic velocity with at least 1σ significance, and the velocity offset with respect to systemic Δv {sub Lyα} is correlated with the R-band magnitude, M {sub UV}, and the velocity dispersion measured from nebular emission lines with >3σ significance: brighter galaxies with larger velocity dispersions tend to have larger values of Δv {sub Lyα}. We also make use of a comparison sample of 122 UV-color-selected R<25.5 galaxies at z ∼ 2, all with Lyα emission and systemic redshifts measured from nebular emission lines. Using the combined LAE and comparison samples for a total of 158 individual galaxies, we find that Δv {sub Lyα} is anti-correlated with the Lyα equivalent width with 7σ significance. Our results are consistent with a scenario in which the Lyα profile is determined primarily by the properties of the gas near the systemic redshift; in such a scenario, the opacity to Lyα photons in lower mass galaxies may be reduced if large gaseous disks have not yet developed and if the gas is ionized by the harder spectrum of young, low metallicity stars.

  17. Preparation of Well-Dispersed Chitosan/Alginate Hollow Multilayered Microcapsules for Enhanced Cellular Internalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Ribeiro

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hollow multilayered capsules have shown massive potential for being used in the biomedical and biotechnology fields, in applications such as cellular internalization, intracellular trafficking, drug delivery, or tissue engineering. In particular, hollow microcapsules, developed by resorting to porous calcium carbonate sacrificial templates, natural-origin building blocks and the prominent Layer-by-Layer (LbL technology, have attracted increasing attention owing to their key features. However, these microcapsules revealed a great tendency to aggregate, which represents a major hurdle when aiming for cellular internalization and intracellular therapeutics delivery. Herein, we report the preparation of well-dispersed polysaccharide-based hollow multilayered microcapsules by combining the LbL technique with an optimized purification process. Cationic chitosan (CHT and anionic alginate (ALG were chosen as the marine origin polysaccharides due to their biocompatibility and structural similarity to the extracellular matrices of living tissues. Moreover, the inexpensive and highly versatile LbL technology was used to fabricate core-shell microparticles and hollow multilayered microcapsules, with precise control over their composition and physicochemical properties, by repeating the alternate deposition of both materials. The microcapsules’ synthesis procedure was optimized to extensively reduce their natural aggregation tendency, as shown by the morphological analysis monitored by advanced microscopy techniques. The well-dispersed microcapsules showed an enhanced uptake by fibroblasts, opening new perspectives for cellular internalization.

  18. Global Properties of M31’s Stellar Halo from the SPLASH Survey. III. Measuring the Stellar Velocity Dispersion Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, Karoline M.; Tollerud, Erik; Beaton, Rachael L.; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Bullock, James S.; Chiba, Masashi; Kalirai, Jason S.; Kirby, Evan N.; Majewski, Steven R.; Tanaka, Mikito

    2018-01-01

    We present the velocity dispersion of red giant branch stars in M31’s halo, derived by modeling the line-of-sight velocity distribution of over 5000 stars in 50 fields spread throughout M31’s stellar halo. The data set was obtained as part of the Spectroscopic and Photometric Landscape of Andromeda’s Stellar Halo (SPLASH) Survey, and covers projected radii of 9 to 175 kpc from M31’s center. All major structural components along the line of sight in both the Milky Way (MW) and M31 are incorporated in a Gaussian Mixture Model, including all previously identified M31 tidal debris features in the observed fields. The probability that an individual star is a constituent of M31 or the MW, based on a set of empirical photometric and spectroscopic diagnostics, is included as a prior probability in the mixture model. The velocity dispersion of stars in M31’s halo is found to decrease only mildly with projected radius, from 108 km s‑1 in the innermost radial bin (8.2 to 14.1 kpc) to ∼80 to 90 km s‑1 at projected radii of ∼40–130 kpc, and can be parameterized with a power law of slope ‑0.12 ± 0.05. The quoted uncertainty on the power-law slope reflects only the precision of the method, although other sources of uncertainty we consider contribute negligibly to the overall error budget. The data presented herein were obtained at the W.M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W.M. Keck Foundation.

  19. An equation of mean velocity of flow in non uniform regime, its relationship with the dispersion phenomenon as time function and its application to study of water quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Constain Aragon, A.; Lemos Ruiz, R.

    2011-01-01

    It is very well known the basic equation of hydraulics discovered by Antoine de Chezy in 1769, which relates in a quadratic from the mean velocity of flow with the slope of energy line and the hydraulic radius, in a uniform regime. This equation has been the central axis of development of hydro metrics as science that faces the huge challenges of penetrating the knowledge of earths streams every time more contaminated. In virtue of that, its mathematical structure and the relationship with other related formulas have been carefully examined, despite the limitation due to constancy of velocity. Starting from chemical considerations rather than dynamic ones as was used to obtain chezys relationship it is possible to establish a second equation for mean velocity of fluid in a non uniform regime that corresponds to averaged movement of a solute poured to steam. This equation will go to relate in an accurate way several aspects hydraulics and mass transport, sight as a single thing, allowing a vital tool for a depth study of water contaminations. to arrive this equation it was reviewed the foundations of mass transport theory in flows, stating a time dependent nature for coefficient currently used in describing dispersion phenomena allowing to interpret properly certain inconsistencies detected long time ago in this theory. It is presented the detailed results of application of this new approach to a small steam and a larger river in Colombia. (Author) 23 refs.

  20. Study of the dissolution velocity of dispersed solid particles. Development of a calculation method for analyzing the kinetic curves. Extension to the study of composed kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jorda, Michel.

    1976-01-01

    The dissolution of a solid in an aqueous phase is studied, the solid consisting of dispersed particles. A continuous colorimetric analysis method is developed to study the dissolution process and a two-parameter optimization method is established to investigate the kinetic curves obtained. This method is based on the differential equation dx/dt=K(1-x)sup(n). (n being the decrease in the dissolution velocity when the dissolved part increases and K a velocity parameter). The dissolution of SO 4 Cu and MnO 4 K in water and UO 3 in SO 4 H 2 is discussed. It is shown that the dissolution velocity of UO 3 is proportional to the concentration of the H + ions in the solution as far as this one is not higher than 0.25N. The study of the temperature dependence of the UO 3 dissolution reaction shows that a transition phase takes place from 25 to 65 0 C between a phase in which the dissolution is controlled by the diffusion of the H + ions and the chemical reaction at the interface and a phase in which the kinetics is only controlled by the diffusion [fr

  1. The Systemic Velocity and Internal Kinematics of the Dwarf Galaxy LGS 3: An Optical Foray beyond the Milky Way

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.H.; Mateo, M.; Olszewski, E.W.; Vogt, S.S.; Stubbs, C.; Diercks, A.

    1999-01-01

    We have obtained radial velocities of three K giants and one faint carbon star in LGS 3, a dwarf companion of M31, based on 12 individual spectra obtained with the HIRES spectrograph on the Keck I telescope. The mean precision of these measurements is 3.8 km s -1 . The mean systemic velocity of LGS 3 is -282.2±3.5 km s -1 . Monte Carlo simulations that take into account the individual velocity uncertainties and the maximum observed velocity difference reveal that the central velocity dispersion of LGS 3 is in the range 2.6 - 30.5 km s -1 , with 95% confidence; the most likely value for the central dispersion is 7.9 +5.3 -2.9 km s -1 . These results agree with the kinematics of H i gas in LGS 3. This contrasts with the tendency for the gas and stars in other low-luminosity Local Group dwarfs to exhibit distinct spatial and kinematic properties. Taking into account the relative youth of LGS 3, we conclude that the 'asymptotic' M/L ratio the value the galaxy would exhibit if it were composed only of ancient stars is M/L V,LGS3 ≥11 (at a 97.5% confidence level), with a most probable value of 95 +175 -56 . These values are consistent with the M/L V ratios observed in other well-studied early-type dwarfs of the Local Group. We have also estimated the mass of LGS 3 using modified Newtonian dynamics. These data represent the first moderately high precision optical spectra of giants in a dwarf system beyond the Galactic halo. We suggest future studies that are now feasible to study the dynamics of dwarf galaxies throughout the Local Group and beyond. copyright copyright 1999. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific

  2. Analysis of Wave Velocity Patterns in Black Cherry Trees and its Effect on Internal Decay Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guanghui Li; Xiping Wang; Jan Wiedenbeck; Robert J. Ross

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we examined stress wave velocity patterns in the cross sections of black cherry trees, developed analytical models of stress wave velocity in sound healthy trees, and then tested the effectiveness of the models as a tool for tree decay diagnosis. Acoustic tomography data of the tree cross sections were collected from 12 black cherry trees at a production...

  3. Internal and external dispersal of plants by animals: an aquatic perspective on alien interference

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Casper

    2018-01-01

    Many alien plants use animal vectors for dispersal of their diaspores (zoochory). If alien plants interact with native disperser animals, this can interfere with animal-mediated dispersal of native diaspores. Interference by alien species is known for frugivorous animals dispersing fruits of

  4. S-wave velocities of the lithosphere-asthenosphere system in the Lesser Antilles from the joint inversion of surface wave dispersion and receiver function analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, O'Leary; Clouard, Valerie; Tait, Stephen; Panza, Giuliano F.

    2018-06-01

    We present an overview of S-wave velocities (Vs) within the crust and upper mantle of the Lesser Antilles as determined with 19 seismic broadband stations. Receiver functions (RF) have been computed from teleseismic recordings of earthquakes, and Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion relations have been taken from earlier surface wave tomographic studies in the Caribbean area. Local smoothness optimization (LSO) procedure has been applied, combined with an H-K stacking method, the spatial distribution of hypocenters of local earthquakes and of the energy they released, in order to identify an optimum 1D model of Vs below each station. Several features of the Caribbean plate and its interaction with the Atlantic subducting slab are visible in the resulting models: (a) relatively thick oceanic crust below these stations ranges from 21 km to 33 km, being slight thinner in the middle of the island arc; (b) crustal low velocity zones are present below stations SABA, SEUS, SKI, SMRT, CBE, DSD, GCMP and TDBA; (c) lithospheric thickness range from 40 km to 105 km but lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary was not straightforward to correlate between stations; (d) the aseismic mantle wedge between the Caribbean seismic lithosphere and the subducted slab varies in thickness as well as Vs values which are, in general, lower below the West of Martinique than below the West of Guadeloupe; (e) the depth of the subducted slab beneath the volcanic arc, appears to be greater to the North, and relatively shallower below some stations (e.g. DLPL, SAM, BIM and FDF) than was estimated in previous studies based on the depth-distribution of seismicity; f) the WBZ is >10-15 km deeper than the top of the slab below the Central Lesser Antilles (Martinique and Dominica) where the presence of partial melt in the mantle wedge seems also to be more evident.

  5. The internal strain parameter of gallium arsenide measured by energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cousins, C.S.G.; Sheldon, B.J.; Webster, G.E.; Gerward, L.; Selsmark, B.; Staun Olsen, J.

    1989-01-01

    The internal strain parameter of GaAs has been measured by observing the stress-dependence of the integrated intensity of the weak 006 reflection, with the compressive stress along the [1anti 10] axis. An energy-dispersive technique was employed so that the reflection could be obtained at a photon energy close to the minimum in the structure factor, thereby approaching closely the strictly-forbidden condition that applies at any energy in the diamond structure. A value anti A=-0.138±0.005, equivalent to a bond-bending parameter ζ=0.55=0.02, has been found. This is in good agreement with recent theoretical calculations and indirect determinations related to the bandstructure of GaAs. (orig.)

  6. The relation between pre-eruptive bubble size distribution, ash particle morphology, and their internal density: Implications to volcanic ash transport and dispersion models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proussevitch, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    Parameterization of volcanic ash transport and dispersion (VATD) models strongly depends on particle morphology and their internal properties. Shape of ash particles affects terminal fall velocities (TFV) and, mostly, dispersion. Internal density combined with particle size has a very strong impact on TFV and ultimately on the rate of ash cloud thinning and particle sedimentation on the ground. Unlike other parameters, internal particle density cannot be measured directly because of the micron scale sizes of fine ash particles, but we demonstrate that it varies greatly depending on the particle size. Small simple type ash particles (fragments of bubble walls, 5-20 micron size) do not contain whole large magmatic bubbles inside and their internal density is almost the same as that of volcanic glass matrix. On the other side, the larger compound type ash particles (>40 microns for silicic fine ashes) always contain some bubbles or the whole spectra of bubble size distribution (BSD), i.e. bubbles of all sizes, bringing their internal density down as compared to simple ash. So, density of the larger ash particles is a function of the void fraction inside them (magmatic bubbles) which, in turn, is controlled by BSD. Volcanic ash is a product of the fragmentation of magmatic foam formed by pre-eruptive bubble population and characterized by BSD. The latter can now be measured from bubble imprints on ash particle surfaces using stereo-scanning electron microscopy (SSEM) and BubbleMaker software developed at UNH, or using traditional high-resolution X-Ray tomography. In this work we present the mathematical and statistical formulation for this problem connecting internal ash density with particle size and BSD, and demonstrate how the TFV of the ash population is affected by variation of particle density.

  7. Non-contact evaluation of mechanical properties of electroplated wear resistant Ni-P layer from the velocity dispersion of laser SAW; Laser reiki Rayleigh ha no sokudo bunsan wo mochiita taimamo Ni-P mekkiso tokusei no hisesshoku hyoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morikawa, Y.; Cho, H.; Takemoto, M. [Aoyama Gakuin University, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Science and Engineering; Nakayama, T. [Kobe Steel Ltd., Kobe (Japan)

    1996-11-01

    We developed a new laser surface acoustic wave (SAW) system and applied this to estimate the mechanical properties of the wear-resistant Ni-P layer electroplated on a stainless steel. The velocity dispersions of Rayleigh wave of the as -plated and heat-treated Ni-P layer were obtained by the one point time domain signal processing. The Ni-P layers with excellent wear resistance produced by the heated treatment higher than 725K were found to show higher Rayleigh velocities than that of the substrate steel, while the Ni-P layer with poor wear resistance showed lower velocities. Young`s moduli of the Ni-P layer, estimated so as the computed velocity dispersion agreed with the measured one, increased with the increase of wear resistance. 10 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Numerical Study of Ammonia Leak and Dispersion in the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Chang H.

    2012-01-01

    Release of ammonia into the International Space Station (ISS) cabin atmosphere can occur if the water/ammonia barrier breach of the active thermal control system (ATCS) interface heat exchanger (IFHX) happens. After IFHX breach liquid ammonia is introduced into the water-filled internal thermal control system (ITCS) and then to the cabin environment through a ruptured gas trap. Once the liquid water/ammonia mixture exits ITCS, it instantly vaporizes and mixes with the U.S. Laboratory cabin air that results in rapid deterioration of the cabin conditions. The goal of the study is to assess ammonia propagation in the Station after IFHX breach to plan the operation procedure. A Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model for accurate prediction of airflow and ammonia transport within each of the modules in the ISS cabin was developed. CFD data on ammonia content in the cabin aisle way of the ISS and, in particular, in the Russian On- Orbit Segment during the period of 15 minutes after gas trap rupture are presented for four scenarios of rupture response. Localized effects of ammonia dispersion and risk mitigation are discussed.

  9. Experimental results showing the internal three-component velocity field and outlet temperature contours for a model gas turbine combustor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Meyers, BC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Inc. All rights reserved ISABE-2011-1129 EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS SHOWING THE INTERNAL THREE-COMPONENT VELOCITY FIELD AND OUTLET TEMPERATURE CONTOURS FOR A MODEL GAS TURBINE COMBUSTOR BC Meyers*, GC... identifier c Position identifier F Fuel i Index L (Combustor) Liner OP Orifice plate Introduction There are often inconsistencies when comparing experimental and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations for gas turbine combustors [1...

  10. On vertical velocity fluctuations and internal tides in an upwelling region off the west coast of India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A.S.; Antony, M.K.

    .28 at 40 m (between two stations separated by a distance of 27 km), we obtain u a T/ax = 0.26 x 10m5 “C sP ‘. If the minimum value of AT over 1 h is taken as 0.3”C, aTlatz8.3 x lOA “C s-l, which is an order of Vertical velocity and internal tides 869 60...

  11. MASS CALIBRATION AND COSMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SPT-SZ GALAXY CLUSTER SAMPLE USING VELOCITY DISPERSION σ v AND X-RAY Y X MEASUREMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Bazin, G.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S.; Aird, K. A.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Bautz, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T.; Brodwin, M.; Cho, H. M.; Clocchiatti, A.; De Haan, T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg 2 of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σ v ) and 16 X-ray Y X measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σ v and Y X are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ v calibration preferring ∼16% higher masses. We use the full SPT CL data set (SZ clusters+σ v +Y X ) to measure σ 8 (Ω m /0.27) 0.3 = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is ∑m ν = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger ∑m ν further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPT CL and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the Y X calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ v calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (∼44% and ∼23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ω m = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ 8 = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find ∑m ν = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the dark energy equation-of-state parameter w to vary, we find γ = 0.73 ± 0.28 and w = –1.007 ± 0.065, demonstrating that the

  12. The MASSIVE Survey - V. Spatially resolved stellar angular momentum, velocity dispersion, and higher moments of the 41 most massive local early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Melanie; Ma, Chung-Pei; Thomas, Jens; Greene, Jenny E.; McConnell, Nicholas J.; Walsh, Jonelle; Ito, Jennifer; Blakeslee, John P.; Janish, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    We present spatially resolved two-dimensional stellar kinematics for the 41 most massive early-type galaxies (ETGs; MK ≲ -25.7 mag, stellar mass M* ≳ 1011.8 M⊙) of the volume-limited (D McDonald Observatory, covering a 107 arcsec × 107 arcsec field of view (often reaching 2 to 3 effective radii). We measure the 2D spatial distribution of each galaxy's angular momentum (λ and fast or slow rotator status), velocity dispersion (σ), and higher order non-Gaussian velocity features (Gauss-Hermite moments h3 to h6). Our sample contains a high fraction (˜80 per cent) of slow and non-rotators with λ ≲ 0.2. When combined with the lower mass ETGs in the ATLAS3D survey, we find the fraction of slow rotators to increase dramatically with galaxy mass, reaching ˜50 per cent at MK ˜ -25.5 mag and ˜90 per cent at MK ≲ -26 mag. All of our fast rotators show a clear anticorrelation between h3 and V/σ, and the slope of the anticorrelation is steeper in more round galaxies. The radial profiles of σ show a clear luminosity and environmental dependence: the 12 most luminous galaxies in our sample (MK ≲ -26 mag) are all brightest cluster/group galaxies (except NGC 4874) and all have rising or nearly flat σ profiles, whereas five of the seven `isolated' galaxies are all fainter than MK = -25.8 mag and have falling σ. All of our galaxies have positive average h4; the most luminous galaxies have average h4 ˜ 0.05, while less luminous galaxies have a range of values between 0 and 0.05. Most of our galaxies show positive radial gradients in h4, and those galaxies also tend to have rising σ profiles. We discuss the implications for the relationship among dynamical mass, σ, h4, and velocity anisotropy for these massive galaxies.

  13. Determining the group velocity dispersion by field analysis for the LP0X, LP1X, and LP2X mode groups independently of the fiber length: applications to step-index fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Israelsen, Stine Møller; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    By knowing the electric field distribution of a guided mode in an optical fiber, we are able to evaluate the group velocity dispersion in a weakly guiding step-index fiber for a pure mode in the LP0X, LP1X, and LP2X mode groups independently of the fiber length. We demonstrate the method numerica...

  14. Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy of compact star-forming galaxies at z ≳ 2: high velocity dispersions in progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, Sandra M.; Guo, Yicheng; Toloba, Elisa; Fang, Jerome J.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Dekel, Avishai; Kassin, Susan A.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Kocevski, Dale D.; Van der Wel, Arjen; Pérez-González, Pablo G.; Pacifici, Camilla; Simons, Raymond; Campbell, Randy D.; Goodrich, Bob; Kassis, Marc; Ceverino, Daniel; Finkelstein, Steven L.

    2014-01-01

    We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift 2 ≤ z ≤ 2.5 with star formation rates of SFR ∼ 100 M ☉ yr –1 and masses of log(M/M ☉ ) ∼10.8. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of σ int =230 −30 +40 km s –1 , as measured from emission lines of Hα and [O III], and the resultant M * -σ int relation and M * -M dyn all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at z ∼ 2, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M * /M dyn ) =–0.06 ± 0.2 dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and evolved, i.e., depleted in gas and dark matter (<13 −13 +17 %), and present larger σ int than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than ∼300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence that compact SFGs at z ≳ 2 are already losing gas to become the immediate progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies by z ∼ 2.

  15. Keck-I MOSFIRE spectroscopy of compact star-forming galaxies at z ≳ 2: high velocity dispersions in progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barro, Guillermo; Koo, David C.; Faber, Sandra M.; Guo, Yicheng; Toloba, Elisa; Fang, Jerome J. [University of California, Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Trump, Jonathan R. [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, State College, PA 16802 (United States); Dekel, Avishai [Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Kassin, Susan A.; Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Kocevski, Dale D. [University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40506 (United States); Van der Wel, Arjen [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pérez-González, Pablo G. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Avda. de Sneca, 2 Ciudad Universitaria, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Pacifici, Camilla [Yonsei University Observatory, Yonsei University 50, Yonsei-ro, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Simons, Raymond [Johns Hopkins University, 3400 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-2683 (United States); Campbell, Randy D.; Goodrich, Bob; Kassis, Marc [W. M. Keck Observatory, California Association for Research in Astronomy, 65-1120 Mamalahoa Highway, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Ceverino, Daniel [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria de Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Finkelstein, Steven L. [The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); and others

    2014-11-10

    We present Keck-I MOSFIRE near-infrared spectroscopy for a sample of 13 compact star-forming galaxies (SFGs) at redshift 2 ≤ z ≤ 2.5 with star formation rates of SFR ∼ 100 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1} and masses of log(M/M {sub ☉}) ∼10.8. Their high integrated gas velocity dispersions of σ{sub int} =230{sub −30}{sup +40} km s{sup –1}, as measured from emission lines of Hα and [O III], and the resultant M {sub *}-σ{sub int} relation and M {sub *}-M {sub dyn} all match well to those of compact quiescent galaxies at z ∼ 2, as measured from stellar absorption lines. Since log(M {sub *}/M {sub dyn}) =–0.06 ± 0.2 dex, these compact SFGs appear to be dynamically relaxed and evolved, i.e., depleted in gas and dark matter (<13{sub −13}{sup +17}%), and present larger σ{sub int} than their non-compact SFG counterparts at the same epoch. Without infusion of external gas, depletion timescales are short, less than ∼300 Myr. This discovery adds another link to our new dynamical chain of evidence that compact SFGs at z ≳ 2 are already losing gas to become the immediate progenitors of compact quiescent galaxies by z ∼ 2.

  16. Filamentation and light bullet formation dynamics in solid-state dielectric media with weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gražulevičiūtė, I; Garejev, N; Majus, D; Tamošauskas, G; A Dubietis; Jukna, V

    2016-01-01

    We present a series of measurements, which characterize filamentation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses in the space–time domain, as captured by means of three-dimensional imaging technique in sapphire and fused silica, in the wavelength range of 1.45–2.25 μm, accessing the regimes of weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD). In the regime of weak anomalous GVD (at 1.45 μm), pulse splitting into two sub-pulses producing a pair of light bullets with spectrally shifted carrier frequencies in both nonlinear media is observed. In contrast, in the regimes of moderate (at 1.8 μm) and strong (at 2.25 μm) anomalous GVD we observe notably different transient dynamics, which however lead to the formation of a single self-compressed quasistationary light bullet with an universal spatiotemporal shape comprised of an extended ring-shaped periphery and a localized intense core that carries the self-compressed pulse. (paper)

  17. Filamentation and light bullet formation dynamics in solid-state dielectric media with weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gražulevičiūtė, I.; Garejev, N.; Majus, D.; Jukna, V.; Tamošauskas, G.; Dubietis, A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a series of measurements, which characterize filamentation dynamics of intense ultrashort laser pulses in the space-time domain, as captured by means of three-dimensional imaging technique in sapphire and fused silica, in the wavelength range of 1.45-2.25 μm, accessing the regimes of weak, moderate and strong anomalous group velocity dispersion (GVD). In the regime of weak anomalous GVD (at 1.45 μm), pulse splitting into two sub-pulses producing a pair of light bullets with spectrally shifted carrier frequencies in both nonlinear media is observed. In contrast, in the regimes of moderate (at 1.8 μm) and strong (at 2.25 μm) anomalous GVD we observe notably different transient dynamics, which however lead to the formation of a single self-compressed quasistationary light bullet with an universal spatiotemporal shape comprised of an extended ring-shaped periphery and a localized intense core that carries the self-compressed pulse.

  18. Characterization of Dispersion Strengthened Copper Alloy Prepared by Internal Oxidation Combined with Mechanical Alloying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziqian; Xiao, Zhu; Li, Zhou; Zhu, Mengnan; Yang, Ziqi

    2017-11-01

    Cu-3.6 vol.% Al2O3 dispersion strengthened alloy was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA) of internal oxidation Cu-Al powders. The lattice parameter of Cu matrix decreased with milling time for powders milled in argon, while the abnormal increase of lattice parameter occurred in the air resulting from mechanochemical reactions. With a quantitative analysis, the combined method makes residual aluminum oxidized completely within 10-20 h while mechanical alloying method alone needs longer than 40 h. Lamellar structure formed and the thickness of lamellar structure decreased with milling time. The size of Al2O3 particles decreased from 46 to 22 nm after 40 h milling. After reduction, core-shell structure was found in MAed powders milled in the air. The compacted alloy produced by MAed powders milled in the argon had an average hardness and electrical conductivity of 172.2 HV and 82.1% IACS while the unmilled alloy's were 119.8 HV and 74.1% IACS due to the Al2O3 particles refinement and residual aluminum in situ oxidization.

  19. An analysis of numerical convergence in discrete velocity gas dynamics for internal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekaran, Aarthi; Varghese, Philip; Goldstein, David

    2018-07-01

    The Discrete Velocity Method (DVM) for solving the Boltzmann equation has significant advantages in the modeling of non-equilibrium and near equilibrium flows as compared to other methods in terms of reduced statistical noise, faster solutions and the ability to handle transient flows. Yet the DVM performance for rarefied flow in complex, small-scale geometries, in microelectromechanical (MEMS) devices for instance, is yet to be studied in detail. The present study focuses on the performance of the DVM for locally large Knudsen number flows of argon around sharp corners and other sources for discontinuities in the distribution function. Our analysis details the nature of the solution for some benchmark cases and introduces the concept of solution convergence for the transport terms in the discrete velocity Boltzmann equation. The limiting effects of the velocity space discretization are also investigated and the constraints on obtaining a robust, consistent solution are derived. We propose techniques to maintain solution convergence and demonstrate the implementation of a specific strategy and its effect on the fidelity of the solution for some benchmark cases.

  20. MASS CALIBRATION AND COSMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE SPT-SZ GALAXY CLUSTER SAMPLE USING VELOCITY DISPERSION σ {sub v} AND X-RAY Y {sub X} MEASUREMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bocquet, S.; Saro, A.; Mohr, J. J.; Bazin, G.; Chiu, I.; Desai, S. [Department of Physics, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Scheinerstr. 1, D-81679 München (Germany); Aird, K. A. [University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Bautz, M. [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Benson, B. A. [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510-0500 (United States); Bleem, L. E.; Carlstrom, J. E.; Chang, C. L.; Crawford, T. M.; Crites, A. T. [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Brodwin, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, 5110 Rockhill Road, Kansas City, MO 64110 (United States); Cho, H. M. [NIST Quantum Devices Group, 325 Broadway Mailcode 817.03, Boulder, CO 80305 (United States); Clocchiatti, A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrosifica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica (Chile); De Haan, T., E-mail: bocquet@usm.lmu.de [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 Rue University, Montreal, Quebec H3A 2T8 (Canada); and others

    2015-02-01

    We present a velocity-dispersion-based mass calibration of the South Pole Telescope Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect survey (SPT-SZ) galaxy cluster sample. Using a homogeneously selected sample of 100 cluster candidates from 720 deg{sup 2} of the survey along with 63 velocity dispersion (σ {sub v}) and 16 X-ray Y {sub X} measurements of sample clusters, we simultaneously calibrate the mass-observable relation and constrain cosmological parameters. Our method accounts for cluster selection, cosmological sensitivity, and uncertainties in the mass calibrators. The calibrations using σ {sub v} and Y {sub X} are consistent at the 0.6σ level, with the σ {sub v} calibration preferring ∼16% higher masses. We use the full SPT{sub CL} data set (SZ clusters+σ {sub v}+Y {sub X}) to measure σ{sub 8}(Ω{sub m}/0.27){sup 0.3} = 0.809 ± 0.036 within a flat ΛCDM model. The SPT cluster abundance is lower than preferred by either the WMAP9 or Planck+WMAP9 polarization (WP) data, but assuming that the sum of the neutrino masses is ∑m {sub ν} = 0.06 eV, we find the data sets to be consistent at the 1.0σ level for WMAP9 and 1.5σ for Planck+WP. Allowing for larger ∑m {sub ν} further reconciles the results. When we combine the SPT{sub CL} and Planck+WP data sets with information from baryon acoustic oscillations and Type Ia supernovae, the preferred cluster masses are 1.9σ higher than the Y {sub X} calibration and 0.8σ higher than the σ {sub v} calibration. Given the scale of these shifts (∼44% and ∼23% in mass, respectively), we execute a goodness-of-fit test; it reveals no tension, indicating that the best-fit model provides an adequate description of the data. Using the multi-probe data set, we measure Ω{sub m} = 0.299 ± 0.009 and σ{sub 8} = 0.829 ± 0.011. Within a νCDM model we find ∑m {sub ν} = 0.148 ± 0.081 eV. We present a consistency test of the cosmic growth rate using SPT clusters. Allowing both the growth index γ and the dark energy equation

  1. A galactic disk as a two-fluid system: Consequences for the critical stellar velocity dispersion and the formation of condensations in the gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jog, C.J.; Solomon, P.M.

    1984-01-01

    We examine the consequences of treating a galactic disk as a two-fluid system for the stability of the entire disk and for the stability and form of the gas in the disk. We find that the existence of even a small fraction of the total disk surface density in a cold fluid (that is, the gas) makes it much harder to stabilize the entire two-fluid disk. (C/sub s/,min)/sub 2-f/, the critical stellar velocity dispersion for a two-fluid disk in an increasing function of μ/sub g//μ/sub s/, the gas fraction, and μ/sub t//kappa, where μ/sub g/, μ/sub s/, and μ/sub t/ are the gaseous, stellar, and total disk surface densities and kappa is the epicyclic frequency. In the Galaxy, we find that (C/sub s/,min)/sub 2-f/ as a function of R peaks when μ/sub t//kappa peaks-at galactocentric radii of Rapprox.5-7 kpc; two-fluid instabilities are most likely to occur in this region. This region is coincident with the peak in the molecular cloud distribution in the Galaxy. At the higher effective gas density resulting from the growth of a two-fluid instability, the gas may become unstble, even when originally the gas by itself is stable. The wavelength of a typical (induced) gas instability in the inner galaxy is approx.400 pc, and it contains approx.10 7 M/sub sun/ of interstellar matter; these instabilities may be identified with clusters of giant molecular clouds. We suggest that many of the spiral features seen in gas-rich spiral galaxies may be material arms or arm segments resulting from sheared two-fluid gravitational instabilities. The analysis presented here is applicable to any general disk galaxy consisting of stars and gas

  2. Additional radial velocities of supergiants in the Small Magellanic Cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thackeray, A.D.

    1978-01-01

    Additional radial velocities of 28 SMC supergiants determined in the years 1959-69 at the Radcliffe Observatory are presented. These and other measures from ESO and elsewhere are intercompared. The mean Radcliffe velocities have an internal standard error of +- 4.7 km/s and a systematic error exceeding 4 km/s is regarded as unlikely. Eight stars in the SMC core have a corrected velocity dispersion of only 6.9 km/s, similar to Feast's values for H II regions in the core. But the core H II regions have a velocity differential of -20 km/s relative to these stars. The velocity dispersion for stars in other parts of the Cloud is of the order 15 km/s as previously found. Two possibly variable-velocity stars are discussed, without reaching a satisfactory conclusion. (author)

  3. The preliminary results: Internal seismic velocity structure imaging beneath Mount Lokon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Firmansyah, Rizky, E-mail: rizkyfirmansyah@hotmail.com [Geophysical Engineering, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Nugraha, Andri Dian, E-mail: nugraha@gf.itb.ac.id [Global Geophysical Group, Faculty of Mining and Petroleum Engineering, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, 40132 (Indonesia); Kristianto, E-mail: kris@vsi.esdm.go.id [Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation (CVGHM), Geological Agency, Bandung, 40122 (Indonesia)

    2015-04-24

    Historical records that before the 17{sup th} century, Mount Lokon had been dormant for approximately 400 years. In the years between 1350 and 1400, eruption ever recorded in Empung, came from Mount Lokon’s central crater. Subsequently, in 1750 to 1800, Mount Lokon continued to erupt again and caused soil damage and fall victim. After 1949, Mount Lokon dramatically increased in its frequency: the eruption interval varies between 1 – 5 years, with an average interval of 3 years and a rest interval ranged from 8 – 64 years. Then, on June 26{sup th}, 2011, standby alert set by the Center for Volcanology and Geological Hazard Mitigation. Peak activity happened on July 4{sup th}, 2011 that Mount Lokon erupted continuously until August 28{sup th}, 2011. In this study, we carefully analyzed micro-earthquakes waveform and determined hypocenter location of those events. We then conducted travel time seismic tomographic inversion using SIMULPS12 method to detemine Vp, Vs and Vp/Vs ratio structures beneath Lokon volcano in order to enhance our subsurface geological structure. During the tomographic inversion, we started from 1-D seismic velocities model obtained from VELEST33 method. Our preliminary results show low Vp, low Vs, and high Vp/Vs are observed beneath Mount Lokon-Empung which are may be associated with weak zone or hot material zones. However, in this study we used few station for recording of micro-earthquake events. So, we suggest in the future tomography study, the adding of some seismometers in order to improve ray coverage in the region is profoundly justified.

  4. The stellar initial mass function of early-type galaxies from low to high stellar velocity dispersion: homogeneous analysis of ATLAS3D and Sloan Lens ACS galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posacki, Silvia; Cappellari, Michele; Treu, Tommaso; Pellegrini, Silvia; Ciotti, Luca

    2015-01-01

    We present an investigation about the shape of the initial mass function (IMF) of early-type galaxies (ETGs), based on a joint lensing and dynamical analysis, and on stellar population synthesis models, for a sample of 55 lens ETGs identified by the Sloan Lens Advanced Camera for Surveys (SLACS). We construct axisymmetric dynamical models based on the Jeans equations which allow for orbital anisotropy and include a dark matter halo. The models reproduce in detail the observed Hubble Space Telescope photometry and are constrained by the total projected mass within the Einstein radius and the stellar velocity dispersion (σ) within the Sloan Digital Sky Survey fibres. Comparing the dynamically-derived stellar mass-to-light ratios (M*/L)dyn, obtained for an assumed halo slope ρh ∝ r-1, to the stellar population ones (M*/L)Salp, derived from full-spectrum fitting and assuming a Salpeter IMF, we infer the mass normalization of the IMF. Our results confirm the previous analysis by the SLACS team that the mass normalization of the IMF of high-σ galaxies is consistent on average with a Salpeter slope. Our study allows for a fully consistent study of the trend between IMF and σ for both the SLACS and atlas3D samples, which explore quite different σ ranges. The two samples are highly complementary, the first being essentially σ selected, and the latter volume-limited and nearly mass selected. We find that the two samples merge smoothly into a single trend of the form log α = (0.38 ± 0.04) × log (σe/200 km s-1) + ( - 0.06 ± 0.01), where α = (M*/L)dyn/(M*/L)Salp and σe is the luminosity averaged σ within one effective radius Re. This is consistent with a systematic variation of the IMF normalization from Kroupa to Salpeter in the interval σe ≈ 90-270 km s-1.

  5. Comparison of the socioeconomic impacts of international fuel service centers versus dispersed nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braid, R.B. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper investigates a variety of community impacts including: public services, fiscal issues, economic matters, land and water use, political and social cohesion, and legal considerations. Comparisons of socioeconomic impacts of colocated versus dispersed sites are made on the basis of the size of the impacted communities, the size and type of nuclear facility, and the facility's construction time frame. The paper concludes that, under similar circumstances, most of the socioeconomic impacts of colocated nuclear facilities would be somewhat less than the sum of the impacts associated with equivalent dispersed sites. While empirical data is non-existent, the paper contends, however, that because the socioeconomic impacts of colocated facilities are so great and readily identifiable to a public unskilled in making comparisons with the dispersed alternative, the facilities will likely generate so much public opposition that IFSCs will probably prove infeasible

  6. Seismic velocity structure of the crust and upper mantle beneath the Texas-Gulf of Mexico margin from joint inversion of Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, M.; Pulliam, J.; Sen, M. K.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic structure beneath Texas Gulf Coast Plain (GCP) is determined via velocity analysis of stacked common conversion point (CCP) Ps and Sp receiver functions and surface wave dispersion. The GCP is a portion of a ocean-continental transition zone, or 'passive margin', where seismic imaging of lithospheric Earth structure via passive seismic techniques has been rare. Seismic data from a temporary array of 22 broadband stations, spaced 16-20 km apart, on a ~380-km-long profile from Matagorda Island, a barrier island in the Gulf of Mexico, to Johnson City, Texas were employed to construct a coherent image of the crust and uppermost mantle. CCP stacking was applied to data from teleseismic earthquakes to enhance the signal-to-noise ratios of converted phases, such as Ps phases. An inaccurate velocity model, used for time-to-depth conversion in CCP stacking, may produce higher errors, especially in a region of substantial lateral velocity variations. An accurate velocity model is therefore essential to constructing high quality depth-domain images. To find accurate velocity P- and S-wave models, we applied a joint modeling approach that searches for best-fitting models via simulated annealing. This joint inversion approach, which we call 'multi objective optimization in seismology' (MOOS), simultaneously models Ps receiver functions, Sp receiver functions and group velocity surface wave dispersion curves after assigning relative weights for each objective function. Weights are computed from the standard deviations of the data. Statistical tools such as the posterior parameter correlation matrix and posterior probability density (PPD) function are used to evaluate the constraints that each data type places on model parameters. They allow us to identify portions of the model that are well or poorly constrained.

  7. Multi-azimuth Anisotropic Velocity Measurements in Fractured Crystalline Rock From the International Continental Drilling Program Outokumpu Borehole, Finland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schijns, H.; Duo, X.; Heinonen, S.; Schmitt, D. R.; Kukkonen, I. T.; Heikkinen, P.

    2008-12-01

    A high resolution seismic survey consisting of a multi-depth multi-azimuth VSP, a zero-offset VSP and a reflection/refraction survey was conducting in May, 2006, near the town of Outokumpu, Finland, using the International Continental Scientific Drilling Program 2.5 km deep fully cored scientific borehole. The survey was undertaken in order to create an anisotropic velocity model for future micro-seism studies as well as to provide a higher resolution reflection profile through the area than was previously available. The seismic survey high frequency seismic vibrator as a source, employing 8 s linear taper sweeps from 15-250 Hz at 20 m shot spacing. Receivers were 14 Hz single component geophones on the surface and a three component geophone downhole. The walk-away VSP included measurements over two azimuths with the receiver at depths of 1000, 1750 and 2500 m, while the zero-offset VSP used a 2 m depth increment. Surface geophones were located along the same seismic lines as employed in the walk-away VSP and were nominally 4 m apart. The survey area is located on the Fennoscandian shield, and the glacial history of the area required significant static corrections to account for the variable overburden overlying the mica-rich schist and pegmatitic granite composing the bedrock. These were calculated using travel-time inversion of the refraction data and were applied to the walk-away VSP and reflection profiles, significantly improving the quality of both. Anisotropic velocity analysis was performed using a plane-wave decomposition of the processed walk-away VSP. The maximum anisotropy was observed in the walk-away VSPs along the Southeastern azimuth, with the P-wave phase velocity ranging from 5330-5950 m/s between 50-1000 m in depth, and up to 6150 m/s between 1000-1750 m in depth. Shear wave splitting was observed in the Northeastern direction. Preliminary analysis of the zero-offset VSP has revealed shown good agreement with the relevant portions of the

  8. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kevin T.; Balouet, Jean Christophe; Shortle, Walter C.; Chalot, Michel; Beaujard, François; Grudd, Håkan; Vroblesky, Don A.; Burkem, Joel G.

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to distinguish dendrochemical effects of internal processes from environmental contamination. Calcium, potassium, and zinc are three marker cations that illustrate the influence of these processes. We found changes in cation chemistry in tree rings potentially due to biomineralization, development of cracks or checks, heartwood/sapwood differentiation, intra-annual processes, and compartmentalization of infection. Distinguishing internal from external processes that affect dendrochemistry will enhance the value of EDXRF for both physiological and forensic investigations.

  9. Longitudinal dispersion coefficient depending on superficial velocity of hydrogen isotopes flowing in column packed with zeolite pellets at 77.4 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotoh, K. [Faculty of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Kubo, K.; Takashima, S.; Moriyama, S.T. [Graduate School of Engineering, Kyushu University, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka (Japan); Tanaka, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Oroshi-cho, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugiyama, T. [Faculty of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

    2015-03-15

    Authors have been developing a cryogenic pressure swing adsorption system for hydrogen isotope separation. In the problem of its design and operation, it is necessary to predict the concentration profiles developing in packed beds of adsorbent pellets. The profiling is affected by the longitudinal dispersion of gas flowing in packed beds, in addition to the mass transfer resistance in porous media of adsorbent pellets. In this work, an equation is derived for estimating the packed-bed dispersion coefficient of hydrogen isotopes, by analyzing the breakthrough curves of trace D{sub 2} or HD replacing H{sub 2} adsorbed in synthetic zeolite particles packed columns at the liquefied nitrogen temperature 77.4 K. Since specialized for hydrogen isotopes, this equation can be considered to estimate the dispersion coefficients more reliable for the cryogenic hydrogen isotope adsorption process, than the existing equations. (authors)

  10. A wind-tunnel study on exhaust gas dispersion from road vehicles. Part 1. Velocity and concentration fields behind single vehicles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanda, Isao; Uehara, Kiyoshi; Yamao, Yukio [National Institute for Environmental Studies, 16-2 Onogawa, Tsukuba, 305-8506 (Japan); Yoshikawa, Yasuo; Morikawa, Tazuko [Petroleum Energy Center, 4-3-9 Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo, 105-0001 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    By a reduced-scale model in a wind tunnel, we investigate the dispersion behavior of exhaust gas from automobiles. Two types of vehicles are considered, a passenger car and a small-size truck. Tracer gas experiments show that the exhaust gas dispersion is enhanced significantly by the vehicle wake compared to the case when the vehicle body is absent. The passenger car and the truck promote dispersion in the horizontal and the vertical direction, respectively. The wake field is analyzed by particle image velocimetry (PIV), and the distribution of the mean and the fluctuation fields is found to conform to the concentration field of the exhaust gas. The buoyancy of the exhaust gas has minor effect except on the vertical spread behind the truck whose wake flow amplifies the vertical displacement generated near the pipe exit. (author)

  11. Fine crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity structure beneath the Tengchong volcanic area inferred from receiver function and surface-wave dispersion: constraints on magma chamber distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengkui; Zhang, Shuangxi; Wu, Tengfei; Hua, Yujin; Zhang, Bo

    2018-03-01

    The Tengchong volcanic area is located in the southeastern margin of the collision zone between the Indian and Eurasian Plates. It is one of the youngest intraplate volcano groups in mainland China. Imaging the S-wave velocity structure of the crustal and uppermost mantle beneath the Tengchong volcanic area is an important means of improving our understanding of its volcanic activity and seismicity. In this study, we analyze teleseismic data from nine broadband seismic stations in the Tengchong Earthquake Monitoring Network. We then image the crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity structure by joint analysis of receiver functions and surface-wave dispersion. The results reveal widely distributed low-velocity zones. We find four possible magma chambers in the upper-to-middle crust and one in the uppermost mantle. The chamber in the uppermost mantle locates in the depth range from 55 to 70 km. The four magma chambers in the crust occur at different depths, ranging from the depth of 7 to 25 km in general. They may be the heat sources for the high geothermal activity at the surface. Based on the fine crustal and uppermost mantle S-wave velocity structure, we propose a model for the distribution of the magma chambers.

