WorldWideScience

Sample records for internal emitter radiobiology

  1. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  2. Internal emitter limits for iodine, radium and radon daughters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlenker, R.A.

    1984-08-15

    This paper identifies some of the issues which arise in the consideration of the derivation of new limits on exposure to internal emitters. Basic and secondary radiation protection limits are discussed. Terms are defined and applied to the limitation of risk from stochastic effects. Non-stochastic data for specific internal emitters (/sup 131/I and the radium isotopes) are presented. Emphasis is placed on the quantitative aspects of the limit setting problem. 65 references, 2 figures, 12 tables.

  3. Radiation doses and risks from internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, John [Health Protection Agency, Radiation Protection Division, CRCE, Chilton, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0RQ (United Kingdom); Day, Philip [School of Chemistry, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)], E-mail: john.harrison@hpa.org.uk, E-mail: philip.day@manchester.ac.uk

    2008-06-01

    This review updates material prepared for the UK Government Committee Examining Radiation Risks from Internal Emitters (CERRIE) and also refers to the new recommendations of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) and other recent developments. Two conclusions from CERRIE were that ICRP should clarify and elaborate its advice on the use of its dose quantities, equivalent and effective dose, and that more attention should be paid to uncertainties in dose and risk estimates and their implications. The new ICRP recommendations provide explanations of the calculation and intended purpose of the protection quantities, but further advice on their use would be helpful. The new recommendations refer to the importance of understanding uncertainties in estimates of dose and risk, although methods for doing this are not suggested. Dose coefficients (Sv per Bq intake) for the inhalation or ingestion of radionuclides are published as reference values without uncertainty. The primary purpose of equivalent and effective dose is to enable the summation of doses from different radionuclides and from external sources for comparison with dose limits, constraints and reference levels that relate to stochastic risks of whole-body radiation exposure. Doses are calculated using defined biokinetic and dosimetric models, including reference anatomical data for the organs and tissues of the human body. Radiation weighting factors are used to adjust for the different effectiveness of different radiation types, per unit absorbed dose (Gy), in causing stochastic effects at low doses and dose rates. Tissue weighting factors are used to take account of the contribution of individual organs and tissues to overall detriment from cancer and hereditary effects, providing a simple set of rounded values chosen on the basis of age- and sex-averaged values of relative detriment. While the definition of absorbed dose has the scientific rigour required of a basic physical quantity

  4. Biologic data, models, and dosimetric methods for internal emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, D.A.

    1990-01-01

    The absorbed radiation dose from internal emitters has been and will remain a pivotal factor in assessing risk and therapeutic utility in selecting radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment. Although direct measurements of absorbed dose and dose distributions in vivo have been and will continue to be made in limited situations, the measurement of the biodistribution and clearance of radiopharmaceuticals in human subjects and the use of this data is likely to remain the primary means to approach the calculation and estimation of absorbed dose from internal emitters over the next decade. Since several approximations are used in these schema to calculate dose, attention must be given to inspecting and improving the application of this dosimetric method as better techniques are developed to assay body activity and as more experience is gained in applying these schema to calculating absorbed dose. Discussion of the need for considering small scale dosimetry to calculate absorbed dose at the cellular level will be presented in this paper. Other topics include dose estimates for internal emitters, biologic data mathematical models and dosimetric methods employed. 44 refs.

  5. Design of main linac emittance tuning bumps for the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peder Eliasson

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The installation of elements in the main linac of future linear colliders can only be done with a limited precision. The inevitable misalignments lead to unacceptable emittance growth. Beam-based alignment, e.g., one-to-one correction, dispersion free steering, or ballistic alignment, is necessary to reduce the emittance growth. In some cases, this is, however, not sufficient. For further reduction of the emittance growth, so-called emittance tuning bumps have to be used. A general strategy for the design of emittance tuning bumps has been developed and tested. Simulations suggest that the method can be conveniently used to understand the weaknesses of existing emittance tuning bumps and to significantly improve their performance in terms of, e.g., emittance reduction capability and convergence speed. An example of an application is the design of ten orthogonal knobs that, according to simulations, can reduce the normalized emittance growth in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC main linac from 23.8 to 0.34 nm with convergence within two iterations. Four orthogonal knobs have also been designed for the International Linear Collider (ILC. Simulations show that these knobs converge within a single iteration and reduce normalized emittance growth from 3.8 to 0.05 nm.

  6. Treatment planning for internal emitter therapy: Methods, applications and clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sgouros, G. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States)

    1999-01-01

    Treatment planning involves three basic steps: (1) a procedure must be devised that will provide the most relevant information, (2) the procedure must be applied and (3) the resulting information must be translated into a definition of the optimum implementation. There are varying degrees of treatment planning that may be implemented in internal emitter therapy. As in chemotherapy, the information from a Phase 1 study may be used to treat patients based upon body surface area. If treatment planning is included on a patient-specific basis, a pretherapy, trace-labeled, administration of the radiopharmaceutical is generally required. The data collected following the tracer dose may range from time-activity curves of blood and whole-body for use in blood, marrow or total body absorbed dose estimation to patient imaging for three-dimensional internal emitter dosimetry. The most ambitious approach requires a three-dimensional set of images representing radionuclide distribution (SPECT or PET) and a corresponding set of images representing anatomy (CT or MRI). The absorbed dose (or dose-rate) distribution may be obtained by convolution of a point kernel with the radioactivity distribution or by direct Monte Carlo calculation. A critical requirement for both techniques is the development of an overall structure that makes it possible, in a routine manner, to input the images, to identify the structures of interest and to display the results of the dose calculations in a clinically relevant manner. 52 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Radiobiology and Epidemiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C; Holmstock, L

    2001-04-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are: (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium and to co-ordinate the Belgian contribution to the 'International Collaborative Study of Cancer Risk among Radiation Workers in the Nuclear Industry'; (2) to elucidate the molecular basis of individual susceptibility to ionizing radiation in mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (3) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (4) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (5) to monitor the early variations of gene expression induced by ionising radiation and cytokines; (6) to evaluate the use of cytokines and natural substances for improving radiotherapy protocols; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are reported.

  8. Radiobiological Research in JINR

    CERN Document Server

    Krasavin, E A

    2000-01-01

    The results of long-term radiobiological and radiation-genetical research in DRRR (Division of Radiobiology) are summarized. The different radiation-induced effects in bacteria, yeasts, mammalian and human cells after irradiation by gamma-rays and heavy charged particles are considered. The important role of DNA repair processes in biological effectiveness of different types of radiation were shown. The data on mutagenic action of such kinds of radiation on pro- and eukaryotic cells were analyzed. On the basis of our data the hypersensitivity of human and mammalian chromosomes after low doses of gamma-rays (10-20 sGy) was revealed. The radiobiological effect of ^{211}At - methylene blue complex on human melanoma cells was studied. The extremely high effectiveness of this complex on melanoma cells was shown.

  9. With the Radiobiology Group

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The Radiobiology Group carries out experiments to study the effect of radiation on living cells. The photo shows the apparatus for growing broad beans which have been irradiated by 250 GeV protons. The roots are immersed in a tank of running water (CERN Weekly Bulletin 26 January 1981 and Annual Report 1980 p. 160). Karen Panman, Marilena Streit-Bianchi, Roger Paris.

  10. Alpha-emitters for medical therapy workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E.; McClure, J.J.

    1996-12-31

    A workshop on ``Alpha-Emitters for Medical Therapy`` was held May 30-31, 1996 in Denver Colorado to identify research goals and potential clinical needs for applying alpha-particle emitters and to provide DOE with sufficient information for future planning. The workshop was attended by 36 participants representing radiooncology, nuclear medicine, immunotherapy, radiobiology, molecular biology, biochemistry, radiopharmaceutical chemistry, dosimetry, and physics. This report provides a summary of the key points and recommendations arrived at during the conference.

  11. Biokinetic and dosimetric modelling in the estimation of radiation risks from internal emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, John

    2009-06-01

    . Radon-222 is the one internal emitter for which control of exposure is based on direct information on cancer risks, with extensive information available on lung cancer induction by radon progeny in mines and consistent data on risks in homes. The dose per unit (222)Rn exposure can be calculated by comparing lung cancer risk estimates derived for (222)Rn exposure and for external exposure of the Japanese survivors. Remarkably similar values are obtained by this method and by calculations using the ICRP model of the respiratory tract, providing good support for model assumptions. Other informative comparisons with risks from external exposure can be made for Thorotrast-induced liver cancer and leukaemia, and radium-induced bone cancer. The bone-seeking alpha emitters, plutonium-239 and radium isotopes, are poorer leukaemogens than predicted by models. ICRP dose coefficients are published as single values without consideration of uncertainties. However, it is clear that full consideration of uncertainties is appropriate when considering best estimates of doses and risks to individuals or specific population groups. An understanding of the component uncertainties in the calculation of dose coefficients can be seen as an important goal and should help inform judgements on the control of exposures. The routine consideration of uncertainties in dose assessments, if achievable, would be of questionable value when doses are generally maintained at small fractions of limits.

  12. Past and Future Work on Radiobiology Mega-Studies: A Case Study At Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haley, Benjamin; Wang, Qiong; Wanzer, Beau; Vogt, Stefan; Finney, Lydia; Yang, Ping Liu; Paunesku, Tatjana; Woloschak, Gayle

    2011-09-06

    Between 1952 and 1992, more than 200 large radiobiology studies were conducted in research institutes throughout Europe, North America, and Japan to determine the effects of external irradiation and internal emitters on the lifespan and tissue toxicity development in animals. At Argonne National Laboratory, 22 external beam studies were conducted on nearly 700 beagle dogs and 50,000 mice between 1969 and 1992. These studies helped to characterize the effects of neutron and gamma irradiation on lifespan, tumorigenesis, and mutagenesis across a range of doses and dosing patterns. The records and tissues collected at Argonne during that time period have been carefully preserved and redisseminated. Using these archived data, ongoing statistical work has been done and continues to characterize quality of radiation, dose, dose rate, tissue, and gender-specific differences in the radiation responses of exposed animals. The ongoing application of newly-developed molecular biology techniques to the archived tissues has revealed gene-specific mutation rates following exposure to ionizing irradiation. The original and ongoing work with this tissue archive is presented here as a case study of a more general trend in the radiobiology megastudies. These experiments helped form the modern understanding of radiation responses in animals and continue to inform development of new radiation models. Recent archival efforts have facilitated open access to the data and materials produced by these studies, and so a unique opportunity exists to expand this continued research.

  13. Thyroid cancer in the Marshallese: relative risk of short-lived internal emitters and external radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lessard, E.T.; Brill, A.B.; Adams, W.H.

    1985-01-01

    In a study of the comparative effects of internal versus external irradiation of the thyroid in young people, we determined that the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times less thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. We determined this finding for a group of 85 Marshall Islands children, who were less than 10 years of age at the time of exposure and who were accidentially exposed to internal and external thyroid radiation at an average level of 1400 rad. The external risk coefficient ranged between 2.5 and 4.9 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk, and thus, from our computations, the internal risk coefficient for the Marshallese children was estimated to range between 1.0 and 1.4 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk. In contrast, for individual more than 10 years of age at the time of exposure, the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times more thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. The external risk coefficients for the older age groups were reported in the literature to be in the range of 1.0 to 3.3 cancers per million person-rad-years-at risk. We computed internal risk coefficients of 3.3 to 8.1 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk for adolescent and adult groups. This higher sensitivity to cancer induction in the exposed adolescents and adults, is different from that seen in other exposed groups. 14 refs., 8 tabs.

  14. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 20. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 20. Proceedings

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    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, Hans-Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2011-07-01

    The proceedings include contributions on the following issues: laser driven proton accelerators on the way for radiotherapy, radiobiological evaluation of new radiations; molecular factors of radiation response; biological targeting; EGFR epidermal growth factor receptor/targeting - combined internal and external irradiation, radiobiology of normal tissues; dose-volume histograms for the radiotherapy: curves without radiobiological relevance or important information for the therapy planning; HPV (human papilloma virus) and radiation sensitivity of HNSCC (head and neck squamous cell carcinomas): evidence, radiobiological mechanism, clinical consequences and perspectives; mechanisms of action and intertumoral heterogeneity of response to EGFR inhibition in radiotherapy of solid tumors; evaluation of biomarkers for radiotherapy.

  15. Radiation Protection Research: Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desaintes, C

    2000-07-01

    The main objectives of research in the field of radiobiology and epidemiology performed at the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN are (1) to study cancer mortality in nuclear workers in Belgium; to document the feasibility of retrospective cohort studies in Belgium; (2) to participate in the IARC study; (3) to elucidate the molecular basis of the effects of ionising radiation in the mammalian embryo during the early phases of its development; (4) to assess the genetic risk of maternal exposure to ionizing radiation; (5) to elucidate the cellular mechanisms leading to brain damage after prenatal irradiation; (6) to advise authorities and to provide the general population with adequate information concerning the health risk arising from radiation exposure. Progress and major achievements in these topical areas in 1999 are reported.

