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Sample records for internal ph maintained

  1. Biomedical PhD education - an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvany, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The PhD, otherwise known as the doctor of philosophy or Dr. Phil., is an internationally recognized degree, indicating that the PhD graduate has received training in research under supervision. Traditionally, the PhD was the route to an academic career, with most successful PhD graduates receiving...... tenured university positions. However, over the past 20–30 years, and particularly the past 10 years, the situation has changed dramatically. Governments in many countries have invested massively in PhD education, believing that trained researchers will contribute to the ‘knowledge society’, and thus...... increase the competitiveness of their countries in the future economies of the world. Thus, only a small fraction of PhD graduates now end up in academic research. Yet, the PhD remains a research degree, and indeed, institutions have become heavily dependent on PhD students for their research output...

  2. Establishing and maintaining international collaborative research teams: an autobiographical insight

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T J Carr

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growing impetus for international collaborative research teams (ICRT, there are relatively few resources available to guide and support researchers through the processes of establishing and maintaining ICRTs. In particular, no articles were found that provided researchers’ firsthand accounts of being a member of such a team. Having access to such personal accounts can help both experienced and novice researchers learn more directly about what to expect, as well as the benefits, challenges, pitfalls, and success strategies for establishing and maintaining ICRTs. The authors used phenomenological autobiographical reflective journaling to capture their experiences as members of ICRTs. In this article we provide an overview of key themes that emerged from the analysis of our reflections as members of ICRTs. These themes include: benefits, challenges, and strategies for success. Our aim is to share our first-hand experiences of what it is like to establish and participate in ICRT. It is not our intention to provide readers with prescriptive guidelines on how to set up and maintain ICRTs. Every ICRT is unique and some of these ideas may or may not apply in every case. Instead, we are describing what worked for us, hoping that others may benefit from our experience. Consequently, we suggest that the focus of ICRT should be on the benefits thereof which promote and encourage interaction between disciplines, transfer of knowledge and techniques and personal and professional development. Keywords: international, collaborative, research, teams, interdisciplinary

  3. Maintaining outer space for peaceful purposes through international cooperation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, George E.; Thacher, David J.; Kupperman, Helen S.

    1988-01-01

    NASA activities in support of international cooperation in space exploration and exploitation are briefly reviewed, with a focus on their compatibility with UN treaties. Particular attention is given to the provisions of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 and other applicable legislation, the over 1000 bilateral and international agreements NASA has entered into since 1958, international participation in currently ongoing NASA projects (Hubble Space Telescope, Galileo, Ulysses, Rosat, the D-2 Spacelab mission), and plans for the International Space Station.

  4. Maintaining Your Mental Health all the Way through Your PhD Process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kamma Overgaard

    2017-01-01

    The Ph. D. process is a unique opportunity to develop your wildest thesis, to follow your academic instincts all the way, to test your theoretical ideas in a stimulating academic environment, and to create your very own contribution to your favorite field of research. But the process of writing....... This contribution asks the question of whether these psychological symptoms can be avoided in the process of writing a Ph. D. – and whether they even should be completely avoided. Is mental lability a necessary – and perhaps even fruitful – part of a long, creative academic process? And if it is: what...

  5. Biomedical PhD education - an international perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mulvany, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    tenured university positions. However, over the past 20–30 years, and particularly the past 10 years, the situation has changed dramatically. Governments in many countries have invested massively in PhD education, believing that trained researchers will contribute to the ‘knowledge society’, and thus...... during their PhD studies. The purpose of this article is to explore how this seeming paradox is being addressed in biomedicine and to show that far from being inconsistent that the two aspects are in fact complementary. The article is based on the author’s experience as Head of Aarhus Graduate School...... of Health Sciences 2002–2011 and his work with graduate schools across Europe and internationally through the organization ORPHEUS....

  6. Maintaining International Peace and Security: Reflections on Peace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    take measures and develop strategies to address the peacekeeping ... measures to achieve this purpose that are to be taken by the UN Security ..... For any democratic government it ..... financing for the mission, followed by a long procurement process for .... The view is also held that wide disparities in the international.

  7. The role of international atomic energy agency in maintaining nuclear safety competence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aro, I.; Mazour, T.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides information how International Atomic Energy Agency can assist Member States in maintaining and developing nuclear safety competence. The topics covered include the development of safety standards, organisation of nuclear safety related conferences, provision of safety reviews, organisation of training courses and topical workshops and publication of training related documents. Usefulness of these activities for competence development is discussed. (author)

  8. Optimizing buffering chemistry to maintain near neutral pH of broiler feed during pre-enrichment for Salmonella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, M E; Cosby, D E; Cox, N A; Cason, J A; Richardson, K E

    2015-12-01

    Salmonella is a human pathogen that can accompany live broilers to the slaughter plant, contaminating fully processed carcasses. Feed is one potential source of Salmonella to growing broilers. Monitoring feed for the presence of Salmonella is part of good agricultural practice. The first step in culturing feed for Salmonella (which may be at low numbers and sub-lethally stressed) is to add it to a pre-enrichment broth which is incubated for 24 h. During the course of pre-enrichment, extraneous bacteria metabolize carbohydrates in some feed and excrete acidic byproducts, causing the pH to drop dramatically. An acidic pre-enrichment pH can injure or kill Salmonella resulting in a failure to detect, even if it is present and available to infect chickens. The objective of this study was to test an array of buffering chemistries to prevent formation of an injurious acidic environment during pre-enrichment of feed in peptone water. Five grams of feed were added to 45 mL of peptone water buffered with carbonate, Tris pH 8, and phosphate buffering ingredients individually and in combination. Feed was subjected to a pre-enrichment at 35°C for 24 h; pH was measured at 0, 18, and 24 h. Standard phosphate buffering ingredients at concentrations up to 4 times the normal formulation were unable to fully prevent acidic conditions. Likewise, carbonate and Tris pH 8 were not fully effective. The combination of phosphate, carbonate, and Tris pH 8 was the most effective buffer tested. It is recommended that a highly buffered pre-enrichment broth be used to examine feed for the presence of Salmonella. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Poultry Science Association 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Four weeks of normobaric "live high-train low" do not alter muscular or systemic capacity for maintaining pH and K+ homeostasis during intense exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordsborg, Nikolai B; Siebenmann, C; Jacobs, R A

    2012-01-01

    was double-blind and placebo controlled. Mean power during 30-s all-out cycling was similar before and immediately after LHTL (650 ± 31 vs. 628 ± 32 W; n = 10) and placebo exposure (658 ± 22 vs. 660 ± 23 W; n = 6). Supporting the performance data, arterial plasma pH, lactate, and K(+) during submaximal......It was investigated if athletes subjected to 4 wk of living in normobaric hypoxia (3,000 m; 16 h/day) while training at 800-1,300 m ["live high-train low" (LHTL)] increase muscular and systemic capacity for maintaining pH and K(+) homeostasis as well as intense exercise performance. The design...... before and after 4 wk of placebo-controlled normobaric LHTL. In accordance, 30-s all-out sprint ability was similar before and after LHTL....

  10. Synthesis and photophysical properties of a novel terephthalic PH sensor based on internal charge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miladinova, Polya M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel fluorescence sensing derivative of 2-aminodimethylterephthalate configured as a “fluorophore-receptor” system was synthesized and investigated. Due to the internal charge transfer, the designed fluorophore was able to act as a pH-probe via an “off-on” fluorescence sensing mechanism. The sensor activity toward protons as cations and hydroxide as anions in DMF was studied by monitoring the changes of the fluorescence intensity. Keywords: 2-aminoterephthalic derivative, ICT (internal charge transfer), pH sensor.

  11. International Students' Motivation to Pursue and Complete a Ph.D. in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    This study explores what motivates 19 international students to pursue a Ph.D. at a public research university in the U.S. and, more importantly, what motivates them to persist despite unsatisfying socialization. Based on value-expectancy achievement motivation theory, four motivations emerged: intrinsic interest in research, intrinsic interest in…

  12. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. PMID:27731845

  13. Homogeneous plate based antibody internalization assay using pH sensor fluorescent dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nidhi; Godat, Becky; Zimprich, Chad; Dwight, Stephen J; Corona, Cesear; McDougall, Mark; Urh, Marjeta

    2016-04-01

    Receptor-mediated antibody internalization is a key mechanism underlying several anti-cancer antibody therapeutics. Delivering highly toxic drugs to cancer cells, as in the case of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), efficient removal of surface receptors from cancer cells and changing the pharmacokinetics profile of the antibody drugs are some of key ways that internalization impacts the therapeutic efficacy of the antibodies. Over the years, several techniques have been used to study antibody internalization including radiolabels, fluorescent microscopy, flow cytometry and cellular toxicity assays. While these methods allow analysis of internalization, they have limitations including a multistep process and limited throughput and are generally endpoint assays. Here, we present a new homogeneous method that enables time and concentration dependent measurements of antibody internalization. The method uses a new hydrophilic and bright pH sensor dye (pHAb dye), which is not fluorescent at neutral pH but becomes highly fluorescent at acidic pH. For receptor mediated antibody internalization studies, antibodies against receptors are conjugated with the pHAb dye and incubated with the cells expressing the receptors. Upon binding to the receptor, the dyes conjugated to the antibody are not fluorescent because of the neutral pH of the media, but upon internalization and trafficking into endosomal and lysosomal vesicles the pH drops and dyes become fluorescent. The enabling attributes of the pHAb dyes are the hydrophilic nature to minimize antibody aggregation and bright fluorescence at acidic pH which allows development of simple plate based assays using a fluorescent reader. Using two different therapeutic antibodies--Trastuzumab (anti-HER2) and Cetuximab (anti-EGFR)--we show labeling with pHAb dye using amine and thiol chemistries and impact of chemistry and dye to antibody ration on internalization. We finally present two new approaches using the pHAb dye, which will be

  14. Ability to maintain internal arousal and motivation modulates brain responses to emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterpenich, Virginie; Schwartz, Sophie; Maquet, Pierre; Desseilles, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Persistence (PS) is defined as the ability to generate and maintain arousal and motivation internally in the absence of immediate external reward. Low PS individuals tend to become discouraged when expectations are not rapidly fulfilled. The goal of this study was to investigate whether individual differences in PS influence the recruitment of brain regions involved in emotional processing and regulation. In a functional MRI study, 35 subjects judged the emotional intensity of displayed pictures. When processing negative pictures, low PS (vs. high PS) subjects showed higher amygdala and right orbito-frontal cortex (OFC) activity but lower left OFC activity. This dissociation in OFC activity suggests greater prefrontal cortical asymmetry for approach/avoidance motivation, suggesting an avoidance response to aversive stimuli in low PS. For positive or neutral stimuli, low PS subjects showed lower activity in the amygdala, striatum, and hippocampus. These results suggest that low PS may involve an imbalance in processing distinct emotional inputs, with greater reactivity to aversive information in regions involved in avoidance behaviour (amygdala, OFC) and dampened response to positive and neutral stimuli across circuits subserving motivated behaviour (striatum, hippocampus, amygdala). Low PS affective style was associated with depression vulnerability. These findings in non-depressed subjects point to a neural mechanism whereby some individuals are more likely to show systematic negative emotional biases, as frequently observed in depression. The assessment of these individual differences, including those that may cause vulnerability to depressive disorders, would therefore constitute a promising approach to risk assessment for depression.

  15. Subtype-specific, bi-component inhibition of SK channels by low internal pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peitersen, Torben; Jespersen, Thomas; Jorgensen, Nanna K

    2006-01-01

    The effects of low intracellular pH (pH(i) 6.4) on cloned small-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel currents of all three subtypes (SK1, SK2, and SK3) were investigated in HEK293 cells using the patch-clamp technique. In 400 nM internal Ca2+ [Ca2+]i, all subtypes were inhibited by pH(i) 6...

  16. Strategies for Enhancing Nonlinear Internal Model Control of pH Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Qiuping.; Rangaiah, G.P. [The National University of Singapore, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Chemical and Environmental Engineering

    1999-02-01

    Control of neutralization processes is very difficult due to nonlinear dynamics, different types of disturbances and modeling errors. The objective of the paper is to evaluate two strategies (augmented internal model control, AuIMC and adaptive internal model control, AdIMC) for enhancing pH control by nonlinear internal model control (NIMC). A NIMC controller is derived directly form input output linearization. The AuIMC is composed of NIMC and an additional loop through which the difference between the process and model outputs is fed back and added to the input of the controller. For the AdIMC, and adaptive law with two tuning parameters is proposed for estimating the unknown parameter. Both AuIMC and AdIMC are extensively tested via simulation for pH neutralization. The theoretical and simulation results show that both the proposed strategies can reduce the effect of modeling errors and disturbances, and thereby enhance the performance of NIMC for pH processes. (author)

  17. Qualitative Research in an International Research Program: Maintaining Momentum while Building Capacity in Nurses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy Mill RN, PhD

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Nurses are knowledgeable about issues that affect quality and equity of care and are well qualified to inform policy, yet their expertise is seldom acknowledged and their input infrequently invited. In 2007, a large multidisciplinary team of researchers and decision-makers from Canada and five low- and middle-income countries (Barbados, Jamaica, Uganda, Kenya, and South Africa received funding to implement a participatory action research (PAR program entitled “Strengthening Nurses' Capacity for HIV Policy Development in sub-Saharan Africa and the Caribbean.” The goal of the research program was to explore and promote nurses' involvement in HIV policy development and to improve nursing practice in countries with a high HIV disease burden. A core element of the PAR program was the enhancement of the research capacity, and particularly qualitative capacity, of nurses through the use of mentorship, role-modeling, and the enhancement of institutional support. In this article we: (a describe the PAR program and research team; (b situate the research program by discussing attitudes to qualitative research in the study countries; (c highlight the incremental formal and informal qualitative research capacity building initiatives undertaken as part of this PAR program; (d describe the approaches used to maintain rigor while implementing a complex research program; and (e identify strategies to ensure that capacity building was locally-owned. We conclude with a discussion of challenges and opportunities and provide an informal analysis of the research capacity that was developed within our international team using a PAR approach.

  18. Factors Influencing the Degree Progress of International PhD Students from Africa: An Exploratory Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almoustapha Oumarou Soumana

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades some countries of the Middle East have offered facilities to attract international students to pursue their higher education within their higher education institutions. The purpose of this study is to understand the difficulties faced by these students while conducting their studies abroad, and in doing so, to broaden the awareness of the challenges they face to complete their research. The participants of this qualitative study are international PhD students studying at a Middle Eastern public university. The university has reported increasing enrollment of international students, particularly from Africa in the last few years. Data were collected using a set of semi-structured interviews that drew out information on critical incidents that characterized the kind of difficulties students had faced in their studies. The data collected was further analyzed using a qualitative software package, NVivo (QSR International, 11. Six main themes came out from the content analysis of the interviews, which are the role of the adviser, student features, funding issues, family engagement, research and psychological obstacles which provide a holistic picture of student perspectives on the factors that influence degree progress. While these students might have faced difficulties mentioned in existing literature, this study argues that the participants have indicated experiencing psychological obstacles that were not described in earlier studies, such as the state of mind they were in as a result of being worried for family members due to war or violence in their home countries, and drop in currency exchange rates and difficulties in acquiring money due to international sanctions imposed against their countries. This study provides important thoughts on the factors that impact the degree progress of international PhD students from Africa, while at the same time revealing a serious gap in the advisers’ role which can contribute to the

  19. Teaching International Business across Multiple Modes of Delivery: How to Maintain Equivalence in Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The drivers of globalization are changing how, where, and when international business (IB) is being taught, and increasing student diversity. Concomitantly, education is becoming an important contributor to GDP in developed economies. Today, the same course may be taught at home to domestic and in-bound international students, in host countries,…

  20. The Coconut and the Peach: Understanding, Establishing, and Maintaining Interpersonal Boundaries with International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, Miki; Schwartz, Harriet L.

    2012-01-01

    This chapter explores international students' perspectives of boundaries in the American graduate-level classroom, specifically considering the culturally based essence of boundaries. The authors focus on graduate-level Japanese international students. This population is particularly helpful in their consideration of boundaries because research…

  1. Stakeholder involvement in building and maintaining national and international radiation safety infrastructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimomura, K.

    2004-01-01

    Society's expectations with regard to policy towards risky technologies have changed significantly over the past 50 years, and perhaps most dramatically, over the past decade. Arrangements for the development and implementation of such policy may well fit with traditional theories from the disciplines of law, political science and engineering regarding democratic legitimacy, the delegation of power and the role of the expert. They may, however, no longer fit with a policy environment that is considerably more complex than those theories allow. The stakes are high for the radiation protection community as it seeks to recognize and accommodate these changed and changing expectations.For many years, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency and its Committee on Radiation Protection and Public Health (CRPPH) has an active work programme on details and implications of stakeholder involvement in radiological protection decision making processes. The series of workshops in Villigen, Switzerland (in 1998 and 2002) and related follow-up work, offer assistance to the international radiological protection community on how to better integrate radiological protection into modern society. The lessons that have been learned in this area carry implications on national policy and on the governmental infrastructures necessary to carry it out

  2. Limitations in the use of low pH extraction to distinguish internalized from cell surface-bound radiolabeled antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, Gaik Lin; Mattes, M. Jules

    2000-01-01

    Internalization by cells of radiolabeled protein ligands bound to the cell surface is frequently analyzed by extraction of the cells with low pH buffers. This treatment supposedly strips the ligands from the cell surface, and remaining molecules are considered to be internalized. However, we show herein that: (1) low molecular weight catabolic products that are trapped within lysosomes (residualizing radiolabels) are efficiently extracted by low pH buffers, under the same conditions used to remove cell surface-bound material, and (2) low pH treatment lyses the majority of the cells, as shown with both a nonadherent and an adherent cell line, with the release of most of a 51 Cr label. Still, low pH extraction was effective at demonstrating Ab internalization, as has been demonstrated many times. These effects of low pH treatment may be attributed to the fixative properties of these buffers. Regardless of the mechanism, these data must be taken into consideration in interpreting the results of such experiments

  3. The Fab1/PIKfyve Phosphoinositide Phosphate Kinase Is Not Necessary to Maintain the pH of Lysosomes and of the Yeast Vacuole*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheuk Y.; Choy, Christopher H.; Wattson, Christina A.; Johnson, Danielle E.; Botelho, Roberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Lysosomes and the yeast vacuole are degradative and acidic organelles. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), a master architect of endolysosome and vacuole identity, is thought to be necessary for vacuolar acidification in yeast. There is also evidence that PtdIns(3,5)P2 may play a role in lysosomal acidification in higher eukaryotes. Nevertheless, these conclusions rely on qualitative assays of lysosome/vacuole pH. For example, quinacrine, an acidotropic fluorescent base, does not accumulate in the vacuoles of fab1Δ yeast. Fab1, along with its mammalian ortholog PIKfyve, is the lipid kinase responsible for synthesizing PtdIns(3,5)P2. In this study, we employed several assays that quantitatively assessed the lysosomal and vacuolar pH in PtdIns(3,5)P2-depleted cells. Using ratiometric imaging, we conclude that lysosomes retain a pH lysosomes. PMID:25713145

  4. Searching for "A Third Space": A Creative Pathway towards International PhD Students' Academic Acculturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliot, Dely Lazarte; Baumfield, Vivienne; Reid, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Undertaking a PhD is a challenging endeavour. Pursuing a doctoral education in a "foreign" context tends to increase the demands of this intellectual venture. The nature of research-based PhD programmes, often characterised by a lack of formal curricula where academic supervision lasts several years, may add another layer of complexity.…

  5. Evolution of pH in a radwaste repository: internal reactions between concrete constituents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atkinson, A.; Everitt, N.M.; Guppy, R.M.

    1988-01-01

    The pH is an important characteristic of the chemical conditions within a radioactive waste repository. A high pH is particularly beneficial from a variety of points of view and this can be assured by the use of cementitious materials within the repository. Reactions between repository components which have an influence on pH have been studied in accelerated laboratory experiments. The reactions studied were those occurring in modified cements (specifically 90% pulverized fly ash/10% ordinary Portland cement and 90% blast furnace slag/10% OPC) and between aqueous calcium hydroxide and both crystalline and amorphous SiO 2 . The experiments indicate that extensive use of fuel ash leads to uncertainty in long term pH which could be as low as 9 to 10 in such cases. Experiments with crystalline calcium silicon hydrate (CSH) minerals suggest that crystallization of amorphous CSH could also lead to pH being lower than the optimum. (author)

  6. The Road to Become a Legitimate Scholar: A Case Study of International PhD Students in Science and Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pia Bøgelund

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the doctoral education process is to create and legitimize scholarly researchers. This transformation, from student to scholar, is widely discussed in the literature. However, recent rapid changes in university culture have resulted in less time for supervision, stricter completion deadlines, and a greater focus on efficiency and productivity. This has had an impact on this transition process, and this impact has not been widely studied. The aim of this article is to understand the consequences of the current trends for PhD students and the education of PhD students in general. The article is based on interviews with 14 international students from two different research programs at the Faculty of Engineering and Science at Aalborg University in Denmark. The case of international PhD students in a western setting is singled out as a challenging case for becoming a legitimate scholar, since they face the additional challenge of becoming socialised into their new foreign setting. Overall, the study concludes that the transition process of doctoral students is affected by the way different supervisors deal with current university trends and how PhD students fit or do not fit into their knowledge production practices. The study identifies matches or mismatches in a knowledge production perspective, quality of contact, and degree of independence of the PhD student as factors that influence whether a transition process can be marked as sound, troublesome, or lacking. Finally, the study identifies an overall risk of neglecting the more interdependent types of international PhD students. Suggestions are given as how to address this risk.

  7. The Fab1/PIKfyve phosphoinositide phosphate kinase is not necessary to maintain the pH of lysosomes and of the yeast vacuole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Cheuk Y; Choy, Christopher H; Wattson, Christina A; Johnson, Danielle E; Botelho, Roberto J

    2015-04-10

    Lysosomes and the yeast vacuole are degradative and acidic organelles. Phosphatidylinositol 3,5-bisphosphate (PtdIns(3,5)P2), a master architect of endolysosome and vacuole identity, is thought to be necessary for vacuolar acidification in yeast. There is also evidence that PtdIns(3,5)P2 may play a role in lysosomal acidification in higher eukaryotes. Nevertheless, these conclusions rely on qualitative assays of lysosome/vacuole pH. For example, quinacrine, an acidotropic fluorescent base, does not accumulate in the vacuoles of fab1Δ yeast. Fab1, along with its mammalian ortholog PIKfyve, is the lipid kinase responsible for synthesizing PtdIns(3,5)P2. In this study, we employed several assays that quantitatively assessed the lysosomal and vacuolar pH in PtdIns(3,5)P2-depleted cells. Using ratiometric imaging, we conclude that lysosomes retain a pH lysosomes. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Peranan sorbitol dalam mempertahankan kestabilan pH saliva pada proses pencegahan karies (The role of sorbitol in maintaining saliva’s pH to prevent caries process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Soesilo

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available People in Indonesia often consume food containing sucrose. If the sucrose consumed is in a large amount, it will decrease saliva’s pH and soon teeth destruction will happen. To avoid it, it is necessary to change sucrose consumption habit into another kind of sugar, namely sorbitol. Sorbitol is preferred to use, because it is cheaper and easier to get. Sorbitol is made from cassava, which is plentifully grown in Indonesia. Sorbitol is not good media for bacteria to grow. Because sorbitol has a diol, so it’s difficult to catalyst by glucosyltransferase enzyme, which is produced by bacteria Streptococcus mutans. The conclusion is that sorbitol is difficult to be fermented by Streptococcus mutans so it will not decrease saliva’s pH.

  9. Methylation of Brazilein on Secang (Caesalpinia sappan Linn) Wood Extract for Maintain Color Stability to the Changes of pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulma, Zeni; Rahayuningsih, Edia; Dwi Wahyuningsih, Tutik

    2018-01-01

    The stability of natural dyes to the changes of pH is really necessary when the natural dyes are applied either on fabric or food. This research aimed to increase the stability of brazilein, a compound contained within the secang wood extract, to the changes of pH. The methylation process was done by reacting Dimethyl Carbonate (DMC) with the brazilein on the secang wood extract. DMC acts as a substance that substitute hydroxyl group on brazilein. The methylation reaction of brazilein on secang wood extract was operated on a three-necked round-bottomed flask fitted with mercury-sealed stirrer and reflux condenser under 80°C temperature and 250 rpm stirring speed. There were two variables observed in this research; the DMC amount ratio to the amount of secang wood extract and the time of the methylation process. The research showed that at the 1:10 the DMC amount ratio to the amount of wood extract and 8 hours of the methylation process give the better stability of color of the secang wood extract than the variation of the other variables.

  10. International guidelines for the in vivo assessment of skin properties in non-clinical settings: part 1. pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefaniak, Aleksandr B; du Plessis, Johan; John, Swen M; Eloff, Fritz; Agner, Tove; Chou, Tzu-Chieh; Nixon, Rosemary; Steiner, Markus F C; Kudla, Irena; Holness, D Linn

    2013-01-01

    Background Skin surface pH is known to influence the dissolution and partitioning of chemicals and may influence exposures that lead to skin diseases. Non-clinical environments (e.g. workplaces) are highly variable, thereby presenting unique measurement challenges that are not typically encountered in clinical settings. Hence, guidelines are needed for consistent measurement of skin surface pH in environments that are difficult to control. Methods An expert workshop was convened at the 5th International Conference on Occupational and Environmental Exposure of Skin to Chemicals to review available data on factors that could influence the determination of skin surface pH in non-clinical settings with emphasis on the workplace as a worst case scenario. Results The key elements of the guidelines are: (i) minimize, to the extent feasible, the influences of relevant endogenous (anatomical position, skin health, time of day), exogenous (hand washing, barrier creams, soaps and detergents, occlusion), environmental (seasonality), and measurement (atmospheric conditions) factors; (ii) report pH measurements results as a difference or percent change (not absolute values) using a measure of central tendency and variability; and (iii) report notable deviations from these guidelines and other relevant factors that may influence measurements. Conclusion Guidelines on the measurement and reporting of skin surface pH in non-clinical settings should promote consistency in data reporting, facilitate inter-comparison of study results, and aid in understanding and preventing occupational skin diseases. PMID:23279097

  11. Measurement of the internal pH of mast cell granules using microvolumetric fluorescence and isotopic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1987-01-01

    The intragranular pH of isolated mast cell granules was measured. Because of the minute amounts of isolated granules available, two techniques were developed by modifying aminoacridine fluorescence and [ 14 C]methylamine accumulation techniques to permit measurements with microliter sample volumes. Granule purity was demonstrated by electron microscopy, ruthenium red exclusion, and biochemical (histamine, mast cell granule protease) analysis. The internal pH was determined to be 5.55 +/- 0.06, indicating that the pH environment within mast cell granules is not significantly different from that of previously studied granule types (i.e., chromaffin, platelet, pancreatic islet, and pituitary granules). Collapse of the pH gradient by NH+4 was demonstrated with both techniques. No evidence of Cl-/OH- or specific cation/H+ transport was found, and major chloride permeability could not be unequivocably demonstrated. Ca 2+ and Cl- at concentrations normally present extracellularly destabilized granules in the presence of NH+4, but this phenomenon does not necessarily indicate a role for these ions in the exocytotic release of granule contents from intact cells. The pH measurement techniques developed for investigating the properties of granules in mast cells may be useful for studying other granules that can be obtained only in limited quantities

  12. The experience of international nursing students studying for a PhD in the U.K: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Catrin; Stevenson, Keith

    2011-06-13

    Educating nurses to doctoral level is an important means of developing nursing capacity globally. There is an international shortage of doctoral nursing programmes, hence many nurses seek their doctorates overseas. The UK is a key provider of doctoral education for international nursing students, however, very little is known about international doctoral nursing students' learning experiences during their doctoral study. This paper reports on a national study that sought to investigate the learning expectations and experiences of overseas doctoral nursing students in the UK. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in 2008/09 with 17 international doctoral nursing students representing 9 different countries from 6 different UK universities. Data were analysed thematically. All 17 interviewees were enrolled on 'traditional' 3 year PhD programmes and the majority (15/17) planned to work in higher education institutions back in their home country upon graduation. Studying for a UK PhD involved a number of significant transitions, including adjusting to a new country/culture, to new pedagogical approaches and, in some cases, to learning in a second language. Many students had expected a more structured programme of study, with a stronger emphasis on professional nursing issues as well as research - akin to the professional doctorate. Students did not always feel well integrated into their department's wider research environment, and wanted more opportunities to network with their UK peers. A good supervision relationship was perceived as the most critical element of support in a doctoral programme, but good relationships were sometimes difficult to attain due to differences in student/supervisor expectations and in approaches to supervision. The PhD was perceived as a difficult and stressful journey, but those nearing the end reflected positively on it as a life changing experience in which they had developed key professional and personal skills. Doctoral

  13. The experience of international nursing students studying for a PhD in the U.K: A qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevenson Keith

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Educating nurses to doctoral level is an important means of developing nursing capacity globally. There is an international shortage of doctoral nursing programmes, hence many nurses seek their doctorates overseas. The UK is a key provider of doctoral education for international nursing students, however, very little is known about international doctoral nursing students' learning experiences during their doctoral study. This paper reports on a national study that sought to investigate the learning expectations and experiences of overseas doctoral nursing students in the UK. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted in 2008/09 with 17 international doctoral nursing students representing 9 different countries from 6 different UK universities. Data were analysed thematically. All 17 interviewees were enrolled on 'traditional' 3 year PhD programmes and the majority (15/17 planned to work in higher education institutions back in their home country upon graduation. Results Studying for a UK PhD involved a number of significant transitions, including adjusting to a new country/culture, to new pedagogical approaches and, in some cases, to learning in a second language. Many students had expected a more structured programme of study, with a stronger emphasis on professional nursing issues as well as research - akin to the professional doctorate. Students did not always feel well integrated into their department's wider research environment, and wanted more opportunities to network with their UK peers. A good supervision relationship was perceived as the most critical element of support in a doctoral programme, but good relationships were sometimes difficult to attain due to differences in student/supervisor expectations and in approaches to supervision. The PhD was perceived as a difficult and stressful journey, but those nearing the end reflected positively on it as a life changing experience in which they had

  14. Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) Sodium Bicarbonate/Carbonate Buffer in an Open Aqueous Carbon Dioxide System and Corollary Electrochemical/Chemical Reactions Relative to System pH Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegman, Thomas W.; Wilson, Mark E.; Glasscock, Brad; Holt, Mike

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) Internal Active Thermal Control System (IATCS) experienced a number of chemical changes driven by system absorption of CO2 which altered the coolant’s pH. The natural effects of the decrease in pH from approximately 9.2 to less than 8.4 had immediate consequences on system corrosion rates and corrosion product interactions with specified coolant constituents. The alkalinity of the system was increased through the development and implementation of a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer that would increase coolant pH to 9.0 – 10.0 and maintain pH above 9.0 in the presence of ISS cabin concentrations of CO2 up to twenty times higher than ground concentrations. This paper defines how a carbonate/bicarbonate buffer works in an open carbon dioxide system and summarizes the analyses performed on the buffer for safe and effective application in the on-orbit system. The importance of the relationship between the cabin environment and the IATCS is demonstrated as the dominant factor in understanding the system chemistry and pH trends before and after addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer. The paper also documents the corollary electrochemical and chemical reactions the system has experienced and the rationale for remediation of these effects with the addition of the carbonate/bicarbonate buffer.

  15. InlB-mediated Listeria monocytogenes internalization requires a balanced phospholipase D activity maintained through phospho-cofilin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Han, Xuelin; Yu, Rentao; Ji, Lei; Zhen, Dongyu; Tao, Sha; Li, Shuai; Sun, Yansong; Huang, Liuyu; Feng, Zhe; Li, Xianping; Han, Gaige; Schmidt, Martina; Han, Li

    Internalization of Listeria monocytogenes into non-phagocytic cells is tightly controlled by host cell actin dynamics and cell membrane alterations. However, knowledge about the impact of phosphatidylcholine cleavage driven by host cell phospholipase D (PLD) on Listeria internalization into

  16. Biobased, Internally pH-Sensitive Materials: Immobilized Yellow Fluorescent Protein as an Optical Sensor for Spatiotemporal Mapping of pH Inside Porous Matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Consolati, Tanja; Bolivar, Juan M; Petrasek, Zdenek; Berenguer, Jose; Hidalgo, Aurelio; Guisán, Jose M; Nidetzky, Bernd

    2018-02-28

    The pH is fundamental to biological function and its measurement therefore crucial across all biosciences. Unlike homogenous bulk solution, solids often feature internal pH gradients due to partition effects and confined biochemical reactions. Thus, a full spatiotemporal mapping for pH characterization in solid materials with biological systems embedded in them is essential. In here, therefore, a fully biocompatible methodology for real-time optical sensing of pH within porous materials is presented. A genetically encoded ratiometric pH sensor, the enhanced superfolder yellow fluorescent protein (sYFP), is used to functionalize the internal surface of different materials, including natural and synthetic organic polymers as well as silica frameworks. By using controlled, tailor-made immobilization, sYFP is homogenously distributed within these materials and so enables, via self-referenced imaging analysis, pH measurements in high accuracy and with useful spatiotemporal resolution. Evolution of internal pH is monitored in consequence of a proton-releasing enzymatic reaction, the hydrolysis of penicillin by a penicillin acylase, taking place in solution or confined to the solid surface of the porous matrix. Unlike optochemical pH sensors, which often interfere with biological function, labeling with sYFP enables pH sensing without altering the immobilized enzyme's properties in any of the materials used. Fast response of sYFP to pH change permits evaluation of biochemical kinetics within the solid materials. Thus, pH sensing based on immobilized sYFP represents a broadly applicable technique to the study of biology confined to the internally heterogeneous environment of solid matrices.

  17. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    The 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference was held at the IFOM-IEO-Campus in Milan from 19-21 May 2010 http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.phpThe Conference covered many topics related to cancer, from basic biology to clinical aspects of the disease. All attendees presented their research, by either giving a talk or presenting a poster. This conference is an opportunity to introduce PhD students to top cancer research institutes across Europe.THE CORE PARTICIPANTING INSTITUTES INCLUDED: European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM)-IFOM-IEO Campus, MilanBeatson Institute for Cancer Research (BICR), GlasgowCambridge Research Institute (CRI), Cambridge, UKMRC Gray Institute of Radiation Biology (GIROB), OxfordLondon Research Institute (LRI), LondonPaterson Institute for Cancer Research (PICR), ManchesterThe Netherlands Cancer Institute (NKI), Amsterdam'You organizers have crushed all my prejudices towards Italians. Congratulations, I enjoyed the conference immensely!' Even if it might have sounded like rudeness for sure this was supposed to be a genuine compliment (at least, that's how we took it), also considering that it was told by a guy who himself was the fusion of two usually antithetical concepts: fashion style and English nationality.The year 2010 has marked an important event for Italian research in the international scientific panorama: the European School of Molecular Medicine (SEMM) had the honour to host the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference, which was held from 19-21 May 2010 at the IFOM-IEO-Campus (http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php) in Milan.The conference was attended by more than one hundred students, coming from a selection of cutting edge European institutes devoted to cancer research. The rationale behind it is the promotion of cooperation among young scientists across Europe to debate about science and to exchange ideas and experiences. But that is not all, it is also designed for PhD students to get in touch

  18. THE BIOENERGETICS OF AMMONIA AND HYDROXYLAMINE OXIDATION IN NITROSOMONAS-EUROPAEA AT ACID AND ALKALINE PH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    FRIJLINK, MJ; ABEE, T; LAANBROEK, HJ; DEBOER, W; KONINGS, WN

    Autotrophic ammonia oxidizers depend on alkaline or neutral conditions for optimal activity. Below pH 7 growth and metabolic activity decrease dramatically. Actively oxidizing cells of Nitrosomonas europaea do not maintain a constant internal pH when the external pH is varied from 5 to 8. Studies of

  19. Maintainability allocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, Christian.

    1980-06-01

    The author gives the general lines of a method for the allocation and for the evaluation of maintainability of complex systems which is to be developed during the conference. The maintainability objective is supposed to be formulated under the form of a mean time to repair (M.T.T.R.) [fr

  20. International Symposium: “Scientific School of L.S. Vygotsky: Traditions and Innovations” and International ISCAR Summer University for PhD Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baykovskaya N.A.,

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article represents a brief report on the work of the International Symposium: «Scientific School of L.S. Vygotsky: Traditions and Innovations» and VI th International ISCAR Summer University for PhD Students and young scholars, that were held in Moscow State University of Psychology & Education on June, 28 — July, 3 in 2016 in commemoration of the 120th anniversary of the great Russian psychologist L.S. Vygotsky. The main goals of the events organised by MSUPE include: analysis of the basic principles and the system of concepts of L.S. Vygotsky’s scientific school, discussion of the current state and the prospect for the development of the cultural-historical theory in Russia and abroad, integration of the ideas of the cultural-historical psychology and activity approach in various kinds of social and educational practices, as well as conducting research in the international scientific space. Symposium gathered the world’s leading experts and young scholars in the field of cultural-historical theory and activity approach from 19 countries, including United Kingdom, Australia, Switzerland, Greece, Brasil and USA.

  1. Contribution of International and Regional Networks in Developing and Maintaining Human Capacity Building for Nuclear Power Programmes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, O. E.

    2015-01-01

    Capacity is defined as; the ability of individuals and organizations or organizational units to perform functions effectively, efficiently and sustainably. Capacity building is an evidence-driven process of strengthening the abilities of individuals, organizations, and systems to perform core functions sustainably, and to continue to improve and develop over time. This article will explain the contributions of knowledge networks at the national, regional and international level in developing the existing capacity building and human resources for regulatory body in Sudan, to confront the future challenges regarding to nuclear power program- safety and security. The article will compare the advantages and effectiveness of these knowledge networks (IAEA, ANNuR, FNRBA) in capacity building and enhance the infrastructure of national regulatory body. And how these networks contribute to enable the regulatory bodies in Africa and Arab countries, to establish and strengthen their regulatory infrastructure for nuclear power programme consistent with international standards and recommendations. As well as the recommendations resulting and deduced from comparative study to promote the exchange of knowledge, experience and information among its members. (author)

  2. Maintaining knowledge, training and infrastructure for research and development in nuclear safety - INSAG-16. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to emphasize the importance of maintaining capabilities for nuclear research and education, especially with regard to safety aspects, so that nuclear safety may be maintained in IAEA Member States, and to alert Member States to the potential for significant harm if the infrastructure for research, development and education is not maintained. If the infrastructure for nuclear safety is not maintained, there will be a steady decrease in expertise, and thus in capability to respond to new challenges. The lead time in developing replacement educational opportunities is very long, because most institutions will require an indication of the number of enthusiastic potential students before investing in new infrastructure, and potential students may look elsewhere in the absence of an exciting analytical and experimental programme and a growing career field. Once lost, it would require massive inputs of resources from many IAEA Member States to attempt to re-establish the infrastructure, as was done to establish it when nuclear technology was new. The result could be a downward spiral in which expertise is lost, influence of the technical community on the decision making process is diminished, and complacency, fed by diminished technical capability, begins to exert a strong effect. In view of the above, INSAG has the following recommendations: In order to maintain and further enhance the safety of nuclear facilities and to protect workers and the public and the environment from radiological consequences, the infrastructure for safety research (experimental facilities, highly competent staff and modern analytical tools) must be maintained and supported by the responsible governmental organizations as well as by the operating organizations and manufacturers. This support should include international networking and co-operation, including joint funding of centres of excellence that have facilities and equipment for use in nuclear research

  3. Maintaining knowledge, training and infrastructure for research and development in nuclear safety. INSAG-16. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to emphasize the importance of maintaining capabilities for nuclear research and education, especially with regard to safety aspects, so that nuclear safety may be maintained in IAEA Member States, and to alert Member States to the potential for significant harm if the infrastructure for research, development and education is not maintained. If the infrastructure for nuclear safety is not maintained, there will be a steady decrease in expertise, and thus in capability to respond to new challenges. The lead time in developing replacement educational opportunities is very long, because most institutions will require an indication of the number of enthusiastic potential students before investing in new infrastructure, and potential students may look elsewhere in the absence of an exciting analytical and experimental programme and a growing career field. Once lost, it would require massive inputs of resources from many IAEA Member States to attempt to re-establish the infrastructure, as was done to establish it when nuclear technology was new. The result could be a downward spiral in which expertise is lost, influence of the technical community on the decision making process is diminished, and complacency, fed by diminished technical capability, begins to exert a strong effect. In view of the above, INSAG has the following recommendations: In order to maintain and further enhance the safety of nuclear facilities and to protect workers and the public and the environment from radiological consequences, the infrastructure for safety research (experimental facilities, highly competent staff and modern analytical tools) must be maintained and supported by the responsible governmental organizations as well as by the operating organizations and manufacturers. This support should include international networking and co-operation, including joint funding of centres of excellence that have facilities and equipment for use in nuclear research

  4. Maintaining positive

    OpenAIRE

    Gheorghe Gh. IONESCU; Adina Letitia NEGRUSA

    2004-01-01

    Maintaining positive work-force relationships includes in effective labor-management relations and making appropriate responses to current employee issues. Among the major current employee issues are protection from arbitrary dismissal, drug and alcohol abuse, privacy rights and family maters and they impact work. In our paper we discus two problems: first, the meanings of industrial democracy; second, the three principal operational concepts of industrial democracy (1) industrial democracy t...

  5. Variations of internal pH in typical Italian sourdough yeasts during co-fermentation with lactobacilli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valmorri, Sara; Mortensen, Henrik Dam; Jespersen, Lene

    2008-01-01

    The effects of organic acids (lactic and acetic) and extracellular pH (pHex) on the intracellular pH (pHi) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida milleri during co-fermentation with lactobacilli were investigated by using Fluorescence-Ratio-Imaging-Microscopy (FRIM). Yeasts were grown in a syste...

  6. Dual-lifetime referencing (DLR: a powerful method for on-line measurement of internal pH in carrier-bound immobilized biocatalysts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boniello Caterina

    2012-03-01

    conditions of continuous measurement. During hydrolysis of cephalosporin C by the immobilizate in a stirred reactor with bulk pH maintained at 8.0, the intraparticle pH dropped initially by about 1 pH unit and gradually returned to the bulk pH, reflecting the depletion of substrate from solution. These results support measurement of intraparticle pH as a potential analytical processing tool for proton-forming/consuming biotransformations catalyzed by carrier-bound immobilized enzymes. Conclusions Fluorescein and Ru(dpp constitute a useful pair of luminophores in by DLR-based intraparticle pH monitoring. The pH range accessible by the chosen DLR system overlaps favorably with the pH ranges at which enzymes are optimally active and stable. DLR removes the restriction of working with static immobilized enzyme particles, enabling suspensions of particles to be characterized also. The pH gradient developed between particle and bulk liquid during reaction steady state is an important carrier selection parameter for enzyme immobilization and optimization of biocatalytic conversion processes. Determination of this parameter was rendered possible by the presented DLR method.

  7. Maintaining evolvability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, James F

    2008-12-01

    Although molecular methods, such as QTL mapping, have revealed a number of loci with large effects, it is still likely that the bulk of quantitative variability is due to multiple factors, each with small effect. Typically, these have a large additive component. Conventional wisdom argues that selection, natural or artificial, uses up additive variance and thus depletes its supply. Over time, the variance should be reduced, and at equilibrium be near zero. This is especially expected for fitness and traits highly correlated with it. Yet, populations typically have a great deal of additive variance, and do not seem to run out of genetic variability even after many generations of directional selection. Long-term selection experiments show that populations continue to retain seemingly undiminished additive variance despite large changes in the mean value. I propose that there are several reasons for this. (i) The environment is continually changing so that what was formerly most fit no longer is. (ii) There is an input of genetic variance from mutation, and sometimes from migration. (iii) As intermediate-frequency alleles increase in frequency towards one, producing less variance (as p --> 1, p(1 - p) --> 0), others that were originally near zero become more common and increase the variance. Thus, a roughly constant variance is maintained. (iv) There is always selection for fitness and for characters closely related to it. To the extent that the trait is heritable, later generations inherit a disproportionate number of genes acting additively on the trait, thus increasing genetic variance. For these reasons a selected population retains its ability to evolve. Of course, genes with large effect are also important. Conspicuous examples are the small number of loci that changed teosinte to maize, and major phylogenetic changes in the animal kingdom. The relative importance of these along with duplications, chromosome rearrangements, horizontal transmission and polyploidy

  8. Monitoring of internal pH gradients within multi-layer tablets by optical methods and EPR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eisenächer, Friederike; Schädlich, Andreas; Mäder, Karsten

    2011-09-30

    The high variability of gastrointestinal pH is a general challenge regarding constant release from oral drug delivery systems, especially for ionisable drugs. These drugs often show a pH-dependent solubility and therewith associated intra- and inter-individual variability of emerging drug plasma levels. Several strategies have been investigated with the intention to influence the microenvironmental pH (pH(M)) within solid formulations and therefore achieve pH-independent release profiles. Because of the heterogeneity of solid systems, a precise prediction of the occurring pH(M) is rather difficult. It is therefore important to monitor the pH(M) within the formulations to achieve requested release as well as to minimise pH-dependent degradation processes of the active compound. The purpose of the current study was the analysis of pH(M) gradients within 2- and 3-layer tablets during hydration using 3 different techniques for comparison intensions, in particular a pH indicator dye, fluorescence imaging and EPR imaging. The influence of the presence or absence of pH modifying substances and of an additional lipophilic inter layer on the pH(M) was investigated as well as the variation of matrix forming excipient and buffer pH. The influence of the pH(M) on drug release was analysed as well. In addition, benchtop MRI was accomplished to gain a deeper insight on the hydration and erosion behaviour of 2- and 3-layer tablets. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Maintaining knowledge, training and infrastructure for research and development in nuclear safety. A note by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this INSAG Note is to emphasize the importance of maintaining capabilities for nuclear research and education, especially with regard to safety aspects, so that nuclear safety may be maintained in IAEA Member States, and to alert Member States to the potential for significant harm if the infrastructure for research, development and education is not maintained

  10. Acid dissociation constants of uridine-5 Prime -diphosphate compounds determined by {sup 31}phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and internal pH referencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jancan, Igor [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Macnaughtan, Megan A., E-mail: macnau@lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first reported phosphate and imide pK{sub a} values of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-S-GlcNAc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New role for the monosaccharide in the imide pK{sub a} of uridine-5 Prime -phosphate compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDP-S-GlcNAc and UDP-GlcNAc have the same phosphate pK{sub a}, unlike thioyl analogs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {sup 31}P chemical shift of inorganic phosphate is a viable internal pH reference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stability of the external {sup 31}P chemical shift reference is essential. - Abstract: The acid dissociation constant (pK{sub a}) of small, biological molecules is an important physical property used for investigating enzyme mechanisms and inhibitor design. For phosphorus-containing molecules, the {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift is sensitive to the local chemical environment, particularly to changes in the electronic state of the molecule. Taking advantage of this property, we present a {sup 31}P NMR approach that uses inorganic phosphate buffer as an internal pH reference to determine the pK{sub a} values of the imide and second diphosphate of uridine-5 Prime -diphosphate compounds, including the first reported values for UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-S-GlcNAc. New methods for using inorganic phosphate buffer as an internal pH reference, involving mathematical correction factors and careful control of the chemical shift reference sample, are illustrated. A comparison of the newly determined imide and diphosphate pK{sub a} values of UDP, UDP-GlcNAc, and UDP-S-GlcNAc with other nucleotide phosphate and thio-analogs reveals the significance of the monosaccharide and sulfur position on the pK{sub a} values.

  11. PH og modernismen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahnfeldt-Mollerup, Merete

    2012-01-01

    Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus.......Artiklen kaster et kritisk blik på Poul Henningsens samfundsanalyse og dennes sammenhæng med hans design. PH ses i en bredere national og international sammenhæng. Diskussion af designmetoder, æstetik og Bauhaus....

  12. Coral calcifying fluid pH is modulated by seawater carbonate chemistry not solely seawater pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, S; Tambutté, E; Carpenter, R C; Edmunds, P J; Evensen, N R; Allemand, D; Ferrier-Pagès, C; Tambutté, S; Venn, A A

    2017-01-25

    Reef coral calcification depends on regulation of pH in the internal calcifying fluid (CF) in which the coral skeleton forms. However, little is known about calcifying fluid pH (pH CF ) regulation, despite its importance in determining the response of corals to ocean acidification. Here, we investigate pH CF in the coral Stylophora pistillata in seawater maintained at constant pH with manipulated carbonate chemistry to alter dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentration, and therefore total alkalinity (A T ). We also investigate the intracellular pH of calcifying cells, photosynthesis, respiration and calcification rates under the same conditions. Our results show that despite constant pH in the surrounding seawater, pH CF is sensitive to shifts in carbonate chemistry associated with changes in [DIC] and [A T ], revealing that seawater pH is not the sole driver of pH CF Notably, when we synthesize our results with published data, we identify linear relationships of pH CF with the seawater [DIC]/[H + ] ratio, [A T ]/ [H + ] ratio and [[Formula: see text

  13. Isolated secretion granules from parotid glands of chronically stimulated rats possess an alkaline internal pH and inward-directed H+ pump activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arvan, P.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-01-01

    Secretion granules have been isolated from the parotid glands of rats that have been chronically stimulated with the β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol. These granules are of interest because they package a quantitatively different set of secretory proteins in comparison with granules from the normal gland. Polypeptides enriched in proline, glycine, and glutamine, which are known to have pI's >10, replace α-amylase (pI's = 6.8) as the principal content species. The internal pH of granules from the treated rats changes from 7.8 in a potassium sulfate medium to 6.9 in a choline chloride medium. The increased pH over that of normal parotid granules (∼6.8) appears to protect the change in composition of the secretory contents. Whereas normal mature parotide granules have practically negligible levels of H + pumping ATPase activity, the isolated granules from isoproterenol-treated rats undergo a time-dependent internal acidification that requires the presence of ATP and is abolished by an H + ionophore. Additionally, an inside-positive granule transmembrane potential develops after ATP addition that depends upon ATP hydrolysis. Two independent methods have been used that exclude the possibility that contaminating organelles are the source of the H + -ATPase activity. Together these data provide clear evidence for the presence of an H + pump in the membranes of parotid granules from chronically stimulated rats. However, despite the presence of H + -pump activity, fluorescence microscopy with the weak base, acridine orange, reveals that the intragranular pH in live cells is greater than that of the cytoplasm

  14. PH sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Artero, C.; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a design of a marine instrument for the measurement of pH in seawater. The measurement system consists of a pH electrode connected to the underwater observatory OBSEA. The extracted data are useful for scientists researching ocean acidification. Peer Reviewed

  15. The Obligation to not Render Aid or Assistance so as to Maintain a Situation Created by the Breach of a Peremptory Norm of General International Law

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Djamchid Momtaz

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to prevent the consolidation of de facto authorities established in a territory following an unlawful use of force and/or contempt of the rights of the involved peoples to self-determination, international law imposes obligations on third States. Treaties entered into with the de facto authorities established on such territories on matters concerning them must ensure the interests of the people under their jurisdiction. Otherwise, these States must expect that these treaty relations will be criticized and eventually be denounced by national and international courts. Of the same concern is the origin of the distinction that international law establishes between the different acts of the de facto authorities administering these territories. Administrative acts issued to safeguard the civil rights of the people within their jurisdiction will not be null and void unlike those that seek to allow the population to enjoy the benefits of international cooperation. This is a difficult distinction to establish and implement.

  16. Plant Habitat (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  17. Assessment of the requirements for placing and maintaining Savannah River Site spent fuel storage basins under International Atomic Energy Agency safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amacker, O.P. Jr.; Curtis, M.M.; Delegard, C.H.; Hsue, S.T.; Whitesel, R.N.