  12. Internal dispersal of seeds by waterfowl: effect of seed size on gut passage time and germination patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figuerola, J.; Charalambidou, I.; Santamaria, L.; Green, A.J.

    2010-01-01

    Long distance dispersal may have important consequences for gene flow and community structure. The dispersal of many plants depends on transport by vertebrate seed dispersers. The shapes of seed shadows produced by vertebrates depend both on movement patterns of the dispersers and on the dynamics

  13. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan C Semenza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010.We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally.In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17 for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35, 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10, and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81, respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010.The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is

  14. International dispersal of dengue through air travel: importation risk for Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenza, Jan C; Sudre, Bertrand; Miniota, Jennifer; Rossi, Massimiliano; Hu, Wei; Kossowsky, David; Suk, Jonathan E; Van Bortel, Wim; Khan, Kamran

    2014-12-01

    The worldwide distribution of dengue is expanding, in part due to globalized traffic and trade. Aedes albopictus is a competent vector for dengue viruses (DENV) and is now established in numerous regions of Europe. Viremic travellers arriving in Europe from dengue-affected areas of the world can become catalysts of local outbreaks in Europe. Local dengue transmission in Europe is extremely rare, and the last outbreak occurred in 1927-28 in Greece. However, autochthonous transmission was reported from France in September 2010, and from Croatia between August and October 2010. We compiled data on areas affected by dengue in 2010 from web resources and surveillance reports, and collected national dengue importation data. We developed a hierarchical regression model to quantify the relationship between the number of reported dengue cases imported into Europe and the volume of airline travellers arriving from dengue-affected areas internationally. In 2010, over 5.8 million airline travellers entered Europe from dengue-affected areas worldwide, of which 703,396 arrived at 36 airports situated in areas where Ae. albopictus has been recorded. The adjusted incidence rate ratio for imported dengue into European countries was 1.09 (95% CI: 1.01-1.17) for every increase of 10,000 travellers; in August, September, and October the rate ratios were 1.70 (95%CI: 1.23-2.35), 1.46 (95%CI: 1.02-2.10), and 1.35 (95%CI: 1.01-1.81), respectively. Two Italian cities where the vector is present received over 50% of all travellers from dengue-affected areas, yet with the continuing vector expansion more cities will be implicated in the future. In fact, 38% more travellers arrived in 2013 into those parts of Europe where Ae. albopictus has recently been introduced, compared to 2010. The highest risk of dengue importation in 2010 was restricted to three months and can be ranked according to arriving traveller volume from dengue-affected areas into cities where the vector is present. The

  15. Transport coefficients and orientational distributions of dilute colloidal dispersions composed of hematite particles (for an external magnetic field parallel to the angular velocity vector of simple shear flow)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, Akira; Hayasaka, Ryo; Majima, Tamotsu

    2008-01-01

    We have treated a dilute dispersion composed of ferromagnetic rodlike particles with a magnetic moment normal to the particle axis, such as hematites, to investigate the influences of the magnetic field strength, shear rate, and random forces on the orientational distribution of rodlike particles and also on transport coefficients, such as viscosity and diffusion coefficient. In the present analysis, these rodlike particles are assumed to conduct the rotational Brownian motion in a simple shear flow as well as an external magnetic field. The results obtained here are summarized as follows. In the case of a strong magnetic field and a smaller shear rate, the rodlike particle can freely rotate in the xy-plane with the magnetic moment continuing to point the magnetic field direction. On the other hand, for a strong shear flow, the particle has a tendency to incline in the flow direction with the magnetic moment pointing to the magnetic field direction. In the case of the magnetic field applied normal to the direction of the sedimentation, the diffusion coefficient gives rise to smaller values than expected, since the rodlike particle sediments with the particle axis inclining toward directions normal to the movement direction and, of course, toward the direction along that direction

  16. A gain-field encoding of limb position and velocity in the internal model of arm dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Jung Hwang

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Adaptability of reaching movements depends on a computation in the brain that transforms sensory cues, such as those that indicate the position and velocity of the arm, into motor commands. Theoretical consideration shows that the encoding properties of neural elements implementing this transformation dictate how errors should generalize from one limb position and velocity to another. To estimate how sensory cues are encoded by these neural elements, we designed experiments that quantified spatial generalization in environments where forces depended on both position and velocity of the limb. The patterns of error generalization suggest that the neural elements that compute the transformation encode limb position and velocity in intrinsic coordinates via a gain-field; i.e., the elements have directionally dependent tuning that is modulated monotonically with limb position. The gain-field encoding makes the counterintuitive prediction of hypergeneralization: there should be growing extrapolation beyond the trained workspace. Furthermore, nonmonotonic force patterns should be more difficult to learn than monotonic ones. We confirmed these predictions experimentally.

  17. An equation of mean velocity of flow in non uniform regime, its relationship with the dispersion phenomenon as time function and its application to study of water quality; Una ecuacion de la velocidad media del flujo en regimen no uniforme, su relacion con el fenomeno de dispersion como funcion del tiempo y su aplicacion a los estudios de calidad de agua

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constain Aragon, A.; Lemos Ruiz, R.

    2011-07-01

    It is very well known the basic equation of hydraulics discovered by Antoine de Chezy in 1769, which relates in a quadratic from the mean velocity of flow with the slope of energy line and the hydraulic radius, in a uniform regime. This equation has been the central axis of development of hydro metrics as science that faces the huge challenges of penetrating the knowledge of earths streams every time more contaminated. In virtue of that, its mathematical structure and the relationship with other related formulas have been carefully examined, despite the limitation due to constancy of velocity. Starting from chemical considerations rather than dynamic ones as was used to obtain chezys relationship it is possible to establish a second equation for mean velocity of fluid in a non uniform regime that corresponds to averaged movement of a solute poured to steam. This equation will go to relate in an accurate way several aspects hydraulics and mass transport, sight as a single thing, allowing a vital tool for a depth study of water contaminations. to arrive this equation it was reviewed the foundations of mass transport theory in flows, stating a time dependent nature for coefficient currently used in describing dispersion phenomena allowing to interpret properly certain inconsistencies detected long time ago in this theory. It is presented the detailed results of application of this new approach to a small steam and a larger river in Colombia. (Author) 23 refs.

  18. CFD Simulation and Experimental Measurement of Gas Holdup and Liquid Interstitial Velocity in Internal Loop Airlift Reactor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šimčík, Miroslav; Mota, A.; Růžička, Marek; Vicente, A.; Teixeira, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 14 (2011), s. 3268-3279 ISSN 0009-2509. [International Conference on Gas–Liquid and Gas–Liquid–Solid Reactor Engineering /10./. Braga, 26.06.2011-29.06.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/07/1110 Grant - others:FCT(PT) SFRH/BD/37082/2007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : cfd * airlift * hydrodynamics Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering Impact factor: 2.431, year: 2011

  19. Dendrochemical patterns of calcium, zinc, and potassium related to internal factors detected by energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Jean Christophe Balouet; Walter C. Shortle; Michel Chalot; François Beaujard; Hakan Grudd; Don A. Vroblesky; Joel G. Burken

    2014-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) provides highly sensitive and precise spatial resolution of cation content in individual annual growth rings in trees. The sensitivity and precision have prompted successful applications to forensic dendrochemistry and the timing of environmental releases of contaminants. These applications have highlighted the need to...

  20. Group Velocity for Leaky Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rzeznik, Andrew; Chumakova, Lyubov; Rosales, Rodolfo

    2017-11-01

    In many linear dispersive/conservative wave problems one considers solutions in an infinite medium which is uniform everywhere except for a bounded region. In general, localized inhomogeneities of the medium cause partial internal reflection, and some waves leak out of the domain. Often one only desires the solution in the inhomogeneous region, with the exterior accounted for by radiation boundary conditions. Formulating such conditions requires definition of the direction of energy propagation for leaky waves in multiple dimensions. In uniform media such waves have the form exp (d . x + st) where d and s are complex and related by a dispersion relation. A complex s is required since these waves decay via radiation to infinity, even though the medium is conservative. We present a modified form of Whitham's Averaged Lagrangian Theory along with modulation theory to extend the classical idea of group velocity to leaky waves. This allows for solving on the bounded region by representing the waves as a linear combination of leaky modes, each exponentially decaying in time. This presentation is part of a joint project, and applications of these results to example GFD problems will be presented by L. Chumakova in the talk ``Leaky GFD Problems''. This work is partially supported by NSF Grants DMS-1614043, DMS-1719637, and 1122374, and by the Hertz Foundation.

  1. Versatile microfluidic total internal reflection (TIR)-based devices: application to microbeads velocity measurement and single molecule detection with upright and inverted microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Nam Cao Hoai; Yokokawa, Ryuji; Dao, Dzung Viet; Nguyen, Thien Duy; Wells, John C; Sugiyama, Susumu

    2009-01-21

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) chip for Total Internal Reflection (TIR)-based imaging and detection has been developed using Si bulk micromachining and PDMS casting. In this paper, we report the applications of the chip on both inverted and upright fluorescent microscopes and confirm that two types of sample delivery platforms, PDMS microchannel and glass microchannel, can be easily integrated depending on the magnification of an objective lens needed to visualize a sample. Although any device configuration can be achievable, here we performed two experiments to demonstrate the versatility of the microfluidic TIR-based devices. The first experiment was velocity measurement of Nile red microbeads with nominal diameter of 500 nm in a pressure-driven flow. The time-sequenced fluorescent images of microbeads, illuminated by an evanescent field, were cross-correlated by a Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) program to obtain near-wall velocity field of the microbeads at various flow rates from 500 nl/min to 3000 nl/min. We then evaluated the capabilities of the device for Single Molecule Detection (SMD) of fluorescently labeled DNA molecules from 30 bp to 48.5 kbp and confirm that DNA molecules as short as 1105 bp were detectable. Our versatile, integrated device could provide low-cost and fast accessibility to Total Internal Reflection Fluorescent Microscopy (TIRFM) on both conventional upright and inverted microscopes. It could also be a useful component in a Micro-Total Analysis System (micro-TAS) to analyze nanoparticles or biomolecules near-wall transport or motion.

  2. Improved new generation dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    The use of dispersants to combat oil spills has attracted controversy over the years, and there has been a number of accusations of the chemicals involved doing more harm than good. A new study by the International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association discusses the positive and the negatives of dispersant use to be considered when drawing up spill contingency plans. (author)

  3. High internal phase agar hydrogel dispersions in cocoa butter and chocolate as a route towards reducing fat content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skelhon, Thomas S; Olsson, Patrik K A; Morgan, Adam R; Bon, Stefan A F

    2013-09-01

    Reducing the fat content of chocolate formulations is a major challenge for the confectionery industry. We report the suspension of aqueous microgel agar particles of up to 80% v/v within sunflower oil, cocoa butter, and ultimately chocolate. The optimised emulsification process involves a shear-cooling step. We demonstrate the versatility of our method when applied to white, milk, and dark chocolate formulations, whilst preserving the desired polymorph V of the cocoa butter matrix. In addition, we show that this technology can be used as a strategy to disperse alcoholic beverages into chocolate confectionery.

  4. Tailoring group velocity by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stainko, Roman; Sigmund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a systematic method for the tailoring of dispersion properties of slab-based photonic crystal waveguides. The method is based on the topology optimization method which consists in repeated finite element frequency domain analyses. The goal of the optimization process is to come...... up with slow light, zero group velocity dispersion photonic waveguides or photonic waveguides with tailored dispersion properties for dispersion compensation purposes. An example concerning the design of a wide bandwidth, constant low group velocity waveguide demonstrate the e±ciency of the method....

  5. Summary of 19. NATO/CCMS international technical meeting (ITM) round table discussion on the harmonization of atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.S.

    1992-01-01

    A Round Table discussion was held at the 19th NATO/CCMS Conference on Atmospheric Dispersion with participation of approximately 50 scientists involved with various aspects of air quality assessment from over 15 countries. The premise of discussion was there is a need within the European Countries to provide a basis for developing an approach towards harmonization of air quality modeling. The term ''harmonization'' was used mostly in the sense that for the same input a simulation model would compute the same output. Concern was expressed that this usage was overly simplistic, prohibitively restrictive and counterproductive. The main benefits of achieving harmonization were 1) proper use of available meteorological data and 2) consistent treatment of source impacts throughout the European Community. The challenge before the European Community is to resolve in a realistic manner the problem of assessing environmental impacts in a manner that is fair throughout the European Community and proper within the scientific community. The resolution will involve compromises between 'being fair' and 'being state-of-the-science'. Accuracy and realism may be willingly sacrificed in order to achieve fairness. Developing consensus on how and what is to be achieved in the process of harmonization will involve difficult value judgments. But the consensus process should be encouraged given the significant and worthwhile benefits. (au)

  6. Pb isotope evidence for contaminant-metal dispersal in an international river system: The lower Danube catchment, Eastern Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bird, Graham; Brewer, Paul A.; Macklin, Mark G.; Nikolova, Mariyana; Kotsev, Tsvetan; Mollov, Mihail; Swain, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Lead isotope signatures ( 207 Pb/ 206 Pb, 208 Pb/ 206 Pb, 208 Pb/ 204 Pb, 206 Pb/ 204 Pb), determined by magnetic sector ICP-MS in river channel sediment, metal ores and mine waste, have been used as geochemical tracers to quantify the delivery and dispersal of sediment-associated metals in the lower Danube River catchment. Due to a diverse geology and range of ore-body ages, Pb isotope signatures in ore-bodies within the lower Danube River catchment show considerable variation, even within individual metallogenic zones. It is also possible to discriminate between the Pb isotopic signatures in mine waste and river sediment within river systems draining individual ore bodies. Lead isotopic data, along with multi-element data; were used to establish the provenance of river sediments and quantify sedimentary contributions to mining-affected tributaries and to the Danube River. Data indicate that mining-affected tributaries in Serbia and Bulgaria contribute up to 30% of the river channel sediment load of the lower Danube River. Quantifying relative sediment contributions from mining-affected tributaries enables spatial patterns in sediment-associated metal and As concentrations to be interpreted in terms of key contaminant sources. Combining geochemical survey data with that regarding the provenance of contaminated sediments can therefore be used to identify foci for remediation and environmental management strategies.

  7. Circumferential-wave phase velocities for empty, fluid-immersed spherical metal shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Überall, Herbert; Claude Ahyi, A.; Raju, P. K.

    2001-01-01

    Our earlier studies regarding acoustic scattering resonances and the dispersive phase velocities of the surface waves that generate them, have demonstrated the effectiveness of obtaining phase velocity dispersion curves from the known acoustic resonance frequencies, and their accuracy. This possi...

  8. An improved estimation and focusing scheme for vector velocity estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Munk, Peter

    1999-01-01

    to reduce spatial velocity dispersion. Examples of different velocity vector conditions are shown using the Field II simulation program. A relative accuracy of 10.1 % is obtained for the lateral velocity estimates for a parabolic velocity profile for a flow perpendicular to the ultrasound beam and a signal...

  9. The Mass-to-Light Ratios of the Draco and Ursa Minor Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies. II. The Binary Population and Its Effect in the Measured Velocity Dispersions of Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Olszewski, E.; Pryor, C.; Armandroff, T.

    1995-01-01

    We use a large set of radial velocities in the Ursa Minor and Draco dwarf spheroidal galaxies to search for binary stars and to infer the binary frequency. Of the 118 stars in our sample with multiple observations, six are velocity variables with $\\chi^2$ probabilities below 0.001. We use Monte Carlo simulations that mimic our observations to determine the efficiency with which our observations find binary stars. Our best, though significantly uncertain, estimate of the binary frequency for s...

  10. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-12-08

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained from Rayleigh waves recorded by vertical-component geophones. Similar to wave-equation traveltime tomography, the complicated surface wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the phase-velocity and frequency domains. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2-D or 3-D S-wave velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is significantly less prone to the cycle-skipping problems of full waveform inversion. The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can approximately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distributions in laterally heterogeneous media if the dispersion curves can be identified and picked. The WD method is easily extended to anisotropic data and the inversion of dispersion curves associated with Love waves.

  11. Hydrodynamic disperser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulatov, A.I.; Chernov, V.S.; Prokopov, L.I.; Proselkov, Yu.M.; Tikhonov, Yu.P.

    1980-01-15

    A hydrodynamic disperser is suggested which contains a housing, slit nozzles installed on a circular base arranged opposite from each other, resonators secured opposite the nozzle and outlet sleeve. In order to improve the effectiveness of dispersion by throttling the flow, each resonator is made in the form of a crimped plate with crimpings that decrease in height in a direction towards the nozzle.

  12. Controlled pump with internal toothed gears during four-quadrant operation. Velocity- and position control of a hydraulic handling device; Geregelte Innenzahnradpumpe im Mehrquadrantenbetrieb. Geschwindigkeits- und Positionsregelung eines hydraulischen Handlinggeraetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dahmann, P. [Fachhochschule Aachen (Germany). FB Luft- und Raumfahrttechnik; Hagemeister, W. [IGH, Essen (Germany); Nagel, G.; Exner, P. [Voith Turbo, Heidenheim (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    The drive of a handling device (weight 3t) is realized by an hydrocylinder, which is directly connected with the pressure side of a pump with internal toothed gears. The drive speed is generated by a frequency controlled electric motor. As a result for frequency-controlled drive can be noted less noise formation, less heat generation, an energy efficienct operation as a simple control- and regulation possibilities for position and velocities. (GL)

  13. Tailoring Dispersion properties of photonic crystal waveguides by topology optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stainko, Roman; Sigmund, Ole

    2007-01-01

    based design updates. The goal of the optimization process is to come up with slow light, zero group velocity dispersion photonic waveguides or photonic waveguides with tailored dispersion properties for dispersion compensation purposes. Two examples concerning reproduction of a specific dispersion...

  14. Calculation of particulate dispersion in a design-basis tornadic storm from the Atomics International Nuclear Material Development Facility, Santa Susana, California

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1980-07-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at the Atomics International Nuclear Material Development Facility at Santa Susana, California. Plutonium particles less than 20 ..mu..m in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind values are based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The method of moments is used to incorporate subgrid-scale resolution of the concentration within a grid cell volume. This method is a quasi-Lagrangian scheme which minimizes numerical error associated with advection. In all case studies, the effects of updrafts and downdrafts, coupled with scavenging of the particulates by precipitation, account for most of the material being deposited within 50 km downwind of the plant site. Ground-level isopleths in the x-y plane show that most of the material is deposited behind and slightly to the left of the centerline trajectory of the storm. Approximately 5% of the material is dispersed into the stratosphere and anvil section of the storm.

  15. Calculation of particulate dispersion in a design-basis tornadic storm from the Atomics International Nuclear Material Development Facility, Santa Susana, California

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1980-07-01

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at the Atomics International Nuclear Material Development Facility at Santa Susana, California. Plutonium particles less than 20 μm in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind values are based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The method of moments is used to incorporate subgrid-scale resolution of the concentration within a grid cell volume. This method is a quasi-Lagrangian scheme which minimizes numerical error associated with advection. In all case studies, the effects of updrafts and downdrafts, coupled with scavenging of the particulates by precipitation, account for most of the material being deposited within 50 km downwind of the plant site. Ground-level isopleths in the x-y plane show that most of the material is deposited behind and slightly to the left of the centerline trajectory of the storm. Approximately 5% of the material is dispersed into the stratosphere and anvil section of the storm

  16. Frequency dispersion of longitudinal ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in [001]c-poled 0.24Pb(In₁/₂Nb₁/₂O₃- 0.45Pb(Mg₁/₃Nb₂/₃)O₃-0.31PbTiO₃ single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Enwei; Cao, Wenwu; Han, Pengdi

    2011-08-01

    The frequency dispersion of ultrasonic velocity and attenuation in [001](c)-poled 0.24Pb(in(1/2)Nb(1/2))O(3)-0.45Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))o(3)-0.31PbTio(3) (PIN-0.45PMN-0.31PT) ternary single crystal were measured by ultrasonic spectroscopy from 25 to 100 MHz for the longitudinal wave. It was found that the velocity has a linear relationship with the frequency f, but the attenuation has a quadratic relation with f. The attenuation and frequency dispersion of the ternary system are lower than that of the (1-x)Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O(3)-xPbTiO(3) (PMN-PT) binary system and the coercive field also increased by a factor of 2.5, hence, the ternary single system is superior to the corresponding binary single-crystal system for high-frequency and high-power transducer applications.

  17. Dispersion Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Buhmann, Stefan Yoshi

    2012-01-01

    In this book, a modern unified theory of dispersion forces on atoms and bodies is presented which covers a broad range of advanced aspects and scenarios. Macroscopic quantum electrodynamics is shown to provide a powerful framework for dispersion forces which allows for discussing general properties like their non-additivity and the relation between microscopic and macroscopic interactions. It is demonstrated how the general results can be used to obtain dispersion forces on atoms in the presence of bodies of various shapes and materials. Starting with a brief recapitulation of volume I, this volume II deals especially with bodies of irregular shapes, universal scaling laws, dynamical forces on excited atoms, enhanced forces in cavity quantum electrodynamics, non-equilibrium forces in thermal environments and quantum friction. The book gives both the specialist and those new to the field a thorough overview over recent results in the field. It provides a toolbox for studying dispersion forces in various contex...

  18. Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momeni, M.H.; Yuan, Y.; Zielen, A.J.

    1979-05-01

    The Uranium Dispersion and Dosimetry (UDAD) Code provides estimates of potential radiation exposure to individuals and to the general population in the vicinity of a uranium processing facility. The UDAD Code incorporates the radiation dose from the airborne release of radioactive materials, and includes dosimetry of inhalation, ingestion, and external exposures. The removal of raioactive particles from a contaminated area by wind action is estimated, atmospheric concentrations of radioactivity from specific sources are calculated, and source depletion as a result of deposition, fallout, and ingrowth of radon daughters are included in a sector-averaged Gaussian plume dispersion model. The average air concentration at any given receptor location is assumed to be constant during each annual release period, but to increase from year to year because of resuspension. Surface contamination and deposition velocity are estimated. Calculation of the inhalation dose and dose rate to an individual is based on the ICRP Task Group Lung Model. Estimates of the dose to the bronchial epithelium of the lung from inhalation of radon and its short-lived daughters are calculated based on a dose conversion factor from the BEIR report. External radiation exposure includes radiation from airborne radionuclides and exposure to radiation from contaminated ground. Terrestrial food pathways include vegetation, meat, milk, poultry, and eggs. Internal dosimetry is based on ICRP recommendations. In addition, individual dose commitments, population dose commitments, and environmental dose commitments are computed. This code also may be applied to dispersion of any other pollutant

  19. Statistical description of turbulent dispersion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, J.J.H.

    2012-01-01

    We derive a comprehensive statistical model for dispersion of passive or almost passive admixture particles such as fine particulate matter, aerosols, smoke and fumes, in turbulent flow. The model rests on the Markov limit for particle velocity. It is in accordance with the asymptotic structure of

  20. Normal-dispersion microresonator Kerr frequency combs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Xiaoxiao

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Optical microresonator-based Kerr frequency comb generation has developed into a hot research area in the past decade. Microresonator combs are promising for portable applications due to their potential for chip-level integration and low power consumption. According to the group velocity dispersion of the microresonator employed, research in this field may be classified into two categories: the anomalous dispersion regime and the normal dispersion regime. In this paper, we discuss the physics of Kerr comb generation in the normal dispersion regime and review recent experimental advances. The potential advantages and future directions of normal dispersion combs are also discussed.

  1. Chemical dispersants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahsepar, Shokouhalsadat; Smit, Martijn P.J.; Murk, Albertinka J.; Rijnaarts, Huub H.M.; Langenhoff, Alette A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Chemical dispersants were used in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, both at the sea surface and the wellhead. Their effect on oil biodegradation is unclear, as studies showed both inhibition and enhancement. This study addresses the effect of Corexit on oil

  2. Experimental investigation of ultrasonic velocity anisotropy in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/077/02/0345-0355. Keywords. Magnetic fluids; ultrasonic wave; sound velocity; anisotropy. Abstract. Magnetic field-induced dispersion of ultrasonic velocity in a Mn0.7Zn0.3Fe2O4 fluid (applied magnetic field is perpendicular to the ultrasonic propagation vector) is ...

  3. Dispersion - does it degrade a pulse envelope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deighton, M.O.

    1985-01-01

    In hostile environments, transmitting information as ultrasonic Lamb wave pulses has advantages, since the stainless steel strip serving as a waveguide is very durable. Besides attenuation, velocity dispersion (inherent in Lamb waves) can be important even in fairly short guides. Theory shows that unlimited propagation of a pulsed r.f. envelope is possible, even with dispersion present. The constant group velocity needed would favour asub(o)-mode pulses over other modes, provided ordinary attenuation is small. An approximate formula indicates the useful range of a pulse, when group velocity does vary. (author)

  4. Modeling of Rayleigh wave dispersion in Iberia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Badal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase and group velocities of 15–70 s Rayleigh waves propagating across the Iberian Peninsula have been transformed into local dispersion curves by linear inversion of travel times. The procedure permits that the waveform dispersion to be obtained as a continuous period-dependent velocity function at grid points belonging to the area probed by the waves, thus providing phase- and group-velocity contour maps for several periods within the interval of interest. The regionalization process rests on a homogeneous initial data set in which the number of observations remains almost constant for all periods of reference. Damped least-squares inversion of the local dispersion curves for shear-wave velocity structure is performed to obtain depth-dependent S-wave velocity profiles at the grid points covering the model region. The reliability of the results should improve significantly owing to the use of phase and group velocities simultaneously. On this basis, we have built horizontal depth sections that give an updated view of the seismic velocity structure of the peninsula at lithospheric and upper mantle depths (20–200 km. After averaging all the pure-path S-wave velocities previously determined at each grid point, the velocity-depth models so obtained for major tectonic units allow the comparison between the Hercynian basement and other areas of Mesozoic folding and Tertiary basins.

  5. Characteristic wave velocities in spherical electromagnetic cloaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaghjian, A D; Maci, S; Martini, E

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the characteristic wave velocities in spherical electromagnetic cloaks, namely, phase, ray, group and energy-transport velocities. After deriving explicit expressions for the phase and ray velocities (the latter defined as the phase velocity along the direction of the Poynting vector), special attention is given to the determination of group and energy-transport velocities, because a cursory application of conventional formulae for local group and energy-transport velocities can lead to a discrepancy between these velocities if the permittivity and permeability dyadics are not equal over a frequency range about the center frequency. In contrast, a general theorem can be proven from Maxwell's equations that the local group and energy-transport velocities are equal in linear, lossless, frequency dispersive, source-free bianisotropic material. This apparent paradox is explained by showing that the local fields of the spherical cloak uncouple into an E wave and an H wave, each with its own group and energy-transport velocities, and that the group and energy-transport velocities of either the E wave or the H wave are equal and thus satisfy the general theorem.

  6. Analytical solutions of advection-dispersion equation for varying ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analytical solutions are obtained for a one-dimensional advection–dispersion equation with variable coefficients in a longitudinal domain. Two cases are considered. In the first one the solute dispersion is time dependent along a uniform flow in a semi-infinite domain while in the second case the dispersion and the velocity ...

  7. Retrieval of sea surface velocities using sequential Ocean Colour ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    pended sediment dispersion patterns, in sequential two time lapsed images. .... face advective velocities consists essentially of iden- tifying the ... matrix is time consuming, a significant reduction .... Chauhan, P. 2002 Personal Communication.

  8. The stability of internal transport barriers to MHD ballooning modes and drift waves: A formalism for low magnetic shear and for velocity shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.W.; Hastie, R.J.; Webster, A.J.; Wilson, H.R.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak discharges with internal transport barriers (ITBs) provide improved confinement, so it is important to understand their stability properties. The stability to an important class of modes with high wave-numbers perpendicular to the magnetic field, is usually studied with the standard ballooning transformation and eikonal approach. However, ITBs are often characterised by radial q profiles that have regions of negative or low magnetic shear and by radially sheared electric fields. Both these features affect the validity of the standard method. A new approach to calculating stability in these circumstances is developed and applied to ideal MHD ballooning modes and to micro-instabilities responsible for anomalous transport. (author)

  9. 3D Simulation of a Loss of Vacuum Accident (LOVA in ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor: Evaluation of Static Pressure, Mach Number, and Friction Velocity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Ciparisse

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor is a magnetically confined plasma nuclear reactor. Inside it, due to plasma disruptions, the formation of neutron-activated powders, which are essentially made out of tungsten and beryllium, occurs. As many windows for diagnostics are present on the reactor, which operates at very low pressure, a LOVA (Loss of Vacuum Accident could be possible and may lead to dust mobilisation and a toxic and radioactive fallout inside the plant. This study is aimed at reproducing numerically the first seconds of a LOVA in ITER, in order to get information about the dust resuspension risk. This work has been carried out by means of a CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics simulation of the beginning of the pressurisation transient inside the whole Tokamak. It has been found that the pressurization transient is extremely slow, and that the friction speed on the walls is very high, and therefore a high mobilization risk of the dust is expected on the entire internal surface of the reactor. It has been observed that a LOVA in a real-scale reactor is more severe than the one reproduced in reduced-scale facilities, as STARDUST-U, because the speeds are higher, and the dust resuspension capacity of the flow is greater.

  10. Dispersion strengthening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scattergood, R.O.; Das, E.S.P.

    1976-01-01

    Using digital computer-based methods, models for dispersion strengthening can now be developed which take into account many of the important effects that have been neglected in the past. In particular, the self interaction of a dislocation can be treated, and a computer simulation method was developed to determine the flow stress of a random distribution of circular, impenetrable obstacles, taking into account all such interactions. The flow stress values depended on the obstacle sizes and spacings, over and above the usual 1/L dependence where L is the average obstacle spacing. From an analysis of the results, it was found that the main effects of the self interactions can be captured in a line tension analogue in which the obstacles appear to be penetrable

  11. Complex relationship between groundwater velocity and concentration of radioactive contaminants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaszeta, F.E.; Bond, F.W.

    1980-01-01

    This paper uses the results from the Multi-component Mass Transport model to examine the complex interrelationship between groundwater velocity and contaminant dispersion, decay, and retardation with regard to their influence on the contaminant concentration distribution as it travels through the geosphere to the biosphere. The rate of transport of contaminants through the geosphere is governed by groundwater velocity, leach rate, and contaminant retardation. The dominant characteristics of the contaminant concentration distribution are inherited during leaching and modified during transport by dilution, dispersion and decay. For a hypothetical non-decaying, non-dispersing contaminant with no retardation properties, the shape of the source term distribution is governed by the groundwater velocity (dilution) and leach rate. This distribution remains unchanged throughout transport. Under actual conditions, however, dispersion, decay and retardation modify the concentration distribution during both leaching and transport. The amount of dispersion is determined by the distance traveled, but it does have a greater peak-reducing influence on spiked distributions than square-shaped distributions. Decay acts as an overall scaling factor on the concentration distribution. Retardation alters the contaminant travel time and therefore indirectly influences the amount of dilution, dispersion and decay. Simple relationships between individual parameters and groundwater velocity as they influence peak concentration do not exist. For those cases where the source term is not solubility-limited and flow past the waste is independent of regional hydrologic conditions, a threshold concentration occurs at a specific groundwater velocity where the effects of dilution balance those of dispersion and decay

  12. Micromixer based on Taylor dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, H; Nguyen, N-T; Huang, X

    2006-01-01

    This paper reports an analytical model, the fabrication and the characterization of a polymeric micromixer based on Taylor dispersion. Due to the distributed velocity field over the channel cross section, the effective dispersion in axial direction in a microchannel is much stronger than the pure molecular diffusion. In our work, squential segmentation was used in the micromixer for improving mixing in a microchannel. The micromixer was designed and fabricated based on lamination of five 100-μm-thick polymer sheets. Rubber valve seats were embedded between the forth and the fifth layers. The polymer layers were machined using a CO 2 laser. The lamination of the five layers was carried out by a commercial hot laminator (Aurora LM-450HC). External solenoid actuators are used for closing the valves at the mixer inlets. The experimental results confirm the effect of Taylor dispersion. Mixing ratio can be adjusted by pulse width modulation of the control signal of the solenoids

  13. Nerve conduction velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003927.htm Nerve conduction velocity To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Nerve conduction velocity (NCV) is a test to see ...

  14. The velocity of sound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beyer, R.T.

    1985-01-01

    The paper reviews the work carried out on the velocity of sound in liquid alkali metals. The experimental methods to determine the velocity measurements are described. Tables are presented of reported data on the velocity of sound in lithium, sodium, potassium, rubidium and caesium. A formula is given for alkali metals, in which the sound velocity is a function of shear viscosity, atomic mass and atomic volume. (U.K.)

  15. Hydrodynamic dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pryce, M.H.L.

    1985-01-01

    A dominant mechanism contributing to hydrodynamic dispersion in fluid flow through rocks is variation of travel speeds within the channels carrying the fluid, whether these be interstices between grains, in granular rocks, or cracks in fractured crystalline rocks. The complex interconnections of the channels ensure a mixing of those parts of the fluid which travel more slowly and those which travel faster. On a macroscopic scale this can be treated statistically in terms of the distribution of times taken by a particle of fluid to move from one surface of constant hydraulic potential to another, lower, potential. The distributions in the individual channels are such that very long travel times make a very important contribution. Indeed, while the mean travel time is related to distance by a well-defined transport speed, the mean square is effectively infinite. This results in an asymmetrical plume which differs markedly from a gaussian shape. The distribution of microscopic travel times is related to the distribution of apertures in the interstices, or in the microcracks, which in turn are affected in a complex way by the stresses acting on the rock matrix

  16. The Musca cloud: A 6 pc-long velocity-coherent, sonic filament

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacar, A.; Kainulainen, J.; Tafalla, M.; Beuther, H.; Alves, J.

    2016-03-01

    Filaments play a central role in the molecular clouds' evolution, but their internal dynamical properties remain poorly characterized. To further explore the physical state of these structures, we have investigated the kinematic properties of the Musca cloud. We have sampled the main axis of this filamentary cloud in 13CO and C18O (2-1) lines using APEX observations. The different line profiles in Musca shows that this cloud presents a continuous and quiescent velocity field along its ~6.5 pc of length. With an internal gas kinematics dominated by thermal motions (I.e. σNT/cs ≲ 1) and large-scale velocity gradients, these results reveal Musca as the longest velocity-coherent, sonic-like object identified so far in the interstellar medium. The transonic properties of Musca present a clear departure from the predicted supersonic velocity dispersions expected in the Larson's velocity dispersion-size relationship, and constitute the first observational evidence of a filament fully decoupled from the turbulent regime over multi-parsec scales. This publication is based on data acquired with the Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX). APEX is a collaboration between the Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, the European Southern Observatory, and the Onsala Space Observatory (ESO programme 087.C-0583).The reduced datacubes as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A97

  17. Study on evaluation methods for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, L.; Tao, X.; Kayen, R.; Shi, H.; Yan, S.

    2005-01-01

    The evaluation of Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic is the key step for detecting S-wave velocity structure. By comparing the dispersion curves directly with the spectra analysis of surface waves (SASW) method, rather than comparing the S-wave velocity structure, the validity and precision of microtremor-array method (MAM) can be evaluated more objectively. The results from the China - US joint surface wave investigation in 26 sites in Tangshan, China, show that the MAM has the same precision with SASW method in 83% of the 26 sites. The MAM is valid for Rayleigh wave dispersion characteristic testing and has great application potentiality for site S-wave velocity structure detection.

  18. Exploring the Internal Dynamics of Globular Clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Laura L.; van der Marel, Roeland; Bellini, Andrea; Luetzgendorf, Nora; HSTPROMO Collaboration

    2018-01-01

    Exploring the Internal Dynamics of Globular ClustersThe formation histories and structural properties of globular clusters are imprinted on their internal dynamics. Energy equipartition results in velocity differences for stars of different mass, and leads to mass segregation, which results in different spatial distributions for stars of different mass. Intermediate-mass black holes significantly increase the velocity dispersions at the centres of clusters. By combining accurate measurements of their internal kinematics with state-of-the-art dynamical models, we can characterise both the velocity dispersion and mass profiles of clusters, tease apart the different effects, and understand how clusters may have formed and evolved.Using proper motions from the Hubble Space Telescope Proper Motion (HSTPROMO) Collaboration for a set of 22 Milky Way globular clusters, and our discrete dynamical modelling techniques designed to work with large, high-quality datasets, we are studying a variety of internal cluster properties. We will present the results of theoretical work on simulated clusters that demonstrates the efficacy of our approach, and preliminary results from application to real clusters.

  19. Relativistic energy loss in a dispersive medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houlrik, Jens Madsen

    2002-01-01

    The electron energy loss in a dispersive medium is obtained using macroscopic electrodynamics taking advantage of a static frame of reference. Relativistic corrections are described in terms of a dispersive Lorentz factor obtained by replacing the vacuum velocity c by the characteristic phase...... velocity c/n, where n is the complex index of refraction. The angle-resolved energy-loss spectrum of a Drude conductor is analyzed in detail and it is shown that the low-energy peak due to Ohmic losses is enhanced compared to the classical approximation....

  20. Surface wave velocity tracking by bisection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, T.

    2005-01-01

    Calculation of surface wave velocity is a classic problem dating back to the well-known Haskell's transfer matrix method, which contributes to solutions of elastic wave propagation, global subsurface structure evaluation by simulating observed earthquake group velocities, and on-site evaluation of subsurface structure by simulating phase velocity dispersion curves and/or H/V spectra obtained by micro-tremor observation. Recently inversion analysis on micro-tremor observation requires efficient method of generating many model candidates and also stable, accurate, and fast computation of dispersion curves and Raleigh wave trajectory. The original Haskell's transfer matrix method has been improved in terms of its divergence tendency mainly by the generalized transmission and reflection matrix method with formulation available for surface wave velocity; however, root finding algorithm has not been fully discussed except for the one by setting threshold to the absolute value of complex characteristic functions. Since surface wave number (reciprocal to the surface wave velocity multiplied by frequency) is a root of complex valued characteristic function, it is intractable to use general root finding algorithm. We will examine characteristic function in phase plane to construct two dimensional bisection algorithm with consideration on a layer to be evaluated and algorithm for tracking roots down along frequency axis. (author)

  1. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients for numerical modeling of groundwater solute transport in heterogeneous formations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jonghyun; Rolle, Massimo; Kitanidis, Peter K.

    2018-01-01

    Most recent research on hydrodynamic dispersion in porous media has focused on whole-domain dispersion while other research is largely on laboratory-scale dispersion. This work focuses on the contribution of a single block in a numerical model to dispersion. Variability of fluid velocity and conc...

  2. Noise figure of amplified dispersive Fourier transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goda, Keisuke; Jalali, Bahram

    2010-01-01

    Amplified dispersive Fourier transformation (ADFT) is a powerful tool for fast real-time spectroscopy as it overcomes the limitations of traditional optical spectrometers. ADFT maps the spectrum of an optical pulse into a temporal waveform using group-velocity dispersion and simultaneously amplifies it in the optical domain. It greatly simplifies spectroscopy by replacing the diffraction grating and detector array in the conventional spectrometer with a dispersive fiber and single-pixel photodetector, enabling ultrafast real-time spectroscopic measurements. Following our earlier work on the theory of ADFT, here we study the effect of noise on ADFT. We derive the noise figure of ADFT and discuss its dependence on various parameters.

  3. Corrosion and erosion monitoring in plates and pipes using constant group velocity Lamb wave inspection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Peter B; Simonetti, Francesco; Instanes, Geir

    2014-09-01

    Recent improvements in tomographic reconstruction techniques generated a renewed interest in short-range ultrasonic guided wave inspection for real-time monitoring of internal corrosion and erosion in pipes and other plate-like structures. Emerging evidence suggests that in most cases the fundamental asymmetric A0 mode holds a distinct advantage over the earlier market leader fundamental symmetric S0 mode. Most existing A0 mode inspections operate at relatively low inspection frequencies where the mode is highly dispersive therefore very sensitive to variations in wall thickness. This paper examines the potential advantages of increasing the inspection frequency to the so-called constant group velocity (CGV) point where the group velocity remains essentially constant over a wide range of wall thickness variation, but the phase velocity is still dispersive enough to allow accurate wall thickness assessment from phase angle measurements. This paper shows that in the CGV region the crucial issue of temperature correction becomes especially simple, which is particularly beneficial when higher-order helical modes are also exploited for tomography. One disadvantage of working at such relatively high inspection frequency is that, as the slower A0 mode becomes faster and less dispersive, the competing faster S0 mode becomes slower and more dispersive. At higher inspection frequencies these modes cannot be separated any longer based on their vibration polarization only, which is mostly tangential for the S0 mode while mostly normal for the A0 at low frequencies, as the two modes become more similar as the frequency increases. Therefore, we propose a novel method for suppressing the unwanted S0 mode based on the Poisson effect of the material by optimizing the angle of inclination of the equivalent transduction force of the Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) used for generation and detection purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Seed dispersal in fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middleton, Beth; van Diggelen, Rudy; Jensen, Kai

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and

  5. A laboratory dispersant effectiveness test which reflects dispersant efficiency in the field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lunel, T.; Wood, P.