  16. The radiobiology of hypofractionation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Alan E

    2015-05-01

    If the α/β ratio is high (e.g. 10 Gy) for tumour clonogen killing, but low (e.g. 3 Gy) for late normal tissue complications, then delivering external beam radiotherapy in a large number (20-30) of small (≈2 Gy) dose fractions should yield the highest 'therapeutic ratio'; this is demonstrated via the linear-quadratic model of cell killing. However, this 'conventional wisdom' is increasingly being challenged, partly by the success of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) or stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) extreme hypofractionation regimens of three to five large fractions for early stage non-small cell lung cancer and partly by indications that for certain tumours (prostate, breast) the α/β ratio may be of the same order or even lower than that characterising late complications. It is shown how highly conformal dose delivery combined with quasi-parallel normal tissue behaviour (n close to 1) enables 'safe' hypofractionation; this can be predicted by the (α/β)eff concept for normal tissues. Recent analyses of the clinical outcomes of non-small cell lung cancer radiotherapy covering 'conventional' hyper- to extreme hypofractionation (stereotactic ablative radiotherapy) regimens are consistent with linear-quadratic radiobiology, even at the largest fraction sizes, despite there being theoretical reasons to expect 'LQ violation' above a certain dose. Impairment of re-oxygenation between fractions and the very high (α/β) for hypoxic cells can complicate the picture regarding the analysis of clinical outcomes; it has also been suggested that vascular damage may play a role for very large dose fractions. Finally, the link between high values of (α/β)eff and normal-tissue sparing for quasi-parallel normal tissues, thereby favouring hypofractionation, may be particularly important for proton therapy, but more generally, improved conformality, achieved by whatever technique, can be translated into individualisation of both prescription dose and fraction

  17. γ-H2AX Kinetic Profile in Mouse Lymphocytes Exposed to the Internal Emitters Cesium-137 and Strontium-90.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen C Turner

    Full Text Available In the event of a dirty bomb scenario or an industrial nuclear accident, a significant dose of volatile radionuclides such as 137Cs and 90Sr may be dispersed into the atmosphere as a component of fallout and inhaled or ingested by hundreds and thousands of people. To study the effects of prolonged exposure to ingested radionuclides, we have performed long-term (30 day internal-emitter mouse irradiations using soluble-injected 137CsCl and 90SrCl2 radioisotopes. The effect of ionizing radiation on the induction and repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs in peripheral mouse lymphocytes in vivo was determined using the γ-H2AX biodosimetry marker. Using a serial sacrifice experimental design, whole-body radiation absorbed doses for 137Cs (0 to 10 Gy and 90Sr (0 to 49 Gy were delivered over 30 days following exposure to each radionuclide. The committed absorbed doses of the two internal emitters as a function of time post exposure were calculated based on their retention parameters and their derived dose coefficients for each specific sacrifice time. In order to measure the kinetic profile for γ-H2AX, peripheral blood samples were drawn at 5 specific timed dose points over the 30-day study period and the total γ-H2AX nuclear fluorescence per lymphocyte was determined using image analysis software. A key finding was that a significant γ-H2AX signal was observed in vivo several weeks after a single radionuclide exposure. A mechanistically-motivated model was used to analyze the temporal kinetics of γ-H2AX fluorescence. Exposure to either radionuclide showed two peaks of γ-H2AX: one within the first week, which may represent the death of mature, differentiated lymphocytes, and the second at approximately three weeks, which may represent the production of new lymphocytes from damaged progenitor cells. The complexity of the observed responses to internal irradiation is likely caused by the interplay between continual production and repair of DNA

  18. Design of main linac emittance tuning bumps for the Compact Linear Collider and the International Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Eliasson, Peder

    2008-01-01

    The installation of elements in the main linac of future linear colliders can only be done with a limited precision. The inevitable misalignments lead to unacceptable emittance growth. Beam-based alignment, e.g., one-to-one correction, dispersion free steering, or ballistic alignment, is necessary to reduce the emittance growth. In some cases, this is, however, not sufficient. For further reduction of the emittance growth, so-called emittance tuning bumps have to be used. A general strategy for the design of emittance tuning bumps has been developed and tested. Simulations suggest that the method can be conveniently used to understand the weaknesses of existing emittance tuning bumps and to significantly improve their performance in terms of, e.g., emittance reduction capability and convergence speed. An example of an application is the design of ten orthogonal knobs that, according to simulations, can reduce the normalized emittance growth in the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) main linac from 23.8 to 0.34 nm...

  19. Microirradiation techniques in radiobiological research

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Guido A Drexler; Miguel J Ruiz-Gómez

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work is to review the uses of laser microirradiation and ion microbeam techniques within the scope of radiobiological research. Laser microirradiation techniques can be used for many different purposes. In a specific condition, through the use of pulsed lasers, cell lysis can be produced for subsequent separation of different analytes. Microsurgery allows for the identification and isolation of tissue sections, single cells and subcellular components, using different types of lasers. The generation of different types of DNA damage, via this type of microirradiation, allows for the investigation of DNA dynamics. Ion microbeams are important tools in radiobiological research. There are only a limited number of facilities worldwide where radiobiological experiments can be performed. In the beginning, research was mostly focused on the bystander effect. Nowadays, with more sophisticated molecular and cellular biological techniques, ion microirradiation is used to unravel molecular processes in the field of radiobiology. These include DNA repair protein kinetics or chromatin modifications at the site of DNA damage. With the increasing relevance of charged particles in tumour therapy and new concepts on how to generate them, ion microbeam facilities are able to address unresolved questions concerning particle tumour therapy.

  20. Internal quantum efficiency and Auger recombination in green, yellow and red InGaN-based light emitters grown along the polar direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Thi Huong; Gil, Bernard; Damilano, Benjamin; Lekhal, Kaddour; De Mierry, Philippe

    2017-03-01

    We comparatively study the onset of photo-induced non-radiative intrinsic Auger recombination processes for red, yellow and green light emitting InGaNsbnd GaN hetero-structures grown along the polar orientation. We find a dramatic reduction of the photo excitation densities triggering the domination of Auger effect with increasing emission wavelength; that is to say in concert with the enhancement of the internal electric field in the structure. In long wavelength emitters, the internal electric field is stronger, and hence reducing the impact of the internal electric field is more critical.

  1. Radiotherapy treatment planning linear-quadratic radiobiology

    CERN Document Server

    Chapman, J Donald

    2015-01-01

    Understand Quantitative Radiobiology from a Radiation Biophysics PerspectiveIn the field of radiobiology, the linear-quadratic (LQ) equation has become the standard for defining radiation-induced cell killing. Radiotherapy Treatment Planning: Linear-Quadratic Radiobiology describes tumor cell inactivation from a radiation physics perspective and offers appropriate LQ parameters for modeling tumor and normal tissue responses.Explore the Latest Cell Killing Numbers for Defining Iso-Effective Cancer TreatmentsThe book compil

  2. Literature study of the radiobiological parameters of Caesium-137 required for evaluating internal irradiation doses as a function of age; Etude bibliographique des parametres radiobiologiques du cesium-137 necessaires a l'evaluation des doses d'irradiation interne en fonction de l'age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garnier, A. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, 92 - Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    This document reassembles information published in scientific literature on radiobiological parameters of Cs-137, necessary for the estimate of the internal irradiation dose of man according to his age (during growth). The data are completed by a commented review of the mathematical models, proposed in order to value the irradiation doses from ingested cesium and the biological parameters. (author) [French] Ce document rassemble les informations publiees dans la litterature scientifique, concernant les parametres radiobiologiqueo du cesium-137, necessaires a l'evaluation des doses d'irradiation interne de l'homme en fonction de l'age. Ces donnees sont completees par une revue commentee des modeles mathematiques proposes en vue de l'evaluation des doses d'irradiation a partir des quantites de cesium ingerees et des parametres biologiques. (auteur)

  3. [Systemic approach to radiobiological studies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulanova, K Ia; Lobanok, L M

    2004-01-01

    The principles of information theory were applied for analysis of radiobiological effects. The perception of ionizing radiations as a signal enables living organism to discern their benefits or harm, to react to absolute and relatively small deviations, to keep the logic and chronicle of events, to use the former experience for reacting in presence, to forecast consequences. The systemic analysis of organism's response to ionizing radiations allows explaining the peculiarities of effects of different absorbed doses, hormesis, apoptosis, remote consequences and other post-radiation effects.

  4. Radiobiology of human cancer radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    The author has systematically collected and collated the scientific literature correlating the basic and clinical sciences in this field in order to produce a definitive treatise. The book thoroughly reviews the biology and biochemistry relevant to radiobiology and describes the critical locus for the extinction of cell reproductive capacity. Extensive coverage is given to oxygen effect, hyperthermia, high linear energy transfer, cell populations, and similar topics. Separate sections cover time, dose, and fractionation; radiation hematology; cancer chemotherapy; and cancer immunology. The book also contains invaluable discussions of techniques for optimizing radiotherapy alone and in combination with other therapies.

  5. Internal quantum efficiency mapping analysis for a >20%-efficiency n-type bifacial solar cell with front-side emitter formed by BBr3 thermal diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simayi, Shalamujiang; Mochizuki, Toshimitsu; Kida, Yasuhiro; Shirasawa, Katsuhiko; Takato, Hidetaka

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a large-area (239-cm2) high-efficiency n-type bifacial solar cell that is processed using tube-furnace thermal diffusion employing liquid sources BBr3 for the front-side boron emitter and POCl3 for the rear-side phosphorus back surface field (BSF). The SiN x /Al2O3 stack was applied to the front-side boron emitter as a passivation layer. Both the front and rear-side electrodes are obtained using screen-printed contacts with H-patterns. The resulting highest-efficiency solar cell has front- and rear-side efficiencies of 20.3 and 18.7%, respectively, while the corresponding bifaciality is up to 92%. Finally, the passivation quality of the SiN x /Al2O3 stack on the front-side boron emitter and rear-side phosphorus BSF is investigated and visualized by measuring the internal quantum efficiency mapping of the bifacial solar cell.

  6. Brownian Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  7. Asymmetrical field emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  8. Introduction to radiobiology of targeted radionuclide therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Pierre ePOUGET

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, new radionuclide-based targeted therapies have emerged as efficient tools for cancer treatment. Targeted radionuclide therapies (TRT are based on a multidisciplinary approach that involves the cooperation of specialists in several research fields. Among them, radiobiologists investigate the biological effects of ionizing radiation, specifically the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the radiation response. Most of the knowledge about radiation effects concerns external beam radiation therapy (EBRT and radiobiology has then strongly contributed to the development of this therapeutic approach. Similarly, radiobiology and dosimetry are also assumed to be ways for improving TRT, in particular in the therapy of solid tumors which are radioresistant. However, extrapolation of EBRT radiobiology to TRT is not straightforward. Indeed, the specific physical characteristics of TRT (heterogeneous and mixed irradiation, protracted exposure and low absorbed dose rate differ from those of conventional EBRT (homogeneous irradiation, short exposure and high absorbed dose rate, and consequently the response of irradiated tissues might be different. Therefore, specific TRT radiobiology needs to be explored. Determining dose-effect correlation is also a prerequisite for rigorous preclinical radiobiology studies because dosimetry provides the necessary referential to all TRT situations. It is required too for developing patient-tailored TRT in the clinic in order to estimate the best dose for tumor control, while protecting the healthy tissues, thereby improving therapeutic efficacy. Finally, it will allow to determine the relative contribution of targeted effects (assumed to be dose-related and non-targeted effects (assumed to be non-dose-related of ionizing radiation. However, conversely to EBRT where it is routinely used, dosimetry is still challenging in TRT. Therefore, it constitutes with radiobiology, one of the main

  9. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  10. Metabolomic and lipidomic analysis of serum from mice exposed to an internal emitter, cesium-137, using a shotgun LC-MS(E) approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudarzi, Maryam; Weber, Waylon M; Mak, Tytus D; Chung, Juijung; Doyle-Eisele, Melanie; Melo, Dunstana R; Brenner, David J; Guilmette, Raymond A; Fornace, Albert J

    2015-01-02

    In this study ultra performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the MS(E) mode was used for rapid and comprehensive analysis of metabolites in the serum of mice exposed to internal exposure by Cesium-137 ((137)Cs). The effects of exposure to (137)Cs were studied at several time points after injection of (137)CsCl in mice. Over 1800 spectral features were detected in the serum of mice in positive and negative electrospray ionization modes combined. Detailed statistical analysis revealed that several metabolites associated with amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and the TCA cycle were significantly perturbed in the serum of (137)Cs-exposed mice compared with that of control mice. While metabolites associated with the TCA cycle and glycolysis increased in their serum abundances, fatty acids such as linoleic acid and palmitic acid were detected at lower levels in serum after (137)Cs exposure. Furthermore, phosphatidylcholines (PCs) were among the most perturbed ions in the serum of (137)Cs-exposed mice. This is the first study on the effects of exposure by an internal emitter in serum using a UPLC-MS(E) approach. The results have put forth a panel of metabolites, which may serve as potential serum markers to (137)Cs exposure.

  11. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  12. Emittance exchange results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller, R.P., III; /Brookhaven; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2009-09-01

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  13. Emittance Exchange Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller III,R.; Koeth, T.