    1997-03-01

    The United States is considering the offer of irradiated research reactor spent fuel (RRSF) for international safeguards applied by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The offer would be to add one or more spent fuel storage basins to the list of facilities eligible for IAEA safeguards. The fuel to be safeguarded would be stored in basins on the Savannah River Site (SRS). This RRSF potentially can include returns of Material Test Reactor (MTR) VAX fuel from Argentina, Brazil, and Chile (ABC); returns from other foreign research reactors; and fuel from domestic research reactors. Basins on the SRS being considered for this fuel storage are the Receiving Basin for Offsite Fuel (RBOF) and the L-Area Disassembly Basin (L-Basin). A working group of SRS, U.S. Department of Energy International Safeguards Division (NN-44), and National Laboratory personnel with experience in IAEA safeguards was convened to consider the requirements for applying the safeguards to this material. The working group projected the safeguards requirements and described alternatives

  18. Maintaining the design integrity of nuclear installations throughout their operating life. INSAG-19. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-01-01

    A nuclear power plant design is the product of the activities of many organizations, and changes to that design will occur continuously over the plant's lifetime. Reactor plants are designed to operate for a long period of time, typically 40 years, which may be extended for several decades. This period of time spans several working lifetimes of the staff of the plant, and its length represents a very specific challenge to safety and to the corporate asset management of the enterprise. It also implies that the vendor structure required to support the plant can be expected to change substantially during the plant's lifetime. this INSAG report discusses the problem of maintaining the integrity of design of a nuclear power plant over its entire lifetime in order to achieve a continuous high level of safety. A nuclear power plant design is the product of the activities of many organizations, and changes to that design will occur continuously over the plant's operating lifetime. Reactor plants are designed to operate for a long period of time, typically 40 years, which may be extended for several decades. This period of time spans several working lifetimes of the staff of the plant, and its length represents a very specific challenge to safety and to the corporate asset management of the enterprise. It also implies that the vendor structure required to support the plant can be expected to change substantially during the plant's lifetime. The purpose of this report is to identify the issues and some of the principles that should be addressed, discuss some of the solutions to the problem, and highlight the specific responsibilities of designers, operators and regulators. The issues and principles discussed here are also applicable to other nuclear installations (for example, research reactors and fuel cycle facilities). This INSAG report is directed at senior executives who are responsible for: the overall safety of nuclear installations; the operation, maintenance and

  19. Maintaining the design Integrity of nuclear installations throughout their operating life. INSAG-19. A report by the International Nuclear Safety Advisory Group (Russian Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    A nuclear power plant design is the product of the activities of many organizations, and changes to that design will occur continuously over the plant's lifetime. Reactor plants are designed to operate for a long period of time, typically 40 years, which may be extended for several decades. This period of time spans several working lifetimes of the staff of the plant, and its length represents a very specific challenge to safety and to the corporate asset management of the enterprise. It also implies that the vendor structure required to support the plant can be expected to change substantially during the plant's lifetime. this INSAG report discusses the problem of maintaining the integrity of design of a nuclear power plant over its entire lifetime in order to achieve a continuous high level of safety. A nuclear power plant design is the product of the activities of many organizations, and changes to that design will occur continuously over the plant's operating lifetime. Reactor plants are designed to operate for a long period of time, typically 40 years, which may be extended for several decades. This period of time spans several working lifetimes of the staff of the plant, and its length represents a very specific challenge to safety and to the corporate asset management of the enterprise. It also implies that the vendor structure required to support the plant can be expected to change substantially during the plant's lifetime. The purpose of this report is to identify the issues and some of the principles that should be addressed, discuss some of the solutions to the problem, and highlight the specific responsibilities of designers, operators and regulators. The issues and principles discussed here are also applicable to other nuclear installations (for example, research reactors and fuel cycle facilities). This INSAG report is directed at senior executives who are responsible for: the overall safety of nuclear installations; the operation

  20. Sea Hare Aplysia punctata (Mollusca: Gastropoda) Can Maintain Shell Calcification under Extreme Ocean Acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Nicholas; Dupont, Sam; Sigwart, Julia D

    2016-10-01

    Ocean acidification is expected to cause energetic constraints upon marine calcifying organisms such as molluscs and echinoderms, because of the increased costs of building or maintaining shell material in lower pH. We examined metabolic rate, shell morphometry, and calcification in the sea hare Aplysia punctata under short-term exposure (19 days) to an extreme ocean acidification scenario (pH 7.3, ∼2800 μatm pCO 2 ), along with a group held in control conditions (pH 8.1, ∼344 μatm pCO 2 ). This gastropod and its congeners are broadly distributed and locally abundant grazers, and have an internal shell that protects the internal organs. Specimens were examined for metabolic rate via closed-chamber respirometry, followed by removal and examination of the shell under confocal microscopy. Staining using calcein determined the amount of new calcification that occurred over 6 days at the end of the acclimation period. The width of new, pre-calcified shell on the distal shell margin was also quantified as a proxy for overall shell growth. Aplysia punctata showed a 30% reduction in metabolic rate under low pH, but calcification was not affected. This species is apparently able to maintain calcification rate even under extreme low pH, and even when under the energetic constraints of lower metabolism. This finding adds to the evidence that calcification is a largely autonomous process of crystallization that occurs as long as suitable haeomocoel conditions are preserved. There was, however, evidence that the accretion of new, noncalcified shell material may have been reduced, which would lead to overall reduced shell growth under longer-term exposures to low pH independent of calcification. Our findings highlight that the chief impact of ocean acidification upon the ability of marine invertebrates to maintain their shell under low pH may be energetic constraints that hinder growth of supporting structure, rather than maintenance of calcification.

  1. Maintaining Web Cache Coherency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Document coherency is a challenging problem for Web caching. Once the documents are cached throughout the Internet, it is often difficult to keep them coherent with the origin document without generating a new traffic that could increase the traffic on the international backbone and overload the popular servers. Several solutions have been proposed to solve this problem, among them two categories have been widely discussed: the strong document coherency and the weak document coherency. The cost and the efficiency of the two categories are still a controversial issue, while in some studies the strong coherency is far too expensive to be used in the Web context, in other studies it could be maintained at a low cost. The accuracy of these analysis is depending very much on how the document updating process is approximated. In this study, we compare some of the coherence methods proposed for Web caching. Among other points, we study the side effects of these methods on the Internet traffic. The ultimate goal is to study the cache behavior under several conditions, which will cover some of the factors that play an important role in the Web cache performance evaluation and quantify their impact on the simulation accuracy. The results presented in this study show indeed some differences in the outcome of the simulation of a Web cache depending on the workload being used, and the probability distribution used to approximate updates on the cached documents. Each experiment shows two case studies that outline the impact of the considered parameter on the performance of the cache.

  2. Alkaline pH sensor molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murayama, Takashi; Maruyama, Ichiro N

    2015-11-01

    Animals can survive only within a narrow pH range. This requires continual monitoring of environmental and body-fluid pH. Although a variety of acidic pH sensor molecules have been reported, alkaline pH sensor function is not well understood. This Review describes neuronal alkaline pH sensors, grouped according to whether they monitor extracellular or intracellular alkaline pH. Extracellular sensors include the receptor-type guanylyl cyclase, the insulin receptor-related receptor, ligand-gated Cl- channels, connexin hemichannels, two-pore-domain K+ channels, and transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Intracellular sensors include TRP channels and gap junction channels. Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying alkaline pH sensing is crucial for understanding how animals respond to environmental alkaline pH and how body-fluid pH is maintained within a narrow range. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Identification of a molecular pH sensor in coral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Tresguerres, Martin

    2017-11-15

    Maintaining stable intracellular pH (pHi) is essential for homeostasis, and requires the ability to both sense pH changes that may result from internal and external sources, and to regulate downstream compensatory pH pathways. Here we identified the cAMP-producing enzyme soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) as the first molecular pH sensor in corals. sAC protein was detected throughout coral tissues, including those involved in symbiosis and calcification. Application of a sAC-specific inhibitor caused significant and reversible pHi acidosis in isolated coral cells under both dark and light conditions, indicating sAC is essential for sensing and regulating pHi perturbations caused by respiration and photosynthesis. Furthermore, pHi regulation during external acidification was also dependent on sAC activity. Thus, sAC is a sensor and regulator of pH disturbances from both metabolic and external origin in corals. Since sAC is present in all coral cell types, and the cAMP pathway can regulate virtually every aspect of cell physiology through post-translational modifications of proteins, sAC is likely to trigger multiple homeostatic mechanisms in response to pH disturbances. This is also the first evidence that sAC modulates pHi in any non-mammalian animal. Since corals are basal metazoans, our results indicate this function is evolutionarily conserved across animals. © 2017 The Author(s).

  4. Ergonomics Contribution in Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teymourian, Kiumars; Seneviratne, Dammika; Galar, Diego

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this paper is to describe an ergonomics contribution in maintainability. The economical designs, inputs and training helps to increase the maintainability indicators for industrial devices. This analysis can be helpful, among other cases, to compare systems, to achieve a better design regarding maintainability requirements, to improve this maintainability under specific industrial environment and to foresee maintainability problems due to eventual changes in a device operation conditions. With this purpose, this work first introduces the notion of ergonomics and human factors, maintainability and the implementation of assessment of human postures, including some important postures to perform maintenance activities. A simulation approach is used to identify the critical posture of the maintenance personnel and implements the defined postures with minimal loads on the personnel who use the equipment in a practical scenario. The simulation inputs are given to the designers to improve the workplace/equipment in order to high level of maintainability. Finally, the work concludes summarizing the more significant aspects and suggesting future research.

  5. The mechanism of electron gating in proton pumping cytochrome c oxidase: the effect of pH and temperature on internal electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzezinski, P; Malmström, B G

    1987-10-29

    Electron-transfer reactions following flash photolysis of the mixed-valence cytochrome oxidase-CO complex have been measured at 445, 598 and 830 nm between pH 5.2 and 9.0 in the temperature range of 0-25 degrees C. There is a rapid electron transfer from the cytochrome a3-CuB pair to CuA (time constant: 14200 s-1), which is followed by a slower electron transfer to cytochrome a. Both the rate and the amplitude of the rapid phase are independent of pH, and the rate in the direction from CuA to cytochrome a3-CuB is practically independent of temperature. The second phase depends strongly on pH due to the titration of an acid-base group with pKa = 7.6. The equilibrium at pH 7.4 corresponds to reduction potentials of 225 and 345 mV for cytochrome a and a3, respectively, from which it is concluded that the enzyme is in a different conformation compared to the fully oxidized form. The results have been used to suggest a series of reaction steps in a cycle of the oxidase as a proton pump. Application of the electron-transfer theory to the temperature-dependence data suggests a mechanism for electron gating in the pump. Reduction of both cytochrome a and CuA leads to a conformational change, which changes the structure of cytochrome a3-CuB in such a way that the reorganizational barrier for electron transfer is removed and the driving force is increased.

  6. Two showy traits, scent emission and pigmentation, are finely coregulated by the MYB transcription factor PH4 in petunia flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cna'ani, Alon; Spitzer-Rimon, Ben; Ravid, Jasmin; Farhi, Moran; Masci, Tania; Aravena-Calvo, Javiera; Ovadis, Marianna; Vainstein, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    The mechanism underlying the emission of phenylpropanoid volatiles is poorly understood. Here, we reveal the involvement of PH4, a petunia MYB-R2R3 transcription factor previously studied for its role in vacuolar acidification, in floral volatile emission. We used the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach to knock down PH4 expression in petunia, measured volatile emission and internal pool sizes by GC-MS, and analyzed transcript abundances of scent-related phenylpropanoid genes in flowers. Silencing of PH4 resulted in a marked decrease in floral phenylpropanoid volatile emission, with a concurrent increase in internal pool levels. Expression of scent-related phenylpropanoid genes was not affected. To identify putative scent-related targets of PH4, we silenced PH5, a tonoplast-localized H(+) -ATPase that maintains vacuolar pH homeostasis. Suppression of PH5 did not yield the reduced-emission phenotype, suggesting that PH4 does not operate in the context of floral scent through regulation of vacuolar pH. We conclude that PH4 is a key floral regulator that integrates volatile production and emission processes and interconnects two essential floral traits - color and scent. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Maintaining dignity in vulnerability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2016-01-01

    to understand the meaning of the narrated text. Results. The meaning of maintaining dignity was constituted in a sense of vulnerability to the self, and elucidated in three major interrelated themes: Being involved as a human being, being involved as the person one is and strives to become, and being involved...

  8. Internal Bleeding

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fractures (Part II) Additional Content Medical News Internal Bleeding By Amy H. Kaji, MD, PhD, Associate Professor, ... Emergency First Aid Priorities Cardiac Arrest Choking Internal Bleeding Severed or Constricted Limbs or Digits Soft-Tissue ...

  9. Constructability and maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hart, R.S.

    1985-01-01

    A set of principles for minimizing the construction schedule was established at the outset of the CANDU 300 programme. Consideration of these principles and other factors led to the development of the unique CANDU 300 station layout. The paper discusses the CANDU 300 station layout and construction methods. In summary, the station layout provides 360 deg. construction access to all buildings, separation of nuclear and non-nuclear systems, precise and minimal physical interfaces between buildings, accommodation of many contractors and construction activities without interference, and maximum flexibility in terms of constructional, financial and supply arrangements. The CANDU 300 further employs modularization, shop fabrication and advanced instrumentation (multiplexers, remote processors, data highways) to minimize construction time. Many of the CANDU 300 features that enhance constructability also contribute to maintainability. These include the 360 deg. access to all principal buildings, the uncluttered and spacious building layouts, the simplification of systems and the high level of modularization. The CANDU 300 has also been designed to facilitate the replacement of all key components, thereby offering an essentially unlimited station life. A prime example is a reduction in the fuel channel inlet end-fitting diameter such that the fuel channels can be shop assembled and easily replaced after the initial 40 years of operation, without an extended unit outage. Maintainability within the reactor building has been given particular attention in the CANDU 300 design; key features of other CANDU reactors (the ability to replace a heat transport system pump motor at power, for example) have been incorporated, while accessibility and maintainability of all systems and components have been enhanced. These and other aspects of maintainability are discussed. (author)

  10. Reliability and maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    Several communications in this conference are concerned with nuclear plant reliability and maintainability; their titles are: maintenance optimization of stand-by Diesels of 900 MW nuclear power plants; CLAIRE: an event-based simulation tool for software testing; reliability as one important issue within the periodic safety review of nuclear power plants; design of nuclear building ventilation by the means of functional analysis; operation characteristic analysis for a power industry plant park, as a function of influence parameters

  11. Seamless service: maintaining momentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, N; Timoney, R

    1994-01-01

    Describes the process used by the Mater Infirmorum Hospital in Belfast in 1992-1994 to achieve high quality care (Seamless Service), motivate staff to deliver and measure performance. Aims of the project include focusing the organization on the customer, improving teamwork and motivation at all levels. After comprehensive data collection from GPs, patients and staff management forums developed a full TQM strategy to gain support and maintain momentum including innovative staff events (every staff member was given the opportunity to attend) where multilevel, multidisciplinary workshops enabled staff to design customer care standards, develop teams and lead customer-driven change.

  12. Gestures maintain spatial imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesp, R; Hesse, J; Keutmann, D; Wheaton, K

    2001-01-01

    Recent theories suggest alternatives to the commonly held belief that the sole role of gestures is to communicate meaning directly to listeners. Evidence suggests that gestures may serve a cognitive function for speakers, possibly acting as lexical primes. We observed that participants gestured more often when describing a picture from memory than when the picture was present and that gestures were not influenced by manipulating eye contact of a listener. We argue that spatial imagery serves a short-term memory function during lexical search and that gestures may help maintain spatial images. When spatial imagery is not necessary, as in conditions of direct visual stimulation, reliance on gestures is reduced or eliminated.

  13. Maintainability design guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pack, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The Human Factors Design Guide for Maintainability provides guidance for systematically incorporating good human factors techniques into the design of power plants. The guide describes a means of developing a comprehensive program plan to ensure compliance with the human factors approaches specified by the utility. The guide also provides specific recommendations for design practices, with examples, bases, and references. The recommendations are formatted for easy use by nuclear power plant design teams and by utility personnel involved in specification and design review. The guide was developed under EPRI research project RP2166-4 and is currently being published

  14. Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO AND Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO: SYNTHESIS AND INFRARED STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ABDOU MBAYE

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The mixture of ethanolic solutions of Ph3CCOOSnPh3 and Ph3PO or Ph3AsO gives Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3PO and Ph3CCOOSnPh3.Ph3AsO adducts which have been characterized by infrared spectroscopy. A discrete structure is suggested for both, the environment around the tin centre being trigonal bipyramidal, the triphenylacetate anion behaving as a mondentate ligand.

  15. Maintaining Relationship Based Procurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Davis

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Alliance and relationship projects are increasingin number and represent a large pool of work. Tobe successful relationship style contracts dependon soft-dollar factors, particularly the participants'ability to work together within an agreedframework, generally they are not based on lowbid tendering. Participants should be prepared todo business in an open environment based ontrust and mutually agreed governance. Theresearch evaluates relationship maintenance inthe implementation phase of constructionalliances - a particular derivative of relationshipstyle contracts. To determine the factors thatcontribute to relationship maintenance forty-nineexperienced Australian alliance projectmanagers were interviewed. The main findingswere; the development of relationships early inthe project form building blocks of success fromwhich relationships are maintained and projectvalue added; quality facilitation plays animportant part in relationship maintenance and ahybrid organisation created as a result of alliancedevelopment overcomes destructiveorganisational boundaries. Relationshipmaintenance is integral to alliance project controland failure to formalise it and pay attention toprocess and past outcomes will undermine analliance project's potential for success.

  16. Radio scintillations observed during atmospheric occultations of Voyager: Internal gravity waves at Titan and magnetic field orientations at Jupiter and Saturn. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, D. P.

    1983-01-01

    The refractive index of planetary atmospheres at microwave frequencies is discussed. Physical models proposed for the refractive irregularities in the ionosphere and neutral atmosphere serve to characterize the atmospheric scattering structures, and are used subsequently to compute theoretical scintillation spectra for comparison with the Voyager occultation measurements. A technique for systematically analyzing and interpreting the signal fluctuations observed during planetary occultations is presented and applied to process the dual-wavelength data from the Voyager radio occultations by Jupiter, Saturn, and Titan. Results concerning the plasma irregularities in the upper ionospheres of Jupiter and Saturn are reported. The measured orientation of the irregularities is used to infer the magnetic field direction at several locations in the ionospheres of these two planets; the occultation measurements conflict with the predictions of Jovian magnetic field models, but generally confirm current models of Saturn's field. Wave parameters, including the vertical fluxes of energy and momentum, are estimated, and the source of the internal gravity waves discovered in Titan's upper atmosphere is considered.

  17. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  18. International

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This rubric reports on 10 short notes about international economical facts about nuclear power: Electricite de France (EdF) and its assistance and management contracts with Eastern Europe countries (Poland, Hungary, Bulgaria); Transnuclear Inc. company (a 100% Cogema daughter company) acquired the US Vectra Technologies company; the construction of the Khumo nuclear power plant in Northern Korea plays in favour of the reconciliation between Northern and Southern Korea; the delivery of two VVER 1000 Russian reactors to China; the enforcement of the cooperation agreement between Euratom and Argentina; Japan requested for the financing of a Russian fast breeder reactor; Russia has planned to sell a floating barge-type nuclear power plant to Indonesia; the control of the Swedish reactor vessels of Sydkraft AB company committed to Tractebel (Belgium); the renewal of the nuclear cooperation agreement between Swiss and USA; the call for bids from the Turkish TEAS electric power company for the building of the Akkuyu nuclear power plant answered by three candidates: Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Westinghouse (US) and the French-German NPI company. (J.S.)

  19. pH Sensing and Regulation in Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mehdi eDamaghi; Jonathan W. Wojtkowiak; Robert J. Gillies

    2013-01-01

    Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi) within a narrow range (7.1-7.2) by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the intracellular pH, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs...

  20. Intracellular pH in increased after transformation of Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ober, S.S.; Pardee, A.B.

    1987-01-01

    These studies reveal that a series of tumorigenic Chinese hamster embryo fibroblast (CHEF) cell lines maintain an internal pH (pH/sub i/) that is 0.12 +/- 0.04 pH unit above that of the nontumorigenic CHEF/18 parental line. pH measurements were made with [ 14 C]-benzoic acid. This increase of pH/sub i/ in the tumorigenic CHEF cells is not due to autocrine growth factor production or to the persistent activation of pathways previously shown to modulate Na + /H + -antiporter activity present in the CHEF/18 line. These findings suggest that the defect in pH/sub i/ regulation in the tumorigenic CHEF/18 derivatives lies in the Na + /H + antiporter itself. Further studies to determine the biological significance of an increased pH/sub i/ show that the external pH (pH 0 )-dependence curve for initiation of DNA synthesis in the tumorigenic CHEF lines is shifted by approximately 0.2 pH unit toward acidic values relative to that of the nontumorigenic CHEF/18 parent. These data show a critical role for pH/sub i/ in the regulation of DNA synthesis in Chinese hamster embryo fibroblasts and demonstrate that aberrations in pH/sub i/ can contribute to the acquisition of altered growth properties

  1. pH controls spermatozoa motility in the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrina Boulais

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Investigating the roles of chemical factors stimulating and inhibiting sperm motility is required to understand the mechanisms of spermatozoa movement. In this study, we described the composition of the seminal fluid (osmotic pressure, pH, and ions and investigated the roles of these factors and salinity in initiating spermatozoa movement in the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas. The acidic pH of the gonad (5.82±0.22 maintained sperm in the quiescent stage and initiation of flagellar movement was triggered by a sudden increase of spermatozoa external pH (pHe when released in seawater (SW. At pH 6.4, percentage of motile spermatozoa was three times higher when they were activated in SW containing 30 mM NH4Cl, which alkalinizes internal pH (pHi of spermatozoa, compared to NH4Cl-free SW, revealing the role of pHi in triggering sperm movement. Percentage of motile spermatozoa activated in Na+-free artificial seawater (ASW was highly reduced compared to ASW, suggesting that change of pHi triggering sperm motility was mediated by a Na+/H+ exchanger. Motility and swimming speed were highest in salinities between 33.8 and 42.7‰ (within a range of 0 to 50 ‰, and pH values above 7.5 (within a range of 4.5 to 9.5.

  2. Maintaining quality in blood banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, E; Hewison, C; Nevalainen, D E; Lloyd, H L

    1995-03-01

    component will warrant redress. The degree of fault attributed to the producer will in part depend on whether they have met the best available standards at all stages in the preparation of the product. If a Transfusion Service can show that it's operation has external accreditation, particularly to an internationally recognised standard such as ISO 9000 and they can show that staff have been properly trained, that equipment is properly supplied and maintained and that the facility is appropriate to the work being carried out, then the liability that exists when something goes wrong will be reduced.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  3. Maintaining Healthy Skin -- Part 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and SCI • Depression and SCI • Taking Care of Pressure Sores • Maintaining Healthy Skin (Part I) • Maintaining Healthy Skin ( ... For information on establishing skin tolerance, see our “Pressure Sores” pamphlet.) Pressure releases in a wheelchair can be ...

  4. AECL's reliability and maintainability program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, W.A.; Nieuwhof, G.W.E.

    1976-05-01

    AECL's reliability and maintainability program for nuclear generating stations is described. How the various resources of the company are organized to design and construct stations that operate reliably and safely is shown. Reliability and maintainability includes not only special mathematically oriented techniques, but also the technical skills and organizational abilities of the company. (author)

  5. The Costs and Benefits of Maintaining the Buy American Act

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hirschman, Keith

    1998-01-01

    .... The thesis uses accepted economic analysis on the gains from international trade to show that the costs of maintaining such protectionist legislation are potentially high relative to the uncertain...

  6. Maintainability effectiveness evaluations and enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.

    1985-01-01

    In the mid-seventies EPRI initiated a research project to review the human factors aspects of nuclear power plant control rooms. In the course of investigating operator-control room interfaces in five operational control rooms, it became evident that many plant outages had either been caused or prolonged by human factors problems associated with maintenance activities. Consequently, as one of several follow-on projects, EPRI sponsored a review of nine power plants (five nuclear and four fossil) to examine the human factors aspects of plant maintainability. This survey revealed a wide variety of generic human factors problems that could negatively impact the effectiveness of plant maintenance personnel. It was clear that plant maintainability features deserved no less attention to human factors concerns than the operational features of the control room. This paper describes subsequent EPRI-initiated efforts to assist the utilities in conducting self-reviews of maintainability effectiveness and effect needed enhancements

  7. Developing and maintaining nuclear competencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gobert, C.

    2004-01-01

    The paper discusses the following aspects on the nuclear knowledge management: assimilation of knowledge management, recognition of the nuclear specificity, attracting young talents. Another feature which, possibly, differentiates nuclear from other high-tech industries is that time constraints in some nuclear development may very well exceed the duration of a generation of professionals. That means, not only maintaining scientific and technical knowledge, which, as a minimum, leads to maintain: a rigorous supervision of human resources in quality and quantity; anticipatory planning of human resources, with a special focus on succession planning concerning expertise positions; a steady and continuous effort in training and retraining programs. Maintaining the safety culture is also one of the major managerial duties. Taking full account of the nuclear specificity in knowledge maintenance and development in the AREVA group, requests a multifunctional approach, which combines efforts of Research and Innovation, and Human Resources departments, plus the group Nuclear inspectorate. It is acknowledged that the industry, basically, would readily rely on the capabilities of the academic world and research centers in ensuring that training and education in nuclear science and technologies are attuned to the evolving needs of the industry, in maintaining the proper educational programs and in fostering fruitful cooperations between them

  8. [Maintaining patients' autonomy at home].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niang, Bénédicte; Coudre, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    To maintain the flow of hospital discharges, the patient's return home with support from a home nursing service is important. If any difficulties are identified, there are various programmes or good practices which can be put into place. The future law on adapting society to ageing also comprises a scheme combining home assistance and nursing care.

  9. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited. © 2013 FEBS.

  10. Molecular aspects of bacterial pH sensing and homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krulwich, Terry A.; Sachs, George; Padan, Etana

    2011-01-01

    Diverse mechanisms for pH-sensing and cytoplasmic pH homeostasis enable most bacteria to tolerate or grow at external pH values that are outside the cytoplasmic pH range they must maintain for growth. The most extreme cases are exemplified by the extremophiles that inhabit environments whose pH is below 3 or above 11. Here we describe how recent insights into the structure and function of key molecules and their regulators reveal novel strategies of bacterial pH-homeostasis. These insights may help us better target certain pathogens and better harness the capacities of environmental bacteria. PMID:21464825

  11. Maintaining steam/condensate lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russum, S.A.

    1992-01-01

    Steam and condensate systems must be maintained with the same diligence as the boiler itself. Unfortunately, they often are not. The water treatment program, critical to keeping the boiler at peak efficiency and optimizing operating life, should not stop with the boiler. The program must encompass the steam and condensate system as well. A properly maintained condensate system maximizes condensate recovery, which is a cost-free energy source. The fuel needed to turn the boiler feedwater into steam has already been provided. Returning the condensate allows a significant portion of that fuel cost to be recouped. Condensate has a high heat content. Condensate is a readily available, economical feedwater source. Properly treated, it is very pure. Condensate improves feedwater quality and reduces makeup water demand and pretreatment costs. Higher quality feedwater means more reliable boiler operation

  12. Disturbance maintains alternative biome states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Hirota, Marina; Oliveira, Rafael S; Pausas, Juli G

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms controlling the distribution of biomes remains a challenge. Although tropical biome distribution has traditionally been explained by climate and soil, contrasting vegetation types often occur as mosaics with sharp boundaries under very similar environmental conditions. While evidence suggests that these biomes are alternative states, empirical broad-scale support to this hypothesis is still lacking. Using community-level field data and a novel resource-niche overlap approach, we show that, for a wide range of environmental conditions, fire feedbacks maintain savannas and forests as alternative biome states in both the Neotropics and the Afrotropics. In addition, wooded grasslands and savannas occurred as alternative grassy states in the Afrotropics, depending on the relative importance of fire and herbivory feedbacks. These results are consistent with landscape scale evidence and suggest that disturbance is a general factor driving and maintaining alternative biome states and vegetation mosaics in the tropics. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  13. Maintaining protein composition in cilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen, Louise A; Elmaghloob, Yasmin; Ismail, Shehab

    2017-12-20

    The primary cilium is a sensory organelle that is vital in regulating several signalling pathways. Unlike most organelles cilia are open to the rest of the cell, not enclosed by membranes. The distinct protein composition is crucial to the function of cilia and many signalling proteins and receptors are specifically concentrated within distinct compartments. To maintain this composition, a mechanism is required to deliver proteins to the cilium whilst another must counter the entropic tendency of proteins to distribute throughout the cell. The combination of the two mechanisms should result in the concentration of ciliary proteins to the cilium. In this review we will look at different cellular mechanisms that play a role in maintaining the distinct composition of cilia, including regulation of ciliary access and trafficking of ciliary proteins to, from and within the cilium.

  14. Improving versus maintaining nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The concept of improving nuclear safety versus maintaining it has been discussed at a number of nuclear regulators meetings in recent years. National reports have indicated that there are philosophical differences between NEA member countries about whether their regulatory approaches require licensees to continuously improve nuclear safety or to continuously maintain it. It has been concluded that, while the actual level of safety achieved in all member countries is probably much the same, this is difficult to prove in a quantitative way. In practice, all regulatory approaches require improvements to be made to correct deficiencies and when otherwise warranted. Based on contributions from members of the NEA Committee on Nuclear Regulatory Activities (CNRA), this publication provides an overview of current nuclear regulatory philosophies and approaches, as well as insights into a selection of public perception issues. This publication's intended audience is primarily nuclear safety regulators, but government authorities, nuclear power plant operators and the general public may also be interested. (author)

  15. Regulation of pH During Amelogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Nanci, Antonio; Kurtz, Ira; Wright, J Timothy; Paine, Michael L

    2010-02-01

    During amelogenesis, extracellular matrix proteins interact with growing hydroxyapatite crystals to create one of the most architecturally complex biological tissues. The process of enamel formation is a unique biomineralizing system characterized first by an increase in crystallite length during the secretory phase of amelogenesis, followed by a vast increase in crystallite width and thickness in the later maturation phase when organic complexes are enzymatically removed. Crystal growth is modulated by changes in the pH of the enamel microenvironment that is critical for proper enamel biomineralization. Whereas the genetic bases for most abnormal enamel phenotypes (amelogenesis imperfecta) are generally associated with mutations to enamel matrix specific genes, mutations to genes involved in pH regulation may result in severely affected enamel structure, highlighting the importance of pH regulation for normal enamel development. This review summarizes the intra- and extracellular mechanisms employed by the enamel-forming cells, ameloblasts, to maintain pH homeostasis and, also, discusses the enamel phenotypes associated with disruptions to genes involved in pH regulation.

  16. Combined Non-Self-Maintained Discharge in Air for Generating of Chemically Active Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ardelyan, N. V; Bychkov, V. L; Gordeev, O. A; Klimov, A. I

    2003-01-01

    Development of plasma technologies for problems of external and internal gas dynamics is impossible without the detailed studies of different discharge types both self maintained and non-self maintained improvement...

  17. Developing and maintaining instructor capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, W.P.; Smith, G.

    1985-01-01

    The New York Power Authority, after surveying available courses, decided to develop an in-house instructor training program. Following the principles of the Systems Approach to Training the course embodied the results of a job analysis resulting in a program containing instruction in Educational Philosophy, the Systems Approach to Training, Methods and Media, and Testing. The course content is covered through classroom instruction, on-the-job training, instructor evaluations, and assignments. Instructors completing the program continue to maintain skills with inservice training

  18. Maintaining International Peace and Security: Reflections on Peace ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    it may take, under Article 42, "action by air, sea and land forces as may be necessary to ... budget. Police officers, election observers, human rights monitors and other civilians .... In Asia, only one of the five peace-support operations resulted in ..... armoured personnel carriers in less than satisfactory condition for moving.

  19. Developing, Approving and Maintaining Qualifications: Selected International Approaches. Research Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misko, Josie

    2015-01-01

    There are lessons for Australia in the key approaches to the development, approval, maintenance and quality assurance of qualifications adopted in countries overseas. This research takes into account a range of approaches used in selected European Union (EU) member states (Germany, Finland and Sweden), the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland…

  20. PhD Dissertations

    OpenAIRE

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di)

    2010-01-01

    Report of PhD Dissertations.Anna Airò La scrittura delle regole. Politica e istituzioni a Taranto nel Quattrocento, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Firenze, 2005 Pasquale Arfé La Clavis Physicae II (316-529) di Honorius Augustodunensis. Studio ed edizione critica, Tesi di dottorato in Storia della filosofia medievale, Università degli Studi di Napoli "L'Orientale", 2005 Alessandro Azzimonti Scrittura agiografica e strutture di potere nell'Italia c...

  1. Laboratory Activity on Sample Handling and Maintaining a Laboratory Notebook through Simple pH Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdmann, Mitzy A.; March, Joe L.

    2016-01-01

    Sample handling and laboratory notebook maintenance are necessary skills but can seem abstract if not presented to students in context. An introductory exercise focusing on proper sample handling, data collection and laboratory notebook keeping for the general chemistry laboratory was developed to emphasize the importance of keeping an accurate…

  2. Identifying crucial parameter correlations maintaining bursting activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anca Doloc-Mihu

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent experimental and computational studies suggest that linearly correlated sets of parameters (intrinsic and synaptic properties of neurons allow central pattern-generating networks to produce and maintain their rhythmic activity regardless of changing internal and external conditions. To determine the role of correlated conductances in the robust maintenance of functional bursting activity, we used our existing database of half-center oscillator (HCO model instances of the leech heartbeat CPG. From the database, we identified functional activity groups of burster (isolated neuron and half-center oscillator model instances and realistic subgroups of each that showed burst characteristics (principally period and spike frequency similar to the animal. To find linear correlations among the conductance parameters maintaining functional leech bursting activity, we applied Principal Component Analysis (PCA to each of these four groups. PCA identified a set of three maximal conductances (leak current, [Formula: see text]Leak; a persistent K current, [Formula: see text]K2; and of a persistent Na+ current, [Formula: see text]P that correlate linearly for the two groups of burster instances but not for the HCO groups. Visualizations of HCO instances in a reduced space suggested that there might be non-linear relationships between these parameters for these instances. Experimental studies have shown that period is a key attribute influenced by modulatory inputs and temperature variations in heart interneurons. Thus, we explored the sensitivity of period to changes in maximal conductances of [Formula: see text]Leak, [Formula: see text]K2, and [Formula: see text]P, and we found that for our realistic bursters the effect of these parameters on period could not be assessed because when varied individually bursting activity was not maintained.

  3. Maintaining consistency in distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birman, Kenneth P.

    1991-01-01

    In systems designed as assemblies of independently developed components, concurrent access to data or data structures normally arises within individual programs, and is controlled using mutual exclusion constructs, such as semaphores and monitors. Where data is persistent and/or sets of operation are related to one another, transactions or linearizability may be more appropriate. Systems that incorporate cooperative styles of distributed execution often replicate or distribute data within groups of components. In these cases, group oriented consistency properties must be maintained, and tools based on the virtual synchrony execution model greatly simplify the task confronting an application developer. All three styles of distributed computing are likely to be seen in future systems - often, within the same application. This leads us to propose an integrated approach that permits applications that use virtual synchrony with concurrent objects that respect a linearizability constraint, and vice versa. Transactional subsystems are treated as a special case of linearizability.

  4. Esophageal pH monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    pH monitoring - esophageal; Esophageal acidity test ... Esophageal pH monitoring is used to check how much stomach acid is entering the esophagus. It also checks how well the acid is cleared downward into the ...

  5. Developments in the production of economics PhDs at four research-intensive universities in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip de Jager

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available There is a national drive to increase PhD production, yet we know little about how this imperative takes shape within different disciplines. We therefore set out to explore recent developments and the current status of the PhD in economics at four South African research-intensive universities. A data set of all economics PhDs produced in these commerce faculties during the period 2008-2014 was analysed to determine whether the departments of economics responded to the call for increased doctoral production, and the role the PhD by publication might have played in the process. How an increase in quantity might influence doctoral education in the respective academic departments was also considered by supplementing the quantitative data with perspectives from heads of department at the four institutions. The notable increase in doctoral production over the time period studied shows that national and international trends have influenced doctoral education in economics departments within South African research-intensive universities. Increased usage of the PhD by publication has implications for policy and pedagogical practice within these departments, especially as there seems to be limited available supervisory capacity. Other changes in departmental practices, such as the entrenchment of a research culture and the promotion of collaborative research amongst students and staff, also contributed to maintain quality in doctoral education.

  6. Building and maintaining media contacts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fenton, Bob

    2000-01-01

    This presentation is answering the question: 'how does British Energy build and maintain its relationships with journalists in so many areas', not only the basic industrial correspondents that you would expect to have to deal with an industry British Energy, but those dealing with science and technology, the environment, personnel and training, city and financial, political, and on and on, and that is just the national press. Then add the local and regional media around power station sites - literally hundreds of contacts and you start to get an idea about the size of our media contact database. But it is managed it rather well. Every six months British Energy takes part in a survey run by one of the UK's leading market research companies who conducts a poll among journalists and then rate each company's performance. In the last three years British Energy has not been outside the top five in most categories, and in the top two in several. The answer is a lot of work over a long period of time. You cannot expect to build trusting relationships with a journalist overnight. At British Energy the key is being open and honest, and always available. Of course good media relations is not a one-way street, and there has to be some element of compromise if you are to achieve a relationship based on mutual trust

  7. Intracellular pH homeostasis in Leishmania donovani amastigotes and promastigotes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glaser, T.A.; Baatz, J.E.; Kreishman, G.P.; Mukkada, A.J.

    1988-01-01

    Intracellular pH and pH gradients of Leishmania donovani amastigotes and promastigotes were determined over a broad range of extracellular pH values. Intracellular pH was determined by 31 P NMR and by equilibrium distribution studies with 5,5-dimethyloxazolidine-2,4-dione or methylamine. Promastigotes maintain intracellular pH values close to neutral between extracellular pH values of 5.0 and 7.4. Amastigote intracellular pH is maintained close to neutral at external pH values as low as 4.0. Both life stages maintain a positive pH gradient to an extracellular pH of 7.4, which is important for active transport of substrates. Treatment with ionophores, such as nigericin and carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone and the ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, reduced pH gradients in both stages. Maintenance of intracellular pH in the physiologic range is especially relevant for the survival of the amastigote in its acidic in vivo environment

  8. One Maintain with Two Tigers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xing; Shengjun, Zhang

    The paper argues that regionalism in East Asia, since the end of the Cold War, has been largely shaped by the interactions of China-US relations, influencing and determining the development and transformation of economic and political cooperation and integration in the region. The paper intends...... to offer a framework of understanding the historical inter-connections between China-US relations in East Asia during different periods and their dynamic nexus with the evolution of regional integration process. The theoretical reflection of the paper posits that the neo-functionalism theory, which...... is largely generated and shaped by the historical evolution of the EU political project, cannot be applied as an overall conceptual framework in understanding regionalism in East Asia. Conventional theories of international relations driven by power rivalry, realism, geopolitics, political economy, balance...

  9. 19 CFR 115.12 - Records maintained by Certifying Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Records maintained by Certifying Authority. 115.12 Section 115.12 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CARGO CONTAINER AND ROAD VEHICLE CERTIFICATION PURSUANT TO INTERNATIONAL CUSTOMS...

  10. PhD supervisor-student relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FILIPE PRAZERES

    2017-10-01

    but also improve their coping skills, including critical thinking and problem-solving methods (5. The act of sharing knowledge and experiences can motivate the PhD students to persevere in their studies (10. When needed, supervisors should use their power of influence to increase the time that the student has available to devote to research while maintaining a part of their employment activities (health care‑related or not, since many PhD students are also full-time workers. Last but not least, supervisors and faculty members must encourage PhD students to pursue the available funding opportunities. Socioeconomic problems are known to be an issue for PhD students (5. Without the supervisor’s support – by dealing with PhD student’s emotions and personality –, research time, funding, and the student’s proactiviness, the doctoral journey may not attain success.

  11. Building and maintaining media relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oesterberg, Anders

    2000-01-01

    Full text: In my opinion good media relations are among the most valuable investments regarding the communications and Public Relations operations within an Organisation. This means, that all the work you put up in building and maintaining media relations, is worth all the efforts. It can mean the difference between success or failure. Although a reporter never would admit that he or she is easily influenced, the fact is that you would get better press in an emergency case if you have a positive personal relation to the reporter. So, in my opinion there is nothing more important, in building and maintaining media relations, than the face-to-face-contact. My experience of good personal relations to reporters is also that you're not only getting better press in emergency cases. You are more successful in getting published when you have something positive to say, too. Honesty and openness are two key-words in this context. I have never tried to manipulate and delude a reporter, since that definitely would ruin the relationship. I always try to be as straight forward as possible and underline what I can say and what I can't. That instead of presenting some forced lies. For me, it is also very important to create some kind of mid-field ground, where the reporter and I can meet unprejudiced. Sense of humour and distance, both to yourself and your organisation, are two main characteristics that are invaluable in order to create a good personal relationship with a reporter. But, I'm very accurate in emphasizing when I enter my role as a company representative. All in order to be regarded as correct, yet obliging. To be quick when it comes to returning calls is another vital component that gives the reporter a feeling that he or she is important enough to be contacted as soon as possible. This service-minded attitude is of course good for the relationship. Besides the more personal relation it's important to have a business-like relation, where you show a great deal of

  12. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD Dissertations. Francesco Barone Istituzioni, società ed economia a Catania nel tardo medioevo (XIV-XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Laura Berti Ceroni Il territorio e le strutture di Cesarea e Classe tra tarda antichità e alto medioevo in rapporto con Ravenna, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia e Informatica, Università degli studi di Bologna, 2002-2003.   Marco Bicchierai Poppi dalla signoria dei conti Guidi al vicariato del Casentino (1360-1480, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XIV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Emanuela Garimberti Spatiosa ad habitandum loca. Luoghi e identità nella Historia Langobardorum di Paolo Diacono, Tesi di dottorato in Storia medievale (XV ciclo, Università degli Studi di Bologna, 2004   Lorenzo Tanzini Sistemi normativi e pratiche istituzionali a Firenze dalla fine del XIII all’inizio del XV secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XVI ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2004   Stefania Tarquini Pellegrinaggio e asseto urbano di Roma, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dei centri, delle vie e della cultura dei pellegrinaggi nel Medioevo euro mediterraneo (XV ciclo, Università degli studi di Lecce, 2003

  13. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Report of PhD dissertations. Andrea Brugnoli Una storia locale: l’organizzazione del territorio veronese nel medioevo: trasformazioni della realtà e schemi notarili (IX-metà XII secolo, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Scienze Storiche e Antropologiche (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Verona, 2010   Luca Filangieri Famiglie e gruppi dirigenti a Genova (secoli XII-metà XIII, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale (XXII ciclo, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2010   Jakub Kujawi ski Wernakularna kolekcja historiograficzna z rękopisu francuskiego nr 688 z Biblioteki Narodowej w Paryżu. Studium źródłoznawcze (La raccolta dei volgarizzamenti delle opere storiografiche nel manoscritto francese 688 della Biblioteca Nazionale di Parigi, Tesi di dottorato, Università “Adam Mickiewicz”, Facoltà di Storia, Pozna, a.a. 2009/2010   Marta Longhi I signori “de Radicata”. Strategie di affermazione familiare e patrimoniale nel Piemonte dei secoli XII-XIV, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Istituzioni, Società, Religioni dal Tardo Antico alla fine del Medioevo (XX ciclo, Università di Torino, 2008

  14. PhD Dissertations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redazione Reti Medievali (a cura di

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Reporto of PhD Dissertations.   Mario Dalle Carbonare Società, potere e clientele nell’Irlanda altomedievale (secoli V-IX, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia sociale europea, Università "Ca' Foscari" di Venezia, 2003 Vieri Mazzoni La legislazione antighibellina e la politica oligarchica della Parte Guelfa di Firenze nel secondo Trecento (1347-1378, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia Medievale (ciclo XII, Università degli Studi di Firenze   Alma Poloni Pisa dalle origini del movimento popolare alla discesa di Ludovico il Bavaro. I gruppi dirigenti cittadini tra continuità e trasformazione, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia dell'Europa nel medioevo, Università degli studi di Pisa, 2003   Andrea Puglia Potere marchionale, amministrazione del territorio, società locali dalla morte di Ugo di Tuscia a Guelfo VI di Baviera (1001-1160, Tesi di dottorato di ricerca in Storia medievale, Università degli studi di Milano, 2003

  15. Newly Developed Neutralized pH Icodextrin Dialysis Fluid: Nonclinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Naoya; Miyamoto, Keiichi; Murata, Tomohiro; Ishikawa, Eiji; Horiuchi, Takashi

    2016-08-01

    A two-compartment system (NICOPELIQ; NICO, Terumo Co., Tokyo, Japan) has recently been developed to neutralize icodextrin peritoneal dialysis fluid (PDF). In this study, a nonclinical evaluation of NICO was carried out to evaluate biocompatibility as well as water transport ability. Glucose degradation products (GDPs) in the icodextrin PDFs were analyzed via high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The cell viability of human peritoneal mesothelial cells derived from peritoneal dialysis effluent (PDE-HPMCs) was evaluated as well as the amount of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) released after exposure to different PDFs (NICO and EXTRANEAL [EX, Baxter Healthcare Corp., Chicago, IL, USA]) and neutralized pH glucose PDF MIDPELIQ 250 (M250, Terumo). The water transport ability of NICO, EX, and M250 was tested using dialysis tube membranes with various pore sizes: 1, 2, 6-8, and 12-16 kDa. Although cell viability decreased by 30% after 30 min exposure to NICO, it was maintained for 6 h while a significant decrease was observed after 6 h exposure to EX. However, following adjustment of the pH to the same pre-exposure pH value, there was no significant difference in cell viability within the same pH group despite a doubling of the difference in the total amount of GDPs (44.6 ± 8.6 µM in NICO and 91.9 ± 9.5 µM in EX, respectively). In contrast, a significant decrease in cell viability was observed when the pH decreased to less than pH 6. Levels of released LDH, a cytotoxic marker, were within 5% after a 6-h exposure of NICO to PDE-HPMCs. There was no significant difference in water transport ability represented as overall osmotic gradients between NICO and EX. In conclusion, neutralization of icodextrin PDF is beneficial for maintaining cell viability and minimizing LDH release while water transport ability is comparable to the conventional icodextrin PDF. © 2016 International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Application of Ultrasonic Waves on Maintaining Freshness of Tilapia Fillet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruddy Suwandi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ish fillet is one of fisheries products that easily deteriorated; hence handling techniques are needed to maintain the freshness. Ultrasonic wave have been widely applied to some of food products for maintaining freshness through microbial inactivation, however the ultrasonic application to fisheries products has not been reported. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of ultrasonic wave on fish freshness. The stages of the study were sample preparation, sonication, freshness parameters examination and histology observation. Ultrasonic wave did not affectthe organoleptic value and the TVB, but affected the pH value and the TPC. The sample in which the TPC value was found significantly different, were further observed after 48 and 96 hours storage. The result showed that the TPC value of sonicated sample for 9 minutes was lower to that of without sonication. Histology analysis showed, however, sonication made the structure of muscle fiber less compact and deformation of myomer was found.

  17. Intracellular pH distribution as a cell health indicator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aabo, Thomas; Glückstad, Jesper; Siegumfeldt, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    .d.(pHint)) to describe the internal pH distributions. The cellular pH distributional response to external stress such as heat has not previously been determined. In this study, the intracellular pH (pHi) and the s.d.(pHint) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to supralethal temperatures were measured using...

  18. A PhD is a PhD is a PhD

    OpenAIRE

    Ostrow, Deborah Anne

    2017-01-01

    A PhD is a PhD is a PhD is a practice-based project that interrogates the process of an artist undertaking PhD research under established criteria. It consists of an exegesis, an original screenplay, and a digital film made for online viewing, with images drawn from a range of documentaries and films found on YouTube. They have been dissected, re-assembled and then re-embedded to YouTube. The source material covers topics such as medicalization of madness, the conspicuous appropriation of uni...

  19. The pH Game.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemecology, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Describes a game that can be used to teach students about the acidity of liquids and substances around their school and enable them to understand what pH levels tell us about the environment. Students collect samples and measure the pH of water, soil, plants, and other natural material. (DDR)

  20. Evolution of maintainability in France since 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guyot, Christian.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of the paper is to make the point of maintainability in France since 1971. The importance of maintainability is recalled. Publications in France from 1971 to 1975 show the interest arose by maintainability; their analysis permits to make clear the general plan followed by the studies and gives indications on the directions of actual efforts. Conclusion is drawn on the orientation of work at short, medium and long term [fr

  1. Space maintainers in dentistry: past to present.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Vikas; Pandit, Inder Kumar; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Sekhon, Harveen Kaur

    2013-10-01

    Early orthodontic interventions are often initiated in the developing dentition to promote favourable developmental changes. Interceptive orthodontic can eliminate or reduce the severity of a developing malocclusion, the complexity of orthodontic treatment, overall treatment time and cost. The safest way to prevent future malocclusions from tooth loss is to place a space maintainer that is effective and durable. An appropriate use of space maintainer is advocated to hold the space until the eruption of permanent teeth. This case report describes the various changing trends in use of space maintainers: conventional band and loop, prefabricated band with custom made loop and glass fibre reinforced composite resins as space maintainers.

  2. Light acclimation and pH perturbations affect photosynthetic performance in

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ihnken, S.; Beardall, J.; Kromkamp, J.C.; Gómez Serrano, C.; Torres, M.A.; Masojídek, J.; Malpartida, I.; Abdala, R.; Gil Jerez, C.; Malapascua, J.R.; Navarro, E.; Rico, R.M.; Peralta, E.; Ferreira Ezequil, J.P.; Lopez Figueroa, F

    2014-01-01

    Chlorella spp. are robust chlorophyte microalgal species frequently used in mass culture. The pH optimum for growth is close to neutrality; at this pH, theoretically little energy is required to maintain homeostasis. In the present study, we grew Chlorella fusca cells in an open, outdoor, thin-layer

  3. Urine pH test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... urine test Male urinary tract References Bose A, Monk RD, Bushinsky DA. Kidney stones. In: Melmed S, Polonsky ... and its influence on urine pH. J Am Diet Assoc . 1995;95(7):791-797. PMID: 7797810 ...

  4. Exercise and Pulmonary Hypertension (PH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Situations Find a Doctor PH Care Centers PHA Classroom PHA Registry Insurance Guide Specialty Pharmacy Other Resources ... no published data in the medical literature regarding routine exercise in patients with PAH. However, there are ...

  5. PhEDEx Data Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeland, Ricky; Wildish, Tony; Huang, Chih-Hao

    2010-01-01

    The PhEDEx Data Service provides access to information from the central PhEDEx database, as well as certificate-authenticated managerial operations such as requesting the transfer or deletion of data. The Data Service is integrated with the 'SiteDB' service for fine-grained access control, providing a safe and secure environment for operations. A plug-in architecture allows server-side modules to be developed rapidly and easily by anyone familiar with the schema, and can automatically return the data in a variety of formats for use by different client technologies. Using HTTP access via the Data Service instead of direct database connections makes it possible to build monitoring web-pages with complex drill-down operations, suitable for debugging or presentation from many aspects. This will form the basis of the new PhEDEx website in the near future, as well as providing access to PhEDEx information and certificate-authenticated services for other CMS dataflow and workflow management tools such as CRAB, WMCore, DBS and the dashboard. A PhEDEx command-line client tool provides one-stop access to all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service interactively, for use in simple scripts that do not access the service directly. The client tool provides certificate-authenticated access to managerial functions, so all the functions of the PhEDEx Data Service are available to it. The tool can be expanded by plug-ins which can combine or extend the client-side manipulation of data from the Data Service, providing a powerful environment for manipulating data within PhEDEx.

  6. Programmable pH buffers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Dara Van; Huber, Dale L.; Bunker, Bruce C.; Roberts, Mark E.

    2017-01-24

    A programmable pH buffer comprises a copolymer that changes pK.sub.a at a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) in water. The copolymer comprises a thermally programmable polymer that undergoes a hydrophobic-to-hydrophilic phase change at the LCST and an electrolytic polymer that exhibits acid-base properties that are responsive to the phase change. The programmable pH buffer can be used to sequester CO.sub.2 into water.

  7. PH Department: at the heart of CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2014-01-01

    The Physics Department is where the Laboratory’s scientific activity takes place. Some 1000 members of the personnel and 11,000 users work together on CERN’s highly diversified experimental programme. The challenges for the coming years are twofold: maintain the level of excellence that led the Laboratory to the discovery of the Higgs boson, and preserve the diversity of the scientific programme. The new Department Head discusses his vision with us.   Livio Mapelli. “On paper, our plan for the next two years shows no surprises,” says Livio Mapelli, former Deputy Department Head and now, since January, Head of the Physics Department (PH). “We have to finish the completion, consolidation and initial upgrades of the experiments planned for LS1. In 2015, our core activity will be supporting the experiments during the restart of the accelerator complex. However, as physicists, the best reward for us would be to obtain new breakthroughs and importa...

  8. The Cost of Maintaining Educational Communications Equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, David A.

    Tentative formulas for calculating the cost of maintaining educational communications equipment are proposed. The formulas are based on a survey of campuses of the State University of New York. The survey analyzed the types of equipment to be maintained, types of maintenance, who uses the equipment, who services the equipment, and the cost…

  9. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Maria Andaló TENUTA

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and < 0.005 mmols OH- to reach pH 5.5, respectively. Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH.

  10. Titratable acidity of beverages influences salivary pH recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenuta, Livia Maria Andaló; Fernández, Constanza Estefany; Brandão, Ana Carolina Siqueira; Cury, Jaime Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    A low pH and a high titratable acidity of juices and cola-based beverages are relevant factors that contribute to dental erosion, but the relative importance of these properties to maintain salivary pH at demineralizing levels for long periods of time after drinking is unknown. In this crossover study conducted in vivo, orange juice, a cola-based soft drink, and a 10% sucrose solution (negative control) were tested. These drinks differ in terms of their pH (3.5 ± 0.04, 2.5 ± 0.05, and 5.9 ± 0.1, respectively) and titratable acidity (3.17 ± 0.06, 0.57 ± 0.04 and pH 5.5, respectively). Eight volunteers with a normal salivary flow rate and buffering capacity kept 15 mL of each beverage in their mouth for 10 s, expectorated it, and their saliva was collected after 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, and 120 s. The salivary pH, determined using a mini pH electrode, returned to the baseline value at 30 s after expectoration of the cola-based soft drink, but only at 90 s after expectoration of the orange juice. The salivary pH increased to greater than 5.5 at 15 s after expectoration of the cola drink and at 30 s after expectoration of the orange juice. These findings suggest that the titratable acidity of a beverage influences salivary pH values after drinking acidic beverages more than the beverage pH.