    1996-01-01

    Oil dispersion efficiencies of surfactants, from laboratory dispersion tests and field data were compared and calibrated. Data from an oil spill, where dispersants were used as a major part of the response, was analysed. The data was accumulated through the monitoring of the dispersant operation of the Sea Empress spill incident, in which Forties Blend oil was spilled at sea. This detailed data set was used to calibrate existing laboratory dispersant tests, and to devise a new International Dispersant Effectiveness Test. The objective was to create a comprehensive guide to decision making on whether and when to start a dispersant spraying operation. The dispersion efficiencies obtained from the laboratory dispersant tests were compared with field data. Flume tests produced the highest percentage of dispersed oil for all the dispersal tests. However, it was emphasised that the total percentage of oil dispersed should not be the only measure of dispersant effectiveness, since it does not distinguish between the contribution of natural and chemically enhanced dispersion. 9 refs., 1 tab., 9 figs

  6. The species velocity of trees in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, B. D.; Napier, J.; de Lafontaine, G.; Heath, K.; Li, B.; Hu, F.; Greenberg, J. A.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic climate change has motivated interest in the paleo record to enhance our knowledge about past vegetation responses to climate change and help understand potential responses in the future. Additionally, polar regions currently experience the most rapid rates of climate change globally, prompting concern over changes in the ecological composition of high latitude ecosystems. Recent analyses have attempted to construct methods to estimate a species' ability to track climate change by computing climate velocity; a measure of the rate of climate displacement across a landscape which may indicate the speed an organism must migrate to keep pace with climate change. However, a challenge to using climate velocity in understanding range shifts is a lack of species-specificity in the velocity calculations: climate velocity does not actually use any species data in its analysis. To solve the shortcomings of climate velocity in estimating species displacement rates, we computed the "species velocity" of white spruce, green and grey alder populations across the state of Alaska from the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) to today. Species velocity represents the rate and direction a species is required to migrate to keep pace with a changing climate following the LGM. We used a species distribution model to determine past and present white spruce and alder distributions using statistically downscaled climate data at 60m. Species velocity was then derived from the change in species distribution per year by the change in distribution over Alaska (km/yr). High velocities indicate locations where the species environmental envelope is changing drastically and must disperse rapidly to survive climate change. As a result, high velocity regions are more vulnerable to distribution shifts and higher risk of local extinction. Conversely, low species velocities indicate locations where the local climate envelope is shifting relatively slowly, reducing the stress to disperse quickly

  7. Wave equation dispersion inversion using a difference approximation to the dispersion-curve misfit gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong

    2016-07-26

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh wave dispersion curve using a difference approximation to the gradient of the misfit function. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized surface waves because the skeletonized dispersion curve for the fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave is inverted using finite-difference solutions to the multi-dimensional elastic wave equation. The best match between the predicted and observed dispersion curves provides the optimal S-wave velocity model. Our method can invert for lateral velocity variations and also can mitigate the local minimum problem in full waveform inversion with a reasonable computation cost for simple models. Results with synthetic and field data illustrate the benefits and limitations of this method. © 2016 Elsevier B.V.

  8. Task 5. Grid interconnection of building integrated and other dispersed photovoltaic power systems. International guideline for the certification of photovoltaic system components and grid-connected systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bower, W.

    2002-02-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 5 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme presents a guideline for the certification of photovoltaic system components and grid-connected systems. The mission of the Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme is to enhance the international collaboration efforts which accelerate the development and deployment of photovoltaic solar energy. Task 5 deals with issues concerning grid-interconnection and distributed PV power systems. This generic international guideline for the certification of photovoltaic system components and complete grid-connected photovoltaic systems describes a set of recommended methods and tests that may be used to verify the integrity of hardware and installations, compliance with applicable standards/codes and can be used to provide a measure of the performance of components or of entire systems. The guideline is to help ensure that photovoltaic installations are both safe for equipment as well as for personnel when used according to the applicable installation standards and codes. The guideline may be used in any country using the rules stipulated by the applicable standards and codes and by applying them to the guideline's recommended tests. This document uses examples for some tests but does not specify exact test set-ups, equipment accuracy, equipment manufacturers or calibration procedures.

  9. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  10. Water velocity meter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, C. W.; Smith, D. L.

    1970-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive drag sphere velocity meter with a zero to 6 ft/sec range measures steady-state flow. When combined with appropriate data acquisition system, it is suited to applications where large numbers of simultaneous measurements are needed for current mapping or velocity profile determination.

  11. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...

  12. Stochastic models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ditlevsen, Ove Dalager

    2003-01-01

    Simple stochastic differential equation models have been applied by several researchers to describe the dispersion of tracer particles in the planetary atmospheric boundary layer and to form the basis for computer simulations of particle paths. To obtain the drift coefficient, empirical vertical...... positions close to the boundaries. Different rules have been suggested in the literature with justifications based on simulation studies. Herein the relevant stochastic differential equation model is formulated in a particular way. The formulation is based on the marginal transformation of the position...... velocity distributions that depend on height above the ground both with respect to standard deviation and skewness are substituted into the stationary Fokker/Planck equation. The particle position distribution is taken to be uniform *the well/mixed condition( and also a given dispersion coefficient...

  13. Functional shoulder ratios with high velocities of shoulder internal rotation are most sensitive to determine shoulder rotation torque imbalance: a cross-sectional study with elite handball players and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo Peduzzi de; Fonseca, Pedro; Morais, Sara Tribuzi; Borgonovo-Santos, Márcio; Coelho, Eduardo Filipe Cruz; Ribeiro, Daniel Cury; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2017-12-04

    The aim of the present study was to determine which approach to calculating shoulder ratios is the most sensitive for determining shoulder torque imbalance in handball players. Twenty-six participants (handball athletes, n = 13; healthy controls, n = 13) performed isokinetic concentric and eccentric shoulder internal rotation (IR) and external rotation (ER) assessment at 60, 180 and 300°/s. We used eight approaches to calculating shoulder ratios: four concentric (i.e. concentric ER torque divided by concentric IR torque), and four functional (i.e. eccentric ER torque divided by concentric IR torque) at the velocities of 60, 180 and 300°/s for both IR and ER, and combining 60°/s of ER and 300°/s of IR. A three factorial ANOVA (factors: shoulder ratios, upper limb sides, and groups) along with Tukey's post-hoc analysis, and effect sizes were calculated. The findings suggested the functional shoulder ratio combining 60°/s of ER and 300°/s of IR is the most sensitive to detect differences between upper limbs for handball players, and between players and controls for the dominant side. The functional shoulder ratio combining 60°/s of ER with 300°/s of IR seems to present advantages over the other approaches for identifying upper limb asymmetries and differences in shoulder torque balance related to throwing.

  14. High-energy pulse compressor using self-defocusing spectral broadening in anomalously dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    (3) with a net positive dispersion. Furthermore, the net positive dispersion in the dispersive unit at least partially compensates for the negative nonlinear phase variation and the negative group-velocity dispersion produced by the bulk quadratic nonlinear medium when the optical pulse passes......A method and a pulse compressor (1) for compressing an optical pulse, wherein the pulse compressor comprising a bulk quadratic nonlinear medium (2) adapted for generating a negative nonlinear phase variation on the optical pulse and having a negative group-velocity dispersion, and a dispersive unit...

  15. Planetary nebula velocities in the disc and bulge of M31

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halliday, C.; Carter, D.; Bridges, T. J.; Jackson, Z. C.; Wilkinson, M. I.; Quinn, D. P.; Evans, N. W.; Douglas, N. G.; Merrett, H. R.; Merrifield, M. R.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Kuijken, K.; Irwin, M. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present radial velocities for a sample of 723 planetary nebulae in the disc and bulge of M31, measured using the WYFFOS fibre spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope. Velocities are determined using the [OIII] lambda 5007 emission line. Rotation and velocity dispersion are measured to a

  16. Dynamics of platicons due to third-order dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, Valery E.; Cherenkov, Artem V.; Shitikov, Artem E.; Bilenko, Igor A.; Gorodetsky, Michael L.

    2017-07-01

    Dynamics of platicons caused by the third-order dispersion is studied. It is shown that under the influence of the third-order dispersion platicons obtain angular velocity depending both on dispersion and on detuning value. A method of tuning of platicon associated optical frequency comb repetition rate is proposed. Contribution to the Topical Issue "Theory and Applications of the Lugiato-Lefever Equation", edited by Yanne K. Chembo, Damia Gomila, Mustapha Tlidi, Curtis R. Menyuk.

  17. Improving IUE High Dispersion Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawton, Patricia J.; VanSteenberg, M. E.; Massa, D.

    2007-01-01

    We present a different method to extract high dispersion International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra from the New Spectral Image Processing System (NEWSIPS) geometrically and photometrically corrected (SI HI) images of the echellogram. The new algorithm corrects many of the deficiencies that exist in the NEWSIPS high dispersion (SIHI) spectra . Specifically, it does a much better job of accounting for the overlap of the higher echelle orders, it eliminates a significant time dependency in the extracted spectra (which can be traced to the background model used in the NEWSIPS extractions), and it can extract spectra from echellogram images that are more highly distorted than the NEWSIPS extraction routines can handle. Together, these improvements yield a set of IUE high dispersion spectra whose scientific integrity is sign ificantly better than the NEWSIPS products. This work has been supported by NASA ADP grants.

  18. Velocity Feedback Experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiu Choi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Transient response such as ringing in a control system can be reduced or removed by velocity feedback. It is a useful control technique that should be covered in the relevant engineering laboratory courses. We developed velocity feedback experiments using two different low cost technologies, viz., operational amplifiers and microcontrollers. These experiments can be easily integrated into laboratory courses on feedback control systems or microcontroller applications. The intent of developing these experiments was to illustrate the ringing problem and to offer effective, low cost solutions for removing such problem. In this paper the pedagogical approach for these velocity feedback experiments was described. The advantages and disadvantages of the two different implementation of velocity feedback were discussed also.

  19. The critical ionization velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raadu, M.A.

    1980-06-01

    The critical ionization velocity effect was first proposed in the context of space plasmas. This effect occurs for a neutral gas moving through a magnetized plasma and leads to rapid ionization and braking of the relative motion when a marginal velocity, 'the critical velocity', is exceeded. Laboratory experiments have clearly established the significance of the critical velocity and have provided evidence for an underlying mechanism which relies on the combined action of electron impact ionization and a collective plasma interaction heating electrons. There is experimental support for such a mechanism based on the heating of electrons by the modified two-stream instability as part of a feedback process. Several applications to space plasmas have been proposed and the possibility of space experiments has been discussed. (author)

  20. High Velocity Gas Gun

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    A video tape related to orbital debris research is presented. The video tape covers the process of loading a High Velocity Gas Gun and firing it into a mounted metal plate. The process is then repeated in slow motion.

  1. Experimentally validated dispersion tailoring in a silicon strip waveguide with alumina thin-film coating

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Kai; Christensen, Jesper Bjerge; Shi, Xiaodong

    2018-01-01

    We propose a silicon strip waveguide structure with alumina thin-film coating in-between the core and the cladding for group-velocity dispersion tailoring. By carefully designing the core dimension and the coating thickness, a spectrally-flattened near-zero anomalous group-velocity dispersion...

  2. Dynamics of Dispersive Wave Generation in Gas-Filled Photonic Crystal Fiber with the Normal Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhixiang Deng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The absence of Raman and unique pressure-tunable dispersion is the characteristic feature of gas-filled photonic crystal fiber (PCF, and its zero dispersion points can be extended to the near-infrared by increasing gas pressure. The generation of dispersive wave (DW in the normal group velocity dispersion (GVD region of PCF is investigated. It is demonstrated that considering the self-steepening (SS and introducing the chirp of the initial input pulse are two suitable means to control the DW generation. The SS enhances the relative average intensity of blue-shift DW while weakening that of red-shift DW. The required propagation distance of DW emission is markedly varied by introducing the frequency chirp. Manipulating DW generation in gas-filled PCF by the combined effects of either SS or chirp and three-order dispersion (TOD provides a method for a concentrated transfer of energy into the targeted wavelengths.

  3. Simultaneous measurement of particle and fluid velocities in particle-laden flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, D. X.; Lee, D. Y.

    2009-01-01

    For the velocity measurement in a particle-laden fluid flow, the fluid velocity and the inherently dispersed particle velocity can be analyzed by using PIV and PTV, respectively. Since the PIV result statistically represents the average displacement of all the particles in a PIV image, it is inevitable that the PIV result includes the influence of the dispersed particles' displacement if a single CCD camera is used to simultaneously measure the fluid velocity and the dispersed particle velocity. The influence of dispersed particles should be excluded before the PIV analysis in order to evaluate the fluid velocity accurately. In this study, the optimum replacement brightness of dispersed particles to minimize the false influence of dispersed particles on the PIV analysis was theoretically derived. Simulation results show that the modification of dispersed particle brightness can significantly reduce the PIV error caused by the dispersed particles. This modification method was also verified in the analysis of an actual experimental case of the particle-laden fluid flow in a triangular grooved channel

  4. Control of group velocity by phase-changing collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goren, C.; Rosenbluh, M.; Wilson-Gordon, A.D.; Friedmann, H.

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the influence of phase-changing collisions on the group velocities in Doppler-broadened, cycling, degenerate two-level systems where F e =F g +1 and F g >0, interacting with pump and probe lasers, that exhibit electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA). Two model systems are considered: the N system where the pump and probe are polarized perpendicularly, and EIA is due to transfer of coherence (TOC), and the double two-level system (TLS) where both lasers have the same polarization, and EIA is due to transfer of population (TOP). For the case of Doppler-broadened EIA TOC, which occurs at low pump intensity, there is a switch from positive to negative dispersion and group velocity, as the rate of phase-changing collisions is increased. For the case of EIA TOP at low pump intensity, the dispersion and group velocity remain negative even when the collision rate is increased. Pressure-induced narrowing, accompanied by an increase in the magnitude of the negative dispersion and a decrease in the magnitude of the negative group velocity, occurs in both EIA TOC and EIA TOP, at low pump intensity. When the pump intensity is increased, a switch from negative to positive dispersion and group velocity, with increasing collision rate, also occurs in the double TLS system. However, the effect is far smaller than in the case of the N system at low pump intensity

  5. Wave Tank Studies of Phase Velocities of Short Wind Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermakov, S.; Sergievskaya, I.; Shchegolkov, Yu.

    Wave tank studies of phase velocities of short wind waves have been carried out using Ka-band radar and an Optical Spectrum Analyser. The phase velocities were retrieved from measured radar and optical Doppler shifts, taking into account measurements of surface drift velocities. The dispersion relationship was studied in centimetre (cm)- and millimetre(mm)-scale wavelength ranges at different fetches and wind speeds, both for a clean water surface and for water covered with surfactant films. It is ob- tained that the phase velocities do not follow the dispersion relation of linear capillary- gravity waves, increasing with fetch and, therefore, depending on phase velocities of dominant decimetre (dm)-centimetre-scale wind waves. One thus can conclude that nonlinear cm-mm-scale harmonics bound to the dominant wind waves and propagat- ing with the phase velocities of the decimetric waves are present in the wind wave spectrum. The resulting phase velocities of short wind waves are determined by re- lation between free and bound waves. The relative intensity of the bound waves in the spectrum of short wind waves is estimated. It is shown that this relation depends strongly on the surfactant concentration, because the damping effect due to films is different for free and bound waves; this results to changes of phase velocities of wind waves in the presence of surfactant films. This work was supported by MOD, UK via DERA Winfrith (Project ISTC 1774P) and by RFBR (Project 02-05-65102).

  6. Clock synchronization and dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Lloyd, Seth; Maccone, Lorenzo; Wong, Franco N C

    2002-01-01

    We present a method to defeat effects of dispersion of timing signals when synchronizing clocks. It is based on the recently proposed 'conveyor belt synchronization' scheme and on the quantum dispersion cancellation effect

  7. Relativistic invariance of dispersion-relations and their associated wave-operators and Green-functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Censor, Dan

    2010-01-01

    Identifying invariance properties helps in simplifying calculations and consolidating concepts. Presently the Special Relativistic invariance of dispersion relations and their associated scalar wave operators is investigated for general dispersive homogeneous linear media. Invariance properties of the four-dimensional Fourier-transform integrals is demonstrated, from which the invariance of the scalar Green-function is inferred. Dispersion relations and the associated group velocities feature in Hamiltonian ray tracing theory. The derivation of group velocities for moving media from the dispersion relation for these media at rest is discussed. It is verified that the group velocity concept satisfies the relativistic velocity-addition formula. In this respect it is considered to be 'real', i.e., substantial, physically measurable, and not merely a mathematical artifact. Conversely, if we assume the group velocity to be substantial, it follows that the dispersion relation must be a relativistic invariant. (orig.)

  8. Dispersive stresses in wind farms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio; Braunbehrens, Robert; Hyvarinen, Ann

    2017-11-01

    One of the most famous models of wind farms is provided by the assumption that the farm can be approximated as a horizontally-homogeneous forest canopy with vertically-varying force intensity. By means of this approximation, the flow-motion equations become drastically simpler, as many of the three-dimensional effects are gone. However, the application of the horizontal average operator to the RANS equations leads to the appearance of new transport terms (called dispersive stresses) originating from the horizontal (small-scale) variation of the mean velocity field. Since these terms are related to the individual turbine signature, they are expected to vanish outside the roughness sublayer, providing a definition for the latter. In the present work, an assessment of the dispersive stresses is performed by means of a wake-model approach and through the linearised code ORFEUS developed at KTH. Both approaches are very fast and enable the characterization of a large number of wind-farm layouts. The dispersive stress tensor and its effect on the turbulence closure models are investigated, providing guidelines for those simulations where it is impossible to resolve the farm at a turbine scale due to grid requirements (as, for instance, mesoscale simulations).

  9. Dispersing powders in liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Nelson, RD

    1988-01-01

    This book provides powder technologists with laboratory procedures for selecting dispersing agents and preparing stable dispersions that can then be used in particle size characterization instruments. Its broader goal is to introduce industrial chemists and engineers to the phenomena, terminology, physical principles, and chemical considerations involved in preparing and handling dispersions on a commercial scale. The book introduces novices to: - industrial problems due to improper degree of dispersion; - the nomenclature used in describing particles; - the basic physica

  10. Wave equation dispersion inversion using a difference approximation to the dispersion-curve misfit gradient

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Zhendong; Schuster, Gerard T.; Liu, Yike; Hanafy, Sherif M.; Li, Jing

    2016-01-01

    We present a surface-wave inversion method that inverts for the S-wave velocity from the Rayleigh wave dispersion curve using a difference approximation to the gradient of the misfit function. We call this wave equation inversion of skeletonized

  11. Modified circular velocity law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeghloul, Nazim

    2018-05-01

    A modified circular velocity law is presented for a test body orbiting around a spherically symmetric mass. This law exhibits a distance scale parameter and allows to recover both usual Newtonian behaviour for lower distances and a constant velocity limit at large scale. Application to the Galaxy predicts the known behaviour and also leads to a galactic mass in accordance with the measured visible stellar mass so that additional dark matter inside the Galaxy can be avoided. It is also shown that this circular velocity law can be embedded in a geometrical description of spacetime within the standard general relativity framework upon relaxing the usual asymptotic flatness condition. This formulation allows to redefine the introduced Newtonian scale limit in term of the central mass exclusively. Moreover, a satisfactory answer to the galactic escape speed problem can be provided indicating the possibility that one can also get rid of dark matter halo outside the Galaxy.

  12. Lithospheric Structure of the Arabian Shield from the Joint Inversion of Receiver Function and Surface-Wave Dispersion Observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Julia, Jordi; Ammon, Charles J; Herrimann, Robert B

    2006-01-01

    .... Receiver functions are primarily sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrasts and vertical travel times and surface-wave dispersion measurements are sensitive to vertical shear-wave velocity averages...

  13. Lithospheric Structure of the Arabian Shield From the Joint Inversion of Receiver Function and Surface-Wave Dispersion Observations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Herrmann, Robert B; Julia, Jordi; Ammon, Charles J

    2007-01-01

    .... Receiver functions are primarily sensitive to shear-wave velocity contrast and vertical travel times and surface-wave dispersion measurements are sensitive to vertical shear-wave velocity averages...

  14. The Velocity Distribution of Isolated Radio Pulsars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Chernoff, D. F.; Cordes, J. M.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We infer the velocity distribution of radio pulsars based on large-scale 0.4 GHz pulsar surveys. We do so by modelling evolution of the locations, velocities, spins, and radio luminosities of pulsars; calculating pulsed flux according to a beaming model and random orientation angles of spin and beam; applying selection effects of pulsar surveys; and comparing model distributions of measurable pulsar properties with survey data using a likelihood function. The surveys analyzed have well-defined characteristics and cover approx. 95% of the sky. We maximize the likelihood in a 6-dimensional space of observables P, dot-P, DM, absolute value of b, mu, F (period, period derivative, dispersion measure, Galactic latitude, proper motion, and flux density). The models we test are described by 12 parameters that characterize a population's birth rate, luminosity, shutoff of radio emission, birth locations, and birth velocities. We infer that the radio beam luminosity (i) is comparable to the energy flux of relativistic particles in models for spin-driven magnetospheres, signifying that radio emission losses reach nearly 100% for the oldest pulsars; and (ii) scales approximately as E(exp 1/2) which, in magnetosphere models, is proportional to the voltage drop available for acceleration of particles. We find that a two-component velocity distribution with characteristic velocities of 90 km/ s and 500 km/ s is greatly preferred to any one-component distribution; this preference is largely immune to variations in other population parameters, such as the luminosity or distance scale, or the assumed spin-down law. We explore some consequences of the preferred birth velocity distribution: (1) roughly 50% of pulsars in the solar neighborhood will escape the Galaxy, while approx. 15% have velocities greater than 1000 km/ s (2) observational bias against high velocity pulsars is relatively unimportant for surveys that reach high Galactic absolute value of z distances, but is severe for

  15. Theory of dispersive microlenses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, B.; Gal, George

    1993-01-01

    A dispersive microlens is a miniature optical element which simultaneously focuses and disperses light. Arrays of dispersive mircolenses have potential applications in multicolor focal planes. They have a 100 percent optical fill factor and can focus light down to detectors of diffraction spot size, freeing up areas on the focal plane for on-chip analog signal processing. Use of dispersive microlenses allows inband color separation within a pixel and perfect scene registration. A dual-color separation has the potential for temperature discrimination. We discuss the design of dispersive microlenses and present sample results for efficient designs.

  16. The Prescribed Velocity Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Vilhelm

    The- velocity level in a room ventilated by jet ventilation is strongly influenced by the supply conditions. The momentum flow in the supply jets controls the air movement in the room and, therefore, it is very important that the inlet conditions and the numerical method can generate a satisfactory...

  17. Multidisc neutron velocity selector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosta, L.; Zsigmond, Gy.; Farago, B.; Mezei, F.; Ban, K.; Perendi, J.

    1987-12-01

    The prototype of a velocity selector for neutron monochromatization in the 4-20 A wavelength range is presented. The theoretical background of the multidisc rotor system is given together with a description of the mechanical construction and electronic driving system. The first tests and neutron measurements prove easy handling and excellent parameters. (author) 6 refs.; 7 figs.; 2 tabs

  18. Aquatic dispersion modelling of a tritium plume in Lake Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klukas, M.H.; Moltyaner, G.L.

    1996-05-01

    Approximately 2900 kg of tritiated water, containing 2.3E+15 Bq of tritium, were released to Lake Ontario via the cooling water discharge when a leak developed in a moderator heat exchanger in Unit 1 at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) on 1992 August 2. The release provided the opportunity to study the dispersion of a tritium plume in the coastal zone of Lake Ontario. Current direction over the two-week period following the release was predominantly parallel to the shore, and elevated tritium concentrations were observed up to 20 km east and 85 km west of the PNGS. Predictions of the tritium plume movement were made using current velocity measurements taken at 8-m depth, 2.5 km offshore from Darlington and using a empirical relationship where alongshore current speed is assumed to be proportional to the alongshore component of the wind speed. The tritium migration was best described using current velocity measurements. The tritium plume dispersion is modelled using the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation. Transport parameters are the alongshore current speed and longitudinal dispersion coefficient. Longitudinal dispersion coefficients, estimated by fitting the solution of the advection-dispersion equation to measured concentration distance profiles ranged from 3.75 to 10.57 m 2 s -1 . Simulations using the fitted values of the dispersion coefficient were able to describe maximum tritium concentrations measured at water supply plants located within 25 km of Pickering to within a factor of 3. The dispersion coefficient is a function of spatial and temporal variability in current velocity and the fitted dispersion coefficients estimated here may not be suitable for predicting tritium plume dispersion under different current conditions. The sensitivity of the dispersion coefficient to variability in current conditions should be evaluated in further field experiments. (author). 13 refs., 7 tabs., 12 figs

  19. Group-velocity matched nonlinear photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bache, Morten; Lægsgaard, Jesper; Bang, Ole

    2006-01-01

    A quadratic nonlinear index-guiding silica PCF is optimized for efficient second-harmonic generation through dispersion calculations. Zero group-velocity mismatch is possible for any pump wavelength above 780 nm. Very high conversion efficiencies and bandwidths are found....

  20. Group velocity tomography and regionalization in Italy and bordering areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pontevivo, A.; Panza, G.F.

    2001-10-01

    More than one hundred group velocity dispersion curves of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh waves have been processed to obtain tomographic maps, in the period range from 10 s to 35 s, for the Italian peninsula and bordering areas. We compute average dispersion relations over a 1 deg. x 1 deg. grid, and, since the lateral resolving power of our data set is about 200 km, we group the cells of the grid accordingly to their dispersion curves. In this way and without a priori geological constraints, we define seven different regions, each characterised by a distinctive mean group velocity dispersion curve. The resulting regionalization can be easily correlated with the main tectonic features of the study area and mimics a recently proposed structural sketch. Average models of the shear wave velocity in the crust and in the upper mantle for a few selected regions are presented. The very low S-wave velocity values found in the uppermost upper mantle of the Southern Tyrrhenian basin are consistent with a large percentage of partial melting, well in agreement with the presence of the Vavilov-Magnaghi and Marsili huge volcanic bodies. (author)

  1. Retrieval of sea surface velocities using sequential ocean colour monitor (OCM) data

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Prasad, J.S.; Rajawat, A.S.; Pradhan, Y.; Chauhan, O.S.; Nayak, S.R.

    velocities has been developed. The method is based on matching suspended sediment dispersion patterns, in sequential two time lapsed images. The pattern matching is performed on atmospherically corrected and geo-referenced sequential pair of images by Maximum...

  2. Multidisk neutron velocity selectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammouda, B.

    1992-01-01

    Helical multidisk velocity selectors used for neutron scattering applications have been analyzed and tested experimentally. Design and performance considerations are discussed along with simple explanation of the basic concept. A simple progression is used for the inter-disk spacing in the 'Rosta' design. Ray tracing computer investigations are presented in order to assess the 'coverage' (how many absorbing layers are stacked along the path of 'wrong' wavelength neutrons) and the relative number of neutrons absorbed in each disk (and therefore the relative amount of gamma radiation emitted from each disk). We discuss whether a multidisk velocity selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration (i.e. the selector is turned by 180 0 around a vertical axis with the rotor spun in the reverse direction). Experimental tests and calibration of a multidisk selector are reported together with evidence that a multidisk selector can be operated in the 'reverse' configuration. (orig.)

  3. Sphagnum moss disperses spores with vortex rings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Dwight L; Edwards, Joan

    2010-07-23

    Sphagnum spores, which have low terminal velocities, are carried by turbulent wind currents to establish colonies many kilometers away. However, spores that are easily kept aloft are also rapidly decelerated in still air; thus, dispersal range depends strongly on release height. Vascular plants grow tall to lift spores into sufficient wind currents for dispersal, but nonvascular plants such as Sphagnum cannot grow sufficiently high. High-speed videos show that exploding capsules of Sphagnum generate vortex rings to efficiently carry spores high enough to be dispersed by turbulent air currents. Spores launched ballistically at similar speeds through still air would travel a few millimeters and not easily reach turbulent air. Vortex rings are used by animals; here, we report vortex rings generated by plants.

  4. Optimized nonlinear inversion of surface-wave dispersion data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raykova, Reneta B.

    2014-01-01

    A new code for inversion of surface wave dispersion data is developed to obtain Earth’s crustal and upper mantle velocity structure. The author developed Optimized Non–Linear Inversion ( ONLI ) software, based on Monte-Carlo search. The values of S–wave velocity VS and thickness h for a number of horizontal homogeneous layers are parameterized. Velocity of P–wave VP and density ρ of relevant layers are calculated by empirical or theoretical relations. ONLI explores parameters space in two modes, selective and full search, and the main innovation of software is evaluation of tested models. Theoretical dispersion curves are calculated if tested model satisfied specific conditions only, reducing considerably the computation time. A number of tests explored impact of parameterization and proved the ability of ONLI approach to deal successfully with non–uniqueness of inversion problem. Key words: Earth’s structure, surface–wave dispersion, non–linear inversion, software

  5. Ultrasmall, water dispersible, TWEEN80 modified Yb:Er:NaGd(WO4)2 nanoparticles with record upconversion ratiometric thermal sensitivity and their internalization by mesenchymal stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascales, Concepción; Paíno, Carlos L.; Bazán, Eulalia; Zaldo, Carlos

    2017-05-01

    This work presents the synthesis by coprecipitation of diamond shaped Yb:Er:NaGd(WO4)2 crystalline nanoparticles (NPs) with diagonal dimensions in the 5-7 nm × 10-12 nm range which have been modified with TWEEN80 for their dispersion in water, and their interaction with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) proposed as cellular NP vehicles. These NPs belong to a large family of tetragonal Yb:Er:NaT(XO4)2 (T = Y, La, Gd, Lu; X = Mo, W) compounds with green (2H11/2 + 4S3/2 → 4I15/2) Er-related upconversion (UC) efficiency comparable to that of Yb:Er:β-NaYF4 reference compound, but with a ratiometric thermal sensitivity (S) 2.5-3.5 times larger than that of the fluoride. At the temperature range of interest for biomedical applications (˜293-317 K/20-44 °C) S = 108-118 × 10-4 K-1 for 20 at%Yb:5 at%Er:NaGd(WO4)2 NPs, being the largest values so far reported using the 2H11/2/4S3/2 Er intensity ratiometric method. Cultured MSCs, incubated with these water NP emulsions, internalize and accumulate the NPs enclosed in endosomes/lysosomes. Incubations with up to 10 μg of NPs per ml of culture medium maintain cellular metabolism at 72 h. A thermal assisted excitation path is discussed as responsible for the UC behavior of Yb:Er:NaT(XO4)2 compounds.

  6. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. For continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the, clinical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects. of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  7. Dispersivity in heterogeneous permeable media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chesnut, D.A.

    1994-01-01

    When one fluid displaces another through a one-dimensional porous medium, the composition changes from pure displacing fluid at the inlet to pure displaced fluid some distance downstream. The distance over which an arbitrary percentage (typically 80%) of this change occurs is defined as the mixing zone length, which increases with increasing average distance traveled by the displacement front. Alternatively, for continuous injection, the mixing zone size can be determined from a breakthrough curve as the time required for the effluent displacing fluid concentration to change from, say, 10% to 90%. In classical dispersion theory, the mixing zone grows in proportion to the square root of the mean distance traveled, or, equivalently, to the square root of the mean breakthrough time. In a multi-dimensional heterogeneous medium, especially at field scales, the size of the mixing zone grows almost linearly with mean distance or travel time. If an observed breakthrough curve is forced to fit the classical theory, the resulting effective dispersivity, instead of being constant, also increases almost linearly with the spatial or temporal scale of the problem. This occurs because the heterogeneity in flow properties creates a corresponding velocity distribution along the different flow pathways from the inlet to the outlet of the system. Mixing occurs mostly at the outlet, or wherever the fluid is sampled, rather than within the medium. In this paper, we consider the effects of this behavior on radionuclide or other contaminant migration

  8. Databases of surface wave dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Boschi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Observations of seismic surface waves provide the most important constraint on the elastic properties of the Earth’s lithosphere and upper mantle. Two databases of fundamental mode surface wave dispersion were recently compiled and published by groups at Harvard (Ekström et al., 1997 and Utrecht/Oxford (Trampert and Woodhouse, 1995, 2001, and later employed in 3-d global tomographic studies. Although based on similar sets of seismic records, the two databases show some significant discrepancies. We derive phase velocity maps from both, and compare them to quantify the discrepancies and assess the relative quality of the data; in this endeavour, we take careful account of the effects of regularization and parametrization. At short periods, where Love waves are mostly sensitive to crustal structure and thickness, we refer our comparison to a map of the Earth’s crust derived from independent data. On the assumption that second-order effects like seismic anisotropy and scattering can be neglected, we find the measurements of Ekström et al. (1997 of better quality; those of Trampert and Woodhouse (2001 result in phase velocity maps of much higher spatial frequency and, accordingly, more difficult to explain and justify geophysically. The discrepancy is partly explained by the more conservative a priori selection of data implemented by Ekström et al. (1997. Nevertheless, it becomes more significant with decreasing period, which indicates that it could also be traced to the different measurement techniques employed by the authors.

  9. Skeletonized wave equation of surface wave dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2016-09-06

    We present the theory for wave equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. Similar to wave-equation travel-time inversion, the complicated surface-wave arrivals in traces are skeletonized as simpler data, namely the picked dispersion curves in the (kx,ω) domain. Solutions to the elastic wave equation and an iterative optimization method are then used to invert these curves for 2D or 3D velocity models. This procedure, denoted as wave equation dispersion inversion (WD), does not require the assumption of a layered model and is less prone to the cycle skipping problems of full waveform inversion (FWI). The synthetic and field data examples demonstrate that WD can accurately reconstruct the S-wave velocity distribution in laterally heterogeneous media.

  10. Transport and Dispersion of Nanoparticles in Periodic Nanopost Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    He, Kai; Retterer, Scott T.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Conrad, Jacinta C.; Krishnamoorti, Ramanan

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles transported through highly confined porous media exhibit faster breakthrough than small molecule tracers. Despite important technological applications in advanced materials, human health, energy, and environment, the microscale mechanisms leading to early breakthrough have not been identified. Here, we measure dispersion of nanoparticles at the single-particle scale in regular arrays of nanoposts and show that for highly confined flows of dilute suspensions of nanoparticles the longitudinal and transverse velocities exhibit distinct scaling behaviors. The distributions of transverse particle velocities become narrower and more non-Gaussian when the particles are strongly confined. As a result, the transverse dispersion of highly confined nanoparticles at low Péclet numbers is significantly less important than longitudinal dispersion, leading to early breakthrough. This finding suggests a fundamental mechanism by which to control dispersion and thereby improve efficacy of nanoparticles applied for advanced polymer nanocomposites, drug delivery, hydrocarbon production, and environmental remediation. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  11. Transport and Dispersion of Nanoparticles in Periodic Nanopost Arrays

    KAUST Repository

    He, Kai

    2014-05-27

    Nanoparticles transported through highly confined porous media exhibit faster breakthrough than small molecule tracers. Despite important technological applications in advanced materials, human health, energy, and environment, the microscale mechanisms leading to early breakthrough have not been identified. Here, we measure dispersion of nanoparticles at the single-particle scale in regular arrays of nanoposts and show that for highly confined flows of dilute suspensions of nanoparticles the longitudinal and transverse velocities exhibit distinct scaling behaviors. The distributions of transverse particle velocities become narrower and more non-Gaussian when the particles are strongly confined. As a result, the transverse dispersion of highly confined nanoparticles at low Péclet numbers is significantly less important than longitudinal dispersion, leading to early breakthrough. This finding suggests a fundamental mechanism by which to control dispersion and thereby improve efficacy of nanoparticles applied for advanced polymer nanocomposites, drug delivery, hydrocarbon production, and environmental remediation. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  12. Dispersal of forest insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcmanus, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    Dispersal flights of selected species of forest insects which are associated with periodic outbreaks of pests that occur over large contiguous forested areas are discussed. Gypsy moths, spruce budworms, and forest tent caterpillars were studied for their massive migrations in forested areas. Results indicate that large dispersals into forested areas are due to the females, except in the case of the gypsy moth.

  13. Seed dispersal in fens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, B.; Van Diggelen, R.; Jensen, K.

    2006-01-01

    Question: How does seed dispersal reduce fen isolation and contribute to biodiversity? Location: European and North American fens. Methods: This paper reviews the literature on seed dispersal to fens. Results: Landscape fragmentation may reduce dispersal opportunities thereby isolating fens and reducing genetic exchange. Species in fragmented wetlands may have lower reproductive success, which can lead to biodiversity loss. While fens may have always been relatively isolated from each other, they have become increasingly fragmented in modern times within agricultural and urban landscapes in both Europe and North America. Dispersal by water, animals and wind has been hampered by changes related to development in landscapes surrounding fens. Because the seeds of certain species are long-lived in the seed bank, frequent episodes of dispersal are not always necessary to maintain the biodiversity of fens. However, of particular concern to restoration is that some dominant species, such as the tussock sedge Carex stricta, may not disperse readily between fens. Conclusions: Knowledge of seed dispersal can be used to maintain and restore the biodiversity of fens in fragmented landscapes. Given that development has fragmented landscapes and that this situation is not likely to change, the dispersal of seeds might be enhanced by moving hay or cattle from fens to damaged sites, or by reestablishing lost hydrological connections. ?? IAVS; Opulus Press.

  14. Application of forking genetic algorithm to the estimation of an S-wave-velocity structure from Rayleigh-wave dispersion data. With special reference to an exploration method using microtremors; Rayleigh ha no bunsan data kara S ha sokudo kozo wo suiteisuru inversion mondai eno kotaigun tansaku bunkigata identeki algorithm no tekiyo. Bido tansaho ni kanrenshite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, I; Nakanishi, I [Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Ling, S [Nihon Nessui Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Okada, H [Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan)

    1997-10-22

    Discussions were given on a genetic algorithm as a means to solve simultaneously the problems related to stability of solution and dependence on an initial model in estimating subsurface structures using the microtremor exploration method. In the study, a forking genetic algorithm (fGA) to explore solid substance groups was applied to the optimizing simulations for a velocity structure model to discuss whether the algorithm can be used practically. The simulation No. 1 was performed by making the number of layers four for both of the given velocity structure and the optimizing model. On the other hand, the simulation No. 2 was executed by making the number of layers for the given velocity structure greater than that for the optimizing model. As a result, it was verified that wide range exploration may be possible for the velocity structure model, and that a large number of candidates for the velocity structure model may be proposed. In either case, the exploration capability of the fGA exceeded that of the standard simple genetic algorithm. 8 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Anomalous dispersion due to hydrocarbons: The secret of reservoir geophysics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R.L.

    2009-01-01

    When P- and S-waves travel through porous sandstone saturated with hydrocarbons, a bit of magic happens to make the velocities of these waves more frequency-dependent (dispersive) than when the formation is saturated with brine. This article explores the utility of the anomalous dispersion in finding more oil and gas, as well as giving a possible explanation about the effect of hydrocarbons upon the capillary forces in the formation. ?? 2009 Society of Exploration Geophysicists.

  16. Langmuir wave dispersion relation in non-Maxwellian plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouazene, M.; Annou, R.

    2010-01-01

    The Langmuir wave dispersion relation is derived in partially ionized plasmas, where free electrons are confined to move in a nearest neighbor ions' potential well. The equilibrium velocity distribution function experiences then, a departure from Maxwell distribution function. The effect of the non-Maxwellian character of the distribution function on the Langmuir phase and group velocities as well as the phase matching conditions and the nonlinear growth rate of decay instability is investigated. The proposed Langmuir wave dispersion relation is relevant to dense and cryogenic plasmas.

  17. Improving practical atmospheric dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, J.C.R.; Hudson, B.; Thomson, D.J.

    1992-01-01

    The new generation of practical atmospheric dispersion model (for short range ≤ 30 km) are based on dispersion science and boundary layer meteorology which have widespread international acceptance. In addition, recent improvements in computer skills and the widespread availability of small powerful computers make it possible to have new regulatory models which are more complex than the previous generation which were based on charts and simple formulae. This paper describes the basis of these models and how they have developed. Such models are needed to satisfy the urgent public demand for sound, justifiable and consistent environmental decisions. For example, it is preferable that the same models are used to simulate dispersion in different industries; in many countries at present different models are used for emissions from nuclear and fossil fuel power stations. The models should not be so simple as to be suspect but neither should they be too complex for widespread use; for example, at public inquiries in Germany, where simple models are mandatory, it is becoming usual to cite the results from highly complex computational models because the simple models are not credible. This paper is written in a schematic style with an emphasis on tables and diagrams. (au) (22 refs.)

  18. Transverse dispersion in heterogeneous fractures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dershowitz, Bill; Shuttle, Dawn; Klise, Kate; Outters, Nils; Hermanson, Jan

    2004-12-01

    breakthrough curves are much more strongly affected by transverse dispersivity, with t 95 delayed by up to almost 50%. This is because when aperture is held constant, velocity varies directly with transmissivity, such that flow outside the high transmissivity channel is slower. However, even for these cases, the effect of transverse dispersivity in these single fracture studies was to increase transport times. Studies of sorbing tracer transport (Case 3) produced results similar to those found with conservative tracers, in which the magnitude of changes in breakthrough statistics due to transverse dispersion was on the same order as the changes between stochastic realizations of the spatial fields. Similarly, simulations with larger tracer release area (Case 2) also produced variations due to transverse dispersion within the range defined by stochastic realizations

  19. Estimating plume dispersion: a comparison of several sigma schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irwin, J.S.

    1983-01-01

    The lateral and vertical Gaussian plume dispersion parameters are estimated and compared with field tracer data collected at 11 sites. The dispersion parameter schemes used in this analysis include Cramer's scheme, suggested for tall stack dispersion estimates, Draxler's scheme, suggested for elevated and surface releases, Pasquill's scheme, suggested for interim use in dispersion estimates, and the Pasquill--Gifford scheme using Turner's technique for assigning stability categories. The schemes suggested by Cramer, Draxler and Pasquill estimate the dispersion parameters using onsite measurements of the vertical and lateral wind-velocity variances at the effective release height. The performances of these schemes in estimating the dispersion parameters are compared with that of the Pasquill--Gifford scheme, using the Prairie Grass and Karlsruhe data. For these two experiments, the estimates of the dispersion parameters using Draxler's scheme correlate better with the measurements than did estimates using the Pasquill--Gifford scheme. Comparison of the dispersion parameter estimates with the measurement suggests that Draxler's scheme for characterizing the dispersion results in the smallest mean fractional error in the estimated dispersion parameters and the smallest variance of the fractional errors

  20. Shear wave velocities in the upper mantle of the Western Alps: new constraints using array analysis of seismic surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Chao; Pedersen, Helle A.; Paul, Anne; Zhao, Liang; Solarino, Stefano

    2017-07-01

    It remains challenging to obtain absolute shear wave velocities of heterogeneities of small lateral extension in the uppermost mantle. This study presents a cross-section of Vs across the strongly heterogeneous 3-D structure of the western European Alps, based on array analysis of data from 92 broad-band seismic stations from the CIFALPS experiment and from permanent networks in France and Italy. Half of the stations were located along a dense sublinear array. Using a combination of these stations and off-profile stations, fundamental-mode Rayleigh wave dispersion curves were calculated using a combined frequency-time beamforming approach. We calculated dispersion curves for seven arrays of approximately 100 km aperture and 14 arrays of approximately 50 km aperture, the latter with the aim of obtaining a 2-D vertical cross-section of Vs beneath the western Alps. The dispersion curves were inverted for Vs(z), with crustal interfaces imposed from a previous receiver function study. The array approach proved feasible, as Vs(z) from independent arrays vary smoothly across the profile length. Results from the seven large arrays show that the shear velocity of the upper mantle beneath the European plate is overall low compared to AK135 with the lowest velocities in the internal part of the western Alps, and higher velocities east of the Alps beneath the Po plain. The 2-D Vs model is coherent with (i) a ∼100 km thick eastward-dipping European lithosphere west of the Alps, (ii) very high velocities beneath the Po plain, coherent with the presence of the Alpine (European) slab and (iii) a narrow low-velocity anomaly beneath the core of the western Alps (from the Briançonnais to the Dora Maira massif), and approximately colocated with a similar anomaly observed in a recent teleseismic P-wave tomography. This intriguing anomaly is also supported by traveltime variations of subvertically propagating body waves from two teleseismic events that are approximately located on

  1. Clear and Measurable Signature of Modified Gravity in the Galaxy Velocity Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellwing, Wojciech A.; Barreira, Alexandre; Frenk, Carlos S.; Li, Baojiu; Cole, Shaun

    2014-06-01

    The velocity field of dark matter and galaxies reflects the continued action of gravity throughout cosmic history. We show that the low-order moments of the pairwise velocity distribution v12 are a powerful diagnostic of the laws of gravity on cosmological scales. In particular, the projected line-of-sight galaxy pairwise velocity dispersion σ12(r) is very sensitive to the presence of modified gravity. Using a set of high-resolution N-body simulations, we compute the pairwise velocity distribution and its projected line-of-sight dispersion for a class of modified gravity theories: the chameleon f(R) gravity and Galileon gravity (cubic and quartic). The velocities of dark matter halos with a wide range of masses would exhibit deviations from general relativity at the (5-10)σ level. We examine strategies for detecting these deviations in galaxy redshift and peculiar velocity surveys. If detected, this signature would be a "smoking gun" for modified gravity.