    2009-05-04

    The promise of next-generation light sources depends on the availability of ultra-low emittance electron sources. One method of producing low transverse emittance beams is to generate a low longitudinal emittance beam and exchange it with a large transverse emittance. Experiments are underway at Fermilab's A0 Photoinjector and ANL's Argonne Wakefield Accelerator using the exchange scheme of Kim and Sessler. The experiment at the A0 Photoinjector exchanges a large longitudinal emittance with a small transverse emittance. AWA expects to exchange a large transverse emittance with a small longitudinal emittance. In this paper we discuss recent results at A0 and AWA and future plans for these experiments.

  14. Aberration Corrected Emittance Exchange

    CERN Document Server

    Nanni, Emilio A

    2015-01-01

    Full exploitation of emittance exchange (EEX) requires aberration-free performance of a complex imaging system including active radio-frequency (RF) elements which can add temporal distortions. We investigate the performance of an EEX line where the exchange occurs between two dimensions with normalized emittances which differ by orders of magnitude. The transverse emittance is exchanged into the longitudinal dimension using a double dog-leg emittance exchange setup with a 5 cell RF deflector cavity. Aberration correction is performed on the four most dominant aberrations. These include temporal aberrations that are corrected with higher order magnetic optical elements located where longitudinal and transverse emittance are coupled. We demonstrate aberration-free performance of emittances differing by 4 orders of magnitude, i.e. an initial transverse emittance of $\\epsilon_x=1$ pm-rad is exchanged with a longitudinal emittance of $\\epsilon_z=10$ nm-rad.

  15. [Low-dose rate brachytherapy with locally integrated beta emitters after internal urethrotomy. A pilot project using an animal model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidlich, P; Adam, C; Sroka, R; Lanzl, I; Assmann, W; Stief, C

    2007-09-01

    The treatment of urethral strictures represents an unsolved urological problem. The effect of a (32)P-coated urethral catheter in the sense of low-dose rate brachytherapy to modulate wound healing will be analyzed in an animal experiment. Unfortunately it is not possible to present any results because this is being studied for the first time and there are no experiences with low-dose rate brachytherapy and this form of application in the lower urinary tract. Furthermore the animal experiment will only start in the near future. Both decade-long experiences with radiotherapy to treat benign diseases and our own results of previous studies in otolaryngology and ophthalmology let us expect a significantly lower formation of urethral strictures after internal urethrotomy. This study will contribute to improving the treatment of urethral strictures as demanded in previous papers.

  16. Dosimetry of Auger emitters: Physical and phenomenological approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sastry, K.S.R.; Howell, R.W.; Rao, D.V.; Mylavarapu, V.B.; Kassis, A.I.; Adelstein, S.J.; Wright, H.A.; Hamm, R.N.; Turner, J.E.

    1987-01-01

    Recent radiobiological studies have demonstrated that Auger cascades can cause severe biological damage contrary to expectations based on conventional dosimetry. Several determinants govern these effects, including the nature of the Auger electron spectrum; localized energy deposition; cellular geometry; chemical form of the carrier; cellular localization, concentration, and subcellular distribution of the radionuclide. Conventional dosimetry is inadequate in that these considerations are ignored. Our results provide the basis for biophysical approaches toward subcellular dosimetry of Auger emitters in vitro and in vivo. 12 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durantel, Florent; Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine; Chevalier, François; Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas; Testard, Isabelle; Saintigny, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  18. Dosimetry for radiobiology experiments at GANIL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durantel, Florent, E-mail: durantel@ganil.fr [CIMAP-GANIL, Caen (France); Balanzat, Emmanuel; Cassimi, Amine [CIMAP-GANIL, Caen (France); Chevalier, François [CEA/DSV/LARIA, Caen (France); Ngono-Ravache, Yvette; Madi, Toiammou; Poully, Jean-Christophe; Ramillon, Jean-Marc; Rothard, Hermann; Ropars, Frédéric; Schwob, Lucas [CIMAP-GANIL, Caen (France); Testard, Isabelle [CEA/DSV/CBM/iRTSV, Grenoble (France); Saintigny, Yannick [CEA/DSV/LARIA, Caen (France)

    2016-04-21

    Mainly encouraged by the increasing application of ion beams for cancer treatment (hadron-therapy) including carbon beams, the use of heavy ion facilities for radiobiology is expanding rapidly today. As an alternative to dedicated centers for treatment and medical research, accelerators like GANIL offer the possibility to undertake such experiments. Since 20 years, CIMAP, reinforced 15 years ago by the biological host laboratory LARIA, has been receiving researchers in radiobiology and assisted them in performing experiments in different fields such as hadron-therapy, space radioprotection and fundamental biological and physico-chemical mechanisms. We present here a short description of the beam line and the on-line equipments that allow the automatic irradiation of up to 24 biological samples at once. We also developed an original on-line beam monitoring procedure for low ion flux (low dose rates) based on the measurement of the K-shell X-rays emitted from a thin iron foil. This detector is calibrated on an absolute scale before each experiment by counting etched tracks on an irradiated CR39 polymer plate. We present the performances and limits of this method and finally give typical fluence (dose) uncertainties for a standard irradiation in radiobiology.

  19. Nanocomposite plasmonic fluorescence emitters with core/shell configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miao, Xiaoyu; Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting Shan

    2010-07-16

    This paper is focused on the optical properties of nanocomposite plasmonic emitters with core/shell configurations, where a fluorescence emitter is located inside a metal nanoshell. Systematic theoretical investigations are presented for the influence of material type, core radius, shell thickness, and excitation wavelength on the internal optical intensity, radiative quantum yield, and fluorescence enhancement of the nanocomposite emitter. It is our conclusion that: (i) an optimal ratio between the core radius and shell thickness is required to maximize the absorption rate of fluorescence emitters, and (ii) a large core radius is desired to minimize the non-radiative damping and avoid significant quantum yield degradation of light emitters. Several experimental approaches to synthesize these nanocomposite emitters are also discussed. Furthermore, our theoretical results are successfully used to explain several reported experimental observations and should prove useful for designing ultra-bright core/shell nanocomposite emitters.

  20. Nanocomposite plasmonic fluorescence emitters with core/shell configurations.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brener, Igal; Luk, Ting Shan; Miao, Xiaoyu

    2010-06-01

    This paper is focused on the optical properties of nanocomposite plasmonic emitters with core/shell configurations, where a fluorescence emitter is located inside a metal nanoshell. Systematic theoretical investigations are presented for the influence of material type, core radius, shell thickness, and excitation wavelength on the internal optical intensity, radiative quantum yield, and fluorescence enhancement of the nanocomposite emitter. It is our conclusion that: (i) an optimal ratio between the core radius and shell thickness is required to maximize the absorption rate of fluorescence emitters, and (ii) a large core radius is desired to minimize the non-radiative damping and avoid significant quantum yield degradation of light emitters. Several experimental approaches to synthesize these nanocomposite emitters are also discussed. Furthermore, our theoretical results are successfully used to explain several reported experimental observations and should prove useful for designing ultra-bright core/shell nanocomposite emitters.

  1. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2010-01-01

    From a distinguished author comes this new edition for technologists, practitioners, residents, and students in radiology and nuclear medicine. Encompassing major topics in nuclear medicine from the basic physics of radioactive decay to instrumentation and radiobiology, it is an ideal review for Board and Registry examinations. The material is well organized and written with clarity. The book is supplemented with tables and illustrations throughout. It provides a quick reference book that is concise but comprehensive, and offers a complete discussion of topics for the nuclear medicine and radi

  2. Radiobiological studies using gamma and x rays.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Charles Augustus; Longley, Susan W.; Scott, Bobby R.; Lin, Yong; Wilder, Julie; Hutt, Julie A.; Padilla, Mabel T.; Gott, Katherine M.

    2013-02-01

    There are approximately 500 self-shielded research irradiators used in various facilities throughout the U.S. These facilities use radioactive sources containing either 137Cs or 60Co for a variety of biological investigations. A report from the National Academy of Sciences[1] described the issues with security of particular radiation sources and the desire for their replacement. The participants in this effort prepared two peer-reviewed publications to document the results of radiobiological studies performed using photons from 320-kV x rays and 137Cs on cell cultures and mice. The effectiveness of X rays was shown to vary with cell type.

  3. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E A; Kronenberg, A

    1998-11-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  4. Heavy-ion radiobiology: new approaches to delineate mechanisms underlying enhanced biological effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E. A.; Kronenberg, A.; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Shortly after the discovery of polonium and radium by Marie Curie and her husband and colleague, Pierre Curie, it was learned that exposure to these alpha-particle emitters produced deleterious biological effects. The mechanisms underlying the increased biological effectiveness of densely ionizing radiations, including alpha particles, neutrons and highly energetic heavy charged particles, remain an active area of investigation. In this paper, we review recent advances in several areas of the radiobiology of these densely ionizing radiations, also known as heavy ions. Advances are described in the areas of DNA damage and repair, chromosome aberrations, mutagenesis, neoplastic transformation in vitro, genomic instability, normal tissue radiobiology and carcinogenesis in vivo. We focus on technical innovations, including novel applications of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), linkage analysis, and studies of gene expression and protein expression. We also highlight the use of new cellular and animal systems, including those with defined DNA repair deficiencies, as well as epithelial cell model systems to assess neoplastic transformation both in vitro and in vivo. The studies reviewed herein have had a substantial impact on our understanding of the genotoxic effects of heavy ions as well as their distinct effects on tissue homeostasis. The use of these radiations in cancer therapy is also discussed. The use of both heavy-ion and proton therapy is on the upswing in several centers around the world, due to their unique energy deposition characteristics that enhance the therapeutic effect and help reduce damage to normal tissue.

  5. MONTE CARLO SIMULATION OF THE BREMSSTRAHLUNG RADIATION FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF AN INTERNAL CONTAMINATION WITH PURE-BETA EMITTERS IN VIVO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantínová, K; Fojtík, P; Malátová, I

    2016-09-01

    Rapid measurement techniques are required for a large-scale emergency monitoring of people. In vivo measurement of the bremsstrahlung radiation produced by incorporated pure-beta emitters can offer a rapid technique for the determination of such radionuclides in the human body. This work presents a method for the calibration of spectrometers, based on the use of UPh-02T (so-called IGOR) phantom and specific (90)Sr/(90)Y sources, which can account for recent as well as previous contaminations. The process of the whole- and partial-body counter calibration in combination with application of a Monte Carlo code offers readily extension also to other pure-beta emitters and various exposure scenarios. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  7. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terry, James Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  8. BNL ACCELERATOR-BASED RADIOBIOLOGY FACILITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LOWENSTEIN,D.I.

    2000-05-28

    For the past several years, the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (USA) has provided ions of iron, silicon and gold, at energies from 600 MeV/nucleon to 10 GeV/nucleon, for the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) radiobiology research program. NASA has recently funded the construction of a new dedicated ion facility, the Booster Applications Facility (BAF). The Booster synchrotron will supply ion beams ranging from protons to gold, in an energy range from 40--3,000 MeV/nucleon with maximum beam intensities of 10{sup 10} to 10{sup 11} ions per pulse. The BAF Project is described and the future AGS and BAF operation plans are presented.

  9. Physics and radiobiology of nuclear medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Gopal B

    2013-01-01

    The Fourth Edition of Dr. Gopal B. Saha’s Physics and Radiobiology of Nuclear Medicine was prompted by the need to provide up-to-date information to keep pace with the perpetual growth and improvement in the instrumentation and techniques employed in nuclear medicine since the last edition published in 2006. Like previous editions, the book is intended for radiology and nuclear medicine residents to prepare for the American Board of Nuclear Medicine, American Board of Radiology, and American Board of Science in Nuclear Medicine examinations, all of which require a strong physics background. Additionally, the book will serve as a textbook on nuclear medicine physics for nuclear medicine technologists taking the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board examination.

  10. Radiobiology with heavy charged particles: a historical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skarsgard, L.D. [Dept. of Medical Biophysics, B.C. Cancer Research Centre and TRIUMF, Vancouver (Canada)

    1997-09-01

    The presentation will attempt to briefly review some of radiobiological data on the effects of heavy charged particles and to discuss the influence of those studies on the clinical application which followed. (orig./MG)

  11. Radiobiology of Radiosurgery for the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Santacroce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available According to Leksell radiosurgery is defined as “the delivery of a single, high dose of irradiation to a small and critically located intracranial volume through the intact skull.” Before its birth in the early 60s and its introduction in clinical therapeutic protocols in late the 80s dose application in radiation therapy of the brain for benign and malignant lesions was based on the administration of cumulative dose into a variable number of fractions. The rationale of dose fractionation is to lessen the risk of injury of normal tissue surrounding the target volume. Radiobiological studies of cell culture lines of malignant tumors and clinical experience with patients treated with conventional fractionated radiotherapy helped establishing this radiobiological principle. Radiosurgery provides a single high dose of radiation which translates into a specific toxic radiobiological response. Radiobiological investigations to study the effect of high dose focused radiation on the central nervous system began in late the 50s. It is well known currently that radiobiological principles applied for dose fractionation are not reproducible when single high dose of ionizing radiation is delivered. A review of the literature about radiobiology of radiosurgery for the central nervous system is presented.

  12. Single-bunch emittance dilution in the perfect ILC main linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dou; GAO Jie

    2011-01-01

    In the ILC(International Linear Collider)main linac, low emittance preservation is the most important issue for beam dynamics study. As the main sources of emittance dilution, the dispersive and wakefield effects were studied in this paper. The theoretical calculations and numerical simulations of these two effects on single-bunch emittance dilution, without any misalignment errors, are presented in detail.