  11. pH Sensing and Regulation in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi eDamaghi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi within a narrow range (7.1-7.2 by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the intracellular pH, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs. In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including colfilin and talin regulated actin (de-polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H+-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extra-cellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors.

  12. Diurnal variation in ruminal pH on the digestibility of highly digestible perennial ryegrass during continuous culture fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wales, W J; Kolver, E S; Thorne, P L; Egan, A R

    2004-06-01

    Dairy cows grazing high-digestibility pastures exhibit pronounced diurnal variation in ruminal pH, with pH being below values considered optimal for digestion. Using a dual-flow continuous culture system, the hypothesis that minimizing diurnal variation in pH would improve digestion of pasture when pH was low, but not at a higher pH, was tested. Four treatments were imposed, with pH either allowed to exhibit normal diurnal variation around an average pH of 6.1 or 5.6, or maintained at constant pH. Digesta samples were collected during the last 3 d of each of four, 9-d experimental periods. A constant pH at 5.6 compared with a constant pH of 6.1 reduced the digestibility of organic matter (OM), neutral detergent (NDF), and acid detergent fiber (ADF) by 7, 14, and 21%, respectively. When pH was allowed to vary (averaging 5.6), digestion of OM, NDF, and ADF were reduced by 15,30, and 36%, respectively, compared with pH varying at 6.1. There was little difference in digestion parameters when pH was either constant or varied with an average pH of 6.1. However, when average pH was 5.6, maintaining a constant pH significantly increased digestion of OM, NDF, and ADF by 5, 25, and 24% compared with a pH that exhibited normal diurnal variation. These in vitro results show that gains in digestibility and potential milk production can be made by minimizing diurnal variation in ruminal pH, but only when ruminal pH is low (5.6). However, larger gains in productivity can be achieved by increasing average daily ruminal pH from 5.6 to 6.1.

  13. Evaluating nanoparticle sensor design for intracellular pH measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke V; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas R; Christensen, Nynne M; Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas L

    2011-07-26

    Particle-based nanosensors have over the past decade been designed for optical fluorescent-based ratiometric measurements of pH in living cells. However, quantitative and time-resolved intracellular measurements of pH in endosomes and lysosomes using particle nanosensors are challenging, and there is a need to improve measurement methodology. In the present paper, we have successfully carried out time-resolved pH measurements in endosomes and lyosomes in living cells using nanoparticle sensors and show the importance of sensor choice for successful quantification. We have studied two nanoparticle-based sensor systems that are internalized by endocytosis and elucidated important factors in nanosensor design that should be considered in future development of new sensors. From our experiments it is clear that it is highly important to use sensors that have a broad measurement range, as erroneous quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pK(a) to each sensor, seem to be a solution to some of the earlier problems found when measuring pH in the endosome-lysosome pathway.

  14. Coastal Maintained Channels in US waters

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This layer shows coastal channels and waterways that are maintained and surveyed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE). These channels are necessary...

  15. Marshal: Maintaining Evolving Models, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SIFT proposes to design and develop the Marshal system, a mixed-initiative tool for maintaining task models over the course of evolving missions. Marshal-enabled...

  16. Commentary: PhDs in biochemistry education-5 years later.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Erika G; Momsen, Jennifer L; Osgood, Marcy

    2014-01-01

    In this commentary, the discussion of PhDs in biochemistry education research is expanded to explore a number of diverse pathways leading to a competitive research program in biochemistry education research. © 2013 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  17. pH sensing and regulation in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Gillies, Robert J

    2013-12-17

    Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi) within a narrow range (7.1-7.2) by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the pHi, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including cofilin and talin regulated actin (de-)polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate, and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H(+)-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extracellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors.

  18. Effect of pH on structure, function, and stability of mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idrees, Danish; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase VA (CAVA) catalyzes the hydration of carbon dioxide to produce proton and bicarbonate which is primarily expressed in the mitochondrial matrix of liver, and involved in numerous physiological processes including lipogenesis, insulin secretion from pancreatic cells, ureagenesis, gluconeogenesis, and neuronal transmission. To understand the effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of CAVA, we employed spectroscopic techniques such as circular dichroism, fluorescence, and absorbance measurements in wide range of pH (from pH 2.0 to pH 11.5). CAVA showed an aggregation at acidic pH range from pH 2.0 to pH 5.0. However, it remains stable and maintains its secondary structure in the pH range, pH 7.0-pH 11.5. Furthermore, this enzyme has an appreciable activity at more than pH 7.0 (7.0 < pH ≤ 11.5) with maximum activity at pH 9.0. The maximal values of k cat and k cat /K m at pH 9.0 are 3.7 × 10 6  s -1 and 5.5 × 10 7  M -1  s -1 , respectively. However, this enzyme loses its activity in the acidic pH range. We further performed 20-ns molecular dynamics simulation of CAVA to see the dynamics at different pH values. An excellent agreement was observed between in silico and in vitro studies. This study provides an insight into the activity of CAVA in the pH range of subcellular environment.

  19. Paulette Gray, Ph.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulette S. Gray, Ph.D. is the Director for the Division of Extramural Activities (DEA). As the director of the division, she is responsible for the overall scientific, fiscal, and administrative management of the division, including broad strategic planning, development, implementation, and evaluation.

  20. pH in Action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Biekman, E.S.A.

    2001-01-01

    Based on fundamental chemical relations, well-established in chemical engineering and chemical technology over almost a century, the effects of pH in food and agricultural products will be deduced for different situations and processes. Based on simple equilibria and dissociation of water, salts,

  1. Neuronal pH regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorstrup, S; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    The intracellular pH in the brain was studied in six healthy volunteers before and immediately after the administration of 2 g of acetazolamide. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy by a 1.5 tesla whole-body scanner was used. The chemical shift between the inorganic phosphate...

  2. 6th International RILEM PhD Workshop

    CERN Document Server

    Gulikers, Joost; Polder, Rob

    2015-01-01

    This book presents key advances in the modeling of reinforcement corrosion and concrete durability. It also examines various further aspects of reinforcement corrosion and concrete durability, striking a balance between modeling and testing. Particular attention is paid to innovative treatments for avoiding deterioration, and to methods for modeling performance in a real environment. Some basic aspects related to non-destructive testing techniques are also discussed. Deterioration-related topics addressed in the book include the basis for modeling alkali-silica reactions, chloride diffusion and the development of concrete microstructure; measurement-related topics include cathodic protection, polarization resistance and resistivity. A combined approach using the AFM technique and polarization measurements is examined, and the relation between cracking and corrosion and the treatment of concrete with hydrophobes or innovative products such as hydrotalcite is also discussed.

  3. Industrial PhD report: Sustainable Innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Gitte Gylling Hammershøj

    2011-01-01

    Erhvervs PhD rapport udarbejdet i tilknytning til Erhvervs PhD kurset der er obligatorisk for Erhvervs PhD studerende. Rapporten omhandler relationer melllem den akademiske verden og industrien i sammenhæng med PhD projektet, betragtet og analyseret gennem teori om bæredygtig innovation....

  4. International Humanitarian Award.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    The International Humanitarian Award recognizes extraordinary humanitarian services and activism by psychologists, including professional and volunteer work conducted primarily in the field with underserved populations. Award recipients are psychologists who, by their extraordinary service at a difficult time, improve the lives and contribute to the well-being of people in a large or small geographic area anywhere in the world. The 2017 recipient of the APA International Humanitarian Award was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  5. How Do Positive Views Maintain Life Satisfaction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chia-Huei; Tsai, Ying-Mei; Chen, Lung Hung

    2009-01-01

    This study proposes three mediation pathways to explain how the positive views (perceived control, optimism and self-enhancement) proposed by Cummins and Nistico (Journal of Happiness Studies 3:37-69 2002) maintain life satisfaction. The three pathways were enhancing self-esteem, reducing have-want discrepancy and changing importance perceptions.…

  6. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Mølhave, Thomas; Revsbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining the contour tree T of a terrain Sigma, represented as a triangulated xy-monotone surface, as the heights of its vertices vary continuously with time. We characterize the combinatorial changes in T and how they relate to topological changes in Sigma. We present ...

  7. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars; Mølhave, Thomas

    We consider maintaining the contour tree T of a piecewise-linear triangulation M that is the graph of a time varying height function h:R2→R. We carefully describe the combinatorial change in T that happen as h varies over time and how these changes relate to topological changes in M. We present a...

  8. Maintainability of manpower system with restricted recruitment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maintainability of a manpower system is studied under a Markov framework. The classical method of controlling only one factor of flow is extended to highlight the case in which two factors are under control simultaneously. One special case of this extension, where recruitment of units faces partial embargo, is given, ...

  9. Competence in radiation protection - acquisition, maintaining, extending

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breckow, J.; Geringer, T.; Radiation Protection Academy Seibersdorf; Haug, T.

    2007-01-01

    A survey is given on current initiatives, supranational in the EU and national in Germany and Switzerland, for education and training in radiation protection with the aim of maintaining and enlarging professional competence. Successively, individual studying possibilities and courses as well as some experiences with guidelines for professional knowledge in Germany are described. (orig.)

  10. Effect of pH on radiation-induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, W. Song; Park, Heon J.; Lyons, John C.; Auger, Elizabeth A.; Lee, Hyung-Sik

    1996-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The effect of environmental pH on the radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro was investigated. Materials and Methods: SCK mammary adenocarcinoma cells of A/J mice were irradiated with γ-rays using a 137 Cs irradiator and incubated in media of different pHs. After incubation at 37 degree sign C for 24-120 hrs., the extent of apoptosis was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA, in situ TUNEL staining, flow cytometry, and release of 3 H from 3 H-thymidine labeled cells. The membrane integrity, using the trypan blue exclusion method, and the clonogenicity of the cells were also determined. Results: Irradiation with 2-12 Gy of γ-rays induced apoptosis in pH 7.5 medium within 48 hrs. The radiation-induced apoptosis progressively declined as the medium pH was lowered so that little apoptosis occurred in 48 hrs. after irradiation with 12 Gy in pH 6.6 medium. However, when the cells were irradiated and incubated for 48 hrs. in pH 6.6 medium and then medium was replaced with pH 7.5 medium, apoptosis promptly occurred. Apoptosis also occurred even in pH 6.6 medium when the cells were irradiated and maintained in pH 7.5 medium for 8 hrs. or longer post-irradiation before incubation in pH 6.6 medium. Conclusion: An acidic environment markedly suppresses radiation-induced apoptosis probably by suppressing the expression of initial signals responsible for irradiation-induced apoptosis. Indications are that the signals persist in an acidic environment and trigger apoptosis when the environmental acidity is eased. Our results suggest that the acidic environment in human tumors may inhibit the apoptosis after irradiation. However, apoptosis may be triggered when reoxygenation occurs after irradiation, and thus, the intratumor environment becomes less acidic after irradiation. Not only the change in pO 2 but the change in pH during the course of fractionated radiotherapy may greatly influence the outcome of the treatment

  11. Fabrication of triple-labeled polyelectrolyte microcapsules for localized ratiometric pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiaoxue; Li, Huanbin; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2014-02-15

    Encapsulation of pH sensitive fluorophores as reporting molecules provides a powerful approach to visualize the transportation of multilayer capsules. In this study, two pH sensitive dyes (fluorescein and oregon green) and one pH insensitive dye (rhodamine B) were simultaneously labeled on the microcapsules to fabricate ratiometric pH sensors. The fluorescence of the triple-labeled microcapsule sensors was robust and nearly independent of other intracellular species. With a dynamic pH measurement range of 3.3-6.5, the microcapsules can report their localized pH at a real time. Cell culture experiments showed that the microcapsules could be internalized by RAW 246.7 cells naturally and finally accumulated in acidic organelles with a pH value of 5.08 ± 0.59 (mean ± s.d.; n=162). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A networked pathway to the PhD: The African-Norwegian case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    How do PhD students become socialised into the professional world of academic work? This article pays attention to a 'networked' support pathway towards a PhD. The network constitutes an international research collaboration through a programme called Productive Learning Cultures (PLC) (2002-2011) between Norway ...

  13. Low pH Cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven

    2007-05-01

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit ≤ 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio ≤ 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  14. Low pH Cements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savage, David; Benbow, Steven [Quintessa Ltd., Henley-on-Thames (United Kingdom)

    2007-05-15

    The development of low-pH cements for use in geological repositories for radioactive waste stems from concerns over the potential for deleterious effects upon the host rock and other EBS materials (notably bentonite) under the hyperalkaline conditions (pH > 12) of cement pore fluids. Low pH cement (also known as low heat cement) was developed by the cement industry for use where large masses of cement (e.g. dams) could cause problems regarding heat generated during curing. In low pH cements, the amount of cement is reduced by substitution of materials such as fly ash, blast furnace slag, silica fume, and/or non-pozzolanic silica flour. SKB and Posiva have ruled out the use of blast furnace slag and fly-ash and are focusing on silica fume as a blending agent. Currently, no preferred composition has been identified by these agencies. SKB and Posiva have defined a pH limit {<=} 11 for cement grout leachates. To attain this pH, blending agents must comprise at least 50 wt % of dry materials. Because low pH cement has little, or no free portlandite, the cement consists predominantly of calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) gel with a Ca/Si ratio {<=} 0.8. Although there are potential implications for the performance of the spent fuel and cladding due to the presence of hyperalkaline fluids from cement, the principal focus for safety assessment lies with the behaviour of bentonite. There are a number of potential constraints on the interaction of hyperalkaline cement pore fluids with bentonite, including mass balance, thermodynamic issues, mass transport, and kinetics, but none of these is likely to be limiting if conventional OPC cements are employed in repository construction. Nevertheless: Low-pH cements may supply approximately 50 % less hydroxyl ions than conventional OPC for a given volume of cement, but mass balance constraints are complicated by the uncertainty concerning the type of secondary minerals produced during cement-bentonite interaction. The change of aqueous

  15. Some effects of pH on iodine volatility in containment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashmore, C.B.; Gwyther, J.R.; Sims, H.E.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of iodine in containment in the event of an accident involving fission product release would be strongly dependent on pH. High pH leads to a lower rate of radiolytic oxidation and in alkaline conditions the thermally stable form is IO 3 - . Much of the work on effects of pH on radiolytic oxidation reported in the literature may be erroneous or misleading because of postirradiation reaction and in this report some new experiments are described which were designed to overcome these problems involving sparged irradiated solutions of CsI spiked with 131 I. The rate of radiolytic oxidation has been measured as a function of pH between pH 4.6 and pH 9 and iodide concentrations between 10 -4 and 10 -6 mol dm -3 . Also discussed in the paper are factors which can affect the pH of the sump water and the effects of high pH in sprays. It is concluded that high pH is beneficial and it is important not only to achieve high pH but to maintain it. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  16. Breeding and maintaining high-quality insects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kim; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Insects have a large potential for sustainably enhancing global food and feed production, and commercial insect production is a rising industry of high economic value. Insects suitable for production typically have fast growth, short generation time, efficient nutrient utilization, high...... reproductive potential, and thrive at high density. Insects may cost-efficiently convert agricultural and industrial food by-products into valuable protein once the technology is finetuned. However, since insect mass production is a new industry, the technology needed to efficiently farm these animals is still...... in a starting phase. Here, we discuss the challenges and precautions that need to be considered when breeding and maintaining high-quality insect populations for food and feed. This involves techniques typically used in domestic animal breeding programs including maintaining genetically healthy populations...

  17. Maintaining Respiratory Health in Cystic Fibrosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Modaresi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cystic fibrosis (CF is an inherited disease that primarily affects the lungs and the digestive system, however, it also affects a number of other organs and systems. More than 90% of mortality of  CF patients is due to lung complications.  Healthy lungs are important for a long life for people with CF, We will discuss two important topics for maintaining respiratory health. Chronic use of drugs for maintaining respiratory health There are a number of drugs available to keep CF lungs healthy. We will discuss the science behind the recommendations for use of: Inhaled antibiotics Dornase alfa Azithromycin Hypertonic saline High-dose ibuprofen Ivacaftor CF Airway Clearance Therapies Airway Clearance therapy is very important to keeping CF lungs healthy. Our discussions cover the following topics such as the: Daily airway clearance Different techniques of airway clearance Effect of aerobic exercise on airway clearance  

  18. Proceedings of the ICTSS 2012 PhD Workshop - Preface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Brian; Weise, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    and their thesis work and receive constructive feedback from experts in the field as well as from peers. Also it is an opportunity for researchers to get an insight into new research topics in the field. Ph.D. students at any stage of their doctoral studies may participate. Seven abstracts were submitted......This technical report contains the proceedings of the Ph.D. Workshop held in conjunction with the The 24th IFIP Int. Conference on Testing Software and Systems (ICTSS'12) in Aalborg, Denmark, November 19, 2012. The well‐established ICTSS series of international conferences addresses the conceptual......, theoretic, and practical challenges of testing software systems, including communication protocols, services, distributed platforms, middleware, embedded systems, and security infrastructures. The aims of the ICTSS Doctoral Workshop is to provide a forum for PhD students to present preliminary results...

  19. Maintaining the Identify of Dynamically Embodied Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Alan; O'Hare, Gregory; Duffy, Brian; Schoen-Phelan, Bianca; Bradley, John

    2005-01-01

    Virtual agents are traditionally constrained in their embod- iment, as they are restricted to one form of body. We propose allowing them to change their embodiment in order to expand their capabili- ties. This presents users with a number of di±culties in maintaining the identity of the agents, but these can be overcome by using identity cues, certain features that remain constant across embodiment forms. This pa- per outlines an experiment that examines these identity cues, and shows that th...

  20. Water quality maintaining device of power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Minoru; Inami, Ichiro.

    1994-01-01

    The device of the present invention reduces the amount of leaching materials of ion exchange resins from a water processing system of a BWR tyep plant, improves the water quality of reactor water to maintain the water at high purity. That is, steams used for power generation are condensated in a condensate system. A condensate filter and a condensate desalter for cleaning the condensates are disposed. A resin storage hopper is disposed for supplying the ion exchange resins to the water processing system. A device for supplying a nitrogen gas or an inert gas is disposed in the hopper. With such a constitution, the ion exchange resins in the water processing system are maintained in a nitrogen gas or inert gas atmosphere or at a low dissolved oxygen level in an operation stage in the power plant. Accordingly, degradation of the ion exchange resins in the water processing system is suppressed and the amount of the leaching material from the resins is reduced. As a result, the amount of the resins leached into the reactor is reduced, so that the reactor water quality can be maintained at high purity. (I.S.)

  1. Intracellular pH and 42.00 C heat response of CHO cells cultured at pH 6.6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, J.A.; Fox, M.H.

    1987-01-01

    The authors previously reported that cells under chronic low pH (6.6) conditions have altered thermotolerance. They further characterized both the doubling time (t/sub d/) and the internal pH (pH/sub 1/) of CHO cells continuously cultured at pH 6.6 for times greater than one year. The following differences were noted: 1) A t/sub d/ of 16 hr compared to a t/sub d/ of 12 hr for cells at normal pH (7.3) and a t/sub d/ of 25 hr for the acute low pH cells (pH = 6.6; incubation time = 4 hr). 2) A pH/sub i/ 0.1-0.15 pH units > normal cells and 0.3 pH units > acute low pH cells. 3) Survival at 42.0 0 C which differed from both normal and acute low pH cells. The chronic culture was still quite sensitive to 42.0 0 C treatments during the first 5 hr, but developed tolerance at a higher level than cells under acute low pH conditions. The pH/sub i/ of the chronic culture responded to 42.0 0 C heating in a manner similar to that for acute low pH cells. Whether this culture represents a normal response to long term low pH exposure, or was the response of a mutant population is at the present unknown

  2. Fetal scalp pH testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetal scalp blood; Scalp pH testing; Fetal blood testing - scalp; Fetal distress - fetal scalp testing; Labor - fetal scalp testing ... a baby. In these cases, testing the scalp pH can help the doctor decide whether the fetus ...

  3. Acid loading test (pH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003615.htm Acid loading test (pH) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The acid loading test (pH) measures the ability of the ...

  4. Traceability of pH to the Mole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Filomena Camões

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Free acidity of aqueous solutions was initially defined in 1909 by Søren Peter Lauritz Sørensen as pH = −lgcH+ (c/mol·dm−3 or m/mol·kg−1 of the free hydrogen ions in solution, H+ soon (1910 was changed to pH = paH+ = −lgaH+, integrating the new concepts of activity, ai and activity coefficient γi, for the ionic species i under concern, H+ in this case; it is ai = −lg(miγi. Since individual ions do not exist alone in solution, primary pH values cannot be assigned solely by experimental measurements, requiring extra thermodynamic model assumptions for the activity coefficient, γH+, which has put pH in a unique situation of not being fully traceable to the International System of Units (SI. Also the concept of activity is often not felt to be as perceptible as that of concentration which may present difficulties, namely with the interpretation of data. pH measurements on unknown samples rely on calibration of the measuring setup with adequate reference pH buffers. In this work, the assignment of pH values to buffers closely matching the samples, e.g., seawater, is revisited. An approach is presented to assess the quantity pmH+ = −lgmH+ profiting from the fact that, contrary to single ion activity coefficients, mean activity coefficients,   can be assessed based on experimentally assessed quantities alone, γExp ±, thus ensuring traceability to the mole, the SI base unit for amount of substance. Compatibility between γExp ± and mean activity coefficient calculated by means of Pitzer model equations, γPtz ±, validates the model for its intended use.

  5. Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1) function is necessary for maintaining mammary tissue architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Edmund C; Debnath, Shawon; Varriano, Sophia; Gundry, Stephen; Fata, Jimmie E

    2014-02-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal model to study the link between form and function in normal tissue. Perhaps as interesting as the cues necessary to generate this structure are the signals required to maintain its branched architecture over the lifetime of the organism, since likely these pathways are de-regulated in malignancies. Previously, we have shown that the Na(+) /H(+) exchanger 1 (NHE1), a critical regulator of intracellular pH, was necessary for mammary branching morphogenesis. Here we provide strong evidence that NHE1 function is also necessary for maintaining mammary branched architecture. Inhibition of NHE1 with 5-N-Methy-N-isobutyl amiloride (MIA) on branched structures resulted in a rapid (within 24 hr) and reversible loss of branched architecture that was not accompanied by any overt changes in cell proliferation or cell death. NHE1 inhibition led to a significant acidification of intracellular pH in the branched end buds that preceded a number of events, including altered tissue polarity of myoepithelial cells, loss of NHE1 basal polarity, F-actin rearrangements, and decreased E-cadherin expression. Our results implicate NHE1 function and intracellular pH homeostasis as key factors that maintain mammary tissue architecture, thus, indirectly allowing for mammary function as a milk-providing (form) and -producing (function) gland. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. SWCNT-Based Biosensor Modelling for pH Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Javad Kiani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different forms of CNT delivery have been discovered with several biomedical functions during past decades. The mechanisms of the cellular uptake of CNTs are mainly maintained due to the chemical nature, the cell type, and the features of the molecules, which are used to functionalize the nanotube exterior. Since single-wall carbon Nanotube (SWCNT has unique chemical and physical properties, it is a great applicant for pH sensing. In addition, ion sensitive FET (ISFET base on nanostructured SWCNT have covered a new method to help genetic investigators restructure metabolic pathways in cells, recognize the progression of disease, and expand diagnostics and therapeutics. Particularly, because PH sensing is very crucial for the constancy of enzymes, it is essential to extend the cost efficient types of this sensing. In this research, the conductance changes of the CNT-based ISFET device with different pH values can be modelled by ion concentration of the solution. In addition, the electrical current of channel is imagined as a function of pH levels, which can be controlled by a control factor (α. Thus, ISFET based nanostructured SWCNT is proposed focusing on the area of electrical detection of hydrogen ions of the electrolyte membrane. Besides, electrical detection of hydrogen ion applications is suggested to be used by modelling the delivery of SWCNT sheets. In the end, after comparing the proposed model and experimental data, it has been reported that there is a good compatibility between them.

  7. pH sensor calibration procedure

    OpenAIRE

    Artero Delgado, Carola; Nogueras Cervera, Marc; Manuel Lázaro, Antonio; Prat Tasias, Jordi; Prat Farran, Joana d'Arc

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the calibration of pH sensor located at the OBSEA marine Observatory. This instrument is based on an industrial pH electrode that is connected to a CTD instrument (Conductivity, Temperature, and Depth ). The calibration of the pH sensor has been done using a high precision spectrophotometer pH meter from Institute of Marine Sciences (ICM), and in this way it has been obtained a numerical function for the p H sensor propor...

  8. PhD students and integrative research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fry, G.; Tress, B.; Tress, G.

    2006-01-01

    The training of PhD students is currently very dynamic and varies widely from place to place. We present some examples of this variation and comment on how it may affect the way PhD students cope with integrative studies. Our focus is on the training needs of PhD students studying integrative

  9. Store operations to maintain cache coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Nair, Ravi; Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-08-01

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes encountering a store operation during a compile-time of a program, where the store operation is applicable to a memory line. It is determined, by a computer processor, that no cache coherence action is necessary for the store operation. A store-without-coherence-action instruction is generated for the store operation, responsive to determining that no cache coherence action is necessary. The store-without-coherence-action instruction specifies that the store operation is to be performed without a cache coherence action, and cache coherence is maintained upon execution of the store-without-coherence-action instruction.

  10. Store operations to maintain cache coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Nair, Ravi; Ohmacht, Martin

    2017-09-12

    In one embodiment, a computer-implemented method includes encountering a store operation during a compile-time of a program, where the store operation is applicable to a memory line. It is determined, by a computer processor, that no cache coherence action is necessary for the store operation. A store-without-coherence-action instruction is generated for the store operation, responsive to determining that no cache coherence action is necessary. The store-without-coherence-action instruction specifies that the store operation is to be performed without a cache coherence action, and cache coherence is maintained upon execution of the store-without-coherence-action instruction.

  11. TAPERED OPTICAL FIBRES FOR LOCAL pH DETECTION

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martan, Tomáš; Pospíšilová, Marie; Aubrecht, Jan; Mrázek, Jan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Kašík, Ivan; Matějec, Vlastimil

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 206, č. 1 (2010), 0120171-0120172 ISSN 1742-6588. [8th International Workshop on Information Optics (WIO' 09). Paris, 20.07.2009-24.07.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP102/08/P639 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20670512 Keywords : optical planar sensor * fluorescence * pH Subject RIV: JB - Sensor s, Measurment, Regulation

  12. Experience of maintaining laboratory educational website's sustainability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimenstein, Izak B

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory methodology websites are specialized niche websites. The visibility of a niche website transforms it into an authority site on a particular "niche of knowledge." This article presents some ways in which a laboratory methodology website can maintain its sustainability. The optimal composition of the website includes a basic content, a blog, and an ancillary part. This article discusses experimenting with the search engine optimization query results page. Strategic placement of keywords and even phrases, as well as fragmentation of the post's material, can improve the website's visibility to search engines. Hyperlinks open a chain reaction of additional links and draw attention to the previous posts. Publications in printed periodicals are a substantial part of a niche website presence on the Internet. Although this article explores a laboratory website on the basis of our hands-on expertise maintaining "Grossing Technology in Surgical Pathology" (www.grossing-technology.com) website with a high volume of traffic for more than a decade, the recommendations presented here for developing an authority website can be applied to other professional specialized websites. The authority websites visibility and sustainability are preconditions for aggregating them in a specialized educational laboratory portal.

  13. Maintaining ancient organelles: mitochondrial biogenesis and maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega, Rick B; Horton, Julie L; Kelly, Daniel P

    2015-05-22

    The ultrastructure of the cardiac myocyte is remarkable for the high density of mitochondria tightly packed between sarcomeres. This structural organization is designed to provide energy in the form of ATP to fuel normal pump function of the heart. A complex system comprised of regulatory factors and energy metabolic machinery, encoded by both mitochondrial and nuclear genomes, is required for the coordinate control of cardiac mitochondrial biogenesis, maturation, and high-capacity function. This process involves the action of a transcriptional regulatory network that builds and maintains the mitochondrial genome and drives the expression of the energy transduction machinery. This finely tuned system is responsive to developmental and physiological cues, as well as changes in fuel substrate availability. Deficiency of components critical for mitochondrial energy production frequently manifests as a cardiomyopathic phenotype, underscoring the requirement to maintain high respiration rates in the heart. Although a precise causative role is not clear, there is increasing evidence that perturbations in this regulatory system occur in the hypertrophied and failing heart. This review summarizes current knowledge and highlights recent advances in our understanding of the transcriptional regulatory factors and signaling networks that serve to regulate mitochondrial biogenesis and function in the mammalian heart. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Chewing Maintains Hippocampus-Dependent Cognitive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huayue; Iinuma, Mitsuo; Onozuka, Minoru; Kubo, Kin-Ya

    2015-01-01

    Mastication (chewing) is important not only for food intake, but also for preserving and promoting the general health. Recent studies have showed that mastication helps to maintain cognitive functions in the hippocampus, a central nervous system region vital for spatial memory and learning. The purpose of this paper is to review the recent progress of the association between mastication and the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function. There are multiple neural circuits connecting the masticatory organs and the hippocampus. Both animal and human studies indicated that cognitive functioning is influenced by mastication. Masticatory dysfunction is associated with the hippocampal morphological impairments and the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory deficits, especially in elderly. Mastication is an effective behavior for maintaining the hippocampus-dependent cognitive performance, which deteriorates with aging. Therefore, chewing may represent a useful approach in preserving and promoting the hippocampus-dependent cognitive function in older people. We also discussed several possible mechanisms involved in the interaction between mastication and the hippocampal neurogenesis and the future directions for this unique fascinating research.

  15. Maintaining heterokaryosis in pseudo-homothallic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grognet, Pierre; Silar, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Among all the strategies displayed by fungi to reproduce and propagate, some species have adopted a peculiar behavior called pseudo-homothallism. Pseudo-homothallic fungi are true heterothallics, i.e., they need 2 genetically-compatible partners to mate, but they produce self-fertile mycelium in which the 2 different nuclei carrying the compatible mating types are present. This lifestyle not only enables the fungus to reproduce without finding a compatible partner, but also to cross with any mate it may encounter. However, to be fully functional, pseudo-homothallism requires maintaining heterokaryosis at every stage of the life cycle. We recently showed that neither the structure of the mating-type locus nor hybrid-enhancing effect due to the presence of the 2 mating types accounts for the maintenance of heterokaryosis in the pseudo-homothallic fungus P. anserina. In this addendum, we summarize the mechanisms creating heterokaryosis in P. anserina and 2 other well-known pseudo-homothallic fungi, Neurospora tetrasperma and Agaricus bisporus. We also discuss mechanisms potentially involved in maintaining heterokaryosis in these 3 species.

  16. Determination of Peroxisomal pH in Living Mammalian Cells Using pHRed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho, Luis F; Schrader, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Organelle pH homeostasis is crucial for maintaining proper cellular function. The nature of the peroxisomal pH remains somewhat controversial, with several studies reporting conflicting results. Here, we describe in detail a rapid and accurate method for the measurement of peroxisomal pH, using the pHRed sensor protein and confocal microscopy of living mammalian cells. pHRed, a ratiometric sensor of pH, is targeted to the peroxisomes by virtue of a C-terminal targeting sequence. The probe has a maximum fluorescence emission at 610 nm while exhibiting dual excitation peaks at 440 and 585 nm, allowing for ratiometric imaging and determination of intracellular pH in live cell microscopy.

  17. The effect of pH on phosphorus availability and speciation in an aquaponics nutrient solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerozi, Brunno da Silva; Fitzsimmons, Kevin

    2016-11-01

    The interaction between the main ions in aquaponics nutrient solutions affects chemical composition and availability of nutrients, and nutrient uptake by plant roots. This study determined the effect of pH on phosphorus (P) speciation and availability in an aquaponics nutrient solution and used Visual MINTEQ to simulate P species and P activity. In both experimental and simulated results, P availability decreased with increase in pH of aquaponics nutrient solutions. According to simulations, P binds to several cations leaving less free phosphate ions available in solution. High pH values resulted in the formation of insoluble calcium phosphate species. The study also demonstrated the importance of organic matter and alkalinity in keeping free phosphate ions in solution at high pH ranges. It is recommended though that pH in aquaponics systems is maintained at a 5.5-7.2 range for optimal availability and uptake by plants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of pH on nitrogen transformations in media-based aquaponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yina; Hu, Zhen; Zhang, Jian; Xie, Huijun; Guimbaud, Christophe; Fang, Yingke

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the effects of pH on performance and nitrogen transformations in aquaponics, media-based aquaponics operated at pH 6.0, 7.5 and 9.0 were systematically examined and compared in this study. Results showed that nitrogen utilization efficiency (NUE) reached its maximum of 50.9% at pH 6.0, followed by 47.3% at pH 7.5 and 44.7% at pH 9.0. Concentrations of nitrogen compounds (i.e., TAN, NO2(-)-N and NO3(-)-N) in three pH systems were all under tolerable levels. pH had significant effect on N2O emission and N2O conversion ratio decreased from 2.0% to 0.6% when pH increased from 6.0 to 9.0, mainly because acid environment would inhibit denitrifiers and lead to higher N2O emission. 75.2-78.5% of N2O emission from aquaponics was attributed to denitrification. In general, aquaponics was suggested to maintain pH at 6.0 for high NUE, and further investigations on N2O mitigation strategy are needed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Lactobacillus casei combats acid stress by maintaining cell membrane functionality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-07-01

    Lactobacillus casei strains have traditionally been recognized as probiotics and frequently used as adjunct culture in fermented dairy products where lactic acid stress is a frequently encountered environmental condition. We have investigated the effect of lactic acid stress on the cell membrane of L. casei Zhang [wild type (WT)] and its acid-resistant mutant Lbz-2. Both strains were grown under glucose-limiting conditions in chemostats; following challenge by low pH, the cell membrane stress responses were investigated. In response to acid stress, cell membrane fluidity decreased and its fatty acid composition changed to reduce the damage caused by lactic acid. Compared with the WT, the acid-resistant mutant exhibited numerous survival advantages, such as higher membrane fluidity, higher proportions of unsaturated fatty acids, and higher mean chain length. In addition, cell integrity analysis showed that the mutant maintained a more intact cellular structure and lower membrane permeability after environmental acidification. These results indicate that alteration in membrane fluidity, fatty acid distribution, and cell integrity are common mechanisms utilized by L. casei to withstand severe acidification and to reduce the deleterious effect of lactic acid on the cell membrane. This detailed comparison of cell membrane responses between the WT and mutant add to our knowledge of the acid stress adaptation and thus enable new strategies to be developed aimed at improving the industrial performance of this species under acid stress.

  20. Computer model of hydroponics nutrient solution pH control using ammonium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, M; Stutte, G

    1999-01-01

    A computer simulation of a hydroponics-based plant growth chamber using ammonium to control pH was constructed to determine the feasibility of such a system. In nitrate-based recirculating hydroponics systems, the pH will increase as plants release hydroxide ions into the nutrient solution to maintain plant charge balance. Ammonium is an attractive alternative to traditional pH controls in an ALSS, but requires careful monitoring and control to avoid overdosing the plants with ammonium. The primary advantage of using NH4+ for pH control is that it exploits the existing plant nutrient uptake charge balance mechanisms to maintain solution pH. The simulation models growth, nitrogen uptake, and pH of a l-m2 stand of wheat. Simulation results indicated that ammonium-based control of nutrient solution pH is feasible using a proportional integral controller. Use of a 1 mmol/L buffer (Ka = 1.6 x 10(-6)) in the nutrient solution is required.

  1. International Trade. International Business

    OpenAIRE

    Мохнюк, А. М.; Mokhniuk, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Work programme of the study course “International Trade. International Business” was prepared in accordance with educational and vocational training program for bachelors of training direction 6.030601 “Management”.

  2. Methods of achieving and maintaining an appropriate caesarean section rate.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Robson, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Caesarean section rates continue to increase worldwide. The appropriate caesarean section rate remains a topic of debate among women and professionals. Evidence-based medicine has not provided an answer and depends on interpretation of the literature. Overall caesarean section rates are unhelpful, and caesarean section rates should not be judged in isolation from other outcomes and epidemiological characteristics. Better understanding of caesarean section rates, their consequences and their benefits will improve care, and enable learning between delivery units nationally and internationally. To achieve and maintain an appropriate caesarean section rate requires a Multidisciplinary Quality Assurance Programme in each delivery unit, recognising caesarean section rates as one of many factors that determine quality. Women will always choose the type of delivery that seems safest to them and their babies. Professionals need to monitor the quality of their practice continuously in a standardised way to ensure that women can make the right choice.

  3. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations on resolving the issue are discussed

  4. Maintaining Mappings Valid between Dynamic KOS

    OpenAIRE

    Dos Reis , Julio Cesar

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Knowledge Organization Systems (KOS) and the existing mappings between them have become extremely relevant in semantic-enabled systems especially for interoperability reasons. KOS may have a dynamic nature since knowledge in a lot of domains evolves fast, and thus KOS evolution can potentially impact mappings, turning them unreliable. A still open research problem is how to adapt mappings in the course of KOS evolution without re- computing semantic correspondences bet...

  5. [Maintaining solidarity: is mutuality the solution?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gevers, J K M; Ploem, M C

    2013-01-01

    Solidarity is essentially the willingness to contribute to the community and its demands, which may even involve contributing more than one is expecting to receive. Another principle is mutuality: this refers to a balance between rights and obligations or between mutual obligations. In its advisory document 'The importance of mutuality......solidarity takes work!', The Dutch Council for Public Health and Health Care underlines the importance of ensuring solidarity within the Dutch health care system, e.g. by encouraging patients to take responsibility for their own health, possibly by introducing elements of mutuality. In our contribution, we comment on the Council's advice. Although we fully agree with the overall conclusion that solidarity should be maintained within the system, we do not see how the introduction of increased mutuality will contribute to this goal.

  6. Maintaining human productivity during Mars transit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statler, Irving C.; Billings, Charles E.

    1989-01-01

    This paper addresses the special nature of the human-machine relationship during a trip to Mars. In particular, the potential for monotony and boredom during a long-duration space voyage and the effect on motivation and productivity can be important considerations to the health and welfare of the crew. For the voyage to Mars, a design may be considered that will purposefully maintain some level of workload for the crew as a preventive measure for the deterioration of productivity that comes with boredom. This paper speculates on these considerations, on the appropriate level of workload for maximum productivity, and on what might be done during the mission to alleviate the problems caused by monotony and boredom.

  7. Heartwarming memories: Nostalgia maintains physiological comfort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xinyue; Wildschut, Tim; Sedikides, Constantine; Chen, Xiaoxi; Vingerhoets, Ad J J M

    2012-08-01

    Nostalgia, a sentimental longing or wistful affection for the past, is a predominantly positive and social emotion. Recent evidence suggests that nostalgia maintains psychological comfort. Here, we propose, and document in five methodologically diverse studies, a broader homeostatic function for nostalgia that also encompasses the maintenance of physiological comfort. We show that nostalgia--an emotion with a strong connotation of warmth--is triggered by coldness. Participants reported stronger nostalgia on colder (vs. warmer) days and in a cold (vs. neutral or warm) room. Nostalgia, in turn, modulates the interoceptive feeling of temperature. Higher levels of music-evoked nostalgia predicted increased physical warmth, and participants who recalled a nostalgic (vs. ordinary autobiographical) event perceived ambient temperature as higher. Finally, and consistent with the close central nervous system integration of temperature and pain sensations, participants who recalled a nostalgic (vs. ordinary autobiographical) event evinced greater tolerance to noxious cold.

  8. Human factors review of power plant maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seminara, J.L.; Parsons, S.O.; Schmidt, W.J.; Gonzalez, W.R.; Dove, L.E.

    1980-10-01

    Human factors engineering is an interdisciplinary science and technology concerned with shaping the design of machines, facilities, and operational environments to promote safe, efficient, and reliable performance on the part of operators and maintainers of equipment systems. The human factors aspects of five nuclear power plants and four fossil fuel plants were evaluated using such methods as a checklist guided observation system, structured interviews with maintenance personnel, direct observations of maintenance tasks, reviews of procedures, and analyses of maintenance errors or accidents by means of the critical incident technique. The study revealed a wide variety of human factors problem areas, most of which are extensively photodocumented. The study recommends that a more systematic and formal approach be adopted to ensure that future power plants are human engineered to the needs of maintenance personnel

  9. Maintaining and troubleshooting your 3D printer

    CERN Document Server

    Bell, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining and Troubleshooting Your 3D Printer by Charles Bell is your guide to keeping your 3D printer running through preventive maintenance, repair, and diagnosing and solving problems in 3D printing. If you've bought or built a 3D printer such as a MakerBot only to be confounded by jagged edges, corner lift, top layers that aren't solid, or any of a myriad of other problems that plague 3D printer enthusiasts, then here is the book to help you get past all that and recapture the joy of creative fabrication. The book also includes valuable tips for builders and those who want to modify the

  10. Balancing selection maintains cryptic colour morphs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellenreuther, Maren

    2017-11-01

    Animals display incredibly diverse colour patterns, a testament to evolution's endless innovation in shaping life. In many species, the interplay between males and females in the pursuit of mates has driven the evolution of a myriad of colour forms, from the flashy peacock tail feathers to the tiniest colour markings in damselflies. In others, colour provides crypsis by allowing to blend into the background and to escape the eyes of predators. While the obvious benefits of this dazzling diversity for reproduction and survival seem straightforward, its maintenance is not. Theory predicts that genetic drift and various forms of selection reduce variation over time, making the persistence of colour variants over generations a puzzle. In this issue of Molecular Ecology, Lindtke et al. () study the cryptic colour morphs of Timema cristinae walking sticks to shed light on the genetic architecture and mechanisms that allow colour polymorphism maintenance over long timescales. By combining genome-wide data with phenotyping information from natural populations, they were able to map the green and melanistic colour to one genomic region with highly reduced effective recombination rate between two main chromosomal variants, consistent with an inversion polymorphism. These two main chromosomal variants showed geographically widespread heterozygote excess, and genomic signatures consistent with long-term balancing selection. A younger chromosomal variant was detected for the third morph, the green-striped colour morphs, in the same genomic regions as the melanistic and the green-unstriped morphs. Together, these results suggest that the genetic architecture of cryptic T. cristinae morphs is caused by nonrecombining genomic blocks that have been maintained over extended time periods by balancing selection making this study one of the few available empirical examples documenting that balancing selection of various forms may play an important role in maintaining adaptive genetic

  11. Dynamic regulation of gastric surface pH by luminal pH

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Shaoyou; Tanaka, Shin; Kaunitz, Jonathan D.; Montrose, Marshall H.

    1999-01-01

    In vivo confocal imaging of the mucosal surface of rat stomach was used to measure pH noninvasively under the mucus gel layer while simultaneously imaging mucus gel thickness and tissue architecture. When tissue was superfused at pH 3, the 25 μm adjacent to the epithelial surface was relatively alkaline (pH 4.1 ± 0.1), and surface alkalinity was enhanced by topical dimethyl prostaglandin E2 (pH 4.8 ± 0.2). Luminal pH was changed from pH 3 to pH 5 to mimic the fasted-to-fed transition in intra...

  12. Maintaining operational excellence: building capability beyond knowledge transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramjist, S.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the issues relating to human resources and maintaining capabilities in an organization. The sustaining elements are: vision and plan for excellence; invest in the plant; invest in human capital; find and fix problems. There is much discussion about knowledge transfer and retention that is mainly focused on technical attributes and proficiency. We are losing more people with the requisite managerial and leadership capability than we can develop and backfill at a Time when our industry is facing increased competition and decreased margins. We are vulnerable because this Increases our dependence on augmented staff for certain key leadership roles. Previous methods for developing people will take too long and does not appeal to current generation. A solution, not the only solution, but the one we have chosen is initial hiring of operators, maintainers and engineers, internal promotion for key roles (FLM, FSOS, Shift Supervisor, Section Manager, ANO) and focus on all three aspects of capability and looking for leadership traits. Look for ambition, drive, initiative and motivation. Identify, separate and stream. Take specific measures to accelerate growth.

  13. The human brain maintains contradictory and redundant auditory sensory predictions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Pieszek

    Full Text Available Computational and experimental research has revealed that auditory sensory predictions are derived from regularities of the current environment by using internal generative models. However, so far, what has not been addressed is how the auditory system handles situations giving rise to redundant or even contradictory predictions derived from different sources of information. To this end, we measured error signals in the event-related brain potentials (ERPs in response to violations of auditory predictions. Sounds could be predicted on the basis of overall probability, i.e., one sound was presented frequently and another sound rarely. Furthermore, each sound was predicted by an informative visual cue. Participants' task was to use the cue and to discriminate the two sounds as fast as possible. Violations of the probability based prediction (i.e., a rare sound as well as violations of the visual-auditory prediction (i.e., an incongruent sound elicited error signals in the ERPs (Mismatch Negativity [MMN] and Incongruency Response [IR]. Particular error signals were observed even in case the overall probability and the visual symbol predicted different sounds. That is, the auditory system concurrently maintains and tests contradictory predictions. Moreover, if the same sound was predicted, we observed an additive error signal (scalp potential and primary current density equaling the sum of the specific error signals. Thus, the auditory system maintains and tolerates functionally independently represented redundant and contradictory predictions. We argue that the auditory system exploits all currently active regularities in order to optimally prepare for future events.

  14. Maintaining operational excellence: building capability beyond knowledge transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramjist, S. [Ontario Power Generation, Darlington Nuclear Generating Station, Bowmanville, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper describes the issues relating to human resources and maintaining capabilities in an organization. The sustaining elements are: vision and plan for excellence; invest in the plant; invest in human capital; find and fix problems. There is much discussion about knowledge transfer and retention that is mainly focused on technical attributes and proficiency. We are losing more people with the requisite managerial and leadership capability than we can develop and backfill at a Time when our industry is facing increased competition and decreased margins. We are vulnerable because this Increases our dependence on augmented staff for certain key leadership roles. Previous methods for developing people will take too long and does not appeal to current generation. A solution, not the only solution, but the one we have chosen is initial hiring of operators, maintainers and engineers, internal promotion for key roles (FLM, FSOS, Shift Supervisor, Section Manager, ANO) and focus on all three aspects of capability and looking for leadership traits. Look for ambition, drive, initiative and motivation. Identify, separate and stream. Take specific measures to accelerate growth.

  15. Effect of pH on Cleavage of Glycogen by Vaginal Enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg T Spear

    Full Text Available Glycogen expressed by the lower genital tract epithelium is believed to support Lactobacillus growth in vivo, although most genital isolates of Lactobacillus are not able to use glycogen as an energy source in vitro. We recently reported that α-amylase is present in the genital fluid of women and that it breaks down glycogen into small carbohydrates that support growth of lactobacilli. Since the pH of the lower genital tract can be very low, we determined how low pH affects glycogen processing by α-amylase. α-amylase in saliva degraded glycogen similarly at pH 6 and 7, but activity was reduced by 52% at pH 4. The glycogen degrading activity in nine genital samples from seven women showed a similar profile with an average reduction of more than 50% at pH 4. However, two samples collected from one woman at different times had a strikingly different pH profile with increased glycogen degradation at pH 4, 5 and 6 compared to pH 7. This second pH profile did not correlate with levels of human α-acid glucosidase or human intestinal maltase glucoamylase. High-performance anion-exchange chromatography showed that mostly maltose was produced from glycogen by samples with the second pH profile in contrast to genital α-amylase that yielded maltose, maltotriose and maltotetraose. These studies show that at low pH, α-amylase activity is reduced to low but detectable levels, which we speculate helps maintain Lactobacillus growth at a limited but sustained rate. Additionally, some women have a genital enzyme distinct from α-amylase with higher activity at low pH. Further studies are needed to determine the identity and distribution of this second enzyme, and whether its presence influences the makeup of genital microbiota.

  16. Dissolution kinetics of heulandite at pH 2--12 and 25 degrees C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragnarsdottir, K.V.

    1993-01-01

    Because of their favourable cation exchange reactions, heulandite and clinoptilolite have been suggested as being capable of immobilizing radionuclides and therefore could possibly act as an important barrier for nuclear waste. Recent studies of laboratory-reacted minerals indicate, however, that hydrated surface layers tend to accumulate highly hydrolyzable heavy elements. These hydrated layers may therefore be the most important retardants for radionuclides. The dissolution rate of heulandite depends strongly on pH. Based on silica release, the logarithm of the steady-state dissolution rate at pH 2 is -13.1 mol cm -2 s -1 . The logarithm of the rate decreases to -15.8 mol cm -2 s -1 at pH 7.2 and increases again to -14.6 mol cm -2 s -1 at pH 12.2. At low pH, Al is released preferentially to silica; but at intermediate and high pH, the release of silica appears to be congruent relative to Al. The change in dissolution rate with pH indicates that at low pH, the dissolution mechanism is controlled by the detachment of a positively charged Al species, >Al-OH 2 + . Below pH 5, however, a silica-rich surface layer is formed requiring diffusion through the layer. At intermediate and high pH, it is likely that the dissolution rate is controlled by the detachment of a negatively charged silica species, >Si - O - . The reaction order of the hydrogen ion under low pH conditions is 0.7, and the reaction order of the OH - ion is 0.3 at high pH. The measured dissolution rates indicate that a 1 mm heulandite crystal would dissolve in 300,000 yrs if the solution composition is maintained undersaturated. 75 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs

  17. Shielding and maintainability in an experimental tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdou, M.A.; Fuller, G.; Hager, E.R.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an attempt to develop an understanding of the various factors involved. This work was performed as a part of the task assigned to one of the expert groups on the International Tokamak Reactor (INTOR). However, the results of this investigation are believed to be generally applicable to the broad class of the next generation of experimental tokamak facilities such as ETF. The shielding penalties for requiring personnel access are quantified. This is followed by a quantitative estimate of the benefits associated with personnel access. The penalties are compared to the benefits and conclusions and recommendations are developed on resolving the issue

  18. Maintaining nuclear competence and expertise in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Y.

    2004-01-01

    The fundamental law of atomic energy, which strictly restricts the application of atomic energy to the peaceful use, was established in 1955 in Japan. Since then, during the past five decades, great efforts were made to develop atomic energy. So far 52 units of light water reactors, 29 BWRs and 23 PWRs, have been built and in operation, 5 units are under construction and 6 units are planed to be built. Total capacity of presently operated NPPs amounts to 45.7 Gwe and the nuclear energy shares 30 % of the total electricity generation in Japan. During the past 10 years, several accidents occur in the nuclear facilities of electric power companies, and JNC ( previously PNC ). In spite of these accidents, including the accident of Kansai Electric Power Co. this year, the important role of nuclear energy to sustain the lives of people in Japan is intact. In the nuclear energy projection, the construction of NPPs continues till 2010. Thereafter reconstructions of NPPs are foreseen in the decade 2030's for the replacement of present NPPs in operation after 60 years services. Attention has been directed to the technology preservation: how competence and expertise of nuclear engineering can be maintained till the next period of replacement construction, in particular, the period between years 2010 and 2030. The present paper reviews the status of nuclear engineering programs in universities in Japan. The nuclear education programs started in graduate schools in 1957 and expanded to undergraduate schools of major national universities. Presently nine universities are providing systematic nuclear education programs in their graduate schools, although the corresponding department have been changed their names from 'nuclear' to more broaden terms of 'quantum', 'energy' and 'system' in several universities. Under the conditions of shrinking nuclear industries, how to maintain the present education system is seriously concerned matter in the universities. The present paper

  19. Maintaining Gamma Spectrometer and its challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazlipah Mohd Ramlan; Ramzah Mohamed; Saipo Bahari Abdul Ratan

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the activities of the Group Maintenance of Instrumentation and Automation Center. Maintenance of group activities is to provide maintenance service on equipment at the Malaysian Nuclear Agency. Category of equipment is maintained instrumentation / nuclear electronics, scientific, analytical, security, communications, audio visual and other related. Maintenance services is to support research and development and scientific services at Nuclear Malaysia. Equipment maintenance services including repair service (CM), periodic maintenance (PM), technical testing and calibration of new devices. The objective is to ensure that maintenance activities can be the hope of an equipment, extend the life of the operation of the equipment, reducing 'down time' and reduce maintenance costs. Among the challenges in managing the maintenance of equipment in Nuclear Malaysia is the lack of expertise in specific areas such as nuclear instrumentation, analytical instruments, the problem of the inability of local suppliers to provide after-sales service, lack of spares, maintenance and nothing less emphasis on preventive maintenance schedule is perfect. (author)

  20. Sociable Robots Through Self-Maintained Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trung Dung Ngo

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Research of autonomous mobile robots has mostly emphasized interaction and coordination that are natually inspired from biological behavior of birds, insects, and fish: flocking, foraging, collecting, and sharing. However, most research has been only focused on autonomous behaviors in order to perform robots like animals, whereas it is lacked of determinant to those behaviours: energy. Approaching to clusted amimal and the higher, collective and sharing food among individuals are major activity to keep society being. This paper issues an approach to sociable robots using self-maintained energy in cooperative mobile robots, which is dominantly inspired from swarm behavior of collecting and sharing food of honey-bee and ant. Autonomous mobile robots are usually equipped with a finite energy, thus they can operate in a finite time. To overcome the finitude, we describe practical deployment of mobile robots that are capable of carrying and exchanging fuel to other robots. Mechanism implementation including modular hardware and control architecture to demonstrate the capabicities of the approach is presented. Subsequently, the battery exchange algorithm basically based on probabilistic modeling of total energy on each robot located in its local vicinity is described. The paper is concluded with challenging works of chain of mobile robots, rescue, repair, and relation of heterogeneous robots.