  2. Examples of Vector Velocity Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter M.; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    To measure blood flow velocity in vessels with conventional ultrasound, the velocity is estimated along the direction of the emitted ultrasound wave. It is therefore impossible to obtain accurate information on blood flow velocity and direction, when the angle between blood flow and ultrasound wa...

  3. Dispersal and metapopulation stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaopeng Wang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Metapopulation dynamics are jointly regulated by local and spatial factors. These factors may affect the dynamics of local populations and of the entire metapopulation differently. Previous studies have shown that dispersal can stabilize local populations; however, as dispersal also tends to increase spatial synchrony, its net effect on metapopulation stability has been controversial. Here we present a simple metapopulation model to study how dispersal, in interaction with other spatial and local processes, affects the temporal variability of metapopulations in a stochastic environment. Our results show that in homogeneous metapopulations, the local stabilizing and spatial synchronizing effects of dispersal cancel each other out, such that dispersal has no effect on metapopulation variability. This result is robust to moderate heterogeneities in local and spatial parameters. When local and spatial dynamics exhibit high heterogeneities, however, dispersal can either stabilize or destabilize metapopulation dynamics through various mechanisms. Our findings have important theoretical and practical implications. We show that dispersal functions as a form of spatial intraspecific mutualism in metapopulation dynamics and that its effect on metapopulation stability is opposite to that of interspecific competition on local community stability. Our results also suggest that conservation corridors should be designed with appreciation of spatial heterogeneities in population dynamics in order to maximize metapopulation stability.

  4. Velocity ratio measurement using the frequency of gyro backward wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muggli, P.; Tran, M.Q.; Tran, T.M.

    1990-10-01

    The operating diagram of a low quality factor, 8GHz TE 01 0 gyrotron exhibits oscillations between 6.8 and 7.3GHz. These oscillations are identified as the backward wave component of the TE 21 0 traveling mode. As the resonance condition of this mode depends on the average parallel velocity [ > of the beam electrons (ω BW ≅Ω C /γ - k [ [ >), the measurement of ω BW for given Ω C and γ, is used as a diagnostic for the beam electrons velocity ratio α= / [ >. The values of α, deduced from ω BW through the linear dispersion relation for the electron cyclotron instability in an infinite waveguide, are unrealistic. A non-linear simulation code gives α values which are in very good agreement with the ones predicted by a particle trajectory code (+10% to +20%). We find numerically that the particles' velocity dispersion in vperpendicular and v [ increases ω BW . This effect explains part of the discrepancy between the values of α inferred from ω BW without velocity dispersion and the expected values. (author) 10 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. Dispersed Fringe Sensing Analysis - DFSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigrist, Norbert; Shi, Fang; Redding, David C.; Basinger, Scott A.; Ohara, Catherine M.; Seo, Byoung-Joon; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa A.; Spechler, Joshua A.

    2012-01-01

    Dispersed Fringe Sensing (DFS) is a technique for measuring and phasing segmented telescope mirrors using a dispersed broadband light image. DFS is capable of breaking the monochromatic light ambiguity, measuring absolute piston errors between segments of large segmented primary mirrors to tens of nanometers accuracy over a range of 100 micrometers or more. The DFSA software tool analyzes DFS images to extract DFS encoded segment piston errors, which can be used to measure piston distances between primary mirror segments of ground and space telescopes. This information is necessary to control mirror segments to establish a smooth, continuous primary figure needed to achieve high optical quality. The DFSA tool is versatile, allowing precise piston measurements from a variety of different optical configurations. DFSA technology may be used for measuring wavefront pistons from sub-apertures defined by adjacent segments (such as Keck Telescope), or from separated sub-apertures used for testing large optical systems (such as sub-aperture wavefront testing for large primary mirrors using auto-collimating flats). An experimental demonstration of the coarse-phasing technology with verification of DFSA was performed at the Keck Telescope. DFSA includes image processing, wavelength and source spectral calibration, fringe extraction line determination, dispersed fringe analysis, and wavefront piston sign determination. The code is robust against internal optical system aberrations and against spectral variations of the source. In addition to the DFSA tool, the software package contains a simple but sophisticated MATLAB model to generate dispersed fringe images of optical system configurations in order to quickly estimate the coarse phasing performance given the optical and operational design requirements. Combining MATLAB (a high-level language and interactive environment developed by MathWorks), MACOS (JPL s software package for Modeling and Analysis for Controlled Optical

  6. Measurement of particle velocity using a mutual inductance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerr, Stephen; Kirkpatrick, Douglas; Garden, Steven

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary work on the development of a novel method for the measurement of particle velocity is described. The technique relies on measurement of the mutual inductance between two coaxial coils, one stationary and the other perturbed by the shock wave. The moving coil is the gauge and is deposited on thin film. The method was developed to assist in the study of particle velocities in large samples of porous media surrounding an explosive charge. The technique does not require measurements to be taken in a region of uniform magnetic field and therefore dispenses with the need for Helmholtz coils, the size and cost of which can become prohibitive for large experiments. This has the added advantage of allowing measurements to be taken at points widely dispersed through a sample with relative ease. Measurements of particle velocity in porous media have been compared with those from co-located conventional electromagnetic particle velocity gauges with reasonable agreement

  7. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dufour, G.; Lambrecht, A.; Reynaud, S. [CNRS, ENS, UPMC, Laboratoire Kastler-Brossel, Paris (France); Debu, P. [CEA-Saclay, Institut de Recherche sur les lois Fondamentales de l' Univers, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Nesvizhevsky, V.V. [Institut Max von Laue-Paul Langevin, Grenoble (France); Voronin, A.Yu. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-01-15

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the freefall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms (H). The precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution.We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of the vertical velocities of H, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing H with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk.We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and we show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration g of H could be pushed below 10{sup -3} under realistic experimental conditions. (orig.)

  8. Shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of antihydrogen in GBAR

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, G.; Lambrecht, A.; Nesvizhevsky, V.V.; Reynaud, S.; Voronin, A.Yu.

    2014-01-30

    GBAR is a project aiming at measuring the free fall acceleration of gravity for antimatter, namely antihydrogen atoms ($\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$). Precision of this timing experiment depends crucially on the dispersion of initial vertical velocities of the atoms as well as on the reliable control of their distribution. We propose to use a new method for shaping the distribution of vertical velocities of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$, which improves these factors simultaneously. The method is based on quantum reflection of elastically and specularly bouncing $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ with small initial vertical velocity on a bottom mirror disk, and absorption of atoms with large initial vertical velocities on a top rough disk. We estimate statistical and systematic uncertainties, and show that the accuracy for measuring the free fall acceleration $\\overline{g}$ of $\\overline{\\mathrm{H}}$ could be pushed below $10^{-3}$ under realistic experimental conditions.

  9. CO and IRAS detection of an intermediate-velocity cloud

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desert, F.X.; Bazell, D.; Blitz, L.

    1990-01-01

    In the course of a radio survey of high-Galactic-latitude clouds, CO emission was detected at the position l = 210.8 deg and b = 63.1 deg with an LSR velocity of -39 km/sec. This molecular cloud constitutes the third one with an unusually large absolute velocity at these latitudes, as compared with the 5.4-km/sec cloud-to-cloud velocity dispersion of the high-latitude molecular clouds. The position is coincident with an H I intermediate-velocity cloud (GHL 11, Verschuur H, OLM 268) and the IR-excess cloud 306 in the list by Desert et al. (1988). This cloud is clearly detected at all four IRAS wavelengths and has warmer colors than the local ISM. 27 refs

  10. Utilization of multimode Love wave dispersion curve inversion for geotechnical site investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamimu, La; Nawawi, Mohd; Safani, Jamhir

    2011-01-01

    Inversion codes based on a modified genetic algorithm (GA) have been developed to invert multimode Love wave dispersion curves. The multimode Love wave dispersion curves were synthesized from the profile representing shear-wave velocity reversal using a full SH (shear horizontal) waveform. In this study, we used a frequency–slowness transform to extract the dispersion curve from the full SH waveform. Dispersion curves overlain in dispersion images were picked manually. These curves were then inverted using the modified GA. To assess the accuracy of the inversion results, differences between the true and inverted shear-wave velocity profile were quantified in terms of shear-wave velocity and thickness errors, E S and E H . Our numerical modeling showed that the inversion of multimode dispersion curves can significantly provide the better assessment of a shear-wave velocity structure, especially with a velocity reversal profile at typical geotechnical site investigations. This approach has been applied on field data acquired at a site in Niigata prefecture, Japan. In these field data, our inversion results show good agreement between the calculated and experimental dispersion curves and accurately detect low velocity layer targets

  11. Refractive index dispersion measurement using carrier-envelope phasemeters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hansinger, Peter; Töpfer, Philipp; Adolph, Daniel; Hoff, Dominik; Rathje, Tim; Sayler, A Max; Paulus, Gerhard G; Dimitrov, Nikolay; Dreischuh, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a novel method for direct and accurate measurement of refractive index dispersion based on carrier-envelope phase detection of few-cycle laser pulses, exploiting the difference between phase and group velocity in a dispersive medium. In a layout similar to an interferometer, two carrier-envelope phasemeters are capable of measuring the dispersion of a transparent or reflective sample, where one phasemeter serves as the reference and the other records the influence of the sample. Here we report on proof-of-principle measurements that already reach relative uncertainties of a few 10 −4 . Further development is expected to allow for unprecedented precision. (paper)

  12. A costal dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rahm, L.; Nyberg, L.; Gidhagen, L.

    1990-01-01

    A dispersion model to be used off costal waters has been developed. The model has been applied to describe the migration of radionuclides in the Baltic sea. A summary of the results is presented here. (K.A.E)

  13. Wave-equation dispersion inversion

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Feng, Zongcai; Schuster, Gerard T.

    2016-01-01

    We present the theory for wave-equation inversion of dispersion curves, where the misfit function is the sum of the squared differences between the wavenumbers along the predicted and observed dispersion curves. The dispersion curves are obtained

  14. Reactimeter dispersion equation

    OpenAIRE

    A.G. Yuferov

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work is to derive and analyze a reactimeter metrological model in the form of the dispersion equation which connects reactimeter input/output signal dispersions with superimposed random noise at the inlet. It is proposed to standardize the reactimeter equation form, presenting the main reactimeter computing unit by a convolution equation. Hence, the reactimeter metrological characteristics are completely determined by this unit hardware function which represents a transient re...

  15. Cerenkov detector for heavy-ion velocity measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, D.L.; Baumgartner, M.; Dufour, J.P.; Girard, J.G.; Greiner, D.E.; Lindstrom, P.J.; Symons, T.J.M.; Crawford, H.J.

    1984-08-01

    We have developed a highly sensitive velocity measuring detector using total-internal-reflection Cerenkov counters of a type mentioned by Jelly in 1958. If the velocity of the particle is above the threshold for total-internal-reflection these counters have a charge resolution of sigma = 0.18e for a 3mm thick glass radiator. For the velocity measurement we use a fused silica radiator so that the velocity of the particles are near the threshold for total-internal reflection. For momentum-analyzed projectile fragments of 1.6 GeV/nucleon 40 Ar, we have measured a mass resolution of sigma = 0.1u for isotope identification

  16. Fickian dispersion is anomalous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushman, John H.; O'Malley, Dan

    2015-12-01

    The thesis put forward here is that the occurrence of Fickian dispersion in geophysical settings is a rare event and consequently should be labeled as anomalous. What people classically call anomalous is really the norm. In a Lagrangian setting, a process with mean square displacement which is proportional to time is generally labeled as Fickian dispersion. With a number of counter examples we show why this definition is fraught with difficulty. In a related discussion, we show an infinite second moment does not necessarily imply the process is super dispersive. By employing a rigorous mathematical definition of Fickian dispersion we illustrate why it is so hard to find a Fickian process. We go on to employ a number of renormalization group approaches to classify non-Fickian dispersive behavior. Scaling laws for the probability density function for a dispersive process, the distribution for the first passage times, the mean first passage time, and the finite-size Lyapunov exponent are presented for fixed points of both deterministic and stochastic renormalization group operators. The fixed points of the renormalization group operators are p-self-similar processes. A generalized renormalization group operator is introduced whose fixed points form a set of generalized self-similar processes. Power-law clocks are introduced to examine multi-scaling behavior. Several examples of these ideas are presented and discussed.

  17. Inversion and sensitivity analysis of ground penetrating radar data with waveguide dispersion using deterministic and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bikowski, J.; Huisman, J.A.; Vrugt, J.A.; Vereecken, H.; van der Kruk, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data affected by waveguide dispersion are not straightforward to analyse. Therefore, waveguide dispersed common midpoint measurements are typically interpreted using so-called dispersion curves, which describe the phase velocity as a function of frequency. These

  18. Clay squirt: Local flow dispersion in shale-bearing sandstones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten Kanne; Fabricius, Ida Lykke

    2017-01-01

    Dispersion of elastic-wave velocity is common in sandstone and larger in shaly sandstone than in clean sandstone. Dispersion in fluid-saturated shaly sandstone often exceeds the level expected from the stress-dependent elastic moduli of dry sandstone. The large dispersion has been coined clay...... squirt and is proposed to originate from a pressure gradient between the clay microporosity and the effective porosity. We have formulated a simple model that quantifies the clay-squirt effect on bulk moduli of sandstone with homogeneously distributed shale laminae or dispersed shale. The model...... predictions were compared with the literature data. For sandstones with dispersed shale, agreement was found, whereas other sandstones have larger fluid-saturated bulk modulus, possibly due to partially load-bearing shales or heterogeneous shale distribution. The data that agree with the clay-squirt model...

  19. Cold dark matter. 2: Spatial and velocity statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelb, James M.; Bertschinger, Edmund

    1994-01-01

    We examine high-resolution gravitational N-body simulations of the omega = 1 cold dark matter (CDM) model in order to determine whether there is any normalization of the initial density fluctuation spectrum that yields acceptable results for galaxy clustering and velocities. Dense dark matter halos in the evolved mass distribution are identified with luminous galaxies; the most massive halos are also considered as sites for galaxy groups, with a range of possibilities explored for the group mass-to-light ratios. We verify the earlier conclusions of White et al. (1987) for the low-amplitude (high-bias) CDM model-the galaxy correlation function is marginally acceptable but that there are too many galaxies. We also show that the peak biasing method does not accurately reproduce the results obtained using dense halos identified in the simulations themselves. The Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) anisotropy implies a higher normalization, resulting in problems with excessive pairwise galaxy velocity dispersion unless a strong velocity bias is present. Although we confirm the strong velocity bias of halos reported by Couchman & Carlberg (1992), we show that the galaxy motions are still too large on small scales. We find no amplitude for which the CDM model can reconcile simultaneously and galaxy correlation function, the low pairwise velocity dispersion, and the richness distribution of groups and clusters. With the normalization implied by COBE, the CDM spectrum has too much power on small scales if omega = 1.

  20. Robust Imaging Methodology for Challenging Environments: Wave Equation Dispersion Inversion of Surface Waves

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Schuster, Gerard T.; Zeng, Zhaofa

    2017-01-01

    A robust imaging technology is reviewed that provide subsurface information in challenging environments: wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) of surface waves for the shear velocity model. We demonstrate the benefits and liabilities of the method

  1. Development of an optimal velocity selection method with velocity obstacle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Geuk; Oh, Jun Ho [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-15

    The Velocity obstacle (VO) method is one of the most well-known methods for local path planning, allowing consideration of dynamic obstacles and unexpected obstacles. Typical VO methods separate a velocity map into a collision area and a collision-free area. A robot can avoid collisions by selecting its velocity from within the collision-free area. However, if there are numerous obstacles near a robot, the robot will have very few velocity candidates. In this paper, a method for choosing optimal velocity components using the concept of pass-time and vertical clearance is proposed for the efficient movement of a robot. The pass-time is the time required for a robot to pass by an obstacle. By generating a latticized available velocity map for a robot, each velocity component can be evaluated using a cost function that considers the pass-time and other aspects. From the output of the cost function, even a velocity component that will cause a collision in the future can be chosen as a final velocity if the pass-time is sufficiently long enough.

  2. Observations of High Dispersion Clusters of Galaxies: Constraints on Cold Dark Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oegerle, William R.; Hill, John M.; Fitchett, Michael J.

    1995-07-01

    We have studied the dynamics of several Abell clusters of galaxies, which were previously reported to have large velocity dispersions, and hence very large masses. In particular, we have investigated the assertion of Frenk et al. (1990) that clusters with intrinsic velocity dispersions ~> 1200 km s^-1^ are extremely rare in the universe, and that large observed dispersions are due to projection effects. We report redshifts for 303 galaxies in the fields of A1775, A2029, A2142, and A2319, obtained with the Nessie multifiber spectrograph at the Mayall 4 m telescope. A1775 appears to be two poor, interacting clusters, separated in velocity space by ~3075 km s^-1^ (in the cluster rest frame). A2029 has a velocity dispersion of 1436 km s^-1^, based on 85 cluster member redshifts. There is evidence that a group or poor cluster of galaxies of slightly different redshift is projected onto (or is merging with) the core of A2029. However, the combined kinematic and x-ray data for A2029 argue for an intrinsically large dispersion for this cluster. Based on redshifts for 103 members of A2142, we find a dispersion of 1280 km s^-1^, and evidence for subclustering. With 130 redshifts in the A2319 field, we have isolated a subcluster ~10' NW of the cD galaxy. After its removal, A2319 has a velocity dispersion of 1324 km s^-1^. The data obtained here have been combined with recent optical and X-ray data for other supposedly high-mass clusters to study the cluster velocity dispersion distribution in a sample of Abell clusters. We find that clusters with true velocity dispersions ~> 1200 km s^-1^ are not extremely rare, but account for ~5% of all Abell clusters with R >= 0. If these clusters are in virial equilibrium, then our results are inconsistent with a high-bias (b~>22), high-density CDM model.

  3. The dispersion relation of a gravitating spiral system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evangelidis, E.

    1977-01-01

    The dispersion relation has been found for a galaxy, without the assumption that the centrifugal force is balanced by the gravitational force. It has been shown that such a system (1) can be gravitationally unstable under appropriate conditions, and (2) that there is no resonance at ω=2Ω (Ω=angular velocity of the Galaxy). (Auth.)

  4. Control rod velocity limiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cearley, J.E.; Carruth, J.C.; Dixon, R.C.; Spencer, S.S.; Zuloaga, J.A. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    This patent describes a velocity control arrangement for a reciprocable, vertically oriented control rod for use in a nuclear reactor in a fluid medium, the control rod including a drive hub secured to and extending from one end therefrom. The control device comprises: a toroidally shaped control member spaced from and coaxially positioned around the hub and secured thereto by a plurality of spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the toroidal member spaced therefrom in coaxial position. The side of the control member toward the control rod has a smooth generally conical surface. The side of the control member away from the control rod is formed with a concave surface constituting a single annular groove. The device also comprises inner and outer annular vanes radially spaced from one another and spaced from the side of the control member away from the control rod and positioned coaxially around and spaced from the hub and secured thereto by spaced radial webs thereby providing an annular passage for fluid intermediate the hub and the vanes. The vanes are angled toward the control member, the outer edge of the inner vane being closer to the control member and the inner edge of the outer vane being closer to the control member. When the control rod moves in the fluid in the direction toward the drive hub the vanes direct a flow of fluid turbulence which provides greater resistance to movement of the control rod in the direction toward the drive hub than in the other direction

  5. Dispersion analysis for waves propagated in fractured media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniak, A; Niitsuma, H [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-05-01

    Dispersion of velocity is defined as a variation of the phase velocity with frequency. This paper describes the dispersion analysis of compressional body waves propagated in the heterogeneous fractured media. The new method proposed and discussed here permitted the evaluation of the variation in P wave arrival with frequency. For this processing method, any information about the attenuation of the medium are not required, and only an assumption of weak heterogeneity is important. It was shown that different mechanisms of dispersion can be distinguished and its value can be quantitatively estimated. Although the frequency used in this study was lower than those in most previous experiments reported in literature, the evaluated dispersion was large. It was suggested that such a large dispersion may be caused by the velocity structure of the media studied and by frequency dependent processes in a highly fractured zone. It was demonstrated that the present method can be used in the evaluation of subsurface fracture systems or characterization of any kind of heterogeneities. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  6. Eccentricity samples: Implications on the potential and the velocity distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cubarsi R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar and vertical epicycle frequencies and local angular velocity are related to the derivatives up to the second order of the local potential and can be used to test the shape of the potential from stellar disc samples. These samples show a more complex velocity distribution than halo stars and should provide a more realistic test. We assume an axisymmetric potential allowing a mixture of independent ellipsoidal velocity distributions, of separable or Staeckel form in cylindrical or spherical coordinates. We prove that values of local constants are not consistent with a potential separable in addition in cylindrical coordinates and with a spherically symmetric potential. The simplest potential that fits the local constants is used to show that the harmonical and non-harmonical terms of the potential are equally important. The same analysis is used to estimate the local constants. Two families of nested subsamples selected for decreasing planar and vertical eccentricities are used to borne out the relation between the mean squared planar and vertical eccentricities and the velocity dispersions of the subsamples. According to the first-order epicycle model, the radial and vertical velocity components provide accurate information on the planar and vertical epicycle frequencies. However, it is impossible to account for the asymmetric drift which introduces a systematic bias in estimation of the third constant. Under a more general model, when the asymmetric drift is taken into account, the rotation velocity dispersions together with their asymmetric drift provide the correct fit for the local angular velocity. The consistency of the results shows that this new method based on the distribution of eccentricities is worth using for kinematic stellar samples. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. No 176011: Dynamics and Kinematics of Celestial Bodies and Systems

  7. Anomalous acoustic dispersion in architected microlattice metamaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    KröDel, Sebastian; Palermo, Antonio; Daraio, Chiara

    The ability to control dispersion in acoustic metamaterials is crucial to realize acoustic filtering and rectification devices as well as perfect imaging using negative refractive index materials. Architected microlattice metamaterials immersed in fluid constitute a versatile platform for achieving such control. We investigate architected microlattice materials able to exploit locally resonant modes of their fundamental building blocks that couple with propagating acoustic waves. Using analytical, numerical and experimental methods we find that such lattice materials show a hybrid dispersion behavior governed by Biot's theory for long wavelengths and multiple scattering theory when wave frequency is close to the resonances of the building block. We identify the relevant geometric parameters to alter and control the group and phase velocities in this class of acoustic metamaterials. Furthermore, we fabricate small-scale acoustic metamaterial samples using high precision SLA additive manufacturing and test the resulting materials experimentally using a customized ultrasonic setup. This work paves the way for new acoustic devices based on microlattice metamaterials.

  8. On linear relationship between shock velocity and particle velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dandache, H.

    1986-11-01

    We attempt to derive the linear relationship between shock velocity U s and particle velocity U p from thermodynamic considerations, taking into account an ideal gas equation of state and a Mie-Grueneisen equation of state for solids. 23 refs

  9. Coping with power dispersion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The last decades have witnessed a significant shift in policy competences away from central governments in Europe. The reallocation of competences spans over three dimensions: upwards; sideways; and downwards. This collection takes the dispersion of powers as a starting point and seeks to assess...... how the actors involved cope with the new configurations. In this introduction, we discuss the conceptualization of power dispersion and highlight the ways in which the contributions add to this research agenda. We then outline some general conclusions and end by indicating future avenues of research....... Taken together, the collection contributes some answers to the challenge of defining and measuring – in a comparative way – the control and co-ordination mechanisms which power dispersion generates. It also explores the tension between political actors' quest for autonomy and the acknowledgement...

  10. Sodium Velocity Maps on Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, A. E.; Killen, R. M.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the current work was to measure two-dimensional maps of sodium velocities on the Mercury surface and examine the maps for evidence of sources or sinks of sodium on the surface. The McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope and the Stellar Spectrograph were used to measure Mercury spectra that were sampled at 7 milliAngstrom intervals. Observations were made each day during the period October 5-9, 2010. The dawn terminator was in view during that time. The velocity shift of the centroid of the Mercury emission line was measured relative to the solar sodium Fraunhofer line corrected for radial velocity of the Earth. The difference between the observed and calculated velocity shift was taken to be the velocity vector of the sodium relative to Earth. For each position of the spectrograph slit, a line of velocities across the planet was measured. Then, the spectrograph slit was stepped over the surface of Mercury at 1 arc second intervals. The position of Mercury was stabilized by an adaptive optics system. The collection of lines were assembled into an images of surface reflection, sodium emission intensities, and Earthward velocities over the surface of Mercury. The velocity map shows patches of higher velocity in the southern hemisphere, suggesting the existence of sodium sources there. The peak earthward velocity occurs in the equatorial region, and extends to the terminator. Since this was a dawn terminator, this might be an indication of dawn evaporation of sodium. Leblanc et al. (2008) have published a velocity map that is similar.

  11. Shrubline but not treeline advance matches climate velocity in montane ecosystems of south-central Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dial, Roman J; Smeltz, T Scott; Sullivan, Patrick F; Rinas, Christina L; Timm, Katriina; Geck, Jason E; Tobin, S Carl; Golden, Trevor S; Berg, Edward C

    2016-05-01

    Tall shrubs and trees are advancing into many tundra and wetland ecosystems but at a rate that often falls short of that predicted due to climate change. For forest, tall shrub, and tundra ecosystems in two pristine mountain ranges of Alaska, we apply a Bayesian, error-propagated calculation of expected elevational rise (climate velocity), observed rise (biotic velocity), and their difference (biotic inertia). We show a sensitive dependence of climate velocity on lapse rate and derive biotic velocity as a rigid elevational shift. Ecosystem presence identified from recent and historic orthophotos ~50 years apart was regressed on elevation. Biotic velocity was estimated as the difference between critical point elevations of recent and historic logistic fits divided by time between imagery. For both mountain ranges, the 95% highest posterior density of climate velocity enclosed the posterior distributions of all biotic velocities. In the Kenai Mountains, mean tall shrub and climate velocities were both 2.8 m y(-1). In the better sampled Chugach Mountains, mean tundra retreat was 1.2 m y(-1) and climate velocity 1.3 m y(-1). In each mountain range, the posterior mode of tall woody vegetation velocity (the complement of tundra) matched climate velocity better than either forest or tall shrub alone, suggesting competitive compensation can be important. Forest velocity was consistently low at 0.1-1.1 m y(-1), indicating treeline is advancing slowly. We hypothesize that the high biotic inertia of forest ecosystems in south-central Alaska may be due to competition with tall shrubs and/or more complex climate controls on the elevational limits of trees than tall shrubs. Among tall shrubs, those that disperse farthest had lowest inertia. Finally, the rapid upward advance of woody vegetation may be contributing to regional declines in Dall's sheep (Ovis dalli), a poorly dispersing alpine specialist herbivore with substantial biotic inertia due to dispersal reluctance. © 2015

  12. Suspended sediment drift and dispersion at Hibernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tedford, T.; Drozdowski, A.; Hannah, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    Surface water waves and near-bottom currents around the Hibernia oil production platform on the Grand Banks of Newfoundland were examined to determine how the different seasons affect changes in wave magnitude and directions of water currents. Wave observations revealed a strong correlation with seasons, with the larger waves occurring in fall and early winter. There was no obvious seasonality in the size or direction of currents. The benthic boundary layer transport (BBLT) model was used to predict the drift and dispersion pathways of suspended drilling muds discharged from the Hibernia platform. The 2-year study from March 1998 to May 2000 involved 5-day BBLT model simulations covering the complete period of current meter deployment. The study focused on the sensitivity of the drift and dispersion to variability in the physical environment and uncertainty in the bottom stress calculation and particle settling velocity. The BBLT model incorporates a stress dependent particle settling velocity that includes the main features of the flocculations of drill mud fines under marine conditions. The study provides a better understanding of how drill mud concentration levels can change with variations in waves, currents, and bottom stress. It was determined that drift is generally oriented along the northwest/southeast axis, with a typical magnitude of 0.8 cm/sec for the fast settling velocity and 3.1 cm/sec for the slow settling velocity. It was concluded that near-surface or mid-depth discharges of drilling mud in the summer may not reach the sea floor. 17 refs., 13 tabs., 36 figs

  13. A method for grindability testing using the Scirocco disperser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonakdar, Tina; Ali, Muzammil; Dogbe, Selasi; Ghadiri, Mojtaba; Tinke, Arjen

    2016-03-30

    In the early stages of development of a new Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API), insufficient material quantity is available for addressing processing issues, and it is highly desirable to be able to assess processability issues using the smallest possible powder sample quantity. A good example is milling of new active pharmaceutical ingredients. For particle breakage that is sensitive to strain rate, impact testing is the most appropriate method. However, there is no commercially available single particle impact tester for fine particulate solids. In contrast, dry powder dispersers, such as the Scirocco disperser of the Malvern Mastersizer 2000, are widely available, and can be used for this purpose, provided particle impact velocity is known. However, the distance within which the particles can accelerate before impacting on the bend is very short and different particle sizes accelerate to different velocities before impact. As the breakage is proportional to the square of impact velocity, the interpretation of breakage data is not straightforward and requires an analysis of particle velocity as a function of size, density and shape. We report our work using an integrated experimental and CFD modelling approach to evaluate the suitability of this device as a grindability testing device, with the particle sizing being done immediately following dispersion by laser diffraction. Aspirin, sucrose and α-lactose monohydrate are tested using narrow sieve cuts in order to minimise variations in impact velocity. The tests are carried out at eight different air nozzle pressures. As intuitively expected, smaller particles accelerate faster and impact the wall at a higher velocity compared to the larger particles. However, for a given velocity the extent of breakage of larger particles is larger. Using a numerical simulation based on CFD, the relationship between impact velocity and particle size and density has been established assuming a spherical shape, and using one

  14. Pulse splitting of self-focusing-beams in normally dispersive media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of the normal group-velocity dispersion on anisotropic self-focusing beams in nonlinear Kerr media is studied analytically. It is shown that a light pulse self-focusing in the presence of normal dispersion is split up into several small-scale cells preventing a catastrophic collapse....... The theoretical explanation of this splitting process is revealed....

  15. Dispersive excitations in the high-temperature superconductor La2-xSrxCuO4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N.B.; McMorrow, D.F.; Rønnow, H.M.

    2004-01-01

    High-resolution neutron scattering experiments on optimally doped La(2-x)Sr(x)CuO(4) (x=0.16) reveal that the magnetic excitations are dispersive. The dispersion is the same as in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(6.85), and is quantitatively related to that observed with charge sensitive probes. The associated veloc...

  16. Modal expansions in periodic photonic systems with material loss and dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Christian; Busch, Kurt; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2018-01-01

    in the presence of material dispersion can be overcome. We then formulate expressions for the band-structure derivative (∂ω)/(∂k) (complex group velocity) and the local and total density of transverse optical states. Our exact expressions hold for 3D periodic arrays of materials with arbitrary dispersion...

  17. Average pollutant concentration in soil profile simulated with Convective-Dispersive Equation. Model and Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Different parts of soil solution move with different velocities, and therefore chemicals are leached gradually from soil with infiltrating water. Solute dispersivity is the soil parameter characterizing this phenomenon. To characterize the dispersivity of soil profile at field scale, it is desirable...

  18. Experimental simulation of corium dispersion phenomena in direct containment heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Q.

    1996-01-01

    In a direct containment heating (DCH) accident scenario, the degree of corium dispersion is one of the most significant factors responsible for the reactor containment heating and pressurization. To study the mechanisms of the corium dispersion phenomenon, a DCH separate effect test facility of 1:10 linear scale for Zion PWR geometry is constructed. Experiments are carried out with air-water and air-woods metal simulating steam and molten core materials. The physical process of corium dispersion is studied in detail through various instruments, as well as with flow visualization at several locations. The accident transient begins with the liquid jet discharge at the bottom of the reactor pressure vessel. Once the jet impinges on the cavity bottom floor, it immediately spreads out and moves rapidly to the cavity exit as a film flow. Part of the discharged liquid flows out of the cavity before gas blowdown, and the rest is subjected to the entrainment process due to the high speed gas stream. The liquid film and droplet flows from the reactor cavity will then experience subcompartment trapping and re-entrainment. Consequently, the dispersed liquid droplets that follow the gas stream are transported into the containment atmosphere, resulting in containment heating and pressurization in the prototypic condition. Comprehensive measurements are obtained in this study, including the liquid jet velocity, liquid film thickness and velocity transients in the test cavity, gas velocity and velocity profile in the cavity, droplet size distribution and entrainment rate, and the fraction of dispersed liquid in the containment building. These data are of great importance for better understanding of the corium dispersion mechanisms. (orig.)

  19. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    Current ultrasound scanners can only estimate the velocity along the ultrasound beam and this gives rise to the cos() factor on all velocity estimates. This is a major limitation as most vessels are close to perpendicular to the beam. Also the angle varies as a function of space and time making ...

  20. NOISY DISPERSION CURVE PICKING (NDCP): a Matlab friendly suite package for fully control dispersion curve picking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granados, I.; Calo, M.; Ramos, V.

    2017-12-01

    We developed a Matlab suite package (NDCP, Noisy Dispersion Curve Picking) that allows a full control over parameters to identify correctly group velocity dispersion curves in two types of datasets: correlograms between two stations or surface wave records from earthquakes. Using the frequency-time analysis (FTAN), the procedure to obtain the dispersion curves from records with a high noise level becomes difficult, and sometimes, the picked curve result in a misinterpreted character. For correlogram functions, obtained with cross-correlation of noise records or earthquake's coda, a non-homogeneous noise sources distribution yield to a non-symmetric Green's function (GF); to retrieve the complete information contained in there, NDCP allows to pick the dispersion curve in the time domain both in the causal and non-causal part of the GF. Then the picked dispersion curve is displayed on the FTAN diagram to in order to check if it matches with the maximum of the signal energy avoiding confusion with overtones or spike of noise. To illustrate how NDCP performs, we show exemple using: i) local correlograms functions obtained from sensors deployed into a volcanic caldera (Los Humeros, in Puebla, Mexico), ii) regional correlograms functions between two stations of the National Seismological Service (SSN, Servicio Sismológico Nacional in Spanish), and iii) surface wave seismic record for an earthquake located in the Pacific Ocean coast of Mexico and recorded by the SSN. This work is supported by the GEMEX project (Geothermal Europe-Mexico consortium).

  1. Dispersive shock mediated resonant radiations in defocused nonlinear medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Surajit; Chattopadhyay, Rik; Bhadra, Shyamal Kumar

    2018-04-01

    We report the evolution of resonant radiation (RR) in a self-defocused nonlinear medium with two zero dispersion wavelengths. RR is generated from dispersive shock wave (DSW) front when the pump pulse is in non-solitonic regime close to first zero dispersion wavelength (ZDW). DSW is responsible for pulse splitting resulting in the generation of blue solitons when leading edge of the pump pulse hits the first ZDW. DSW also generates a red shifted dispersive wave (DW) in the presence of higher order dispersion coefficients. Further, DSW through cross-phase modulation with red shifted dispersive wave (DW) excites a localized radiation. The presence of zero nonlinearity point in the system restricts red-shift of RR and enhances the red shifting of DW. It also helps in the formation of DSW at shorter distance and squeezes the solitonic region beyond second zero dispersion point. Predicted results indicate that the spectral evolution depends on the product of Kerr nonlinearity and group velocity dispersion.

  2. Electromagnetic energy density and stress tensor in a warm plasma with finite flow velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Cheong R.; Lee, Nam C.

    2004-01-01

    The expressions of the average of energy density and the average stress tensor of the electromagnetic field in a warm collisionless plasma moving with a finite velocity are obtained by using a microscopic method that uses the fluid description of plasma. The result contains terms involved with derivatives of the dielectric tensor with respect to the velocity, which explicitly represent the effects of the finite velocity of the medium. In the zero-velocity limit, the results reduce to the well-known expressions for a plasma at rest with temporal and spatial dispersion

  3. Training for Internationalization through Domestic Geographical Dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santangelo, Grazia D.; Stucchi, Tamara

    Traditionally created to deal with the unfriendly domestic environment, business groups (BGs) are increasingly internationalizing. However, how BGs can reconcile their strictly domestic orientation with an international dimension still remains an open question. Drawing on arguments from...... organizational learning, we seek to solve this puzzle in relation to the internationalization of Indian BGs. In particular, we argue that in heterogeneous domestic emerging markets BG’s geographical dispersion across sub-national states provides training for internationalization. To internationalize successfully......, BGs need to develop the capability of managing geographically dispersed units in institutional heterogeneous contexts. Domestic geographical dispersion would indeed help the BG dealing with different regulations, customers and infrastructures. However, there is less scope for such training as BGs...

  4. Photonic crystal waveguides with semi-slow light and tailored dispersion properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Lars Hagedorn; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Fage-Pedersen, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    waveguide with either vanishing, positive, or negative group velocity dispersion and semi-slow light. We realize experimentally a silicon-on-insulator photonic crystal waveguide having nearly constant group velocity [similar to]c$-0$//34 in an 11-nm bandwidth below the silica-line. $CPY@2006 Optical Society...

  5. The upper mantle beneath the Gulf of California from surface wave dispersion. Geologica Ultraiectina (299)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, X.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is a study on upper mantle shear velocity structure beneath the Gulf of California. Surface wave interstation dispersion data were measured in the Gulf of California area and vicinity to obtain a 3-D shear velocity structure of the upper mantle. This work has particular significance for

  6. Interface, a dispersed architecture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vissers, C.A.

    1976-01-01

    Past and current specification techniques use timing diagrams and written text to describe the phenomenology of an interface. This paper treats an interface as the architecture of a number of processes, which are dispersed over the related system parts and the message path. This approach yields a

  7. Psychorheology of food dispersions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Štern, Petr; Panovská, Z.; Pokorný, J.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 58, č. 1 (2010), s. 29-35 ISSN 0042-790X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2060404 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : psychorheology * food dispersions * tomato ketchup * rheology * sensory analysis Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics Impact factor: 0.553, year: 2010

  8. Dispersal of sticky particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Ramana; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, we show through simulations that when sticky particles are broken continually, particles are dispersed into fine dust only if they are present in a narrow range of volume fractions. The upper limit of this range is 0.20 in the 2D and 0.10 in the 3D space. An increase in the dimensionality of space reduces the upper limit nearly by a factor of two. This scaling holds for dispersal of particles in hyperdimensional space of dimensions up to ten, the maximum dimension studied in this work. The maximum values of volume fractions obtained are significantly lower than those required for close packing and random packing of discs in 2D and spheres in 3D space. These values are also smaller than those required for critical phenomena of cluster percolation. The results obtained are attributed to merger cascades of sticky particles, triggered by breakup events. A simple theory that incorporates this cascade is developed to quantitatively explain the observed scaling of the upper limit with the dimensionality of space. The theory also captures the dynamics of the dispersal process in the corresponding range of particle volume fractions. The theory suggests that cascades of order one and two predominantly decide the upper limit for complete dispersal of particles.

  9. Humans as long-distance dispersers of rural plant communities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair G Auffret

    Full Text Available Humans are known for their capacity to disperse organisms long distances. Long-distance dispersal can be important for species threatened by habitat destruction, but research into human-mediated dispersal is often focused upon few and/or invasive species. Here we use citizen science to identify the capacity for humans to disperse seeds on their clothes and footwear from a known species pool in a valuable habitat, allowing for an assessment of the fraction and types of species dispersed by humans in an alternative context. We collected material from volunteers cutting 48 species-rich meadows throughout Sweden. We counted 24,354 seeds of 197 species, representing 34% of the available species pool, including several rare and protected species. However, 71 species (36% are considered invasive elsewhere in the world. Trait analysis showed that seeds with hooks or other appendages were more likely to be dispersed by humans, as well as those with a persistent seed bank. More activity in a meadow resulted in more dispersal, both in terms of species and representation of the source communities. Average potential dispersal distances were measured at 13 km. We consider humans capable seed dispersers, transporting a significant proportion of the plant communities in which they are active, just like more traditional vectors such as livestock. When rural populations were larger, people might have been regular and effective seed dispersers, and the net rural-urban migration resulting in a reduction in humans in the landscape may have exacerbated the dispersal failure evident in declining plant populations today. With the fragmentation of habitat and changes in land use resulting from agricultural change, and the increased mobility of humans worldwide, the dispersal role of humans may have shifted from providers of regular local and landscape dispersal to providers of much rarer long-distance and regional dispersal, and international invasion.

  10. Diffraction imaging and velocity analysis using oriented velocity continuation

    KAUST Repository

    Decker, Luke

    2014-08-05

    We perform seismic diffraction imaging and velocity analysis by separating diffractions from specular reflections and decomposing them into slope components. We image slope components using extrapolation in migration velocity in time-space-slope coordinates. The extrapolation is described by a convection-type partial differential equation and implemented efficiently in the Fourier domain. Synthetic and field data experiments show that the proposed algorithm is able to detect accurate time-migration velocities by automatically measuring the flatness of events in dip-angle gathers.

  11. SLIP VELOCITY IN PULSED DISC AND DOUGHNUT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Outokesh

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, slip velocity has been measured in a 76 mm diameter pulsed disc and doughnut extraction column for four different liquid-liquid systems. The effects of operating variables including pulsation intensity and dispersed and continuous phase flow rates on slip velocity have been investigated. The existence of three different operational regimes, namely mixersettler, transition, and emulsion regimes, was observed when the energy input was changed. Empirical correlations are derived for prediction of the slip velocity in terms of operating variables, physical properties of the liquid systems, and column geometry for different regimes. Good agreement between prediction and experiments was found for all operating conditions that were investigated.

  12. The radial velocities of planetary nebulae in NGC 3379

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciardullo, Robin; Jacoby, George H.; Dejonghe, Herwig B.