  13. Biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, B.R.

    1991-01-01

    Highlights of my biophysical and biomathematical adventures in radiobiology is presented. Early adventures involved developing state-vector models'' for specific harmful effects (cell killing, life shortening) of exposure to radiation. More recent adventures led to developing hazard-function models'' for predicting biological effects (e.g., cell killing, mutations, tumor induction) of combined exposure to different toxicants. Hazard-function models were also developed for predicting harm to man from exposure to large radiation doses. Major conclusions derived from the modeling adventures are as follows: (1) synergistic effects of different genotoxic agents should not occur at low doses; (2) for exposure of the lung or bone marrow to large doses of photon radiation, low rates of exposure should be better tolerated than high rates; and (3) for some types of radiation (e.g., alpha particles and fission neutrons), moderate doses delivered at a low rate may be more harmful than the same dose given at a high rate. 53 refs., 7 figs.

  14. Spectral beam combining of multi-single emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baohua; Guo, Weirong; Guo, Zhijie; Xu, Dan; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Thomas; Chen, Xiaohua

    2016-03-01

    Spectral beam combination expands the output power while keeps the beam quality of the combined beam almost the same as that of a single emitter. Spectral beam combination has been successfully achieved for high power fiber lasers, diode laser arrays and diode laser stacks. We have recently achieved the spectral beam combination of multiple single emitter diode lasers. Spatial beam combination and beam transformation are employed before beams from 25 single emitter diode lasers can be spectrally combined. An average output power about 220W, a spectral bandwidth less than 9 nm (95% energy), a beam quality similar to that of a single emitter and electro-optical conversion efficiency over 46% are achieved. In this paper, Rigorous Coupled Wave analysis is used to numerically evaluate the influence of emitter width, emitter pitch and focal length of transform lens on diffraction efficiency of the grating and spectral bandwidth. To assess the chance of catastrophic optical mirror damage (COMD), the optical power in the internal cavity of a free running emitter and the optical power in the grating external cavity of a wavelength locked emitter are theoretically analyzed. Advantages and disadvantages of spectral beam combination are concluded.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Field Emitters

    OpenAIRE

    Zhbanov, Alexander; Pogorelov, Evgeny; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we theoretically investigate the field emission from carbon nanotube field emitters in diode configuration between a flat anode and cathode. Exact analytical formulas of the electrical field, field enhancement factor, ponderomotive force, and field emission current are found. Applied voltage, height of the needle, radius of curvature on its top, and the work function are the parameters at our disposal. The field enhancement factor, total force and emission current, as well as ...

  16. Radiobiological Determination of Dose Escalation and Normal Tissue Toxicity in Definitive Chemoradiation Therapy for Esophageal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: Samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Carrington, Rhys [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Department of Oncology, Gray Institute of Radiation Oncology and Biology, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-01

    Purpose: This study investigated the trade-off in tumor coverage and organ-at-risk sparing when applying dose escalation for concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT) of mid-esophageal cancer, using radiobiological modeling to estimate local control and normal tissue toxicity. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with mid-esophageal cancer were selected from the SCOPE1 database (International Standard Randomised Controlled Trials number 47718479), with a mean planning target volume (PTV) of 327 cm{sup 3}. A boost volume, PTV2 (GTV + 0.5 cm margin), was created. Radiobiological modeling of tumor control probability (TCP) estimated the dose required for a clinically significant (+20%) increase in local control as 62.5 Gy/25 fractions. A RapidArc (RA) plan with a simultaneously integrated boost (SIB) to PTV2 (RA{sub 62.5}) was compared to a standard dose plan of 50 Gy/25 fractions (RA{sub 50}). Dose-volume metrics and estimates of normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) for heart and lungs were compared. Results: Clinically acceptable dose escalation was feasible for 16 of 21 patients, with significant gains (>18%) in tumor control from 38.2% (RA{sub 50}) to 56.3% (RA{sub 62.5}), and only a small increase in predicted toxicity: median heart NTCP 4.4% (RA{sub 50}) versus 5.6% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001 and median lung NTCP 6.5% (RA{sub 50}) versus 7.5% (RA{sub 62.5}) P<.001. Conclusions: Dose escalation to the GTV to improve local control is possible when overlap between PTV and organ-at-risk (<8% heart volume and <2.5% lung volume overlap for this study) generates only negligible increase in lung or heart toxicity. These predictions from radiobiological modeling should be tested in future clinical trials.

  17. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  18. National Radiobiology Archives Distributed Access user's manual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.; Smith, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Prather, J. (Linfield Coll., McMinnville, OR (United States))

    1991-11-01

    This User's Manual describes installation and use of the National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) Distributed Access package. The package consists of a distributed subset of information representative of the NRA databases and database access software which provide an introduction to the scope and style of the NRA Information Systems.

  19. Low-emittance tuning at the Cornell Electron Storage Ring

    CERN Document Server

    Shanks, James; Sagan, David

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 the Cornell Electron/Positron Storage Ring (CESR) was reconfigured from an electron/positron collider to serve as a testbed for the International Linear Collider (ILC) damping rings. One of the primary goals of the CESR Test Accelerator (CesrTA) project is to develop low emittance tuning techniques to achieve sub-10pm geometric vertical emittance at 2.085 GeV. This paper discusses the tuning methods used at CesrTA to achieve low-emittance conditions. A minimum vertical emittance of 8.7 +2.9/-3.4(sys) +/-0.2(stat) pm has been achieved at 2.085 GeV. In various configurations and beam energies the correction technique routinely achieves vertical emittance <15 pm after correction. Beam-based measurement and correction requires about 15 minutes. Simulations modeling the effects of magnet misalignments, BPM errors, and emittance correction algorithm suggest the residual vertical emittance measured at the conclusion of the tuning procedure is dominated by sources other than optics errors and misalignments...

  20. Evaluation of dual energy quantitative CT for determining the spatial distributions of red marrow and bone for dosimetry in internal emitter radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodsitt, Mitchell M., E-mail: goodsitt@umich.edu; Shenoy, Apeksha; Howard, David; Christodoulou, Emmanuel; Dewaraja, Yuni K. [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Shen, Jincheng [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Schipper, Matthew J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Wilderman, Scott [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of Michigan, 1500 East Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Chun, Se Young [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: To evaluate a three-equation three-unknown dual-energy quantitative CT (DEQCT) technique for determining region specific variations in bone spongiosa composition for improved red marrow dose estimation in radionuclide therapy. Methods: The DEQCT method was applied to 80/140 kVp images of patient-simulating lumbar sectional body phantoms of three sizes (small, medium, and large). External calibration rods of bone, red marrow, and fat-simulating materials were placed beneath the body phantoms. Similar internal calibration inserts were placed at vertebral locations within the body phantoms. Six test inserts of known volume fractions of bone, fat, and red marrow were also scanned. External-to-internal calibration correction factors were derived. The effects of body phantom size, radiation dose, spongiosa region segmentation granularity [single (∼17 × 17 mm) region of interest (ROI), 2 × 2, and 3 × 3 segmentation of that single ROI], and calibration method on the accuracy of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow (cellularity) and trabecular bone were evaluated. Results: For standard low dose DEQCT x-ray technique factors and the internal calibration method, the RMS errors of the estimated volume fractions of red marrow of the test inserts were 1.2–1.3 times greater in the medium body than in the small body phantom and 1.3–1.5 times greater in the large body than in the small body phantom. RMS errors of the calculated volume fractions of red marrow within 2 × 2 segmented subregions of the ROIs were 1.6–1.9 times greater than for no segmentation, and RMS errors for 3 × 3 segmented subregions were 2.3–2.7 times greater than those for no segmentation. Increasing the dose by a factor of 2 reduced the RMS errors of all constituent volume fractions by an average factor of 1.40 ± 0.29 for all segmentation schemes and body phantom sizes; increasing the dose by a factor of 4 reduced those RMS errors by an average factor of 1.71 ± 0.25. Results

  1. Research trends in radiobiology since 40 years. a new approach: the enzymatic repair function of DNA, internal factor in evolution of biological systems under irradiation; Etude des tendances des recherches en radiologie depuis 40 ans. Une nouvelle voie de recherche: la fonction de reparation enzymatique de l'ADN, facteur interne d'evolution des systemes biologiques sous rayonnement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouton, R. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-07-01

    In the first part of the report, the author attempts to draw an historical scheme of successive research working hypotheses in radiobiology since 1924. Less than a generation ago the effect of radiation exposure were viewed as being direct, immediate, irreparable and unmodifiable. Now it is generally accepted that radiation lesion can also be indirect, delayed, reparable and often modified with appropriate chemical or biochemical treatment. It was however in 1962-1964 that came the decisive breakthrough in radiobiology with the discovery that the cell possesses a natural active self-defense mechanism against whatever stress would affect the integrity of the genetic message contained in the DNA structure itself. The existence of what could be considered as a fourth DNA function i.e. self-repair by enzymatic action under genetic control-brings at least to radiobiology the missing molecular biology basis it needed to get out of its 'phenomenological night' after abandon of the generalization of Lea's theory through lack of experimental evidence. In the second part, which is a prospective one, the author tries to set an enlarged synthesis considering the possible role of DNA repair system not only in cell survival - in presence or absence of dose modifiers or mutagens - but also in the artificial and natural evolution of biological system exposed to sub-lethal doses of radiation. Most recent data from the literature fit well with what must be still considered as a general working hypothesis. Studies dealing with phenotypic and genotypic characters linked with the acquisition of gamma and UV radiation resistance in 'Escherichia coli K12' has been started by the author, in collaboration with O. Tremeau, in order to bring a new experimental contribution in this respect. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie, l'auteur tente de retracer l'historique des hypotheses successives qui ont jalonne les avances de la radiobiologie depuis 1924

  2. Emitter Design and Numerical Simulation Based on the Extenics Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Fan

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the performance of emitter, the extenics theory is introduced, whose divergent thinking is used to resolve the conflict of anti-clogging and energy dissipation and a new structure is proposed. The wide triangular areas are designed to reduce the flow rate behind of the each orifice and be easy to precipitation of impurities. The orifices are set to gradually decrease water kinetic energy and the flow channel is designed to be dismantle. The numerical simulation technology is used to analyze the internal flow field of emitter, the flow field results show that the improved emitter has great effect of energy dissipation and anti-clogging. As the same time, the structure of emitter is optimized and L1 = 31 mm, L2 = 21 mm, L3 = 8 mm and L4 = 5 mm are the optimization size values.

  3. Transnational science and collaborative networks. The case of Genetics and Radiobiology in Mexico, 1950-1970.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The transnational approach of the science and technology studies (S&TS) abandons the nation as a unit of analysis in order to understand the development of science history. It also abandons Euro-US-centred narratives in order to explain the role of international collaborative networks and the circulation of knowledge, people, artefacts and scientific practices. It is precisely under this perspective that the development of genetics and radiobiology in Mexico shall be analyzed, together with the pioneering work of the Mexican physician-turned-geneticist Alfonso León de Garay who spent two years in the Galton Laboratory in London under the supervision of Lionel Penrose. Upon his return de Garay funded the Genetics and Radiobiology Program of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy based on local needs and the aim of working beyond geographical limitations to thus facilitate the circulation of knowledge, practices and people. The three main lines of research conducted in the years after its foundation that were in line with international projects while responding to the national context were, first, cytogenetic studies of certain abnormalities, and the cytogenetics and anthropological studies of the Olympic Games held in Mexico in 1968; second, the study of the effects of radiation on hereditary material; and third, the study of population genetics in Drosophila and in Mexican indigenous groups. The program played a key role in reshaping the scientific careers of Mexican geneticists, and in transferring locally sourced research into broader networks. This case shows the importance of international collaborative networks and circulation in the constitution of national scientific elites, and also shows the national and transnational concerns that shaped local practices.

  4. Pulsed radiobiology with laser-driven plasma accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giulietti, Antonio; Grazia Andreassi, Maria; Greco, Carlo

    2011-05-01

    Recently, a high efficiency regime of acceleration in laser plasmas has been discovered, allowing table top equipment to deliver doses of interest for radiotherapy with electron bunches of suitable kinetic energy. In view of an R&D program aimed to the realization of an innovative class of accelerators for medical uses, a radiobiological validation is needed. At the present time, the biological effects of electron bunches from the laser-driven electron accelerator are largely unknown. In radiobiology and radiotherapy, it is known that the early spatial distribution of energy deposition following ionizing radiation interactions with DNA molecule is crucial for the prediction of damages at cellular or tissue levels and during the clinical responses to this irradiation. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radio-biological effects obtained with electron bunches from a laser-driven electron accelerator compared with bunches coming from a IORT-dedicated medical Radio-frequency based linac's on human cells by the cytokinesis block micronucleus assay (CBMN). To this purpose a multidisciplinary team including radiotherapists, biologists, medical physicists, laser and plasma physicists is working at CNR Campus and University of Pisa. Dose on samples is delivered alternatively by the "laser-linac" operating at ILIL lab of Istituto Nazionale di Ottica and an RF-linac operating for IORT at Pisa S. Chiara Hospital. Experimental data are analyzed on the basis of suitable radiobiological models as well as with numerical simulation based on Monte Carlo codes. Possible collective effects are also considered in the case of ultrashort, ultradense bunches of ionizing radiation.