  1. Sociable Robots through Self-maintained Energy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik Schioler

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Research of autonomous mobile robots has mostly emphasized interaction and coordination that are natually inspired from biological behavior of birds, insects, and fish: flocking, foraging, collecting, and sharing. However, most research has been only focused on autonomous behaviors in order to perform robots like animals, whereas it is lacked of determinant to those behaviours: energy. Approaching to clusted amimal and the higher, collective and sharing food among individuals are major activity to keep society being. This paper issues an approach to sociable robots using self-maintained energy in cooperative mobile robots, which is dominantly inspired from swarm behavior of collecting and sharing food of honey-bee and ant. Autonomous mobile robots are usually equipped with a finite energy, thus they can operate in a finite time. To overcome the finitude, we describe practical deployment of mobile robots that are capable of carrying and exchanging fuel to other robots. Mechanism implementation including modular hardware and control architecture to demonstrate the capabicities of the approach is presented. Subsequently, the battery exchange algorithm basically based on probabilistic modeling of total energy on each robot located in its local vicinity is described. The paper is concluded with challenging works of chain of mobile robots, rescue, repair, and relation of heterogeneous robots.

  2. Re-designing the PhEDEx security model

    CERN Document Server

    Wildish, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    PhEDEx. the data-placement tool used by the CMS experiment at the LHC, was conceived in a more trusting time. The security model was designed to provide a safe working environment for site agents and operators, but provided little more protection than that. CMS data was not sufficiently protected against accidental loss caused by operator error or software bugs or from loss of data caused by deliberate manipulation of the database. Operations staff were given high levels of access to the database, beyond what should have been needed to accomplish their tasks. This exposed them to the risk of suspicion should an incident occur. Multiple implementations of the security model led to difficulties maintaining code, which can lead to degredation of security over time.In order to meet the simultaneous goals of protecting CMS data, protecting the operators from undue exposure to risk, increasing monitoring capabilities and improving maintainability of the security model, the PhEDEx security model was redesigned and r...

  3. Re-designing the PhEDEx Security Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-H, Huang; Wildish, T.; X, Zhang

    2014-06-01

    PhEDEx, the data-placement tool used by the CMS experiment at the LHC, was conceived in a more trusting time. The security model provided a safe environment for site agents and operators, but offerred little more protection than that. Data was not sufficiently protected against loss caused by operator error or software bugs or by deliberate manipulation of the database. Operators were given high levels of access to the database, beyond what was actually needed to accomplish their tasks. This exposed them to the risk of suspicion should an incident occur. Multiple implementations of the security model led to difficulties maintaining code, which can lead to degredation of security over time. In order to meet the simultaneous goals of protecting CMS data, protecting the operators from undue exposure to risk, increasing monitoring capabilities and improving maintainability of the security model, the PhEDEx security model was redesigned and re-implemented. Security was moved from the application layer into the database itself, fine-grained access roles were established, and tools and procedures created to control the evolution of the security model over time. In this paper we describe this work, we describe the deployment of the new security model, and we show how these enhancements improve security on several fronts simultaneously.

  4. Re-designing the PhEDEx security model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang C-H; Wildish, T; Zhang X

    2014-01-01

    PhEDEx, the data-placement tool used by the CMS experiment at the LHC, was conceived in a more trusting time. The security model provided a safe environment for site agents and operators, but offerred little more protection than that. Data was not sufficiently protected against loss caused by operator error or software bugs or by deliberate manipulation of the database. Operators were given high levels of access to the database, beyond what was actually needed to accomplish their tasks. This exposed them to the risk of suspicion should an incident occur. Multiple implementations of the security model led to difficulties maintaining code, which can lead to degredation of security over time. In order to meet the simultaneous goals of protecting CMS data, protecting the operators from undue exposure to risk, increasing monitoring capabilities and improving maintainability of the security model, the PhEDEx security model was redesigned and re-implemented. Security was moved from the application layer into the database itself, fine-grained access roles were established, and tools and procedures created to control the evolution of the security model over time. In this paper we describe this work, we describe the deployment of the new security model, and we show how these enhancements improve security on several fronts simultaneously.

  5. Mutant carbonic anhydrase 4 impairs pH regulation and causes retinal photoreceptor degeneration.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Z.; Alvarez, B.V.; Chakarova, C.; Jiang, L.; Karan, G.; Frederick, J.M.; Zhao, Y.; Sauve, Y.; Li, X.; Zrenner, E.; Wissinger, B.; Hollander, A.I. den; Katz, B.; Baehr, W.; Cremers, F.P.M.; Casey, J.R.; Bhattacharya, S.S.; Zhang, K.

    2005-01-01

    Retina and retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) belong to the metabolically most active tissues in the human body. Efficient removal of acid load from retina and RPE is a critical function mediated by the choriocapillaris. However, the mechanism by which pH homeostasis is maintained is largely unknown.

  6. Roles of interstitial fluid pH in diabetes mellitus: Glycolysis and mitochondrial function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2015-01-01

    The pH of body fluids is one the most important key factors regulating various cell function such as enzyme activity and protein-protein interaction via modification of its binding affinity. Therefore, to keep cell function normal, the pH of body fluids is maintained constant by various systems. Insulin resistance is one of the most important, serious factors making the body condition worse in diabetes mellitus. I have recently found that the pH of body (interstitial) fluids is lower in diabetes mellitus than that in non-diabetic control, and that the lowered pH is one of the causes producing insulin resistance. In this review article, I introduce importance of body (interstitial) fluid pH in regulation of body function, evidence on abnormal regulation of body fluid pH in diabetes mellitus, and relationship between the body fluid pH and insulin resistance. Further, this review proposes perspective therapies on the basis of regulation of body fluid pH including propolis (honeybee product) diet. PMID:25685283

  7. pH distribution in human tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thistlethwaite, A.J.; Leeper, D.B.; Moylan, D.J.; Nerlinger, R.E.

    1984-01-01

    pH distribution in human tumors is being determined to evaluate this parameter as a prognostic indicator of hyperthermia response. pH is measured by a modified glass pH electrode (21g, model MI 408, Microelectrodes, Inc., Londonderry, NH) inserted through an 18g open-ended Angiocath. Eight tumors have been evaluated to date; and of those, 3 were also assayed after the first heat treatment coincident with determination of blood flow. Tumors were between 2-5 cm, of various histologies, and of primary, recurrent, or metastatic origin. 2-4 measurements were made per tumor. Pretreatment readings were between 6.4 and 7.2 pH units. As tumor blood flow increased after 1 hr heating (41.5 - 43 0 ) pH rose 0.1 - 0.3 units. Normal rat muscle yields pH readings of 7.35 - 7.45. Although there was considerable heterogeneity of pH within tumors, accuracy and drift were not a problem. 5-15 min were required for pH stabilization after catheter insertion and <5 min after electrode insertion. A saline wheal was used for anesthesia to preclude modification of pH by anesthetics. Patient tolerance has not been a problems. This study suggests that human tumor tissue has a preponderance of areas more acidic than normal tissue. This may serve to sensitize tumor cells to hyperthermia and provide a prognostic indicator of tumor response

  8. Maintaining homeostasis by decision-making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph W Korn

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Living organisms need to maintain energetic homeostasis. For many species, this implies taking actions with delayed consequences. For example, humans may have to decide between foraging for high-calorie but hard-to-get, and low-calorie but easy-to-get food, under threat of starvation. Homeostatic principles prescribe decisions that maximize the probability of sustaining appropriate energy levels across the entire foraging trajectory. Here, predictions from biological principles contrast with predictions from economic decision-making models based on maximizing the utility of the endpoint outcome of a choice. To empirically arbitrate between the predictions of biological and economic models for individual human decision-making, we devised a virtual foraging task in which players chose repeatedly between two foraging environments, lost energy by the passage of time, and gained energy probabilistically according to the statistics of the environment they chose. Reaching zero energy was framed as starvation. We used the mathematics of random walks to derive endpoint outcome distributions of the choices. This also furnished equivalent lotteries, presented in a purely economic, casino-like frame, in which starvation corresponded to winning nothing. Bayesian model comparison showed that--in both the foraging and the casino frames--participants' choices depended jointly on the probability of starvation and the expected endpoint value of the outcome, but could not be explained by economic models based on combinations of statistical moments or on rank-dependent utility. This implies that under precisely defined constraints biological principles are better suited to explain human decision-making than economic models based on endpoint utility maximization.

  9. Corrosion studies of thermally sensitised AGR fuel element brace in pH7 and pH9.2 borate solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tyfield, S.P.; Smith, C.A.

    1987-04-01

    Brace and cladding of AGR fuel elements sensitised in reactor are susceptible to intergranular and crevice corrosion, which may initiate in the pH7 borate pond storage environment of CEGB/SSEB stations. This report considers the benefit in corrosion control that is provided by raising the pond solution pH to 9.2, whilst maintaining the boron level at 1250 gm -3 . The greater corrosion protection provided by pH9.2 solution compared to the pH7 borate solution is demonstrated by a series of tests with non-active laboratory sensitised brace samples exposed to solutions dosed with chloride or sulphate in order to promote localised corrosion. The corrosion tests undertaken consisted of 5000 hour immersions at 32 0 C and shorter term electrochemically monitored experiments (rest potential, impedance, anodic current) generally conducted at 22 0 C. The pH9.2 solution effectively inhibited the initiation of crevice and intergranular corrosion in the presence of low levels of chloride and sulphate, whereas the pH7 solution did not always do so. However, the pH9.2 solution, dosed with 40 gm -3 chloride, failed to suppress fully crevice corrosion initiated in unborated 40 gm -3 chloride solution at 22 0 C. Fluoride is not deleterious at low levels ∼ 10 gm -3 in the borate solutions. The significant improvement in corrosion control demonstrated for the change from pH7 to pH9.2 borate solution on laboratory sensitised brace samples should ideally be confirmed using complete irradiated AGR fuel elements. (U.K.)

  10. Response of Syntrophic Propionate Degradation to pH Decrease and Microbial Community Shifts in an UASB Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liguo; Ban, Qiaoying; Li, Jianzheng; Jha, Ajay Kumar

    2016-08-28

    The effect of pH on propionate degradation in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor containing propionate as a sole carbon source was studied. Under influent propionate of 2,000 mg/l and 35ºC, propionate removal at pH 7.5-6.8 was above 93.6%. Propionate conversion was significantly inhibited with stepwise pH decrease from pH 6.8 to 6.5, 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, 4.5, and then to 4.0. After long-term operation, the propionate removal at pH 6.5-4.5 maintained an efficiency of 88.5%-70.1%, whereas propionate was hardly decomposed at pH 4.0. Microbial composition analysis showed that propionate-oxidizing bacteria from the genera Pelotomaculum and Smithella likely existed in this system. They were significantly reduced at pH ≤5.5. The methanogens in this UASB reactor belonged to four genera: Methanobacterium, Methanospirillum, Methanofollis, and Methanosaeta. Most detectable hydrogenotrophic methanogens were able to grow at low pH conditions (pH 6.0-4.0), but the acetotrophic methanogens were reduced as pH decreased. These results indicated that propionate-oxidizing bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens were more sensitive to low pH (5.5-4.0) than hydrogenotrophic methanogens.

  11. Meta-Cresol Purple Reference Material® (RM) for Seawater pH Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Easley, R. A.; Waters, J. F.; Place, B. J.; Pratt, K. W.

    2016-02-01

    The pH of seawater is a fundamental quantity that governs the carbon dioxide - carbonate system in the world's oceans. High quality pH measurements for long-term monitoring, shipboard studies, and shorter-term biological studies (mesocosm and field experiments) can be ensured through a reference material (RM) that is compatible with existing procedures and which is traceable to primary pH measurement metrology. High-precision spectrophotometric measurements of seawater pH using an indicator dye such as meta-cresol purple (mCP) are well established. However, traceability of these measurements to the International System of Units (SI) additionally requires characterizing the spectrophotometric pH response of the dye in multiple artificial seawater buffers that themselves are benchmarked via primary pH (Harned cell) measurements at a range of pH, salinity, and temperature. NIST is currently developing such a mCP pH RM using this approach. This material will also incorporate new procedures developed at NIST for assessing the purity and homogeneity of the mCP reagent itself. The resulting mCP will provide long-term (years) stability and ease of shipment compared to artificial seawater pH buffers. These efforts will provide the oceanographic user community with a NIST issued mCP (RM), characterized as to its molar absorptivity values and acid dissociation constants (pKa), with uncertainties that comply with the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (GUM).

  12. Coaching af ph.d.-studerende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godskesen, Mirjam Irene

    Rapporten danner grundlag for at etablere et koncept for ph.d.-coaching. Erfaringerne fra et 2-årigt projekt om ph.d.-coaching i SCKK regi beskrives. De centrale temaer er tilrettelæggelse af den individuelle coaching, typiske temaer i coachingen og arbejdsdeling mellem coach og vejleder. Der er...

  13. Salivary pH: A diagnostic biomarker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Baliga

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Saliva contains a variety of host defense factors. It influences calculus formation and periodontal disease. Different studies have been done to find exact correlation of salivary biomarkers with periodontal disease. With a multitude of biomarkers and complexities in their determination, the salivary pH may be tried to be used as a quick chairside test. The aim of this study was to analyze the pH of saliva and determine its relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Study Design: The study population consisted of 300 patients. They were divided into three groups of 100 patients each: Group A had clinically healthy gingiva, Group B who had generalized chronic gingivitis and Group C who had generalized chronic periodontitis. The randomized unstimulated saliva from each patient was collected and pH was tested. Data was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance technique. Results: The salivary pH was more alkaline for patients with generalized chronic gingivitis as compared with the control group (P = 0.001 whereas patients with generalized chronic periodontitis had more acidic pH as compared with the control group (P = 0.001. Conclusion: These results indicate a significant change in the pH depending on the severity of the periodontal condition. The salivary pH shows significant changes and thus relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Salivary pH may thus be used as a quick chairside diagnostic biomarker.

  14. Salivary pH: A diagnostic biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Sharmila; Muglikar, Sangeeta; Kale, Rahul

    2013-07-01

    Saliva contains a variety of host defense factors. It influences calculus formation and periodontal disease. Different studies have been done to find exact correlation of salivary biomarkers with periodontal disease. With a multitude of biomarkers and complexities in their determination, the salivary pH may be tried to be used as a quick chairside test. The aim of this study was to analyze the pH of saliva and determine its relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. The study population consisted of 300 patients. They were divided into three groups of 100 patients each: Group A had clinically healthy gingiva, Group B who had generalized chronic gingivitis and Group C who had generalized chronic periodontitis. The randomized unstimulated saliva from each patient was collected and pH was tested. Data was analyzed statistically using analysis of variance technique. The salivary pH was more alkaline for patients with generalized chronic gingivitis as compared with the control group (P = 0.001) whereas patients with generalized chronic periodontitis had more acidic pH as compared with the control group (P = 0.001). These results indicate a significant change in the pH depending on the severity of the periodontal condition. The salivary pH shows significant changes and thus relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Salivary pH may thus be used as a quick chairside diagnostic biomarker.

  15. Ph og børnenes rum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Coninck-Smith, Ning

    2008-01-01

    Arkiteten og kulturkritikeren PH tegnede to bygninger til børn, nemlig fabriksbørnehaven ved Dehns Vaskeri fra 1948 og det ombyggede børnehjem Mindet fra 1954. Bidraget diskuterer PH's særlige greb om arkitektur til børn og placerer det ind i samtidens diskussion om børn, deres udvikling og behov....

  16. PER PhDs & Bachelor's Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Susan C.

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the editor remarked to me that physics departments that offered a PhD with a specialization in Physics Education Research (PER) seemed to graduate more bachelor's degree recipients than those physics PhD departments that did not have the specialization. I was not convinced. That led to quite a bit of discussion between us. He compiled a…

  17. Urbanism PhD Research 2008 - 2010

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, M.; Van der Hoeven, F.D.; Brand, N.; Van der Burg, L.; Çal??kan, O.; Tan, E.R.; Wang, C.Y.; Zhou, J.

    2009-01-01

    To ensure the quality of the Ph.D. research the Department introduced a special procedure for periodic evaluation: after a period of nine months the potential Ph.D. candidates are asked to present their research design, theoretical framework and methodological approach to the members of the

  18. (ajst) the influence of ph and adsorbent

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    goethite sorbed a little more metal ion than the natural goethite. This was attributed ... was greatly governed by pH with nearly 100% adsorption of Pb occurring at initial pH of 5. Generally, Pb was ... extensively study and applied for the removal of heavy .... Goethite has variable surface charge characteristics, which gave it a ...

  19. On Calibration of pH Meters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Ming Zhu

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The calibration of pH meters including the pH glass electrode, ISE electrodes,buffers, and the general background for calibration are reviewed. Understanding of basicconcepts of pH, pOH, and electrode mechanism is emphasized. New concepts of pH, pOH,as well as critical examination of activity, and activity coefficients are given. Theemergence of new solid state pH electrodes and replacement of the salt bridge with aconducting wire have opened up a new horizon for pH measurements. A pH buffer solutionwith a conducting wire may be used as a stable reference electrode. The misleadingunlimited linear Nernstian slope should be discarded. Calibration curves with 3 nonlinearportions for the entire 0—14 pH range due to the isoelectric point change effect areexplained. The potential measurement with stirring or unstirring and effects by double layer(DL and triple layer (TL will be discussed.

  20. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lincoln Taiz

    2005-06-22

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemon fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.

  1. Trends in MD/PhD Graduates Entering Psychiatry: Assessing the Physician-Scientist Pipeline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbuckle, Melissa R; Luo, Sean X; Pincus, Harold Alan; Gordon, Joshua A; Chung, Joyce Y; Chavez, Mark; Oquendo, Maria A

    2018-06-01

    The goal of this study was to identify trends in MD/PhD graduates entering psychiatry, to compare these trends with other specialties, and to review strategies for enhancing the physician-scientist pipeline. Data on 226,588 medical students graduating from Liaison Committee on Medical Education accredited programs between 1999 and 2012 (6626 MD/PhDs) were used to evaluate the number, percentage, and proportion of MD/PhDs entering psychiatry in comparison with other specialties (neurology, neurosurgery, internal medicine, family medicine, and radiation oncology). Linear regression and multiple linear regression determined whether these values increased over time and varied by sex. Over 14 years, an average of 18 MD/PhDs (range 13-29) enrolled in psychiatry each year. The number of MD/PhDs going into psychiatry significantly increased, although these gains were modest (less than one additional MD/PhD per year). The proportion of students entering psychiatry who were MD/PhDs varied between 2.9 and 5.9 per 100 residents, with no significant change over time. There was also no change in the percentage of MD/PhDs entering psychiatry from among all MD/PhD graduates. The rate of increase in the number of MD/PhDs going into psychiatry did not differ significantly from other specialties except for family medicine, which is decreasing. The rate of MD/PhDs going into psychiatry was higher for women, suggesting closure of the sex gap in 17 years. Despite the increase in the number of MD/PhDs entering psychiatry, these numbers remain low. Expanding the cohort of physician-scientists dedicated to translational research in psychiatry will require a multipronged approach.

  2. Spectroscopic determination of pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faanu, A.; Glover, E.T.; Bailey, E.; Rochelle, C.

    2009-01-01

    A technique of measuring pH at temperature range of 20 - 70 0 C and high pressure conditions of 1 - 200 atmospheres has been developed by relating the ratio of absorbance peaks of indicator solutions (basic and acidic) as a function of pH, using ultraviolet-visible spectrophotometer. The pH values of the buffer solutions measured at 20 0 C and 70 0 C indicated slight temperature dependence, while the pressure had no effect. The pH of the buffer solutions increased with temperature with relative standard deviations in the range 0.4 - 0.5 % at 95 % confidence interval. The possible causes of the temperature dependence were attributed to changes in pH values as the temperature changed. (au)

  3. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  4. Endoscopic sensing of alveolar pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, D; Tanner, M G; McAughtrie, S; Yu, F; Mills, B; Choudhary, T R; Seth, S; Craven, T H; Stone, J M; Mati, I K; Campbell, C J; Bradley, M; Williams, C K I; Dhaliwal, K; Birks, T A; Thomson, R R

    2017-01-01

    Previously unobtainable measurements of alveolar pH were obtained using an endoscope-deployable optrode. The pH sensing was achieved using functionalized gold nanoshell sensors and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The optrode consisted of an asymmetric dual-core optical fiber designed for spatially separating the optical pump delivery and signal collection, in order to circumvent the unwanted Raman signal generated within the fiber. Using this approach, we demonstrate a ~100-fold increase in SERS signal-to-fiber background ratio, and demonstrate multiple site pH sensing with a measurement accuracy of ± 0.07 pH units in the respiratory acini of an ex vivo ovine lung model. We also demonstrate that alveolar pH changes in response to ventilation.

  5. Development of Hybrid pH sensor for long-term seawater pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Y.; Egashira, T.; Miwa, T.; Kimoto, H.

    2016-02-01

    We have been developing the in situ pH sensor (Hybrid pH sensor: HpHS) for the long-term seawater pH monitoring. We are planning to provide the HpHS for researchers and environmental consultants for observation of the CCS (Carbon dioxide Capture and Storage) monitoring system, the coastal environment monitoring system (e.g. Blue Carbon) and ocean acidification. The HpHS has two types of pH sensors (i.e. potentiometric pH sensor and spectrophotometric pH sensor). The spectrophotometric pH sensor can measure pH correctly and stably, however it needs large power consumption and a lot of reagents in a long period of observation. The pH sensor used m-cresol purple (mCP) as an indicator of pH (Clayton and Byrne, 1993 and Liu et al., 2011). We can choose both coefficients before deployment. On the other hand, although the potentiometric pH sensor is low power consumption and high-speed response (within 10 seconds), drifts in the pH of the potentiometric measurements may possibly occur for a long-term observation. The HpHS can measure in situ pH correctly and stably combining advantage of both pH sensors. The HpHS consists of an aluminum pressure housing with optical cell (main unit) and an aluminum silicon-oil filled, pressure-compensated vessel containing pumps and valves (diaphragm pump and valve unit) and pressure-compensated reagents bags (pH indicator, pure water and Tris buffer or certified reference material: CRM) with an ability to resist water pressure to 3000m depth. The main unit holds system control boards, pump drivers, data storage (micro SD card), LED right source, photodiode, optical cell and pressure proof windows. The HpHS also has an aluminum pressure housing that holds a rechargeable lithium-ion battery or a lithium battery for the power supply (DC 24 V). The HpHS is correcting the value of the potentiometric pH sensor (measuring frequently) by the value of the spectrophotometric pH sensor (measuring less frequently). It is possible to calibrate in

  6. High performance flexible pH sensor based on polyaniline nanopillar array electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jo Hee; Hong, Seok Bok; Yun, Seok-Oh; Lee, Seok Jae; Lee, Tae Jae; Lee, Kyoung G; Choi, Bong Gill

    2017-03-15

    Flexible pH sensor technologies have attracted a great deal of attention in many applications, such as, wearable health care devices and monitors for chemical and biological processes. Here, we fabricated flexible and thin pH sensors using a two electrode configuration comprised of a polyaniline nanopillar (PAN) array working electrode and an Ag/AgCl reference electrode. In order to provide nanostructure, soft lithography using a polymeric blend was employed to create a flexible nanopillar backbone film. Polyaniline-sensing materials were deposited on a patterned-nanopillar array by electrochemical deposition. The pH sensors produced exhibited a near-Nernstian response (∼60.3mV/pH), which was maintained in a bent state. In addition, pH sensors showed other excellent sensor performances in terms of response time, reversibility, repeatability, selectivity, and stability. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Long-term changes in soil pH across major forest ecosystems in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuanhe; Li, Pin; He, Honglin; Zhao, Xia; Datta, Arindam; Ma, Wenhong; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Xuejun; Han, Wenxuan; Wilson, Maxwell C.; Fang, Jingyun

    2015-02-01

    Atmospheric acidic deposition has been a major environmental problem since the industrial revolution. However, our understanding of the effect of acidic deposition on soil pH is inconclusive. Here we examined temporal variations in topsoil pH and their relationships with atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition across China's forests from the 1980s to the 2000s. To accomplish this goal, we conducted artificial neural network simulations using historical soil inventory data from the 1980s and a data set synthesized from literature published after 2000. Our results indicated that significant decreases in soil pH occurred in broadleaved forests, while minor changes were observed in coniferous and mixed coniferous and broadleaved forests. The magnitude of soil pH change was negatively correlated with atmospheric sulfur and nitrogen deposition. This relationship highlights the need for stringent measures that reduce sulfur and nitrogen emissions so as to maintain ecosystem structure and function.

  8. The PhEDEx next-gen website

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egeland, R; Sundarrajan, P; Huang, C-H; Rossman, P; Wildish, T

    2012-01-01

    PhEDEx is the data-transfer management solution written by CMS. It consists of agents running at each site, a website for presentation of information, and a web-based data-service for scripted access to information. The website allows users to monitor the progress of data-transfers, the status of site agents and links between sites, and the overall status and behaviour of everything about PhEDEx. It also allows users to make and approve requests for data-transfers and for deletion of data. It is the main point-of-entry for all users wishing to interact with PhEDEx. For several years, the website has consisted of a single perl program with about 10K SLOC. This program has limited capabilities for exploring the data, with only coarse filtering capabilities and no context-sensitive awareness. Graphical information is presented as static images, generated on the server, with no interactivity. It is also not well connected to the rest of the PhEDEx codebase, since much of it was written before the data-service was developed. All this makes it hard to maintain and extend. We are re-implementing the website to address these issues. The UI is being rewritten in Javascript, replacing most of the server-side code. We are using the YUI toolkit to provide advanced features and context-sensitive interaction, and will adopt a Javascript charting library for generating graphical representations client-side. This relieves the server of much of its load, and automatically improves server-side security. The Javascript components can be re-used in many ways, allowing custom pages to be developed for specific uses. In particular, standalone test-cases using small numbers of components make it easier to debug the Javascript than it is to debug a large server program. Information about PhEDEx is accessed through the PhEDEx data-service, since direct SQL is not available from the clients’ browser. This provides consistent semantics with other, externally written monitoring tools, which

  9. Comparative evaluation of mouth rinsing with plain water and an antibacterial mouth rinse on salivary pH: A randomized clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Shweta Singh; P Anuradha; S Sahana; Manu Narayan; Sugandha Agarwal

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Salivary pH plays an important role in maintaining oral health and in particular affecting dental caries. Studies have confirmed the antibacterial beneficial effects of chlorhexidine on dental health by increasing salivary pH (changing acidic pH to more neutral pH). Water, the most precious/omnipresent liquid also bears an effect on salivary pH. Materials and Methods: A double-blind concurrent parallel study design was employed on 40 individuals to evaluate changes in salivary p...

  10. Regulation of neuronal pH by the metabotropic Zn(2+)-sensing Gq-coupled receptor, mZnR/GPR39.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganay, Thibault; Asraf, Hila; Aizenman, Elias; Bogdanovic, Milos; Sekler, Israel; Hershfinkel, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Synaptically released Zn(2+) acts as a neurotransmitter, in part, by activating the postsynaptic metabotropic Zn(2+)-sensing Gq protein-coupled receptor (mZnR/GPR39). In previous work using epithelial cells, we described crosstalk between Zn(2+) signaling and changes in intracellular pH and/or extracellular pH (pHe). As pH changes accompany neuronal activity under physiological and pathological conditions, we tested whether Zn(2+) signaling is involved in regulation of neuronal pH. Here, we report that up-regulation of a major H(+) extrusion pathway, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), is induced by mZnR/GPR39 activation in an extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2-dependent manner in hippocampal neurons in vitro. We also observed that changes in pHe can modulate neuronal mZnR/GPR39-dependent signaling, resulting in reduced activity at pHe 8 or 6.5. Similarly, Zn(2+)-dependent extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation and up-regulation of NHE activity were absent at acidic pHe. Thus, our results suggest that when pHe is maintained within the physiological range, mZnR/GPR39 activation can up-regulate NHE-dependent recovery from intracellular acidification. During acidosis, as pHe drops, mZnR/GPR39-dependent NHE activation is inhibited, thereby attenuating further H(+) extrusion. This mechanism may serve to protect neurons from excessive decreases in pHe. Thus, mZnR/GPR39 signaling provides a homeostatic adaptive process for regulation of intracellular and extracellular pH changes in the brain. We show that the postsynaptic metabotropic Zn(2+)-sensing Gq protein-coupled receptor (mZnR/GPR39) activation induces up-regulation of a major neuronal H(+) extrusion pathway, the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), thereby enhancing neuronal recovery from intracellular acidification. Changes in extracellular pH (pHe), however, modulate neuronal mZnR/GPR39-dependent signaling, resulting in reduced activity at pHe 8 or 6.5. This mechanism may serve to protect neurons from excessive

  11. Evaluation of Gastric pH and Serum Gastrin Concentrations in Cats with Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolbert, M K; Olin, S; MacLane, S; Gould, E; Steiner, J M; Vaden, S; Price, J

    2017-09-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a highly prevalent condition in cats. Advanced CKD is associated with hyporexia and vomiting, which typically are attributed to uremic toxins and gastric hyperacidity. However, gastric pH studies have not been performed in cats with CKD. To determine if cats with CKD have decreased gastric pH compared to age-matched, healthy cats. Based on previous work demonstrating an association of hypergastrinemia and CKD, we hypothesized that cats with CKD would have decreased gastric pH compared to healthy, age-matched control cats. 10 CKD cats; 9 healthy control cats. All cats with concurrent disease were excluded on the basis of history, physical examination, CBC, plasma biochemistry profile, urinalysis, urine culture, serum total thyroxine concentration, and serum symmetric dimethylarginine concentration (controls only) obtained within 24 hours of pH monitoring and assessment of serum gastrin concentrations. Serum for gastrin determination was collected, and 12-hour continuous gastric pH monitoring was performed in all cats. Serum gastrin concentration, mean pH, and percentage time that gastric pH was strongly acidic (pH pH parameters including mean ± SD gastric pH (CKD, 1.8 ± 0.5; healthy, 1.6 ± 0.3; P-value = 0.23). These findings suggest that cats with CKD may not have gastric hyperacidity compared to healthy cats and, therefore, may not need acid suppression. Thus, further studies to determine if there is a benefit to acid suppression in cats with CKD are warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  12. Streptococcus oligofermentans Inhibits Streptococcus mutans in Biofilms at Both Neutral pH and Cariogenic Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xudong; de Soet, Johannes Jacob; Tong, Huichun; Gao, Xuejun; He, Libang; van Loveren, Cor; Deng, Dong Mei

    2015-01-01

    Homeostasis of oral microbiota can be maintained through microbial interactions. Previous studies showed that Streptococcus oligofermentans, a non-mutans streptococci frequently isolated from caries-free subjects, inhibited the cariogenic Streptococcus mutans by the production of hydrogen peroxide (HP). Since pH is a critical factor in caries formation, we aimed to study the influence of pH on the competition between S. oligofermentans and S. mutans in biofilms. To this end, S. mutans and S. oligofermentans were inoculated alone or mixed at 1:1 ratio in buffered biofilm medium in a 96-well active attachment model. The single- and dual-species biofilms were grown under either constantly neutral pH or pH-cycling conditions. The latter includes two cycles of 8 h neutral pH and 16 h pH 5.5, used to mimic cariogenic condition. The 48 h biofilms were analysed for the viable cell counts, lactate and HP production. The last two measurements were carried out after incubating the 48 h biofilms in buffers supplemented with 1% glucose (pH 7.0) for 4 h. The results showed that S. oligofermentans inhibited the growth of S. mutans in dual-species biofilms under both tested pH conditions. The lactic acid production of dual-species biofilms was significantly lower than that of single-species S. mutans biofilms. Moreover, dual-species and single-species S. oligofermentans biofilms grown under pH-cycling conditions (with a 16 h low pH period) produced a significantly higher amount of HP than those grown under constantly neutral pH. In conclusion, S. oligofermentans inhibited S. mutans in biofilms not only under neutral pH, but also under pH-cycling conditions, likely through HP production. S. oligofermentans may be a compelling probiotic candidate against caries.

  13. Manipulation of pH Shift to Enhance the Growth and Antibiotic Activity of Xenorhabdus nematophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of pH control strategy on cell growth and the production of antibiotic (cyclo(2-Me-BABA-Gly by Xenorhabdus nematophila and enhance the antibiotic activity. The effects of uncontrolled- (different initial pH and controlled-pH (different constant pH and pH-shift operations on cell growth and antibiotic activity of X. nematophila YL00I were examined. Experiments showed that the optimal initial pH for cell growth and antibiotic production of X. nematophila YL001 occurred at 7.0. Under different constant pH, a pH level of 7.5 was found to be optimal for biomass and antibiotic activity at 23.71 g/L and 100.0 U/mL, respectively. Based on the kinetic information relating to the different constant pH effects on the fermentation of X. nematophila YL001, a two-stage pH control strategy in which pH 6.5 was maintained for the first 24 h, and then switched to 7.5 after 24 h, was established to improve biomass production and antibiotic activity. By applying this pH-shift strategy, the maximal antibiotic activity and productivity were significantly improved and reaching 185.0 U/mL and 4.41 U/mL/h, respectively, compared to values obtained from constant pH operation (100.0 U/mL and 1.39 U/mL/h.

  14. Structural and biophysical characteristics of human skin in maintaining proper epidermal barrier function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Boer

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The complex structure of human skin and its physicochemical properties turn it into an efficient outermost defence line against exogenous factors, and help maintain homeostasis of the human body. This role is played by the epidermal barrier with its major part – stratum corneum. The condition of the epidermal barrier depends on individual and environmental factors. The most important biophysical parameters characterizing the status of this barrier are the skin pH, epidermal hydration, transepidermal water loss and sebum excretion. The knowledge of biophysical skin processes may be useful for the implementation of prophylactic actions whose aim is to restore the barrier function.

  15. PhD Crisis Discourse: A Critical Approach to the Framing of the Problem and Some Australian "Solutions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Denise; Molla, Tebeje

    2015-01-01

    A feature of HE reform discourse is the tendency to construct the rationale for reform in terms of averting calamity and risk. We refer to this risk talk as "crisis discourse." This study examines the formulation of PhD crisis discourse internationally and in Australia. We find that a key feature of PhD crisis discourse is that…

  16. Water balance creates a threshold in soil pH at the global scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slessarev, E. W.; Lin, Y.; Bingham, N. L.; Johnson, J. E.; Dai, Y.; Schimel, J. P.; Chadwick, O. A.

    2016-12-01

    Soil pH regulates the capacity of soils to store and supply nutrients, and thus contributes substantially to controlling productivity in terrestrial ecosystems. However, soil pH is not an independent regulator of soil fertility—rather, it is ultimately controlled by environmental forcing. In particular, small changes in water balance cause a steep transition from alkaline to acid soils across natural climate gradients. Although the processes governing this threshold in soil pH are well understood, the threshold has not been quantified at the global scale, where the influence of climate may be confounded by the effects of topography and mineralogy. Here we evaluate the global relationship between water balance and soil pH by extracting a spatially random sample (n = 20,000) from an extensive compilation of 60,291 soil pH measurements. We show that there is an abrupt transition from alkaline to acid soil pH that occurs at the point where mean annual precipitation begins to exceed mean annual potential evapotranspiration. We evaluate deviations from this global pattern, showing that they may result from seasonality, climate history, erosion and mineralogy. These results demonstrate that climate creates a nonlinear pattern in soil solution chemistry at the global scale; they also reveal conditions under which soils maintain pH out of equilibrium with modern climate.

  17. Ubiquinone modified printed carbon electrodes for cell culture pH monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBeth, Craig; Dughaishi, Rajaa Al; Paterson, Andrew; Sharp, Duncan

    2018-08-15

    The measurement of pH is important throughout many biological systems, but there are limited available technologies to enable its periodical monitoring in the complex, small volume, media often used in cell culture experiments across a range of disciplines. Herein, pad printed electrodes are developed and characterised through modification with: a commercially available fullerene multiwall carbon nanotube composite applied in Nafion, casting of hydrophobic ubiquinone as a pH probe to provide the electrochemical signal, and coated in Polyethylene glycol to reduce fouling and potentially enhance biocompatibility, which together are proven to enable the determination of pH in cell culture media containing serum. The ubiquinone oxidation peak position (E pa ) provided an indirect marker of pH across the applicable range of pH 6-9 (R 2 = 0.9985, n = 15) in complete DMEM. The electrochemical behaviour of these sensors was also proven to be robust; retaining their ability to measure pH in cell culture media supplemented with serum up to 20% (v/v) [encompassing the range commonly employed in cell culture], cycled > 100 times in 10% serum containing media and maintain > 60% functionality after 5 day incubation in a 10% serum containing medium. Overall, this proof of concept research highlights the potential applicability of this, or similar, electrochemical approaches to enable to detection or monitoring of pH in complex cell culture media. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Objective determination of pH thresholds in the analysis of 24 h ambulatory oesophageal pH monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weusten, B. L.; Roelofs, J. M.; Akkermans, L. M.; vanBerge-Henegouwen, G. P.; Smout, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    In 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring, pH 4 is widely but arbitrarily used as the threshold between reflux and non-reflux pH values. The aim of the study was to define pH thresholds objectively, based on Gaussian curve fitting of pH frequency distributions. Single-channel 24 h oesophageal pH monitoring

  19. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, J.B. (Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y{sub ATP} (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up ({sup 14}C)acetate and ({sup 14}C)benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation.

  20. Resistance of Streptococcus bovis to acetic acid at low pH: Relationship between intracellular pH and anion accumulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Streptococcus bovis JB1, an acid-tolerant ruminal bacterium, was able to grown at pHs from 6.7 to 4.5, and 100 mM acetate had little effect on growth rate or proton motive force across the cell membrane. When S. bovis was grown in glucose-limited chemostats at pH 5.2, the addition of sodium acetate (as much as 100 mM) had little effect on the production of bacterial protein. At higher concentrations of sodium acetate (100 to 360 mM), production of bacterial protein declined, but this decrease could largely be explained by a shift in fermentation products (acetate, formate, and ethanol production to lactate production) and a decline in ATP production (3 ATP per glucose versus 2 ATP per glucose). Y ATP (grams of cells per mole at ATP) was not decreased significantly even by high concentrations of acetate. Cultures supplemented with 100 mM sodium acetate took up [ 14 C]acetate and [ 14 C]benzoate in accordance with the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation and gave similar estimates of intracellular pH. As the extracellular pH declined, S. bovis allowed its intracellular pH to decrease and maintained a relatively constant pH gradient across the cell membrane (0.9 unit). The decrease in intracellular pH prevented S. bovis from accumulating large amounts of acetate anion. On the basis of these results it did not appear that acetate was acting as an uncoupler. The sensitivity of other bacteria to volatile fatty acids at low pH is explained most easily by a high transmembrane pH gradient and anion accumulation

  1. Influence of extracellular pH on growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity, and intracellular pH of Lactococcus lactis in batch fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Gunda; Johansen, Claus Lindvald; Marten, Gunvor; Wilmes, Jacqueline; Jespersen, Lene; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of three extracellular pH (pHex) values (i.e., 5.5, 6.5, and 7.5) on the growth, viability, cell size, acidification activity in milk, and intracellular pH (pHi) of Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis DGCC1212 during pH-controlled batch fermentations. A universal parameter (e.g., linked to pHi) for the description or prediction of viability, specific acidification activity, or growth behavior at a given pHex was not identified. We found viability as determined by flow cytometry to remain high during all growth phases and irrespectively of the pH set point. Furthermore, regardless of the pHex, the acidification activity per cell decreased over time which seemed to be linked to cell shrinkage. Flow cytometric pHi determination demonstrated an increase of the averaged pHi level for higher pH set points, while the pH gradient (pHi-pHex) and the extent of pHi heterogeneity decreased. Cells maintained positive pH gradients at a low pHex of 5.5 and even during substrate limitation at the more widely used pHex 6.5. Moreover, the strain proved able to grow despite small negative or even absent pH gradients at a high pHex of 7.5. The larger pHi heterogeneity at pHex 5.5 and 6.5 was associated with more stressful conditions resulting, e.g., from higher concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid, while the low pHi heterogeneity at pHex 7.5 most probably corresponded to lower concentrations of non-dissociated lactic acid which facilitated the cells to reach the highest maximum active cell counts of the three pH set points.

  2. Highly Sensitive and Reproducible SERS Sensor for Biological pH Detection Based on a Uniform Gold Nanorod Array Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Liyan; Wang, Yunqing; Yang, Ying; Li, Yuling; Mo, Shanshan; Zheng, Qingyin; Chen, Lingxin

    2018-05-09

    Conventional research on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based pH sensors often depends on nanoparticle aggregation, whereas the variability in nanoparticle aggregation gives rise to poor repeatability in the SERS signal. Herein, we fabricated a gold nanorod array platform via an efficient evaporative self-assembly method. The platform exhibits great SERS sensitivity with an enhancement factor of 5.6 × 10 7 and maintains excellent recyclability and reproducibility with relative standard deviation (RSD) values of less than 8%. On the basis of the platform, we developed a highly sensitive bovine serum albumin (BSA)-coated 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy)-linked (BMP) SERS-based pH sensor to report pH ranging from pH 3.0 to pH 8.0. The intensity ratio variation of 1004 and 1096 cm -1 in 4-MPy showed excellent pH sensitivity, which decreased as the surrounding pH increased. Furthermore, this BMP SERS-based pH sensor was employed to measure the pH value in C57BL/6 mouse blood. We have demonstrated that the pH sensor has great advantages such as good stability, reliability, and accuracy, which could be extended for the design of point-of-care devices.

  3. Reactivity of Nanoscale Zero-Valent Iron in Unbuffered Systems: Effect of pH and Fe(II) Dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Sungjun; Hanna, Khalil

    2015-09-01

    While most published studies used buffers to maintain the pH, there is limited knowledge regarding the reactivity of nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) in poorly buffered pH systems to date. In this work, the effect of pH and Fe(II) dissolution on the reactivity of NZVI was investigated during the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) in unbuffered pH systems. The reduction rate increased exponentially with respect to the NZVI concentration, and the ratio of dissolved Fe(II)/initial NZVI was related proportionally to the initial pH values, suggesting that lower pH (6-7) with low NZVI loading may slow the 4-NP reduction through acceleration of the dissolution of NZVI particles. Additional experiments using buffered pH systems confirmed that high pH values (8-9) can preserve the NZVI particles against dissolution, thereby enhancing the reduction kinetics of 4-NP. Furthermore, reduction tests using ferrous ion in suspensions of magnetite and maghemite showed that surface-bound Fe(II) on oxide coatings can play an important role in enhancing 4-NP reduction by NZVI at pH 8. These unexpected results highlight the importance of pH and Fe(II) dissolution when NZVI technology is applied to poorly buffered systems, particularly at a low amount of NZVI (i.e., <0.075 g/L).

  4. Influence of pH on organic acid production by Clostridium sporogenes in test tube and fermentor cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montville, T J; Parris, N; Conway, L K

    1985-01-01

    The influence of pH on the growth parameters of and the organic acids produced by Clostridium sporogenes 3121 cultured in test tubes and fermentors at 35 degrees C was examined. Specific growth rates in the fermentor maintained at a constant pH ranged from 0.20 h-1 at pH 5.00 to 0.86 h-1 at pH 6.50. Acetic acid was the primary organic acid in supernatants of 24-h cultures; total organic acid levels were 2.0 to 22.0 mumol/ml. Supernatants from pH 5.00 and 5.50 cultures had total organic acid levels less than one-third of those found at pH 6.00 to 7.00. The specific growth rates of the test tube cultures ranged from 0.51 h-1 at pH 5.00 to 0.95 h-1 at pH 6.50. The pH of the medium did not affect the average total organic acid content (51.5 mumol/ml) but did affect the distribution of the organic acids, which included formic, acetic, propionic, butyric, 3-(p-hydroxyphenyl)propionic, and 3-phenylpropionic acids. Butyric acid levels were lower, but formic and propionic acid levels were higher, at pH 5.00 than at other pHs. PMID:4004207

  5. PH in Rockwool Propagation Blocks: a Method to Measure the pH Buffer Capacity of Rockwool and Other Mineral Wool Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, C.; Kaarsemaker, R.C.

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of the international KIWA quality label for rooting media representatives of plant propagators and the rockwool industry agreed to develop a method to characterize the influence of the rooting medium materials on the pH in cultivation. A method for the characterization of

  6. Expression of characteristics of ammonium nutrition as affected by pH of the root medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaillou, S.; Vessey, J. K.; Morot-Gaudry, J. F.; Raper, C. D. Jr; Henry, L. T.; Boutin, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    To study the effect of root-zone pH on characteristic responses of NH4+ -fed plants, soybeans (Glycine max inverted question markL. inverted question mark Merr. cv. Ransom) were grown in flowing solution culture for 21 d on four sources of N (1.0 mol m-3 NO3-, 0.67 mol m-3 NO3- plus 0.33 mol m-3 NH4+, 0.33 mol m-3 NO3- plus 0.67 mol m-3 NH4+, and 1.0 mol m-3 NH4+) with nutrient solutions maintained at pH 6.0, 5.5, 5.0, and 4.5. Amino acid concentration increased in plants grown with NH4+ as the sole source of N at all pH levels. Total amino acid concentration in the roots of NH4+ -fed plants was 8 to 10 times higher than in NO3(-)-fed plants, with asparagine accounting for more than 70% of the total in the roots of these plants. The concentration of soluble carbohydrates in the leaves of NH4+ -fed plants was greater than that of NO3(-)-fed plants, but was lower in roots of NH4+ -fed plants, regardless of pH. Starch concentration was only slightly affected by N source or root-zone pH. At all levels of pH tested, organic acid concentration in leaves was much lower when NH4+ was the sole N source than when all or part of the N was supplied as NO3-. Plants grown with mixed NO3- plus NH4+ N sources were generally intermediate between NO3(-)- and NH4+ -fed plants. Thus, changes in tissue composition characteristic of NH4+ nutrition when root-zone pH was maintained at 4.5 and growth was reduced, still occurred when pH was maintained at 5.0 or above, where growth was not affected. The changes were slightly greater at pH 4.5 than at higher pH levels.

  7. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P; Maslov, Konstantin I; Wang, Lihong V

    2011-10-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, an imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. In this paper, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of a commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye (SNARF-5F carboxylic acid) in tissue phantoms. We demonstrated that PAM is capable of pH imaging in absolute values at tissue depths of up to 2.0 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  8. The PhD by Publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susi Peacock

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop more nuanced understandings of the PhD by publication, particularly raising awareness of the retrospective PhD by publication. The article aims to contribute to contemporary debates about the differing pathways to the attainment of doctoral study completion and the artifacts submitted for that purpose. It also seeks to support prospective graduate students and supervisors who are embarking upon alternative routes to doctoral accreditation. Background: The PhD is considered the pinnacle of academic study – highly cherished, and replete with deeply held beliefs. In response to changes in job markets, developments in the disciplines, and more varied student cohorts, diverse pathways to completion of this award have emerged, such as the PhD by publication (PhDP. A PhDP may either be prospective or retrospective. For the former, publications are planned and created with their contributions to the PhDP in mind. The retrospective PhD is assembled after some, or most, of the publications have been completed. The artifact submitted for examination in this case consists of a series of peer-reviewed academic papers, books, chapters, or equivalents that have been published or accepted for publication, accompanied by an over-arching narrative. The retrospective route is particularly attractive for professionals who are research-active but lack formal academic accreditation at the highest level. Methodology: This article calls upon a literature review pertaining to the award of PhDP combined with the work of authors who offer their personal experiences of the award. The author also refers to her candidature as a Scottish doctoral student whilst studying for the award of PhD by publication. Contribution: This work raises awareness of the PhDP as a credible and comparable pathway for graduate students. The article focuses upon the retrospective PhDP which, as with all routes to doctoral accreditation, has

  9. 33 CFR 150.555 - How must cranes be maintained?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How must cranes be maintained? 150.555 Section 150.555 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Operations § 150.555 How must cranes be maintained? Cranes must be operated, maintained, and tested in...

  10. Valve maintainability in CANDU-PHW nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pothier, N.E.; Crago, W.A.

    1977-09-01

    Design, application, layout and administrative factors which affect valve maintainability in CANDU-PHW power reactors are identified and discussed. Some of these are illustrated by examples based on prototype reactor operation experience. Valve maintainability improvements resulting from laboratory development and maintainability analysis, have been incorporated in commercial CANDU-PHW nuclear generating stations. These, also, are discussed and illustrated. (author)

  11. Apoplastic pH in corn root gravitropism: a laser scanning confocal microscopy measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.P.; Slattery, J.; Leopold, A.C.

    1996-01-01

    The ability to measure the pH of the apoplast in situ is of special interest as a test of the cell wall acidification theory. Optical sectioning of living seedlings of corn roots using the laser scanning confocal microscope (LSCM) permits us to make pH measurements in living tissue. The pH of the apoplast of corn roots was measured by this method after infiltration with CI-NERF, a pH-sensitive dye, along with Texas Red Dextran 3000, a pH-insensitive dye, as an internal standard. In the elongation zone of corn roots, the mean apoplastic pH was 4.9. Upon gravitropic stimulation, the pH on the convex side of actively bending roots was 4.5. The lowering of the apoplastic pH by 0.4 units appears to be sufficient to account for the increased growth on that side. This technique provides site-specific evidence for the acid growth theory of cell elongation. The LSCM permits measurements of the pH of living tissues, and has a sensitivity of approximately 0.2 pH units. (author)

  12. Customer retention: maintaining the competitive edge in the retail market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, T. [CitiPower Ltd., Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1997-09-01

    The current market environment in the electricity industry is one of changing regulations with many of the rules being developed. There is a great deal of customer confusion and uncertainty with some customers unaware of their contestable status and many are insecure about mixing retail and distribution supplies. This paper discusses customer retention and maintaining the competitive edge in the retail market. It draws on some conclusions from a survey released by the Australian Chamber of Manufacturers entitled `Customer feedback on Victoria`s competitive electricity market`. An overview is presented of the retail market in Australia which is one of very strong price-based competition, with as yet little differentiation. A process is described for retaining customers which involves asking the customer what he/she wants in a language which they understand. The best way to determine customer needs is through a combination of internal and external sources. Enhancing customer loyalty and differentiating and marketing the product are also discussed. As the market matures, customer retention and satisfaction will be based on value added services at a reasonable cost. (author). 6 figs.

  13. Strategies to maintain health in the Third World.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korte, R; Rehle, T; Merkle, A

    1991-12-01

    International cooperation with Third World countries aims at reducing the high morbidity and mortality of the population to a tolerable level. The main health problems are caused by poverty. Thus, the range of diseases in tropical countries can be explained more readily by the socio-economic situation than solely by the climate. Health services, in Africa in particular, have had to reduce drastically their budgets in the last ten years and now have only approximately 1/1000th of the funds usually available in industrialised countries. High population growth reduces the resources available per head, increases infection potential and worsens living conditions. Control strategies must take account of these circumstances in order to achieve the required sustained effect within the framework of primary health care. The example of the control of several infectious diseases, such as schistosomiasis, pneumonia, malaria and AIDS, is used to show that control programmes can be effective but, in the current conditions, can hardly be maintained without outside support. In the future, diseases caused by environmental problems and new life styles as a result of industrialization, urbanization and slum growth will move dramatically into the foreground.

  14. International Team Identifies Biomarker for Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Spotlight on Research International Team Identifies Biomarker for Scleroderma By Kirstie Saltsman, Ph.D. | May 5, 2014 ... molecule correlates with a more severe form of scleroderma, a chronic autoimmune disorder that involves the abnormal ...

  15. Metabolic and hemodynamic effects of saline infusion to maintain volemia on temporary abdominal aortic occlusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Ferreira Amorim

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze hemodynamic and metabolic effects of saline solution infusion in the maintenance of blood volume in ischemia-reperfusion syndrome during temporary abdominal aortic occlusion in dogs. METHODS: We studied 20 dogs divided into 2 groups: the ischemia-reperfusion group (IRG, n=10 and the ischemia-reperfusion group with saline solution infusion aiming at maintaining mean pulmonary arterial wedge pressure between 10 and 20 mmHg (IRG-SS, n=10. All animals were anesthetized with sodium thiopental and maintained on spontaneous ventilation. Occlusion of the supraceliac aorta was obtained with inflation of a Fogarty catheter inserted through the femoral artery. After 60 minutes of ischemia, the balloon was deflated, and the animals were observed for another 60 minutes of reperfusion. RESULTS: IRG-SS dogs did not have hemodynamic instability after aortic unclamping, and the mean systemic blood pressure and heart rate were maintained. However, acidosis worsened, which was documented by a greater reduction of arterial pH that occurred especially due to the absence of a respiratory response to metabolic acidosis that was greater with the adoption of this procedure. CONCLUSION: Saline solution infusion to maintain blood volume avoided hemodynamic instability after aortic unclamping. This procedure, however, caused worsening in metabolic acidosis in this experimental model.