    1993-09-01

    We present the results of a radial velocity survey of planetary nebulae (PNs) in the normal elliptical galaxy NGC 3379 performed with the Kitt Peak 4 m telescope and the NESSIE multifiber spectrograph. In two half-nights, we measured 29 PNs with projected galactocentric distances between 0.4 and 3.8 effective radii with an observational uncertainty of about 7 km/s. These data extend three times farther into the halo than any previous absorption-line velocity study. The velocity dispersion and photometric profile of the galaxy agrees extremely well with that expected from a constant mass-to-light ratio, isotropic orbit Jaffe model with M/L(B) about 7; the best-fitting anisotropic models from a quadratic programming algorithm also give M/L(B) about 7. The data are consistent with models that contain no dark matter within 3.5 effective radii of the galaxy's nucleus.

  13. Radial velocity asymmetries from jets with variable velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cerqueira, A. H.; Vasconcelos, M. J.; Velazquez, P. F.; Raga, A. C.; De Colle, F.

    2006-01-01

    We have computed a set of 3-D numerical simulations of radiatively cooling jets including variabilities in both the ejection direction (precession) and the jet velocity (intermittence), using the Yguazu-a code. In order to investigate the effects of jet rotation on the shape of the line profiles, we also introduce an initial toroidal rotation velocity profile. Since the Yguazu-a code includes an atomic/ionic network, we are able to compute the emission coefficients for several emission lines, and we generate line profiles for the Hα, [O I]λ6300, [S II]λ6716 and [N II]λ6548 lines. Using initial parameters that are suitable for the DG Tau microjet, we show that the computed radial velocity shift for the medium-velocity component of the line profile as a function of distance from the jet axis is strikingly similar for rotating and non-rotating jet models

  14. Chemical countermeasures: Dispersants overview of dispersant use (including application) and research issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, J.N.

    1992-01-01

    I will attempt in twenty minutes to summarize the state of research on oil spill dispersants as I perceive it. The expertise I bring to this task includes 20 years of experience with the fate and effects of petroleum in the marine environment, including participation in the 1973 and 1981 NRC studies and three years as chairman of the NRC committee on oil spill dispersants. I More recently I served on a committee of the International Maritime Organization which reviewed the open-quotes Impact of oil and related chemicals and wastes on the marine environment.close quotes That report will be published this year. However, my statements in this paper are not made as a representative of either NRC or IMO. They are my own interpretation of scientific literature cited in the above reviews. Dispersants are chemical formulations, which include surface active agents, designed to decrease the interfacial tension between oil and water. Because the first attempts to disperse oil on a large scale, at the Torrey Canyon spill of 1967, used highly toxic degreasing agents, dispersants have an undeserved reputation for toxicity. In fact, for twenty years dispersant formulations have been developed with an emphasis on reducing their toxicity to marine life. The dispersal of oil in water has been documented in the laboratory by dozens of papers (see references in NRC 1989, pp 70-79), and in the field by dozens of studies (NRC 1989, pp 165- 193). The toxicity of commercial dispersant formulations (NRC 1989, pp 81-123) and dispersed oil (NRC 1989, pp 123-147) has been tested on a wide variety of marine organisms ranging from algae to salmonid fishes. The NRC review has been updated by the IMO/GESAMP (1992) study, but the conclusions remain unchanged

  15. Generalized internal multiple imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Zuberi, M. A. H.; Alkhalifah, Tariq Ali

    2014-01-01

    Internal multiples deteriorate the image when the imaging procedure assumes only single scattering, especially if the velocity model does not have sharp contrasts to reproduce such scattering in the Green’s function through forward modeling

  16. Wave-equation dispersion inversion of surface waves recorded on irregular topography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing

    2017-08-17

    Significant topographic variations will strongly influence the amplitudes and phases of propagating surface waves. Such effects should be taken into account, otherwise the S-velocity model inverted from the Rayleigh dispersion curves will contain significant inaccuracies. We now show that the recently developed wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) method naturally takes into account the effects of topography to give accurate S-velocity tomograms. Application of topographic WD to demonstrates that WD can accurately invert dispersion curves from seismic data recorded over variable topography. We also apply this method to field data recorded on the crest of mountainous terrain and find with higher resolution than the standard WD tomogram.

  17. Wave-equation dispersion inversion of surface waves recorded on irregular topography

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Jing; Schuster, Gerard T.; Lin, Fan-Chi; Alam, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Significant topographic variations will strongly influence the amplitudes and phases of propagating surface waves. Such effects should be taken into account, otherwise the S-velocity model inverted from the Rayleigh dispersion curves will contain significant inaccuracies. We now show that the recently developed wave-equation dispersion inversion (WD) method naturally takes into account the effects of topography to give accurate S-velocity tomograms. Application of topographic WD to demonstrates that WD can accurately invert dispersion curves from seismic data recorded over variable topography. We also apply this method to field data recorded on the crest of mountainous terrain and find with higher resolution than the standard WD tomogram.

  18. Fractals control in particle's velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yongping; Liu Shutang; Shen Shulan

    2009-01-01

    Julia set, a fractal set of the literature of nonlinear physics, has significance for the engineering applications. For example, the fractal structure characteristics of the generalized M-J set could visually reflect the change rule of particle's velocity. According to the real world requirement, the system need show various particle's velocity in some cases. Thus, the control of the nonlinear behavior, i.e., Julia set, has attracted broad attention. In this work, an auxiliary feedback control is introduced to effectively control the Julia set that visually reflects the change rule of particle's velocity. It satisfies the performance requirement of the real world problems.

  19. Southern high-velocity stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augensen, H.J.; Buscombe, W.

    1978-01-01

    Using the model of the Galaxy presented by Eggen, Lynden-Bell and Sandage (1962), plane galactic orbits have been calculated for 800 southern high-velocity stars which possess parallax, proper motion, and radial velocity data. The stars with trigonometric parallaxes were selected from Buscombe and Morris (1958), supplemented by more recent spectroscopic data. Photometric parallaxes from infrared color indices were used for bright red giants studied by Eggen (1970), and for red dwarfs for which Rodgers and Eggen (1974) determined radial velocities. A color-color diagram based on published values of (U-B) and (B-V) for most of these stars is shown. (Auth.)

  20. Dispersion Differences and Consistency of Artificial Periodic Structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhi-Bao; Lin, Wen-Kai; Shi, Zhi-Fei

    2017-10-01

    Dispersion differences and consistency of artificial periodic structures, including phononic crystals, elastic metamaterials, as well as periodic structures composited of phononic crystals and elastic metamaterials, are investigated in this paper. By developing a K(ω) method, complex dispersion relations and group/phase velocity curves of both the single-mechanism periodic structures and the mixing-mechanism periodic structures are calculated at first, from which dispersion differences of artificial periodic structures are discussed. Then, based on a unified formulation, dispersion consistency of artificial periodic structures is investigated. Through a comprehensive comparison study, the correctness for the unified formulation is verified. Mathematical derivations of the unified formulation for different artificial periodic structures are presented. Furthermore, physical meanings of the unified formulation are discussed in the energy-state space.

  1. Chromatic dispersion effects in ultra-low coherence interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lychagov, V V; Ryabukho, V P [N.G.Chernyshevsky Saratov State University (Russian Federation)

    2015-06-30

    We consider the properties of an interference signal shift from zero-path-difference position in the presence of an uncompensated dispersive layer in one of the interferometer arms. It is experimentally shown that in using an ultra-low coherence light source, the formation of the interference signal is also determined by the group velocity dispersion, which results in a nonlinear dependence of the position of the interference signal on the geometrical thickness of the dispersive layer. The discrepancy in the dispersive layer and compensator refractive indices in the third decimal place is experimentally shown to lead to an interference signal shift that is an order of magnitude greater than the pulse width. (interferometry)

  2. Altered velocity processing in schizophrenia during pursuit eye tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Nagel

    Full Text Available Smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM are needed to keep the retinal image of slowly moving objects within the fovea. Depending on the task, about 50%-80% of patients with schizophrenia have difficulties in maintaining SPEM. We designed a study that comprised different target velocities as well as testing for internal (extraretinal guidance of SPEM in the absence of a visual target. We applied event-related fMRI by presenting four velocities (5, 10, 15, 20°/s both with and without intervals of target blanking. 17 patients and 16 healthy participants were included. Eye movements were registered during scanning sessions. Statistical analysis included mixed ANOVAs and regression analyses of the target velocity on the Blood Oxygen Level Dependency (BOLD signal. The main effect group and the interaction of velocity×group revealed reduced activation in V5 and putamen but increased activation of cerebellar regions in patients. Regression analysis showed that activation in supplementary eye field, putamen, and cerebellum was not correlated to target velocity in patients in contrast to controls. Furthermore, activation in V5 and in intraparietal sulcus (putative LIP bilaterally was less strongly correlated to target velocity in patients than controls. Altered correlation of target velocity and neural activation in the cortical network supporting SPEM (V5, SEF, LIP, putamen implies impaired transformation of the visual motion signal into an adequate motor command in patients. Cerebellar regions seem to be involved in compensatory mechanisms although cerebellar activity in patients was not related to target velocity.

  3. Time-Frequency Analysis of the Dispersion of Lamb Modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosser, W. H.; Seale, Michael D.; Smith, Barry T.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate knowledge of the velocity dispersion of Lamb modes is important for ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation methods used in detecting and locating flaws in thin plates and in determining their elastic stiffness coefficients. Lamb mode dispersion is also important in the acoustic emission technique for accurately triangulating the location of emissions in thin plates. In this research, the ability to characterize Lamb mode dispersion through a time-frequency analysis (the pseudo Wigner-Ville distribution) was demonstrated. A major advantage of time-frequency methods is the ability to analyze acoustic signals containing multiple propagation modes, which overlap and superimpose in the time domain signal. By combining time-frequency analysis with a broadband acoustic excitation source, the dispersion of multiple Lamb modes over a wide frequency range can be determined from as little as a single measurement. In addition, the technique provides a direct measurement of the group velocity dispersion. The technique was first demonstrated in the analysis of a simulated waveform in an aluminum plate in which the Lamb mode dispersion was well known. Portions of the dispersion curves of the A(sub 0), A(sub 1), S(sub 0), and S(sub 2)Lamb modes were obtained from this one waveform. The technique was also applied for the analysis of experimental waveforms from a unidirectional graphite/epoxy composite plate. Measurements were made both along, and perpendicular to the fiber direction. In this case, the signals contained only the lowest order symmetric and antisymmetric modes. A least squares fit of the results from several source to detector distances was used. Theoretical dispersion curves were calculated and are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results.

  4. Simulated effects of host fish distribution on juvenile unionid mussel dispersal in a large river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daraio, J.A.; Weber, L.J.; Zigler, S.J.; Newton, T.J.; Nestler, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Larval mussels (Family Unionidae) are obligate parasites on fish, and after excystment from their host, as juveniles, they are transported with flow. We know relatively little about the mechanisms that affect dispersal and subsequent settlement of juvenile mussels in large rivers. We used a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a reach of the Upper Mississippi River with stochastic Lagrangian particle tracking to simulate juvenile dispersal. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine the importance of excystment location in two-dimensional space (lateral and longitudinal) and to assess the effects of vertical location (depth in the water column) on dispersal distances and juvenile settling distributions. In our simulations, greater than 50% of juveniles mussels settled on the river bottom within 500 m of their point of excystment, regardless of the vertical location of the fish in the water column. Dispersal distances were most variable in environments with higher velocity and high gradients in velocity, such as along channel margins, near the channel bed, or where effects of river bed morphology caused large changes in hydraulics. Dispersal distance was greater and variance was greater when juvenile excystment occurred in areas where vertical velocity (w) was positive (indicating an upward velocity) than when w was negative. Juvenile dispersal distance is likely to be more variable for mussels species whose hosts inhabit areas with steeper velocity gradients (e.g. channel margins) than a host that generally inhabits low-flow environments (e.g. impounded areas).

  5. Dispersed flow film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, M.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1989-12-01

    Dispersed flow film boiling is the heat transfer regime that occurs at high void fractions in a heated channel. The way this transfer mode is modelled in the NRC computer codes (RELAP5 and TRAC) and the validity of the assumption and empirical correlations used is discussed. An extensive review of the theoretical and experimental work related with heat transfer to highly dispersed mixtures reveals the basic deficiencies of these models: the investigation refers mostly to the typical conditions of low rate bottom reflooding, since the simulation of this physical situation by the computer codes has often showed poor results. The alternative models that are available in the literature are reviewed, and their merits and limits are highlighted. The modification that could improve the physics of the models implemented in the codes are identified. (author) 13 figs., 123 refs

  6. Working document dispersion models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dop, H. van

    1988-01-01

    This report is a summary of the most important results from June 1985 of the collaboration of the RIVM (Dutch National Institute for Public Health and Environment Hygiene) and KNMI (Royal Dutch Meteorologic Institute) on the domain of dispersion models. It contains a short description of the actual SO x /NO x -model. Furthermore it contains recommendations for modifications of some numerical-mathematical aspects and an impulse to a more complete description of chemical processes in the atmosphere and the (wet) deposition process. A separate chapter is devoted to the preparation of meteorologic data which are relevant for dispersion as well as atmospheric chemistry and deposition. This report serves as working document for the final formulation of a acidifying- and oxidant-model. (H.W.). 69 refs.; 51 figs.; 13 tabs.; 3 schemes

  7. Spatially Dispersed Employee Recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvass, Kristian Anders; Torfadóttir, Embla

    2014-01-01

    Employee recovery addresses either employee well-being or management's practices in aiding employees in recovering themselves following a service failure. This paper surveys the cabin crew at a small, European, low-cost carrier and investigates employees' perceptions of management practices to aid...... personnel achieve service recovery. Employee recovery within service research often focuses on front-line employees that work in a fixed location, however a contribution to the field is made by investigating the recovery of spatially dispersed personnel, such as operational personnel in the transport sector......, who have a work place away from a fixed or central location and have minimal management contact. Results suggest that the support employees receive from management, such as recognition, information sharing, training, and strategic awareness are all important for spatially dispersed front...

  8. Heat dispersion in rivers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaw, T.L.

    1974-01-01

    One of the tasks of the Sonderforschungsbereich 80 is to study the dispersion of heat discharged into rivers and other bodies of water and to develop methods which permit prediction of detrimental effects caused by the heated discharges. In order to help the SFB 80 to specify this task, Dr. Shaw, lecturer of Civil Engineering at the Bristol University, conducted a literature survey on heat-dispersion studies during the two months which he spent as a visiting research fellow with the SFB 80 at the University of Karlsruhe in the summer of 1973. The following report is the outcome of this survey. It gives Dr. Shaw's assessment of the present state of knowledge - based almost exclusively on literature in the English language - and compares this with the knowledge required by river planners. The apparent discrepancy leads to suggestions for future research. Selected references as well as a representative bibliography can be found at the end of the report. (orig.) [de

  9. Sound Velocity in Soap Foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Gong-Tao; Lü Yong-Jun; Liu Peng-Fei; Li Yi-Ning; Shi Qing-Fan

    2012-01-01

    The velocity of sound in soap foams at high gas volume fractions is experimentally studied by using the time difference method. It is found that the sound velocities increase with increasing bubble diameter, and asymptotically approach to the value in air when the diameter is larger than 12.5 mm. We propose a simple theoretical model for the sound propagation in a disordered foam. In this model, the attenuation of a sound wave due to the scattering of the bubble wall is equivalently described as the effect of an additional length. This simplicity reasonably reproduces the sound velocity in foams and the predicted results are in good agreement with the experiments. Further measurements indicate that the increase of frequency markedly slows down the sound velocity, whereas the latter does not display a strong dependence on the solution concentration

  10. Settling velocities in batch sedimentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fricke, A.M.; Thompson, B.E.

    1982-10-01

    The sedimentation of mixtures containing one and two sizes of spherical particles (44 and 62 μm in diameter) was studied. Radioactive tracing with 57 Co was used to measure the settling velocities. The ratio of the settling velocity U of uniformly sized particles to the velocity predicted to Stokes' law U 0 was correlated to an expression of the form U/U 0 = epsilon/sup α/, where epsilon is the liquid volume fraction and α is an empirical constant, determined experimentally to be 4.85. No effect of viscosity on the ratio U/U 0 was observed as the viscosity of the liquid medium was varied from 1x10 -3 to 5x10 -3 Pa.s. The settling velocities of particles in a bimodal mixture were fit by the same correlation; the ratio U/U 0 was independent of the concentrations of different-sized particles

  11. Climatology of tropospheric vertical velocity spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ecklund, W. L.; Gage, K. S.; Balsley, B. B.; Carter, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Vertical velocity power spectra obtained from Poker Flat, Alaska; Platteville, Colorado; Rhone Delta, France; and Ponape, East Caroline Islands using 50-MHz clear-air radars with vertical beams are given. The spectra were obtained by analyzing the quietest periods from the one-minute-resolution time series for each site. The lengths of available vertical records ranged from as long as 6 months at Poker Flat to about 1 month at Platteville. The quiet-time vertical velocity spectra are shown. Spectral period ranging from 2 minutes to 4 hours is shown on the abscissa and power spectral density is given on the ordinate. The Brunt-Vaisala (B-V) periods (determined from nearby sounding balloons) are indicated. All spectra (except the one from Platteville) exhibit a peak at periods slightly longer than the B-V period, are flat at longer periods, and fall rapidly at periods less than the B-V period. This behavior is expected for a spectrum of internal waves and is very similar to what is observed in the ocean (Eriksen, 1978). The spectral amplitudes vary by only a factor of 2 or 3 about the mean, and show that under quiet conditions vertical velocity spectra from the troposphere are very similar at widely different locations.

  12. Mechanisms and velocities of anthropogenic Pb migration in Mediterranean soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erel, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The isotopic composition of Pb measured in soil samples was used to determine rates and mechanisms of anthropogenic Pb migration in the soil. Petrol-Pb found in soluble halogenated aerosols migrates into the soil and is retained in the soil by the stationary soil particles. Lead infiltration velocity is approximately 5 x 10 -1 cm/year, and its retardation factor is estimated to be on the order of 1 x 10 3 . The infiltration of Pb into the soil is best described by the advection-dispersion equation under the assumption that the time scale of the longitudinal dispersion is much longer than the time scale of advection. Therefore, the contribution of dispersion to the solution of the advection-dispersion equation is negligible. As a result, the soil profile of petrol-Pb resembles the time-dependent input function of petrol-Pb. The estimated petrol-Pb penetration velocity and the isotopic composition profile of Pb in off-road soil are used for the computation of the fraction of anthropogenic Pb in this soil. It is calculated that the fraction of anthropogenic Pb in the acid-leached soil samples and in the soil residue of this soil profile drops from 60 and 22% near the surface to 6 and 0% at a depth of 33 cm, respectively. The downward migration velocity of Pb in soils of the studied area, which are typically 50 to 100 cm deep, implies a residence time of Pb in the soil of 100 to 200 years

  13. Taylor dispersion of nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balog, Sandor; Urban, Dominic A.; Milosevic, Ana M.; Crippa, Federica; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Petri-Fink, Alke

    2017-08-01

    The ability to detect and accurately characterize particles is required by many fields of nanotechnology, including materials science, nanotoxicology, and nanomedicine. Among the most relevant physicochemical properties of nanoparticles, size and the related surface-to-volume ratio are fundamental ones. Taylor dispersion combines three independent phenomena to determine particle size: optical extinction, translational diffusion, and sheer-enhanced dispersion of nanoparticles subjected to a steady laminar flow. The interplay of these defines the apparent size. Considering that particles in fact are never truly uniform nor monodisperse, we rigorously address particle polydispersity and calculate the apparent particle size measured by Taylor dispersion analysis. We conducted case studies addressing aqueous suspensions of model particles and large-scale-produced "industrial" particles of both academic and commercial interest of various core materials and sizes, ranging from 15 to 100 nm. A comparison with particle sizes determined by transmission electron microscopy confirms that our approach is model-independent, non-parametric, and of general validity that provides an accurate account of size polydispersity—independently on the shape of the size distribution and without any assumption required a priori.

  14. Vertical Transport of Momentum by the Inertial-Gravity Internal Waves in a Baroclinic Current

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Slepyshev

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available When the internal waves break, they are one of the sources of small-scale turbulence. Small-scale turbulence causes the vertical exchange in the ocean. However, internal waves with regard to the Earth rotation in the presence of vertically inhomogeneous two-dimensional current are able to contribute to the vertical transport. Free inertial-gravity internal waves in a baroclinic current in a boundless basin of a constant depth are considered in the Bussinesq approximation. Boundary value problem of linear approximation for the vertical velocity amplitude of internal waves has complex coefficients when current velocity component, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, depends on the vertical coordinate (taking into account the rotation of the Earth. Eigenfunction and wave frequency are complex, and it is shown that a weak wave damping takes place. Dispersive relation and wave damping decrement are calculated in the linear approximation. At a fixed wave number damping decrement of the second mode is larger (in the absolute value than the one of the first mode. The equation for vertical velocity amplitude for real profiles of the Brunt – Vaisala frequency and current velocity are numerically solved according to implicit Adams scheme of the third order of accuracy. The dispersive curves of the first two modes do not reach inertial frequency in the low-frequency area due to the effect of critical layers in which wave frequency of the Doppler shift is equal to the inertial one. Termination of the second mode dispersive curves takes place at higher frequency than the one of the first mode. In the second order of the wave amplitude the Stokes drift speed is determined. It is shown that the Stokes drift speed, which is transversal to the wave propagation direction, differs from zero if the transversal component of current velocity depends on the vertical coordinate. In this case, the Stokes drift speed in the second mode is lower than

  15. Online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Righettini, Paolo; Strada, Roberto; KhademOlama, Ehsan; Valilou, Shirin

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a new online Wavelet Complementary velocity Estimator (WCE) over position and acceleration data gathered from an electro hydraulic servo shaking table. This is a batch estimator type that is based on the wavelet filter banks which extract the high and low resolution of data. The proposed complementary estimator combines these two resolutions of velocities which acquired from numerical differentiation and integration of the position and acceleration sensors by considering a fixed moving horizon window as input to wavelet filter. Because of using wavelet filters, it can be implemented in a parallel procedure. By this method the numerical velocity is estimated without having high noise of differentiators, integration drifting bias and with less delay which is suitable for active vibration control in high precision Mechatronics systems by Direct Velocity Feedback (DVF) methods. This method allows us to make velocity sensors with less mechanically moving parts which makes it suitable for fast miniature structures. We have compared this method with Kalman and Butterworth filters over stability, delay and benchmarked them by their long time velocity integration for getting back the initial position data. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. FY 1999 achievement report on the supporting project to form energy/environmental technology verification project - International joint verification research project. Development of the mean wind velocity prediction method and the related matters in developing countries; 1999 nendo hatten tojokoku ni oikeru heikin fusoku yosoku shuho nado no kaihatsu seika hokokusho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    Developing countries have no sufficient basic data for the analysis of meteorological conditions including wind characteristics, and there are problems in adopting simulation models there. Accordingly, the revision/development of simulation models were conducted, considering characteristics of models to predict wind characteristics from topographical/geographical aspects and widely meteorological aspect in Myanmar. At the same time, the mean wind velocity distribution chart for Myanmar was drawn up by observing wind characteristics domestically in Myanmar, by comparing the predicted results using the above-mentioned models and the measured data, and by verifying the simulation results. The items for development are as follows: (1) To make simulation models for wind characteristics in the whole Myanmar based on the information obtained from the meteorological observation system for prediction of the mean wind velocity. Also to verify the simulational results using the measured data on wind characteristics at specified points. (2) To conduct the developmental work under a research system jointly with the counterpart and to produce favorable results as an international joint research. (3) To acquire the basic data to find the relation between the photovoltaic power generation and wind characteristics for studying hybrid type power systems for renewable energy in the future. (NEDO)

  17. Water dispersal of vegetative bulbils of the invasive exotic Dioscorea oppositifolia L. in southern Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J.R.; Gibson, D.J.; Middleton, B.A.

    2005-01-01

    Riparian corridors promote dispersal of several species of exotic invasives worldwide. Dispersal plays a role in the colonization of exotic invasive species into new areas and this study was conducted to determine if the invasiveness of Dioscorea oppositifolia L. (Chinese yam) is facilitated by secondary dispersal of vegetative diaspores (bulbils) by water. Since seed production of this plant has not been observed in the United States, bulbils represent the only means of dispersal to new habitats. Dispersal was monitored by placing aquatic traps, tethered bulbils, and painted bulbil caches in a tributary of Drury Creek, Giant City State Park, Illinois. Results indicate that high-energy flow in the creek accelerated secondary dispersal of bulbils downstream and onto the floodplain. The longest recorded dispersal distance was 206.2 m downstream. Dispersal distance of tethered bulbils was not related to rainfall or flow velocity in the creek; however the total number of bulbils trapped was positively related to flow velocity. We conclude that secondary dispersal by water in streams can facilitate dispersal of vegetative bulbils of this exotic species.

  18. Nozzle for electric dispersion reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sisson, W.G.; Basaran, O.A.; Harris, M.T.

    1995-11-07

    A nozzle for an electric dispersion reactor includes two concentric electrodes, the inner one of the two delivering disperse phase fluid into a continuous phase fluid. A potential difference generated by a voltage source creates a dispersing electric field at the end of the inner electrode. 4 figs.

  19. Automatic discrimination of bubbles and slugs in two-phase gas-liquid flow and measurement of the respective velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitremann, J.M.; Guilpin, C.; Postaire, J.

    1976-01-01

    The measurement of the interface velocity in a two-phase gas-liquid flow is a difficult problem, owing to the dispersion of the velocity components of individual bubbles, gas-slugs, droplets, waves, etc. An entirely automatic method is presented, it gives the velocity of slugs and bubbles independently, by discrimination of local phase probe signals into a 'slug' signal and a 'bubble' signal feeding a shape-recognition program. Both discriminated void fractions are also calculated by the apparatus [fr

  20. Internally driven inertial waves in geodynamo simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjan, A.; Davidson, P. A.; Christensen, U. R.; Wicht, J.

    2018-05-01

    Inertial waves are oscillations in a rotating fluid, such as the Earth's outer core, which result from the restoring action of the Coriolis force. In an earlier work, it was argued by Davidson that inertial waves launched near the equatorial regions could be important for the α2 dynamo mechanism, as they can maintain a helicity distribution which is negative (positive) in the north (south). Here, we identify such internally driven inertial waves, triggered by buoyant anomalies in the equatorial regions in a strongly forced geodynamo simulation. Using the time derivative of vertical velocity, ∂uz/∂t, as a diagnostic for traveling wave fronts, we find that the horizontal movement in the buoyancy field near the equator is well correlated with a corresponding movement of the fluid far from the equator. Moreover, the azimuthally averaged spectrum of ∂uz/∂t lies in the inertial wave frequency range. We also test the dispersion properties of the waves by computing the spectral energy as a function of frequency, ϖ, and the dispersion angle, θ. Our results suggest that the columnar flow in the rotation-dominated core, which is an important ingredient for the maintenance of a dipolar magnetic field, is maintained despite the chaotic evolution of the buoyancy field on a fast timescale by internally driven inertial waves.

  1. Tracer dispersion - experiment and CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zitny, R.

    2004-01-01

    Description of tracer distribution by means of dispersion models is a method successfully used in process engineering for fifty years. Application of dispersion models in reactor engineering for characterization of flows in column apparatus, heat exchangers, etc. is summarized and experimental tracer techniques as well as CFD methods for dispersion coefficients evaluation are discussed. Possible extensions of thermal axial dispersion model (ADM) and a core-wall ADM model suitable for description of tracer dispersion in laminar flows are suggested as well as CFD implementation as 1D finite elements. (author)

  2. High density dispersion fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hofman, G.L.

    1996-01-01

    A fuel development campaign that results in an aluminum plate-type fuel of unlimited LEU burnup capability with an uranium loading of 9 grams per cm 3 of meat should be considered an unqualified success. The current worldwide approved and accepted highest loading is 4.8 g cm -3 with U 3 Si 2 as fuel. High-density uranium compounds offer no real density advantage over U 3 Si 2 and have less desirable fabrication and performance characteristics as well. Of the higher-density compounds, U 3 Si has approximately a 30% higher uranium density but the density of the U 6 X compounds would yield the factor 1.5 needed to achieve 9 g cm -3 uranium loading. Unfortunately, irradiation tests proved these peritectic compounds have poor swelling behavior. It is for this reason that the authors are turning to uranium alloys. The reason pure uranium was not seriously considered as a dispersion fuel is mainly due to its high rate of growth and swelling at low temperatures. This problem was solved at least for relatively low burnup application in non-dispersion fuel elements with small additions of Si, Fe, and Al. This so called adjusted uranium has nearly the same density as pure α-uranium and it seems prudent to reconsider this alloy as a dispersant. Further modifications of uranium metal to achieve higher burnup swelling stability involve stabilization of the cubic γ phase at low temperatures where normally α phase exists. Several low neutron capture cross section elements such as Zr, Nb, Ti and Mo accomplish this in various degrees. The challenge is to produce a suitable form of fuel powder and develop a plate fabrication procedure, as well as obtain high burnup capability through irradiation testing

  3. Velocity distribution in snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, K.; Ito, Y.

    1997-12-01

    In order to investigate the detailed structure of snow avalanches, we have made snow flow experiments at the Miyanomori ski jump in Sapporo and systematic observations in the Shiai-dani, Kurobe Canyon. In the winter of 1995-1996, a new device to measure static pressures was used to estimate velocities in the snow cloud that develops above the flowing layer of avalanches. Measurements during a large avalanche in the Shiai-dani which damaged and destroyed some instruments indicate velocities increased rapidly to more than 50 m/s soon after the front. Velocities decreased gradually in the following 10 s. Velocities of the lower flowing layer were also calculated by differencing measurement of impact pressure. Both recordings in the snow cloud and in the flowing layer changed with a similar trend and suggest a close interaction between the two layers. In addition, the velocity showed a periodic change. Power spectrum analysis of the impact pressure and the static pressure depression showed a strong peak at a frequency between 4 and 6 Hz, which might imply the existence of either ordered structure or a series of surges in the flow.

  4. Scale dependence of acoustic velocities. An experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotusso, Angelamaria Pillitteri

    2001-06-01

    Reservoir and overburden data (e.g. seismic, sonic log and core data) are collected at different stages of field development, at different scales, and under different measurement conditions. A more precise reservoir characterization could be obtained by combining all the collected data. Reliable data may also be obtained from drill cuttings. This methodology can give data in quasi-real time, it is easily applicable, and cheap. It is then important, to understand the relationship between results obtained from measurements at different scales. In this Thesis acoustic velocities measured at several different laboratory scales are presented. This experimental study was made in order to give the base for the development of a model aiming to use/combine appropriately the data collected at different scales. The two main aspects analyzed are the experimental limitations due to the decrease in sample size and the significance of measurements in relation to material heterogeneities. Plexiglas, an isotropic, non-dispersive artificial material, with no expected scale effect, was used to evaluate the robustness of the measurement techniques. The results emphasize the importance of the wavelength used with respect to the sample length. If the sample length (L) is at least 5 time bigger than wavelength used ({lambda}), then the measured velocities do not depend on sample size. Leca stone, an artificial isotropic material containing spherical grains was used to evaluate the combined effects of technique, heterogeneities and sample length. The ratio between the scale of the heterogeneities and the sample length has to be taken in to account. In this case velocities increase with decreasing sample length when the ratio L/{lambda} is smaller than 10-15 and at the same time the ratio between sample length and grain size is greater than 10. Measurements on natural rocks demonstrate additional influence of grain mineralogy, shape and orientation. Firenzuola sandstone shows scale and

  5. Should tsunami simulations include a nonzero initial horizontal velocity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotto, Gabriel C.; Nava, Gabriel; Dunham, Eric M.

    2017-08-01

    Tsunami propagation in the open ocean is most commonly modeled by solving the shallow water wave equations. These equations require initial conditions on sea surface height and depth-averaged horizontal particle velocity or, equivalently, horizontal momentum. While most modelers assume that initial velocity is zero, Y.T. Song and collaborators have argued for nonzero initial velocity, claiming that horizontal displacement of a sloping seafloor imparts significant horizontal momentum to the ocean. They show examples in which this effect increases the resulting tsunami height by a factor of two or more relative to models in which initial velocity is zero. We test this claim with a "full-physics" integrated dynamic rupture and tsunami model that couples the elastic response of the Earth to the linearized acoustic-gravitational response of a compressible ocean with gravity; the model self-consistently accounts for seismic waves in the solid Earth, acoustic waves in the ocean, and tsunamis (with dispersion at short wavelengths). Full-physics simulations of subduction zone megathrust ruptures and tsunamis in geometries with a sloping seafloor confirm that substantial horizontal momentum is imparted to the ocean. However, almost all of that initial momentum is carried away by ocean acoustic waves, with negligible momentum imparted to the tsunami. We also compare tsunami propagation in each simulation to that predicted by an equivalent shallow water wave simulation with varying assumptions regarding initial velocity. We find that the initial horizontal velocity conditions proposed by Song and collaborators consistently overestimate the tsunami amplitude and predict an inconsistent wave profile. Finally, we determine tsunami initial conditions that are rigorously consistent with our full-physics simulations by isolating the tsunami waves from ocean acoustic and seismic waves at some final time, and backpropagating the tsunami waves to their initial state by solving the

  6. Zero-Dispersion Slow Light with Wide Bandwidth in Photonic Crystal Coupled Waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao-Yu, Mao; Geng-Yan, Zhang; Yi-Dong, Huang; Wei, Zhang; Jiang-De, Peng

    2008-01-01

    By introducing an adjustment waveguide besides the incident waveguide, zero-dispersion slow light with wide bandwidth can be realized due to anticrossing of the incident waveguide mode and the adjustment waveguide mode. The width of the adjustment waveguide (W 2 ) and the hole radii of the coupling region (r') will change the dispersion of incident waveguide mode. Theoretical investigation reveals that zero dispersion at various low group velocity ν g in incident waveguide can be achieved. In particular, proper W 2 and r' can lead to the lowest ν g of 0.0085c at 1550 nm with wide bandwidth of 202 GHz for zero dispersion

  7. Effect of pore size distribution and flow segregation on dispersion in porous media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbonell, R.G.

    1978-11-01

    In order to study the effect of the pore size distribution and flow segregation on dispersion in a porous media, the dispersion of solute in an array of parallel pores is considered. Equations are obtained for the dispersion coefficient in laminar and turbulent flow, as a function of the particle Peclet number. The theory fits quite well cumulative experimental data from various researchers in the Peclet number range from 10 -3 to 10 6 . The model also predicts some trends, backed by experimental data, regarding the effect of particle size, particle size distribution and fluid velocity on dispersion

  8. Velocity Estimate Following Air Data System Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    McLaren, Scott A

    2008-01-01

    .... A velocity estimator (VEST) algorithm was developed to combine the inertial and wind velocities to provide an estimate of the aircraft's current true velocity to be used for command path gain scheduling and for display in the cockpit...

  9. Spurious dispersion effects at FLASH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prat, Eduard

    2009-07-01

    The performance of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) process imposes stringent demands on the transverse trajectory and size of the electron beam. Since transverse dispersion changes off-energy particle trajectories and increases the effective beam size, dispersion must be controlled. This thesis treats the concept of dispersion in linacs, and analyses the impact of dispersion on the electron beam and on the FEL process. It presents generation mechanisms for spurious dispersion, quantifying its importance for FLASH (Free-electron Laser in Hamburg) and the XFEL (European X-ray Free-Electron Laser). A method for measuring and correcting dispersion and its implementation in FLASH is described. Experiments of dispersion e ects on the transverse beam quality and on the FEL performance are presented. (orig.)

  10. Spurious dispersion effects at FLASH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prat, Eduard

    2009-07-15

    The performance of the Free-Electron Laser (FEL) process imposes stringent demands on the transverse trajectory and size of the electron beam. Since transverse dispersion changes off-energy particle trajectories and increases the effective beam size, dispersion must be controlled. This thesis treats the concept of dispersion in linacs, and analyses the impact of dispersion on the electron beam and on the FEL process. It presents generation mechanisms for spurious dispersion, quantifying its importance for FLASH (Free-electron Laser in Hamburg) and the XFEL (European X-ray Free-Electron Laser). A method for measuring and correcting dispersion and its implementation in FLASH is described. Experiments of dispersion e ects on the transverse beam quality and on the FEL performance are presented. (orig.)

  11. Dispersion stability of thermal nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Yu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal nanofluids, the engineered fluids with dispersed functional nanoparticles, have exhibited extraordinary thermophysical properties and added functionalities, and thus have enabled a broad range of important applications. The poor dispersion stability of thermal nanofluids, however, has been considered as a long-existing issue that limits their further development and practical application. This review overviews the recent efforts and progresses in improving the dispersion stability of thermal nanofluids such as mechanistic understanding of dispersion behavior of nanofluids, examples of both water-based and oil-based nanofluids, strategies to stabilize nanofluids, and characterization techniques for dispersion behavior of nanofluids. Finally, on-going research needs, and possible solutions to research challenges and future research directions in exploring stably dispersed thermal nanofluids are discussed. Keywords: Thermal nanofluids, Dispersion, Aggregation, Electrostatic stabilization, Steric stabilization

  12. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D.

    1991-01-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs

  13. Blood flow velocity in migraine attacks - a transcranial Doppler study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwetsloot, C.P.; Caekebeke, J.F.V.; Jansen, J.C.; Odink, J.; Ferrari, M.D. (Rijksuniversiteit Leiden (Netherlands))

    1991-05-01

    A pulsed Doppler device was used to measure blood flow velocities in the common carotid artery, the extracranial part of the internal carotid artery, the external carotid artery, the middle cerebral artery, and the anterior cerebral artery in 31 migraneurs without aura (n=27) and with aura (n=4), both during and ouside an attack. The aims were to compare blood flow velocity during and between migraine attacks and to study asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. Compared with blood flow velocity values obtained in the attack-free interval, blood flow velocity was lower during attacks without aura in both common carotid arteries, but not in the other extra- and intracranial vessels which were examined. However, during attacks of migraine with aura, blood flow velocity tended to be lower in all examined vessels. There were no asymmetries of the blood flow velocity. It is suggested that during migraine attacks without aura there is a dissociation in blood flow regulation in the common carotid and middle cerebral arteries. 20 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. On the Hartman paradox, electromagnetic wave tunneling and supraluminal velocities (comment on the paper 'Tunneling of electromagnetic waves: paradoxes and prospects' by A B Shvartsburg)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidovich, Mikhail V

    2009-01-01

    Some paradoxes are discussed concerning the interpretation of the passage of particles and electromagnetic waves (pulses) across potential barriers and through nonuniform media, in particular, those with frequency dispersion and therefore dissipation. It is emphasized that a rigorous nonstationary approach does not entail any supraluminal velocities for the transfer of physical substances, although supraluminal velocities are indeed possible for several kinematically defined velocities, e.g., for the group velocity. (letters to the editors)

  15. Welding wire velocity modelling and control using an optical sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kirsten M.; Pedersen, Tom S.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a method for controlling the velocity of a welding wire at the tip of the handle is described. The method is an alternative to the traditional welding apparatus control system where the wire velocity is controlled internal in the welding machine implying a poor disturbance reduction....... To obtain the tip velocity a dynamic model of the wire/liner system is developed and verified.  In the wire/liner system it turned out that backlash and reflections are influential factors. An idea for handling the backlash has been suggested. In addition an optical sensor for measuring the wire velocity...... at the tip has been constructed. The optical sensor may be used but some problems due to focusing cause noise in the control loop demanding a more precise mechanical wire feed system or an optical sensor with better focusing characteristics....

  16. Determination of flow times and longitudinal dispersion coefficients in the Main river using 3HHO as tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krause, W.J.; Mundschenk, H.

    1989-01-01

    Single discharges from nuclear power plants as well as discrete labeling with tritiated water are used to determine flow times, flow velocities and longitudinal dispersion coefficients in German rivers as shown here, for example, for the Main river. (orig.)

  17. Study on Rayleigh Wave Inversion for Estimating Shear-wave Velocity Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.A. Sanny

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh wave or ground roll is a noise in seismic body waves. However, how to use this noise for soil characterization is very interesting since Rayleigh wave phase velocity is a function of compression-wave velocity, shear-wave velocity, density and layer thickness. In layered-medium Rayleigh wave velocity also depends on wavelength or frequency, and this phenomenon is called dispersion. Inversion procedure to get shear-wave velocity profile needs a priori information about the solution of the problem to limit the unknown parameters. The Lagrange multiplier method was used to solve the constrained optimization problems or well known as a smoothing parameter in inversion problems. The advantage of our inversion procedure is that it can guarantee the convergence of solution even though the field data is incomplete, insufficient, and inconsistent. The addition of smoothing parameter can reduce the time to converge. Beside numerical stability, the statistical stability is also involved in inversion procedure. In field experiment we extracted ground roll data from seismic refraction record. The dispersion curves had been constructed by applying f-k analysis and f-k dip filtering. The dispersion curves show the dependence of Rayleigh wave phase velocities in layered media to frequency. The synthetic models also demonstrate the stability and the speed of inversion procedure.

  18. The effect of gradational velocities and anisotropy on fault-zone trapped waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulley, A. K.; Eccles, J. D.; Kaipio, J. P.; Malin, P. E.

    2017-08-01

    Synthetic fault-zone trapped wave (FZTW) dispersion curves and amplitude responses for FL (Love) and FR (Rayleigh) type phases are analysed in transversely isotropic 1-D elastic models. We explore the effects of velocity gradients, anisotropy, source location and mechanism. These experiments suggest: (i) A smooth exponentially decaying velocity model produces a significantly different dispersion curve to that of a three-layer model, with the main difference being that Airy phases are not produced. (ii) The FZTW dispersion and amplitude information of a waveguide with transverse-isotropy depends mostly on the Shear wave velocities in the direction parallel with the fault, particularly if the fault zone to country-rock velocity contrast is small. In this low velocity contrast situation, fully isotropic approximations to a transversely isotropic velocity model can be made. (iii) Fault-aligned fractures and/or bedding in the fault zone that cause transverse-isotropy enhance the amplitude and wave-train length of the FR type FZTW. (iv) Moving the source and/or receiver away from the fault zone removes the higher frequencies first, similar to attenuation. (v) In most physically realistic cases, the radial component of the FR type FZTW is significantly smaller in amplitude than the transverse.