  5. Toward a consensus on radiobiology teaching to radiation oncology residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynlacht, Joseph R; Dewhirst, Mark W; Hall, Eric J; Rosenstein, Barry S; Zeman, Elaine M

    2002-05-01

    There are approximately 82 radiation oncology residency programs in the United States, which provide training opportunities for about 400 residents. All accredited radiation oncology residency programs must have at least one basic scientist on the faculty, and it is these individuals who often assume, wholly or in part, the responsibility of teaching radiation and cancer biology to radiation oncology residents in preparation for the American College of Radiology (ACR) In-Training Examination in Radiation Oncology and the American Board of Radiology (ABR) written examinations. In response to a perceived lack of uniformity in radiation and cancer biology curricula currently being taught to residents and a perceived lack of guidance for instructors in formulating course content for this population, a special session was presented at the Forty-eighth Annual Radiation Research Society meeting on April 23, 2001. The session, entitled "Toward a Consensus on Radiobiology Teaching to Radiation Oncology Residents", was focused on issues related to teaching radiobiology to radiation oncology residents and targeted for individuals who actively teach radiation and cancer biology as well as coordinators of residency training programs. The speakers addressed current challenges and future problems facing instructors and programs. Among these were lack of feedback on resident performance on ABR and ACR written examinations and on course content, uncertainty about what topics residents must know to pass the ABR examination, and, in the near future, a reduction (due to retirement) of instructors qualified to teach radiobiology. This article provides a synopsis of the information that was presented during that session, offers a glimpse into how the ABR and ACR examinations are prepared and details of the content of past and future examinations, and summarizes the activities of the Joint Working Group on Radiobiology Teaching which was formed to educate instructors, to establish a

  6. (RadioBiological Optimization of External-Beam Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan E. Nahum

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available “Biological optimization” (BIOP means planning treatments using (radiobiological criteria and models, that is, tumour control probability and normal-tissue complication probability. Four different levels of BIOP are identified: Level I is “isotoxic” individualization of prescription dose at fixed fraction number. is varied to keep the NTCP of the organ at risk constant. Significant improvements in local control are expected for non-small-cell lung tumours. Level II involves the determination of an individualized isotoxic combination of and fractionation scheme. This approach is appropriate for “parallel” OARs (lung, parotids. Examples are given using our BioSuite software. Hypofractionated SABR for early-stage NSCLC is effectively Level-II BIOP. Level-III BIOP uses radiobiological functions as part of the inverse planning of IMRT, for example, maximizing TCP whilst not exceeding a given NTCP. This results in non-uniform target doses. The NTCP model parameters (reflecting tissue “architecture” drive the optimizer to emphasize different regions of the DVH, for example, penalising high doses for quasi-serial OARs such as rectum. Level-IV BIOP adds functional imaging information, for example, hypoxia or clonogen location, to Level III; examples are given of our prostate “dose painting” protocol, BioProp. The limitations of and uncertainties inherent in the radiobiological models are emphasized.

  7. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, M

    2014-03-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space.

  8. New challenges in high-energy particle radiobiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Densely ionizing radiation has always been a main topic in radiobiology. In fact, α-particles and neutrons are sources of radiation exposure for the general population and workers in nuclear power plants. More recently, high-energy protons and heavy ions attracted a large interest for two applications: hadrontherapy in oncology and space radiation protection in manned space missions. For many years, studies concentrated on measurements of the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the energetic particles for different end points, especially cell killing (for radiotherapy) and carcinogenesis (for late effects). Although more recently, it has been shown that densely ionizing radiation elicits signalling pathways quite distinct from those involved in the cell and tissue response to photons. The response of the microenvironment to charged particles is therefore under scrutiny, and both the damage in the target and non-target tissues are relevant. The role of individual susceptibility in therapy and risk is obviously a major topic in radiation research in general, and for ion radiobiology as well. Particle radiobiology is therefore now entering into a new phase, where beyond RBE, the tissue response is considered. These results may open new applications for both cancer therapy and protection in deep space. PMID:24198199

  9. Beta emitters and radiation protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jødal, Lars

    2009-01-01

    , and 90Y, using data from a freely available database. Bremsstrahlung yields were calculated for 90Y shielded by lead, aluminium, or perspex. Bremsstrahlung spectrum from 90Y shielded by perspex was measured, and attenuation of spectrum by lead was calculated. Whole-body and finger doses to persons...... preparing 90Y-Zevalin were measured. CONCLUSIONS. Good laboratory practice is important to keep radiation doses low. To reduce bremsstrahlung, 90Y should not be shielded by lead but instead perspex (10 mm) or aluminium (5 mm). Bremsstrahlung radiation can be further reduced by adding a millimetre of lead......BACKGROUND. Beta emitters, such as 90Y, are increasingly being used for cancer treatment. However, beta emitters demand other precautions than gamma emitters during preparation and administration, especially concerning shielding. AIM. To discuss practical precautions for handling beta emitters...

  10. Nanodiamond Emitters of Single Photons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlasov I.I.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Luminescence properties of single color centers were studied in nanodiamonds of different origin. It was found that single photon emitters could be realized even in molecularsized diamond (less than 2 nm capable of housing stable luminescent center “silicon-vacancy.” First results on incorporation of single-photon emitters based on luminescent nanodiamonds in plasmonic nanoantennas to enhance the photon count rate and directionality, diminish the fluorescence decay time, and provide polarization selectivity are presented.

  11. Single-bunch emittance dilution in the perfect ILC main linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王逗; 高杰

    2011-01-01

    In the ILC (International Linear Collider) main linac, low emittance preservation is the most important issue for beam dynamics study. As the main sources of emittance dilution, the dispersive and wakefield effects were studied in this paper. The theoreti

  12. Radiobiological and standard data for radioprotection and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jammet, H.

    1972-09-01

    From ninth annual meeting of the European Society for Radiation Biology; Rome, Italy (26 Sep 1972). Radiobiological data provide the scientific bases for radioprotection norms and radiotherapy practices. Nevertheless numerous problems remain unsolved including dosimetry at the cellular and infracellular level, metabolic curves for the purlfication of radionuclides, dose-effect relations for stochastic phenomena, effect of high doses on conjunctive tissue, value of the calibration factor in time, RBE of high energy particles, and radiosensitivity as a function of age and sex. The scope of these problems is briefly indicated. (JSR)

  13. Treatment plan comparison between helical tomotherapy and MLC-based IMRT using radiobiological measures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Ferreira, Brigida Costa [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Shi, Chengyu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Lind, Bengt K [Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University (Sweden); Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2007-07-07

    The rapid implementation of advanced treatment planning and delivery technologies for radiation therapy has brought new challenges in evaluating the most effective treatment modality. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) using multi-leaf collimators (MLC) and helical tomotherapy (HT) are becoming popular modes of treatment delivery and their application and effectiveness continues to be investigated. Presently, there are several treatment planning systems (TPS) that can generate and optimize IMRT plans based on user-defined objective functions for the internal target volume (ITV) and organs at risk (OAR). However, the radiobiological parameters of the different tumours and normal tissues are typically not taken into account during dose prescription and optimization of a treatment plan or during plan evaluation. The suitability of a treatment plan is typically decided based on dosimetric criteria such as dose-volume histograms (DVH), maximum, minimum, mean and standard deviation of the dose distribution. For a more comprehensive treatment plan evaluation, the biologically effective uniform dose D-bar is applied together with the complication-free tumour control probability (P{sub +}). Its utilization is demonstrated using three clinical cases that were planned with two different forms of IMRT. In this study, three different cancer types at different anatomical sites were investigated: head and neck, lung and prostate cancers. For each cancer type, a linac MLC-based step-and-shoot IMRT plan and a HT plan were developed. The MLC-based IMRT treatment plans were developed on the Philips treatment-planning platform, using the Pinnacle 7.6 software release. For the tomotherapy HiArt plans, the dedicated tomotherapy treatment planning station was used, running version 2.1.2. By using D-bar as the common prescription point of the treatment plans and plotting the tissue response probabilities versus D-bar for a range of prescription doses, a number of plan trials can be

  14. REVIEW: Development of radiobiology for oncology—a personal view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Jack F.

    2006-07-01

    When I came into radiotherapy in 1950, I was puzzled that some patients were treated to 3000 rads (cGy) in 3 weeks but others received 4000 in 5 or 6000 in 6 weeks. When I asked why, there were no convincing answers given, except 'this is what we usually do'. It wasn't until I went to a course on 'Radiobiology for Radiotherapy' in Cambridge that I learnt about the basic theories of Douglas Lea and the very considerable history of research into radiobiology and clinical radiotherapy. And there were still some questions outstanding, such as the relative importance of intracellular repair between 'daily' fractions, whether a 2 day gap each week was a good or a bad idea, and the role of proliferation, if any, during irradiation. I thought that a few simple animal experiments might help to give answers! That led me to a continuing interest in these questions and answers, which has taken me more than 50 years to pursue. This is the very personal story of what I saw happening in the subject, decade by decade. I was happy to experience all this together with scientists in many other countries, and our own, along the way.

  15. Hypofractionation in Prostate Cancer: Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mangoni

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76–80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α/β. Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  16. Hypofractionation in prostate cancer: radiobiological basis and clinical appliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangoni, M; Desideri, I; Detti, B; Bonomo, P; Greto, D; Paiar, F; Simontacchi, G; Meattini, I; Scoccianti, S; Masoni, T; Ciabatti, C; Turkaj, A; Serni, S; Minervini, A; Gacci, M; Carini, M; Livi, L

    2014-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy with conventional fractionation to a total dose of 76-80 Gy represents the most adopted treatment modality for prostate cancer. Dose escalation in this setting has been demonstrated to improve biochemical control with acceptable toxicity using contemporary radiotherapy techniques. Hypofractionated radiotherapy and stereotactic body radiation therapy have gained an increasing interest in recent years and they have the potential to become the standard of care even if long-term data about their efficacy and safety are not well established. Strong radiobiological basis supports the use of high dose for fraction in prostate cancer, due to the demonstrated exceptionally low values of α / β . Clinical experiences with hypofractionated and stereotactic radiotherapy (with an adequate biologically equivalent dose) demonstrated good tolerance, a PSA control comparable to conventional fractionation, and the advantage of shorter time period of treatment. This paper reviews the radiobiological findings that have led to the increasing use of hypofractionation in the management of prostate cancer and briefly analyzes the clinical experience in this setting.

  17. Influence of oxygen on the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barilla, Jiří; Lokajíček, Miloš V.; Pisaková, Hana; Simr, Pavel

    2016-07-01

    The simulation of the chemical stage of radiobiological mechanism may be very helpful in studying the radiobiological effect of ionizing radiation when the water radical clusters formed by the densely ionizing ends of primary or secondary charged particle may form DSBs damaging DNA molecules in living cells. It is possible to study not only the efficiency of individual radicals but also the influence of other species or radiomodifiers (mainly oxygen) being present in water medium during irradiation. The mathematical model based on Continuous Petri nets (proposed by us recently) will be described. It makes it possible to analyze two main processes running at the same time: chemical radical reactions and the diffusion of radical clusters formed during energy transfer. One may study the time change of radical concentrations due to the chemical reactions running during diffusion process. Some orientation results concerning the efficiency of individual radicals in DSB formation (in the case of Co60 radiation) will be presented; the influence of oxygen present in water medium during irradiation will be shown, too.

  18. An irradiation facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological studies

    CERN Document Server

    Besserer, J; Dellert, M; Gahn, C; Moosburger, M; Pemler, P; Quicken, P; Distel, L; Schuessler, H

    1999-01-01

    A vertical beam facility for radiobiological experiments was designed and constructed at the Munich Tandem-Accelerator Laboratory. The main part of the facility is a 90 deg. dipole magnet bending the beam of protons or heavy particles into a vertical upward direction, which is advantageous for wet-cell irradiation. After collimation the beam is spread out passively by thin scattering foils and dynamically by magnetic coils. A homogeneity of the radiation field better than +-5% has been achieved over the diameter of the exit window of 60 mm. The dose rate can be widely adjusted from single particles to more than 10 sup 1 sup 0 particles (i.e. hundreds of Grays) per second. The dose measurement is based on single-particle counting and on standard dosimeters. The detector system for dosimetry and irradiation control is described. In a first radiobiological experiment the cell survival of chinese hamster cells was measured after irradiation with 22.7 MeV protons and compared with the X-ray result.

  19. Biofilm structure and its influence on clogging in drip irrigation emitters distributing reclaimed wastewater

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YAN Dazhuang; BAI Zhihui; Mike Rowan; GU Likun; Ren Shumei; YANG Peiling

    2009-01-01

    Using reclaimed wastewater for crop irrigation is a practical alternative to discharge wastewater treatment plant effluents into surface waters.However,biofouling has been identified as a major contributor to emitter clogging in drip irrigation systems distributing reclaimed wastewater.Little is known about the biofilm structure and its influence on clogging in the drip emitter flow path.This study was first to investigate the microbial characteristics of mature biofilms present in the emitters and the effect of flow path structures on the biofilm microbial communities.The analysis of biofilm matrix structure using a scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that particles in the matrix of the biofilm coupled extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) and formed sediment in the emitter flow path.Analysis of biofilm mass including protein,polysaccharide and phospholipid fatty acids (PLFAs) showed that emitter flow path style influenced biofilm community structure and diversity.The correlations of biofilm biomass and discharge reduction after 360 h irrigation were computed and suggest that PFLAs provide the best correlation coefficient.Comparatively,the emitter with the unsymmetrical dentate structure and shorter flow path (Emitter C) had the best anti-clogging capability.By optimizing the dentate structure,the internal flow pattern within the flow path could be enhanced as an important method to control the biofilm within emitter flow path.This study established electron microscope techniques and biochemical microbial analysis methods that may provide a framework for future emitter biofilm studies.