  16. Secondary side water chemistry pH control strategy improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roumiguiere, Fernando-Mario; Fandrich, Joerg; Ramminger, Ute; Hoffmann-Wankerl, Stephan; Drexler, Andreas

    2012-09-01

    Over the years the PWR plant operators were aware of the need of optimizing the pH control strategy in the water-steam cycle with the focus on improvement of steam generator performance with the main goal of reducing the corrosion product ingress into the steam generators and their consequences: SG fouling, SG tube corrosion beneath deposits. To achieve this goal, it becomes necessary to harmonize three requirements: a. High overall pH along the circuit for suppression of general corrosion, requiring a volatile amine to ensure a suitable distribution in steam areas and condenser, and b. High local pH at the water phase of two-phase flow areas, requiring an either rather low volatile amine to ensure high pH in the wet steam water film, or larger amounts of a volatile amine. c. Sufficient amount of hydrazine to ensure reducing conditions in the steam generators. The basic strategy of AREVA NP GmbH (formerly KWU), successfully applied in German nuclear power plants since the late seventies consisted on the achievement of the necessary pH by means of ammonia, as generated by thermal decomposition of hydrazine. By dosing of hydrazine at the necessary amounts to ensure reducing conditions, also sufficient ammonia is generated to achieve a high overall pH along the cycle, being the target pH (25 deg. C) ≥ 9.8 resulting in < 1 ppb Fe in final feed water. This treatment is known as H-AVT (High pH - All Volatile Treatment). Main prerequisite for its application is to have a copper-free system. Eventually, H-AVT started to be applied later at some other western nuclear power plants. In some units, the high condenser exhaust flow rate applied caused a considerable amount of ammonia being removed from the cycle, resulting in too low ammonia concentrations to maintain a sufficiently high pH, making the addition of ammonia necessary. AREVA NP GmbH together with plant operators investigated the possibility of complementing the applied classical H-AVT by addition of an advanced

  17. The correlation between pH and flow rate of salivary smokers related to nicotine levels labelled on cigarettes

    OpenAIRE

    Saputri, Dewi; Nasution, Abdillah Imron; Surbakti, Mutiara Rizki Wardarni; Gani, Basri A.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Saliva is a biological fluid in oral cavity that plays a role in maintaining the environmental balance and oral commensal. Nicotine of cigarettes has been reported as a predisposing factor for changing of pH and salivary flow rate, thereby changing in biological salivary components. Purpose: This study aimed to analyze the correlation between salivary pH and salivary flow rate in smokers with nicotine levels labeled on cigarettes. Methods: Purposive sampling was conducted involvin...

  18. Licensee programs for maintaining occupational exposure to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Munson, L.H.

    1983-06-01

    This report defines the concept of maintaining occupational exposures to radiation as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA) and describes the elements necessary for specific licensees to implement, operate, and evaluate an effective ALARA program. Examples of cost-effectiveness analysis and optimization are provided. The rationale for providing more detailed guidance to specific licensees stems from the current recommendations provided by the International Commission on Radiological Protection, as well as from the increased regulatory emphasis on maintaining occupational exposures ALARA. The objective of this work is to provide the Nuclear Regulatory Commission with a basis for updating Regulatory Guide 8.10

  19. Effect of two mouthwashes on salivary ph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardinelli, Paola A; Morelatto, Rosana A; Benavidez, Tomás E; Baruzzi, Ana M; López de Blanc, Silvia A

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the effect of two mouthwashes on salivary pH and correlate it with age, buffer capacity and saliva flow rate in healthy volunteers, a crossover phase IV clinical study involving three age-based groups was designed. Two commercial mouthwashes (MW), Cool Mint ListerineR (MWa) and Periobacter R (MWb) were used. The unstimulated saliva of each individual was first characterized by measuring flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity. Salivary pH was evaluated before rinsing with a given MW, immediately after rinsing, 5 minutes later, and then every 10 min (at 15, 25, 35 min) until the baseline pH was recovered. Paired t-test, ANOVA with a randomized block design, and Pearson correlation tests were used. Averages were 0.63 mL/min, 7.06, and 0.87 for flow rate, pH, and buffer capacity, respectively. An immediate significant increase in salivary pH was observed after rinsing, reaching average values of 7.24 (MWb) and 7.30 (MWa), which declined to an almost stable value 15 minutes. The great increase in salivary pH, after MW use shows that saliva is a dynamic system, and that the organism is capable of responding to a stimulus with changes in its composition. It is thus evident that pH of the external agent alone is not a good indicator for its erosive potential because biological systems tend to neutralize it. The results of this study enhance the importance of in vivo measurements and reinforce the concept of the protective action of saliva.

  20. Salivary pH: A diagnostic biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Baliga, Sharmila; Muglikar, Sangeeta; Kale, Rahul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Saliva contains a variety of host defense factors. It influences calculus formation and periodontal disease. Different studies have been done to find exact correlation of salivary biomarkers with periodontal disease. With a multitude of biomarkers and complexities in their determination, the salivary pH may be tried to be used as a quick chairside test. The aim of this study was to analyze the pH of saliva and determine its relevance to the severity of periodontal disease. Study D...

  1. Polymeric nanosensors for measuring the full dynamic pH range of endosomes and lysosomes in mammalian cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Honghao; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki

    2009-01-01

    Polymer nanoparticle sensors have been constructed for studying pH in the endocytic pathway in mammalian cells. The pH sensors for fluorescence ratiometric measurements were prepared using inverse microemulsion polymerization with rhodamine as reference fluorophor and fluorescein and oregon green...... was used to introduce a net positive charge in the cationic particles. It was found that the positively charged particle sensors were internalized spontaneously by HepG2 cancer cells. These new pH nanosensors are potential tools in time resolved quantification of pH in the endocytic pathway of living cells....

  2. Effects of anatomy and diet on gastrointestinal pH in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohl, Kevin D; Stengel, Ashley; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Dearing, M Denise

    2013-04-01

    The pH of the gastrointestinal tract can have profound influences on digestive processes. Rodents exhibit wide variation in both stomach morphology and dietary strategies, both of which may influence gut pH. Various rodent species have evolved bilocular (or semi-segmented) stomachs that may allow for more microbial growth compared to unilocular (single-chambered) stomachs. Additionally, herbivory has evolved multiple times in rodents. The high dietary fiber typical of an herbivorous diet is known to induce secretion of bicarbonate in the gut. We predicted that stomach segmentation might facilitate the separation of contents in the proximal chamber from that of the gastric stomach, facilitating a chemical environment suitable to microbial growth. To investigate the effect of stomach anatomy and diet on gut pH, several species of rodent with varying stomach morphology were fed either a high or low-fiber diet for 7 days, and pH of the proximal stomach, gastric stomach, small intestine, and cecum were measured. We discovered that rodents with bilocular stomach anatomy maintained a larger pH gradient between the proximal and gastric stomach compartments, and were able to achieve a lower absolute gastric pH compared to those with unilocular stomachs. Dietary fiber increased the pH of the small intestine, but not in any other gut regions. The stomach pH data supports the century old hypothesis that bilocular stomach anatomy creates an environment in the proximal stomach that is suitable for microbial growth. Additionally, the alkaline small intestinal pH on a high fiber diet may enhance digestion. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Reliability and Maintainability Analysis for the Amine Swingbed Carbon Dioxide Removal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    I have performed a reliability & maintainability analysis for the Amine Swingbed payload system. The Amine Swingbed is a carbon dioxide removal technology that has gone through 2,400 hours of International Space Station on-orbit use between 2013 and 2016. While the Amine Swingbed is currently an experimental payload system, the Amine Swingbed may be converted to system hardware. If the Amine Swingbed becomes system hardware, it will supplement the Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) as the primary CO2 removal technology on the International Space Station. NASA is also considering using the Amine Swingbed as the primary carbon dioxide removal technology for future extravehicular mobility units and for the Orion, which will be used for the Asteroid Redirect and Journey to Mars missions. The qualitative component of the reliability and maintainability analysis is a Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA). In the FMEA, I have investigated how individual components in the Amine Swingbed may fail, and what the worst case scenario is should a failure occur. The significant failure effects are the loss of ability to remove carbon dioxide, the formation of ammonia due to chemical degradation of the amine, and loss of atmosphere because the Amine Swingbed uses the vacuum of space to regenerate the Amine Swingbed. In the quantitative component of the reliability and maintainability analysis, I have assumed a constant failure rate for both electronic and nonelectronic parts. Using this data, I have created a Poisson distribution to predict the failure rate of the Amine Swingbed as a whole. I have determined a mean time to failure for the Amine Swingbed to be approximately 1,400 hours. The observed mean time to failure for the system is between 600 and 1,200 hours. This range includes initial testing of the Amine Swingbed, as well as software faults that are understood to be non-critical. If many of the commercial parts were switched to military-grade parts, the expected

  4. Radiation-induced apoptosis in different pH environments in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hyung-Sik; Park, Heon J.; Lyons, John C.; Griffin, Robert J.; Auger, Elizabeth A.; Song, Chang W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of environmental pH on the radiation-induced apoptosis in tumor cells in vitro was investigated. Methods and Materials: Mammary adenocarcinoma cells of A/J mice (SCK cells) were irradiated with γ-rays using a 137 Cs irradiator and incubated in media of different pHs. After incubation at 37 deg. C for 24-120 h the extent of apoptosis was determined using agarose gel electrophoresis, TdT-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL) staining, flow cytometry, and release of 3 H from 3 H-thymidine labeled cells. The clonogenicity of the cells irradiated in different pH medium was determined, and the progression of cells through the cell cycle after irradiation in different pHs was also determined with flow cytometry. Results: Irradiation with 2-12 Gy of γ-rays induced apoptosis in SCK cells in pH 7.5 medium within 48 h as judged from the results of four different assays mentioned. Radiation-induced apoptosis declined as the medium pH was lowered from 7.5 to 6.4. Specifically, the radiation-induced degradation of DNA including the early DNA breaks, as determined with the TUNEL method, progressively declined as the medium pH was lowered so that little DNA fragmentation occurred 48 h after irradiation with 12 Gy in pH 6.6 medium. When the cells were irradiated and incubated for 48 h in pH 6.6 medium and the medium was replaced with pH 7.5 medium, DNA fragmentation promptly occurred. DNA fragmentation also occurred even in pH 6.6 medium when the cells were irradiated and maintained in pH 7.5 medium for 8 h or longer post-irradiation before incubation in pH 6.6 medium. The radiation-induced G 2 arrest in pH 6.6 medium lasted markedly longer than that in pH 7.5 medium. Conclusion: Radiation-induced apoptosis in SCK cells in vitro is reversibly suppressed in an acidic environment. Taking the results of four different assays together, it was concluded that early step(s) in the apoptotic pathway, probably the DNA break or upstream of DNA break, is

  5. Professionals with hearing loss: maintaining that competitive edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye-Murray, Nancy; Spry, Jacqueline L; Mauzé, Elizabeth

    2009-08-01

    The goals of this investigation were to gauge how hearing loss affects the self-perceived job performance and psycho-emotional status of professionals in the workforce and to develop a profile of their aural rehabilitation needs. Forty-eight participants who had at least a high school education and who hold salaried positions participated in one of seven focus groups. Participants first answered questions about a hypothetical executive who had hearing loss and considered how she might react to various communication issues. They then addressed questions about their own work-related predicaments. The sessions were audiovideo recorded and later transcribed for analysis. Unlike workers who have occupational hearing loss, the professionals in this investigation seem not to experience an inordinate degree of stigmatization in their workplaces, although most believe that hearing loss has negatively affected their job performance. Some of the participants believe that they have lost their "competitive edge," and some believe that they have been denied promotions because of hearing loss. However, most report that they have overcome their hearing-related difficulties by various means, and many have developed a determination and stamina to remain active in the workforce. The majority of the participants seemed to be unfamiliar with the Americans with Disability Act, Public Law 101-336. The overriding theme to emerge is that professionals desire to maintain their competency to perform their jobs and will do what they have to do to "get the job done." The situations of professionals who have hearing loss can be modeled, with a central theme of maintaining job competency or a competitive edge. It is hypothesized that five factors affect professionals' abilities to continue their optimal work performance in the face of hearing loss: (a) self-concept and sense of internal locus of control, (b) use of hearing assistive technology, (c) supervisor's and co-workers' perceptions and

  6. Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, 1920-2003.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckling, Frederick W; Lo Vecchio, Janolyn G; Reckling, JoAnn B

    2004-05-01

    Leonard F. Peltier, MD, PhD, was an orthopaedic surgeon, academician, administrator, laboratory investigator, historian, and mentor. His career spanned nearly six decades, beginning with graduate education at the University of Minnesota (UM) under the auspices of Owen H. Wangensteen, MD, PhD. In addition to obtaining a PhD in physiology in the UM Graduate School, he completed general and orthopaedic surgery residencies and attained board certification in each specialty. He served in the US Army Occupation Force Medical Corps in Germany just after World War II. In 1957, at 37 years old, he assumed the chairmanship of the orthopaedic training program at the University of Kansas. In 1971, he couldn't resist the opportunity to become one of the founding members of the "start-up" University of Arizona College of Medicine, accepting an appointment as chair of the new orthopaedic training program, where he remained until his retirement in 1990. He took clinical problems to the laboratory, and made important scientific contributions, particularly in the area of fat embolism and in using calcium sulfate (plaster of Paris) to fill bone defects. He served on governing boards of national professional organizations and presided over the American Association for the Surgery of Trauma from 1980-1981. Throughout his career, he was fascinated by, and published extensively in, the history of medicine arena. Known fondly as "the professor" to many of his residents and colleagues, he had a pragmatic, honest, upbeat, and often humorous approach to life's challenges, valuing personal integrity above other virtues. He explored various eclectic interests far beyond his professional contributions while maintaining his family as a central priority. With his exemplary productivity and interests in the surgical and laboratory sciences, history of medicine, appreciation of fine arts, and perceptive and effective interactions with family, friends, patients, and colleagues, the memory of Leonard

  7. Fabrication and Evaluation of a New High-Temperature pH Sensor for Use in PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Yong Ju [Korea University of Technology and Education, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Yeon, Jei Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    A new high-temperature pH sensor has been successfully developed by reforming the internal reference systems of the pH sensors based on oxygen-ion conducting ceramic membrane. The conventional internal reference system, a mixture of Ni and NiO, has been replaced with partially oxidized Ni powders, where Ni and NiO coexist on the surface of particles, in order to avoid the cumbersome mixing step of Ni and NiO particles. The partially oxidized Ni particles were made by oxidizing Ni under air atmosphere at 600 .deg. C and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR spectroscopy. The viability of the pH sensor developed was assessed in boric acid (1000 ppm-B) / lithium hydroxide (1 to 3 ppm-Li) buffer solutions at 280 .deg. C. The pH sensor showed excellent accuracy with a small error less than ±0.2 pH units.

  8. Fabrication and Evaluation of a New High-Temperature pH Sensor for Use in PWR Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Yong Ju; Yeon, Jei Won

    2010-01-01

    A new high-temperature pH sensor has been successfully developed by reforming the internal reference systems of the pH sensors based on oxygen-ion conducting ceramic membrane. The conventional internal reference system, a mixture of Ni and NiO, has been replaced with partially oxidized Ni powders, where Ni and NiO coexist on the surface of particles, in order to avoid the cumbersome mixing step of Ni and NiO particles. The partially oxidized Ni particles were made by oxidizing Ni under air atmosphere at 600 .deg. C and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and FTIR spectroscopy. The viability of the pH sensor developed was assessed in boric acid (1000 ppm-B) / lithium hydroxide (1 to 3 ppm-Li) buffer solutions at 280 .deg. C. The pH sensor showed excellent accuracy with a small error less than ±0.2 pH units

  9. Campylobacter, Salmonella, and Escherichia coli on broiler carcasses subjected to a high pH scald and low pH postpick chlorine dip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrang, M E; Windham, W R; Meinersmann, R J

    2011-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the individual and combined effects of a high pH scald and a postpick chlorine dip on bacteria present on broiler carcasses. In each of 3 replications, a flock was sampled at several sites within a commercial broiler processing plant. Carcasses were sampled by whole carcass rinse before and after treated scalding at mean pH 9.89 or control scalding at mean pH 6.88. Other carcasses from the same flock run on both the treated and control scald lines were collected and sampled before and after a chlorine dip tank operated at mean total chlorine level of 83.3 mg/kg and pH 6.04. Rinses were cultured for numbers of Campylobacter and Escherichia coli and presence or absence of Salmonella. High pH scald was more effective than standard scald to lessen the prevalence and numbers of Campylobacter on broiler carcasses; a lower prevalence was maintained through the postpick chlorine dip tank. The pH of the scald tank made no difference in numbers of E. coli recovered from broiler carcasses at any tested point on the processing line. High pH scald was not more effective than standard scald to lessen Salmonella prevalence. Furthermore, it is unclear why the postpick chlorine dip effectively lessened Salmonella prevalence on only the control scald line. Although no evidence exists that these treatments have an additive effect when used in series, each treatment shows some promise individually. Further optimization may result in more effective decontamination of broiler carcasses.

  10. Variation in pH of Model Secondary Organic Aerosol during Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallemagne, Magda A; Huang, Xiau Ya; Eddingsaas, Nathan C

    2016-05-12

    The majority of atmospheric aerosols consist of both organic and inorganic components. At intermediate relative humidity (RH), atmospheric aerosol can undergo liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in which the organic and inorganic fractions segregate from each other. We have extended the study of LLPS to the effect that phase separation has on the pH of the overall aerosols and the pH of the individual phases. Using confocal microscopy and pH sensitive dyes, the pH of internally mixed model aerosols consisting of polyethylene glycol 400 and ammonium sulfate as well as the pH of the organic fraction during LLPS have been directly measured. During LLPS, the pH of the organic fraction was observed to increase to 4.2 ± 0.2 from 3.8 ± 0.1 under high RH when the aerosol was internally mixed. In addition, the high spatial resolution of the confocal microscope allowed us to characterize the composition of each of the phases, and we have observed that during LLPS the organic shell still contains large quantities of water and should be characterized as an aqueous organic-rich phase rather than simply an organic phase.

  11. Implementasi Fuzzy Logic Controller untuk Mengatur Ph Nutrisi pada Sistem Hidroponik Nutrient Film Technique (NFT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Pancawati

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available One solution to solve limited agricultural land is applying hydroponics Nutrient Film Technique (NFT. The advantage of NFT is using water circulated as a growing medium in order to obtain water, nutrients and oxygen to accelerate the growth of plants with good results. The most important parameter is the pH of nutrients. This article discusses how to design an automatic nutritional pH control system by implementing the method of Fuzzy Logic Controller. The control system use Arduino Mega2560, Analog pH Meter Kit as input, and the solenoid valve as actuators. The best response of the implementation of Fuzzy Logic Controller with the system which has 25 rules. The response shows that the system has in 1200 millisecond rise time and the steady state in 5530 milliseconds to increase the pH. While to decrease the pH system has response of rise time at 2000 milliseconds and steady state at the time of 3000 milliseconds. The system is able to maintain the pH at 5.5, with the result of the growth of lettuce as high as 20 cm and seven leaves for 54 days.

  12. Plasmalemmal V-H+-ATPases regulate intracellular pH in human lung microvascular endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sennoune, Souad R.; Maiti, Debasish; Martinez, Gloria M.; Bakunts, Karina; Wesson, Donald E.; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    2004-01-01

    The lung endothelium layer is exposed to continuous CO 2 transit which exposes the endothelium to a substantial acid load that could be detrimental to cell function. The Na + /H + exchanger and HCO 3 - -dependent H + -transporting mechanisms regulate intracellular pH (pH cyt ) in most cells. Cells that cope with high acid loads might require additional primary energy-dependent mechanisms. V-H + -ATPases localized at the plasma membranes (pmV-ATPases) have emerged as a novel pH regulatory system. We hypothesized that human lung microvascular endothelial (HLMVE) cells use pmV-ATPases, in addition to Na + /H + exchanger and HCO 3 - -based H + -transporting mechanisms, to maintain pH cyt homeostasis. Immunocytochemical studies revealed V-H + -ATPase at the plasma membrane, in addition to the predicted distribution in vacuolar compartments. Acid-loaded HLMVE cells exhibited proton fluxes in the absence of Na + and HCO 3 - that were similar to those observed in the presence of either Na + , or Na + and HCO 3 - . The Na + - and HCO 3 - -independent pH cyt recovery was inhibited by bafilomycin A 1 , a V-H + -ATPase inhibitor. These studies show a Na + - and HCO 3 - -independent pH cyt regulatory mechanism in HLMVE cells that is mediated by pmV-ATPases

  13. Effects of high medium pH on growth, metabolism and transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, Antonio; Sánchez, Norma Silvia; Álvarez, Helber; Calahorra, Martha; Ramírez, Jorge

    2015-03-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stopped by maintaining the pH of the medium in a pH-stat at pH 8.0 or 9.0. Studying its main physiological capacities and comparing cells after incubation at pH 6.0 vs. 8.0 or 9.0, we found that (a) fermentation was moderately decreased by high pH and respiration was similar and sensitive to the addition of an uncoupler, (b) ATP and glucose-6-phosphate levels upon glucose addition increased to similar levels and (c) proton pumping and K(+) transport were also not affected; all this indicating that energy mechanisms were preserved. Growth inhibition at high pH was also not due to a significant lower amino acid transport by the cells or incorporation into proteins. The cell cycle stopped at pH 9.0, probably due to an arrest as a result of adjustments needed by the cells to contend with the changes under these conditions, and microarray experiments showed some relevant changes to this response. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permission@oup.com.

  14. Stabilization of pH in solid-matrix hydroponic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, J.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1993-01-01

    2-[N-morpholino]ethanesulfonic acid (MES) buffer or Amberlite DP-1 (cation-exchange resin beads) were used to stabilize substrate pH of passive-wicking, solid-matrix hydroponic systems in which small canopies of Brassica napus L. (CrGC 5-2, genome : ACaacc) were grown to maturity. Two concentrations of MES (5 or 10 mM) were included in Hoagland 1 nutrient solution. Alternatively, resin beads were incorporated into the 2 vermiculite : 1 perlite (v/v) growth medium at 6% or 12% of total substrate volume. Both strategies stabilized pH without toxic side effects on plants. Average seed yield rates for all four pH stabilization treatments (13.3 to 16.9 g m-2 day-1) were about double that of the control (8.2 g m-2 day-1), for which there was no attempt to buffer substrate pH. Both the highest canopy seed yield rate (16.9 g m-2 day-1) and the highest shoot harvest index (19.5%) occurred with the 6% resin bead treatment, even though the 10 mM MES and 12% bead treatments maintained pH within the narrowest limits. The pH stabilization methods tested did not significantly affect seed oil and protein contents.

  15. Bicarbonate/chloride antiport in Vero cells: II. Mechanisms for bicarbonate-dependent regulation of intracellular pH

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsnes, S.; Ludt, J.; Tonnessen, T.I.; Sandvig, K.

    1987-01-01

    The rates of bicarbonate-dependent uptake and efflux of 22 Na + in Vero cells were studied and compared with the uptake and efflux of 36 Cl - . Both processes were strongly inhibited by DIDS. Whereas the transport of chloride increased approximately ten-fold when the internal pH was increased over a narrow range around neutrality, the uptake of Na + was much less affected by changes in pH. The bicarbonate-linked uptake of 22 Na + was dependent on internal Cl- but not on internal Na + . At a constant external concentration of HCO 3 -, the amount of 22 Na + associated with the cells increased when the internal concentration of HCO 3 - decreased and vice versa, which is compatible with the possibility that the ion pair NaCO 3 - is the transported species and that the transport is symmetric across the membrane. Bicarbonate inhibited the uptake of 36 Cl - both in the absence and presence of Na + . At alkaline internal pH, HCO 3 - stimulated the efflux of 36 Cl - from preloaded cells, while at acidic internal pH both Na + and HCO 3 - were required to induce 36 Cl - efflux. We propose a model for how bicarbonate-dependent regulation of the internal pH may occur. This model implies the existence of two bicarbonate transport mechanisms that, under physiological conditions, transport OH(-)-equivalents in opposite directions across the plasma membrane

  16. Mechanisms of intragastric pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goo, Tyralee; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2010-12-01

    Luminal amino acids and lack of luminal acidity as a result of acid neutralization by intragastric foodstuffs are powerful signals for acid secretion. Although the hormonal and neural pathways underlying this regulatory mechanism are well understood, the nature of the gastric luminal pH sensor has been enigmatic. In clinical studies, high pH, tryptic peptides, and luminal divalent metals (Ca(2+) and Mg(2+)) increase gastrin release and acid production. The calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), first described in the parathyroid gland but expressed on gastric G cells, is a logical candidate for the gastric acid sensor. Because CaSR ligands include amino acids and divalent metals, and because extracellular pH affects ligand binding in the pH range of the gastric content, its pH, metal, and nutrient-sensing functions are consistent with physiologic observations. The CaSR is thus an attractive candidate for the gastric luminal sensor that is part of the neuroendocrine negative regulatory loop for acid secretion.

  17. A study on the behaviour of corrosion-erosion at the Bearing metals by cavitation(1) (for the influence of pH)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Uh Hoh; Lee, Jin Yeol

    1991-01-01

    Recently, due to increased occurrence of cavitation-erosion at slide bearing metals with the tendency of high speed and large output at internal combustion engine, there is a need to study the role of corrosive environments on cavitation-erosion. Therefore, this paper were investigate on the behaviour of cavitation-erosion under the change of pH environments at slide bearing metals with using piezoelectric vibratory apparatus. The main results obtained were as follows: 1. The weight loss and its rate showed to be increased according to the order of pH 2 > pH 12 > pH 7 > pH 4 environments, and also retarded extremely at pH 4 environment 2. The resistance of material on cavitation-erosion was excellent at pH 4 environment, and also was improved considerably its resistance with increasing of the space between specimen and horn tip. 3. It was showed that the incubation periods shortened with the tendency of pH 2 > pH 12 > pH 4 > pH 7 environment, and enlarged greatly at pH 7 environment. 4. The pitted holes of damaged surface under pH 4 environment showed dense aspects by comparison with pH 7 environment

  18. Effects of pH during liquid storage of goat semen on sperm viability and fertilizing potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-He; Dong, Hai-Bo; Ma, Dong-Li; Li, You-Wei; Han, Dong; Luo, Ming-Jiu; Chang, Zhong-Le; Tan, Jing-He

    2016-01-01

    A specific problem in goat semen preservation is the detrimental effect of seminal plasma on sperm viability in extenders containing yolk or milk. Thus, the use of chemically defined extenders will have obvious advantages. Although previous studies indicate that the initial pH of an extender is crucial to sustain high sperm motility, changes in extender pH during long-term semen storage have not been observed. Monitoring extender pH at different times of semen storage and modeling its variation according to nonlinear models is thus important for protocol optimization for long-term liquid semen preservation. The present results showed that during long-term liquid storage of goat semen, both sperm motility and semen pH decreased gradually, and a strong correlation was observed between the two. Whereas increasing the initial extender pH from 6.04 to 6.25 or storage with stabilized pH improved, storage with artificially lowered pH impaired sperm motility. Extender renewal improved sperm motility by maintaining a stable pH. Sperm coating with chicken (Gallus gallus) egg yolk improved motility by increasing tolerance to pH decline. A new extender (n-mZAP) with a higher buffering capacity was formulated, and n-mZAP maintained higher sperm motility, membrane integrity and acrosome intactness than the currently used mZAP extender did. Goat semen liquid-stored for 12 d in n-mZAP produced pregnancy and kidding rates similar to those obtained with freshly collected semen following artificial insemination. In conclusion, maintenance of a stable pH during liquid semen storage dramatically improved sperm viability and fertilizing potential. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Design and application of optical nanosensors for pH imaging in cell compartments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Almdal, Kristoffer

    the last two decades. However, even though these sensor systems have proven themselves as superior to conventional methods, there are still questions about the use of these sensors that need to be addressed, especially regarding sensor design and calibration. We have developed a new triple-labelled p......Measurements of pH in acidic cellular compartments of mammalian cells is important for our understanding of cell metabolism, and organelle acidification is an essential event in living cells especially in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway where pH is critical for cellular sorting of internalized...... material. Intracellular pH can be measured by the use of fluorescence ratio imaging microscopy (FRIM), however, available methods for pH measurements in living cells are not optimal. Nanoparticle based optical sensor technology for quantification of metabolites in living cells has been developed over...

  20. Crossing the borders and the cultural gaps for educating PhDs in software engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Lene Tolstrup; Knutas, Antti; Seffah, Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    PhDs and educators. While large universities and research centres have the required expertise and infrastructure to providing a cost-effective training by research as well as covering wide spectrum of software engineering topics, the situation in small universities with limited resources...... is challenging. This is even more difficult for some countries where the discipline of software engineering is totally new, which is the case of emerging countries. This paper describes the Pathways to PhDs project funded by the European Commission. The long-term aim is to support the development, modernization...... and international visibility and excellence of higher education, namely education by research at the PhD level in Europe, while helping partner countries to develop new PhD programs and consolidate existing ones in the field of computing in the area of software engineering. This paper presents the creation...

  1. Nanoparticle/Polymer assembled microcapsules with pH sensing property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Song, Xiaoxue; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2014-10-01

    The dual-labeled microcapsules via nanoparticle/polymer assembly based on polyamine-salt aggregates can be fabricated for the ratiometric intracellular pH sensing. After deposition of SiO2 nanoparticles on the poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/multivalent anionic salt aggregates followed by silicic acid treatment, the generated microcapsules are stable in a wide pH range (3.0 ∼ 8.0). pH sensitive dye and pH insensitive dye are simultaneously labeled on the capsules, which enable the ratiometric pH sensing. Due to the rough and positively charged surface, the microcapsules can be internalized by several kinds of cells naturally. Real-time measurement of intracellular pH in several living cells shows that the capsules are all located in acidic organelles after being taken up. Furthermore, the negatively charged DNA and dyes can be easily encapsulated into the capsules via charge interaction. The microcapsules with combination of localized pH sensing and drug loading abilities have many advantages, such as following the real-time transportation and processing of the carriers in cells. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. A cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Guoliang; Zhu, Zhi; Wang, Wei; Zou, Yuan; Guan, Zhichao; Jia, Shasha; Zhang, Huimin; Wu, Xuemeng; Yang, Chaoyong James

    2014-09-10

    Accurate sensing of the extracellular pH is a very important yet challenging task in biological and clinical applications. This paper describes the development of an amphiphilic lipid-DNA molecule as a simple yet useful cell-surface-anchored ratiometric fluorescent probe for extracellular pH sensing. The lipid-DNA probe, which consists of a hydrophobic diacyllipid tail and a hydrophilic DNA strand, is modified with two fluorescent dyes; one is pH-sensitive as pH indicator and the other is pH-insensitive as an internal reference. The lipid-DNA probe showed sensitive and reversible response to pH change in the range of 6.0-8.0, which is suitable for most extracellular studies. In addition, based on simple hydrophobic interactions with the cell membrane, the lipid-DNA probe can be easily anchored on the cell surface with negligible cytotoxicity, excellent stability, and unique ratiometric readout, thus ensuring its accurate sensing of extracellular pH. Finally, this lipid-DNA-based ratiometric pH indicator was successfully used for extracellular pH sensing of cells in 3D culture environment, demonstrating the potential applications of the sensor in biological and medical studies.

  3. Maintainability design and evaluation of mechanical systems based on tribology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wani, M.F.; Gandhi, O.P.

    2002-01-01

    Maintainability of mechanical systems based on tribology is suggested and evaluated in this paper. Tribo-features of mechanical systems, which characterise maintainability are identified and are modelled in terms of tribo-maintainability digraph. The nodes in the digraph represent the tribo-features and edges represent the degree of influence among the features. A matrix, one to one representation of the digraph, is defined to develop system maintainability expression (SPF-t) based on the tribology. It is also useful in comparing the various design alternatives from tribo-maintainability point of view. Maintainability is evaluated from the tribo-maintainability index, obtained from SPF-t (i.e. permanent of the matrix) by substituting the numerical values of the features and their interdependence. A higher value of the index implies better maintainability of the systems. The proposed methodology also guides designers in enhancing the maintainability of a system by appropriately incorporating tribo-features. An example to illustrate the methodology is also presented

  4. Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions for Parents of Children with PH What causes pulmonary hypertension in children? I’ve ... of what I read is about adults with PH. What are the primary differences between PH in ...

  5. Microscopic monitoring of extracellular pH in dental biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schlafer, Sebastian; Garcia, Javier; Greve, Matilde

    pH in dental biofilm is a key virulence factor for the development of caries lesions. The complex three-dimensional architecture of dental biofilms leads to steep gradients of nutrients and metabolites, including organic acids, across the biofilm. For decades, measuring pH in dental biofilm has...... been limited to monitoring bulk pH with electrodes. Although pH microelectrodes with a better spatial resolution have been developed, they do not permit to monitor horizontal pH gradients in real-time. Quantitative fluorescent microscopic techniques, such as fluorescence lifetime imaging or pH...... ratiometry, can be employed to map the pH landscape in dental biofilm with more detail. However, when pH sensitive fluorescent probes are used to visualize pH in biofilms, it is crucial to differentiate between extracellular and intracellular pH. Intracellular microbial pH and pH in the extracellular matrix...

  6. Publication ethics from the perspective of PhD students of health sciences: a limited experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arda, Berna

    2012-06-01

    Publication ethics, an important subtopic of science ethics, deals with determination of the misconducts of science in performing research or in the dissemination of ideas, data and products. Science, the main features of which are secure, reliable and ethically obtained data, plays a major role in shaping the society. As long as science maintains its quality by being based on reliable and ethically obtained data, it will be possible to maintain its role in shaping the society. This article is devoted to the presentation of opinions of PhD candidate students in health sciences in Ankara concerning publication ethics. The data obtained from 143 PhD students from the fields of medicine, dentistry, pharmacy and veterinary reveal limited but unique experiences. It also shows that plagiarism is one of the worst issues in the publication ethics from the perspective of these young academics.

  7. pH dependent polymeric micelle adsorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McLean, S C; Gee, M L [The University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia). School of Chemistry

    2003-07-01

    Full text: Poly(2-vinylpyridine)-poly(ethylene oxide) (P2VP-PEO) shows potential as a possible drug delivery system for anti-tumour drugs since it forms pH dependent polymeric micelles. Hence to better understand the adsorption behaviour of this polymer we have studied the interaction forces between layers of P2VP-PEO adsorbed onto silica as a function of solution pH using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM). When P2VP-PEO is initially adsorbed above the pKa of the P2VP block, P2VP-PEO adsorbs from solution as micelles that exist as either partially collapsed- or a hemi-micelles at the silica surface. Below the pKa of P2VP, the P2VP-PEO adsorbs as unimers, forming a compact layer with little looping and tailing into solution. When initial adsorption of P2VP-PEO is in the form of unimers, any driving force to self-assembly of the now charge neutral polymer is kinetically hindered. Hence, after initial adsorption at pH 3.6, a subsequent increase in pH to 6.6 results in a slow surface restructuring towards self-assembly and equilibrium. When the pH is increased from pH 6.6 to 9.7 there is a continuation of the evolution of the system to its equilibrium position during which the adsorbed P2VP-PEO unimers continue to 'unravel' from the surface, extending away from it, towards eventual complete surface self-assembly.

  8. Control and Resilience: The Importance of an Internal Focus to Maintain Resilience in Academically Able Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronborg, Leonie; Plunkett, Margaret; Gamble, Nicholas; Kaman, Yvette

    2017-01-01

    This article reports one component of a longitudinal multilayered research project originating from a unique partnership between a university and a selective secondary school in Victoria, Australia. One hundred and twenty-five Year 10 academically able students at the school completed a survey at two different times to investigate a range of…

  9. Biochar contribution to soil pH buffer capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonutare, Tonu; Krebstein, Kadri; Utso, Maarius; Rodima, Ako; Kolli, Raimo; Shanskiy, Merrit

    2014-05-01

    , organic matter and type of added carbonizated material. Our study showed that the biochar content has significant role in total pH buffer capacity in soil:biochar system . References. Kimetu, J.M., Lehmann, J., Ngoze, S.O., Mugendi, D.N., Kinyangi, J., Riha, S.J., Verchot, L., Recha, J.W., Pell, A.N. 2008. Reversibility of Soil Productivity Decline with Organic Matter of Differing Quality Along a Degradation Gradient. Ecosystems, 11, 726-739. Krull, E. S., Skjemstad, J.O., Baldock, J.A. 2004 'Functions of Soil Organic Matter and the Effect on Soil Properties'. GRDC report. Project CSO 00029. Mutezo, W.T., 2013. Early crop growth and yield responses of maize (Zea mays) to biochar applied on soil. International Working Paper Series, 13/03, 50 pp.

  10. Low corrosive chemical decontamination method using pH control. 1. Basic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagase, Makoto; Ishida, Kazushige; Uetake, Naohito; Anazawa, Kazumi; Nakamura, Fumito; Yoshikawa, Hiroo; Tamagawa, Tadashi; Furukawa, Kiyoharu

    2001-01-01

    A new low corrosive decontamination method was developed which uses both oxalic acid and hydrazine as the reducing agent and potassium permanganate as the oxidizing agent. Less corrosion of structural materials during the decontamination is realized by pH control of the reducing agent. The pH of 2.5, attained by adding hydrazine to oxalic acid, was the optimum pH for maintaining a high decontamination effect and lowering the corrosion at the same time. As this reducing agent can be decomposed into carbon dioxide, nitrogen and water by using a catalyst column with hydrogen peroxide, the amount of secondary radioactive waste is small. These good features were demonstrated through actual plant decontamination tasks. (author)

  11. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Xue

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs. The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with “teeth”-like patterns—fabricated with photolithography and wet etching—are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to deposit and align in desired locations. The device fabrication is inexpensive, solution-based, and conducted at room temperature. The devices are used as pH sensors with the electrodes as the testing pads and the dielectrophoretically captured SWNTs as the sensing elements. When exposed to aqueous solutions with various pH values, the SWNTs change their resistance accordingly. The SWNT-based sensors demonstrate a linear relationship between the sensor resistance and the pH values in the range of 5–9. The characterization of multiple sensors proves that their pH sensitivity is highly repeatable. The real-time data acquisition shows that the sensor response time depends on the pH value, ranging from 2.26 s for the pH-5 solution to 23.82 s for the pH-9 solution. The long-term stability tests illustrate that the sensors can maintain their original sensitivity for a long period of time. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the SWNT-based sensors facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas.

  12. Dielectrophoresis Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as pH Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Pengfei; Martin, Caleb M; Yeung, Kan Kan; Xue, Wei

    2011-01-31

    Here we report the fabrication and characterization of pH sensors using aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The SWNTs are dispersed in deionized (DI) water after chemical functionalization and filtration. They are deposited and organized on silicon substrates with the dielectrophoresis process. Electrodes with "teeth"-like patterns-fabricated with photolithography and wet etching-are used to generate concentrated electric fields and strong dielectrophoretic forces for the SWNTs to deposit and align in desired locations. The device fabrication is inexpensive, solution-based, and conducted at room temperature. The devices are used as pH sensors with the electrodes as the testing pads and the dielectrophoretically captured SWNTs as the sensing elements. When exposed to aqueous solutions with various pH values, the SWNTs change their resistance accordingly. The SWNT-based sensors demonstrate a linear relationship between the sensor resistance and the pH values in the range of 5-9. The characterization of multiple sensors proves that their pH sensitivity is highly repeatable. The real-time data acquisition shows that the sensor response time depends on the pH value, ranging from 2.26 s for the pH-5 solution to 23.82 s for the pH-9 solution. The long-term stability tests illustrate that the sensors can maintain their original sensitivity for a long period of time. The simple fabrication process, high sensitivity, and fast response of the SWNT-based sensors facilitate their applications in a wide range of areas.

  13. CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENT OF THE CYTOPLASMIC PH IN LACTOCOCCUS-LACTIS WITH A FLUORESCENT PH INDICATOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MOLENAAR, D; ABEE, T; KONINGS, WN

    1991-01-01

    The cytoplasmic pH of Lactococcus lactis was studied with the fluorescent pH indicator 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and-6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF). A novel method was applied for loading bacterial cells with BCECF, which consists of briefly treating a dense cell suspension with acid in the

  14. A Busy period analysis of the level dependent PH/PH/1/K queue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the transient behavior of a level dependent single server queuing system with a waiting room of finite size during the busy period. The focus is on the level dependent PH/PH/1/K queue. We derive in closed form the joint transform of the length of the busy period, the number

  15. Low immediate scientific yield of the PhD among medical doctors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fosbol, Emil L.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup; Rerup, Sofie

    2016-01-01

    . Scientific activity over time was assessed independently of author-rank and inactivity was measured relative to the date of graduation. Factors associated with inactivity were identified using multivariable logistic regression. 88.6 % of the PhD theses were conducted in internal medicine vs. 11...

  16. Chemically driven switches for online detection of pH changes in microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mela, P.; Onclin, S.; Goedbloed, M.H.; Levi, S.; Levi, S.A.; van Hulst, N.F.; van den Berg, Albert

    2003-01-01

    The internal walls of microfabricated fluidic channels were functionalized with a selfassembled monolayer of Rhodamine B lactam. This molecule has the capability to interconvert between its open fluorescent amide form and the closed non-fluorescent lactam form upon changes of the pH conditions. The

  17. Influence of HEPES buffer on the local pH and formation of surface layer during in vitro degradation tests of magnesium in DMEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Naddaf Dezfuli

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The human body is a buffered environment where pH is effectively maintained. HEPES is a biological buffer often used to mimic the buffering activity of the body in in vitro studies on the degradation behavior of magnesium. However, the influence of HEPES on the degradation behavior of magnesium in the DMEM pseudo-physiological solution has not yet been determined. The research aimed at elucidating the degradation mechanisms of magnesium in DMEM with and without HEPES. The morphologies and compositions of surface layers formed during in vitro degradation tests for 15–3600 s were characterized. The effect of HEPES on the electrochemical behavior and corrosion tendency was determined by performing electrochemical tests. HEPES indeed retained the local pH, leading to intense intergranular/interparticle corrosion of magnesium made from powder and an increased degradation rate. This was attributed to an interconnected network of cracks formed at the original powder particle boundaries and grain boundaries in the surface layer, which provided pathways for the corrosive medium to interact continuously with the internal surfaces and promoted further dissolution. Surface analysis revealed significantly reduced amounts of precipitated calcium phosphates due to the buffering activity of HEPES so that magnesium became less well protected in the buffered environment.

  18. Cementitious porous pavement in stormwater quality control: pH and alkalinity elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Xuheng; Sansalone, John

    2011-01-01

    A certain level of alkalinity acts as a buffer and maintains the pH value in a stable range in water bodies. With rapid urban development, more and more acidic pollutants flow to watersheds with runoff and drop alkalinity to a very low level and ultimately degrade the water environment. Cementitious porous pavement is an effective tool for stormwater acidic neutralization. When stormwater infiltrates cement porous pavement (CPP) materials, alkalinity and pH will be elevated due to the basic characteristics of cement concrete. The elevated alkalinity will neutralize acids in water bodies and maintain the pH in a stable level as a buffer. It is expected that CPP materials still have a certain capability of alkalinity elevation after years of service, which is important for CPP as an effective tool for stormwater management. However, few previous studies have reported on how CPP structures would elevate runoff alkalinity and pH after being exposed to rainfall-runoff for years. In this study, three groups of CPP specimens, all exposed to rainfall-runoff for 3 years, were used to test the pH and alkalinity elevation properties. It was found that runoff pH values were elevated from 7.4 to the range of 7.8-8.6 after infiltrating through the uncoated specimens, and from 7.4 to 8.5-10.7 after infiltrating through aluminum-coated specimens. Runoff alkalinity elevation efficiencies are 11.5-14.5% for uncoated specimens and 42.2% for coated specimens. The study shows that CPP is an effective passive unit operation for stormwater acid neutralization in our built environment.

  19. Charge-Neutral Constant pH Molecular Dynamics Simulations Using a Parsimonious Proton Buffer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnini, Serena; Ullmann, R Thomas; Groenhof, Gerrit; Grubmüller, Helmut

    2016-03-08

    In constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, the protonation states of titratable sites can respond to changes of the pH and of their electrostatic environment. Consequently, the number of protons bound to the biomolecule, and therefore the overall charge of the system, fluctuates during the simulation. To avoid artifacts associated with a non-neutral simulation system, we introduce an approach to maintain neutrality of the simulation box in constant pH molecular dynamics simulations, while maintaining an accurate description of all protonation fluctuations. Specifically, we introduce a proton buffer that, like a buffer in experiment, can exchange protons with the biomolecule enabling its charge to fluctuate. To keep the total charge of the system constant, the uptake and release of protons by the buffer are coupled to the titration of the biomolecule with a constraint. We find that, because the fluctuation of the total charge (number of protons) of a typical biomolecule is much smaller than the number of titratable sites of the biomolecule, the number of buffer sites required to maintain overall charge neutrality without compromising the charge fluctuations of the biomolecule, is typically much smaller than the number of titratable sites, implying markedly enhanced simulation and sampling efficiency.

  20. 33 CFR 118.5 - Penalty for failure to maintain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... States who fails or refuses to maintain such lights and other signals, or to obey any of the lawful rules... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Penalty for failure to maintain. 118.5 Section 118.5 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY...

  1. Maintaining patients' dignity during clinical care: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yea-Pyng; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2011-02-01

    This article is a report of a study undertaken to understand how nurses maintain patients' dignity in clinical practice. Dignity is a core concept in nursing care and maintaining patients' dignity is critical to their recovery. In Western countries, measures to maintain dignity in patients' care include maintaining privacy of the body, providing spatial privacy, giving sufficient time, treating patients as a whole person and allowing patients to have autonomy. However, this is an under-studied topic in Asian countries. For this qualitative descriptive study, data were collected in Taiwan in 2009 using in-depth interviews with a purposive sample of 30 nurses from a teaching hospital in eastern Taiwan. The audiotaped interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. Nurses' measures to maintain dignity in patient care were captured in five themes: respect, protecting privacy, emotional support, treating all patients alike and maintaining body image. Participants did not mention beneficence, a crucial element achieved through the professional care of nurses that can enhance the recovery of patients. In-service education to help nurses enhance dignity in patient care should emphasize emotional support, maintaining body image and treating all patients alike. Our model for maintaining dignity in patient care could be used to develop a clinical care protocol for nurses to use in clinical practice. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. A Methodology for Integrating Maintainability Using Software Metrics

    OpenAIRE

    Lewis, John A.; Henry, Sallie M.

    1989-01-01

    Maintainability must be integrated into software early in the development process. But for practical use, the techniques used must be as unobtrusive to the existing software development process as possible. This paper defines a methodology for integrating maintainability into large-scale software and describes an experiment which implemented the methodology into a major commercial software development environment.

  3. The Shampoo pH can Affect the Hair: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavazzoni Dias, Maria Fernanda Reis; de Almeida, Andréia Munck; Cecato, Patricia Makino Rezende; Adriano, Andre Ricardo; Pichler, Janine

    2014-07-01

    Dermatologists most frequently prescribe shampoos for the treatment of hair shed and scalp disorders. Prescription of hair care products is often focused on improving scalp hair density, whereas the over-the-counter products focus on hair damage prevention. Little is taught in medical schools about the hair cosmetics, so that the prescriptions are based only on the treatment of the scalp and usually disregards the hair fiber health. In this work, we review the current literature about the mode of action of a low-pH shampoo regarding the hair shaft's health and analyze the pH of 123 shampoos of international brands. All shampoo pH values ranged from 3.5 to 9.0. 38.21% of all 123 shampoos presented a pH ≤ 5.5 (IC: 29.9-47%) and 61.78% presented a pH > 5.5. 26 anti-dandruff shampoos were analyzed. About 19.23% presented pH ≤ 5.5.(IC: 7.4-37.6%). 80.77% of all anti-dandruffs shampoos presented a pH > 5.5. The dermatological shampoo group (n = 19) presented 42.10% with pH ≤ 5.5 (IC: 21.8-64.6%), and 57.90% with pH > 5.5. Among the commercial (popular) products (n = 96), 34.37% presented pH ≤ 5.5 (IC: 25.4-44.3%) and 65.62% presented pH > 5.5. 15 professional products (used in hair salons) were analyzed, of which 75% had a pH ≤ 5.5 (IC: 18-65, 4%), and 25% had a pH > 5.5. 100% of the children's shampoos presented a pH > 5.5. Alkaline pH may increase the negative electrical charge of the hair fiber surface and, therefore, increase friction between the fibers. This may lead to cuticle damage and fiber breakage. It is a reality and not a myth that lower pH of shampoos may cause less frizzing for generating less negative static electricity on the fiber surface. Interestingly, only 38% of the popular brand shampoos against 75% of the salons shampoos presented a pH ≤ 5.0. Pediatric shampoos had the pH of 7.0 because of the "no-tear" concept. There is no standardized value for the final pH. The authors believe that it is important to reveal the pH value on the

  4. Evolving Reliability and Maintainability Allocations for NASA Ground Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Gisela; Toon, T.; Toon, J.; Conner, A.; Adams, T.; Miranda, D.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the methodology and value of modifying allocations to reliability and maintainability requirements for the NASA Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) programs subsystems. As systems progressed through their design life cycle and hardware data became available, it became necessary to reexamine the previously derived allocations. This iterative process provided an opportunity for the reliability engineering team to reevaluate allocations as systems moved beyond their conceptual and preliminary design phases. These new allocations are based on updated designs and maintainability characteristics of the components. It was found that trade-offs in reliability and maintainability were essential to ensuring the integrity of the reliability and maintainability analysis. This paper discusses the results of reliability and maintainability reallocations made for the GSDO subsystems as the program nears the end of its design phase.

  5. Maintaining dignity. The perspective of nursing home residents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høy, Bente

    2016-01-01

    body image; feeling recognised and valued as a person of worth; Abilities and opportunities for changing of lifevalues; to exert control; to form and maintain meaningful relationships and to participation in meaningful activity. Conclusion. Although there is no one way to maintain dignity, the themes...... dignity is maintained. Background. Elderly living in nursing homes are vulnerable which appeal to nursing care ethics and emphasise the importance of care for human dignity. There have been several attempts to define dignity as a theoretical concept, but few studies on how dignity is maintained from...... was used to understand the meaning of the narrated text. Findings. The residents’ experiences revealed one main theme and seven sub-themes contributing to maintain dignity. The overall theme was: Coping with vulnerability and the subthemes were: Attention and care for basic needs; preserving a positive...

  6. Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This award is given to individuals who have made sustained and enduring contributions to international cooperation and the advancement of knowledge in psychology. The 2017 recipient of the APA Award for Distinguished Contributions to the International Advancement of Psychology was selected by the 2016 Committee on International Relations in Psychology (CIRP). The members of the 2016 CIRP were Melissa Morgan Consoli, PhD, and Arpana G. Inman, PhD (Co-chairs); Rehman Abdulrehman, PhD; Gonzalo Bacigalupe, EdD; Frederic Bemak, EdD; Brigitte Khoury, PhD; Susan Nolan, PhD; Nancy Sidun, PsyD; and Danny Wedding, PhD. Dr. Morgan Consoli, Dr. Inman, Dr. Nolan, and Doctor Sidun were members of the subcommittee for the 2017 award. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Coating dental implant abutment screws with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles: the effect on maintaining torque after mechanical cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepesqueur, Laura Soares; de Figueiredo, Viviane Maria Gonçalves; Ferreira, Leandro Lameirão; Sobrinho, Argemiro Soares da Silva; Massi, Marcos; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Nogueira Junior, Lafayette

    2015-01-01

    To determine the effect of maintaining torque after mechanical cycling of abutment screws that are coated with diamondlike carbon and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles, with external and internal hex connections. Sixty implants were divided into six groups according to the type of connection (external or internal hex) and the type of abutment screw (uncoated, coated with diamondlike carbon, and coated with diamondlike carbon doped with diamond nanoparticles). The implants were inserted into polyurethane resin and crowns of nickel chrome were cemented on the implants. The crowns had a hole for access to the screw. The initial torque and the torque after mechanical cycling were measured. The torque values maintained (in percentages) were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way analysis of variance and the Tukey test, with a significance level of 5%. The largest torque value was maintained in uncoated screws with external hex connections, a finding that was statistically significant (P = .0001). No statistically significant differences were seen between the groups with and without coating in maintaining torque for screws with internal hex connections (P = .5476). After mechanical cycling, the diamondlike carbon with and without diamond doping on the abutment screws showed no improvement in maintaining torque in external and internal hex connections.

  8. Roles of putative sodium-hydrogen antiporter (SHA) genes in S. coelicolor A3(2) culture with pH variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Jung; Moon, Myung Hee; Lee, Jae Sun; Hong, Soon-Kwang; Chang, Yong Keun

    2011-09-01

    Culture pH change has some important roles in signal transduction and secondary metabolism. We have already reported that acidic pH shock enhanced actinorhodin production in Streptomyces coelicolor. Among many potential governing factors on pH variation, the putative Na(+)/H(+) antiporter (sha) genes in S. coelicolor have been investigated in this study to elucidate the association of the sha on pH variation and secondary metabolism. Through the transcriptional analysis and overexpression experiments on 8 sha genes, we observed that most of the sha expressions were promoted by pH shock, and in the opposite way the pH changes and actinorhodin production were enhanced by the overexpression of each sha. We also confirmed that sha8 especially has a main role in maintaining cell viability and pH homeostasis through Na(+) extrusion, in salt effect experiment under the alkaline medium condition by deleting sha8. Moreover, this gene was observed to have a function of pH recovery after pH variation such as the pH shock, being able to cause the sporulation. However, actinorhodin production was not induced by the only pH recovery. The sha8 gene could confer on the host cell the ability to recover pH to the neutral level after pH variation like a pH drop. Sporulation was closely associated with this pH recovery caused by the action of sha8, whereas actinorhodin production was not due to such pH variation patterns alone.

  9. Optoelectronic pH Meter: Further Details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Anderson, Mejody M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.