  19. Cosmic string induced peculiar velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Dalen, A.; Schramm, D.N.

    1987-02-01

    We calculate analytically the probability distribution for peculiar velocities on scales from 10h -1 to 60h -1 Mpc with cosmic string loops as the dominant source of primordial gravitational perturbations. We consider a range of parameters βGμ appropriate for both hot (HDM) and cold (CDM) dark matter scenarios. An Ω = 1 CDM Universe is assumed with the loops randomly placed on a smooth background. It is shown how the effects can be estimated of loops breaking up and being born with a spectrum of sizes. It is found that to obtain large scale streaming velocities of at least 400 km/s it is necessary that either a large value for βGμ or the effect of loop fissioning and production details be considerable. Specifically, for optimal CDM string parameters Gμ = 10 -6 , β = 9, h = .5, and scales of 60h -1 Mpc, the parent size spectrum must be 36 times larger than the evolved daughter spectrum to achieve peculiar velocities of at least 400 km/s with a probability of 63%. With this scenario the microwave background dipole will be less than 800 km/s with only a 10% probability. The string induced velocity spectrum is relatively flat out to scales of about 2t/sub eq//a/sub eq/ and then drops off rather quickly. The flatness is a signature of string models of galaxy formation. With HDM a larger value of βGμ is necessary for galaxy formation since accretion on small scales starts later. Hence, with HDM, the peculiar velocity spectrum will be larger on large scales and the flat region will extend to larger scales. If large scale peculiar velocities greater than 400 km/s are real then it is concluded that strings plus CDM have difficulties. The advantages of strings plus HDM in this regard will be explored in greater detail in a later paper. 27 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Phonon dispersion in vanadium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.S.; Rumiantsev, A.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Phonon dispersion curves in Vanadium metal are investigated by neutron inelastic scattering using three-axis spectrometers. Due to extremely low coherent scattering amplitude of neutrons in natural isotope mixture of vanadium the phonon frequencies could be determined in the energy range below about 15 meV. Several phonon groups were measured with the polarised neutron scattering set-up. It is demonstrated that the intensity of coherent inelastic scattering observed in the non-spin-flip channel vanishes in the spin-flip channel. The phonon density of states is measured on a single crystal keeping the momentum transfer equal to a vector of reciprocal lattice where the coherent inelastic scattering is suppressed. Phonon dispersion curves in vanadium, as measured by neutron and earlier by X-ray scattering, are described in frames of a charge-fluctuation model involving monopolar and dipolar degrees of freedom. The model parameters are compared for different transition metals with body-centred cubic-structure. (author)

  1. Dispersion and current measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boelskifte, S.

    1986-04-01

    A model for the simulation of particle movements in water should incorporate the mutual distance dependent correlation. As long as reliable data are given accessible a model can be created of the dispersion in a given area from a statistical description of turbulence. Current measurements have been performed in an area north of the Swedish nuclear power plant Barsebaeck, and statistical time series analysis have made it possible to estimate multivariate autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) models for these data using the Box-Jenkins method. The correlation structure for the area has been investigated in detail. Transport and dispersion models for the marine environment are used in estimating doses to the population from the aquatic food chain. Some of these models are described with special emphasis on the time and length scales they cover. Furthermore, to illustrate the background of the simulation model, short introductuions are given to health physics, time series analysis, and turbulence theory. Analysis of the simulation model shows the relative importance of the different parameters. The model can be expanded to conditional simulation, where the current measurements are used directly to simulate the movement of one of the particles. Results from the model are also compared to results from a sampling of bioindicators (Fucus vesiculosus) along the Danish coast. The reliability of bioindicators in this kind of experiment is discussed. (author)

  2. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements. PMID:27713928

  3. Angle independent velocity spectrum determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    An ultrasound imaging system (100) includes a transducer array (102) that emits an ultrasound beam and produces at least one transverse pulse-echo field that oscillates in a direction transverse to the emitted ultrasound beam and that receive echoes produced in response thereto and a spectral vel...... velocity estimator (110) that determines a velocity spectrum for flowing structure, which flows at an angle of 90 degrees and flows at angles less than 90 degrees with respect to the emitted ultrasound beam, based on the received echoes....

  4. Atomization of liquids in a Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber. Part II. Droplet dispersion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, J A S; Costa, M A M; Aguiar, M L; Coury, J R

    2004-12-10

    Droplet distribution is of fundamental importance to the performance of a Venturi scrubber. Ensuring good liquid distribution can increase performance at minimal liquid usage. In this study, droplet dispersion in a rectangular Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber, operating horizontally, was examined both theoretically and experimentally. The Venturi throat cross-section was 24 mm x 35 mm, and the throat length varied from 63 to 140 mm. Liquid was injected through a single orifice (1.0 mm diameter) on the throat wall. This arrangement allowed the study of the influence of jet penetration on droplet distribution. Gas velocity at the throat was 58.3 and 74.6 m/s, and the liquid flow rate was 286, 559 and 853 ml/min. A probe with a 2.7 mm internal diameter was used to isokinetically remove liquid from several positions inside the equipment. It was possible to study liquid distribution close to the injection point. A new model for droplet dispersion, which incorporates the new description of the jet atomization process developed by the present authors in the first article of this series, is proposed and evaluated. The model predicted well the experimental data.

  5. Tidal effects on ichthyoplankton aggregation and dispersion in the Southern Gulf of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Adela Monreal Gómez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of vertical barotropic and baroclinic tidal forcing in the aggregation and dispersion of ichthyoplankton in the Southern Gulf of Mexico was analyzed in this study. Samplings of ichthyoplankton and the determination of hydrographic parameters were performed during September 1992 at a single point of 180 m depth, near the shelf break (19º32'N - 92º38.5'W. A 24 h CTD yo-yoing casting and biological samples were taken every 2 h and these measurements were combined with water velocity and density simulations from the Regional Ocean Model System (ROMS. One thermocline and two haloclines were depicted. The Froude number increased with a 2 h lag with respect to the maximal barotropic tide, suggesting the existence of a baroclinic tide. Aggregation and dispersion of the ichthyoplankton showed vertical oscillations in the abundance and the numbers of taxa and larvae with a 5 h lag with respect to the maximal barotropic tide and were in phase with the thermocline oscillation. The vertical oscillation was attributed to a hydraulic control forced by the internal tide.

  6. Passive aerial dispersal of insects and other arthropods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura

    2016-11-01

    One of the defining features of the aerial dispersal of tiny organisms is the ability to overcome negative buoyancy. This can be accomplished by dispersing in the right wind conditions (e.g. an updraft) or by active flight or active release. Once in the air, draggy structures, such as the draglines of spiders or bristled wings of tiny insects, can reduce the settling velocity and extend the time of transport. Purely passive mechanisms allow spiders and other arthropods to drift on strands of silk to heights of 14,000 m and distances of hundreds of miles. Similarly, tiny insects like thrips and parasitoid wasps can travel distances of thousands to tens of thousands of meters, possibly using a combination of periods of active and passive flight. In this presentation, we used the immersed boundary method to quantify settling velocities and transport dynamics of parachuting insects and other arthropods within a quiescent fluid, a uniform updraft, and eddies.

  7. Relationship between the complex susceptibility and the plasma dispersion function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez D, H.; Cabral P, A

    1991-04-15

    It is shown that when magnetization processes in a spin system and resonant excitation of spin n states occur in the presence of internal and or external random line-broadening mechanisms, the complex magnetic susceptibility of the plasma dispersion function. letter could be useful spin in system is proportional to the relationship found in this spectroscopies such as EPR and NMR, for example, as its fitting to experimental absorption and dispersion profiles produces their Lorentzian and Gaussian contents. (Author)

  8. Relationship between the complex susceptibility and the plasma dispersion function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez D, H.; Cabral P, A.

    1991-04-01

    It is shown that when magnetization processes in a spin system and resonant excitation of spin n states occur in the presence of internal and or external random line-broadening mechanisms, the complex magnetic susceptibility of the plasma dispersion function. letter could be useful spin in system is proportional to the relationship found in this spectroscopies such as EPR and NMR, for example, as its fitting to experimental absorption and dispersion profiles produces their Lorentzian and Gaussian contents. (Author)

  9. Oil spill dispersants. Risk assessment for Swedish waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, C.; Lager, H.; Fejes, J.

    2001-12-01

    IVL has compiled a list of the international usage of oil spill dispersants and presents the technical limitations with the use of such agents as well as the biological effects of these chemical products. IVL, has also conducted an analysis of the pros and cons to using dispersants against oil spills in waters and has applied this with a risk assessment of chemical methods to combat oil spills in the Kattegat and Skagerrak and the Baltic Sea

  10. Strongly coupled dispersed two-phase flows; Ecoulements diphasiques disperses fortement couples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zun, I.; Lance, M.; Ekiel-Jezewska, M.L.; Petrosyan, A.; Lecoq, N.; Anthore, R.; Bostel, F.; Feuillebois, F.; Nott, P.; Zenit, R.; Hunt, M.L.; Brennen, C.E.; Campbell, C.S.; Tong, P.; Lei, X.; Ackerson, B.J.; Asmolov, E.S.; Abade, G.; da Cunha, F.R.; Lhuillier, D.; Cartellier, A.; Ruzicka, M.C.; Drahos, J.; Thomas, N.H.; Talini, L.; Leblond, J.; Leshansky, A.M.; Lavrenteva, O.M.; Nir, A.; Teshukov, V.; Risso, F.; Ellinsen, K.; Crispel, S.; Dahlkild, A.; Vynnycky, M.; Davila, J.; Matas, J.P.; Guazelli, L.; Morris, J.; Ooms, G.; Poelma, C.; van Wijngaarden, L.; de Vries, A.; Elghobashi, S.; Huilier, D.; Peirano, E.; Minier, J.P.; Gavrilyuk, S.; Saurel, R.; Kashinsky, O.; Randin, V.; Colin, C.; Larue de Tournemine, A.; Roig, V.; Suzanne, C.; Bounhoure, C.; Brunet, Y.; Tanaka, A.T.; Noma, K.; Tsuji, Y.; Pascal-Ribot, S.; Le Gall, F.; Aliseda, A.; Hainaux, F.; Lasheras, J.; Didwania, A.; Costa, A.; Vallerin, W.; Mudde, R.F.; Van Den Akker, H.E.A.; Jaumouillie, P.; Larrarte, F.; Burgisser, A.; Bergantz, G.; Necker, F.; Hartel, C.; Kleiser, L.; Meiburg, E.; Michallet, H.; Mory, M.; Hutter, M.; Markov, A.A.; Dumoulin, F.X.; Suard, S.; Borghi, R.; Hong, M.; Hopfinger, E.; Laforgia, A.; Lawrence, C.J.; Hewitt, G.F.; Osiptsov, A.N.; Tsirkunov, Yu. M.; Volkov, A.N.

    2003-07-01

    This document gathers the abstracts of the Euromech 421 colloquium about strongly coupled dispersed two-phase flows. Behaviors specifically due to the two-phase character of the flow have been categorized as: suspensions, particle-induced agitation, microstructure and screening mechanisms; hydrodynamic interactions, dispersion and phase distribution; turbulence modulation by particles, droplets or bubbles in dense systems; collective effects in dispersed two-phase flows, clustering and phase distribution; large-scale instabilities and gravity driven dispersed flows; strongly coupled two-phase flows involving reacting flows or phase change. Topic l: suspensions particle-induced agitation microstructure and screening mechanisms hydrodynamic interactions between two very close spheres; normal stresses in sheared suspensions; a critical look at the rheological experiments of R.A. Bagnold; non-equilibrium particle configuration in sedimentation; unsteady screening of the long-range hydrodynamic interactions of settling particles; computer simulations of hydrodynamic interactions among a large collection of sedimenting poly-disperse particles; velocity fluctuations in a dilute suspension of rigid spheres sedimenting between vertical plates: the role of boundaries; screening and induced-agitation in dilute uniform bubbly flows at small and moderate particle Reynolds numbers: some experimental results. Topic 2: hydrodynamic interactions, dispersion and phase distribution: hydrodynamic interactions in a bubble array; A 'NMR scattering technique' for the determination of the structure in a dispersion of non-brownian settling particles; segregation and clustering during thermo-capillary migration of bubbles; kinetic modelling of bubbly flows; velocity fluctuations in a homogeneous dilute dispersion of high-Reynolds-number rising bubbles; an attempt to simulate screening effects at moderate particle Reynolds numbers using an hybrid formulation; modelling the two

  11. Metapopulation extinction risk: dispersal's duplicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Kevin

    2009-09-01

    Metapopulation extinction risk is the probability that all local populations are simultaneously extinct during a fixed time frame. Dispersal may reduce a metapopulation's extinction risk by raising its average per-capita growth rate. By contrast, dispersal may raise a metapopulation's extinction risk by reducing its average population density. Which effect prevails is controlled by habitat fragmentation. Dispersal in mildly fragmented habitat reduces a metapopulation's extinction risk by raising its average per-capita growth rate without causing any appreciable drop in its average population density. By contrast, dispersal in severely fragmented habitat raises a metapopulation's extinction risk because the rise in its average per-capita growth rate is more than offset by the decline in its average population density. The metapopulation model used here shows several other interesting phenomena. Dispersal in sufficiently fragmented habitat reduces a metapopulation's extinction risk to that of a constant environment. Dispersal between habitat fragments reduces a metapopulation's extinction risk insofar as local environments are asynchronous. Grouped dispersal raises the effective habitat fragmentation level. Dispersal search barriers raise metapopulation extinction risk. Nonuniform dispersal may reduce the effective fraction of suitable habitat fragments below the extinction threshold. Nonuniform dispersal may make demographic stochasticity a more potent metapopulation extinction force than environmental stochasticity.

  12. The Effect of Velocity Correlation on the Spatial Evolution of Breakthrough Curves in Heterogeneous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoudieh, A.; Dentz, M.; Le Borgne, T.

    2017-12-01

    In heterogeneous media, the velocity distribution and the spatial correlation structure of velocity for solute particles determine the breakthrough curves and how they evolve as one moves away from the solute source. The ability to predict such evolution can help relating the spatio-statistical hydraulic properties of the media to the transport behavior and travel time distributions. While commonly used non-local transport models such as anomalous dispersion and classical continuous time random walk (CTRW) can reproduce breakthrough curve successfully by adjusting the model parameter values, they lack the ability to relate model parameters to the spatio-statistical properties of the media. This in turns limits the transferability of these models. In the research to be presented, we express concentration or flux of solutes as a distribution over their velocity. We then derive an integrodifferential equation that governs the evolution of the particle distribution over velocity at given times and locations for a particle ensemble, based on a presumed velocity correlation structure and an ergodic cross-sectional velocity distribution. This way, the spatial evolution of breakthrough curves away from the source is predicted based on cross-sectional velocity distribution and the connectivity, which is expressed by the velocity transition probability density. The transition probability is specified via a copula function that can help construct a joint distribution with a given correlation and given marginal velocities. Using this approach, we analyze the breakthrough curves depending on the velocity distribution and correlation properties. The model shows how the solute transport behavior evolves from ballistic transport at small spatial scales to Fickian dispersion at large length scales relative to the velocity correlation length.

  13. CRUNCH, Dispersion Model for Continuous Dense Vapour Release in Atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagger, S.F.

    1987-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The situation modelled is as follows. A dense gas emerges from a source such that it can be considered to emerge through a rectangular area, placed in the vertical plane and perpendicular to the plume direction, which assumes that of the ambient wind. The gas flux at the source, and in every plane perpendicular to the plume direction, is constant in time and a stationary flow field has been attained. For this to apply, the characteristic time of release must be much larger than that for dispersal of the contaminant. The plume can be thought to consist of a number of rectangular elements or 'puffs' emerging from the source at regular time intervals. The model follows the development of these puffs at a series of downwind points. These puffs are immediately assumed to advect with the ambient wind at their half-height. The plume also slumps due to the action of gravity and is allowed to entrain air through its sides and top surface. Spreading of a fluid element is caused by pressure differences across this element and since the pressure gradient in the wind direction is small, the resulting pressure differences and slumping velocities are small also, thus permitting this convenient approximation. Initially, as the plume slumps, its vertical dimension decreases and with it the slumping velocity and advection velocity. Thus the plume advection velocity varies as a function of downwind distance. With the present steady state modelling, and to satisfy continuity constraints, there must be consequent adjustment of plume height. Calculation of this parameter from the volume flux ensures this occurs. As the cloud height begins to grow, the advection velocity increases and the plume height decreases accordingly. With advection downwind, the cloud gains buoyancy by entraining air and, if the cloud is cold, by absorbing heat from the ground. Eventually the plume begins to disperse as would a passive pollutant, through the action of

  14. Submesoscale dispersion in the vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon spill

    OpenAIRE

    Poje, Andrew C.; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Lipphardt, Bruce L.; Haus, Brian K.; Ryan, Edward H.; Haza, Angelique C.; Jacobs, Gregg A.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Olascoaga, Maria Josefina; Novelli, Guillaume; Griffa, Annalisa; Beron-Vera, Francisco J.; Chen, Shuyi S.; Coelho, Emanuel; Hogan, Patrick J.

    2014-01-01

    Reliable forecasts for the dispersion of oceanic contamination are important for coastal ecosystems, society and the economy as evidenced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the Fukushima nuclear plant incident in the Pacific Ocean in 2011. Accurate prediction of pollutant pathways and concentrations at the ocean surface requires understanding ocean dynamics over a broad range of spatial scales. Fundamental questions concerning the structure of the velocity fi...

  15. The role of vertical shear on the horizontal oceanic dispersion

    OpenAIRE

    A. S. Lanotte; R. Corrado; G. Lacorata; L. Palatella; C. Pizzigalli; I. Schipa; R. Santoleri

    2015-01-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observative and model data. In-situ current measurements reveal that vertical velocity gradients in the upper mixed layer decorrelate quite fast (∼ 1 day), whereas basin-scale ocean circulation models tend to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispers...

  16. DISECA - A Matlab code for dispersive waveform calculations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaždová, Renata; Vilhelm, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 38, č. 4 (2011), s. 526-531 ISSN 0266-352X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519 Keywords : velocity dispersion * synthetic waveform * seismic method Subject RIV: DC - Siesmology, Volcanology, Earth Structure Impact factor: 0.987, year: 2011 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0266352X11000425

  17. ROTATIONAL VELOCITIES FOR M DWARFS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, J. S.; Ramsey, L. W.; Jones, H. R. A.; Pavlenko, Y.; Barnes, J. R.; Pinfield, D. J.; Gallardo, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present spectroscopic rotation velocities (v sin i) for 56 M dwarf stars using high-resolution Hobby-Eberly Telescope High Resolution Spectrograph red spectroscopy. In addition, we have also determined photometric effective temperatures, masses, and metallicities ([Fe/H]) for some stars observed here and in the literature where we could acquire accurate parallax measurements and relevant photometry. We have increased the number of known v sin i values for mid M stars by around 80% and can confirm a weakly increasing rotation velocity with decreasing effective temperature. Our sample of v sin is peak at low velocities (∼3 km s -1 ). We find a change in the rotational velocity distribution between early M and late M stars, which is likely due to the changing field topology between partially and fully convective stars. There is also a possible further change in the rotational distribution toward the late M dwarfs where dust begins to play a role in the stellar atmospheres. We also link v sin i to age and show how it can be used to provide mid-M star age limits. When all literature velocities for M dwarfs are added to our sample, there are 198 with v sin i ≤ 10 km s -1 and 124 in the mid-to-late M star regime (M3.0-M9.5) where measuring precision optical radial velocities is difficult. In addition, we also search the spectra for any significant Hα emission or absorption. Forty three percent were found to exhibit such emission and could represent young, active objects with high levels of radial-velocity noise. We acquired two epochs of spectra for the star GJ1253 spread by almost one month and the Hα profile changed from showing no clear signs of emission, to exhibiting a clear emission peak. Four stars in our sample appear to be low-mass binaries (GJ1080, GJ3129, Gl802, and LHS3080), with both GJ3129 and Gl802 exhibiting double Hα emission features. The tables presented here will aid any future M star planet search target selection to extract stars with low v

  18. Waves in microstructured solids and negative group velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peets, T.; Kartofelev, D.; Tamm, K.; Engelbrecht, J.

    2013-07-01

    Waves with negative group velocity (NGV) were discovered in optics by Sommerfeld and Brillouin, and experimentally verified in many cases, for example in left-handed media. For waves in solids, such an effect is described mostly in layered media. In this paper, it is demonstrated that in microstructured solids, waves with NGV may also exist leading to backwards pulse propagation. Two physical cases are analysed: a Mindlin-type hierarchical (a scale within a scale) material and a felt-type (made of fibres) material. For both cases, the dispersion analysis of one-dimensional waves shows that there exists certain ranges of physical parameters which lead to NGV. The results can be used in dispersion engineering for designing materials with certain properties.

  19. Experimental and numerical study of atmospheric turbulence and dispersion in stable conditions and in near field at a complex site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    An experimental program has been designed in order to study pollutants dispersion at a complex site with a focus on stable conditions, which are still challenging for numerical modelling. This experimental program is being conducted at the SIRTA site in a southern suburb of Paris and consists in measuring, in near field, the turbulence and the pollutants dispersion. The aim of this program is to characterize the fine structure of turbulence and associated dispersion through high temporal and spatial resolution measurements. Then, these measurements allow to validate and improve the performance of CFD simulation for turbulence and dispersion in a heterogeneous field. The instrumental set up includes 12 ultrasonic anemometers measuring continuously wind velocity and temperature at 10 Hz, and 6 photo-ionization detectors (PIDs) measuring gas concentration at 50 Hz during tracer tests. Intensive observations periods (IOPs) with gas releases have been performed since March 2012.First of all, a detailed study of flow on the site is made, because it must be characterised and properly simulated before attempting to simulate the pollutants dispersion. This study is based on two years of continuous measurements and on measurements performed during IOPs. Turbulence strong anisotropy in the surface layer is characterized by calculating variances, integral length scales and power spectra of the three wind velocity components. Propagation of turbulent structures between sensors has been characterized with velocity correlations. Energy spectra show several slopes in different frequency regions. Also, data analyses show impact of terrain heterogeneity on the measurements. The forest to the north of experimental field modifies wind velocity and direction for a large northerly sector. It induces a strong directional wind shear and a wind deceleration below the forest height. Numerical simulations are carried out using the CFD code Code-Saturne in RANS mode with a standard κ

  20. Relativistic plasma dispersion functions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The known properties of plasma dispersion functions (PDF's) for waves in weakly relativistic, magnetized, thermal plasmas are reviewed and a large number of new results are presented. The PDF's required for the description of waves with small wave number perpendicular to the magnetic field (Dnestrovskii and Shkarofsky functions) are considered in detail; these functions also arise in certain quantum electrodynamical calculations involving strongly magnetized plasmas. Series, asymptotic series, recursion relations, integral forms, derivatives, differential equations, and approximations for these functions are discussed as are their analytic properties and connections with standard transcendental functions. In addition a more general class of PDF's relevant to waves of arbitrary perpendicular wave number is introduced and a range of properties of these functions are derived

  1. Anomalous dispersion properties of TM waves in subwavelength metallic waveguides loaded by uniaxial metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Guanghui, E-mail: wanggh@scnu.edu.cn; Lei, Yuandong; Zhang, Weifeng

    2015-02-20

    Dispersion properties of transverse magnetic (TM) waves in a subwavelength metallic waveguide loaded by uniaxial metamaterials are investigated, based on two kinds of uniaxial metamaterials with different orientations of optical axis. The numerical results show that the existence of fundamental TM{sub 0} mode and high-order TM modes in the waveguide system is dependent on the orientation of optical axis. In addition, their anomalous dispersion properties are clarified. When the orientation of optical axis is selected properly, there are two branches of dispersion curves for each high-order mode—one is normal dispersion and another belongs to anomalous dispersion, showing a transition from a backward wave to a forward one with the increase of working frequency. Moreover, the group velocity and energy flow distribution for TM{sub 1} mode are also demonstrated. These properties may have potential applications in optical information storage, integrated optics and nanophotonic devices. - Highlights: • Two kinds of subwavelength uniaxial metamaterial waveguides are constructed. • We demonstrate anomalous dispersion properties of transverse magnetic (TM) guided modes. • There are two branches of dispersion curves for high-order TM modes, showing a transition from a backward wave to a forward one. • Group velocity can approach to zero, having potential application in optical information storage. • Negative group velocity and energy flow distribution for TM modes are shown.

  2. The concave iris in pigment dispersion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lance; Ong, Ee Lin; Crowston, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    To visualize the changes of the iris contour in patients with pigment dispersion syndrome after blinking, accommodation, and pharmacologic miosis using anterior segment optical coherence tomography. Observational case series. A total of 33 eyes of 20 patients with pigment dispersion syndrome. Each eye was imaged along the horizontal 0- to 180-degree meridian using the Visante Anterior Segment Imaging System (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Scans were performed at baseline and after focusing on an internal fixation target for 5 minutes, forced blinking, accommodation, and pharmacologic miosis with pilocarpine 2%. Quantitative analysis of the changes in the iris configuration. After 5 minutes of continual fixation, the iris became planar with the mean ± standard deviation curvature decreasing from 214 ± 74 μm to 67 ± 76 μm (P pigment dispersion syndrome after forced blinking, but the iris concavity recovered to 227 ± 113 μm (P = 0.34) and 238 ± 119 μm (P = 0.19) with the -3.0 and -6.0 diopter lenses, respectively. Pilocarpine-induced miosis caused the iris to assume a planar configuration in all subjects. This study shows that the iris in pigment dispersion syndrome assumes a planar configuration when fixating and that the concavity of the iris surface is not restored by blinking. Accommodation restored the iris concavity, suggesting that the posterior curvature of the iris in pigment dispersion syndrome is induced and probably maintained, at least in part, by accommodation. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Evolution of dispersion coefficient in the single rough-walled fracture before and after circulated flow near the wall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.; Yeo, I.; Lee, K.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding detailed solute transport mechanism in a single fracture is required to expand it to the complex fractured medium. Dispersion in the variable-aperture fractures occurs by combined effects of molecular diffusion, macro dispersion and Taylor dispersion. It has been reported that Taylor dispersion which is proportional to the square of the velocity dominates for the high velocity, while macro dispersion is proportional to the velocity. Contributions of each scheme are different as the velocity changes. To investigate relationship between Reynolds number and dispersion coefficient, single acrylic rough-walled fracture which has 20 cm length and 1.03 mm average aperture was designed. In this experiment, dispersion coefficient was calculated at the middle of the fracture and at the edge of the fracture via moment analysis using breakthrough curve (BTC) of fluorescent solute under the Reynolds number 0.08, 0.28, 2.78, 8.2 and 16.4. In the results, distinct dispersion regime was observed at the highly rough-walled fracture, which is inconsistent with the model that was suggested by previous research. In the range of Re 2.78. The reason of this transition zone was related to the generation of circulated flow near the wall. It can flush the trapped contaminant out to the main flow channel, which makes tailing effect diminished. Also, these circulation zones were visualized using microscope, CCD camera and fluorescent particles.

  4. Influence of the pore fluid on the phase velocity in bovine trabecular bone In Vitro: Prediction of the biot model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang Il

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the influence of the pore fluid on the phase velocity in bovine trabecular bone in vitro. The frequency-dependent phase velocity was measured in 20 marrow-filled and water-filled bovine femoral trabecular bone samples. The mean phase velocities at frequencies between 0.6 and 1.2 MHz exhibited significant negative dispersions for both the marrow-filled and the water-filled samples. The magnitudes of the dispersions showed no significant differences between the marrow-filled and the water-filled samples. In contrast, replacement of marrow by water led to a mean increase in the phase velocity of 27 m/s at frequencies from 0.6 to 1.2 MHz. The theoretical phase velocities of the fast wave predicted by using the Biot model for elastic wave propagation in fluid-saturated porous media showed good agreements with the measurements.

  5. Longitudinal dispersion of radioactive substances in Federal waterways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, W.J. [Bundesanstalt fuer Gewaesserkunde (BfG), Koblenz (Germany); Speer, W.; Luellwitz, T.; Cremer, M.; Tolksdorf, W.

    2007-08-15

    In the context of radioactivity monitoring in German Federal Waterways (BWStr) by the Federal Institute of Hydrology (BfG) according to the Precautionary Radiation Protection Act (StrVG), the prediction of the dispersion of radioactive substances in water is one of the key tasks. The aim is the forecasting of the longitudinal dispersion of concentrations of soluble hazardous substances in flowing water. These predictions are based on the so-called dispersion tests with tritium as a tracer that the BfG has performed since 1980. Characteristic parameters like discharge-dependent flow velocities, dispersion and elimination constants related to emission sources or selected river sections are determined. They will serve as basis for a mathematical model to forecast discharge-dependent flow velocities, expected impact times, concentration maxima, and the duration of critical increases in concentrations. In the following, the results obtained till now from three investigation campaigns on the River Weser and its source rivers Werra and Fulda are described. (orig.)

  6. Gravity flow and solute dispersion in variably saturated sand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumahor, Samuel K.; de Rooij, Gerrit H.; Vogel, Hans-Joerg

    2014-05-01

    Solute dispersion in porous media depends on the structure of the velocity field at the pore scale. Hence, dispersion is expected to change with water content and with mean flow velocity. We performed laboratory experiments using a column of repacked fine-grained quartz sand (0.1-0.3 mm grain size) with a porous plate at the bottom to controle the water potential at the lower boundary. We established gravity flow conditions - i.e. constant matric potential and water content throughout the column - for a number of different irrigation rates. We measured breakthrough curves during unit gradient flow for an inert tracer which could be described by the convection-dispersion equation. As the soil water content decreased we observed an initially gradual increase in dispersivity followed by an abrupt increase below a threshold water content (0.19) and pressure head (-38 hPa). This phenomena can be explained by the geometry of phase distribution which was simulated based on Xray-CT images of the porous structure.

  7. Statistical Thermodynamics of Disperse Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander

    1996-01-01

    Principles of statistical physics are applied for the description of thermodynamic equilibrium in disperse systems. The cells of disperse systems are shown to possess a number of non-standard thermodynamic parameters. A random distribution of these parameters in the system is determined....... On the basis of this distribution, it is established that the disperse system has an additional degree of freedom called the macro-entropy. A large set of bounded ideal disperse systems allows exact evaluation of thermodynamic characteristics. The theory developed is applied to the description of equilibrium...

  8. Geometry of physical dispersion relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raetzel, Dennis; Rivera, Sergio; Schuller, Frederic P.

    2011-01-01

    To serve as a dispersion relation, a cotangent bundle function must satisfy three simple algebraic properties. These conditions are derived from the inescapable physical requirements that local matter field dynamics must be predictive and allow for an observer-independent notion of positive energy. Possible modifications of the standard relativistic dispersion relation are thereby severely restricted. For instance, the dispersion relations associated with popular deformations of Maxwell theory by Gambini-Pullin or Myers-Pospelov are not admissible. Dispersion relations passing the simple algebraic checks derived here correspond to physically admissible Finslerian refinements of Lorentzian geometry.

  9. Reconstruction of piano hammer force from string velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaigne, Antoine

    2016-11-01

    A method is presented for reconstructing piano hammer forces through appropriate filtering of the measured string velocity. The filter design is based on the analysis of the pulses generated by the hammer blow and propagating along the string. In the five lowest octaves, the hammer force is reconstructed by considering two waves only: the incoming wave from the hammer and its first reflection at the front end. For the higher notes, four- or eight-wave schemes must be considered. The theory is validated on simulated string velocities by comparing imposed and reconstructed forces. The simulations are based on a nonlinear damped stiff string model previously developed by Chabassier, Chaigne, and Joly [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 134(1), 648-665 (2013)]. The influence of absorption, dispersion, and amplitude of the string waves on the quality of the reconstruction is discussed. Finally, the method is applied to real piano strings. The measured string velocity is compared to the simulated velocity excited by the reconstructed force, showing a high degree of accuracy. A number of simulations are compared to simulated strings excited by a force derived from measurements of mass and acceleration of the hammer head. One application to an historic piano is also presented.

  10. Rotational velocities of low-mass stars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, J.B.; Hartmann, L.W.; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA)

    1986-01-01

    The rotational velocities of stars provide important clues to how stars form and evolve. Yet until recently, studies of stellar rotation were limited to stars more massive than the sun. This is beginning to change, and an observational outline of the rotational velocity evolution of stars less massive than the sun can now be provided. Low-mass stars rotate slowly during the early stages of premain-sequence evolution, and spin up as they contract to the main sequence. This spin-up culminates in a brief period of very rapid rotation at an age of order 50 million years. Physical interpretation of this increase in rotation and the subsequent main-sequence spin-down are complicated by the possibility of differential internal rotation. The observed rapidity of spin-down among G dwarfs suggests that initially only the outer convective envelopes of these stars are slowed. The data suggest an intrinsic spread in angular momentum among young stars of the same mass and age, a spread which is apparently minimized by the angular-momentum loss mechanism in old low-mass stars. 83 references

  11. The Relationship Between Maximum Isometric Strength and Ball Velocity in the Tennis Serve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baiget Ernest

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to analyze the relationship between maximum isometric strength levels in different upper and lower limb joints and serve velocity in competitive tennis players as well as to develop a prediction model based on this information. Twelve male competitive tennis players (mean ± SD; age: 17.2 ± 1.0 years; body height: 180.1 ± 6.2 cm; body mass: 71.9 ± 5.6 kg were tested using maximum isometric strength levels (i.e., wrist, elbow and shoulder flexion and extension; leg and back extension; shoulder external and internal rotation. Serve velocity was measured using a radar gun. Results showed a strong positive relationship between serve velocity and shoulder internal rotation (r = 0.67; p < 0.05. Low to moderate correlations were also found between serve velocity and wrist, elbow and shoulder flexion – extension, leg and back extension and shoulder external rotation (r = 0.36 – 0.53; p = 0.377 – 0.054. Bivariate and multivariate models for predicting serve velocity were developed, with shoulder flexion and internal rotation explaining 55% of the variance in serve velocity (r = 0.74; p < 0.001. The maximum isometric strength level in shoulder internal rotation was strongly related to serve velocity, and a large part of the variability in serve velocity was explained by the maximum isometric strength levels in shoulder internal rotation and shoulder flexion.

  12. Intermittent Lagrangian velocities and accelerations in three-dimensional porous medium flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzner, M; Morales, V L; Willmann, M; Dentz, M

    2015-07-01

    Intermittency of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration is a key to understanding transport in complex systems ranging from fluid turbulence to flow in porous media. High-resolution optical particle tracking in a three-dimensional (3D) porous medium provides detailed 3D information on Lagrangian velocities and accelerations. We find sharp transitions close to pore throats, and low flow variability in the pore bodies, which gives rise to stretched exponential Lagrangian velocity and acceleration distributions characterized by a sharp peak at low velocity, superlinear evolution of particle dispersion, and double-peak behavior in the propagators. The velocity distribution is quantified in terms of pore geometry and flow connectivity, which forms the basis for a continuous-time random-walk model that sheds light on the observed Lagrangian flow and transport behaviors.

  13. Polarization dependent dispersion and its impact on optical parametric process in high nonlinear microstructure fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Li; Zhang Wei; Huang Yidong; Peng Jiangde

    2008-01-01

    High nonlinear microstructure fibre (HNMF) is preferred in nonlinear fibre optics, especially in the applications of optical parametric effects, due to its high optical nonlinear coefficient. However, polarization dependent dispersion will impact the nonlinear optical parametric process in HNMFs. In this paper, modulation instability (MI) method is used to measure the polarization dependent dispersion of a piece of commercial HNMF, including the group velocity dispersion, the dispersion slope, the fourth-order dispersion and group birefringence. It also experimentally demonstrates the impact of the polarization dependent dispersion on the continuous wave supercontinuum (SC) generation. On one axis MI sidebands with symmetric frequency detunings are generated, while on the other axis with larger MI frequency detuning, SC is generated by soliton self-frequency shift

  14. Zero-velocity solitons in high-index photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lægsgaard, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear propagation in slow-light states of high-index photonic crystal fibers (PCFs) is studied numerically. To avoid divergencies in dispersion and nonlinear parameters around the zero-velocity mode, a time-propagating generalized nonlinear Schrödinger equation is formulated. Calculated slow-...

  15. High Velocity Oxidation and Hot Corrosion Resistance of Some ODS Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowell, C. E.; Deadmore, D. L.

    1977-01-01

    Several oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys were tested for cyclic, high velocity, oxidation, and hot corrosion resistance. These results were compared to the resistance of an advanced, NiCrAl coated superalloy. An ODS FeCrAl were identified as having sufficient oxidation and hot corrosion resistance to allow potential use in an aircraft gas turbine without coating.

  16. Circumferential-wave phase velocities for empty, fluid-immersed spherical metal shells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Überall, Herbert; Ahyi, A. C.; Raju, P. K.

    2002-01-01

    In earlier studies of acoustic scattering resonances and of the dispersive phase velocities of surface waves that generate them [see, e.g., Talmant et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 86, 278–289 (1989) for spherical aluminum shells] we have demonstrated the effectiveness and accuracy of obtaining phase ...

  17. Dispersion bias, dispersion effect, and the aerosol-cloud conundrum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yangang; Daum, Peter H; Guo Huan; Peng Yiran

    2008-01-01

    This work examines the influences of relative dispersion (the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean radius of the cloud droplet size distribution) on cloud albedo and cloud radiative forcing, derives an analytical formulation that accounts explicitly for the contribution from droplet concentration and relative dispersion, and presents a new approach to parameterize relative dispersion in climate models. It is shown that inadequate representation of relative dispersion in climate models leads to an overestimation of cloud albedo, resulting in a negative bias of global mean shortwave cloud radiative forcing that can be comparable to the warming caused by doubling CO 2 in magnitude, and that this dispersion bias is likely near its maximum for ambient clouds. Relative dispersion is empirically expressed as a function of the quotient between cloud liquid water content and droplet concentration (i.e., water per droplet), yielding an analytical formulation for the first aerosol indirect effect. Further analysis of the new expression reveals that the dispersion effect not only offsets the cooling from the Twomey effect, but is also proportional to the Twomey effect in magnitude. These results suggest that unrealistic representation of relative dispersion in cloud parameterization in general, and evaluation of aerosol indirect effects in particular, is at least in part responsible for several outstanding puzzles of the aerosol-cloud conundrum: for example, overestimation of cloud radiative cooling by climate models compared to satellite observations; large uncertainty and discrepancy in estimates of the aerosol indirect effect; and the lack of interhemispheric difference in cloud albedo.

  18. Long-range transmission of pollutants simulated by a two-dimensional pseudospectral dispersion model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prahm, L.P.; Christensen, O.

    1977-01-01

    The pseudospectral dispersion model (Christensen and Prahm, 1976) is adapted for simulation of the long-range transmission of sulphur pollutants in the European region, covering an area of about 4000 km x 4000 km. Regional ''background'' concentrations of sulphur oxides are found to be highly dependent on distant sources and to correlate poorly with local source strength during the considered three- and four-day episodes. The simulation is based on emission data, given in squares of about 50 km x 50 km and on synoptic wind fields derived from observed wind velocities of the 850 mb level and the surface level. The two-dimensional model includes a constant vertical mixing depth. Appropriate values for the deposition and the transformation rates of SO 2 and SO/sup 4 are used. The concentration of pollutants computed from the two-dimensional pseudospectral dispersion model reflects the variable meteorological conditions. Computed concentrations are compared with measurements, giving spatial correlations between 0.4 and 0.8 for more than 400 ground-based 24 h mean values, and a spatial correlation of 0.9 for eight aircraft samples averaged over approx.30 min. A discussion of the influence of different sources of error in the model simulation is given. The high numerical accuracy of the pseudospectral model is combined with a modest consumption of CPU computer time. This study is the first application of the pseudospectral dispersion model which compares computed concentrations with measured field data. The model has possible applications as a tool for assessment of the impact of both national and international emission regulation strategies

  19. Study on the dependence of the resonance frequency of accelerators on the cavities internal diameter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrao, V.A.; Franco, M.A.R.; Fuhrmann, C.

    1988-05-01

    The resonance frequencies of individual cavities and of a six cell disk-loaded prototype of an accelerating structure were measured as a function of cavity inner diameter. A linear relationship between the indidual cavity frequency and the six cell stack 2Π/3 mode frequency was obtained that will be very useful during the final tuning of the accelerating strutures of the IEAV linac. The dispersion diagrams were also obtained for various internal cavity diameters; these diagrams were utilized to estimate the group velocity and the RF filling time of the accelerating structure. (author) [pt

  20. Sound dispersion in a spin-1 Ising system near the second-order phase transition point

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdem, Ryza; Keskin, Mustafa

    2003-01-01

    Sound dispersion relation is derived for a spin-1 Ising system and its behaviour near the second-order phase transition point or the critical point is analyzed. The method used is a combination of molecular field approximation and Onsager theory of irreversible thermodynamics. If we assume a linear coupling of sound wave with the order parameter fluctuations in the system, we find that the dispersion which is the relative sound velocity change with frequency behaves as ω 0 ε 0 , where ω is the sound frequency and ε the temperature distance from the critical point. In the ordered region, one also observes a frequency-dependent velocity or dispersion minimum which is shifted from the corresponding attenuation maxima. These phenomena are in good agreement with the calculations of sound velocity in other magnetic systems such as magnetic metals, magnetic insulators, and magnetic semiconductors

  1. Modelling Pollutant Dispersion in a Street Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, N. Ben; Garbero, V.; Salizzoni, P.; Lamaison, G.; Soulhac, L.

    2015-04-01

    This study constitutes a further step in the analysis of the performances of a street network model to simulate atmospheric pollutant dispersion in urban areas. The model, named SIRANE, is based on the decomposition of the urban atmosphere into two sub-domains: the urban boundary layer, whose dynamics is assumed to be well established, and the urban canopy, represented as a series of interconnected boxes. Parametric laws govern the mass exchanges between the boxes under the assumption that the pollutant dispersion within the canopy can be fully simulated by modelling three main bulk transfer phenomena: channelling along street axes, transfers at street intersections, and vertical exchange between street canyons and the overlying atmosphere. Here, we aim to evaluate the reliability of the parametrizations adopted to simulate these phenomena, by focusing on their possible dependence on the external wind direction. To this end, we test the model against concentration measurements within an idealized urban district whose geometrical layout closely matches the street network represented in SIRANE. The analysis is performed for an urban array with a fixed geometry and a varying wind incidence angle. The results show that the model provides generally good results with the reference parametrizations adopted in SIRANE and that its performances are quite robust for a wide range of the model parameters. This proves the reliability of the street network approach in simulating pollutant dispersion in densely built city districts. The results also show that the model performances may be improved by considering a dependence of the wind fluctuations at street intersections and of the vertical exchange velocity on the direction of the incident wind. This opens the way for further investigations to clarify the dependence of these parameters on wind direction and street aspect ratios.

  2. Modelling airborne dispersion for disaster management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musliman, I. A.; Yohnny, L.

    2017-05-01

    Industrial disasters, like any other disasters, can happen anytime, anywhere and in any form. Airborne industrial disaster is a kind of catastrophic event involving the release of particles such as chemicals and industrial wastes into environment in gaseous form, for instance gas leakages. Unlike solid and liquid materials, gases are often colourless and odourless, the particles are too tiny to be visible to the naked eyes; hence it is difficult to identify the presence of the gases and to tell the dispersion and location of the substance. This study is to develop an application prototype to perform simulation modelling on the gas particles to determine the dispersion of the gas particles and to identify the coverage of the affected area. The prototype adopted Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) model to calculate the position of the gas particles under the influence of wind and turbulent velocity components, which are the induced wind due to the rotation of the Earth, and Convex Hull algorithm to identify the convex points of the gas cloud to form the polygon of the coverage area. The application performs intersection and overlay analysis over a set of landuse data at Pasir Gudang, Johor industrial and residential area. Results from the analysis would be useful to tell the percentage and extent of the affected area, and are useful for the disaster management to evacuate people from the affected area. The developed application can significantly increase efficiency of emergency handling during a crisis. For example, by using a simulation model, the emergency handling can predict what is going to happen next, so people can be well informed and preparations works can be done earlier and better. Subsequently, this application helps a lot in the decision making process.