  20. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHenry, R.S. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Naval Architecture, Ocean and Marine Engineering

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  1. Assessment of beta-emitter radionuclides in biological samples using liquid scintillation counting. Application to the study of internal doses in molecular and cellular biology techniques; Evaluacion en muestras biologicas de radionucleidos emisores beta mediante espectrometria de centelleo en fase liquida. Aplicaciones al estudio de dosis internas en tecnicas de investigacion de biologia molecular y celular

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierra, I.; Delgado, A.; Navarro, T.; Macias, M. T.

    2007-07-01

    The radioisotopic techniques used in Molecular and Cellular Biology involve external and internal irradiation risk. It is necessary to control the possible internal contamination associated to the development of these techniques. The internal contamination risk can be due to physical and chemical properties of the labelled compounds, aerosols generated during the performance technique. The aim of this work was to estimate the possible intake of specific beta emitters during the technique development and to propose the required criterions to perform Individual Monitoring. The most representative radioisotopic techniques were selected attending their potential risk of internal contamination. Techniques were analysed applying IAEA methodology according to the used activity in each technique. It was necessary to identify the worker groups that would require individual monitoring on the base of their specific risk. Different measurement procedures were applied to study the possible intake in group risk and more than 160 persons were measured by in vitro bioassay. (Author) 96 refs.

  2. Optical characterization of OLED emitter properties by radiation pattern analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaemmich, Michael

    2011-09-08

    Researches in both, academia and industry are investigating optical loss channels in OLED layered systems by means of optical simulation tools in order to derive promising concepts for a further enhancement of the overall device performance. Besides other factors, the prospects of success of such optimization strategies rely severely on the credibility of the optical input data. The present thesis provides a guideline to measure the active optical properties of OLED emitter materials in situ by radiation pattern analyses. Reliable and widely applicable methods are introduced to determine the internal electroluminescence spectrum, the profile of the emission zone, the dipole emitter orientation, and the internal luminescence quantum efficiency of emissive materials from the optical far field emission of OLEDs in electrical operation. The proposed characterization procedures are applied to sets of OLEDs containing both, fluorescent polymeric materials as well as phosphorescent small-molecular emitters, respectively. On the one hand, quite expected results are obtained. On the other hand, several novel and truly surprising results are found. Most importantly, this thesis contains the first report of a non-isotropic, mainly parallel emitter orientation in a phosphorescent small-molecular guest-host system (Ir(MDQ)2(acac) in a-NPD). Due to the latter result, emitter orientation based optimization of phosphorescent OLEDs seems to be within reach. Since parallel dipoles emit preferably into air, the utilization of smart emissive materials with advantageous molecular orientation is capable to boost the efficiency of phosphorescent OLEDs by 50%. Materials design, the influence of the matrix material and the substrate, as well as film deposition conditions are just a few parameters that need to be studied further in order to exploit the huge potential of the dipole emitter orientation in phosphorescent OLEDs.

  3. Radiobiological long-term accumulation of environmental alpha radioactivity in extracted human teeth and animal bones in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almayahi, B A; Tajuddin, A A; Jaafar, M S

    2014-03-01

    In this study, the radiobiological analysis of natural alpha emitters in extracted human teeth and animal bones from Malaysia was estimated. The microdistributions of alpha particles in tooth and bone samples were measured using CR-39 alpha-particle track detectors. The lowest and highest alpha emission rates in teeth in the Kedah and Perak states were 0.0080 ± 0.0005 mBq cm(-2) and 0.061 ± 0.008 mBq cm(-2), whereas those of bones in the Perlis and Kedah states were 0.0140 ± 0.0001 mBq cm(-2) and 0.7700 ± 0.0282 mBq cm(-2), respectively. The average alpha emission rate in male teeth was 0.0209 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2), whereas that of female teeth was 0.0199 ± 0.0010 mBq cm(-2). The alpha emission rate in teeth is higher in smokers (0.0228 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)) than in non-smokers (0.0179 ± 0.0008 mBq cm(-2)). Such difference was found statistically significant (p < 0.01).

  4. Characterization and performances of DOSION, a dosimetry equipment dedicated to radiobiology experiments taking place at GANIL

    CERN Document Server

    Boissonnat, G; Balanzat, E; Boumard, F; Carniol, B; Colin, J; Cussol, D; Etasse, D; Fontbonne, C; Frelin, A -M; Hommet, J; Peronnel, J; Salvador, S

    2016-01-01

    Currently, radiobiology experiments using heavy ions at GANIL(Grand Acc\\'el\\'erateur National d'Ions Lourds) are conducted under the supervision of the CIMAP (Center for research on Ions, MAterials and Photonics). In this context, a new beam monitoring equipment named DOSION has been developed. It allows to perform measurements of accurate fluence and dose maps in near real time for each biological sample irradiated. In this paper, we present the detection system, its design, performances, calibration protocol and measurements performed during radiobiology experiments. This setup is currently available for any radiobiology experiments if one wishes to correlate one's own sample analysis to state of the art dosimetric references.

  5. Operation and Maintenance of the National Radiobiology Archives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Anthony C. James; Stacey L. McCord

    2012-03-07

    The National Radiobiology Archives (NRA) are an archival program, started in 1989, to collect, organize and maintain data, laboratory notebooks, and animal tissue specimens from government (Department of Energy and its predecessor agencies) sponsored radiobiology life-span animal studies. These unique records, histopathology slides and paraffin embedded tissue blocks are maintained in a central facility and are available for further research study. The materials include electronic and paper records for each of more than 6,000 life-span-observations on dogs as well as details of major studies involving nearly 30,000 mice. Although these studies were performed over many years and at different laboratories with differing data management systems, the NRA has translated them into a standardized set of relational database tables. These can be distributed to interested individuals on written request. Specific Aims are: (1) To Maintain the Archive of Written Records from the Animal Experiments - The USTUR continued to maintain the NRA archives which consist of approximately 175 storage boxes containing laboratory notebooks, animal exposure records, animal pathologic records, and radiographs. These were stored in a 6,000 square foot leased facility in Richland, WA. Additionally, through a collaboration with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) Low Dose Program, many of these records were scanned into digital files. These totaled 34 GB of data, which are saved in 2,407 separate PDF files that are organized by box number and animal identification number. (2) To Maintain the Archive of Animal Tissues at Washington State University - The USTUR continued to house the NRA dog tissue collection in the leased facility. The NRA tissue collection consisted of pathology slides and tissue blocks. Approximately 25% of the laboratory facility was dedicated to the storage of the NRA materials. (3) To Organize the Datasets of These Animals in the Context of Other Datasets so

  6. Heavy ion radiobiology for hadrontherapy and space radiation protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durante, Marco

    2004-12-01

    Research in the field of biological effects of heavy charged particles is needed for both heavy-ion therapy (hadrontherapy) and protection from the exposure to galactic cosmic radiation in long-term manned space missions. Although the exposure conditions (e.g. high- vs. low-dose rate) and relevant endpoints (e.g. cell killing vs. neoplastic transformation) are different in the two fields, it is clear that a substantial overlap exists in several research topics. Three such topics are discussed in this short review: individual radiosensitivity, mixed radiation fields, and late stochastic effects of heavy ions. In addition, researchers involved either in experimental studies on space radiation protection or heavy-ion therapy will basically use the same accelerator facilities. It seems to be important that novel accelerator facilities planned (or under construction) for heavy-ion therapy reserve a substantial amount of beamtime to basic studies of heavy-ion radiobiology and its applications in space radiation research.

  7. Method for validating radiobiological samples using a linear accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brengues, Muriel [The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Liu, David; Korn, Ronald [Scottsdale Clinical Research Institute, Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale, AZ (United States); Zenhausern, Frederic [The University of Arizona College of Medicine, Center for Applied NanoBioscience and Medicine, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Scottsdale Clinical Research Institute, Scottsdale Healthcare, Scottsdale, AZ (United States)

    2014-12-15

    There is an immediate need for rapid triage of the population in case of a large scale exposure to ionizing radiation. Knowing the dose absorbed by the body will allow clinicians to administer medical treatment for the best chance of recovery for the victim. In addition, today's radiotherapy treatment could benefit from additional information regarding the patient's sensitivity to radiation before starting the treatment. As of today, there is no system in place to respond to this demand. This paper will describe specific procedures to mimic the effects of human exposure to ionizing radiation creating the tools for optimization of administered radiation dosimetry for radiotherapy and/or to estimate the doses of radiation received accidentally during a radiation event that could pose a danger to the public. In order to obtain irradiated biological samples to study ionizing radiation absorbed by the body, we performed ex-vivo irradiation of human blood samples using the linear accelerator (LINAC). The LINAC was implemented and calibrated for irradiating human whole blood samples. To test the calibration, a 2 Gy test run was successfully performed on a tube filled with water with an accuracy of 3% in dose distribution. To validate our technique the blood samples were ex-vivo irradiated and the results were analyzed using a gene expression assay to follow the effect of the ionizing irradiation by characterizing dose responsive biomarkers from radiobiological assays. The response of 5 genes was monitored resulting in expression increase with the dose of radiation received. The blood samples treated with the LINAC can provide effective irradiated blood samples suitable for molecular profiling to validate radiobiological measurements via the gene-expression based biodosimetry tools. (orig.)

  8. Electric field distribution of electron emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagawa, M.; Takenobu, S.; Ohmae, N.; Umeno, M.

    1987-03-01

    The electric field distribution of a tungsten field emitter surface and a LaB6 thermionic emitter surface has been studied. The computer simulation of electric field distribution on the emitter surface was carried out with a charge simulation method. The electric field distribution of the LaB6 thermionic emitter was experimentally evaluated by the Schottky plot. Two independent equations are necessary for obtaining local electric field and work function; the Fowler-Nordheim equation and the equation of total energy distribution of emitted electron being used to evaluate the electric field distribution of the tungsten field emitter. The experimental results agreed with the computer simulation.

  9. Beam emittance measurements at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendt, Manfred; Eddy, Nathan; Hu, Martin; Scarpine, Victor; Syphers, Mike; Tassotto, Gianni; Thurman-Keup, Randy; Yang, Ming-Jen; Zagel, James; /Fermilab

    2008-01-01

    We give short overview of various beam emittance measurement methods, currently applied at different machine locations for the Run II collider physics program at Fermilab. All these methods are based on beam profile measurements, and we give some examples of the related instrumentation techniques. At the end we introduce a multi-megawatt proton source project, currently under investigation at Fermilab, with respect to the beam instrumentation challenges.

  10. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  11. Novel Radiobiological Gamma Index for Evaluation of 3-Dimensional Predicted Dose Distribution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumida, Iori, E-mail: sumida@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Yamaguchi, Hajime; Kizaki, Hisao; Aboshi, Keiko; Tsujii, Mari; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu; Seo, Yuji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Isohashi, Fumiaki [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan); Yoshioka, Yasuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, NTT West Osaka Hospital, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To propose a gamma index-based dose evaluation index that integrates the radiobiological parameters of tumor control (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCP). Methods and Materials: Fifteen prostate and head and neck (H&N) cancer patients received intensity modulated radiation therapy. Before treatment, patient-specific quality assurance was conducted via beam-by-beam analysis, and beam-specific dose error distributions were generated. The predicted 3-dimensional (3D) dose distribution was calculated by back-projection of relative dose error distribution per beam. A 3D gamma analysis of different organs (prostate: clinical [CTV] and planned target volumes [PTV], rectum, bladder, femoral heads; H&N: gross tumor volume [GTV], CTV, spinal cord, brain stem, both parotids) was performed using predicted and planned dose distributions under 2%/2 mm tolerance and physical gamma passing rate was calculated. TCP and NTCP values were calculated for voxels with physical gamma indices (PGI) >1. We propose a new radiobiological gamma index (RGI) to quantify the radiobiological effects of TCP and NTCP and calculate radiobiological gamma passing rates. Results: The mean RGI gamma passing rates for prostate cases were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.03–.001). The mean RGI gamma passing rates for H&N cases (except for GTV) were significantly different compared with those of PGI (P<.001). Differences in gamma passing rates between PGI and RGI were due to dose differences between the planned and predicted dose distributions. Radiobiological gamma distribution was visualized to identify areas where the dose was radiobiologically important. Conclusions: RGI was proposed to integrate radiobiological effects into PGI. This index would assist physicians and medical physicists not only in physical evaluations of treatment delivery accuracy, but also in clinical evaluations of predicted dose distribution.