    2009-01-01

    A collection of documents provides further detailed information about an optoelectronic instrument that measures the pH of an aqueous cell-culture medium to within 0.1 unit in the range from 6.5 to 7.5. The instrument at an earlier stage of development was reported in Optoelectronic Instrument Monitors pH in a Culture Medium (MSC-23107), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 9 (September 2004), page 4a. To recapitulate: The instrument includes a quartz cuvette through which the medium flows as it is circulated through a bioreactor. The medium contains some phenol red, which is an organic pH-indicator dye. The cuvette sits between a light source and a photodetector. [The light source in the earlier version comprised red (625 nm) and green (558 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs); the light source in the present version comprises a single green- (560 nm)-or-red (623 nm) LED.] The red and green are repeatedly flashed in alternation. The responses of the photodiode to the green and red are processed electronically to obtain the ratio between the amounts of green and red light transmitted through the medium. The optical absorbance of the phenol red in the green light varies as a known function of pH. Hence, the pH of the medium can be calculated from the aforesaid ratio.

  10. PhAST: pharmacophore alignment search tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähnke, Volker; Hofmann, Bettina; Grgat, Tomislav; Proschak, Ewgenij; Steinhilber, Dieter; Schneider, Gisbert

    2009-04-15

    We present a ligand-based virtual screening technique (PhAST) for rapid hit and lead structure searching in large compound databases. Molecules are represented as strings encoding the distribution of pharmacophoric features on the molecular graph. In contrast to other text-based methods using SMILES strings, we introduce a new form of text representation that describes the pharmacophore of molecules. This string representation opens the opportunity for revealing functional similarity between molecules by sequence alignment techniques in analogy to homology searching in protein or nucleic acid sequence databases. We favorably compared PhAST with other current ligand-based virtual screening methods in a retrospective analysis using the BEDROC metric. In a prospective application, PhAST identified two novel inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase product formation with minimal experimental effort. This outcome demonstrates the applicability of PhAST to drug discovery projects and provides an innovative concept of sequence-based compound screening with substantial scaffold hopping potential. 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. PH of Hawaiian precipitation: A preliminary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.M.; Yoshinaga, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    Daily or biweekly precipitation samples have been collected at various sites on the island of Hawaii since 1974. The elevations of the sites ranged from sea level to 3400 m. Samples were analyzed on the day of collection for pH and conductivity. Detection of major anions, such as sulfate and nitrate, were made on selected samples during the period

  12. The Ph.D. Value Proposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Kenneth J.

    2012-01-01

    Atlanta University launched its doctor of arts in humanities (DAH) programs almost 40 years ago, and, since the 1988 merger with Clark College, Clark Atlanta University has continued to award the degrees. This fall, for the first time, its students will be able to earn Ph.D.s in humanities instead. In DAH programs around the country, there's been…

  13. Internal Temperature Control For Vibration Testers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Richard J.

    1996-01-01

    Vibration test fixtures with internal thermal-transfer capabilities developed. Made of aluminum for rapid thermal transfer. Small size gives rapid response to changing temperatures, with better thermal control. Setup quicker and internal ducting facilitates access to parts being tested. In addition, internal flows smaller, so less energy consumed in maintaining desired temperature settings.

  14. Optimization of urinary dipstick pH: Are multiple dipstick pH readings reliably comparable to commercial 24-hour urinary pH?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Joel E; Miller, Daniel L; Shi, William; Wenzler, David; Elkhoury, Fuad F; Patel, Nishant D; Sur, Roger L

    2017-09-01

    Accurate measurement of pH is necessary to guide medical management of nephrolithiasis. Urinary dipsticks offer a convenient method to measure pH, but prior studies have only assessed the accuracy of a single, spot dipstick. Given the known diurnal variation in pH, a single dipstick pH is unlikely to reflect the average daily urinary pH. Our goal was to determine whether multiple dipstick pH readings would be reliably comparable to pH from a 24-hour urine analysis. Kidney stone patients undergoing a 24-hour urine collection were enrolled and took images of dipsticks from their first 3 voids concurrently with the 24-hour collection. Images were sent to and read by a study investigator. The individual and mean pH from the dipsticks were compared to the 24-hour urine pH and considered to be accurate if the dipstick readings were within 0.5 of the 24-hour urine pH. The Bland-Altman test of agreement was used to further compare dipstick pH relative to 24-hour urine pH. Fifty-nine percent of patients had mean urinary pH values within 0.5 pH units of their 24-hour urine pH. Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean difference between dipstick pH and 24-hour urine pH of -0.22, with an upper limit of agreement of 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.45-1.59) and a lower limit of agreement of -1.47 (95% CI, -2.04 to -0.90). We concluded that urinary dipstick based pH measurement lacks the precision required to guide medical management of nephrolithiasis and physicians should use 24-hour urine analysis to base their metabolic therapy.

  15. Support for PhD Students: The Impact of Institutional Dynamics on the Pedagogy of Learning Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peelo, Moira

    2013-01-01

    This paper explores one practitioner's learning development work with PhD students in a changing university context in which managerialism and financial stringency have combined. It questions how learning development practitioners can maintain their professional goals while negotiating issues arising from managerialism, financial stringency,…

  16. Fermentation pH influences the physiological-state dynamics of Lactobacillus bulgaricus CFL1 during pH-controlled culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rault, Aline; Bouix, Marielle; Béal, Catherine

    2009-07-01

    This study aims at better understanding the effects of fermentation pH and harvesting time on Lactobacillus bulgaricus CFL1 cellular state in order to improve knowledge of the dynamics of the physiological state and to better manage starter production. The Cinac system and multiparametric flow cytometry were used to characterize and compare the progress of the physiological events that occurred during pH 6 and pH 5 controlled cultures. Acidification activity, membrane damage, enzymatic activity, cellular depolarization, intracellular pH, and pH gradient were determined and compared during growing conditions. Strong differences in the time course of viability, membrane integrity, and acidification activity were displayed between pH 6 and pH 5 cultures. As a main result, the pH 5 control during fermentation allowed the cells to maintain a more robust physiological state, with high viability and stable acidification activity throughout growth, in opposition to a viability decrease and fluctuation of activity at pH 6. This result was mainly explained by differences in lactate concentration in the culture medium and in pH gradient value. The elevated content of the ionic lactate form at high pH values damaged membrane integrity that led to a viability decrease. In contrast, the high pH gradient observed throughout pH 5 cultures was associated with an increased energetic level that helped the cells maintain their physiological state. Such results may benefit industrial starter producers and fermented-product manufacturers by allowing them to better control the quality of their starters, before freezing or before using them for food fermentation.

  17. Comparing Effective Treatments for Attention-Maintained and Escape- Maintained Behaviors in Children with Behavior Disorders: Brief Review and Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Lauren Worcester; T. F. McLaughlin

    2013-01-01

    This literature review compares treatment for attention-maintainedversus escape maintained aberrant behavior in children with behavior disorders. Specifically, studies utilizing time out procedures, differential reinforcement procedures, noncontingent reinforcement, and functional communication training are discussed. It was found that these are effective treatments for attention-maintained behaviors; while escape extinction, positive and negative reinforcement, functional communication trai...

  18. Effective sharing of health records, maintaining privacy: a practical schema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neame, Roderick

    2013-01-01

    A principal goal of computerisation of medical records is to join up care services for patients, so that their records can follow them wherever they go and thereby reduce delays, duplications, risks and errors, and costs. Healthcare records are increasingly being stored electronically, which has created the necessary conditions for them to be readily sharable. However simply driving the implementation of electronic medical records is not sufficient, as recent developments have demonstrated (1): there remain significant obstacles. The three main obstacles relate to (a) record accessibility (knowing where event records are and being able to access them), (b) maintaining privacy (ensuring that only those authorised by the patient can access and extract meaning from the records) and (c) assuring the functionality of the shared information (ensuring that the records can be shared non-proprietorially across platforms without loss of meaning, and that their authenticity and trustworthiness are demonstrable). These constitute a set of issues that need new thinking, since existing systems are struggling to deliver them. The solution to this puzzle lies in three main parts. Clearly there is only one environment suited to such widespread sharing, which is the World Wide Web, so this is the communications basis. Part one requires that a sharable synoptic record is created for each care event and stored in standard web-format and in readily accessible locations, on 'the web' or in 'the cloud'. To maintain privacy these publicly-accessible records must be suitably protected either stripped of identifiers (names, addresses, dates, places etc.) and/or encrypted: either way the record must be tagged with a tag that means nothing to anyone, but serves to identify and authenticate a specific record when retrieved. For ease of retrieval patients must hold an index of care events, records and web locations (plus any associated information for each such as encryption keys, context etc

  19. PhD on Track – designing learning for PhD students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunhild Austrheim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Three years ago we started the project "Information Management for Knowledge Creation". The project was initiated to create online information literacy modules for PhD students. The result of our endeavours, PhD on Track, will be launched in May 2013. The initial stage of the project was mapping out the information behaviour of PhD students, as well as what services they require from the library through a literature review and a focus group study. The findings of these inquiries formed the knowledge base from which we developed our information literacy modules. Our paper will focus on the interaction between content production and user testing when creating PhD on Track. Methods: User testing has been employed throughout the production stage. We have tested navigation and organisation of the web site, content and usability. The project team have conducted expert testing. Analysis: The results from our user testing have played an important part in decisions concerning content production. Our working hypothesis was that the PhD students would want an encyclopaedic website, a place to quickly find answers. However, the user tests revealed that PhD students understood and expected the website to be learning modules. Conclusions: The PhD students in the tests agreed that a site such as this would be useful, especially to new PhD students. They also liked the design, but had some qualms with the level of information. They preferred shorter text, but with more depth. The students would likewise have preferred more practical examples, more illustrations and more discipline specific information. The current content of PhD on Track reflects the feedback from the user testing. We have retained initial ideas such as one section for reviewing and discovering research literature and one section for publishing PhD research work. In addition, we have included more practical examples to indicate efficient workflows or relevant actions in context. Illustrations

  20. Polyamine/salt-assembled microspheres coated with hyaluronic acid for targeting and pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pan; Yang, Hui; Wang, Guojun; Tong, Weijun; Gao, Changyou

    2016-06-01

    The poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/trisodium citrate aggregates were fabricated and further covalently crosslinked via the coupling reaction of carboxylic sites on trisodium citrate with the amine groups on polyamine, onto which poly-L-lysine and hyaluronic acid were sequentially assembled, forming stable microspheres. The pH sensitive dye and pH insensitive dye were further labeled to enable the microspheres with pH sensing property. Moreover, these microspheres could be specifically targeted to HeLa tumor cells, since hyaluronic acid can specifically recognize and bind to CD44, a receptor overexpressed on many tumor cells. Quantitative pH measurement by confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that the microspheres were internalized into HeLa cells, and accumulated in acidic compartments. By contrast, only a few microspheres were adhered on the NIH 3T3 cells surface. The microspheres with combined pH sensing property and targeting ability can enhance the insight understanding of the targeted drug vehicles trafficking after cellular internalization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 876.1400 - Stomach pH electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stomach pH electrode. 876.1400 Section 876.1400...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 876.1400 Stomach pH electrode. (a) Identification. A stomach pH electrode is a device used to measure intragastric and intraesophageal pH (hydrogen...

  2. EVALUATION OF A NEW CATHETER FOR ESOPHAGEAL PH MONITORING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUIT, JA; SCHEPEL, SJ; BIJLEVELD, CMA; KLEIBEUKER, JH

    A new catheter, provided with an Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor as a pH sensor and incorporating a reference electrode, was evaluated for esophageal pH recording. The pH-sensitivity was 54 mV/pH in vitro, with a linear response between pH 2 and pH 9. Clinical semi-ambulatory 24-hour

  3. Pressure pressure-balanced pH sensing system for high temperature and high pressure water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachibana, Koji

    1995-01-01

    As for the pH measurement system for high temperature, high pressure water, there have been the circumstances that first the reference electrodes for monitoring corrosion potential were developed, and subsequently, it was developed for the purpose of maintaining the soundness of metallic materials in high temperature, high pressure water in nuclear power generation. In the process of developing the reference electrodes for high temperature water, it was clarified that the occurrence of stress corrosion cracking in BWRs is closely related to the corrosion potential determined by dissolved oxygen concentration. As the types of pH electrodes, there are metal-hydrogen electrodes, glass electrodes, ZrO 2 diaphragm electrodes and TiO 2 semiconductor electrodes. The principle of pH measurement using ZrO 2 diaphragms is explained. The pH measuring system is composed of YSZ element, pressure-balanced type external reference electrode, pressure balancer and compressed air vessel. The stability and pH response of YSZ elements are reported. (K.I.)

  4. Free Glycogen in Vaginal Fluids Is Associated with Lactobacillus Colonization and Low Vaginal pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirmonsef, Paria; Hotton, Anna L.; Gilbert, Douglas; Burgad, Derick; Landay, Alan; Weber, Kathleen M.; Cohen, Mardge; Ravel, Jacques; Spear, Gregory T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Lactobacillus dominates the lower genital tract microbiota of many women, producing a low vaginal pH, and is important for healthy pregnancy outcomes and protection against several sexually transmitted pathogens. Yet, factors that promote Lactobacillus remain poorly understood. We hypothesized that the amount of free glycogen in the lumen of the lower genital tract is an important determinant of Lactobacillus colonization and a low vaginal pH. Methods Free glycogen in lavage samples was quantified. Pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA gene was used to identify microbiota from 21 African American women collected over 8–11 years. Results Free glycogen levels varied greatly between women and even in the same woman. Samples with the highest free glycogen had a corresponding median genital pH that was significantly lower (pH 4.4) than those with low glycogen (pH 5.8; pglycogen versus those with low glycogen (median = 0.97 vs. 0.05, pglycogen. High concentrations of glycogen corresponded to higher levels of L. crispatus and L. jensenii, but not L. iners. Conclusion These findings show that free glycogen in genital fluid is associated with a genital microbiota dominated by Lactobacillus, suggesting glycogen is important for maintaining genital health. Treatments aimed at increasing genital free glycogen might impact Lactobacillus colonization. PMID:25033265

  5. CARINA data synthesis project: pH data scale unification and cruise adjustments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velo, A.; Pérez, F. F.; Lin, X.; Key, R. M.; Tanhua, T.; de La Paz, M.; Olsen, A.; van Heuven, S.; Jutterström, S.; Ríos, A. F.

    2010-05-01

    Data on carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Artic Mediterranean Seas (AMS), Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged to a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic Ocean). These data have gone through rigorous quality control (QC) procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the measured parameters in the CARINA database were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the data products, three merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions; AMS, Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean. Out of a total of 188 cruise entries in the CARINA database, 59 reported pH measured values. All reported pH data have been unified to the Sea-Water Scale (SWS) at 25 °C. Here we present details of the secondary QC of pH in the CARINA database and the scale unification to SWS at 25 °C. The pH scale has been converted for 36 cruises. Procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between cruises and inversion analysis are described. Adjustments were applied to the pH values for 21 of the cruises in the CARINA dataset. With these adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with the GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal consistency of the CARINA pH data to be 0.005 pH units. The CARINA data are now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates, for ocean acidification assessment and for model validation.

  6. CARINA data synthesis project: pH data scale unification and cruise adjustments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Velo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Data on carbon and carbon-relevant hydrographic and hydrochemical parameters from 188 previously non-publicly available cruise data sets in the Artic Mediterranean Seas (AMS, Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean have been retrieved and merged to a new database: CARINA (CARbon IN the Atlantic Ocean.

    These data have gone through rigorous quality control (QC procedures to assure the highest possible quality and consistency. The data for most of the measured parameters in the CARINA database were objectively examined in order to quantify systematic differences in the reported values. Systematic biases found in the data have been corrected in the data products, three merged data files with measured, calculated and interpolated data for each of the three CARINA regions; AMS, Atlantic Ocean and Southern Ocean. Out of a total of 188 cruise entries in the CARINA database, 59 reported pH measured values. All reported pH data have been unified to the Sea-Water Scale (SWS at 25 °C.

    Here we present details of the secondary QC of pH in the CARINA database and the scale unification to SWS at 25 °C. The pH scale has been converted for 36 cruises. Procedures of quality control, including crossover analysis between cruises and inversion analysis are described. Adjustments were applied to the pH values for 21 of the cruises in the CARINA dataset. With these adjustments the CARINA database is consistent both internally as well as with the GLODAP data, an oceanographic data set based on the World Hydrographic Program in the 1990s. Based on our analysis we estimate the internal consistency of the CARINA pH data to be 0.005 pH units. The CARINA data are now suitable for accurate assessments of, for example, oceanic carbon inventories and uptake rates, for ocean acidification assessment and for model validation.

  7. Chemical equilibrium modeling of organic acids, pH, aluminum, and iron in Swedish surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöstedt, Carin S; Gustafsson, Jon Petter; Köhler, Stephan J

    2010-11-15

    A consistent chemical equilibrium model that calculates pH from charge balance constraints and aluminum and iron speciation in the presence of natural organic matter is presented. The model requires input data for total aluminum, iron, organic carbon, fluoride, sulfate, and charge balance ANC. The model is calibrated to pH measurements (n = 322) by adjusting the fraction of active organic matter only, which results in an error of pH prediction on average below 0.2 pH units. The small systematic discrepancy between the analytical results for the monomeric aluminum fractionation and the model results is corrected for separately for two different fractionation techniques (n = 499) and validated on a large number (n = 3419) of geographically widely spread samples all over Sweden. The resulting average error for inorganic monomeric aluminum is around 1 µM. In its present form the model is the first internally consistent modeling approach for Sweden and may now be used as a tool for environmental quality management. Soil gibbsite with a log *Ks of 8.29 at 25°C together with a pH dependent loading function that uses molar Al/C ratios describes the amount of aluminum in solution in the presence of organic matter if the pH is roughly above 6.0.

  8. Arginine Improves pH Homeostasis via Metabolism and Microbiome Modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnello, M; Cen, L; Tran, N C; Shi, W; McLean, J S; He, X

    2017-07-01

    Dental caries can be described as a dysbiosis of the oral microbial community, in which acidogenic, aciduric, and acid-adapted bacterial species promote a pathogenic environment, leading to demineralization. Alkali generation by oral microbes, specifically via arginine catabolic pathways, is an essential factor in maintaining plaque pH homeostasis. There is evidence that the use of arginine in dentifrices helps protect against caries. The aim of the current study was to investigate the mechanistic and ecological effect of arginine treatment on the oral microbiome and its regulation of pH dynamics, using an in vitro multispecies oral biofilm model that was previously shown to be highly reflective of the in vivo oral microbiome. Pooled saliva from 6 healthy subjects was used to generate overnight biofilms, reflecting early stages of biofilm maturation. First, we investigated the uptake of arginine by the cells of the biofilm as well as the metabolites generated. We next explored the effect of arginine on pH dynamics by pretreating biofilms with 75 mM arginine, followed by the addition of sucrose (15 mM) after 0, 6, 20, or 48 h. pH was measured at each time point and biofilms were collected for 16S sequencing and targeted arginine quantification, and supernatants were prepared for metabolomic analysis. Treatment with only sucrose led to a sustained pH drop from 7 to 4.5, while biofilms treated with sucrose after 6, 20, or 48 h of preincubation with arginine exhibited a recovery to higher pH. Arginine was detected within the cells of the biofilms, indicating active uptake, and arginine catabolites citrulline, ornithine, and putrescine were detected in supernatants, indicating active metabolism. Sequencing analysis revealed a shift in the microbial community structure in arginine-treated biofilms as well as increased species diversity. Overall, we show that arginine improved pH homeostasis through a remodeling of the oral microbial community.

  9. Investigation of the fabrication parameters of thick film metal oxide-polymer pH electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gac, Arnaud

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes a study into the development of an optimum material and fabrication process for the production of thick film pH electrodes. These devices consist of low cost, miniature and rugged pH sensors formed by screen printing a metal oxide bearing paste onto a high temperature (∼850 deg C) fired metal back contact supported on a standard alumina substrate. The pH sensitive metal oxide layer must be fabricated at relatively low temperatures (<300 deg C) in order to maintain the pH sensitivity of the layer and hence requires the use of a suitably stable low temperature curing binder. Bespoke fabricated inks are derived from a Taguchi style factorial experimental plans in which, different binder types, curing temperatures, hydration level and percentage mixtures of different metal oxides and layer thicknesses were investigated. The pH responses of 18 printed electrodes per batch were assessed in buffer solutions with respect to a commercial reference electrode forming a complete potentiometric circuit. The evaluation criteria used in the study included the device-to-device variation in sensitivity of the pH sensors and their sensitivity variation as a function of time. The results indicated the importance of the choice of binder type in particular on the performance characteristics. Reproducible device-to-device variation in sensitivity was determined for the best inks found, whatever the ink fabrication batch. A reduction in the sensitivity variation with time has been determined using the mathematical models derived from an experimental plan. The lack of reproducibility of the sensitivity magnitude, regardless of the ink manufacturing batch, seems to be a recurrent problem with prototype inks. Experimental sub-Nernstian responses are discussed in the light of possible pH mechanisms. (author)

  10. Immunomodulatory effects of temperature and pH of water in an Indian freshwater sponge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Soumalya; Bhunia, Anindya Sundar; Bhunia, Niladri Sekhar; Ray, Mitali; Ray, Sajal

    2016-07-01

    Eunapius carteri, a freshwater sponge of India, inhabits the ponds and lakes and experiences variations of temperature and pH of water throughout the year. Sponges bear evolutionary and ecological importance with limited information on their immunological attribute and adaptational resilience in a changing environment. This paper reports temperature and pH specific responses of immune related parameters in sponge maintained in the experimental conditions of laboratory. Innate immunological parameters like phagocytosis and generation of cytotoxic molecules like superoxide anion, nitric oxide and phenoloxidase activity were estimated in E. carteri at different environmentally realistic water temperatures (10, 20, 30 and 40°C) and pH (6.4, 7.4 and 8.4). Phagocytosis and cytotoxicity are established as important immune parameters of invertebrates. Calalase, an antioxidant enzyme and phosphatases are involved in pathogen destruction and are considered as components of innate immunity. Activities of catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatases were estimated in E. carteri at different thermal regimes and pH. Modulation of phagocytic and cytotoxic responses and the activities of catalase and phosphatases at different water temperatures and pH indicated temperature and pH specific immunological status of E. carteri. Present investigation deals with the effects of selected hydrological parameters on the fundamental immune related parameters in sponge indicating its adaptational plasticity. Immunological resilience of this species in the face of variation of water temperature and pH is thought to be a special adaptive feature of sponge, a reported "living fossil". Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. PhD competences of food studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelo Gonzalez-Martinez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In European Higher Education, learning outcomes and competences have been used sometimes with different meanings and sometimes with the same meaning. But both terms have been more commonly used to refer to knowledge, understanding and abilities a student must demonstrate at the end of a learning experience.  Their use is a consequence of the paradigm shift of the Bologna Process to a learner centered education environment. The definition of standards of competences (or learning outcomes for the PhD degree is thus a need for the quality assurance of this degree. In this work, subject-specific and generic competences for the PhD in Food Science and Technology and their alignment with the European Qualifications Framework (EQF level descriptors for quality assurance purposes have been identified.

  12. ATLAS PhD Grant Scholarship Programme

    CERN Multimedia

    Abha Eli Phoboo

    2014-01-01

    On 11 February, the first recipients of the ATLAS PhD Grant were presented with a certificate by the programme’s selection committee. The three scholars - Lailin Xu of China, Josefina Alconada of Argentina and Gagik Vardanyan of Armenia - were delighted at being able to continue their PhD programmes at CERN.   With certificates, from left: Lailin Xu, Josefina Alconada, and Gagik Vardanyan. The selection committee members, from left: IFAE Barcelona’s Martine Bosman, Fabiola Gianotti, Peter Jenni and from CERN HR James Purvis. (Image: ATLAS/Claudia Marcelloni). Former ATLAS spokespersons Peter Jenni and Fabiola Gianotti started the fund with the Fundamental Physics Prize award money they received last year. Both have used the entirety of their prizes for educational and humanitarian programmes. "We wanted to do something for students who are working on ATLAS, in particular those who otherwise could not come here and actually see the detector they are working on,&am...

  13. PhD students share their work

    CERN Multimedia

    Joannah Caborn Wengler

    2012-01-01

    Last week, the second Doctoral Student Assembly gave students in the final stages of their PhD at CERN the chance to meet and present their work.   On 9 May, 24 students who are completing their PhD under the CERN Doctoral Student Programme were joined by their CERN supervisors and some of their university supervisors at an event organised by HR and the Technical Students Committee (TSC). After an address by the Director-General Rolf Heuer and short presentations by Ingrid Haug from HR and TSC Chair Stephan Russenschuck, the students presented their work in a poster session. Held in a packed Council Chamber, the event was a great opportunity for the doctoral students to get to know each other and to share their work in fields as diverse as radiation protection, computing, physics and engineering.

  14. Developing maintainability for fusion power systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Curtis, C.T.; Buchheit, R.J.; Green, W.M.; Zuckerman, D.S.

    1979-11-01

    The overall purpose of the study is to identify design features of fusion power reactors which contribute to the achievement of high levels of maintainability. Previous phases evaluated several commercial tokamak reactor design concepts. This final phase compares the maintainability of a tandem mirror reactor (TMR) commercial conceptual design with the most maintainable tokamak concept selected from earlier work. A series of maintainability design guidelines and desirable TMR design features are defined. The effects of scheduled and unscheduled maintenance for most of the reactor subsystems are defined. The comparison of the TMR and tokamak reactor maintenance costs and availabilities show that both reactors have similar costs for scheduled maintenance at 19.4 and 20.8 million dollars annually and similar scheduled downtime availability impacts, achieving approximate availabilities of 79% at optimized maintenance intervals and cost of electricity.

  15. Reliability and maintainability data acquisition in equipment development tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haire, M.J.; Gift, E.H.

    1983-10-01

    The need for collection of reliability, maintainability, and availability data adds a new dimension to the data acquisition requirements of equipment development tests. This report describes the reliability and maintainability data that are considered necessary to ensure that sufficient and high quality data exist for a comprehensive, quantitative evaluation of equipment and system availability. These necessary data are presented as a set of data collection forms. Three data acquisition forms are discussed: an inventory and technical data form, which is filed by the design engineer when the design is finished or the equipment is received; an event report form, which is completed by the senior test operator at each shutdown; and a maintainability report, which is a collaborative effort between senior operators and lead engineers and is completed on restart. In addition, elements of a reliability, maintainability evaluation program are described. Emphasis is placed on the role of data, its storage, and use in such a program

  16. 399 Maintaining Discipline and Orderliness in Secondary Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2010-10-17

    Oct 17, 2010 ... complicated that most teachers find it difficult to maintain and keep their ... gang fighting, drug abuse, unrest, smoking, armed robbery, students/ ... instance, both the principals' and teachers' leadership styles can affect the.

  17. A cryogenic optical feedthrough using polarization maintaining fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M J; Collins, C J; Speake, C C

    2016-03-01

    Polarization maintaining optical fibers can be used to transmit linearly polarized light over long distances but their use in cryogenic environments has been limited by their sensitivity to temperature changes and associated mechanical stress. We investigate experimentally how thermal stresses affect the polarization maintaining fibers and model the observations with Jones matrices. We describe the design, construction, and testing of a feedthrough and fiber termination assembly that uses polarization maintaining fiber to transmit light from a 633 nm HeNe laser at room temperature to a homodyne polarization-based interferometer in a cryogenic vacuum. We report on the efficiency of the polarization maintaining properties of the feedthrough assembly. We also report that, at cryogenic temperatures, the interferometer can achieve a sensitivity of 8 × 10(-10) rad/√Hz at 0.05 Hz using this feedthrough.

  18. Developing maintainability for fusion power systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahn, H.S.; Mantz, H.C.; Curtis, C.T.; Buchheit, R.J.; Green, W.M.; Zuckerman, D.S.

    1979-11-01

    The overall purpose of the study is to identify design features of fusion power reactors which contribute to the achievement of high levels of maintainability. Previous phases evaluated several commercial tokamak reactor design concepts. This final phase compares the maintainability of a tandem mirror reactor (TMR) commercial conceptual design with the most maintainable tokamak concept selected from earlier work. A series of maintainability design guidelines and desirable TMR design features are defined. The effects of scheduled and unscheduled maintenance for most of the reactor subsystems are defined. The comparison of the TMR and tokamak reactor maintenance costs and availabilities show that both reactors have similar costs for scheduled maintenance at 19.4 and 20.8 million dollars annually and similar scheduled downtime availability impacts, achieving approximate availabilities of 79% at optimized maintenance intervals and cost of electricity

  19. Complexation Key to a pH Locked Redox Reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Masood Ahmad; Dangat, Yuvraj; Shams, Tahir; Khan, Khaliquz Zaman

    2016-01-01

    An unfavorable pH can block a feasible electron transfer for a pH dependent redox reaction. In this experiment, a series of potentiometric titrations demonstrate the sequential loss in feasibility of iron(II) dichromate redox reaction over a pH range of 0-4. The pH at which this reaction failed to occur was termed as a pH locked reaction. The…

  20. The PhD Conundrum in South African Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breier, Mignonne; Herman, Chaya

    2017-01-01

    South African universities need more academics with PhDs, from historically disadvantaged population groups in particular, but they face a conundrum. In order to have more staff with PhDs, they need to produce more PhD graduates. But in order to produce more PhD graduates, they need more staff with PhDs to supervise. This article explores this…

  1. Iodine evolution and pH control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beahm, E.C.; Lorenz, R.A.; Weber, C.F.

    1993-01-01

    The pH is the major factor in determining the extent of I 2 in solution. In containment where no pH-control chemicals are present, the acidity or basicity of the water pool will be determined by materials that are introduced into containment as a result of the accident itself. These materials may be fission products (i.e., cesium compounds), thermally produced products (i.e., core-concrete aerosols), or compounds produced by radiation (i.e., nitric acid). In situations where pH levels fall below ∼7, the formation of I 2 will occur in irradiated iodide solutions. A correlation between pH and iodine formation is needed so that the amounts I 2 in water pools can be assessed. This, in turn, determines the amount of I 2 in the atmosphere available for escape by containment leakage. A number of calculational routines based on more than 100 differential equations representing individual reactions can be found in the literature. In this work, it is shown that a simpler approach based on the steady-state decomposition of hydrogen peroxide should correctly describe iodine formation in severe accidents. Comparisons with test data show this approach to be valid. The most important acids in containment will be nitric acid (HNO 3 ), produced by irradiation of water and air, and hydrochloric acid (HCl), produced by irradiation or heating of electrical cable insulation. The most important bases in containment will be cesium hydroxide, cesium borate (or cesium carbonate), and in some plants pH additives, such as sodium hydroxide or sodium phosphate

  2. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    OpenAIRE

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2015-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several trans...

  3. Condensation of rye chromatin in somatic interphase nuclei of Ph1 and ph1b wheat

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopecký, David; Allen, D.C.; Duchoslav, M.; Doležel, Jaroslav; Lukaszewski, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 119, 3-4 (2007), s. 263-267 ISSN 1424-8581 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06004 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : hexaploid wheat * Ph1 and ph1b * rye chromatin Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.402, year: 2007

  4. Optimum pH and pH Stability of Crude Polyphenol Oxidase (PPO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of pH on the activity and stability of crude polyphenol oxidase (PPO) extracted from garden egg (Solanum aethiopicum), pawpaw (Carica papaya), pumpkin ... Optimum pH values were found to be 6.0,6.5,6.0, 4.5 and 4.0/or 8.0 for the enzyme extracted from Solanum aethiopicum, Carica papaya, Cucurbita pepo, ...

  5. An interview with James Wilbur, Ph.D. General Manager, Life Sciences, Meso Scale Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur, James

    2004-06-01

    James L. Wilbur, Ph.D. received a Bachelor's degree from the University of California, San Diego and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Stanford University. After completing an NIH Postdoctoral Fellowship with Professor George M. Whitesides in the Department of Chemistry at Harvard University, he joined IGEN International, Inc., where he held a variety of positions in Research and Development. During that time, he was part of the team that developed the core technology and products for Meso Scale Discovery. He assumed his current position in 2001 when Meso Scale Discovery launched the products discussed here.

  6. Growth and Tissue Elemental Composition Response of Butterhead Lettuce (Lactuca sativa, cv. Flandria to Hydroponic Conditions at Different pH and Alkalinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler S. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Biomass and tissue elemental differences were quantified for lettuce grown in deep-water conventional hydroponic conditions at two pH and alkalinity conditions. Nutrient solutions were created using inorganic salts and either reverse osmosis (RO water or municipal water with high alkalinity. Three treatments were evaluated: (a nutrient solution created with reverse osmosis (RO water and maintained at pH 5.8 (H5; (b same as H5 but maintained at pH 7.0 (H7; and (c nutrient solution created using municipal water and maintained at pH 7.0, referred to as HA7. Averaged across three trials, the HA7 and H7 treatments produced 26% less shoot fresh weight (FW than the H5 treatment with an 18% reduction in dry weight (DW. The H5 treatment had the least biomass in root FW and DW. In tissue elemental analyses, both the pH 7.0 treatments showed lower concentrations than H5 in Cu, N, Mo, and Sr, and increased concentrations in Ba, Mg, Na, and Zn. There were no differences in Al, C, Ca, Fe, K, Mn, Ni, P, S, and Si concentrations among treatments (p = 0.05. The results from this experiment can be used to isolate the effects of pH and alkalinity in aquaponic conditions where pH and alkalinity will mimic HA7 conditions.

  7. Millimeter/submillimeter Spectroscopy of PH2CN ({\\tilde{X}} 1A') and CH3PH2 ({\\tilde{X}} 1A'): Probing the Complexity of Interstellar Phosphorus Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfen, D. T.; Clouthier, D. J.; Ziurys, L. M.

    2014-11-01

    Millimeter/submillimeter spectra of PH2CN ({\\tilde{X}} 1A') and CH3PH2 ({\\tilde{X}} 1A') have been recorded for the first time using direct absorption techniques. This work extends previous measurements of both molecules beyond the 10-50 GHz range. Both species were created in the presence of an AC discharge by the reaction of phosphorus vapor and either cyanogen and hydrogen (PH2CN) or methane (CH3PH2). Twelve rotational transitions of PH2CN were recorded over the region 305-422 GHz for asymmetry components Ka = 0 through 8. For CH3PH2, eight rotational transitions were measured from 210-470 GHz with Ka = 0 through 16; these spectra exhibited greater complexity due to the presence of internal rotation, which splits the Ka = 1, 2, and 3 asymmetry components into A and E states. Combined analyses of the millimeter/submillimeter and previous microwave data were performed for both molecules. For PH2CN, the spectra were fit with a Watson S-reduced asymmetric top Hamiltonian, resulting in more accurate rotational and centrifugal distortion constants. In the case of CH3PH2, an asymmetric top internal-rotation Hamiltonian was employed in the analysis, significantly improving the rotational and torsional parameters over previous microwave estimates. Searches for both molecules were subsequently conducted toward Sgr B2(N), using the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO). Neither species was identified, with abundance upper limits, relative to H2, of f (PH2CN/H2) PH2/H2) 2 and >200, respectively.

  8. Using a nursing theory or a model in nursing PhD dissertations: a qualitative study from Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mete, Samiye; Gokçe İsbir, Gozde

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to reveal experiences of nursing students and their advisors using theories and models in their PhD dissertations. The study adopted a descriptive qualitative approach. This study was performed with 10 PhD candidates and their five advisors from nursing faculty. The results of the study were categorized into four. These are reasons for using a theory/model in a PhD dissertation, reasons for preferring a given model, causes of difficulties in using models in PhD dissertations, and facilitating factors of using theories and models in PhD of dissertations. It was also reported to contribute to the methodology of research and professional development of the students and advisors. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  9. Decreased extracellular pH inhibits osteogenesis through proton-sensing GPR4-mediated suppression of yes-associated protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shi-Cong; Gao, You-Shui; Zhu, Hong-Yi; Yin, Jun-Hui; Chen, Yi-Xuan; Zhang, Yue-Lei; Guo, Shang-Chun; Zhang, Chang-Qing

    2016-06-03

    The pH of extracellular fluids is a basic property of the tissue microenvironment and is normally maintained at 7.40 ± 0.05 in humans. Many pathological circumstances, such as ischemia, inflammation, and tumorigenesis, result in the reduction of extracellular pH in the affected tissues. In this study, we reported that the osteogenic differentiation of BMSCs was significantly inhibited by decreases in the extracellular pH. Moreover, we demonstrated that proton-sensing GPR4 signaling mediated the proton-induced inhibitory effects on the osteogenesis of BMSCs. Additionally, we found that YAP was the downstream effector of GPR4 signaling. Our findings revealed that the extracellular pH modulates the osteogenic responses of BMSCs by regulating the proton-sensing GPR4-YAP pathway.

  10. Estimating the financial savings from maintaining the level of acute services with fewer hospital beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beech, R; Larkinson, J

    1990-01-01

    All district health authorities are obliged to use resources most efficiently. One approach to increasing efficiency is to identify measures which allow service levels, in terms of patients treated and standards of care, to be maintained at a lower cost. This could be achieved by maintaining service levels with fewer hospital beds. Reducing lengths of stay by removing organizational delays and expansions of day-case care, are policies which can increase patient caseload per bed. This paper puts forward an approach for estimating the resources released by such policies and assesses the savings achieved by realizing efficiency gains identified in a previous study by Beech et al. (1987). That study identified significant potential for maintaining services with fewer beds, with the expansion of day-case care being a key mechanism. However this paper concludes that when services are maintained with fewer beds, the vast majority of hospital costs remain fixed. It also reaches the alarming conclusion that as a vehicle for reducing costs, day-case care is much less effective than previous studies have implied. However, increasing hospital throughput per bed does release capacity to treat more patients. The proposed reforms of the NHS (Secretaries of State, 1989) envisage an internal market for health care, allowing hospitals to enter into contracts with purchasers of health care. The approach to costing described in this paper is applicable to assessing the increased costs associated with such developments. These extra costs can then be compared with expected income.

  11. Associate Director | IDRC - International Development Research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... funding from another donor or social investor;; Is responsible for the Program team's and IDRC's contacts ... Primary Duties or Responsibilities ... Maintains individual and corporate leadership positions internationally in the Program's area of ...

  12. Pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Carl O.; Herman, Janet S.

    1991-02-01

    Previous studies of pyrite oxidation kinetics have concentrated primarily on the reaction at low pH, where Fe(III) has been assumed to be the dominant oxidant. Studies at circumneutral pH, necessitated by effective pH buffering in some pyrite oxidation systems, have often implicitly assumed that the dominant oxidant must be dissolved oxygen (DO), owing to the diminished solubility of Fe(III). In fact, Fe(III)(aq) is an effective pyrite oxidant at circumneutral pH, but the reaction cannot be sustained in the absence of DO. The purpose of this experimental study was to ascertain the relative roles of Fe(III) and DO in pyrite oxidation at circumneutral pH. The rate of pyrite oxidation was first-order with respect to the ratio of surface area to solution volume. Direct determinations of both Fe(II) (aq)> and Fe(III) (aq) demonstrated a dramatic loss of Fe(II) from the solution phase in excess of the loss for which oxidation alone could account. Based on rate data, we have concluded that Fe(II) is adsorbed onto the pyrite surface. Furthermore, Fe(II) is preferred as an adsorbate to Fe(III), which we attribute to both electrostatic and acid-base selectivity. We also found that the rate of pyrite oxidation by either Fe(III) (aq) or DO is reduced in the presence of aqueous Fe(II), which leads us to conclude that, under most natural conditions, neither Fe(III) (aq) nor DO directly attacks the pyrite surface. The present evidence suggests a mechanism for pyrite oxidation that involves adsorbed Fe( II ) giving up electrons to DO and the resulting Fe(III) rapidly accepting electrons from the pyrite. The adsorbed Fe is, thus, cyclically oxidized and reduced, while it acts as a conduit for electrons traveling from pyrite to DO. Oxygen is transferred from the hydration sphere of the adsorbed Fe to pyrite S. The cycle of adsorbed Fe oxidation and reduction and the successive addition of oxygen to pyrite S continues until a stable sulfoxy species dissociates from the surface. Prior

  13. Application of carnauba-based wax maintains postharvest quality of 'Ortanique' tangor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Ligia de Castro Machado

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating compositional changes in the quality of 'Ortanique' tangor after coating with the carnauba-based waxes Aruá Tropical® or Star Light®. The storage conditions studied simulated those of local marketing (22 ± 2 °C, 60 ± 5% RH. Non-destructive analysis, mass loss, peel color, and sensory evaluation, were performed upon coating and every three days up to the fifteenth day of storage. Destructive analysis, peel moisture content, chlorophyll of the peel, pulp color, juice content, soluble solids (SS, titratable acidity (TA, pH, and soluble solids to titratable acidity ratio, were performed upon coating and every four days up to the sixteenth day of storage. The assay was conducted using an entirely randomized design, with three replications (destructive analyses or ten replications (non-destructive analyses, in a split plot scheme. Wax-coating, especially Aruá Tropical®, maintained fruit freshness by reducing mass loss and peel dehydration and retaining green color. Peel moisture content, chlorophyll content, and juice content had lower rates in the wax coated fruits. Puncture force, soluble solids, titratable acidity, pH, and soluble solids to titratable acidity ratio varied vary little over the course of storage. Sensory evaluation showed that the application of Aruá Tropical keeps 'Ortanique' tangor fresher for 6 days longer for commercialization.

  14. Impact of seawater acidification on pH at the tissue–skeleton interface and calcification in reef corals

    OpenAIRE

    Venn, Alexander A.; Tambutté, Eric; Holcomb, Michael; Laurent, Julien; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the response of reef corals and other major marine calcifiers to ocean acidification is limited by a lack of knowledge about how seawater pH and carbonate chemistry impact the physiological processes that drive biomineralization. Ocean acidification is proposed to reduce calcification rates in corals by causing declines in internal pH at the calcifying tissue–skeleton interface where biomineralization takes place. Here, we performed an in vivo study on how partial-pressure CO2-dr...

  15. Host origin determines pH tolerance of Tritrichomonas foetus isolates from the feline gastrointestinal and bovine urogenital tracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin-Adeline, Victoria; Fraser, Stuart T; Stack, Colin; Šlapeta, Jan

    2015-10-01

    The ability for protozoan parasites to tolerate pH fluctuations within their niche is critical for the establishment of infection and require the parasite to be capable of adapting to a distinct pH range. We used two host adapted Tritrichomonas foetus isolates, capable of infecting either the digestive tract (pH 5.3-6.6) of feline hosts or the reproductive tract (pH 7.4-7.8) of bovine hosts to address their adaptability to changing pH. Using flow cytometry, we investigated the pH tolerance of the bovine and feline T. foetus isolates over a range of physiologically relevant pH in vitro. Following exposure to mild acid stress (pH 6), the bovine T. foetus isolates showed a significant decrease in cell viability and increased cytoplasmic granularity (p-value  0.7). In contrast, the feline genotype displayed an enhanced capacity to maintain cell morphology and viability (p-value > 0.05). Microscopic assessment revealed that following exposure to a weak acidic stress (pH 6), the bovine T. foetus transformed into rounded parasites with extended cell volumes and displays a decrease in viability. The higher tolerance for acidic extracellular environment of the feline isolate compared to the bovine isolate suggests that pH could be a critical factor in regulating T. foetus infections and host-specificity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. International Relations

    OpenAIRE

    McGlinchey, S.

    2017-01-01

    A ‘Day 0’ introduction to International Relations for beginners. Written by a range of emerging and established experts, the chapters offer a broad sweep of the basic components of International Relations and the key contemporary issues that concern the discipline. The narrative arc forms a complete circle, taking readers from no knowledge to competency. The journey starts by examining how the international system was formed and ends by reflecting that International Relations is always adapti...

  17. The panacea toolbox of a PhD biomedical student.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skaik, Younis

    2014-01-01

    Doing a PhD (doctor of philosophy) for the sake of contribution to knowledge should give the student an immense enthusiasm through the PhD period. It is the time in one's life that one spends to "hit the nail on the head" in a specific area and topic of interest. A PhD consists mostly of hard work and tenacity; however, luck and genius might also play a little role. You can pass all PhD phases without having both luck and genius. The PhD student should have pre-PhD and PhD toolboxes, which are "sine quibus non" for getting successfully a PhD degree. In this manuscript, the toolboxes of the PhD student are discussed.

  18. Amperometric micro pH measurements in oxygenated saliva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaisiwamongkhol, Korbua; Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Compton, Richard G

    2017-07-24

    An amperometric micro pH sensor has been developed based on the chemical oxidation of carbon fibre surfaces (diameter of 9 μm and length of ca. 1 mm) to enhance the population of surface quinone groups for the measurement of salivary pH. The pH analysis utilises the electrochemically reversible two-electron, two-proton behaviour of surface quinone groups on the micro-wire electrodes. A Nernstian response is observed across the pH range 2-8 which is the pH range of many biological fluids. We highlight the measurement of pH in small volumes of biological fluids without the need for oxygen removal and specifically the micro pH electrode is examined by measuring the pH of commercial synthetic saliva and authentic human saliva samples. The results correspond well with those obtained by using commercial glass pH electrodes on large volume samples.

  19. Compartment-specific pH monitoring in Bacillus subtilis using fluorescent sensor proteins: a tool to analyze the antibacterial effect of weak organic acids.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beilen, J.W.A.; Brul, S.

    2013-01-01

    The internal pH (pHi) of a living cell is one of its most important physiological parameters. To monitor the pH inside Bacillus subtilis during various stages of its life cycle, we constructed an improved version (IpHluorin) of the ratiometric, pH-sensitive fluorescent protein pHluorin by extending

  20. Direction of glucose fermentation towards hydrogen or ethanol production through on-line pH control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karadag, Dogan; Puhakka, Jaakko A. [Department of Chemistry and Bioengineering, Tampere University of Technology, Tampere (Finland)

    2010-10-15

    The present study investigated the production of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and ethanol from glucose in an Anaerobic Continuous Stirred Tank Reactor (ACSTR). Effects of hydraulic retention time (HRT) and pH on the preference of producing H{sub 2} and/or ethanol and other soluble metabolic products in an open anaerobic enriched culture were studied. Production rates of H{sub 2} and ethanol increased with the increase of biomass concentration. Open anaerobic fermentation was directed and managed through on-line pH control for the production of H{sub 2} or ethanol. Hydrogen was produced by ethanol and acetate-butyrate type fermentations. pH has strong effect on the H{sub 2} or ethanol production by changing fermentation pathways. ACSTR produced mainly ethanol at over pH 5.5 whereas highest H{sub 2} production was obtained at pH 5.0. pH 4.9 favored the lactate production and accumulation of lactate inhibited the biomass concentration in the reactor and the production of H{sub 2} and ethanol. The microbial community structure quickly responded to pH changes and the Clostridia dominated in ACSTR during the study. H{sub 2} production was maintained mainly by Clostridium butyricum whereas in the presence of Bacillus coagulans glucose oxidation was directed to lactate production. (author)

  1. Importance of pH Homeostasis in Metabolic Health and Diseases: Crucial Role of Membrane Proton Transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wataru Aoi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Protons dissociated from organic acids in cells are partly buffered. If not, they are transported to the extracellular fluid through the plasma membrane and buffered in circulation or excreted in urine and expiration gas. Several transporters including monocarboxylate transporters and Na+/H+ exchanger play an important role in uptake and output of protons across plasma membranes in cells of metabolic tissues including skeletal muscle and the liver. They also contribute to maintenance of the physiological pH of body fluid. Therefore, impairment of these transporters causes dysfunction of cells, diseases, and a decrease in physical performance associated with abnormal pH. Additionally, it is known that fluid pH in the interstitial space of metabolic tissues is easily changed due to little pH buffering capacitance in interstitial fluids and a reduction in the interstitial fluid pH may mediate the onset of insulin resistance unlike blood containing pH buffers such as Hb (hemoglobin and albumin. In contrast, habitual exercise and dietary intervention regulate expression/activity of transporters and maintain body fluid pH, which could partly explain the positive effect of healthy lifestyle on disease prognosis.

  2. Compliance evaluation of removable space maintainer or space regainer usage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revanti Ramadhani

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Premature loss could cause a problem with the tooth arrangement or the dental arch size. A space left by the primary tooth loss could cause migration of the adjacent teeth. As a result, space will be narrowed and undermined the eruption of the permanent teeth. The success of the space maintainer or space regainer usage due to the premature loss marked by space for the replacement of the permanent teeth. The purpose of this research was to evaluate the compliance of children in wearing a space maintainer or space regainer after insertion at Pedodontics Installation of Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran Dental Hospital, Bandung, Indonesia. The research method was descriptive survey technique. The sample consisted of 30 patients selected using the total sampling technique. Data were obtained with a questionnaire and statistically analyzed. The results showed that majority of the children uses the removable space maintainer or the space regainer daily was only about 23,3% overall. Most of the children only use the removable space maintainer or the space regainer for sometimes. The research concluded that the low rate of pedodontic patients compliance at Pedodontics Installation of Faculty of Dentistry Universitas Padjadjaran Dental Hospital in the usage of the removable space maintainer or the space regainer was usually caused by pain or discomfort. This fact was evidence of a low awareness of parents in preventing malocclusion to their children.

  3. STRATEGIES OF MAINTAINING PROFICIENCY BY TEACHERS OF ENGLISH IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junaidi Mistar, Alfan Zuhairini

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study are four-fold: (1 to identify the types of strategies to maintain proficiency used by teachers of English in Indonesia, (2 to know the intensity of use of the obtained strategy types, (3 to measure the inter-correlation in the use of the obtained strategy types, and (4 to investigate the effect of proficiency level on the use of maintaining strategies. The subjects were 93 teachers applying for S2 degree in 2010/2011 at the postgraduate program of the Islamic University of Malang. They were given two sets of instrument, a Likert-scale questionnaire of English proficiency maintaining strategies and a TOEFL test. Then, a factor analysis identified nine strategy categories, including language focusing, metacognitive and affective developing, reading and writing activating, language resource utilizing, cognitive processing, culture learning, social communicating, text analyzing, and radio listening strategies. These strategy types explained 63.84% of variances of maintaining strategies and they were used at high level of intensity. Moreover, the use of the nine strategy types were found to be inter-correlated with one another. Finally, no significant effect of proficiency level on strategy use was found, indicating that teachers with different level of proficiency reported using the same strategies of maintaining their proficiency.

  4. Forum for Almen Medicinske ph.d.-studerende

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vedsted, Peter; Waldorff, Frans Boch; Eriksson, Tina

    Rapport fra første fællesmøde mellem nuværende og kommende almenmedicinske ph.d.-studerende. Rapporten anbefaler dannelse af et egentligt almenmedicinsk ph.d.-forum, der søges optaget i DSAM som en interessegruppe. Ph.d.-forum betragter sig som en ressource ved forskellige initiativer og ønsker...... blandt andet at arbejde for en værdig ansættelse af yngre forskere. Blandt de konkrete forslag, Ph.d.-forum har stillet, er almenmedicinske ph.d.-kurser og ph.d.-stipendium med henblik på udarbejdelse af protokol....

  5. Glycerin levels while maintaining the electrolyte balance in finishing pig diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaeli Gonçalves Leite

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The objective of this study was to evaluate performance and carcass and meat characteristics of finishing pigs fed diets with different levels of glycerin, while maintaining the electrolyte balance. Forty barrows with an initial weight of 97.76±13.44 kg were distributed, in a randomized block design, into four treatments with five replicates. Treatments consisted of diets containing 0, 5, 10, and 15% glycerin. Inclusions of salt and sodium bicarbonate were adjusted to balance the sodium content and maintain the same electrolyte balance of the diets as a function of glycerin inclusions. In vivo backfat thickness, daily feed intake, daily weight gain, and feed conversion were measured. After the animals were slaughtered, pH and temperature were measured 45 min and 24 h postmortem, and backfat thickness, loin-eye area, drip loss, and colorimetry were determined. Glycerin inclusion levels did not influence the performance of barrows. Hot carcass weight, dressing percentage, and lightness had higher values when pigs were fed diets containing 2.32, 2.43, and 2.61% glycerin, respectively. The other carcass and meat characteristics were not influenced. Glycerin can be used in finishing pig diets without compromising results of performance or carcass and meat characteristics up to the inclusion level of 15%.

  6. International law

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, Malcolm N

    2017-01-01

    International Law is the definitive and authoritative text on the subject, offering Shaw's unbeatable combination of clarity of expression and academic rigour and ensuring both understanding and critical analysis in an engaging and authoritative style. Encompassing the leading principles, practice and cases, and retaining and developing the detailed references which encourage and assist the reader in further study, this new edition motivates and challenges students and professionals while remaining accessible and engaging. Fully updated to reflect recent case law and treaty developments, this edition contains an expanded treatment of the relationship between international and domestic law, the principles of international humanitarian law, and international criminal law alongside additional material on international economic law.