  3. Modelling airborne dispersion for disaster management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Musliman, I A; Yohnny, L

    2017-01-01

    Industrial disasters, like any other disasters, can happen anytime, anywhere and in any form. Airborne industrial disaster is a kind of catastrophic event involving the release of particles such as chemicals and industrial wastes into environment in gaseous form, for instance gas leakages. Unlike solid and liquid materials, gases are often colourless and odourless, the particles are too tiny to be visible to the naked eyes; hence it is difficult to identify the presence of the gases and to tell the dispersion and location of the substance. This study is to develop an application prototype to perform simulation modelling on the gas particles to determine the dispersion of the gas particles and to identify the coverage of the affected area. The prototype adopted Lagrangian Particle Dispersion (LPD) model to calculate the position of the gas particles under the influence of wind and turbulent velocity components, which are the induced wind due to the rotation of the Earth, and Convex Hull algorithm to identify the convex points of the gas cloud to form the polygon of the coverage area. The application performs intersection and overlay analysis over a set of landuse data at Pasir Gudang, Johor industrial and residential area. Results from the analysis would be useful to tell the percentage and extent of the affected area, and are useful for the disaster management to evacuate people from the affected area. The developed application can significantly increase efficiency of emergency handling during a crisis. For example, by using a simulation model, the emergency handling can predict what is going to happen next, so people can be well informed and preparations works can be done earlier and better. Subsequently, this application helps a lot in the decision making process. (paper)

  4. Auroral electron time dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kletzing, C.A.

    1989-01-01

    A sounding rocket flight was launched from Greenland in 1985 to study high latitude, early morning auroral physics. The payload was instrumented with electron and ion detectors, AC and DC electric field experiments, a plasma density experiment, and a magnetometer to measure the ambient field. The rocket was launched during disturbed conditions, when the polar cap was in a contracted state with visible aurora overhead. The electron data contained numerous signatures indicative of time-of-flight energy dispersion characterized by a coherent structure in which lower energy electrons arrived at the rocket after higher energy electrons. A model was constructed to explain this phenomena by the sudden application of a region of parallel electric field along a length of magnetic field line above the rocket. The model incorporates detector response and uses an altitudinal density profile based on auroral zone measurements. Three types of potential structures were tried: linear, quadratic and cubic. Of the three it was found that the cubic (electric field growing in a quadratic manner moving up the field line) produced the best fit to the data. The potential region was found to be approximately 1-2 R e in extent with the lower edge 3000-4000 km away from the rocket. The background electron temperature in the model which produced the best fit to the data was of the order of 15 eV

  5. Dispersal and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Ringing of birds unveiled many aspects of avian migration and dispersal movements. However, there is even much more to be explored by the use of ringing and other marks. Dispersal is crucial in understanding the initial phase of migration in migrating birds as it is to understand patterns and processes of distribution and gene flow. So far, the analysis of migration was largely based on analysing spatial and temporal patters of recoveries of ringed birds. However, there are considerable biases and pitfalls in using recoveries due to spatial and temporal variation in reporting probabilities. Novel methods are required for future studies separating the confounding effects of spatial and temporal heterogeneity of recovery data and heterogeneity of the landscape as well. These novel approaches should aim a more intensive and novel use of the existing recovery data by taking advantage of, for instance, dynamic and multistate modeling, should elaborate schemes for future studies, and should also include other marks that allow a more rapid data collection, like telemetry, geolocation and global positioning systems, and chemical and molecular markers. The latter appear to be very useful in the delineating origin of birds and connectivity between breeding and non–breeding grounds. Many studies of migration are purely descriptive. However, King and Brooks (King & Brooks, 2004 examine if movement patterns of dolphins change after the introduction of a gillnet ban. Bayesian methods are an interesting approach to this problem as they provide a meaningful measure of the probability that such a change occurred rather than simple yes/no response that is often the result of classical statistical methods. However, the key difficulty of a general implementation of Bayesian methods is the complexity of the modelling —there is no general userfriendly package that is easily accessible to most scientists. Drake and Alisauskas (Drake & Alisauskas, 2004 examine the

  6. Stereoscopic measurements of particle dispersion in microgravity turbulent flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groszmann, Daniel Eduardo

    2001-08-01

    The presence of particles in turbulent flows adds complexity to an already difficult subject. The work described in this research dissertation was intended to characterize the effects of inertia, isolated from gravity, on the dispersion of solid particles in a turbulent air flow. The experiment consisted of releasing particles of various sizes in an enclosed box of fan- generated, homogenous, isotropic, and stationary turbulent airflow and examining the particle behavior in a microgravity environment. The turbulence box was characterized in ground-based experiments using laser Doppler velocimetry techniques. Microgravity was established by free-floating the experiment apparatus during the parabolic trajectory of NASA's KC-135 reduced gravity aircraft. The microgravity generally lasted about 20 seconds, with about fifty parabolas per flight and one flight per day over a testing period of four days. To cover a broad range of flow regimes of interest, particles with Stokes numbers (St) of 1 to 300 were released in the turbulence box. The three- dimensional measurements of particle motion were made using a three-camera stereo imaging system with a particle-tracking algorithm. Digital photogrammetric techniques were used to determine the particle locations in three-dimensional space from the calibrated camera images. The epipolar geometry constraint was used to identify matching particles from the three different views and a direct spatial intersection scheme determined the coordinates of particles in three-dimensional space. Using velocity and acceleration constraints, particles in a sequence of frames were matched resulting in particle tracks and dispersion measurements. The goal was to compare the dispersion of different Stokes number particles in zero gravity and decouple the effects of inertia and gravity on the dispersion. Results show that higher inertia particles disperse less in zero gravity, in agreement with current models. Particles with St ~ 200

  7. Progress in urban dispersion studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, E.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2006-01-01

    The present Study addresses recent achievements in better representation Of the urban area structure in meteorology and dispersion parameterisations. The setup and Main Outcome of several recent dispersion experiments in Urban areas and their use in model validation are discussed. The maximum con...

  8. Nest-mediated seed dispersal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert J. Warren; Jason P. Love; Mark A. Bradford

    2017-01-01

    Many plant seeds travel on the wind and through animal ingestion or adhesion; however, an overlooked dispersal mode may lurk within those dispersal modes. Viable seeds may remain attached or embedded within materials birds gather for nest building. Our objective was to determine if birds inadvertently transport seeds when they forage for plant materials to...

  9. Definition of global dispersion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naff, R.L.

    1983-10-01

    For estimation of a global longitudinal dispersivity at the Gorleben site, data available primarily consist of suites of geophysical logs from wells penetrating the Quaternary aquifer. A length scale for the principle aquifer at Gorleben is to be found. Samples are to be taken separately to estimate the variance in hydraulic conductivity (Taylor Analysis, Fickian dispersion process). (DG)

  10. Absorption and dispersion of ultrasonic waves

    CERN Document Server

    Herzfeld, Karl F; Massey, H S W; Brueckner, Keith A

    1959-01-01

    Absorption and Dispersion of Ultrasonic Waves focuses on the influence of ultrasonics on molecular processes in liquids and gases, including hydrodynamics, energy exchange, and chemical reactions. The book first offers information on the Stokes-Navier equations of hydrodynamics, as well as equations of motion, viscosity, formal introduction of volume viscosity, and linearized wave equation for a nonviscous fluid. The manuscript then ponders on energy exchange between internal and external degrees of freedom as relaxation phenomenon; effect of slow energy exchange on sound propagation; differe

  11. Anomalous transport in disordered fracture networks: Spatial Markov model for dispersion with variable injection modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Peter K.; Dentz, Marco; Le Borgne, Tanguy; Lee, Seunghak; Juanes, Ruben

    2017-08-01

    We investigate tracer transport on random discrete fracture networks that are characterized by the statistics of the fracture geometry and hydraulic conductivity. While it is well known that tracer transport through fractured media can be anomalous and particle injection modes can have major impact on dispersion, the incorporation of injection modes into effective transport modeling has remained an open issue. The fundamental reason behind this challenge is that-even if the Eulerian fluid velocity is steady-the Lagrangian velocity distribution experienced by tracer particles evolves with time from its initial distribution, which is dictated by the injection mode, to a stationary velocity distribution. We quantify this evolution by a Markov model for particle velocities that are equidistantly sampled along trajectories. This stochastic approach allows for the systematic incorporation of the initial velocity distribution and quantifies the interplay between velocity distribution and spatial and temporal correlation. The proposed spatial Markov model is characterized by the initial velocity distribution, which is determined by the particle injection mode, the stationary Lagrangian velocity distribution, which is derived from the Eulerian velocity distribution, and the spatial velocity correlation length, which is related to the characteristic fracture length. This effective model leads to a time-domain random walk for the evolution of particle positions and velocities, whose joint distribution follows a Boltzmann equation. Finally, we demonstrate that the proposed model can successfully predict anomalous transport through discrete fracture networks with different levels of heterogeneity and arbitrary tracer injection modes.

  12. Comment on "Design of a broadband highly dispersive pure silica photonic crystal fiber"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Niels Asger

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper, Subbaraman et al. [Appl. Opt. 46, 3263–3268 (2007)] reported a theoretical and numerical study of highly dispersive pure silica photonic crystal fiber supporting group-velocity dispersion exceeding −2 × 104 ps=nm=km. This Comment argues that the authors consider only one of two...... sides of the same coin by not taking the corresponding beating length into account....

  13. Relationships of dispersive mass transport and stochastic convective flow through hydrologic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simmons, C.S.

    1981-01-01

    Uncertainty in water flow velocity appears to be a major factor in determining the magnitude of contaminant dispersion expected in a ground water system. This report discusses some concepts and mathematical methods relating dispersive contaminant transport to stochastic aspects of ground water flow. The theory developed should not be construed as absolutely rigorous mathematics, but is presented with the intention of clarifying the physical concepts

  14. A First Layered Crustal Velocity Model for the Western Solomon Islands: Inversion of Measured Group Velocity of Surface Waves using Ambient Noise Cross-Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ku, C. S.; Kuo, Y. T.; Chao, W. A.; You, S. H.; Huang, B. S.; Chen, Y. G.; Taylor, F. W.; Yih-Min, W.

    2017-12-01

    Two earthquakes, MW 8.1 in 2007 and MW 7.1 in 2010, hit the Western Province of Solomon Islands and caused extensive damage, but motivated us to set up the first seismic network in this area. During the first phase, eight broadband seismic stations (BBS) were installed around the rupture zone of 2007 earthquake. With one-year seismic records, we cross-correlated the vertical component of ambient noise recorded in our BBS and calculated Rayleigh-wave group velocity dispersion curves on inter-station paths. The genetic algorithm to invert one-dimensional crustal velocity model is applied by fitting the averaged dispersion curves. The one-dimensional crustal velocity model is constituted by two layers and one half-space, representing the upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle respectively. The resulted thickness values of the upper and lower crust are 6.4 and 14.2 km, respectively. Shear-wave velocities (VS) of the upper crust, lower crust, and uppermost mantle are 2.53, 3.57 and 4.23 km/s with the VP/VS ratios of 1.737, 1.742 and 1.759, respectively. This first layered crustal velocity model can be used as a preliminary reference to further study seismic sources such as earthquake activity and tectonic tremor.

  15. Velocity distribution of fragments of catastrophic impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasuhiko; Kato, Manabu; Mizutani, Hitoshi

    1992-01-01

    Three dimensional velocities of fragments produced by laboratory impact experiments were measured for basalts and pyrophyllites. The velocity distribution of fragments obtained shows that the velocity range of the major fragments is rather narrow, at most within a factor of 3 and that no clear dependence of velocity on the fragment mass is observed. The NonDimensional Impact Stress (NDIS) defined by Mizutani et al. (1990) is found to be an appropriate scaling parameter to describe the overall fragment velocity as well as the antipodal velocity.

  16. Vacuum field energy and spontaneous emission in anomalously dispersive cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bradshaw, Douglas H.; Di Rosa, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    Anomalously dispersive cavities, particularly white-light cavities, may have larger bandwidth to finesse ratios than their normally dispersive counterparts. Partly for this reason, they have been proposed for use in laser interferometer gravitational-wave observatory (LIGO)-like gravity-wave detectors and in ring-laser gyroscopes. In this paper we analyze the quantum noise associated with anomalously dispersive cavity modes. The vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode is proportional to the cavity-averaged group velocity of that mode. For anomalously dispersive cavities with group index values between 1 and 0, this means that the total vacuum field energy associated with a particular cavity mode must exceed (ℎ/2π)ω/2. For white-light cavities in particular, the group index approaches zero and the vacuum field energy of a particular spatial mode may be significantly enhanced. We predict enhanced spontaneous emission rates into anomalously dispersive cavity modes and broadened laser linewidths when the linewidth of intracavity emitters is broader than the cavity linewidth.

  17. Lateral dispersion coefficients as functions of averaging time

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheih, C.M.

    1980-01-01

    Plume dispersion coefficients are discussed in terms of single-particle and relative diffusion, and are investigated as functions of averaging time. To demonstrate the effects of averaging time on the relative importance of various dispersion processes, and observed lateral wind velocity spectrum is used to compute the lateral dispersion coefficients of total, single-particle and relative diffusion for various averaging times and plume travel times. The results indicate that for a 1 h averaging time the dispersion coefficient of a plume can be approximated by single-particle diffusion alone for travel times <250 s and by relative diffusion for longer travel times. Furthermore, it is shown that the power-law formula suggested by Turner for relating pollutant concentrations for other averaging times to the corresponding 15 min average is applicable to the present example only when the averaging time is less than 200 s and the tral time smaller than about 300 s. Since the turbulence spectrum used in the analysis is an observed one, it is hoped that the results could represent many conditions encountered in the atmosphere. However, as the results depend on the form of turbulence spectrum, the calculations are not for deriving a set of specific criteria but for demonstrating the need in discriminating various processes in studies of plume dispersion

  18. Relation between radius and expansion velocity in planetary nebulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Y.H.; Kwitter, K.B.; Kaler, J.B.

    1984-01-01

    The expansion velocity-radius (R-V) relation for planetary nebulae is examined using the existing measurements of expansion velocities and recent calculations of radii. It is found that some of the previously alleged R-V relations for PN are not convincingly established. The scatter in the R-V plots may be due largely to stratification of ions in individual nebulae and to heterogeneity in the planetary nebula population. In addition, from new echelle/CCD observations of planetary nebulae, it is found that spatial information is essential in deriving the internal kinematic properties. Future investigations of R-V relations should be pursued separately for groups of planetaries with similar physical properties, and they should employ observations of appropriate low excitation lines in order to measure the expansion velocity at the surface of the nebula. 26 references

  19. Electron velocity and momentum density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkins, G.A.

    1978-01-01

    A null 4-vector eta + sigma/sub μ/based on Dirac's relativistic electron equation, is shown explicitly for a plane wave and various Coulomb states. This 4-vector constitutes a mechanical ''model'' for the electron in those staes, and expresses the important spinor quantities represented conventionally by n, f, g, m, j, kappa, l, and s. The model for a plane wave agrees precisely with the relation between velocity and phase gradient customarily used in quantum theory, but the models for Coulomb states contradict that relation

  20. ALADIN: an atmospheric laser Doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, R.; Ghibaudo, JB.; Labandibar, JY.; Willetts, D.; Vaughan, M.; Pearson, G.; Harris, M.; Flamant, P. H.; Salamitou, P.; Dabas, A.; Charasse, R.; Midavaine, T.; Royer, M.; Heimel, H.

    2018-04-01

    This paper, "ALADIN: an atmospheric laser Doppler wind lidar instrument for wind velocity measurements from space," was presented as part of International Conference on Space Optics—ICSO 1997, held in Toulouse, France.

  1. A radial velocity survey of the Carina Nebula's O-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Smith, Nathan

    2018-03-01

    We have obtained multi-epoch observations of 31 O-type stars in the Carina Nebula using the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope. We measure their radial velocities to 1-2 km s-1 precision and present new or updated orbital solutions for the binary systems HD 92607, HD 93576, HDE 303312, and HDE 305536. We also compile radial velocities from the literature for 32 additional O-type and evolved massive stars in the region. The combined data set shows a mean heliocentric radial velocity of 0.6 km s-1. We calculate a velocity dispersion of ≤9.1 km s-1, consistent with an unbound, substructured OB association. The Tr 14 cluster shows a marginally significant 5 km s-1 radial velocity offset from its neighbor Tr 16, but there are otherwise no correlations between stellar position and velocity. The O-type stars in Cr 228 and the South Pillars region have a lower velocity dispersion than the region as a whole, supporting a model of distributed massive-star formation rather than migration from the central clusters. We compare our stellar velocities to the Carina Nebula's molecular gas and find that Tr 14 shows a close kinematic association with the Northern Cloud. In contrast, Tr 16 has accelerated the Southern Cloud by 10-15 km s-1, possibly triggering further massive-star formation. The expansion of the surrounding H II region is not symmetric about the O-type stars in radial velocity space, indicating that the ionized gas is constrained by denser material on the far side.

  2. A radial velocity survey of the Carina Nebula's O-type stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiminki, Megan M.; Smith, Nathan

    2018-06-01

    We have obtained multi-epoch observations of 31 O-type stars in the Carina Nebula using the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO/SMARTS 1.5-m telescope. We measure their radial velocities to 1-2 km s-1 precision and present new or updated orbital solutions for the binary systems HD 92607, HD 93576, HDE 303312, and HDE 305536. We also compile radial velocities from the literature for 32 additional O-type and evolved massive stars in the region. The combined data set shows a mean heliocentric radial velocity of 0.6 km s-1. We calculate a velocity dispersion of ≤9.1 km s-1, consistent with an unbound, substructured OB association. The Tr 14 cluster shows a marginally significant 5 km s-1 radial velocity offset from its neighbour Tr 16, but there are otherwise no correlations between stellar position and velocity. The O-type stars in Cr 228 and the South Pillars region have a lower velocity dispersion than the region as a whole, supporting a model of distributed massive star formation rather than migration from the central clusters. We compare our stellar velocities to the Carina Nebula's molecular gas and find that Tr 14 shows a close kinematic association with the Northern Cloud. In contrast, Tr 16 has accelerated the Southern Cloud by 10-15 km s-1, possibly triggering further massive star formation. The expansion of the surrounding H II region is not symmetric about the O-type stars in radial velocity space, indicating that the ionized gas is constrained by denser material on the far side.

  3. CONCRETE BASED ON MODIFIED DISPERSE CEMENT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Rudenko

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article considers definition of the bond types occurring in a modified cement concrete matrix, and the evaluation of the quality of these links in a non-uniform material to determine the geometrical and physical relationships between the structure and the cement matrix modifiers. Methodology. To achieve this purpose the studies covered the microstructure of dispersed modified concrete cement matrix, the structure formation mechanism of the modified cement concrete system of natural hardening; as well as identification of the methods of sound concrete strength assessment. Findings. The author proposed a model of the spatial structure of the concrete cement matrix, modified by particulate reinforcement crystal hydrates. The initial object of study is a set of volume elements (cells of the cement matrix and the system of the spatial distribution of reinforcing crystallohydrates in these volume elements. It is found that the most dangerous defects such as cracks in the concrete volume during hardening are formed as a result of internal stresses, mainly in the zone of cement matrix-filler contact or in the area bordering with the largest pores of the concrete. Originality. The result of the study is the defined mechanism of the process of formation of the initial strength and stiffness of the modified cement matrix due to the rapid growth of crystallohydrates in the space among the dispersed reinforcing modifier particles. Since the lack of space prevents from the free growth of crystals, the latter cross-penetrate, forming a dense structure, which contributes to the growth of strength. Practical value. Dispersed modifying cement matrix provides a durable concrete for special purposes with the design performance characteristics. The developed technology of dispersed cement system modification, the defined features of its structure formation mechanism and the use of congruence principle for the complex of technological impacts of physical

  4. A Revised Velocity for the Globular Cluster GC-98 in the Ultra Diffuse Galaxy NGC 1052-DF2

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dokkum, Pieter; Cohen, Yotam; Danieli, Shany; Romanowsky, Aaron; Abraham, Roberto; Brodie, Jean; Conroy, Charlie; Kruijssen, J. M. Diederik; Lokhorst, Deborah; Merritt, Allison; Mowla, Lamiya; Zhang, Jielai

    2018-06-01

    We recently published velocity measurements of luminous globular clusters in the galaxy NGC1052-DF2, concluding that it lies far off the canonical stellar mass - halo mass relation. Here we present a revised velocity for one of the globular clusters, GC-98, and a revised velocity dispersion measurement for the galaxy. We find that the intrinsic dispersion $\\sigma=5.6^{+5.2}_{-3.8}$ km/s using Approximate Bayesian Computation, or $\\sigma=7.8^{+5.2}_{-2.2}$ km/s using the likelihood. The expected dispersion from the stars alone is ~7 km/s. Responding to a request from the Editors of ApJ Letters and RNAAS, we also briefly comment on the recent analysis of our measurements by Martin et al. (2018).

  5. Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Komech, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    A simplified, yet rigorous treatment of scattering theory methods and their applications Dispersion Decay and Scattering Theory provides thorough, easy-to-understand guidance on the application of scattering theory methods to modern problems in mathematics, quantum physics, and mathematical physics. Introducing spectral methods with applications to dispersion time-decay and scattering theory, this book presents, for the first time, the Agmon-Jensen-Kato spectral theory for the Schr?dinger equation, extending the theory to the Klein-Gordon equation. The dispersion decay plays a crucial role i

  6. Instrument for measuring flow velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffo, J.

    1977-01-01

    The design described here means to produce a 'more satisfying instrument with less cost' than comparable instruments known up to now. Instead of one single turbine rotor, two similar ones but with opposite blade inclination and sense of rotation are to be used. A cylindrical measuring body is carrying in its axis two bearing blocks whose shape is offering little flow resistance. On the shaft, supported by them, the two rotors run in opposite direction a relatively small axial distance apart. The speed of each rotor is picked up as pulse recurrence frequency by a transmitter and fed to an electronic measuring unit. Measuring errors as they are caused for single rotors by turbulent flow, profile distortion of the velocity, or viscous flow are to be eliminated by means of the contrarotating turbines and the subsequently added electronic unit, because in these cases the adulterating increase of the angular velocity of one rotor is compensated by a corresponding deceleration of the other rotor. The mean value then indicated by the electronic unit has high accurancy of measurement. (RW) [de

  7. Gas-solute dispersivity ratio in granular porous media as related to particle size distribution and particle shape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pugliese, Lorenzo; Poulsen, Tjalfe; Straface, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of solute dispersion in porous media is generally much more time consuming than gas dispersion measurements performed under equivalent conditions. Significant time savings may therefore, be achieved if solute dispersion coefficients can be estimated based on measured gas dispersion...... data. This paper evaluates the possibility for estimating solute dispersion based on gas dispersion measurements. Breakthrough measurements were carried out at different fluid velocities (covering the same range in Reynolds number), using O2 and NaCl as gas and solute tracers, respectively. Three...... different, granular porous materials were used: (1) crushed granite (very angular particles), (2) gravel (particles of intermediate roundness) and (3) Leca® (almost spherical particles). For each material, 21 different particle size fractions were used. Gas and solute dispersion coefficients were determined...

  8. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  9. Combined effect of magnetic field and thermal dispersion on a non-darcy mixed convection

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2011-05-21

    This paper is devoted to investigate the influences of thermal dispersion and magnetic field on a hot semi-infinite vertical porous plate embedded in a saturated Darcy-Forchheimer-Brinkman porous medium. The coefficient of thermal diffusivity has been assumed to be the sum of the molecular diffusivity and the dynamic diffusivity due to mechanical dispersion. The effects of transverse magnetic field parameter (Hartmann number Ha), Reynolds number Re (different velocities), Prandtl number Pr (different types of fluids) and dispersion parameter on the wall shear stress and the heat transfer rate are discussed. © 2011 Science Press, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, CAS and Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  10. Optical tsunamis: shoaling of shallow water rogue waves in nonlinear fibers with normal dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wabnitz, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    In analogy with ocean waves running up towards the beach, shoaling of pre-chirped optical pulses may occur in the normal group-velocity dispersion regime of optical fibers. We present exact Riemann wave solutions of the optical shallow water equations and show that they agree remarkably well with the numerical solutions of the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, at least up to the point where a vertical pulse front develops. We also reveal that extreme wave events or optical tsunamis may be generated in dispersion tapered fibers in the presence of higher-order dispersion. (paper)

  11. Effect of water content on dispersion of transferred solute in unsaturated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latrille, C. [CEA Saclay, DEN/DANS/DPC/SECR/L3MR, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2013-07-01

    Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content impacts directly on porous solute transfer. Depending on the spatial distribution of water content, the flow pathway is more complex than in water saturated media. Dispersivity is consequently dependent on water content. Non-reactive tracer experiments performed using unsaturated sand columns confirm the dependence of dispersivity with pore velocity; moreover, a power law relationship between dispersivity and water content is evidenced. (authors)

  12. Fuel oil and dispersant toxicity to the Antarctic sea urchin (Sterechinus neumayeri).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Frances J; King, Catherine K; Reichelt-Brushett, Amanda J; Harrison, Peter L

    2017-06-01

    The risk of a major marine fuel spill in Antarctic waters is increasing, yet there are currently no standard or suitable response methods under extreme Antarctic conditions. Fuel dispersants may present a possible solution; however, little data exist on the toxicity of dispersants or fuels to Antarctic species, thereby preventing informed management decisions. Larval development toxicity tests using 3 life history stages of the Antarctic sea urchin (Sterechinus neumayeri) were completed to assess the toxicity of physically dispersed, chemically dispersed, and dispersant-only water-accommodated fractions (WAFs) of an intermediate fuel oil (IFO 180, BP) and the chemical dispersant Slickgone NS (Dasic International). Despite much lower total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations, physically dispersed fuels contained higher proportions of low-to-intermediate weight carbon compounds and were generally at least an order of magnitude more toxic than chemically dispersed fuels. Based on concentrations that caused 50% abnormality (EC50) values, the embryonic unhatched blastula life stage was the least affected by fuels and dispersants, whereas the larval 4-armed pluteus stage was the most sensitive. The present study is the first to investigate the possible implications of the use of fuel dispersants for fuel spill response in Antarctica. The results indicate that the use of a fuel dispersant did not increase the hydrocarbon toxicity of IFO 180 to the early life stages of Antarctic sea urchins, relative to physical dispersal. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:1563-1571. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  13. What Causes Animals to Disperse?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    research involving animal behaviour and ecology for a very long time. ... shall examine two different types of dispersals that occur, try to understand the ... finally look at some practical methods through which the phe- ..... further qualitative or.

  14. Application of Vectors to Relative Velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tin-Lam, Toh

    2004-01-01

    The topic 'relative velocity' has recently been introduced into the Cambridge Ordinary Level Additional Mathematics syllabus under the application of Vectors. In this note, the results of relative velocity and the 'reduction to rest' technique of teaching relative velocity are derived mathematically from vector algebra, in the hope of providing…

  15. Questions Students Ask: About Terminal Velocity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Earl R.; Nelson, Jim

    1984-01-01

    If a ball were given an initial velocity in excess of its terminal velocity, would the upward force of air resistance (a function of velocity) be greater than the downward force of gravity and thus push the ball back upwards? An answer to this question is provided. (JN)

  16. Balance velocities of the Greenland ice sheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joughin, I.; Fahnestock, M.; Ekholm, Simon

    1997-01-01

    We present a map of balance velocities for the Greenland ice sheet. The resolution of the underlying DEM, which was derived primarily from radar altimetery data, yields far greater detail than earlier balance velocity estimates for Greenland. The velocity contours reveal in striking detail......, the balance map is useful for ice-sheet modelling, mass balance studies, and field planning....

  17. A new approach for modeling dry deposition velocity of particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardina, M.; Buffa, P.

    2018-05-01

    The dry deposition process is recognized as an important pathway among the various removal processes of pollutants in the atmosphere. In this field, there are several models reported in the literature useful to predict the dry deposition velocity of particles of different diameters but many of them are not capable of representing dry deposition phenomena for several categories of pollutants and deposition surfaces. Moreover, their applications is valid for specific conditions and if the data in that application meet all of the assumptions required of the data used to define the model. In this paper a new dry deposition velocity model based on an electrical analogy schema is proposed to overcome the above issues. The dry deposition velocity is evaluated by assuming that the resistances that affect the particle flux in the Quasi-Laminar Sub-layers can be combined to take into account local features of the mutual influence of inertial impact processes and the turbulent one. Comparisons with the experimental data from literature indicate that the proposed model allows to capture with good agreement the main dry deposition phenomena for the examined environmental conditions and deposition surfaces to be determined. The proposed approach could be easily implemented within atmospheric dispersion modeling codes and efficiently addressing different deposition surfaces for several particle pollution.

  18. Onset of entrainment and degree of dispersion in dual continuous horizontal oil-water flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Wahaibi, Talal [Department of Petroleum and Chemical Engineering, Sultan Qaboos University, P.O. Box 33, Al-Khoud, P.C. 123 (Oman); Angeli, Panagiota [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-15

    The transition from stratified to dual continuous oil-water flow (where each phase retains its continuity but there is dispersion of one phase into the other) as well as the dispersed phase fractions in the layers of the dual continuous pattern, were studied experimentally. Transition to this pattern from stratified flow occurs when drops of one phase appear into the other (onset of entrainment). The studies were carried out in a 38 mm ID horizontal stainless steel test section using two different inlet geometries, a T- and a Y-junction. The patterns were visualized through a transparent acrylic section located at 7 m from the inlet using a high speed video camera. Phase distribution measurements in a pipe cross section were obtained just before the acrylic section with a local impedance probe and the results were used to calculate the volume fraction of each phase entrained into the other. The onset of entrainment was found to occur at lower superficial water velocities as the oil superficial velocities increased. However, the inlet geometry did not affect significantly the transition line. During dual continuous flow, the dispersion of one phase into the opposite was found to extend further away from the interface with increasing water superficial velocity for a certain oil superficial velocity. An increase in the superficial water velocity increased the entrained fraction of water in oil (E{sub w/o}) but there was no trend with the oil velocity. Similarly, an increase in the superficial oil velocity increased the fraction of oil drops in water (E{sub o/w}) but the water velocity had no clear effect. The entrainment fractions were affected by the inlet geometry, with the T-inlet resulting in higher entrainment than the Y-inlet, perhaps because of the increased mixing induced by the T-inlet. The difference between the two inlets increased as the oil and water velocities increased. (author)

  19. Birefringent dispersive FDTD subgridding scheme

    OpenAIRE

    De Deckere, B; Van Londersele, Arne; De Zutter, Daniël; Vande Ginste, Dries

    2016-01-01

    A novel 2D finite difference time domain (FDTD) subgridding method is proposed, only subject to the Courant limit of the coarse grid. By making mu or epsilon inside the subgrid dispersive, unconditional stability is induced at the cost of a sparse, implicit set of update equations. By only adding dispersion along preferential directions, it is possible to dramatically reduce the rank of the matrix equation that needs to be solved.

  20. Dispersion engineering for integrated nanophotonics

    CERN Document Server

    Vanbésien, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    This book shows how dispersion engineering in two dimensional dielectric photonic crystals can provide new effects for the precise control of light propagation for integrated nanophotonics.Dispersion engineering in regular and graded photonic crystals to promote anomalous refraction effects is studied from the concepts to experimental demonstration via nanofabrication considerations. Self collimation, ultra and negative refraction, second harmonic generation, mirage and invisibility effects which lead to an unprecedented control of light propagation at the (sub-)wavelength scale for the

  1. Dispersion coefficients for coastal regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacRae, B.L.; Kaleel, R.J.; Shearer, D.L.

    1983-03-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has undertaken an extensive atmospheric dispersion research and measurement program from which it is intended will emerge improved predictive techniques for employment in licensing decisions and for emergency planning and response. Through this program the NRC has conducted field measurement programs over a wide range of geographic and topographic locations, and are using the acquired tracer and meteorological measurements to evaluate existing dispersion models and prediction techniques, and to develop new techniques when necessary

  2. Comparison of turbulent particle dispersion models in turbulent shear flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Laín

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available This work compares the performance of two Lagrangian turbulent particle dispersion models: the standard model (e.g., that presented in Sommerfeld et al. (1993, in which the fluctuating fluid velocity experienced by the particle is composed of two components, one correlated with the previous time step and a second one randomly sampled from a Wiener process, and the model proposed by Minier and Peirano (2001, which is based on the PDF approach and performs closure at the level of acceleration of the fluid experienced by the particle. Formulation of a Langevin equation model for the increments of fluid velocity seen by the particle allows capturing some underlying physics of particle dispersion in general turbulent flows while keeping the mathematical manipulation of the stochastic model simple, thereby avoiding some pitfalls and simplifying the derivation of macroscopic relations. The performance of both dispersion models is tested in the configurations of grid-generated turbulence (Wells and Stock (1983 experiments, simple shear flow (Hyland et al., 1999 and confined axisymmetric jet flow laden with solids (Hishida and Maeda (1987 experiments.

  3. Phonon dispersion evolution in uniaxially strained aluminum crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Misra, Anil; Aryal, Sitaram; Ouyang, Lizhi

    2018-04-01

    The influence of loading upon the phonon dispersion of crystalline materials could be highly nonlinear with certain particular trends that depend upon the loading path. In this paper, we have calculated the influence of [100] uniaxial strain on the phonon dispersion and group velocities in fcc aluminum using second moments of position obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulation at 300 K. In contrast to nonlinear monotonic variation of both longitudinal and transverse phonon frequencies along the Δ , Λ and Σ lines of the first Brillouin zone under tension, transverse phonon branches along the Λ line show inflection at specific wavevectors when the compressive strain exceeds 5%. Further, the longitudinal group velocities along the high-symmetry Δ line vary non-monotonically with strain, reaching a minimum at 5% compressive strain. Throughout the strain range studied, the equilibrium positions of atoms displace in an affine manner preserving certain static structural symmetry. We attribute the anomalies in the phonon dispersion to the non-affine evolution of second moments of atomic position, and the associated plateauing of force constants under the applied strain path.

  4. Impact of local diffusion on macroscopic dispersion in three-dimensional porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dartois, Arthur; Beaudoin, Anthony; Huberson, Serge

    2018-02-01

    While macroscopic longitudinal and transverse dispersion in three-dimensional porous media has been simulated previously mostly under purely advective conditions, the impact of diffusion on macroscopic dispersion in 3D remains an open question. Furthermore, both in 2D and 3D, recurring difficulties have been encountered due to computer limitation or analytical approximation. In this work, we use the Lagrangian velocity covariance function and the temporal derivative of second-order moments to study the influence of diffusion on dispersion in highly heterogeneous 2D and 3D porous media. The first approach characterizes the correlation between the values of Eulerian velocity components sampled by particles undergoing diffusion at two times. The second approach allows the estimation of dispersion coefficients and the analysis of their behaviours as functions of diffusion. These two approaches allowed us to reach new results. The influence of diffusion on dispersion seems to be globally similar between highly heterogeneous 2D and 3D porous media. Diffusion induces a decrease in the dispersion in the direction parallel to the flow direction and an increase in the dispersion in the direction perpendicular to the flow direction. However, the amplification of these two effects with the permeability variance is clearly different between 2D and 3D. For the direction parallel to the flow direction, the amplification is more important in 3D than in 2D. It is reversed in the direction perpendicular to the flow direction.

  5. Critical velocities in He II for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baehr, M.L.

    1984-01-01

    Experiments were performed to measure the critical velocity in pure superflow and compare to the theoretical prediction; to measure the first critical velocity for independently varied superfluid and normal fluid velocities; and to investigate the propagation of the second critical velocity from the thermal counterflow line through the V/sub n/,-V/sub s/ quadrant. The experimental apparatus employed a thermal counterflow heater to adjust the normal fluid velocity, a fountain pump to vary the superfluid velocity, and a level sensing capacitor to measure the superfluid velocity. The results of the pure superfluid critical velocity measurements indicate that this velocity is temperature independent contrary to Schwarz's theory. It was found that the first critical velocity for independently varied V/sub n/ and V/sub s/ could be described by a linear function of V/sub n/ and was otherwise temperature independent. It was found that the second critical velocity could only be distinguished near the thermal counterflow line

  6. Asymmetric Velocity Distributions from Halo Density Profiles in the Eddington Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vergados, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    We show how to obtain the energy distribution f(E) in our vicinity starting from WIMP density profiles in a self-consistent way by employing the Eddington approach and adding reasonable angular momentum dependent terms in the expression of the energy. We then show how we can obtain the velocity dispersions and the asymmetry parameter β in terms of the parameters describing the angular momentum dependence. From this expression, for f(E), we proceed to construct an axially symmetric WIMP a velocity distribution, which, for a gravitationally bound system, automatically has a velocity upper bound and is characterized by the same asymmetriy β. This approach is tested and clarified by constructing analytic expressions in a simple model, with adequate structure. We then show how such velocity distributions can be used in determining the event rates, including modulation, in both the standard and the directional WIMP searches.

  7. Quenching of Particle-Gas Combustible Mixtures Using Electric Particulate Suspension (EPS) and Dispersion Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colver, Gerald M.; Goroshin, Samuel; Lee, John H. S.

    2001-01-01

    A cooperative study is being carried out between Iowa State University and McGill University. The new study concerns wall and particle quenching effects in particle-gas mixtures. The primary objective is to measure and interpret flame quenching distances, flammability limits, and burning velocities in particulate suspensions. A secondary objective is to measure particle slip velocities and particle velocity distribution as these influence flame propagation. Two suspension techniques will be utilized and compared: (1) electric particle suspension/EPS; and (2) flow dispersion. Microgravity tests will permit testing of larger particles and higher and more uniform dust concentrations than is possible in normal gravity.

  8. On the K-term and dispersion ratios of semi-regular variables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aslan, Z.

    1981-01-01

    Optical velocities of semi-regular (SR) and irregular (Lb) variables are analysed for a K-term. There is evidence for a dependence upon stellar period. Absorption lines in shorter period non-emission SR variables are blue-shifted relative to the centre-of-mass velocity by about 6 +- 3 km s -1 . Emission-line SR variables give a non-negative absorption K-term and Lb variables give no K-terms other than zero. Comparison is made with the K-terms implied by the OH velocity pattern in long-period variables. Dispersion ratios are also calculated. (author)

  9. Trajectory and Relative Dispersion Case Studies and Statistics from the Green River Mesoscale Deformation, Dispersion, and Dissipation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemann, Brand Lee

    A major field program to study beta-mesoscale transport and dispersion over complex mountainous terrain was conducted during 1969 with the cooperation of three government agencies at the White Sands Missile Range in central Utah. The purpose of the program was to measure simultaneously on a large number of days the synoptic and mesoscale wind fields, the relative dispersion between pairs of particle trajectories and the rate of small scale turbulence dissipation. The field program included measurements during more than 60 days in the months of March, June, and November. The large quantity of data generated from this program has been processed and analyzed to provide case studies and statistics to evaluate and refine Lagrangian variable trajectory models. The case studies selected to illustrate the complexities of mesoscale transport and dispersion over complex terrain include those with terrain blocking, lee waves, and stagnation, as well as those with large vertical wind shears and horizontal wind field deformation. The statistics of relative particle dispersion were computed and compared to the classical theories of Richardson and Batchelor and the more recent theories of Lin and Kao among others. The relative particle dispersion was generally found to increase with travel time in the alongwind and crosswind directions, but in a more oscillatory than sustained or even accelerated manner as predicted by most theories, unless substantial wind shears or finite vertical separations between particles were present. The relative particle dispersion in the vertical was generally found to be small and bounded even when substantial vertical motions due to lee waves were present because of the limiting effect of stable temperature stratification. The data show that velocity shears have a more significant effect than turbulence on relative particle dispersion and that sufficient turbulence may not always be present above the planetary boundary layer for "wind direction shear

  10. A new methodology for determining dispersion coefficient using ordinary and partial differential transport equations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung Hwa; Lee, Seungwon; Ham, Young Sik; Hwang, Jin Hwan; Cha, Sung Min; Park, Yongeun; Kim, Joon Ha

    2009-01-01

    The present study proposes a methodology for determining the effective dispersion coefficient based on the field measurements performed in Gwangju (GJ) Creek in South Korea which is environmentally degraded by the artificial interferences such as weirs and culverts. Many previous works determining the dispersion coefficient were limited in application due to the complexity and artificial interferences in natural stream. Therefore, the sequential combination of N-Tank-In-Series (NTIS) model and Advection-Dispersion-Reaction (ADR) model was proposed for evaluating dispersion process in complex stream channel in this study. The series of water quality data were intensively monitored in the field to determine the effective dispersion coefficient of E. coli in rainy day. As a result, the suggested methodology reasonably estimates the dispersion coefficient for GJ Creek with 1.25 m(2)/s. Also, the sequential combined method provided Number of tank-Velocity-Dispersion coefficient (NVD) curves for convenient evaluation of dispersion coefficient of other rivers or streams. Comparing the previous studies, the present methodology is quite general and simple for determining the effective dispersion coefficients which are applicable for other rivers and streams.

  11. Small seed size increases the potential for dispersal of wetland plants by ducks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soons, M.B.; van der Vlugt, C.; van Lith, B.; Heil, G.W.; Klaassen, M.R.J.

    2008-01-01

    1. Long-distance dispersal (LDD) is important in plants of dynamic and ephemeral habitats. For plants of dynamic wetland habitats, waterfowl are generally considered to be important LDD vectors. However, in comparison to the internal (endozoochorous) dispersal of terrestrial plants by birds,

  12. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yeon Soo [Argonne National Laboratory, New York (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat.

  13. Performance Evaluation of Metallic Dispersion Fuel for Advanced Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Ho Jin; Park, Jong Man; Kim, Chang Kyu; Chae, Hee Taek; Song, Kee Chan; Kim, Yeon Soo

    2007-01-01

    Uranium alloys with a high uranium density has been developed for high power research reactor fuel using low-enriched uranium (LEU). U-Mo alloys have been developed as candidate fuel material because of excellent irradiation behavior. Irradiation behavior of U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel has been investigated to develop high performance research reactor fuel as RERTR international research program. While plate-type and rod-type dispersion fuel elements are used for research reactors, HANARO uses rod-type dispersion fuel elements. PLATE code is developed by Argonne National Laboratory for the performance evaluation of plate-type dispersion fuel, but there is no counterpart for rod-type dispersion fuel. Especially, thermal conductivity of fuel meat decreases during the irradiation mainly because of interaction layer formation at the interface between the U-Mo fuel particle and Al matrix. The thermal conductivity of the interaction layer is not as high as the Al matrix. The growth of interaction layer is interactively affected by the temperature of fuel because it is associated with a diffusion reaction which is a thermally activated process. It is difficult to estimate the temperature profile during irradiation test due to the interdependency of fuel temperature and thermal conductivity changed by interaction layer growth. In this study, fuel performance of rod-type U-Mo/Al dispersion fuels during irradiation tests were estimated by considering the effect of interaction layer growth on the thermal conductivity of fuel meat

  14. Dense gas dispersion in the atmosphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Morten

    1998-09-01

    Dense gas dispersion is characterized by buoyancy induced gravity currents and reduction of the vertical mixing. Liquefied gas releases from industrial accidents are cold because of the heat of evaporation which determines the density for a given concentration and physical properties. The temperature deficit is moderated by the heat flux from the ground, and this convection is an additional source of turbulence which affects the mixing. A simple model as the soil heat flux is used to estimate the ability of the ground to sustain the heat flux during release. The initial enthalpy, release rate, initial entrainment and momentum are discussed for generic source types and the interaction with obstacles is considered. In the MTH project BA experiments source with and without momentum were applied. The continuously released propane gas passed a two-dimensional removable obstacle perpendicular to the wind direction. Ground-level gas concentrations and vertical profiles of concentration, temperature, wind speed and turbulence were measured in front of and behind the obstacle. Ultrasonic anemometers providing fast velocity and concentration signals were mounted at three levels on the masts. The observed turbulence was influenced by the stability and the initial momentum of the jet releases. Additional information were taken from the `Dessert tortoise` ammonia jet releases, from the `Fladis` experiment with transition from dense to passive dispersion, and from the `Thorney Island` continuous releases of isothermal freon mixtures. The heat flux was found to moderate the negative buoyancy in both the propane and ammonia experiments. The heat flux measurements are compared to an estimate by analogy with surface layer theory. (au) 41 tabs., 146 ills., 189 refs.