  12. A new method of emittance measurement for electron beams from the Micro-emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Hiroshi [Fukuoka Inst. of Technology (Japan); Nakahara, Yuriko; Kawasaki, Sunao; Musyoki, Stephen; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Shiho, Makoto

    1994-03-01

    Recently a new type of cathode called Micro-emitter is in progress. This cathode is micro fabricated field emitter having the characteristics of very low emittance and high brightness. We can not measure the emittance of the cathode with conventional method like pepper-pot method. The reasons are ; 1. The angle between the electron orbit and the axis is very small. ; and 2. We can not focus the electron beam in the vacuum or on the surface of the material since the current density of the cathode is extremely high. For the emittance measurement for such low emittance and high brightness cathode, we need to expand the beam, and measure the beam cross section without any slits or apertures. We study and propose a new emittance measurement method for the Micro-emitter. (author).

  13. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  14. Emittance investigation of RF photo-injector

    CERN Document Server

    Yang Mao Rong; Li Zheng; Li Ming; Xu Zhou

    2002-01-01

    A high-power laser beam illuminates a photocathode surface placed on an end wall of an RF cavity. The emitted electrons are accelerated immediately to a relativistic energy by the strong RF find in the cavity. But space charge effect induces beam emittance growth especially near the cathode where the electrons are still nonrelativistic. The author analyzes the factors which lead the transverse emittance growth and method how to resolve this problem. After introducing solenoidal focusing near the photocathode, the beam emittance growth is suppressed dramatically. The beam emittance is given also after compensation and simulation results. The measurements show these results are coincident

  15. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  16. Feasibility of BNCT radiobiological experiments at the HYTHOR facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J.; Ceballos, C.; Soncin, M.; Fabris, C.; Friso, E.; Moro, D.; Colautti, P.; Jori, G.; Rosi, G.; Nava, E.

    2008-06-01

    HYTHOR (HYbrid Thermal spectrum sHifter tapirO Reactor) is a new thermal-neutron irradiation facility, which was installed and became operative in mid 2005 at the TAPIRO (TAratura PIla Rapida potenza 0) fast reactor, in the Casaccia research centre (near Rome) of ENEA (Ente per le Nuove tecnologie Energia ed Ambiente). The facility has been designed for in vivo radiobiological studies. In HYTHOR irradiation cavity, 1-6 mice can be simultaneously irradiated to study skin melanoma treatments with the BNCT (boron neutron capture therapy). The therapeutic effects of HYTHOR radiation field on mouse melanoma has been studied as a preliminary investigation before studying the tumour local control due to boron neutron capture effect after boronated molecule injection. The method to properly irradiate small animals has been precisely defined. Results show that HYTHOR radiation field is by itself effective in reducing the tumour-growth rate. This finding has to be taken into account in studying the effectiveness of new 10B carriers. A method to properly measure the reduction of the tumour-growth rate is reported and discussed.

  17. Amchitka Radiobiological Program progress report, January 1979-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, L.D.; Sibley, T.H.; Nakatani, R.E.

    1980-07-01

    The objective of the Amchitka Radiobiological Program for the period 1970-1979 was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from world-wide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear blasts on Amchitka Island. The objective is achieved, by the collection and radiological analyses of biological and environmental samples and by background radiation measurements. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground sites of the Amchitka nuclear detonations would be suspected if the contamination was significntly greater than would be expected from world fallout. An account of the program from July 1970 to December 1978 has been given in nine previous reports from the Laboratory of Radiation Ecology to the Nevada Operations Office of the US Department of Energy. This report is an account of the program for calendar year 1979. The results of analyses of the samples collected in 1979 lead to the same conclusions as in previous years; i.e., there is no evidence that the radionuclide contamination at Amchitka Island is greater than would be expected from world fallout except for a slight contamination of the Long Shot Mud Pits with tritium.

  18. Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and multivariate methods for radiobiological dosimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, A D; Clarke, C; Byrne, H J; Lyng, F M

    2010-02-01

    The scientific literature contains an ever-growing number of reports of applications of vibrational spectroscopy as a multivariate non-invasive tool for analysis of biological effects at the molecular level. Recently, Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (FTIRM) has been demonstrated to be sensitive to molecular events occurring in cells and tissue after exposure to ionizing radiation. In this work the application of FTIRM in the examination of dose-dependent molecular effects occurring in skin cells after exposure to ionizing radiation with the use of partial least-squares regression (PLSR) and generalized regression neural networks (GRNN) was studied. The methodology is shown to be sensitive to molecular events occurring with radiation dose and time after exposure. The variation in molecular species with dose and time after irradiation is shown to be non-linear by virtue of the higher modeling efficiency yielded from the non-linear algorithms. Dose prediction efficiencies of approximately +/-10 mGy were achieved at 96 h after irradiation, highlighting the potential applications of the methodology in radiobiological dosimetry.

  19. Amchitka Radiobiological Program. Final report, July 1970-December 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sibley, T.H.; Tornberg, L.D.

    1982-11-01

    The Amchitka Radiobiological Program, to collect biological and environmental samples for radiological analyses, began in 1970 and continued through 1979. The principal objective was to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination from worldwide atmospheric fallout and from the detonation of three underground nuclear tests on Amchitka. Leakage of radionuclides from the underground test sites would be suspected if the amount of contamination was significantly greater than could be attributed to worldwide fallout or if an unexpected assemblage of radionuclides was detected. No radionuclides from the underground sites were detected, except for tritium from the Long Shot test (1965) which produced increased tritium concentrations in surface water and freshwater plants near the test site. This final report compiles all previous data into one report and considers the temporal trends in these data. Two naturally occurring radionuclides, /sup 40/K and /sup 7/Be, were the most abundantly occurring radionuclides in most samples; in lichen samples either /sup 137/Cs or /sup 144/Ce had the highest activity. All samples were below applicable Radiation Protection Guides and by 1979 most samples were near or below the statistical detection limits. Increased concentrations of short-lived fallout radionuclides following the Chinese atmospheric tests were found in freshwater and seawater samples and in most indicator organisms.

  20. Low Emittance Guns for the ILC Polarized Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clendenin, J. E.; Brachmann, A.; Ioakeimidi, K.; Kirby, R. E.; Maruyama, T.; Miller, R. H.; Wang, J. W.; Zhou, F.

    2007-06-01

    Polarized electron beams generated by DC guns are routinely available at several accelerators including JLAB, Mainz and SLAC. These guns operate with a cathode bias on the order of -100 kV. To minimize space charge effects, relatively long bunches are generated at the gun and then compressed longitudinally external to the gun just before and during initial acceleration. For linear colliders, this compression is accomplished using a combination of rf bunchers. For the basic design of the International Linear Collider (ILC), a 120 kV DC photocathode gun is used to produce a series of nanosecond bunches that are each compressed by two sub-harmonic bunchers (SHBs) followed by an L-band buncher and capture section. The longitudinal bunching process results in a significantly higher emittance than produced by the gun alone. While high-energy experiments using polarized beams are not generally sensitive to the source emittance, there are several benefits to a lower source emittance including a simpler more efficient injector system and a lower radiation load during transport especially at bends as at the damping ring. For the ILC, the SHBs could be eliminated if the voltage of the gun is raised sufficiently. Simulations using the General Particle Tracer (GPT) package indicate that a cathode bias voltage of ⩾200 kV should allow both SHBs to be operated at 433 or even 650 MHz, while ⩾500 kV would be required to eliminate the SHBs altogether. Simulations can be used to determine the minimum emittance possible if the injector is designed for a given increased voltage. A possible alternative to the DC gun is an rf gun. Emittance compensation, routinely used with rf guns, is discussed for higher-voltage DC guns.

  1. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik Lund

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters...

  2. 77 FR 68155 - The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R-84

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-15

    ... COMMISSION The Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute TRIGA Reactor: Facility Operating License No. R... Operating License No. R-84 (Application), which currently authorizes the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research... the renewal of Facility Operating License No. R-84, which currently authorizes the licensee to...

  3. Oxidation and emittance of superalloys in heat shield applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Clark, R. K.; Unnam, J.

    1986-01-01

    Recently developed superalloys that form alumina coatings have a high potential for heat shield applications for advanced aerospace vehicles at temperatures above 1095C. Both INCOLOY alloy MA 956 (of the Inco Alloys International, Inc.), an iron-base oxide-dispersion-strengthened alloy, and CABOT alloy No. 214 (of the Cabot Corporation), an alumina-forming nickel-chromium alloy, have good oxidation resistance and good elevated temperature strength. The oxidation resistance of both alloys has been attributed to the formation of a thin alumina layer (alpha-Al2O3) at the surface. Emittance and oxidation data were obtained for simulated Space Shuttle reentry conditions using a hypersonic arc-heated wind tunnel. The surface oxides and substrate alloys were characterized using X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy with an energy-dispersive X-ray analysis unit. The mass loss and emittance characteristics of the two alloys are discussed.

  4. Low Emittance X-FEL Development

    CERN Document Server

    Li, K S B; Anghel, A; Bakker, R J; Böge, M; Candel, A E; Dehler, M; Ganter, R; Gough, C; Ingold, G; Leemann, S C; Pedrozzi, M; Raguin, J Y; Rivkin, L; Schlott, V; Streun, A; Wrulich, A F

    2005-01-01

    The Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) in Switzerland currently develops a Low-Emittance electron-Gun (LEG) based on field-emitter technology [1]. The target is a normalized transverse emittance of 5 10(-8) m rad or less. Such a source is particularly interesting for FELs that target wavelengths below 0.3 nm since it permits a reduction of the required beam-energy and hence, a reduction of the construction- and operational costs of X-ray FELs. That is, for the case that this initial low emittance can be maintained throughout the accelerator. Here we present a concept for a 0.1 nm X-FEL based on LEG, which can be located close to the Swiss Light Source (SLS). Special attention goes to the maintenance of the emittance during the process of acceleration and bunch-compression, in particular in the regimes where either space-charge forces or coherent-synchrotron radiation are of importance.

  5. Batch By Batch Longitudinal Emittance Blowup MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, T; Butterworth, A; Jaussi, M; Molendijk, J

    2012-01-01

    The transverse bunch emittance increases significantly at 450 GeV from the time of injection till the ramp due to IBS. By selectively blowing up the longitudinal emittance of the incoming batch at each injection, it should be possible to reduce the transverse emittance growth rates due to IBS. An MD was conducted on April 22nd 2012 to test the feasibility and performance of the batch-by-batch longitudinal emittance blowup. There were three main goals during the MD. First, to test the developed hardware, firmware, and software for the batch-by-batch blowup. Then, to measure the transverse emittance growth rates of blown-up and "witness" batches to quantify any improvement, and finally to test the ALLInjectSequencer class, which deals with the complicated gymnastics of introducing or masking the new batch to various RF loops.

  6. Screen printed boron emitters for solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Recart, F.; Freire, I.; Perez, L.; Lago-Aurrekoetxea, R.; Jimeno, J.C.; Bueno, G. [Instituto de Tecnologia Microelectronica, Teknologia Mikroelektronikoaren Institutua UPV/EHU, Alda.Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2007-06-15

    Screen printed (SP) boron emitters are presented as a useful option for the manufacturing of p-type emitters of solar cells. Details are provided on the diffusion process, including deposition, drying and firing steps, the latter performed in an infrared belt furnace. Besides their main dependences on the firing conditions, the sheet resistances and dopant profiles of the resulting emitters reveal the relevance of the drying step and the exhaustion limits of the doping source. A characterization of the recombination concludes that moderate emitter saturation currents (J{sub oe}<0.5 pA/cm{sup 2}) and acceptable bulk lifetimes ({tau}{sub B}>40 {mu}s) can be obtained on Czochralski silicon wafers. Finally, Cz n-type 0.7 {omega} cm solar cells are presented, which once again prove the feasibility of SP boron emitters and point to issues regarding their metallization. (author)

  7. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  8. SU-E-T-385: 4D Radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourkal, E; Hossain, M; Veltchev, I; Ma, C; Meyer, J; Horwitz, E [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Nahum, A [Clatterbridge Centre for Oncology, Bebington (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The linear-quadratic model is the most prevalent model for planning dose fractionation in radiation therapy in the low dose per fraction regimens. However for high-dose fractions, used in SRS/SBRT/HDR treatments the LQ model does not yield accurate predictions, due to neglecting the reduction in the number of sublethal lesions as a result of their conversion to lethal lesions with subsequent irradiation. Proper accounting for this reduction in the number of sublethally damaged lesions leads to the dependence of the survival fraction on the temporal structure of the dose. The main objective of this work is to show that the functional dependence of the dose rate on time in each voxel is an important additional factor that can significantly influence the TCP. Methods: Two SBRT lung plans have been used to calculate the TCPs for the same patient. One plan is a 3D conformal plan and the other is an IMRT plan. Both plans are normalized so that 99.5% of PTV volume receives the same prescription dose of 50 Gy in 5 fractions. The dose rate in each individual voxel is calculated as a function of treatment time and subsequently used in the calculation of TCP. Results: The calculated TCPs show that shorter delivery times lead to greater TCP, despite all delivery times being short compared to the repair half-time for sublethal lesions. Furthermore, calculated TCP(IMRT) =0.308 for the IMRT plan is smaller than TCP(3D) =0.425 for 3D conformal, even though it shows greater tumor hot spots and equal PTV coverage. The calculated TCPs are considerably lower compared to those based on the LQ model for which TCP=1 for both plans. Conclusion: The functional dependence of the voxel-by-voxel dose rate on time may be an important factor in predicting the treatment outcome and cannot be neglected in radiobiological modeling.