  7. Interaction of low pH cementitious concretes with groundwaters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Calvo, Jose Luis; Alonso, Maria Cruz; Hidalgo, Ana; Fernandez Luco, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Some engineering construction concepts for high level radioactive waste underground repositories consider the use of a bentonite barrier in contact with cementitious materials with a pore fluid pH value inferior or equal to 11 (based on low-pH cements) to maintain the bentonite stability. The research on low-pH cementitious materials is mainly addressed from two different approaches, one with Calcium Silicate Cements (OPC, Ordinary Portland Cement based), the other with Calcium Aluminates Cements (CAC based). The use of these both types of cements (OPC based or CAC based) implies the use of high mineral additions contents in the binder that should significantly modify most of the concrete 'standard' properties. Taking into account the long life expected in this type of repositories, parameters related to the durability of the low-pH concretes must be analyzed. This work shows some recent studies that deal with the evaluation of the resistance of low-pH concretes to long term groundwater aggression. After a presentation of the accelerated leaching test (based on a percolation method), results are given for the characterization of the leaching solution evolution and the evaluation of the modifications generated in the solid phases. Results show that the low-pH concretes evaluated have good resistance against groundwater interaction, although an altered front can be observed from the surface in all the tested samples

  8. ATLAS PhD Grants 2015

    CERN Multimedia

    Marcelloni De Oliveira, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS PHd Grants - We are excited to announce the creation of a dedicated grant scheme (thanks to a donation from Fabiola Gianotti and Peter Jenni following their award from the Fundamental Physics Prize foundation) to encourage young and high-caliber doctoral students in particle physics research (including computing for physics) and permit them to obtain world class exposure, supervision and training within the ATLAS collaboration. This special PhD Grant is aimed at graduate students preparing a doctoral thesis in particle physics (incl. computing for physics) to spend one year at CERN followed by one year support also at the home Institute.

  9. Internal Audit Role in Cybersecurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carataș Maria Alina

    2017-01-01

    Internal audit function has a key role in assessing cyber disruptions as part of strategic risks and identifying the operational control gaps on the business level, working with management at developing and maintaining an adaptive capacity to different types of risks building and improving business continuity.

  10. Challenges of designing fusion reactors for remote maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mason, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major problems faced by the fusion community is the development of the high level of reliability required to assure that fusion will be a viable commercial power source. Much of the responsibility for solving this problem falls directly on the designer in developing concepts that have a high level of maintainability. The problems are both near-term, in developing maintainability for next generation engineering oriented reactors; and long range, in developing full maintainability for the more commercial concepts with their required high level of on-line time. The near-time challenge will include development of unqiue design concepts to perform inspection, maintenance, replacement, and testing under the stringent conditions imposed by the next generation engineering oriented machines. The long range challenge will focus on basic design concepts that will enable the full mainatability required by commerical fusion

  11. Advanced remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuban, D.P.; Martin, H.L.

    1984-01-01

    A remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator concept is being developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world. 10 references, 4 figures, 1 table

  12. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosan, Christian; Godmann, Maren

    2016-01-01

    All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function. PMID:26798358

  13. pH, redox potential and local biofilm potential microenvironments within Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms and their roles in electron transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Harrington, Timothy D; Renslow, Ryan; Beyenal, Haluk

    2012-10-01

    The limitation of pH inside electrode-respiring biofilms is a well-known concept. However, little is known about how pH and redox potential are affected by increasing current inside biofilms respiring on electrodes. Quantifying the variations in pH and redox potential with increasing current is needed to determine how electron transfer is tied to proton transfer within the biofilm. In this research, we quantified pH and redox potential variations in electrode-respiring Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms as a function of respiration rates, measured as current. We also characterized pH and redox potential at the counter electrode. We concluded that (1) pH continued to decrease in the biofilm through different growth phases, showing that the pH is not always a limiting factor in a biofilm and (2) decreasing pH and increasing redox potential at the biofilm electrode were associated only with the biofilm, demonstrating that G. sulfurreducens biofilms respire in a unique internal environment. Redox potential inside the biofilm was also compared to the local biofilm potential measured by a graphite microelectrode, where the tip of the microelectrode was allowed to acclimatize inside the biofilm. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Assessment of the suitability of Durafet-based sensors for pH measurement in dynamic estuarine environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonski, Stephen F.; Cai, Wei-Jun; Ullman, William J.; Joesoef, Andrew; Main, Christopher R.; Pettay, D. Tye; Martz, Todd R.

    2018-01-01

    The suitability of the Honeywell Durafet to the measurement of pH in productive, high-fouling, and highly-turbid estuarine environments was investigated at the confluence of the Murderkill Estuary and Delaware Bay (Delaware, USA). Three different flow configurations of the SeapHOx sensor equipped with a Honeywell Durafet and its integrated internal (Ag/AgCl reference electrode containing a 4.5 M KCl gel liquid junction) and external (solid-state chloride ion selective electrode, Cl-ISE) reference electrodes were deployed for four periods between April 2015 and September 2016. In this environment, the Honeywell Durafet proved capable of making high-resolution and high-frequency pH measurements on the total scale between pH 6.8 and 8.4. Natural pH fluctuations of >1 pH unit were routinely captured over a range of timescales. The sensor pH collected between May and August 2016 using the most refined SeapHOx configuration exhibited good agreement with multiple sets of independently measured reference pH values. When deployed in conjunction with rigorous discrete sampling and calibration schemes, the sensor pH had a root-mean squared error ranging between 0.011 and 0.036 pH units across a wide range of salinity relative to both pHT calculated from measured dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity and pHNBS measured with a glass electrode corrected to pHT at in situ conditions. The present work demonstrates the viability of the Honeywell Durafet to the measurement of pH to within the weather-level precision defined by the Global Ocean Acidification Observing Network (GOA-ON, ≤ 0.02 pH units) as a part of future estuarine CO2 chemistry studies undertaken in dynamic environments.

  15. Impact of seawater acidification on pH at the tissue–skeleton interface and calcification in reef corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venn, Alexander A.; Tambutté, Eric; Holcomb, Michael; Laurent, Julien; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2013-01-01

    Insight into the response of reef corals and other major marine calcifiers to ocean acidification is limited by a lack of knowledge about how seawater pH and carbonate chemistry impact the physiological processes that drive biomineralization. Ocean acidification is proposed to reduce calcification rates in corals by causing declines in internal pH at the calcifying tissue–skeleton interface where biomineralization takes place. Here, we performed an in vivo study on how partial-pressure CO2-driven seawater acidification impacts intracellular pH in coral calcifying cells and extracellular pH in the fluid at the tissue–skeleton interface [subcalicoblastic medium (SCM)] in the coral Stylophora pistillata. We also measured calcification in corals grown under the same conditions of seawater acidification by measuring lateral growth of colonies and growth of aragonite crystals under the calcifying tissue. Our findings confirm that seawater acidification decreases pH of the SCM, but this decrease is gradual relative to the surrounding seawater, leading to an increasing pH gradient between the SCM and seawater. Reductions in calcification rate, both at the level of crystals and whole colonies, were only observed in our lowest pH treatment when pH was significantly depressed in the calcifying cells in addition to the SCM. Overall, our findings suggest that reef corals may mitigate the effects of seawater acidification by regulating pH in the SCM, but they also highlight the role of calcifying cell pH homeostasis in determining the response of reef corals to changes in external seawater pH and carbonate chemistry. PMID:23277567

  16. Impact of seawater acidification on pH at the tissue-skeleton interface and calcification in reef corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venn, Alexander A; Tambutté, Eric; Holcomb, Michael; Laurent, Julien; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2013-01-29

    Insight into the response of reef corals and other major marine calcifiers to ocean acidification is limited by a lack of knowledge about how seawater pH and carbonate chemistry impact the physiological processes that drive biomineralization. Ocean acidification is proposed to reduce calcification rates in corals by causing declines in internal pH at the calcifying tissue-skeleton interface where biomineralization takes place. Here, we performed an in vivo study on how partial-pressure CO(2)-driven seawater acidification impacts intracellular pH in coral calcifying cells and extracellular pH in the fluid at the tissue-skeleton interface [subcalicoblastic medium (SCM)] in the coral Stylophora pistillata. We also measured calcification in corals grown under the same conditions of seawater acidification by measuring lateral growth of colonies and growth of aragonite crystals under the calcifying tissue. Our findings confirm that seawater acidification decreases pH of the SCM, but this decrease is gradual relative to the surrounding seawater, leading to an increasing pH gradient between the SCM and seawater. Reductions in calcification rate, both at the level of crystals and whole colonies, were only observed in our lowest pH treatment when pH was significantly depressed in the calcifying cells in addition to the SCM. Overall, our findings suggest that reef corals may mitigate the effects of seawater acidification by regulating pH in the SCM, but they also highlight the role of calcifying cell pH homeostasis in determining the response of reef corals to changes in external seawater pH and carbonate chemistry.

  17. The pH heterogeneity in human calf muscle during neuromuscular electrical stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzig, Norman; Rzanny, Reinhard; Moll, Kevin; Gussew, Alexander; Reichenbach, Jürgen R; Siebert, Tobias

    2017-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine pH heterogeneity during fatigue induced by neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) using phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P-MRS). It is hypothesized that three pH components would occur in the 31 P-MRS during fatigue, representing three fiber types. The medial gastrocnemius of eight subjects was stimulated within a 3-Tesla whole body MRI scanner. The maximal force during stimulation (F stim ) was examined by a pressure sensor. Phosphocreatine (PCr), adenosintriphosphate, inorganic phosphate (Pi), and the corresponding pH were estimated by a nonvolume-selective 31 P-MRS using a small loop coil at rest and during fatigue. During fatigue, F stim and PCr decreased to 27% and 33% of their initial levels, respectively. In all cases, the Pi peak increased when NMES was started and split into three different peaks. Based on the single Pi peaks during fatigue, an alkaline (6.76 ± 0.08), a medium (6.40 ± 0.06), and an acidic (6.09 ± 0.05) pH component were observed compared to the pH (7.02 ± 0.02) at rest. It is suggested that NMES is able to induce pH heterogeneity in the medial gastrocnemius, and that the single Pi peaks represent the different muscle fiber types of the skeletal muscle. Magn Reson Med 77:2097-2106, 2017. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. © 2016 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  18. Maintainability design criteria for packaging of spacecraft replaceable electronic equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kappler, J. R.; Folsom, A. B.

    1972-01-01

    Maintainability must be designed into long-duration spacecraft and equipment to provide the required high probability of mission success with the least cost and weight. The ability to perform repairs quickly and easily in a space environment can be achieved by imposing specific maintainability design criteria on spacecraft equipment design and installation. A study was funded to investigate and define design criteria for electronic equipment that would permit rapid removal and replacement in a space environment. The results of the study are discussed together with subsequent simulated zero-g demonstration tests of a mockup with new concepts for packaging.

  19. On the theory of non-self-maintained low voltage arc discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shcherbinin, P.P.; Cherednichenko, Yu.G.

    1980-01-01

    In the approximation of constant temperature of plasma electrons for two emitter temperatures 1440 and 1830 K calculated are the volt-ampere characteristics and components of the voltage internal drop in a thermionic converter in the cases of self-maintained discharge in cesium and with an external source of atom ionization and electron heating. It is obtained, that using an external ionization source the decrease of voltage drop in the interelectrode gap with account of ionization energy constitutes about 0.1 V. Electron heating is not effective. For further reduction of voltage losses it is necessary to search for ways for decreasing electron Coulomb scattering on ions

  20. Development of oxygen and pH sensors for aqueous systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stvartak, C.; Alcock, C.B.; Li, B.; Wang, L.; Fergus, J.W.; Bakshi, N.

    1994-04-01

    Corrosion science has long recognized that two of the most important parameters in characterizing the corrosivity of an aqueous environment are oxygen chemical potential and pH. These parameters not only determine the thermodynamic driving forces for various corrosion reactions, but also characterize the rates of these reactions and hence the lifetime of a particular component. The primary goal of this project is to develop an electrochemical oxygen and pH sensor for continuous use in the cycle chemistry control of power plants. In the past year, electrochemical sensors with a metal/metal oxide or metal/metal hydride internal reference electrode and a fluoride-based electrolyte tube have been developed and tested in this laboratory. The corrosion tests showed that the LaF 3 -based solid electrolyte was very stable both chemically and physically in water. Furthermore, its electrical conductivity is 4 to 5 orders of magnitude higher than that of stabilized zirconia below 573 K (300 degree C), which is the main advantage of a fluoride-based electrolyte at low temperatures. With this electrolyte and the selected internal oxygen reference electrode (Ag/Ag 2 O), the electrochemical probe demonstrated Nernstian responses to the oxygen chemical potential and pH of the aqueous solution with good reproducibility. A similar cell with Zr/ZrH 1+x as the internal hydrogen reference electrode showed promising pH sensing characteristics. It is proposed that these two cells be combined to form a double-headed electrochemical probe to determine oxygen chemical potential and pH in the solution simultaneously

  1. Nanomechanical DNA Origami pH Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Kuzuya

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM. Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers, which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5'-AACCCCAACCCC-3', which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors.

  2. Nanomechanical DNA origami pH sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzuya, Akinori; Watanabe, Ryosuke; Yamanaka, Yusei; Tamaki, Takuya; Kaino, Masafumi; Ohya, Yuichi

    2014-10-16

    Single-molecule pH sensors have been developed by utilizing molecular imaging of pH-responsive shape transition of nanomechanical DNA origami devices with atomic force microscopy (AFM). Short DNA fragments that can form i-motifs were introduced to nanomechanical DNA origami devices with pliers-like shape (DNA Origami Pliers), which consist of two levers of 170-nm long and 20-nm wide connected at a Holliday-junction fulcrum. DNA Origami Pliers can be observed as in three distinct forms; cross, antiparallel and parallel forms, and cross form is the dominant species when no additional interaction is introduced to DNA Origami Pliers. Introduction of nine pairs of 12-mer sequence (5'-AACCCCAACCCC-3'), which dimerize into i-motif quadruplexes upon protonation of cytosine, drives transition of DNA Origami Pliers from open cross form into closed parallel form under acidic conditions. Such pH-dependent transition was clearly imaged on mica in molecular resolution by AFM, showing potential application of the system to single-molecular pH sensors.

  3. Active Control of pH in the Bioculture System Through Carbon Dioxide Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monhollon, Luke; Pletcher, David; Hauss, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    For successful cell research, the growth culture environment must be tightly controlled. Deviance from the optimal conditions will mask the desired variable being analyzed or lead to inconstancies in the results. In standard laboratories, technology and procedures are readily available for the reliable control of variables such as temperature, pH, nutrient loading, and dissolved gases. Due to the nature of spaceflight, and the inherent constraints to engineering designs, these same elements become a challenge to maintain at stable values by both automated and manual approaches. Launch mass, volume, and power usage create significant constraints to cell culture systems; nonetheless, innovative solutions for active environmental controls are available. The acidity of the growth media cannot be measured through standard probes due to the degradation of electrodes and reliance on indicators for chromatography. Alternatively, carbon dioxide sensors are capable of monitoring the pH by leveraging the relationship between the partial pressure of carbon dioxide and carbonic acid in solution across a membrane. In microgravity cell growth systems, the gas delivery system can be used to actively maintain the media at the proper acidity by maintaining a suitable gas mixture around permeable tubing. Through this method, launch mass and volume are significantly reduced through the efficient use of the limited gas supply in orbit.

  4. 10 CFR 1.29 - Office of International Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... maintains working relationships with individual countries and international nuclear organizations, as well... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Office of International Programs. 1.29 Section 1.29 Energy... Staff § 1.29 Office of International Programs. The Office of International Programs— (a) Advises the...

  5. Bactericidal efficacy of elevated pH on fish pathogenic and environmental bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starliper, Clifford E.; Watten, Barnaby J.

    2013-01-01

    Ship ballast water is a recognized medium for transfer and introductions of nonindigenous species. There is a need for new ballast water treatment methods that effectively and safely eliminate or greatly minimize movements of these species. The present study employed laboratory methods to evaluate the bactericidal efficacy of increased pH (pH 10.0–12.0) for exposure durations of up to 72 h to kill a variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including fish pathogens (Aeromonas spp., Yersinia ruckeri, Edwardsiella ictaluri, Serratia liquefaciens, Carnobacterium sp.), other common aquatic-inhabitant bacteria (Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp.) and indicators listed in International Maritime Organization D2 Standards; namely, Vibrio cholera (an environmental isolate from fish), Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Volumes of 5 N NaOH were added to tryptic soy broth to obtain desired pH adjustments. Viable cells were determined after 0, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Initial (0 h) cell numbers ranged from 3.40 × 104 cfu/mL for Bacillus sp. to 2.44 × 107 cfu/mL for E. faecalis. The effective endpoints of pH and treatment duration necessary to realize 100% bactericidal effect varied; however, all bacteria tested were killed within 72 h at pH 12.0 or lower. The lowest parameters examined, 4 h at pH 10.0, were bactericidal to V. cholera, E. ictaluri, three of four isolates of E. coli, and (three of four) Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. Bactericidal effect was attained at pH 10.0 within 12 h for the other A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and within 24 h for P. fluorescens, and the remaining E. coli.

  6. Bactericidal efficacy of elevated pH on fish pathogenic and environmental bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford E. Starliper

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Ship ballast water is a recognized medium for transfer and introductions of nonindigenous species. There is a need for new ballast water treatment methods that effectively and safely eliminate or greatly minimize movements of these species. The present study employed laboratory methods to evaluate the bactericidal efficacy of increased pH (pH 10.0–12.0 for exposure durations of up to 72 h to kill a variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria including fish pathogens (Aeromonas spp., Yersinia ruckeri, Edwardsiella ictaluri, Serratia liquefaciens, Carnobacterium sp., other common aquatic-inhabitant bacteria (Serratia marcescens, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Staphylococcus sp., Bacillus sp. and indicators listed in International Maritime Organization D2 Standards; namely, Vibrio cholera (an environmental isolate from fish, Escherichia coli and Enterococcus faecalis. Volumes of 5 N NaOH were added to tryptic soy broth to obtain desired pH adjustments. Viable cells were determined after 0, 4, 12, 24, 48, and 72 h. Initial (0 h cell numbers ranged from 3.40 × 104 cfu/mL for Bacillus sp. to 2.44 × 107 cfu/mL for E. faecalis. The effective endpoints of pH and treatment duration necessary to realize 100% bactericidal effect varied; however, all bacteria tested were killed within 72 h at pH 12.0 or lower. The lowest parameters examined, 4 h at pH 10.0, were bactericidal to V. cholera, E. ictaluri, three of four isolates of E. coli, and (three of four Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida. Bactericidal effect was attained at pH 10.0 within 12 h for the other A. salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and within 24 h for P. fluorescens, and the remaining E. coli.

  7. Launching a Geoscience Career: Insights Gained from MS PHD'S Beyond the PhD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzman, W. I.; Johnson, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Jansma, P. E.; Huggans, M. J.; Ricciardi, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program is the newest addition to the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success (MS PHD'S®) Professional Development Program in Earth System Science. This exciting new program is designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. Building upon MS PHD'S extensive professional development activities provided to URM undergraduate and graduate students, B-PhD's vision is to encourage and support URM doctoral students and early career PhD's in becoming part of the global workforce. (Since its inception in 2003, MSPHD'S supports 213 participants of which 42 have achieved the doctoral degree and another 71 are enrolled in doctoral programs.) By providing customized support and advocacy for participants, B-PhD facilitates smoother and informed transitions from graduate school to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in academia, government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In 2011, the first conference for 18 doctoral candidate and recent graduates was hosted at the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science. Using a format of guest speakers, brown bag discussions, and interactive breakout sessions, participants engaged in sessions entitled "Toolkits for Success in Academia, Business and Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This presentation will discuss outcomes from this pilot project, the use of social media to track and support ongoing B-PhD activities, and objectives for future B-PhD workshops.

  8. Voltage and pH sensing by the voltage-gated proton channel, HV1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCoursey, Thomas E

    2018-04-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are unique ion channels, membrane proteins that allow protons but no other ions to cross cell membranes. They are found in diverse species, from unicellular marine life to humans. In all cells, their function requires that they open and conduct current only under certain conditions, typically when the electrochemical gradient for protons is outwards. Consequently, these proteins behave like rectifiers, conducting protons out of cells. Their activity has electrical consequences and also changes the pH on both sides of the membrane. Here we summarize what is known about the way these proteins sense the membrane potential and the pH inside and outside the cell. Currently, it is hypothesized that membrane potential is sensed by permanently charged arginines (with very high p K a ) within the protein, which results in parts of the protein moving to produce a conduction pathway. The mechanism of pH sensing appears to involve titratable side chains of particular amino acids. For this purpose their p K a needs to be within the operational pH range. We propose a 'counter-charge' model for pH sensing in which electrostatic interactions within the protein are selectively disrupted by protonation of internally or externally accessible groups. © 2018 The Author.

  9. Voltage and pH sensing by the voltage-gated proton channel, HV1

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Voltage-gated proton channels are unique ion channels, membrane proteins that allow protons but no other ions to cross cell membranes. They are found in diverse species, from unicellular marine life to humans. In all cells, their function requires that they open and conduct current only under certain conditions, typically when the electrochemical gradient for protons is outwards. Consequently, these proteins behave like rectifiers, conducting protons out of cells. Their activity has electrical consequences and also changes the pH on both sides of the membrane. Here we summarize what is known about the way these proteins sense the membrane potential and the pH inside and outside the cell. Currently, it is hypothesized that membrane potential is sensed by permanently charged arginines (with very high pKa) within the protein, which results in parts of the protein moving to produce a conduction pathway. The mechanism of pH sensing appears to involve titratable side chains of particular amino acids. For this purpose their pKa needs to be within the operational pH range. We propose a ‘counter-charge’ model for pH sensing in which electrostatic interactions within the protein are selectively disrupted by protonation of internally or externally accessible groups. PMID:29643227

  10. Optical ph sensing material prepared from doped sol-gel film for use in acid-base titration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Musa Ahmad

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available An optical pH sensing material has been prepared in this study by using sol-gel technique. Bromothymol blue, bromophenol blue and thymol blue were chosen in this study as acidbase indicators for strong acid-strong base, strong acid-weak base and weak acid-strong base titration, respectively. The results show that these indicators could be successfully entrapped inside the sol-gel film and still maintain its chemical behaviour as in solution. The entrapped acid-base indicators respond well to any pH changes and could be used to determine the end-point of the acid-base titration.

  11. Toward commercialization of FBR cycle (1). Promotion of R and D on technologies maintaining sustainable society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagaoki, Yoshihiro; Nagura, Fuminori; Sakaguchi, Tomoyoshi; Kawasaki, Hirotsugu; Kikuchi, Shin

    2008-01-01

    The FBR cycle is a key technology maintaining a sustainable society through efficient utilization of limited uranium resources and conformance to global environmental protection. The domestic and overseas R and D of the FBR cycle entered on a new phase aiming at its commercialization and JAEA started the Fast Reactor Cycle Technology Development (FaCT) project. The FaCT project targeted at international standardization of the FBR fuel cycle and promoting the advanced R and D on the innovative technologies to increase cost-efficiency and reliability for the commercialization under international competition and cooperation. The combination of a sodium cooled FBR and advanced fuel cycle system with advanced aqueous reprocessing and simplified pelletizing fuel fabrication was selected a major concept. (T. Tanaka)

  12. Smoke considerations for using fire in maintaining healthy forest ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger D. Ottmar; Mark D. Schaaf; Ernesto Alvarado

    1996-01-01

    Fire is the single most important ecological disturbance process throughout the interior Pacific Northwest (Mutch and others 1993; Agee 1994). It is also a natural process that helps maintain a diverse ecological landscape. Fire suppression and timber harvesting have drastically altered this process during the past 50 to 90 years. Natural resource specialists generally...

  13. JWIG: Yet Another Framework for Maintainable and Secure Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Schwarz, Mathias Romme

    2009-01-01

    Although numerous frameworks for web application programming have been developed in recent years, writing web applications remains a challenging task. Guided by a collection of classical design principles, we propose yet another framework. It is based on a simple but flexible server-oriented arch...... services.The resulting framework provides a novel foundation for developing maintainable and secure web applications....

  14. 44 CFR 321.3 - Maintaining the mobilization base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... base. 321.3 Section 321.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PREPAREDNESS MAINTENANCE OF THE MOBILIZATION BASE (DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, MARITIME ADMINISTRATION) § 321.3 Maintaining the mobilization base. (a) Facilities...

  15. Maintaining connections in children's grief narratives in popular film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedney, Mary Anne

    2002-04-01

    Children's grief narratives in popular films were examined for their portrayal of connection-maintaining strategies with the deceased. Comparisons were made between strategies found in actual parentally bereaved children and in child characters in films. Implications of these filmed grief narratives for models of grieving and for practice are discussed.

  16. Maintaining a Cybersecurity Curriculum: Professional Certifications as Valuable Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Kenneth J.; Maurer, Christopher; Plachkinova, Miloslava

    2017-01-01

    Much has been published about developing a cybersecurity curriculum for institutes of higher learning (IHL). Now that a growing number of IHLs globally offer such programs, a need exists on how to guide, maintain, and improve the relevancy of existing curricula. Just as cybersecurity professionals must be hone their skills continually to keep with…

  17. Declarative versus imperative process modeling languages : the issue of maintainability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fahland, D.; Mendling, J.; Reijers, H.A.; Weber, B.; Weidlich, M.; Zugal, S.; Rinderle-Ma, S.; Sadiq, S.; Leymann, F.

    2010-01-01

    The rise of interest in declarative languages for process modeling both justifies and demands empirical investigations into their presumed advantages over more traditional, imperative alternatives. Our concern in this paper is with the ease of maintaining business process models, for example due to

  18. Maintaining public confidence in UK nuclear safety regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, L.

    2001-01-01

    The key to maintaining stake holder confidence is competence and having the resources necessary to not only carry out regulatory functions effectively, but also to keep the public informed and respond to their questions. This does not come cheap but it is a price well worth paying. (N.C.)

  19. Genetic and somatic effects in animals maintained on tritiated water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carsten, A.L.; Brooks, A.; Commerford, S.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1981-01-01

    The possible genetic (dominant lethal mutations (DLM) and cytogenetic changes in the regenerating liver) and somatic (hematopoietic stem cell changes, growth and nonspecific life time shortening) effects in mice maintained on tritiated water (HTO) over two generations was investigated. Results to date are summarized

  20. 4 CFR 200.11 - Maintaining records of disclosure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552). (b) An accounting of each disclosure shall be retained..., whichever is longer. (c) The Board shall make the accounting of disclosure of a record pertaining to an... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maintaining records of disclosure. 200.11 Section 200.11...

  1. Maintaining the power balance in an "empty network"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reza, M.; Dominguez, A.O.; Schavemaker, P.H.; Kling, W.L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the concept of an empty network and shows how the power balance can be maintained in such a system. In this study, an empty network is defined as a power system in which no rotating mass is present; all generators are grid-connected via power electronic interfaces. One generator

  2. Maintaining of the demineralized water quality in storage tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hochmueller, K.; Wandelt, E.

    1981-03-01

    Two processes for maintaining the quality of the mineralized water in storage tanks are considered. A slight overpressure of nitrogen can be created above the water, or the air flowing in the tank can be cleaned by passing it through a soda-containing lime filter [fr

  3. Sponsored Grant-maintained Schools: Extending the Franchise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walford, Geoffrey

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the introduction and implementation of the 1988 Education Reform Act for England and Wales. Traces the attempts of several existing private schools to become grant maintained (eligible for various forms of government support). Most private and faith-based schools have not been successful in this endeavor. Discusses the reasons for this.…

  4. Maintaining and restoring sustainable ecosystems in southern Nevada [Chapter 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne C. Chambers; Burton K. Pendleton; Donald W. Sada; Steven M. Ostoja; Matthew L. Brooks

    2013-01-01

    Managers in southern Nevada are challenged with determining appropriate goals and objectives and developing viable approaches for maintaining and restoring sustainable ecosystems in a time of rapid socio-ecological and environmental change. Sustainable or “healthy” ecosystems supply clean air, water and habitat for a diverse array of plants and animals. As described in...

  5. Impact of Agile Software Development Model on Software Maintainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawali, Ajay R.

    2012-01-01

    Software maintenance and support costs account for up to 60% of the overall software life cycle cost and often burdens tightly budgeted information technology (IT) organizations. Agile software development approach delivers business value early, but implications on software maintainability are still unknown. The purpose of this quantitative study…

  6. The evaluation of kikuyu foggage for maintaining dry ewes

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DeVilliersJ

    flow programme to maintain dry ewes during the winter in a system where their lambs were weaned onto .... IVDOM of the combined values of the January and February oesophageal and hand-cut foggage samples and ... The ability of the grazing animal to select material of higher quality than hand-cut samples of the.

  7. Oct-4 expression maintained stem cell properties in prostate cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Keywords: Prostate cancer, Cancer stem-like cells, Oct-4, CD133, Multi-drug resistance1 (MDR1). Received: 7 ... mechanisms in maintaining the self-renewal and drug resistant ... (platelet-derived growth factor α receptor). This suggests that ...

  8. Banded vs Bonded Space Maintainers: Finding Better Way Out.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Vikas; Kumar Pandit, Inder; Srivastava, Nikhil; Gugnani, Neeraj; Gupta, Monika

    2014-05-01

    Of this in vivo study was to evaluate various space maintainers in terms of survival rate, gingival health and presence of caries. A total of 60 extraction sites in the age group of 4 to 9 years were divided into four groups and different space maintainers were placed in them viz (conventional band and loop, prefabricated band with custom made loop, Ribbond, Super splint). Prefabricated bands with custom made loop showed maximum success rates (84.6%), while super splint (33.33%) was found to be least successful. In terms of gingival health, prefabricated band with custom made loop reported minimum cases with poor gingival health (27.2%), while maximum cases with poor gingival health (50%) were reported with Super splint. None of the space maintainers developed caries at the end of 9 months. How to cite this article: Setia v, Pandit IK, Srivastava N, Gugnani N, Gupta M. Banded vs Bonded Space Maintainers: Finding Better Way Out. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):97-104.

  9. A Platform for Developing and Maintaining Competences in PBL Supervision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnaur, Dorina; Huttel, Hans

    2017-01-01

    One of the emerging challenges in academia is that of developing and maintaining teaching qualifications in a setting where teaching staff is often temporary and with diverse backgrounds. At Aalborg University, project-organized problem-based learning is at the heart of all degree programmes...

  10. Maintaining Continuity of Knowledge of Spent Fuel Pools: Tool Survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benz, Jacob M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smartt, Heidi A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tanner, Jennifer E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); MacDougall, Matthew R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-08-30

    This report examines supplemental tools that can be used in addition to optical surveillance cameras to maintain CoK in low-to-no light conditions, and increase the efficiency and effectiveness of spent fuel CoK, including item counting and ID verification, in challenging conditions.

  11. Contribution of maintainability and maintenance to problems of safety evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adnot, Serge; Meriaux, Pierre.

    1977-10-01

    A method has been developed for defining the contribution of Maintainability and the Maintenance Studies to Safety evaluation problems. The efficiency of this method is shown and results obtained are given for two theoretical examples approximating reality. For repairable systems, the risk defined according to such given safety criterion, becomes a characteristic of the systems in operation [fr

  12. Maintaining excellence in teaching of human anatomy: University of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measures to address these challenges have resulted in wide disparities in curriculum design teaching methods, number and composition of instructors. Inspite of the challenges, the Department of Human Anatomy of the University of Nairobi (UON) maintained excellence of teaching for over 40yrs. This article describes the ...

  13. Polymeric gel nanoparticle pH sensors for intracellular measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki

    pH range is approximately 4 pH units and thus a nanoparticle sensor with two pH sensitive fluorophores is appropriate. With one pH sensitive fluorophore the output from the sensor follows R=R0+R1/10(pKa-pH), where R is the ratio of fluorescence for the two fluorophores, R0 is the minimum value of R...

  14. Effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnanaprakash, G. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Mahadevan, S. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Kalyanasundaram, P. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India); Philip, John [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)]. E-mail: philip@igcar.gov.in; Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam 603 102 (India)

    2007-05-15

    We report the effect of initial pH and temperature of iron salt solutions on formation of magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) nanoparticles during co-precipitation. We synthesized nanoparticles by keeping the initial pH at 0.7, 1.5, 3.0, 4.7, 5.7, 6.7 for two different temperatures of 30 and 60 deg. C. When the initial pH (prior to alkali addition) of the salt solution was below 5, the nanoparticles formed were 100% spinel iron oxide. Average size of the magnetite particles increases with initial pH until ferrihydrite is formed at a pH of 3 and the size remains the same till 4.7 pH. The percentage of goethite formed along with non-stoichiometric magnetite was 35 and 78%, respectively, when the initial pH of the solution was 5.7 and 6.7. As the reaction temperature was increased to 60 deg. C, maintaining a pH of 6.7, the amount of goethite increased from 78 to 100%. These results show that the initial pH and temperature of the ferrous and ferric salt solution before initiation of the precipitation reaction are critical parameters controlling the composition and size of nanoparticles formed. We characterize the samples using X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and vibrating sample magnetometer. The results of the present work provide the right conditions to synthesis pure magnetite nanoparticles, without goethite impurities, through co-precipitation technique for ferrofluid applications.

  15. Influence of pH on the acute toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels (fatmucket, Lampsills siliquoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, N.; Erickson, R.J.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Ivey, C.D.; Brunson, E.L.; Augspurger, T.; Barnhart, M.C.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the influence of pH on the toxicity of ammonia to juvenile freshwater mussels. Acute 96-h ammonia toxicity tests were conducted with 10-d-old juvenile mussels (fatmucket, Lampsilis siliquoidea) at five pH levels ranging from 6.5 to 9.0 in flow-through diluter systems at 20??C. Acute 48-h tests with amphipods (Hyalella azteca) and 96-h tests with oligochaetes (Lumbriculus variegatus) were conducted concurrently under the same test conditions to determine the sensitivity of mussels relative to these two commonly tested benthic invertebrate species. During the exposure, pH levels were maintained within 0.1 of a pH unit and ammonia concentrations were relatively constant through time (coefficient of variation for ammonia concentrations ranged from 2 to 30% with a median value of 7.9%). The median effective concentrations (EC50s) of total ammonia nitrogen (N) for mussels were at least two to six times lower than the EC50s for amphipods and oligochaetes, and the EC50s for mussels decreased with increasing pH and ranged from 88 mg N/L at pH 6.6 to 0.96 mg N/L at pH 9.0. The EC50s for mussels were at or below the final acute values used to derive the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's acute water quality criterion (WQC). However, the quantitative relationship between pH and ammonia toxicity to juvenile mussels was similar to the average relationship for other taxa reported in the WQC. These results indicate that including mussel toxicity data in a revision to the WQC would lower the acute criterion but not change the WQC mathematical representation of the relative effect of pH on ammonia toxicity. ?? 2008 SETAC.

  16. internal branding

    OpenAIRE

    Rai, Anu; Omanga, Josphat

    2014-01-01

    The project report provides an insight into internal branding of two different leading firms – Coca-Cola and Google. The aim of this project report is to study how these two companies use internal branding to promote or build brand performance of the company. This report follows a qualitative research method. The report is deductive in nature and hence, it is guided by the literatures of internal branding. The project report conducted research on brand identity, brand commitment and brand loy...

  17. Internal branding

    OpenAIRE

    Rijal, Ramesh; Dhakal, Rajendra

    2015-01-01

    The project report provides an insight into internal branding of two different leading firms – Coca-Cola and Google. The aim of this project report is to study how these two companies use internal branding to promote or build brand performance of the company. This report follows a qualitative research method. The report is deductive in nature and hence, it is guided by the literatures of internal branding. The project report conducted research on brand identity, brand commitment and brand loy...

  18. Decrease in Daphnia egg viability at elevated pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, J.; Kalf, D.F.; Boersma, M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of high pH on the reproduction of two Daphnia galeata clones was experimentally investigated in the laboratory. We observed that the mortality of juveniles and adults did not increase with increasing pH in the range pH 9.0- 10.5, which agrees with what is generally reported in the

  19. Acid Rain, pH & Acidity: A Common Misinterpretation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, David B.; Thompson, Ronald E.

    1989-01-01

    Illustrates the basis for misleading statements about the relationship between pH and acid content in acid rain. Explains why pH cannot be used as a measure of acidity for rain or any other solution. Suggests that teachers present acidity and pH as two separate and distinct concepts. (RT)

  20. Mechanical properties of different types of space maintainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beldiman, M.-A.; Mârţu, I.; Leiţoiu, B.; Luchian, I.; Lupescu, O.; Bârcă, E. S.

    2015-11-01

    Currently, inside the oral cavity, the dental space maintainers are subjected to forces exerted on them when performing various functions; therefore, it is important to know how each of these mechanisms behave and respond to forces that are applied directly to them. The mechanical properties of the materials used in dentistry are defined by a set of characteristics representing the behaviour of their particular working conditions and it is qualitatively expressed by a number of parameters.The study aimed to determine the pressing force that can be taken by four 4 types of space maintainers frequently used in practice - fixed and removable, applied on four samples realized with human teeth extracted for orthodontic purposes. Static tests were carried out on a machine type short WDW-5 EC with a maximum force of 5 kN and a loading speed of 5 mm/min by a special testing machine, with an innovative appliance; data recording was automatically performed, using a computer with a special program that present the specific diagrams. Experimental determinations included the following aspects: to determine the maximum force that can be supported by each sample, and to observe the deformations. The values obtained indicate that the best option in terms of behavior under the conditions specified is the removable appliance, and the less functional version is the fixed space maintainer using brackets. According to tests conducted, the fracture strength was found to be more important for fixed space maintainers (band and loop, for example) so, in practice is using more frequent these types of space maintainers.

  1. Dicer maintains the identity and function of proprioceptive sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Toole, Sean M; Ferrer, Monica M; Mekonnen, Jennifer; Zhang, Haihan; Shima, Yasuyuki; Ladle, David R; Nelson, Sacha B

    2017-03-01

    Neuronal cell identity is established during development and must be maintained throughout an animal's life (Fishell G, Heintz N. Neuron 80: 602-612, 2013). Transcription factors critical for establishing neuronal identity can be required for maintaining it (Deneris ES, Hobert O. Nat Neurosci 17: 899-907, 2014). Posttranscriptional regulation also plays an important role in neuronal differentiation (Bian S, Sun T. Mol Neurobiol 44: 359-373, 2011), but its role in maintaining cell identity is less established. To better understand how posttranscriptional regulation might contribute to cell identity, we examined the proprioceptive neurons in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG), a highly specialized sensory neuron class, with well-established properties that distinguish them from other neurons in the ganglion. By conditionally ablating Dicer in mice, using parvalbumin (Pvalb)-driven Cre recombinase, we impaired posttranscriptional regulation in the proprioceptive sensory neuron population. Knockout (KO) animals display a progressive form of ataxia at the beginning of the fourth postnatal week that is accompanied by a cell death within the DRG. Before cell loss, expression profiling shows a reduction of proprioceptor specific genes and an increased expression of nonproprioceptive genes normally enriched in other ganglion neurons. Furthermore, although central connections of these neurons are intact, the peripheral connections to the muscle are functionally impaired. Posttranscriptional regulation is therefore necessary to retain the transcriptional identity and support functional specialization of the proprioceptive sensory neurons. NEW & NOTEWORTHY We have demonstrated that selectively impairing Dicer in parvalbumin-positive neurons, which include the proprioceptors, triggers behavioral changes, a lack of muscle connectivity, and a loss of transcriptional identity as observed through RNA sequencing. These results suggest that Dicer and, most likely by extension, micro

  2. pH control and rapid mixing in spinning NMR samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesinowski, James P.; Sunberg, Richard J.; Benedict, James J.

    An apparatus is described which permits the acquisition of NMR spectra from spinning 20-mm sample tubes while: (1) constantly monitoring the pH; (2) adding reagents to maintain constant pH (pH-statting); (3) efficiently mixing the added reagent. The apparatus was built to study the spontaneous precipitation of calcium phosphates from supersaturated solutions using 31P NMR. Other applications include the rapid determination of NMR titration curves, and the minimization of temperature gradients in large sample tubes. The apparatus was used to measure the 31P chemical shift titration of dilute phosphoric acid, which yielded accurate shifts for the three species of protonated orthophosphate ion. The bulk magnetic susceptibility of 85% H 3PO 4 relative to a dilute aqueous sample was also measured, and is shown to contribute significantly to chemical shift measurements.

  3. From toolkit to framework: The past and future evolution of PhEDEx

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Hernandez, A. [CINVESTAV, IPN; Egeland, R. [Argosy U., Eagan; Huang, C. H. [Fermilab; Ratnikova, N. [Moscow, ITEP; Magini, N. [CERN; Wildish, T. [Princeton U.

    2012-01-01

    PhEDEx is the data-movement solution for CMS at the LHC. Created in 2004, it is now one of the longest-lived components of the CMS dataflow/workflow world. As such, it has undergone significant evolution over time, and continues to evolve today, despite being a fully mature system. Originally a toolkit of agents and utilities dedicated to specific tasks, it is becoming a more open framework that can be used in several ways, both within and beyond its original problem domain. In this talk we describe how a combination of refactoring and adoption of new technologies that have become available over the years have made PhEDEx more flexible, maintainable, and scaleable.

  4. Development of high temperature and pressure zirconia-based pH sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danielson, M.J.; Koski, O.H.; Myers, J.

    1985-01-01

    Yttria-stabilized zirconia pH sensors are suitable for use from 100-300 0 C. A new Pt internal half cell is discussed which results in a considerable simplification in their calibration. A degradation process takes place after prolonged exposure to 300 0 C conditions and is manifested by a loss of full Nerstian response at temperature ≤ 200 0 C. A hypothesis for the degradation process is discussed

  5. Adsorption of diclofenac onto organoclays: Effects of surfactant and environmental (pH and temperature) conditions

    OpenAIRE

    De Oliveira , Tiago; Guégan , Régis; Thiebault , Thomas; Le Milbeau , Claude; Muller , Fabrice; Teixeira , Vinicius; Giovanela , Marcelo; Boussafir , Mohammed

    2017-01-01

    Accepted Manuscript; International audience; Among pharmaceutical products (PPs) recalcitrant to water treatments, diclofenac shows a high toxicity and remains at high concentration in natural aquatic environments. The aim of this study concerns the understanding of the adsorption mechanism of this anionic PP onto two organoclays prepared with two long-alkyl chains cationic surfactants showing different chemical nature for various experimental pH and temperature conditions. The experimental d...

  6. Synthesis of a new benzanthrone probe for pH determination based on PET and ICT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miladinova, Polya M.

    2016-01-01

    The synthesis and sensor activity of a novel benzanthrone fluoropore is reported. The system is configured on the “fluoropore–receptor_1–spacer–receptor_2” model able to act as a pH-probe via PET and ICT fluorescence sensing mechanism. The novel probe shows “off-on-off” switching properties under the transition from alkaline to acid media. Keywords: benzanthrone derivative, photoinduced electron transfer (PET), Internal Charge Transfer (ICT), selective pH sensor.

  7. Possibilités de prise en compte des phénomènes de transferts internes aux grains lors de la modélisation du séchage en lit fixe du maïs : revue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janas, S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Opportunity to take the grain internal transfers into account in the context of the modelization of the fixed bed drying of corn: a review. The fixed-bed drying is a preservation technique widely used in food industries. Its control and optimization require to know the distributions of temperature and water content in the bed depending on the operating conditions used. This information is obtained through modeling of the heat and mass transfers involved. Models of fixed bed drying have two components. The first one is the model at the product level. This model can predict how temperature and water content of the product change at each point of the bed according to local conditions of temperature and humidity. The second component is the model for the entire bed, which describes how heat and water are conveyed by the drying air through the bed. In this literature review, the main models of fixed bed drying are presented, with particular emphasis on the models used for corn drying. In this review, these two components are presented separately. The goal is to idendify the advantages and disadvantages of each approach, and opportunities for future research in this field.

  8. Scales and sources of pH and dissolved oxygen variability in a shallow, upwelling-driven ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, C. A.; Martz, T.; Levin, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In the coastal zone extreme variability in carbonate chemistry and oxygen is driven by fluctuations in temperature, salinity, air-sea gas exchange, mixing processes, and biology. This variability appears to be magnified in upwelling-driven ecosystems where low oxygen and low pH waters intrude into shallow depths. The oxygen and carbon chemistry signal can be further confounded by highly productive ecosystems such as kelp beds where photosynthesis and respiration consume and release significant amounts of dissolved inorganic carbon and oxygen. This variability poses a challenge for scientists assessing the impacts of climate change on nearshore ecosystems. We deployed physical & biogeochemical sensors in order to observe these processes in situ. The "SeapHOx" instruments used in this study consist of a modified Honeywell Durafet° ISFET pH sensor, an Aanderra Optode Oxygen sensor, and a SBE-37 conductivity, temperature, pressure sensor. The instruments were deployed on and around the La Jolla Kelp Forest at a variety of depths. Our goals were to (a) characterize the link between pH and oxygen and identify the magnitude of pH and oxygen variability over a range of intra-annual time scales and (b) investigate spatial patterns of pH and oxygen variability associated with depth, proximity to shore, and presence of kelp. Results thus far reveal a strong relationship between oxygen and pH. Temporal variability is greatest at the semidiurnal frequency where pH (at 7 m) can range up to 0.3 units and oxygen can change 50% over 6 h. Diurnal variability is a combination of the diurnal tidal component and diel cycles of production and respiration. Event-scale dynamics associated with upwelling can maintain pH and oxygen below 7.8 units and 200 μmol kg-1, respectively, for multiple days. Frequent current reversals drive changes in the observed oxygen and pH variability. When alongshore currents are flowing southward, driven by upwelling-favorable winds, the magnitude of

  9. Intracellular pH in sperm physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishigaki, Takuya; José, Omar; González-Cota, Ana Laura; Romero, Francisco; Treviño, Claudia L; Darszon, Alberto

    2014-08-01

    Intracellular pH (pHi) regulation is essential for cell function. Notably, several unique sperm ion transporters and enzymes whose elimination causes infertility are either pHi dependent or somehow related to pHi regulation. Amongst them are: CatSper, a Ca(2+) channel; Slo3, a K(+) channel; the sperm-specific Na(+)/H(+) exchanger and the soluble adenylyl cyclase. It is thus clear that pHi regulation is of the utmost importance for sperm physiology. This review briefly summarizes the key components involved in pHi regulation, their characteristics and participation in fundamental sperm functions such as motility, maturation and the acrosome reaction. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermodynamic properties of pressurized PH3 superconductor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koka, S.; Rao, G. Venugopal

    2018-05-01

    The paper presents the superconducting thermodynamic functions determined for pressurized phosphorus trihydride (PH3). In particular, free energy difference ΔF, thermodynamic critical field Hc, specific heat etc. have been calculated using analytical expressions. The calculations were performed in the frame work of the strong-coupling formalism. The obtained dimensionless parameters: RΔ ≡ 2Δ(0)/kBTc, RC ≡ ΔC(Tc)/CN(Tc) and RH≡TcCN(Tc)/Hc2(0) are 4.05, 1.96 and 0.156 respectively, which significantly differ from the values arising from the BCS theory of superconductivity. The thermodynamic properties strongly depend on the depairing electron correlations and retardation effects.

  11. Fabrication of internally instrumented reactor fuel rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutz, J.D.; Meservey, R.H.

    1975-01-01

    Procedures are outlined for fabricating internally instrumented reactor fuel rods while maintaining the original quality assurance level of the rods. Instrumented fuel rods described contain fuel centerline thermocouples, ultrasonic thermometers, and pressure tubes for internal rod gas pressure measurements. Descriptions of the thermocouples and ultrasonic thermometers are also contained

  12. Attaining and Maintaining a Continuity of Knowledge to Draw Safeguards Conclusions with Confidence.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, Robert [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Blair, Dianna S. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pickett, Chris [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-11-01

    As the 21st century progresses, new nuclear facilities and the expansion of nuclear activities into new countries will require the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to place a higher reliance on attaining and maintaining a Continuity of Knowledge (CoK) of its safeguards information than is currently practiced. Additionally, a conceptual view of where and how CoK can be applied will need to evolve to support improved efficiency and efficacy of drawing a safeguards conclusion for each Member State. The ability to draw a safeguards conclusion for a Member State will be predicated on the confidence that CoK has been attained and subsequently maintained with respect to the data and information streams used by the IAEA. This confidence can be described as a function of factors such as elapsed time since the measurement, surveillance of attributes, authentication of information, historic knowledge of potential system failures, and the number and type of data collections. A set of general scenarios are further described for determining what is required to attain CoK and whether CoK has been maintained. A high-level analysis of example scenarios is presented to identify failures or gaps that could cause a loss of CoK. Potential areas for technological research and development are discussed for the next generation of CoK tools.

  13. Genetically encoded pH sensor for tracking surface proteins through endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Anmol; Schmidt, Brigitte F; Salter, Russell D; Watkins, Simon C; Waggoner, Alan S; Bruchez, Marcel P

    2012-05-14

    Traffic cam: a tandem dye prepared from a FRET acceptor and a fluorogenic donor functions as a cell surface ratiometric pH indicator, which upon internalization serves to follow protein trafficking during endocytosis. This sensor was used to analyze agonist-dependent internalization of β(2)-adrenergic receptors. It was also used as a surrogate antigen to reveal direct surface-to-endosome antigen transfer between dendritic cells (not shown). Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Production of pigment-free pullulan by swollen cell in Aureobasidium pullulans NG which cell differentiation was affected by pH and nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-xue; Zhang, Ning; Peng, Qing; Yin, Tie; Guan, Fei-fei; Wang, Gui-li; Li, Ying

    2009-08-01

    A black yeast strain "NG" was isolated from strawberry fruit and identified as Aureobasidium pullulans. Strain NG displayed yeast-like cell (YL), swollen cell (SC), septate swollen cell (SSC), meristematic structure (MS), and chlamydospore (CH) morphologies. pH was the key factor regulating cell morphogenesis of strain NG. Differentiation of YL controlled by extracellular pH had no relationship with nutrition level. YL was maintained at pH >6.0, but was transformed into SC at pH approximately 4.5. SC, a stable cell type of A. pullulans, could bud, septate, or transform into MS or CH, in response to nutrition level and low pH. SC produced swollen cell blastospores (SCB) at pH 2.1 with abundant nutrition, and could transform into MS at lower pH (1.5). SC was induced to form CH by low level nutrition and pH melanin) were produced by SC of strain NG. Pullulan content of the polysaccharides was very high (98.37%). Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed that chemical structures of the polysaccharides and standard pullulan were identical. Swollen cells produced 2.08 mg/ml non-pigmented polysaccharides at 96 h in YPD medium. Controlling pH of fermentation is an effective and convenient method to harvest SC for melanin-free pullulan production.

  15. pH in atomic scale simulations of electrochemical interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossmeisl, Jan; Chan, Karen; Ahmed, Rizwan

    2013-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction rates can strongly depend on pH, and there is increasing interest in electrocatalysis in alkaline solution. To date, no method has been devised to address pH in atomic scale simulations. We present a simple method to determine the atomic structure of the metal......|solution interface at a given pH and electrode potential. Using Pt(111)|water as an example, we show the effect of pH on the interfacial structure, and discuss its impact on reaction energies and barriers. This method paves the way for ab initio studies of pH effects on the structure and electrocatalytic activity...

  16. Polymeric gel nanoparticle pH sensors for intracellular measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Almdal, Kristoffer; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Christensen, Nynne Meyn; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Sun, Honghao

    2011-01-01

    Precise measurements of pH in cells and intracellular compartments are of importance to both the fundamental understanding of metabolism and to the development of drugs that are released from the endosomes-lysome pathway. We have developed polymer gel nanoparticles as carriers of covalently bound fluorophores for ratiometric measurements of pH. One pH insensitive fluorophore serves as a reference while one or more pH sensitive fluorophores serve to give the desired pH dependence of the output...

  17. Evaluating high pH for control of dreissenid mussels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dave Evans

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two field experiments were carried out using a custom built flow-through laboratory to test the effect of elevated pH on dreissenid musselsas a potential control method. Both experiments tested the ability of dreissenid pediveligers to settle under conditions of elevated pH and thelong-term survival of adult dreissenids under the same conditions. The two experimental sites had different water quality and differentspecies of dreissenids present. The settlement of quagga mussel pediveligers at the lower Colorado River was inhibited with increasing pH.At the maximum achieved pH of 9.1, there was approximately 90% reduction compared to the maximum settlement observed in the controls.Since the settlement was almost as low in pH 8.9 as at pH 9.1, the inhibition in settlement may have been due to the presence of a precipitateformed under high pH conditions rather than the increase in background pH. No mortality of quagga mussel adults was observed in theexperimental pH levels at the lower Colorado River. At San Justo Reservoir, zebra mussel settlement decreased with increasing pH. Newsettlement was almost entirely absent at the highest pH tested (pH 9.6. The observed mortality of adult zebra mussels was low, but did tendto increase with increasing pH. We also tested the response of adult zebra mussels to short-term exposure to very high pH levels (i.e. pH 10,11, and 12. Adult mussels in poor physical condition experienced 90% mortality after 12 hours at pH 12. For unstressed adult zebra mussels,90% mortality was reached after 120 hours at pH 12. Significant mortalities were also observed both at pH 10 and pH 11. From this study,we conclude that pH elevation could be used both as a preventative treatment to eliminate settlement by dreissenid mussels and as an end ofseason treatment to eliminate adults. The high pH treatment would have to be tailored to the site water quality to prevent formation ofprecipitate during treatment and to minimize corrosive

  18. ph Sensitive hydrogel as colon specific drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alarifi, A.S.

    2011-01-01

    γ-radiation induced graft copolymerization and crosslinking was for the synthesis of ph-sensitive hydrogels composed of poly (vinyl pyrrolidone) acrylic acid. The prepared hydrogels were subjected to swelling test to evaluate the effects of ph and ionic strength of the surrounding solution. Drastic changes in the swelling parameters where observed by changing the surrounding solution ph values. The release of ibuprofen from hydrogels was monitored as a function of time at ph 1 and ph 7 in order to evaluate the prepared copolymer ability for colon- specific drug carrier uses.