  15. Comments on the dispersion equation of a turbulent plasma - an inhomogeneous, magnetoactive case

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ag, A.

    1978-03-01

    A weakly turbulent, magnetoactive plasma is considered in an inhomogeneous case with anisotropic temperature distribution. The dispersion relation is established following a method developed by Tsytovich and Nekrasov. The correction coefficients are calculated in the three principal scaling modes: (1) the turbulent frequencies predominate, (2) the cyclotronic velocities of the macroinstabilities predominate, (3) the turbulent frequencies are lower. (D.P.)

  16. Self-focusing of optical pulses in media with normal dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergé, L.; Kuznetsov, E.A.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The self-focusing of ultra short optical pulses in a nonlinear medium with normal (i.e., negative) group-velocity dispersion is investigated. By using a combination of various techniques like virial-type arguments and self-similar transformations, we obtain strong evidence suggesting that a pulse...

  17. A new formulation of the probability density function in random walk models for atmospheric dispersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falk, Anne Katrine Vinther; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    1997-01-01

    In this model for atmospheric dispersion particles are simulated by the Langevin Equation, which is a stochastic differential equation. It uses the probability density function (PDF) of the vertical velocity fluctuations as input. The PDF is constructed as an expansion after Hermite polynomials...

  18. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Velocity and proper motion of OB associations (Melnik+, 2009)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, A. M.; Dambis, A. K.

    2009-11-01

    For every OB-association from the list by Blaha and Humphreys (1989AJ.....98.1598B) we give the mean galactic coordinates l and b, the mean heliocentric distance r, median line-of-sight velocity Vr, the dispersion of line-of-sight velocities dvr, and number of stars with known line-of-sight velocity nvr. The line-of-sight velocities were taken from the catalog by Barbier-Brossat and Figon (1999, Cat. ). We used only the velocities measured with errors of less than 10km/s which corresponds to the quality estimations A, B, and C. We also present median proper motions of OB-associations along l- and b- coordinates, mul and mub. The data obtained for the old reduction (1997, Cat. ) are denoted by the subscript 1, whereas those based on the reduction by van Leewen (2008, Cat. ) are marked by the subscript 2. For each OB association we represent the dispersions of proper motions, dml and dmb, as well as a number of stars nmu with known proper motion. The last column shows the total number of stars with known photometric measurements, Nt, used for determination of the distances for OB-associations. The distances r correspond to the short distance scale for classical Cepheids. They are equal to the distances from the catalog by Blaha and Humphreys (1989AJ.....98.1598B), rBH, multiplied by a factor of 0.8, r=0.8*rBH. (1 data file).

  19. Effects of dispersion on electromagnetic parameters of tape-helix Blumlein pulse forming line of accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Y.; Liu, J.L.; Feng, J.H.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the tape-helix model is introduced in the field of intense electron beam accelerator to analyze the dispersion effects on the electromagnetic parameters of helical Blumlein pulse forming line (PFL). Work band and dispersion relation of the PFL are analyzed, and the normalized coefficients of spatial harmonics are calculated. Dispersion effects on the important electromagnetic parameters of PFL, such as phase velocity, slow-wave coefficient, electric length and pulse duration, are analyzed as the central topic. In the PFL, electromagnetic waves with different frequencies in the work band of PFL have almost the same phase velocity. When de-ionized water, transformer oil and air are used as the PFL filling dielectric, respectively, the pulse duration of the helical Blumlein PFL is calculated as 479.6 ns, 81.1 ns and 53.1 ns in order. Electromagnetic wave simulation and experiments are carried out to demonstrate the theoretical calculations of the electric length and pulse duration which directly describe the phase velocity and dispersion of the PFL. Simulation results prove the theoretical analysis and calculation on pulse duration. Experiment is carried out based on the tape-helix Blumlein PFL and magnetic switch system. Experimental results show that the pulse durations are tested as 460 ns, 79 ns and 49 ns in order when de-ionized water, transformer oil and air are used respectively. Experimental results basically demonstrate the theoretical calculations and the analyses of dispersion. (authors)

  20. Atmospheric dispersion of radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chino, Masamichi

    1988-01-01

    The report describes currently available techniques for predicting the dispersion of accidentally released radioactive materials and techniques for visualization using computer graphics. A simulation study is also made on the dispersion of radioactive materials released from the Chernobyl plant. The simplest models include the Gauss plume model and the puff model, which cannot serve to analyze the effects of the topography, vertical wind shear, temperature inversion layer, etc. Numerical analysis methods using advection and dispersion equations are widely adopted for detailed evaluation of dispersion in an emergency. An objective analysis model or a hydrodynamical model is often used to calculate the air currents which are required to determine the advection. A small system based on the puff model is widely adopted in Europe, where the topography is considered to have only simple effects. A more sophisticated large-sized system is required in nuclear facilities located in an area with more complex topographic features. An emergency system for dispersion calculation should be equipped with a graphic display to serve for quick understanding of the radioactivity distribution. (Nogami, K.)

  1. Determination of velocity correction factors for real-time air velocity monitoring in underground mines

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Lihong; Yuan, Liming; Thomas, Rick; Iannacchione, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    When there are installations of air velocity sensors in the mining industry for real-time airflow monitoring, a problem exists with how the monitored air velocity at a fixed location corresponds to the average air velocity, which is used to determine the volume flow rate of air in an entry with the cross-sectional area. Correction factors have been practically employed to convert a measured centerline air velocity to the average air velocity. However, studies on the recommended correction fac...

  2. Parametric study of guided waves dispersion curves for composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Predoi, Mihai Valentin; Petre, Cristian Cǎtǎlin; Kettani, Mounsif Ech Cherif El; Leduc, Damien

    2018-02-01

    Nondestructive testing of composite panels benefit from the relatively long range propagation of guided waves in sandwich structures. The guided waves are sensitive to delamination, air bubbles inclusions and cracks and can thus bring information about hidden defects in the composite panel. The preliminary data in all such inspections is represented by the dispersion curves, representing the dependency of the phase/group velocity on the frequency for the propagating modes. In fact, all modes are more or less attenuated, so it is even more important to compute the dispersion curves, which provide also the modal attenuation as function of frequency. Another important aspect is the sensitivity of the dispersion curves on each of the elastic constant of the composite, which are orthotropic in most cases. All these aspects are investigated in the present work, based on our specially developed finite element numerical model implemented in Comsol, which has several advantages over existing methods. The dispersion curves and modal displacements are computed for an example of composite plate. Comparison with literature data validates the accuracy of our results.

  3. Splash-cup plants accelerate raindrops to disperse seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amador, Guillermo J.; Yamada, Yasukuni; McCurley, Matthew; Hu, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The conical flowers of splash-cup plants Chrysosplenium and Mazus catch raindrops opportunistically, exploiting the subsequent splash to disperse their seeds. In this combined experimental and theoretical study, we elucidate their mechanism for maximizing dispersal distance. We fabricate conical plant mimics using three-dimensional printing, and use high-speed video to visualize splash profiles and seed travel distance. Drop impacts that strike the cup off-centre achieve the largest dispersal distances of up to 1 m. Such distances are achieved because splash speeds are three to five times faster than incoming drop speeds, and so faster than the traditionally studied splashes occurring upon horizontal surfaces. This anomalous splash speed is because of the superposition of two components of momentum, one associated with a component of the drop's motion parallel to the splash-cup surface, and the other associated with film spreading induced by impact with the splash-cup. Our model incorporating these effects predicts the observed dispersal distance within 6–18% error. According to our experiments, the optimal cone angle for the splash-cup is 40°, a value consistent with the average of five species of splash-cup plants. This optimal angle arises from the competing effects of velocity amplification and projectile launching angle. PMID:23235266

  4. Study of the determination method of the river dispersion coefficient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, M.A.G. de.

    1982-01-01

    An application of the method introduced by 'Fischer, H.B. - 1968 - Dispersion prediction in natural streams Journal of the Sanitary Engineering Division, ACSE, vol. 94 n 5A5. Proc. Paper 6169 pp 927-943.', for the calculation of the dispersion coefficient, based on Taylor's model is made. The aim is to develop a method which avoids the necessity of having an instantaneous impulse at the entrance section (1st section) of the system being measured. The dispersion coefficient is determined by curve fitting the experimental response in the 2nd secton and that obtained with the model by means of the non-linear least-squares method. The same method is applied with the residence time distribution function. The theoretical differences between these two function and their results are discussed. By adjusting the two model parameters in all these calculations, the dispersion coefficient and the mean velocity are determined, simultaneously. A comparison between the moment's method and Fischer's formulation is also done using the same experimental data. (E.G.) [pt

  5. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salesi, Giovanni [Universita Statale di Catania (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica]|[Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Catania (Italy); Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Matematica Aplicada

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs.

  6. About the velocity operator for spinning particles in quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salesi, Giovanni; Recami, Erasmo; Rodrigues Junior, Waldyr A.

    1995-12-01

    Starting from the formal expressions of the hydrodynamical (or local) quantities employed in the applications of Clifford Algebras to quantum mechanics, we introduce - in terms of the ordinary tensorial framework - a new definition for the field of a generic quantity. By translating from Clifford into sensor algebra, we also propose a new (non-relativistic) velocity operator for a spin 1/2 particle. This operator is the sum of the ordinary part p/m describing the mean motion (the motion of the center-of-mass), and of a second part associated with the so-called Zitterbewegung, which is the spin internal motion observed in the center-of-mass frame. This spin component of the velocity operator is non-zero not only in the Pauli theoretical framework in presence of external magnetic fields and spin precession, but also in the Schroedinger case, when the wave-function is a spin eigenstate. In the latter case, one gets a decomposition of the velocity field for the Madelueng fluid into two distinct parts: which constitutes the non-relativistic analogue of the Gordon decomposition for the Dirac current. We find furthermore that the Zitterbewegung motion involves a velocity field which is solenoidal, and that the local angular velocity is parallel to the spin vector. In presence of a non-constant spin vector (Pauli case) we have, besides the component normal to spin present even in the Schroedinger theory, also a component of the local velocity which is parallel to the rotor of the spin vector. (author). 19 refs

  7. Estimating Velocities of Glaciers Using Sentinel-1 SAR Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gens, R.; Arnoult, K., Jr.; Friedl, P.; Vijay, S.; Braun, M.; Meyer, F. J.; Gracheva, V.; Hogenson, K.

    2017-12-01

    In an international collaborative effort, software has been developed to estimate the velocities of glaciers by using Sentinel-1 Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) imagery. The technique, initially designed by the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU), has been previously used to quantify spatial and temporal variabilities in the velocities of surging glaciers in the Pakistan Karakoram. The software estimates surface velocities by first co-registering image pairs to sub-pixel precision and then by estimating local offsets based on cross-correlation. The Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) has modified the software to make it more robust and also capable of migration into the Amazon Cloud. Additionally, ASF has implemented a prototype that offers the glacier tracking processing flow as a subscription service as part of its Hybrid Pluggable Processing Pipeline (HyP3). Since the software is co-located with ASF's cloud-based Sentinel-1 archive, processing of large data volumes is now more efficient and cost effective. Velocity maps are estimated for Single Look Complex (SLC) SAR image pairs and a digital elevation model (DEM) of the local topography. A time series of these velocity maps then allows the long-term monitoring of these glaciers. Due to the all-weather capabilities and the dense coverage of Sentinel-1 data, the results are complementary to optically generated ones. Together with the products from the Global Land Ice Velocity Extraction project (GoLIVE) derived from Landsat 8 data, glacier speeds can be monitored more comprehensively. Examples from Sentinel-1 SAR-derived results are presented along with optical results for the same glaciers.

  8. Empirical analysis on the runners' velocity distribution in city marathons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zhenquan; Meng, Fan

    2018-01-01

    In recent decades, much researches have been performed on human temporal activity and mobility patterns, while few investigations have been made to examine the features of the velocity distributions of human mobility patterns. In this paper, we investigated empirically the velocity distributions of finishers in New York City marathon, American Chicago marathon, Berlin marathon and London marathon. By statistical analyses on the datasets of the finish time records, we captured some statistical features of human behaviors in marathons: (1) The velocity distributions of all finishers and of partial finishers in the fastest age group both follow log-normal distribution; (2) In the New York City marathon, the velocity distribution of all male runners in eight 5-kilometer internal timing courses undergoes two transitions: from log-normal distribution at the initial stage (several initial courses) to the Gaussian distribution at the middle stage (several middle courses), and to log-normal distribution at the last stage (several last courses); (3) The intensity of the competition, which is described by the root-mean-square value of the rank changes of all runners, goes weaker from initial stage to the middle stage corresponding to the transition of the velocity distribution from log-normal distribution to Gaussian distribution, and when the competition gets stronger in the last course of the middle stage, there will come a transition from Gaussian distribution to log-normal one at last stage. This study may enrich the researches on human mobility patterns and attract attentions on the velocity features of human mobility.

  9. Experimental observation of both negative and positive phase velocities in a two-dimensional sonic crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Ming-Hui; Feng, Liang; Liu, Xiao-Ping; Liu, Xiao-Kang; Chen, Yan-Feng; Zhu, Yong-Yuan; Mao, Yi-Wei; Zi, Jian

    2007-01-01

    Both negative and positive phase velocities for acoustic waves have been experimentally established in a two-dimensional triangular sonic crystal (SC) consisting of steel cylinders embedded in air at first. With the increase of the SCs thickness layer by layer in the experiments, phase shifts decrease in the second band but increase in the first band, showing the negative and the positive phase velocities, respectively. Moreover, the dispersion relation of the SC is constructed by the phase information, which is consistent well with the theoretical results. These abundant characteristics of acoustic wave propagation in the SC might be useful for the device applications

  10. High resolution Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography in North-China from ambient seismic noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang Lihua; Wu Jianping; Ding Zhifeng; Panza, G.F.

    2009-03-01

    This study presents the results of the Rayleigh wave group velocity tomography in North-China performed using ambient seismic noise observed at 190 broadband and 10 very broadband stations of the North-China Seismic Array. All available vertical component time-series for the 14 months span between January, 2007 and February, 2008 are cross-correlated to obtain empirical Rayleigh wave Green functions that are subsequently processed, with the multiple filter method, to isolate the group velocity dispersion curves of the fundamental mode of Rayleigh wave. Tomographic maps, with a grid spacing of 0.25 deg. x 0.25 deg., are computed at the periods of 4.5s, 12s, 20s, 28s. The maps at short periods reveal an evident lateral heterogeneity in the crust of North-China, quite well in agreement with known geological and tectonic features. The North China Basin is imaged as a broad low velocity area, while the Taihangshan and Yanshan uplifts and Ordos block are imaged as high velocity zones, and the Quaternary intermountain basins show up as small low-velocity anomalies. The group velocity contours at 4.5s, 12s and 20s are consistent with the Bouguer gravity anomalies measured in the area of the Taihangshan fault, that cuts through the lower crust at least. Most of the historical strong earthquakes (M≥6.0) are located where the tomographic maps show zones with moderate velocity gradient. (author)

  11. Geotail observations of FTE velocities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Korotova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the plasma velocity signatures expected in association with flux transfer events (FTEs. Events moving faster than or opposite the ambient media should generate bipolar inward/outward (outward/inward flow perturbations normal to the nominal magnetopause in the magnetosphere (magnetosheath. Flow perturbations directly upstream and downstream from the events should be in the direction of event motion. Flows on the flanks should be in the direction opposite the motion of events moving at subsonic and subAlfvénic speeds relative to the ambient plasma. Events moving with the ambient flow should generate no flow perturbations in the ambient plasma. Alfvén waves propagating parallel (antiparallel to the axial magnetic field of FTEs may generate anticorrelated (correlated magnetic field and flow perturbations within the core region of FTEs. We present case studies illustrating many of these signatures. In the examples considered, Alfvén waves propagate along event axes away from the inferred reconnection site. A statistical study of FTEs observed by Geotail over a 3.5-year period reveals that FTEs within the magnetosphere invariably move faster than the ambient flow, while those in the magnetosheath move both faster and slower than the ambient flow.

  12. Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles

    KAUST Repository

    Giese, Andrew

    2014-05-01

    © 2014 IEEE. Modern multi-agent systems frequently use highlevel planners to extract basic paths for agents, and then rely on local collision avoidance to ensure that the agents reach their destinations without colliding with one another or dynamic obstacles. One state-of-the-art local collision avoidance technique is Optimal Reciprocal Collision Avoidance (ORCA). Despite being fast and efficient for circular-shaped agents, ORCA may deadlock when polygonal shapes are used. To address this shortcoming, we introduce Reciprocally-Rotating Velocity Obstacles (RRVO). RRVO generalizes ORCA by introducing a notion of rotation for polygonally-shaped agents. This generalization permits more realistic motion than ORCA and does not suffer from as much deadlock. In this paper, we present the theory of RRVO and show empirically that it does not suffer from the deadlock issue ORCA has, permits agents to reach goals faster, and has a comparable collision rate at the cost of performance overhead quadratic in the (typically small) user-defined parameter δ.

  13. High velocity impact experiment (HVIE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toor, A.; Donich, T.; Carter, P.

    1998-02-01

    The HVIE space project was conceived as a way to measure the absolute EOS for approximately 10 materials at pressures up to {approximately}30 Mb with order-of-magnitude higher accuracy than obtainable in any comparable experiment conducted on earth. The experiment configuration is such that each of the 10 materials interacts with all of the others thereby producing one-hundred independent, simultaneous EOS experiments The materials will be selected to provide critical information to weapons designers, National Ignition Facility target designers and planetary and geophysical scientists. In addition, HVIE will provide important scientific information to other communities, including the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization and the lethality and vulnerability community. The basic HVIE concept is to place two probes in counter rotating, highly elliptical orbits and collide them at high velocity (20 km/s) at 100 km altitude above the earth. The low altitude of the experiment will provide quick debris strip-out of orbit due to atmospheric drag. The preliminary conceptual evaluation of the HVIE has found no show stoppers. The design has been very easy to keep within the lift capabilities of commonly available rides to low earth orbit including the space shuttle. The cost of approximately 69 million dollars for 100 EOS experiment that will yield the much needed high accuracy, absolute measurement data is a bargain!

  14. Droplet dispersion angle measurements on a Pease-Antony Venturi scrubber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. G. Puentes

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A Pease-Anthony Venturi scrubber is a gas cleaning device that uses liquid, injected in the equipment as jets, to remove contaminants from the gas. The liquid jet is atomized into droplets, which are dispersed throughout the equipment due to the turbulence. The performance of the scrubber is affected by the spatial distribution of the droplets. Although CFD models have been used to predict the droplet dispersion, these models are expensive. Alternatively, the concept of "jet spreading angle" could be used as a simple and quick way to estimate droplet dispersion. The purpose of this paper is to measure the spreading angle of jets transversally injected into the throat of a Venturi scrubber and correlate it with both gas and jet velocities. The throat gas velocities varied between 59 and 74 m/s and the jet velocity between 3.18 and 19.1 m/s. The angles were measured through image analysis, obtained with high velocity photography. The spreading angle was found to be strongly dependent on jet velocity.

  15. Lagrangian modelling of dispersion, sedimentation and resuspension processes in marine environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gidhagen, L.; Rahm, L.; Nyberg, L.

    1989-01-01

    The model is based on a modified Langevin's equation which simulates the turbulent crossflow velocity fluctuations in shear flows. The velocity and turbulence fields used are generated by a 2-dimensional hydrodynamical model including a k-ε turbulence scheme. Since the dispersion model is formulated for only low particle concentrations, it is decoupled from the hydrodynamical model calculations. A great drawback in conventional dispersion modelling is the more or less unavoidable numerical diffusion. The use of a Lagrangian particle model will avoid this effect and the resulting too low concentrations for a given release. One consequence is a more realistic distribution of deposited particles. However, with regard to the overall deposition rates the simulated sedimentation process agrees well with well-established advection/diffusion model formulations. With a modified hydrodynamic model, the dispersion model can directly be applied to stratified 3D simulations. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Difficulties in modeling dispersed-flow film boiling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreani, M.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1991-01-01

    Dispersed Flow Film Boiling (DFFB) is characterized by important departures from thermal and velocity equilibrium that make it suitable for modeling with two-fluid models. The fundamental limitations and difficulties imposed by the one-dimensional nature of these models are extensively discussed. The validity of the assumptions and empirical laws used to close the system of conservation equations is critically reviewed, in light of the multidimensional aspects of the problem. Modifications that could improve the physics of the models are identified. (orig.) [de

  17. EDF plan for a dispersant injection trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercier, Stephane; Corredera, Geraldine; Alves-Vieira, Maria; Mansour, Carine; You, Dominique

    2012-09-01

    In its strategy for SG fouling control, EDF is considering the use of dispersant as a preventive remedy. A trial on Golfech 2 started in May 2012. The dispersant selected for the trial is Polyacrylic Acid (PAA). The main goals of the test are to check and quantify the gain on iron transport to blowdown, to evaluate the possible effects on secondary side chemistry and the operational costs of the injection - reactant, ion exchange resins and filters. The results of the test, if satisfying, will be used to set EDF strategy for dispersant long term use on its fleet. So, one concern about the trial is to make sure that the conclusions of this test will be applicable to a wide range of EDF plants. For that purpose, several criteria have been examined for the choice of the candidate plant such as fouling level, secondary circuit materials (presence or absence of copper alloys,...), SG tube material, thermal power margin, secondary side chemistry (amine used and pH applied). Before starting the trial, EDF had to take into account the international feedback and to adapt it to its specific requirements: the neutralization amine was switched from ETA to morpholine, additional work had been completed to validate the innocuousness of PAA injection for EDF plants... This work especially includes laboratory testing of secondary side corrosion cracking in the presence of PAA and water chemistries used in EdF plants. Moreover, investigation on the thermal stability of PAA and degradation products was completed and further evaluation of environmental impact was performed. A dedicated skid for the injection of PAA was implemented in Golfech Chemicals injection room. The installation and the process were notably designed to take into account the high viscosity of the commercial product, and the need to proceed to a good rinsing of the pipes without increasing the discharged effluents. The first available data from Golfech 2 trial are also provided and discussed. (authors)

  18. Computing discharge using the index velocity method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levesque, Victor A.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2012-01-01

    Application of the index velocity method for computing continuous records of discharge has become increasingly common, especially since the introduction of low-cost acoustic Doppler velocity meters (ADVMs) in 1997. Presently (2011), the index velocity method is being used to compute discharge records for approximately 470 gaging stations operated and maintained by the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of this report is to document and describe techniques for computing discharge records using the index velocity method. Computing discharge using the index velocity method differs from the traditional stage-discharge method by separating velocity and area into two ratings—the index velocity rating and the stage-area rating. The outputs from each of these ratings, mean channel velocity (V) and cross-sectional area (A), are then multiplied together to compute a discharge. For the index velocity method, V is a function of such parameters as streamwise velocity, stage, cross-stream velocity, and velocity head, and A is a function of stage and cross-section shape. The index velocity method can be used at locations where stage-discharge methods are used, but it is especially appropriate when more than one specific discharge can be measured for a specific stage. After the ADVM is selected, installed, and configured, the stage-area rating and the index velocity rating must be developed. A standard cross section is identified and surveyed in order to develop the stage-area rating. The standard cross section should be surveyed every year for the first 3 years of operation and thereafter at a lesser frequency, depending on the susceptibility of the cross section to change. Periodic measurements of discharge are used to calibrate and validate the index rating for the range of conditions experienced at the gaging station. Data from discharge measurements, ADVMs, and stage sensors are compiled for index-rating analysis. Index ratings are developed by means of regression

  19. STELLAR MASS DEPENDENT DISK DISPERSAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Grant M.; Kenyon, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    We use published optical spectral and infrared (IR) excess data from nine young clusters and associations to study the stellar mass dependent dispersal of circumstellar disks. All clusters older than ∼3 Myr show a decrease in disk fraction with increasing stellar mass for solar to higher mass stars. This result is significant at about the 1σ level in each cluster. For the complete set of clusters we reject the null hypothesis-that solar and intermediate-mass stars lose their disks at the same rate-with 95%-99.9% confidence. To interpret this behavior, we investigate the impact of grain growth, binary companions, and photoevaporation on the evolution of disk signatures. Changes in grain growth timescales at fixed disk temperature may explain why early-type stars with IR excesses appear to evolve faster than their later-type counterparts. Little evidence that binary companions affect disk evolution suggests that photoevaporation is the more likely mechanism for disk dispersal. A simple photoevaporation model provides a good fit to the observed disk fractions for solar and intermediate-mass stars. Although the current mass-dependent disk dispersal signal is not strong, larger and more complete samples of clusters with ages of 3-5 Myr can improve the significance and provide better tests of theoretical models. In addition, the orbits of extra-solar planets can constrain models of disk dispersal and migration. We suggest that the signature of stellar mass dependent disk dispersal due to photoevaporation may be present in the orbits of observed extra-solar planets. Planets orbiting hosts more massive than ∼1.6 M sun may have larger orbits because the disks in which they formed were dispersed before they could migrate.

  20. Dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in biocompatible dispersants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piret, J.-P.; Detriche, S.; Vigneron, R.; Vankoningsloo, S.; Rolin, S.; Mejia Mendoza, J. H.; Masereel, B.; Lucas, S.; Delhalle, J.; Luizi, F.; Saout, C.; Toussaint, O.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their phenomenal electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been an area of intense research since their discovery in 1991. Different applications for these nanoparticles have been proposed, among others, in electronics and optics but also in the medical field. In parallel, emerging studies have suggested potential toxic effects of CNT while others did not, generating some conflicting outcomes. These discrepancies could be, in part, due to different suspension approaches used and to the agglomeration state of CNT in solution. In this study, we described a standardized protocol to obtain stable CNT suspensions, using two biocompatible dispersants (Pluronic F108 and hydroxypropylcellulose) and to estimate the concentration of CNT in solution. CNT appear to be greatly individualized in these two dispersants with no detection of remaining bundles or agglomerates after sonication and centrifugation. Moreover, CNT remained perfectly dispersed when added to culture medium used for in vitro cell experiments. We also showed that Pluronic F108 is a better dispersant than hydroxypropylcellulose. In conclusion, we have developed a standardized protocol using biocompatible surfactants to obtain reproducible and stable multi-walled carbon nanotubes suspensions which can be used for in vitro or in vivo toxicological studies.

  1. Propagation and dispersion of electrostatic waves in the ionospheric E region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Iranpour

    Full Text Available Low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the ionospheric E region were detected by instruments on the ROSE rockets. The phase velocity and dispersion of plasma waves in the ionospheric E region are determined by band-pass filtering and cross-correlating data of the electric-field fluctuations detected by the probes on the ROSE F4 rocket. The results were confirmed by a different method of analysis of the same data. The results show that the waves propagate in the Hall-current direction with a velocity somewhat below the ion sound speed obtained for ionospheric conditions during the flight. It is also found that the waves are dispersive, with the longest wavelengths propagating with the lowest velocity.

  2. Propagation and dispersion of electrostatic waves in the ionospheric E region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Iranpour

    1997-07-01

    Full Text Available Low-frequency electrostatic fluctuations in the ionospheric E region were detected by instruments on the ROSE rockets. The phase velocity and dispersion of plasma waves in the ionospheric E region are determined by band-pass filtering and cross-correlating data of the electric-field fluctuations detected by the probes on the ROSE F4 rocket. The results were confirmed by a different method of analysis of the same data. The results show that the waves propagate in the Hall-current direction with a velocity somewhat below the ion sound speed obtained for ionospheric conditions during the flight. It is also found that the waves are dispersive, with the longest wavelengths propagating with the lowest velocity.

  3. Surface Ocean Dispersion Observations from the Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlson, Daniel Frazier; Ozgokmen, Tamay; Novelli, Guillaume

    2018-01-01

    Oil slicks and sheens reside at the air-sea interface, a region of the ocean that is notoriously difficult to measure and, therefore, little is known about the velocity field at the sea surface. The Ship-Tethered Aerostat Remote Sensing System (STARSS) was developed to measure Lagrangian velocities...... of experiments in the northern Gulf of Mexico in January- February 2016. STARSS was equipped with a GPS and inertial navigation system (INS) that was used to directly georectify the aerial images. A relative rectification technique was developed that translates and rotates the drift cards to minimize the total...... movement of all drift cards from one frame to the next. Rectified drift card positions were used to quantify scale-dependent dispersion by computing relative dispersion, relative diffusivity, and velocity structure functions. STARSS was part of a nested observational framework, which included deployments...

  4. Vector blood velocity estimation in medical ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gran, Fredrik; Udesen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for making vector velocity estimation in medical ultrasound are presented. All of the techniques can find both the axial and transverse velocity in the image and can be used for displaying both the correct velocity magnitude and direction. The first method uses a transverse oscillation...... in the ultrasound field to find the transverse velocity. In-vivo examples from the carotid artery are shown, where complex turbulent flow is found in certain parts of the cardiac cycle. The second approach uses directional beam forming along the flow direction to estimate the velocity magnitude. Using a correlation...... search can also yield the direction, and the full velocity vector is thereby found. An examples from a flow rig is shown....

  5. Algorithms for estimating blood velocities using ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2000-01-01

    Ultrasound has been used intensively for the last 15 years for studying the hemodynamics of the human body. Systems for determining both the velocity distribution at one point of interest (spectral systems) and for displaying a map of velocity in real time have been constructed. A number of schemes...... have been developed for performing the estimation, and the various approaches are described. The current systems only display the velocity along the ultrasound beam direction and a velocity transverse to the beam is not detected. This is a major problem in these systems, since most blood vessels...... are parallel to the skin surface. Angling the transducer will often disturb the flow, and new techniques for finding transverse velocities are needed. The various approaches for determining transverse velocities will be explained. This includes techniques using two-dimensional correlation (speckle tracking...

  6. Modeling the effects of dispersal and patch size on predicted fisher (Pekania [Martes] pennanti) distribution in the U.S. Rocky Mountains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucretia E. Olson; Joel D. Sauder; Nathan M. Albrecht; Ray S. Vinkey; Samuel A. Cushman; Michael K. Schwartz

    2014-01-01

    Climate change impacts many species through shifts in habitat. The intensity of this impact will depend on the dispersal rates of the species, the patchiness of the environment, and the velocity of habitat change. Here we examine how dispersal affects projected future habitat availability for a threatened carnivore, the fisher (Pekania [Martes] pennanti). We used non-...

  7. On plasma coupling and turbulence effects in low velocity stopping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation); Maynard, G [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Barriga-Carrasco, M D [Laboratoire de Physique des Gaz et des Plasmas, UMR-8578, Bat. 210, Universite Paris XI, F-91405 Orsay (France); Valuev, A A [Unified Institute for High Temperatures of Russian Academy of Sciences, 13/19 Izhorskaya Str., 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-04-28

    The problem of stopping power (SP) for projectile ions is analysed in terms of the dielectric function and effective collision frequency for moderately dense and strongly coupled plasmas (SCP). We consider several issues regarding the calculation of stopping power for correlated ensembles of particles and oscillators. In particular, effects of group (few particle) modes, transition from positive to negative dispersion and excitation of collective modes up to suprathermal level at plasma targets are addressed. Linear SP of dense suprathermal (nonlinear) plasma targets at different levels of target plasma turbulence is estimated. The force of suprathermal plasma oscillations on the projectile ions is mostly in the nature of increased frictional drag. The results obtained show the possibility of increasing low velocity stopping (up to 'turbulent' values) in comparison with losses in equilibrium dense plasma targets. Experimental conditions to create specific turbulent targets as well as some connection between stopping phenomena and SCP transport properties are discussed briefly.

  8. On plasma coupling and turbulence effects in low velocity stopping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurilenkov, Yu K; Maynard, G; Barriga-Carrasco, M D; Valuev, A A

    2006-01-01

    The problem of stopping power (SP) for projectile ions is analysed in terms of the dielectric function and effective collision frequency for moderately dense and strongly coupled plasmas (SCP). We consider several issues regarding the calculation of stopping power for correlated ensembles of particles and oscillators. In particular, effects of group (few particle) modes, transition from positive to negative dispersion and excitation of collective modes up to suprathermal level at plasma targets are addressed. Linear SP of dense suprathermal (nonlinear) plasma targets at different levels of target plasma turbulence is estimated. The force of suprathermal plasma oscillations on the projectile ions is mostly in the nature of increased frictional drag. The results obtained show the possibility of increasing low velocity stopping (up to 'turbulent' values) in comparison with losses in equilibrium dense plasma targets. Experimental conditions to create specific turbulent targets as well as some connection between stopping phenomena and SCP transport properties are discussed briefly

  9. Velocity space ring-plasma instability, magnetized, Part I: Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.K.; Birdsall, C.K.

    1979-01-01

    The interaction of magnetized monoenergetic ions (a ring in velocity space) with a homogeneous Maxwellian target plasma is studied numerically using linear Vlasov theory. The ring may be produced when an energetic beam is injected perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field. In addition to yielding the previously known results, the present study classifies this flute-like instability into three distinct regimes based on the beam density relative to the plasma density, where many features such as physical mechanisms, dispersion diagrams, and maximum growth rates are quite different. The effects of electron dynamics, plasma or ring thermal spread, the ratio of ω/sub p//ω/sub c/ for plasma ions, and electromagnetic modifications are also considered

  10. Remote determination of the velocity index and mean streamwise velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E. D.; Cowen, E. A.

    2017-09-01

    When determining volumetric discharge from surface measurements of currents in a river or open channel, the velocity index is typically used to convert surface velocities to depth-averaged velocities. The velocity index is given by, k=Ub/Usurf, where Ub is the depth-averaged velocity and Usurf is the local surface velocity. The USGS (United States Geological Survey) standard value for this coefficient, k = 0.85, was determined from a series of laboratory experiments and has been widely used in the field and in laboratory measurements of volumetric discharge despite evidence that the velocity index is site-specific. Numerous studies have documented that the velocity index varies with Reynolds number, flow depth, and relative bed roughness and with the presence of secondary flows. A remote method of determining depth-averaged velocity and hence the velocity index is developed here. The technique leverages the findings of Johnson and Cowen (2017) and permits remote determination of the velocity power-law exponent thereby, enabling remote prediction of the vertical structure of the mean streamwise velocity, the depth-averaged velocity, and the velocity index.

  11. Dexamethasone-Mediated Upregulation of Calreticulin Inhibits Primary Human Glioblastoma Dispersal Ex Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Nair

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Dispersal of Glioblastoma (GBM renders localized therapy ineffective and is a major cause of recurrence. Previous studies have demonstrated that Dexamethasone (Dex, a drug currently used to treat brain tumor–related edema, can also significantly reduce dispersal of human primary GBM cells from neurospheres. It does so by triggering α5 integrin activity, leading to restoration of fibronectin matrix assembly (FNMA, increased neurosphere cohesion, and reduction of neurosphere dispersal velocity (DV. How Dex specifically activates α5 integrin in these GBM lines is unknown. Several chaperone proteins are known to activate integrins, including calreticulin (CALR. We explore the role of CALR as a potential mediator of Dex-dependent induction of α5 integrin activity in primary human GBM cells. We use CALR knock-down and knock-in strategies to explore the effects on FNMA, aggregate compaction, and dispersal velocity in vitro, as well as dispersal ex vivo on extirpated mouse retina and brain slices. We show that Dex increases CALR expression and that siRNA knockdown suppresses Dex-mediated FNMA. Overexpression of CALR in GBM cells activates FNMA, increases compaction, and decreases DV in vitro and on explants of mouse retina and brain slices. Our results define a novel interaction between Dex, CALR, and FNMA as inhibitors of GBM dispersal.

  12. Calibration of Discrete Random Walk (DRW) Model via G.I Taylor's Dispersion Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javaherchi, Teymour; Aliseda, Alberto

    2012-11-01

    Prediction of particle dispersion in turbulent flows is still an important challenge with many applications to environmental, as well as industrial, fluid mechanics. Several models of dispersion have been developed to predict particle trajectories and their relative velocities, in combination with a RANS-based simulation of the background flow. The interaction of the particles with the velocity fluctuations at different turbulent scales represents a significant difficulty in generalizing the models to the wide range of flows where they are used. We focus our attention on the Discrete Random Walk (DRW) model applied to flow in a channel, particularly to the selection of eddies lifetimes as realizations of a Poisson distribution with a mean value proportional to κ / ɛ . We present a general method to determine the constant of this proportionality by matching the DRW model dispersion predictions for fluid element and particle dispersion to G.I Taylor's classical dispersion theory. This model parameter is critical to the magnitude of predicted dispersion. A case study of its influence on sedimentation of suspended particles in a tidal channel with an array of Marine Hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines highlights the dependency of results on this time scale parameter. Support from US DOE through the Northwest National Marine Renewable Energy Center, a UW-OSU partnership.

  13. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.

    Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  14. Electron velocity distribution function in a plasma with temperature gradient and in the presence of suprathermal electrons: application to incoherent-scatter plasma lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Guio

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution function are calculated numerically for any arbitrary velocity distribution function with cylindrical symmetry along the magnetic field. The electron velocity distribution is separated into two distributions representing the distribution of the ambient electrons and the suprathermal electrons. The velocity distribution function of the ambient electrons is modelled by a near-Maxwellian distribution function in presence of a temperature gradient and a potential electric field. The velocity distribution function of the suprathermal electrons is derived from a numerical model of the angular energy flux spectrum obtained by solving the transport equation of electrons. The numerical method used to calculate the plasma dispersion function and the reduced velocity distribution is described. The numerical code is used with simulated data to evaluate the Doppler frequency asymmetry between the up- and downshifted plasma lines of the incoherent-scatter plasma lines at different wave vectors. It is shown that the observed Doppler asymmetry is more dependent on deviation from the Maxwellian through the thermal part for high-frequency radars, while for low-frequency radars the Doppler asymmetry depends more on the presence of a suprathermal population. It is also seen that the full evaluation of the plasma dispersion function gives larger Doppler asymmetry than the heat flow approximation for Langmuir waves with phase velocity about three to six times the mean thermal velocity. For such waves the moment expansion of the dispersion function is not fully valid and the full calculation of the dispersion function is needed.Key words. Non-Maxwellian electron velocity distribution · Incoherent scatter plasma lines · EISCAT · Dielectric response function

  15. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity during running

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngeraa, Tobias; Pedersen, Lars Møller; Mantoni, T

    2013-01-01

    for eight subjects, respectively, were excluded from analysis because of insufficient signal quality. Running increased mean arterial pressure and mean MCA velocity and induced rhythmic oscillations in BP and in MCA velocity corresponding to the difference between step rate and heart rate (HR) frequencies....... During running, rhythmic oscillations in arterial BP induced by interference between HR and step frequency impact on cerebral blood velocity. For the exercise as a whole, average MCA velocity becomes elevated. These results suggest that running not only induces an increase in regional cerebral blood flow...

  16. Demonstration of a Vector Velocity Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter Møller; Pedersen, Mads M.; Hansen, Kristoffer L.

    2011-01-01

    With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner. In this pa......With conventional Doppler ultrasound it is not possible to estimate direction and velocity of blood flow, when the angle of insonation exceeds 60–70°. Transverse oscillation is an angle independent vector velocity technique which is now implemented on a conventional ultrasound scanner...

  17. On whistler-mode group velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sazhin, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    An analytical of the group velocity of whistler-mode waves propagating parallel to the magnetic field in a hot anisotropic plasma is presented. Some simple approximate formulae, which can be used for the magnetospheric applications, are derived. These formulae can predict some properties of this group velocity which were not previously recognized or were obtained by numerical methods. In particular, it is pointed out that the anisotropy tends to compensate for the influence of the electron temperature on the value of the group velocity when the wave frequency is well below the electron gyrofrequency. It is predicted, that under conditions at frequencies near the electron gyrofrequency, this velocity tends towards zero

  18. Velocity measurement of conductor using electromagnetic induction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Gu Hwa; Kim, Ho Young; Park, Joon Po; Jeong, Hee Tae; Lee, Eui Wan

    2002-01-01

    A basic technology was investigated to measure the speed of conductor by non-contact electromagnetic method. The principle of the velocity sensor was electromagnetic induction. To design electromagnet for velocity sensor, 2D electromagnetic analysis was performed using FEM software. The sensor output was analyzed according to the parameters of velocity sensor, such as the type of magnetizing currents and the lift-off. Output of magnetic sensor was linearly depended on the conductor speed and magnetizing current. To compensate the lift-off changes during measurement of velocity, the other magnetic sensor was put at the pole of electromagnet.

  19. Conduction velocity of antigravity muscle action potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christova, L; Kosarov, D; Christova, P

    1992-01-01

    The conduction velocity of the impulses along the muscle fibers is one of the parameters of the extraterritorial potentials of the motor units allowing for the evaluation of the functional state of the muscles. There are no data about the conduction velocities of antigravity muscleaction potentials. In this paper we offer a method for measuring conduction velocity of potentials of single MUs and the averaged potentials of the interference electromiogram (IEMG) lead-off by surface electrodes from mm. sternocleidomastoideus, trapezius, deltoideus (caput laterale) and vastus medialis. The measured mean values of the conduction velocity of antigravity muscles potentials can be used for testing the functional state of the muscles.

  20. Microtribology of aqueous carbon nanotube dispersions

    KAUST Repository

    Kristiansen, Kai De Lange; Zeng, Hongbo; Wang, Peng; Israelachvili, Jacob N.

    2011-01-01

    The tribological behavior of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in aqueous humic acid (HA) solutions was studied using a surface forces apparatus (SFA) and shows promising lubricant additive properties. Adding CNTs to the solution changes the friction forces between two mica surfaces from "adhesion controlled" to "load controlled" friction. The coefficient of friction with either single-walled (SW) or multi-walled (MW) CNT dispersions is in the range 0.30-0.55 and is independent of the load and sliding velocity. More importantly, lateral sliding promotes a redistribution or accumulation, rather than squeezing out, of nanotubes between the surfaces. This accumulation reduced the adhesion between the surfaces (which generally causes wear/damage of the surfaces), and no wear or damage was observed during continuous shearing experiments that lasted several hours even under high loads (pressures â∼10 MPa). The frictional properties can be understood in terms of the Cobblestone Model where the friction force is related to the fraction of the adhesion energy dissipated during impacts of the nanoparticles. We also develop a simple generic model based on the van der Waals interactions between particles and surfaces to determine the relation between the dimensions of nanoparticles and their tribological properties when used as additives in oil- or water-based lubricants. © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.