  19. International cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2008-01-01

    In this chapter international cooperation of the Division for Radiation Safety, NPP Decommissioning and Radwaste Management of the VUJE, a. s. is presented. Very important is cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency. This cooperation has various forms - national and regional projects of technical cooperation, coordinated research activities, participation of our experts in preparation of the IAEA documentation etc.

  20. International indsats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sachs, Therese

    En analyse af Beredskabsstyrelsens internationale engagement og muligheder for international indsats fremover. Forslag til struktur logistisk og materielt samt til udvikling af personel-kompetencer......En analyse af Beredskabsstyrelsens internationale engagement og muligheder for international indsats fremover. Forslag til struktur logistisk og materielt samt til udvikling af personel-kompetencer...

  1. International Curriculums.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Larry L.

    This workshop presentation on international curriculums in the field of parks, recreation, leisure, cultural services, and travel/tourism comments that the literature is replete with articles addressing what the field is about, but not about curriculum issues, models, and structure. It reports an international survey of 12 college educators…

  2. International Illiquidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malkhozov, Aytek; Mueller, Philippe; Vedolin, Andrea

    -predicted effect of funding conditions on asset prices internationally. Global illiquidity lowers the slope and increases the intercept of the international security market line. Local illiquidity helps explain the variation in alphas, Sharpe ratios, and the performance of betting-against-beta (BAB) strategies...

  3. International relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    2008-01-01

    Concerning international relations, the different meetings in the field of nuclear safety are reported (Western european nuclear regulator association or Wenra, Nea, IAEA, northern dimension environmental partnership or N.D.E.P., nuclear safety and security group or N.S.S.G., international nuclear regulators association or I.N.R.A.). (N.C.)

  4. Considerations Regarding the International Taxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Mosteanu

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Taxation, an essential element of an efficient public finance system, is the best way for collecting income to achive the public expenditures programs and, in the same time, a way to redistribute the income, in order to get rid of poverty and to ensure social equity. Studies on the topic of international taxation, in its traditional meaning, were addressed to the problems regarding the international taxation effects on trade and investments, unequitable and discriminatory taxation, also the means of preventing such cases, international fiscal evasion, all these aspects being comprised into the area of fiscal competition. The present concept of international taxation, meant to cross states borders, in order to redistribute the income or to achive other objectives with international implications, such as fight against poverty, maintaining world peace or environment protection, is a quite recent one.

  5. Quiescent gastric stem cells maintain the adult Drosophila stomach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Marie; Micchelli, Craig A

    2011-10-25

    The adult Drosophila copper cell region or "stomach" is a highly acidic compartment of the midgut with pH stem cells (GSSCs) produces the acid-secreting copper cells, interstitial cells, and enteroendocrine cells of the stomach. Our assays demonstrate that GSSCs are largely quiescent but can be induced to regenerate the gastric epithelium in response to environmental challenge. Finally, genetic analysis reveals that adult GSSC maintenance depends on Wnt signaling. Characterization of the GSSC lineage in Drosophila, with striking similarities to mammals, will advance the study of both homeostatic and pathogenic processes in the stomach.

  6. The correlation between pH and flow rate of salivary smokers related to nicotine levels labelled on cigarettes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Saputri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Saliva is a biological fluid in oral cavity that plays a role in maintaining the environmental balance and oral commensal. Nicotine of cigarettes has been reported as a predisposing factor for changing of pH and salivary flow rate, thereby changing in biological salivary components. Purpose: This study aimed to analyze the correlation between salivary pH and salivary flow rate in smokers with nicotine levels labeled on cigarettes. Methods: Purposive sampling was conducted involving 40 male smokers. Before participating, they filled a questionnaire related to the history of their smoking habit. Using a spitting method for 5 minutes their saliva was collected. Results: Result of Pearson correlation test showed that there was a significant correlation between smoking intensity and salivary flow rate of those smokers (r = -0.486 and p0.512. There was no correlation between nicotine levels labeled on cigarettes and salivary pH of those smokers (r = -0.216, p>0.181. Nevertheless, there was a significant correlation between salivary flow rate and salivary pH of those smokers (r= 0.686, p<0.00,. Conclusion: There is a strong correlation between the intensity of smoking with salivary flow rate and its pH. However, there is no correlation between nicotine levels labeled on cigarettes and both salivary flow rate as well as salivary pH.

  7. Building Bridges to Diversity in Graduate Physics & Astronomy: The Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stassun, Keivan G.

    2006-12-01

    We describe the Fisk-Vanderbilt Masters-to-PhD Bridge program as a successful model for effective partnerships with minority-serving institutions toward significantly broadening the participation of underrepresented groups in the physical sciences. The program couples targeted recruitment with active retention strategies, and is built upon a clearly defined structure that is flexible enough to address individual student needs while maintaining clearly communicated baseline standards for student performance. A key precept of the program’s philosophy is to eliminate passivity in student mentoring; students are deliberately groomed to successfully transition into the PhD program through active involvement in research experiences with future PhD advisers, coursework that demonstrates competency in core PhD subject areas, and frequent interactions with joint mentoring committees. This approach allows student progress and performance to be monitored and evaluated in a more holistic manner than usually afforded by limited metrics such as standardized tests. Since its inception in 2004, the program has attracted a total of 18 underrepresented students, with a retention rate of 90%. Recent research indicates that minority students are nearly twice as likely as non-minority students to seek a Masters degree en route to the PhD. In essence, the Bridge program described here builds upon this increasingly important pathway, with a dedicated mentoring process designed to ensure that the Masters-to-PhD transition is a successful one.

  8. Influence of rapid changes in cytosolic pH on oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle: theoretical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzeniewski, Bernard; Zoladz, Jerzy A

    2002-07-01

    Cytosolic pH in skeletal muscle may vary significantly because of proton production/consumption by creatine kinase and/or proton production by anaerobic glycolysis. A computer model of oxidative phosphorylation in intact skeletal muscle developed previously was used to study the kinetic effect of these variations on the oxidative phosphorylation system. Two kinds of influence were analysed: (i) via the change in pH across the inner mitochondrial membrane and (ii) via the shift in the equilibrium of the creatine kinase-catalysed reaction. Our simulations suggest that cytosolic pH has essentially no impact on the steady-state fluxes and most metabolite concentrations. On the other hand, rapid acidification/alkalization of cytosol causes a transient decrease/increase in the respiration rate. Furthermore, changes in pH seem to affect significantly the kinetic properties of transition between resting state and active state. An increase in pH brought about by proton consumption by creatine kinase at the onset of exercise lengthens the transition time. At intensive exercise levels this pH increase could lead to loss of the stability of the system, if not compensated by glycolytic H+ production. Thus our theoretical results stress the importance of processes/mechanisms that buffer/compensate for changes in cytosolic proton concentration. In particular, we suggest that the second main role of anaerobic glycolysis, apart from additional ATP supply, may be maintaining the stability of the system at intensive exercise.

  9. International Specialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleindienst, Ingo; Geisler Asmussen, Christian; Hutzschenreuter, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Whether and how international diversification and cross-border arbitrage affects firm performance remains one of the major unresolved research questions in the strategy and international business literatures. We propose that knowing how much a firm has internationally diversified tells us very...... little about performance implications, if we do not know, and do not ask, how the firm has diversified. Therefore, building on the two broad arguments of operating flexibility and location-specific commitment, we develop a theoretical framework that focuses on the extent to which a firm's international...... arbitrage strategy is characterized by specialization versus replication and argue that these different strategies may have differential impact on profitability and risk reduction. Developing a sophisticated measure of international specialization and using a unique panel data set of 92 German MNEs to test...

  10. Peptide-targeted delivery of a pH sensor for quantitative measurements of intraglycosomal pH in live Trypanosoma brucei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng; Morris, Meredith T; Ackroyd, P Christine; Morris, James C; Christensen, Kenneth A

    2013-05-28

    Studies of dynamic changes in organelles of protozoan parasite Trypanosoma brucei have been limited, in part because of the difficulty of targeting analytical probes to specific subcellular compartments. Here we demonstrate application of a ratiometric probe for pH quantification in T. brucei glycosomes. The probe consists of a peptide encoding the peroxisomal targeting sequence (F-PTS1, acetyl-CKGGAKL) coupled to fluorescein, which responds to pH. When incubated with living parasites, the probe is internalized within vesicular structures that colocalize with a glycosomal marker. Inhibition of uptake of F-PTS1 at 4 °C and pulse-chase colocalization with fluorescent dextran suggested that the probe is initially taken up by non-receptor-mediated endocytosis but is subsequently transported separately from dextran and localized within glycosomes, prior to the final fusion of labeled glycosomes and lysosomes as part of glycosomal turnover. Intraorganellar measurements and pH calibration with F-PTS1 in T. brucei glycosomes indicate that the resting glycosomal pH under physiological conditions is 7.4 ± 0.2. However, incubation in glucose-depleted buffer triggered mild acidification of the glycosome over a period of 20 min, with a final observed pH of 6.8 ± 0.3. This glycosomal acidification was reversed by reintroduction of glucose. Coupling of ratiometric fluorescent sensors and reporters to PTS peptides offers an invaluable tool for monitoring in situ glycosomal response(s) to changing environmental conditions and could be applied to additional kinetoplastid parasites.

  11. Care and management of a stoma: maintaining peristomal skin health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyles, Anna; Hunt, Sharon

    2016-09-22

    It is estimated that around one in 500 people in the UK are living with a stoma, with approximately 21 000 operations that result in stoma formation being performed each year ( Colostomy Association, 2016 ). These people face a unique set of challenges in maintaining the integrity of their peristomal skin. This article explores the normal structure and function of skin and how the care and management of a stoma presents challenges for maintaining peristomal skin health. Particular focus is paid to the incidence of skin problems for those living with a stoma, whether it is temporary or permanent, and the factors that contribute to skin breakdown in this population. Wider factors such as the central role of the clinical nurse specialist and the impact of product usage on positive outcomes and health economics are also considered.

  12. Understanding how to maintain compliance in the current regulatory climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bignell, D.T.; Burns, R.

    1995-01-01

    High level radioactive waste facilities must maintain compliance with all regulatory requirements, even those requirements that have been promulgated after the facility was placed into operation. Facilities must aggressively pursue compliance because environmental laws often impose strict liability for violations; therefore, an honest mistake is no defense. Radioactive waste management is constantly under the public microscope, particularly those facilities that handle high-level radioactive waste. The Savannah River Site has effectively met the challenges of regulatory compliance in its HLRW facilities and plans are being formulated to meet future regulatory requirements as well. Understanding, aggressively achieving, and clearly demonstrating compliance is essential for the continued operations of radioactive waste management facilities. This paper examines how HLRW facilities are impacted by regulatory requirements and how compliance in this difficult area is achieved and maintained

  13. Maintaining students’ Speaking Fluency through Exhibition Examination in Sociolinguistic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khusnul Qhotimah Yuliatuty

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Using exhibition for the final project in Sociolinguistic study is really interesting for Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional students, especially for 2011 English Department students. Exhibition becomes interesting because this is the new thing to conduct the final project for English Department students’ cohort 2011 at Universitas Siswa Bangsa Internasional. The lecturer divides the students into pairs and each pairs should master one content or topic in Sociolinguistic study.  The students will do the exhibition about the topic that they get in a pairs. The lecturer also gives the students rubric sheet to fill by the visitors. The exhibition will make the students prepare themselves well because they will face many questions about the content which will be delivered by them. Beside, this exhibition also maintains students’ fluency in speaking English because they will explain and answer the questions from visitors with English. This paper tries to focus on how exhibition examination can maintain students’ fluency in speaking English.

  14. The Role of Leptin in Maintaining Plasma Glucose During Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Rachel J; Shulman, Gerald I

    2018-03-01

    For 20 years it has been known that concentrations of leptin, a hormone produced by the white adipose tissue (WAT) largely in proportion to body fat, drops precipitously with starvation, particularly in lean humans and animals. The role of leptin to suppress the thyroid and reproductive axes during a prolonged fast has been well defined; however, the impact of leptin on metabolic regulation has been incompletely understood. However emerging evidence suggests that, in starvation, hypoleptinemia increases activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, promoting WAT lipolysis, increasing hepatic acetyl-CoA concentrations, and maintaining euglycemia. In addition, leptin may be largely responsible for mediating a shift from a reliance upon glucose metabolism (absorption and glycogenolysis) to fat metabolism (lipolysis increasing gluconeogenesis) which preserves substrates for the brain, heart, and other critical organs. In this way a leptin-mediated glucose-fatty acid cycle appears to maintain glycemia and permit survival in starvation.

  15. Reciprocity and the Tragedies of Maintaining and Providing the Commons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gächter, Simon; Kölle, Felix; Quercia, Simone

    2017-09-01

    Social cooperation often requires collectively beneficial but individually costly restraint to maintain a public good1-4, or it needs costly generosity to create one1,5. Status quo effects6 predict that maintaining a public good is easier than providing a new one. Here we show experimentally and with simulations that even under identical incentives, low levels of cooperation (the 'tragedy of the commons'2) are systematically more likely in Maintenance than Provision. Across three series of experiments, we find that strong and weak positive reciprocity, known to be fundamental tendencies underpinning human cooperation7-10, are substantially diminished under Maintenance compared to Provision. As we show in a fourth experiment, the opposite holds for negative reciprocity ('punishment'). Our findings suggest that incentives to avoid the 'tragedy of the commons' need to contend with dilemma-specific reciprocity.

  16. Creating and maintaining chemical artificial life by robotic symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin M.; Parrilla, Juan M.; Nicholson, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior of the d......We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior...... confluence of chemical, artificial intelligence, and robotic approaches to artificial life....

  17. Creating and Maintaining Chemical Artificial Life by Robotic Symbiosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanczyc, Martin; Parrilla, Juan M.; Nicholson, Arwen

    2015-01-01

    We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior of the d......We present a robotic platform based on the open source RepRap 3D printer that can print and maintain chemical artificial life in the form of a dynamic, chemical droplet. The robot uses computer vision, a self-organizing map, and a learning program to automatically categorize the behavior...... confluence of chemical, artificial intelligence, and robotic approaches to artificial life....

  18. The importance of university research in maintaining the nuclear option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruschi, H.J.; Hochreiter, L.E.

    1991-01-01

    The role of the university in maintaining and revitalizing the nuclear option should have four goals. First, it must attract highly skilled students who have an interest in math and science and help foster their interest in nuclear science and engineering. Next, it must present a state-of-the-art educational program that contains meaningful research to maintain these students. The third goal of nuclear engineering departments is to provide the nontechnical student a fair assessment of benefits and risks associated with commercial nuclear power relative to other sources of electricity. Lastly, it must effectively communicate to all students a compelling vision of nuclear power as a vital energy resource that will grow. The most difficult role for the university is to successfully convey a future for those in the nuclear science and engineering program

  19. SALIVARY PH CHANGES AFTER GIC RESTORATION ON DECIDUOUS TEETH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Nila Sukma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC is the most widely used material in pediatric dentistry. The purpose of this study was to analyze pH changes of saliva after GIC restoration on primary teeth. For this purpose, 20 primary canines which were restored with GIC 24 hours previously were plunged into 20 tubes containing each 1,5 ml pH 6,8 Fusayama artificial saliva and then stored in incubator at the temperature of 37°C. The pH changes were measured at 30, 60, and 90 minutes later with digital pH meter PH-201. It was revealed that the highest pH acceleration was at 30 minutes exposure an decrease thereafter and the lowest pH acceleration was at 90 minutes exposure. Statistical analysis was performed by Anova and Tukey HSD.

  20. Skin pH, Atopic Dermatitis, and Filaggrin Mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandier, Josefine; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup

    2014-01-01

    mutations may influence skin pH. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the epidermal pH in different groups stratified by filaggrin mutations and atopic dermatitis. Further, we investigated the changes in pH according to severity of mutational status among patients with dermatitis, irrespective of skin condition....... METHODS: pH was measured with a multiprobe system pH probe (PH 905), and the study population was composed of 67 individuals, who had all been genotyped for 3 filaggrin mutations (R501X, 2282del4, R2447X). RESULTS: We found no clear pattern in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status. Individuals...... with wild-type filaggrin displayed both the most acidic and most alkaline values independent of concomitant skin disease; however, no statistical differences between the groups were found. CONCLUSIONS: The lack of significant diversity in skin pH in relation to filaggrin mutation carrier status suggests...

  1. Corrosion of zirconium alloys in alternating pH environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, P.; Manolescu, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Behaviour of two commercial alloys, Zircaloy-2 and zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium were investigated in an environment of alternating pH. Corrosion advancement and scale morphology of coupons exposed to aqueous solution of LiOH (pH 10.2 and 14) were followed as a function of temperature (300-360 degreesC) and time (up to 165 days). The test sequence consisted of short term exposure to high pH and re-exposure to low pH solutions for extended period of time followed by a short term test in high pH. The results of these tests and detailed post-corrosion analysis indicate a fundamental difference between the corrosion behaviour of these two materials. Both alloys corrode fast in high pH environments, but only zirconium-2.5 wt% niobium continues to form detectable new oxide in low pH solution

  2. Maintaining Genome Stability: The Role of Helicases and Deaminases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Errors in duplicating DNA can result in genomic instability, leading to various human diseases, such as cancer, immune system disorder, muscle dystrophy ...as cancer, immune system disorder, muscle dystrophy , and neurodegenerations. Thus, maintaining genomic integrity is vital to the normal growth of...31–38. Eberharter, A., R. Ferreira and P. Becker , 2005 Dynamic chro- matin: concerted nucleosome remodelling and acetylation. Biol. Chem. 386: 745

  3. Maintaining Customer Loyalty : Case company: Industrail Securities Ltd (China)

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wenqing

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate how customer relationship management can be applied in maintaining customer loyalty. The study will assist the case company to find the way to develop a long-term relationship with existing customers. The better relationship with customers, the higher customer loyalty will be obtained. The theoretical background of the thesis begins with general view of customer relationship management, which embodies the concept of managing customer relations...

  4. Prefrontal Neuronal Excitability Maintains Cocaine-Associated Memory During Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Otis

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Presentation of drug-associated cues provokes craving and drug seeking, and elimination of these associative memories would facilitate recovery from addiction. Emotionally salient memories are maintained during retrieval, as particular pharmacologic or optogenetic perturbations of memory circuits during retrieval, but not after, can induce long-lasting memory impairments. For example, in rats, inhibition of noradrenergic beta-receptors, which control intrinsic neuronal excitability, in the prelimbic medial prefrontal cortex (PL-mPFC can cause long-term memory impairments that prevent subsequent cocaine-induced reinstatement. The physiologic mechanisms that allow noradrenergic signaling to maintain drug-associated memories during retrieval, however, are unclear. Here we combine patch-clamp electrophysiology ex vivo and behavioral neuropharmacology in vivo to evaluate the mechanisms that maintain drug-associated memory during retrieval in rats. Consistent with previous studies, we find that cocaine experience increases the intrinsic excitability of pyramidal neurons in PL-mPFC. In addition, we now find that this intrinsic plasticity positively predicts the retrieval of a cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP memory, suggesting that such plasticity may contribute to drug-associated memory retrieval. In further support of this, we find that pharmacological blockade of a cAMP-dependent signaling cascade, which allows noradrenergic signaling to elevate neuronal excitability, is required for memory maintenance during retrieval. Thus, inhibition of PL-mPFC neuronal excitability during memory retrieval not only leads to long-term deficits in the memory, but this memory deficit provides protection against subsequent cocaine-induced reinstatement. These data reveal that PL-mPFC intrinsic neuronal excitability maintains a cocaine-associated memory during retrieval and suggest a unique mechanism whereby drug-associated memories could be targeted

  5. Incisional abdominal hernia repair with concomitant abdominoplasty: Maintaining umbilical viability

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Phan; Elan Kaplan; Jemma K. Porrett; Yik-Hong Ho; Warren M. Rozen

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Abdominoplasty and abdominal hernia repair are often carried out in two-stage procedures, and those describing single-stage surgery require careful dissection to preserve often only partial blood supply to the umbilicus to maintain its viability. This paper aims to describe the surgical method of laparoscopic umbilical hernia repair in association with abdominoplasty. Case presentation: A patient presents with an incisional hernia at a previous periumbilical port site of size 14...

  6. Ballast system for maintaining constant pressure in a glove box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.

    1989-09-01

    A ballast system is disclosed for a glove box including a fixed platform on which is mounted an inflatable bag on top of which resides a cover and a weight. The variable gas volume of the inflatable bag communicates with that of the glove box via a valved tube. The weight and the gas volume are selected to maintain a relatively constant pressure in the glove box despite variations in the glove box volume while avoiding the use of complicated valving apparatus.

  7. Maintaining Limited-Range Connectivity Among Second-Order Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-07

    we consider ad-hoc networks of robotic agents with double integrator dynamics. For such networks, the connectivity maintenance problems are: (i) do...connectivity-maintaining controls in a distributed fashion? The proposed solution is based on three contributions. First, we define and characterize...hoc networks of mobile autonomous agents. This loose ter- minology refers to groups of robotic agents with limited mobility and communica- tion

  8. Improved reliability, maintainability and safety through elastomer upgrading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wensel, R.; Wittich, K.C.

    1995-01-01

    Equipment in nuclear plants has historically contained whatever elastomer each component supplier traditionally used for corresponding non-nuclear service. The resulting proliferation of elastomer compounds, many of which are far from optimal for the service conditions (e.g., pressure, temperature, radiation, etc.), has multiplied the costs to provide station reliability, maintainability and safety. Cost-effective improvements are being achieved in CANDU plants by upgrading and standardizing on a handful of high performing elastomer compounds. These upgraded materials offer significant gains in service life over the materials they replace (often by factors of 2 or more). This rationalization of elastomer compounds also facilitates the EQ process for safety-related equipment. Detailed test data on aging is currently being generated for these specific elastomers, encompassing the conditions and media (air, water, oil) common in CANDU service. Two key elements characterize this testing. First, each result is specific to the compound used in the test, and second, it is specific to the tested failure mode (e.g., compression set, extrusion, fracture, etc.). Having fewer, but more thoroughly tested compounds, avoids the penalty (associated with poorly characterized materials) of having to replace parts prematurely because of conservatism, while maintaining safe, reliable service. This paper provides an overview of this approach covering: the benefits of compound rationalization; and the how and why of establishing relevant failure criteria; appropriate quality assurance to maintain EQ; procurement, storage and handling guidelines; and monitoring and predicting in-service degradation. (author)

  9. Challenges of designing fusion reactors for remote maintainability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masson, L.S.

    1981-01-01

    One of the major problems faced by the fusion community is the development of the high level of reliability required to assure that fusion will be a viable commercial power source. Much of the responsibility for solving this problem falls directly on the designer in developing concepts that have a high level of maintainability for the next generation engineering oriented reactors; and long range, in developing full maintainability for the more complicated commercial concepts with their required high level of on-line time. The near-term challenge will include development of unique design concepts to perform inspection, maintenance, replacement, and testing under the stringent conditions imposed by the next generation engineering oriented machines. The long range challenge will focus on basic design concepts that will enable the full maintainability required by commercial fusion. In addition to the purely technical challenges, the fusion community is also faced with the problem of developing programmatic means to assure that reactor maintenance issues are given proper and timely emphasis as the nuclear phase of fusion is approached

  10. The importance of maintainability in maintenance cost management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    This paper provides specific examples and results from ongoing projects at Power Plants, and for offshore oil platforms. The paper describes the vital role maintainability has on plant availability. How the application of equipment maintainability principles, if addressed using state of the art computer tools and advanced business processes can bring annual return on investment results as high as 15 to 1. The maintenance process of today and for the future must provide for high plant availability at the lowest possible cost. The high cost of obtaining equipment reliability levels necessary to meet required availability demands has not proved to be sustainable. Therefore new business decision processes that address equipment failures as part of the maintenance process have been developed. Repair costs require that equipment failures be selective and controlled so that a high level of safety and plant availability is assurance. This can only be accomplished by the use of advanced computer tools in the hands of well trained maintenance-engineering specialist. The relationship between Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM), Condition Directed Planned Maintenance (CDPM), and maintainability is also presented

  11. Genetic and Epigenetic Mechanisms That Maintain Hematopoietic Stem Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Kosan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available All hematopoiesis cells develop from multipotent progenitor cells. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC have the ability to develop into all blood lineages but also maintain their stemness. Different molecular mechanisms have been identified that are crucial for regulating quiescence and self-renewal to maintain the stem cell pool and for inducing proliferation and lineage differentiation. The stem cell niche provides the microenvironment to keep HSC in a quiescent state. Furthermore, several transcription factors and epigenetic modifiers are involved in this process. These create modifications that regulate the cell fate in a more or less reversible and dynamic way and contribute to HSC homeostasis. In addition, HSC respond in a unique way to DNA damage. These mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of HSC function and are essential to ensure viability after DNA damage. How HSC maintain their quiescent stage during the entire life is still matter of ongoing research. Here we will focus on the molecular mechanisms that regulate HSC function.

  12. Maintaining and assessing extended 9 test methods in accordance with ISO/IEC 17025: 2005 for Isotopes Hydrology Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen Thi Hong Thinh; Ha Lan Anh; Vo Thi Anh; Tran Khanh Minh; Vu Hoai

    2016-01-01

    The ISO/IEC 17025:2005 ''General requirements for the competence of testing and calibration laboratories'' is basis for the accreditation body of the country in general and VILAS in particular recognizing the competence of laboratories. With the desire to prove that we have sufficient technique and management capacity , and the ability to provide the legally recognized and technically valuable test results, the Isotope Hydrology Laboratory have developed and maintain a quality management system in accordance with ISO/IEC 17025:2005. In 2013, Isotope Hydrology Laboratory received a certificate of accreditation issued by Bureau of Accreditation which recognized the laboratory in accordance with ISO/IEC 17025:2005 with VILAS 670 accredited code. Scope of recognition is analyzed 14 parameters: F"-, Cl"-, NO_2"-, NO_3"-, Br"-, PO_4"3"-, SO_4"2"-, Li"+, Na"+, NH_4"+, K"+, Mg"2"+, Ca"2"+ and "3H in water by ion chromatography and liquid scintillator counting method. The laboratory has successfully implemented the task of maintaining quality management systems conform to ISO/IEC 17025: 2005 and expanded the scope of accreditation by 9 parameters in water: pH, EC, TSS, TDS, DO, BOD5, pH, Fe and Mn in 2015. (author)

  13. Vestibular feedback maintains reaching accuracy during body movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Raymond F.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Reaching movements can be perturbed by vestibular input, but the function of this response is unclear.Here, we applied galvanic vestibular stimulation concurrently with real body movement while subjects maintained arm position either fixed in space or fixed with respect to their body.During the fixed‐in‐space conditions, galvanic vestibular stimulation caused large changes in arm trajectory consistent with a compensatory response to maintain upper‐limb accuracy in the face of body movement.Galvanic vestibular stimulation responses were absent during the body‐fixed task, demonstrating task dependency in vestibular control of the upper limb.The results suggest that the function of vestibular‐evoked arm movements is to maintain the accuracy of the upper limb during unpredictable body movement, but only when reaching in an earth‐fixed reference frame. Abstract When using our arms to interact with the world, unintended body motion can introduce movement error. A mechanism that could detect and compensate for such motion would be beneficial. Observations of arm movements evoked by vestibular stimulation provide some support for this mechanism. However, the physiological function underlying these artificially evoked movements is unclear from previous research. For such a mechanism to be functional, it should operate only when the arm is being controlled in an earth‐fixed rather than a body‐fixed reference frame. In the latter case, compensation would be unnecessary and even deleterious. To test this hypothesis, subjects were gently rotated in a chair while being asked to maintain their outstretched arm pointing towards either earth‐fixed or body‐fixed memorized targets. Galvanic vestibular stimulation was applied concurrently during rotation to isolate the influence of vestibular input, uncontaminated by inertial factors. During the earth‐fixed task, galvanic vestibular stimulation produced large polarity‐dependent corrections in arm

  14. Insulin at pH 2: structural analysis of the conditions promoting insulin fibre formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittingham, Jean L; Scott, David J; Chance, Karen; Wilson, Ashley; Finch, John; Brange, Jens; Guy Dodson, G

    2002-04-26

    When insulin solutions are subjected to acid, heat and agitation, the normal pattern of insulin assembly (dimers-->tetramers-->hexamers) is disrupted; the molecule undergoes conformational changes allowing it to follow an alternative aggregation pathway (via a monomeric species) leading to the formation of insoluble amyloid fibres. To investigate the effect of acid pH on the conformation and aggregation state of the protein, the crystal structure of human insulin at pH 2.1 has been determined to 1.6 A resolution. The structure reveals that the native fold is maintained at low pH, and that the molecule is still capable of forming dimers similar to those found in hexameric insulin structures at higher pH. Sulphate ions are incorporated into the molecule and the crystal lattice where they neutralise positive charges on the protein, stabilising its structure and facilitating crystallisation. The sulphate interactions are associated with local deformations in the protein, which may indicate that the structure is more plastic at low pH. Transmission electron microscopy analysis of insulin fibres reveals that the appearance of the fibres is greatly influenced by the type of acid employed. Sulphuric acid produces distinctive highly bunched, truncated fibres, suggesting that the sulphate ions have a sophisticated role to play in fibre formation, rather as they do in the crystal structure. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies show that in the absence of heating, insulin is predominantly dimeric in mineral acids, whereas in acetic acid the equilibrium is shifted towards the monomer. Hence, the effect of acid on the aggregation state of insulin is also complex. These results suggest that acid conditions increase the susceptibility of the molecule to conformational change and dissociation, and enhance the rate of fibrillation by providing a charged environment in which the attractive forces between the protein molecules is increased. (c) 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

  15. International market research at the Mayo Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hathaway, M; Seltman, K

    2001-01-01

    Mayo Clinic has a long international history and has been providing care to international patients since its inception. Despite its history and reputation, however, the marketing staff continues to monitor the international market to gauge the level of awareness, reputation, and attractiveness of Mayo Clinic around the world. Here's a look at how one institution has used word-of-mouth marketing to maintain its global reputation.

  16. Fresh and preserved green fodder modify effects of urinary acidifiers on urine pH of horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goren, G; Fritz, J; Dillitzer, N; Hipp, B; Kienzle, E

    2014-04-01

    Hay stabilises urine pH in horses. It is unknown whether this is an effect of structure or of chemical composition. In this study, four ponies (230-384 kg body weight [BW]) were fed six different diets with either a structure or a composition similar to hay with and without acidifiers in a cross-over experimental design in amounts to maintain body weight with the following main compounds: Fresh grass (GRASS), alfalfa hay (ALF), grass cobs (COBS), grass silage (SIL), straw (STR) or extruded straw (STRe) for 2 to 10 days. Urine pH was measured in all trials, blood pH, blood base excess and bicarbonate as well as mineral balance were determined in GRASS, ALF, STR and STRe. In the trials with straw and extruded straw, urine pH decreased significantly (STR control: 7.8 ± 0.23, acidifier: 5.2 ± 0.38) when acidifiers were added, whereas in all other diets that were based on fresh or preserved green fodder, pH did not decrease below 7. Blood pH was similarly affected by diet and acidifiers. Acidifiers had little effect on the pre-prandial blood pH, only in diet STR there was a significant reduction in relation to control. Post-prandial blood pH was significantly reduced by acidifiers in all diets. Blood bicarbonate and base excess showed corresponding effects. Faecal and renal mineral excretion and apparent mineral digestibility were not systematically affected by diet or acidifiers except for chloride. Chloride added as inorganic chloride salt had an even better apparent digestibility than chloride originating from feed. Because only green plant material stabilised acid base balance, chlorophyll and its metabolites are discussed as potential mediators of the effect of green fodder on acid base balance. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  17. In vitro synthesis and purification of PhIP-deoxyguanosine and PhIP-DNA oligomer covalent complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freeman, J.

    1994-12-01

    2-Amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (PhIP) is a heterocyclic amine compound formed when meats are cooked at high temperatures. PhIP damages DNA by forming covalent complexes with DNA carcinogen. In an effort to understand how the binding of PhIP to DNA may cause cancer, it is important to characterize the structures of PhIP-damaged DNA molecules. Our HPLC data support fluorescence and {sup 32}P Post-labeling studies which indicate the formation of several species of 2{prime}deoxyguanosine-(dG) or oligodeoxynucleotide-PhIP adducts. The reaction of PhIP with dG resulted in a reddish precipitate that was likely the major adduct, N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-PhIP (dG-C8-PhIP) adduct, with a more polar adduct fraction remaining in the supernatant. Reversed-phase HPLC analysis of the adducts in the supernatant revealed the existence of species of much shorter retention times than the dG-C8-PhIP adduct, confirming that these species are more polar than dG-C8-PhIP. At least four adducts were formed in the reaction of PhIP with DNA oligomer. HPLC analysis of the PhIP-DNA oligomer supernatant after butanol extractions revealed four unresolved peaks which spectra had maximum wavelengths between 340 and 360 nm. Though adduct peaks were not completely resolved, there was {approximately}3 minutes interval between the DNA oligomer peak and the adduct peaks. Furthermore, fluorescence emission data of the DNA oligomer-PhIP adduct solution show heterogeneous binding. The more polar PhIP adducts were fraction-collected and their structures will be solved by nuclear magnetic resonance or x-ray crystallography.

  18. International Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... create refugee populations with immediate and long-term health problems. Some of the major diseases currently affecting ... also an international problem which can affect people's health. Many countries and health organizations are working together ...

  19. Juris International

    CERN Document Server

    A database on international trade law aimed at lawyers and legal counsel in developing and transition economies. Juris International is a multilingual collection (English, Spanish, and French) of legal information on international trade. Juris International aims to facilitate and reduce the work involved in research for business lawyers, advisers and in-house counsel, and state organizations in developing nd transition economies, by providing access to texts which have often been difficult to obtain. Its objective is to gather a large quantity of basic information at one site (favoring complete legal texts), without the need to send for the information, and consequently without excessive communication costs for users who d benefit from an efficient and cheap telecommunications network.

  20. Thai PhD Students and Their Supervisors at an Australian University: Working Relationship, Communication, and Agency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomnian, Singhanat

    2017-01-01

    PhD supervision is crucial for higher degree research students in western academic contexts. Despite an increasing body of literature regarding the international student-supervisor relationship, Thai students in Australian higher education are under-represented. This qualitative study aims to explore discursive practices that impact on Thai…

  1. Regulating Internalities

    OpenAIRE

    Sunstein, Cass Robert; Allcott, Hunt

    2015-01-01

    This paper offers a framework for regulating internalities. Using a simple economic model, we provide four principles for designing and evaluating behaviorally-motivated policy. We then outline rules for determining which contexts reliably reflect true preferences and discuss empirical strategies for measuring internalities. As a case study, we focus on energy efficiency policy, including Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards and appliance and lighting energy efficiency standards.

  2. Cardiopulmonary effects during anaesthesia induced and maintained with propofol in acepromazine pre-medicated donkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naddaf, Hadi; Baniadam, Ali; Rasekh, Abdolrahman; Arasteh, Abdolmajid; Sabiza, Soroush

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the cardiopulmonary effects of anaesthesia induced and maintained with propofol in acepromazine pre-medicated donkeys. Prospective experimental study. Six healthy male donkeys weighing 78-144 kg. Donkeys were pre-medicated with intravenous (IV) acepromazine (0.04 mg kg(-1) ). Ten minutes later, anaesthesia was induced with IV propofol (2 mg kg(-1) ) and anaesthesia maintained by continuous IV infusion of the propofol (0.2 mg kg(-1)  minute(-1) ) for 30 minutes. Baseline measurements of physiological parameters, and arterial blood samples were taken before the acepromazine administration, then 5, 15, 30, 45, and 60 minutes after the induction of anaesthesia. Changes from baseline were analysed by anova for repeated measures. When compared with baseline (standing) values, during anaesthesia heart rate increased throughout: significant at 5 (p = 0.001) and 15 (p = 0.015) minutes. Mean arterial blood pressure increased significantly only at 15 minutes (p < 0.001). Respiratory rate and arterial pH did not change significantly. PaO2 was lower throughout anaethesia, but this only reached significance at 15 minutes (p = 0.041). PaCO2 was statistically (but not clinically) significantly reduced at the times of 30 (p = 0.02), 45 (p = 0.01) and 60 (p = 0.04). Rectal temperature decreased significantly at all times of the study. Administration of propofol by the continuous infusion rate for the maintenance of anaesthesia resulted in stable cardiopulmonary effects and could prove to be clinically useful in donkeys. © 2014 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.

  3. Maintaining experiences of nature as a city grows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica R. Sushinsky

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Experiences of nature contribute to human health and well-being, yet as the world's population continues to concentrate in towns and cities there is mounting concern that these experiences are diminishing. Despite this, little is known about how we can maintain experiences of nature as cities grow. Here, we quantify how people's opportunities to experience nature might change with future urban growth in the city of Brisbane, Australia. We simulated the addition of 84,642 houses under compact and sprawling growth scenarios and modeled changes in people's opportunities to experience nature by estimating changes in backyard size, public green space provision, and bird species richness close to households. We discovered that the form of urban growth could strongly influence people's opportunities to experience nature in a way that is highly nonrandom across the socioeconomic gradient. Under a sprawling pattern of development, with low residential densities and few interstitial green spaces, our models suggest severe declines in access to public green space and bird species richness around people's homes. These declines are predicted to be concentrated in socioeconomically disadvantaged areas of the city. Compact development leads to greater reductions in backyard size, but smaller declines in access to public green space and bird species richness. Our results point to a difficult trade-off; residential infill will maintain larger green spaces and higher overall bird diversity but reduce backyard sizes, impacting people's opportunities to experience nature in a different way. Careful planning is needed to balance the availability of public and private urban green spaces to ensure that the opportunities for people to experience nature are maintained as urbanization continues.

  4. Maintaining Students’ Involvement in a Math Lecture Using Countdown Timers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann Krizzel A. Aban

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Involving students in a lecture is an important but not an easy task that every lecturer must encourage. This task becomes even greater in a math class that is composed of eighty to a hundred sixty students. In 2007, the University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB started offering some of its basic math courses in lecture-recitation set-up. This shift and many other factors drove most math instructors of UPLB to widely use presentation software, such as the PowerPoint (PPT, to deliver their lectures. The non-stop use of these softwares, however, seems to have negative effects on the students when it comes to maintaining their involvement in a lecture discussion for they tend to be more passive spectators. On the other hand, adding countdown timers strategically on some parts of the discussion seems to lessen such negative effects. This study determined the effectiveness of using countdown timers in maintaining students’ involvement in a lecture of MATH 27 (Analytic Geometry and Calculus II, a course in UPLB commonly taken by sophomore students. Results show that the effectiveness of countdown timers, as perceived by the students, is independent to students’ genders and degree programs, but is dependent to the colleges where the students belong to. Also, some effects of countdown timers are significantly correlated to various data from students’ profiles. It was concluded in the study that the use of countdown timers is effective in maintaining student’s involvement in MATH 27 lectures and might also be useful in other math lecture classes

  5. Research Trends on Benefits of Implementing Constructability, Operability, and Maintainability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kordestani Ghaleenoe, N.

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite allocating huge budgets to civil engineering projects, detailed planning, and employing human resources, project managers still face time, cost, and quality constraints. Most of these challenges are due to a lack of integration of different project phases and the limitations of the presence of construction and maintenance contractors in the initial stages of the project. Considering the benefits of applying constructability, operability, and maintainability (COM concepts, many problems caused by lack of coordination, or duplications and weakness in management, and also time and extra costs due to lack of presence of construction and maintenance contractors in the early stages of the project are resolvable. In this regard, various studies have investigated the benefits of applying these concepts; however, there has been no comprehensive analysis of the benefits of COM. As a result of focus on the benefits of implementation of these concepts and evaluating the effect of each of these strategies and benefits, from different perspectives during various time periods, managers can increase project efficiency and productivity, and improve their performance, through using concepts and strategies of their implementation. This research aims to evaluate the trend of studies on the benefits of implementing constructability, operability, and maintainability in the construction industry. For that, the in-depth literature review method is applied. For qualitative analysis of the obtained information, descriptive analysis has been used. Then, the data was coded, and classified using Excel Software for quantitative data analysis. Finally, the charts presented were evaluated according to the classified fields of study. The necessity of performing such a study is significant because of the fact that a large share of a project’s problems, such as lack of plans’ integration and weakness of administrative system, and increasing time and cost, are due to

  6. Managers' duty to maintain good workplace communications skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmins, Fiona

    2011-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental element of care at every level of nursing practice. It is important, therefore, for nurse managers to create environments that promote and encourage good communication, and help nurses to develop their communication skills formally and informally. This article discusses the effects of communication on the quality of care. It examines nurses' professional duty to maintain good communication skills and how managers can help them do this. It also discusses nurse managers' communication skills in the context of leadership style, conflict resolution and self-awareness. Finally, it considers the notion of shared governance as good practice.

  7. Prepare to protect: Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herseth, Andrew; Goldsmith-Grinspoon, Jennifer; Scott, Pataya

    2017-06-01

    Operating and maintaining a tornado safe room can be critical to the effective continuity of business operations because a firm's most valuable asset is its people. This paper describes aspects of operations and maintenance (O&M) for existing tornado safe rooms as well as a few planning and design aspects that affect the ultimate operation of a safe room for situations where a safe room is planned, but not yet constructed. The information is based on several Federal Emergency Management Agency safe room publications that provide guidance on emergency management and operations, as well as the design and construction of tornado safe rooms.

  8. JWIG: Yet Another Framework for Maintainable and Secure Web Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Anders; Schwarz, Mathias Romme

    2009-01-01

    Although numerous frameworks for web application programming have been developed in recent years, writing web applications remains a challenging task. Guided by a collection of classical design principles, we propose yet another framework. It is based on a simple but flexible server......-oriented architecture that coherently supports general aspects of modern web applications, including dynamic XML construction, session management, data persistence, caching, and authentication, but it also simplifies programming of server-push communication and integration of XHTML-based applications and XML-based web...... services.The resulting framework provides a novel foundation for developing maintainable and secure web applications....

  9. Phase noise cancellation in polarisation-maintaining fibre links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, B.; Vélez López, M. C.; Thoumany, P.; Pizzocaro, M.; Calonico, D.

    2018-03-01

    The distribution of ultra-narrow linewidth laser radiation is an integral part of many challenging metrological applications. Changes in the optical pathlength induced by environmental disturbances compromise the stability and accuracy of optical fibre networks distributing the laser light and call for active phase noise cancellation. Here we present a laboratory scale optical (at 578 nm) fibre network featuring all polarisation maintaining fibres in a setup with low optical powers available and tracking voltage-controlled oscillators implemented. The stability and accuracy of this system reach performance levels below 1 × 10-19 after 10 000 s of averaging.

  10. Social Pharmacy Research in Copenhagen—Maintaining a Broad Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Kälvemark Sporrong

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Social Pharmacy (SP is a multidisciplinary field to promote the adequate use of medicine. The field of SP is increasingly important due to a numbers of new trends all posing challenges to society. The SP group at the University of Copenhagen has for several years used a broad approach to SP teaching and research, often illustrated by the four levels: individual, group, organizational, and societal. In this paper the relevance of maintaining a broad approach to SP research is argued for and examples of the importance of such type of research is presented.

  11. Maintaining Traceability in an Evolving Distributed Computing Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, I.; Wartel, R.

    2015-12-01

    The management of risk is fundamental to the operation of any distributed computing infrastructure. Identifying the cause of incidents is essential to prevent them from re-occurring. In addition, it is a goal to contain the impact of an incident while keeping services operational. For response to incidents to be acceptable this needs to be commensurate with the scale of the problem. The minimum level of traceability for distributed computing infrastructure usage is to be able to identify the source of all actions (executables, file transfers, pilot jobs, portal jobs, etc.) and the individual who initiated them. In addition, sufficiently fine-grained controls, such as blocking the originating user and monitoring to detect abnormal behaviour, are necessary for keeping services operational. It is essential to be able to understand the cause and to fix any problems before re-enabling access for the user. The aim is to be able to answer the basic questions who, what, where, and when concerning any incident. This requires retaining all relevant information, including timestamps and the digital identity of the user, sufficient to identify, for each service instance, and for every security event including at least the following: connect, authenticate, authorize (including identity changes) and disconnect. In traditional grid infrastructures (WLCG, EGI, OSG etc.) best practices and procedures for gathering and maintaining the information required to maintain traceability are well established. In particular, sites collect and store information required to ensure traceability of events at their sites. With the increased use of virtualisation and private and public clouds for HEP workloads established procedures, which are unable to see 'inside' running virtual machines no longer capture all the information required. Maintaining traceability will at least involve a shift of responsibility from sites to Virtual Organisations (VOs) bringing with it new requirements for their

  12. Experience with managing, operating and maintaining gas turbine powerplants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wadman, B.

    1994-01-01

    Stewart ampersand Stevenson, a major supplier of gas turbine powered cogeneration systems to worldwide markets, established plant management, operations and maintenance capabilities in 1985 in order to provide complete service capability to the customer. As of the fall of 1993, twenty-two individual cogeneration facilities are now being operated and maintained by this company with a total capacity of 1100+ MW. More than 300 plant management and operating personnel are employed in this operation. To date, activities have been concentrated in North and South America. Negotiations are in process in a number of other areas including the Pacific Rim, China, and several Middle East countries. 7 figs

  13. Dural afferents express acid-sensing ion channels: a role for decreased meningeal pH in migraine headache.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jin; Edelmayer, Rebecca M; Wei, Xiaomei; De Felice, Milena; Porreca, Frank; Dussor, Gregory

    2011-01-01

    Migraine headache is one of the most common neurological disorders. The pathological conditions that directly initiate afferent pain signaling are poorly understood. In trigeminal neurons retrogradely labeled from the cranial meninges, we have recorded pH-evoked currents using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology. Approximately 80% of dural-afferent neurons responded to a pH 6.0 application with a rapidly activating and rapidly desensitizing ASIC-like current that often exceeded 20nA in amplitude. Inward currents were observed in response to a wide range of pH values and 30% of the neurons exhibited inward currents at pH 7.1. These currents led to action potentials in 53%, 30% and 7% of the dural afferents at pH 6.8, 6.9 and 7.0, respectively. Small decreases in extracellular pH were also able to generate sustained window currents and sustained membrane depolarizations. Amiloride, a non-specific blocker of ASIC channels, inhibited the peak currents evoked upon application of decreased pH while no inhibition was observed upon application of TRPV1 antagonists. The desensitization time constant of pH 6.0-evoked currents in the majority of dural afferents was less than 500ms which is consistent with that reported for ASIC3 homomeric or heteromeric channels. Finally, application of pH 5.0 synthetic-interstitial fluid to the dura produced significant decreases in facial and hind-paw withdrawal threshold, an effect blocked by amiloride but not TRPV1 antagonists, suggesting that ASIC activation produces migraine-related behavior in vivo. These data provide a cellular mechanism by which decreased pH in the meninges following ischemic or inflammatory events directly excites afferent pain-sensing neurons potentially contributing to migraine headache. Copyright © 2010 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Metarhizium anisopliae: influence of pH on enzyme activity and control of Rhipicephalus microplus ticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Felipe Marciano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Marciano A.F., Coutinho-Rodrigues C.J.B., Perinotto W.M.S., Camargo M.G., Gôlo P.S., Sá F.A., Quinelato S., Freitas M.C., Angelo I.C., Nogueira M.R.S. & Bittencourt V.R.E.P. [Metarhizium anisopliae: influence of pH on enzyme activity and control of Rhipicephalus microplus ticks.] Metarhizium anisopliae: influência do pH na atividade enzimática e no controle de Rhipicephalus microplus. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(Supl.1:85-90, 2015. Departamento de Parasitologia Animal, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, Km 47, Seropédica, RJ 23897-970, Brasil. E-mail: vaniabit@ufrrj.br Rhipicephalus microplus ticks are one of the major agents causing substantial losses to livestock worldwide. In the search for alternative control strategies, both in vitro and in vivo use of the arthropodpathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae has shown promising results against this ectoparasite. During host colonization, protease production by M. anisopliae is considered one important virulence factor once it is directly related to the active penetration process carried by the fungus on the full host cuticle. Nevertheless, limitations as environmental pH may modulate the proteases production and/or activity, as well as, the fungal virulence. The current study aimed evaluate the virulence and total protease activity of M. anisopliae CG 148 sensu lato (s.l.. Fungal aqueous suspensions or 5% mineral oil formulations were used in different pH ranges (5, 7, or 9. Suspensions and formulations were prepared using a pH meter and adjusted to 108 spores mL-1. In the bioassay, four groups were formed for each pH range: the aqueous fungal suspension, the oil-based fungal formulation and their respective controls (aqueous and oil-based, totaling 12 groups. Engorged females were immersed for 3 minutes and maintained under optimal conditions for evaluation of biological parameters. Total protease activity of the artificial medium (after

  15. Critical review of pH sensing with optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldini, Francesco

    1999-02-01

    The chemical parameter most investigated with optical fibers is doubtless pH. The first pH optical fiber sensor was described in 1980. Since then, more than one hundred and twenty original papers describing different pH sensors have been published, based on absorption-based indicators on fluorophores. Such interest is perfectly justified, since pH detection is essential in many fields of application, ranging from the environment and medicine to industry and process control. Moreover, pH transduction can be used for measuring different chemical species, such as carbon dioxide, ammonia and pesticides. Notwithstanding the great number of prototypes realized in different laboratories all over the world, only a few products are available on the market. A critical analysis of the state of art in pH sensing using optical fibers is described, outlining the advantages and disadvantages of an optical approach.

  16. A graphene oxide pH sensor for wound monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melai, B; Salvo, P; Calisi, N; Moni, L; Bonini, A; Paoletti, C; Lomonaco, T; Mollica, V; Fuoco, R; Di Francesco, F

    2016-08-01

    This article describes the fabrication and characterization of a pH sensor for monitoring the wound status. The pH sensitive layer consists of a graphene oxide (GO) layer obtained by drop-casting 5 μΐ of GO dispersion onto the working electrode of a screen-printed substrate. Sensitivity was 31.8 mV/pH with an accuracy of 0.3 unit of pH. Open-circuit potentiometry was carried out to measure pH in an exudate sample. The GO pH sensor proved to be reliable as the comparison with results obtained from a standard glass electrode pH-meter showed negligible differences (pH units in the worst case) for measurements performed over a period of 4 days.

  17. A quantum dot-spore nanocomposite pH sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xingya; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Qian; Zeng, Zhiming; Xu, Xiangdong; Hu, Yonggang

    2016-04-01

    A new quantum dot (QD)-based pH sensor design is investigated. The sensor is synthesized based on the self-assembly of green QDs onto treated spores to form QD@spore nanocomposites. The nanocomposites are characterized using laser scanning confocal microscopy, transmission electron microscope, and fluorescence spectroscopy, among others. Fluorescence measurements showed that these nanocomposites are sensitive to pH in a broad pH range of 5.0-10.0. The developed pH sensors have been satisfactorily applied for pH estimation of real samples and are comparable with those of the commercial assay method, indicating the potential practical application of the pH sensors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluating Nanoparticle Sensor Design for Intracellular pH Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benjaminsen, Rikke Vicki; Sun, Honghao; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager

    2011-01-01

    Particle-based nanosensors have over the last decade been designed for optical fluorescent-based ratiometric measurements of pH in living cells. However, quantitative and time-resolved intracellular measurements of pH in endosomes and lysosomes using particle nanosensors is challenging...... and there is a need to improve measurement methodology. In the present paper, we have successfully carried out time resolved pH measurements in endosomes and lyosomes in living cells using nanoparticle sensors and show the importance of sensor choice for successful quantification. We have studied two nanoparticle...... quantification of pH is an unfortunate result when measuring pH too close to the limit of the sensitive range of the sensors. Triple-labeled nanosensors with a pH measurement range of 3.2-7.0, which was synthesized by adding two pH-sensitive fluorophores with different pKa to each sensor, seem to be a solution...

  19. Cell wall pH and auxin transport velocity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasenstein, K. H.; Rayle, D.

    1984-01-01

    According to the chemiosmotic polar diffusion hypothesis, auxin pulse velocity and basal secretion should increase with decreasing cell wall pH. Experiments were designed to test this prediction. Avena coleoptile sections were preincubated in either fusicoccin (FC), cycloheximide, pH 4.0, or pH 8.0 buffer and subsequently their polar transport capacities were determined. Relative to controls, FC enhanced auxin (IAA) uptake while CHI and pH 8.0 buffer reduced IAA uptake. Nevertheless, FC reduced IAA pulse velocity while cycloheximide increased velocity. Additional experiments showed that delivery of auxin to receivers is enhanced by increased receiver pH. This phenomenon was overcome by a pretreatment of the tissue with IAA. Our data suggest that while acidic wall pH values facilitate cellular IAA uptake, they do not enhance pulse velocity or basal secretion. These findings are inconsistent with the chemiosmotic hypothesis for auxin transport.

  20. Is not the universality of implementation of IAEA rules as difficult to maintain as it was to obtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grenier, M.

    1989-07-01

    IAEA recommendations on the safe transport of radioactive materials succeded in their task to uniformize the applicable rules for national and international transport. Problems set up by this carriage evolve with technical progress, nuclear knowledge and implementation development. This report tries to see under what conditions, the harmony obtained at one given date could be maintained and kept with the passing time, through the necessary adaptations in the field of the making up of the general rules, and in the practical applications