  9. Single-Ion Microbeam for Applications in Radiobiology: State of the Art

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Zhiwen; Wu Lijun; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    Single-Ion Microbeam (SIM) is uniquely capable of precisely delivering a predefined number of charged particles (precise doses of radiation) to individual cells or sub-cellular targets in situ. Since the early 1990's, there has been an ever-increasing interest in developing and applying the SIM technique to problems in radiobiology for studies of cell and tissue damaged by ionizing radiations. Potential applications for SIM in radiobiology continues to grow and have been diversified. There are currently more than 14 SIM facilities worldwide, and they have been in a constant state of evolution. This paper reviews the current state of SIM research worldwide and the related pivotal technological developments in the fields of both biophysics and radiobiology.Representative applications and the perspective of SIM are also introduced and discussed.

  10. Microlensless interdigitated photoconductive terahertz emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhishek; Prabhu, S S

    2015-01-26

    We report here fabrication of interdigitated photoconductive antenna (iPCA) terahertz (THz) emitters based on plasmonic electrode design. Novel design of this iPCA enables it to work without microlens array focusing, which is otherwise required for photo excitation of selective photoconductive regions to avoid the destructive interference of emitted THz radiation from oppositely biased regions. Benefit of iPCA over single active region PCA is, photo excitation can be done at larger area hence avoiding the saturation effect at higher optical excitation density. The emitted THz radiation power from plasmonic-iPCAs is ~2 times more than the single active region plasmonic PCA at 200 mW optical excitation, which will further increase at higher optical powers. This design is expected to reduce fabrication cost of photoconductive THz sources and detectors.

  11. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikhoplav, Rodion [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  12. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yañez, Elvia; López, Jesús

    2012-10-01

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerología de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  13. Development of applicable software containing radiobiological and physical indices to evaluate radiotherapy planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seu Ran; Suh, Tae Suk [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Yeon [Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stafnord University, Richmond (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) provides more conformal dose distribution to the morphologically and physiologically changed tumor volumes during fractionated radiation therapy (RT). To develop an enhanced treatment plan evaluation tool based on multi-modality imaging which incorporates physical and radiobiological parameters, the software system was developed using MATLAB v.7.10.0499 (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). The application of plan evaluation can help the user choose more biologically optimal treatment plans and potentially predict treatment outcome more accurately. The radiotherapy planning based on the multi-modality images had more accurate results than that of based on only CT images in both physical and radiobiological perspectives.

  14. Radiobiological compensation: A case study of uterine cervix cancer with concurrent chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrera, Higmar; Yanez, Elvia; Lopez, Jesus [Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico); ISSSTE General Hospital Dr. Santiago Ramon y Cajal, Victoria de Durango, Durango (Mexico)

    2012-10-23

    The case of a patient diagnosed with uterine cervix cancer is presented as an example of the clinical application of the radiobiological compensation method implemented at Centro Estatal de Cancerologia de Durango. Radiotherapy treatment was initially modified to compensate for the chemotherapy component and, as medical complications arose during treatment delivery resulting in an 18 days gap, new compensation followed. All physical and radiobiological assumptions to calculate the Biologically Effective Dose in the external beam and brachytherapy parts of the treatment are presented. Good local control of the tumor was achieved, the theoretical tolerance limits for the organs at risk were not surpassed and the patient manifested no extensive morbidity.

  15. Prototype of a subsurface drip irrigation emitter: Manufacturing, hydraulic evaluation and experimental analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Wanderley De Jesus; Rodrigues Sinobas, Leonor; Sánchez, Raúl; Arriel Botrel, Tarlei; Duarte Coelho, Rubens

    2013-04-01

    Root and soil intrusion into the conventional emitters is one of the major disadvantages to obtain a good uniformity of water application in subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). In the last years, there have been different approaches to reduce these problems such as the impregnation of emitters with herbicide, and the search for an emitter geometry impairing the intrusion of small roots. Within the last this study, has developed and evaluated an emitter model which geometry shows specific physical features to prevent emitter clogging. This work was developed at the Biosystems Engineering Department at ESALQ-USP/Brazil, and it is a part of a research in which an innovated emitteŕs model for SDI has been developed to prevent root and soil particles intrusion. An emitter with a mechanical-hydraulic mechanism (opening and closing the water outlet) for SDI was developed and manufactured using a mechanical lathe process. It was composed by a silicon elastic membrane a polyethylene tube and a Vnyl Polychloride membrane protector system. In this study the performance of the developed prototype was assessed in the laboratory and in the field conditions. In the laboratory, uniformity of water application was calculated by the water emission uniformity coefficient (CUE), and the manufacturer's coefficient of variation (CVm). In addition, variation in the membrane diameter submitted to internal pressures; head losses along the membrane, using the energy equation; and, precision and accuracy of the equation model, analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient (r), and by Willmott's concordance index (d) were also calculated with samples of the developed emitters. In the field, the emitters were installed in pots with and without sugar cane culture from October 2010 to January 2012. During this time, flow rate in 20 emitters were measured periodically, and the aspects of them about clogging at the end of the experiment. Emitters flow rates were measured quarterly to calculate

  16. Evaluation of extremely small horizontal emittance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Okugi

    1999-02-01

    Full Text Available The KEK Accelerator Test Facility (KEK-ATF was constructed to develop technologies for producing a low-emittance beam which will be required by future linear colliders. The KEK-ATF consists of an injector linac, a damping ring, and a beam extraction line. The basic optical structure of the damping ring is a FOBO lattice, which reduces the horizontal dispersion at the center of the bending magnets and, as a consequence, can produce an extremely small emittance beam. To verify the performance of such a unique, low-emittance lattice, it is crucial to measure the horizontal emittance. The horizontal emittance was measured using wire scanners in the beam extraction line. Since the horizontal beam position was not stable, we established a method to correct the measured beam size for position fluctuation (“jitter” and we succeeded in the observation of the so far smallest horizontal emittance in any accelerator. The measured horizontal emittance was 1.37±0.03nm at a beam energy of 1.285 GeV and a bunch population of \\(3–5\\×10^{9}, in agreement with the design value of 1.27–1.34 nm at the beam energy and the bunch population.

  17. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  18. Thermophotovoltaic emitter material selection and design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saxton, P.C.; Moran, A.L.; Harper, M.J.; Lindler, K.W. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States)

    1997-07-01

    Thermophotovoltaics (TPV) is a potentially attractive direct energy conversion technology. It reduces the need for complex machinery with moving parts and maintenance. TPV generators can be run from a variety of heat sources including waste heat for smaller scale operations. The US Naval Academy`s goal was to build a small experimental thermophotovoltaic generator powered by combustion gases from a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine. The design of the generator imposes material limitations that directly affect emitter and structural materials selection. This paper details emitter material goals and requirements, and the methods used to select suitable candidate emitter materials for further testing.

  19. Laser wire emittance measurement line AT CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia, H; Blair, G A; Aumeyr, T; Schulte, D; Stulle, F

    2011-01-01

    A precise measurement of the transverse beam size and beam emittances upstream of the final focus is essential for ensuring the full luminosity at future linear colliders. A scheme for the emittance measurements at the RTML line of the CLIC using laser-wire beam profile monitors is described. A lattice of the measurement line is discussed and results of simulations of statistical errors and of their impact on the accuracy of the emittance reconstruction are given. Laser wire systems suitable for CLIC and their main characteristics are discussed.

  20. Narrowband terahertz emitters using metamaterial films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Fabio; Kearney, Brian; Grbovic, Dragoslav; Karunasiri, Gamani

    2012-09-10

    In this article we report on metamaterial-based narrowband thermal terahertz (THz) emitters with a bandwidth of about 1 THz. Single band emitters designed to radiate in the 4 to 8 THz range were found to emit as high as 36 W/m(2) when operated at 400 °C. Emission into two well-separated THz bands was also demonstrated by using metamaterial structures featuring more complex unit cells. Imaging of heated emitters using a microbolometer camera fitted with THz optics clearly showed the expected higher emissivity from the metamaterial structure compared to low-emissivity of the surrounding aluminum.

  1. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  2. A community call for a dedicated radiobiological research facility to support particle beam cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holzscheiter, Michael H.; Bassler, Niels; Dosanjh, Manjit;

    2012-01-01

    Recently more than one hundred researchers followed an invitation to a brainstorming meeting on the topic of a future dedicated radio-biological and radio-physical research center. 100 more joint the meeting via webcast. After a day of presentations and discussions it was clear, that an urgent need...

  3. Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons. [on cells of mammals, bacteria and viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryzhov, N. I.; Vorozhtsova, S. V.; Krasavin, Y. A.; Mashinskaya, T. Y.; Savchenko, N. Y.; Fedorov, B. S.; Khlaponina, V. F.; Shelegedin, V. N.; Gut, L.; Sabo, L.

    1974-01-01

    Radiobiological effects of heavy ions and protons are studied on cells of mammals, bacteria, viruses and DNA of bacteria. Results show that the dose effect dependence bears an exponential character; the reduction of RBE as LET of particle increases reflects the different character of microdistribution of absorbed energy in biological objects with different levels of biological organization.

  4. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M.D.

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 micron patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  5. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N. [and others

    1995-08-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf-pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of an rf-generated plasma.

  6. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K.N.; Perkins, L.T.; Pickard, D.S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M.D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    1996-03-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 {mu}m patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of a rf-generated plasma. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Beam emittance measurements on multicusp ion sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarstedt, M.; Lee, Y.; Leung, K. N.; Perkins, L. T.; Pickard, D. S.; Weber, M.; Williams, M. D.

    1996-03-01

    Multicusp ion sources are used for various applications. Presently, the implementation of this type of ion source is planned for the development of an ion beam lithography machine, which will be used for the projection of sub-0.2 μm patterns onto a wafer substrate. Since, for this application, a very good beam quality and a small ion energy spread are required, emittance measurements have been performed on a multicusp ion source for various source conditions. It is shown that the installation of proper capacitors between the extraction electrodes is necessary to avoid rf pickup, which otherwise leads to a distortion of the beam emittance. The influence of the magnetic filter field on the beam emittance has been investigated, and the beam emittance of a dc filament-discharge plasma has also been compared to that of a rf-generated plasma.

  8. Emitters of N-photon bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, C Sánchez; Del Valle, E; Tudela, A González; Müller, K; Lichtmannecker, S; Kaniber, M; Tejedor, C; Finley, J J; Laussy, F P

    2014-07-01

    Controlling the ouput of a light emitter is one of the basic tasks of photonics, with landmarks such as the laser and single-photon sources. The development of quantum applications makes it increasingly important to diversify the available quantum sources. Here, we propose a cavity QED scheme to realize emitters that release their energy in groups, or "bundles" of N photons, for integer N. Close to 100% of two-photon emission and 90% of three-photon emission is shown to be within reach of state of the art samples. The emission can be tuned with system parameters so that the device behaves as a laser or as a N-photon gun. The theoretical formalism to characterize such emitters is developed, with the bundle statistics arising as an extension of the fundamental correlation functions of quantum optics. These emitters will be useful for quantum information processing and for medical applications.

  9. Monochromatic gamma emitter for low energy quanta

    CERN Document Server

    Tomova, Z R; Mironova, S A

    2004-01-01

    The possibility of creating of a monochromatic gamma emitter of low energy quanta is analyzed. The idea is based on Daning's scheme. Except for purely scientific problems the monochromator is actual for therapy of wide range of diseases.

  10. Emittance growth in linear induction accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ekdahl, C A; Schulze, M E; Carlson, C A; Frayer, D K; Mostrum, C; Thoma, C H

    2014-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility uses bremsstrahlung radiation source spots produced by the focused electron beams from two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to radiograph large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives. Radiographic resolution is determined by the size of the source spot, and beam emittance is the ultimate limitation to spot size. On the DARHT Axis-II LIA we measure an emittance higher than predicted by theoretical simulations, and even though this axis produces sub-millimeter source spots, we are exploring ways to improve the emittance. Some of the possible causes for the discrepancy have been investigated using particle-in-cell (PIC) codes, although most of these are discounted based on beam measurements. The most likely source of emittance growth is a mismatch of the beam to the magnetic transport, which can cause beam halo.

  11. Emittance Growth in Linear Induction Accelerators

    OpenAIRE

    Ekdahl, Carl

    2017-01-01

    The Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) facility uses bremsstrahlung radiation source spots produced by the focused electron beams from two linear induction accelerators (LIAs) to radiograph large hydrodynamic experiments driven by high explosives. Radiographic resolution is determined by the size of the source spot, and beam emittance is the ultimate limitation to spot size. Some of the possible causes for the emittance growth in the DARHT LIA have been investigated using particle-in-ce...

  12. Paul Scherrer Institut annual report 1995. Annex II: PSI life sciences and institute for medical radiobiology newsletter 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaeuenstein, P.; Gschwend, B. [eds.

    1996-09-01

    The newsletter presents the 1995 progress report of PSI F2-Department and of the Institute for Medical Radiobiology in the fields of radiation medicine, radiopharmacy and radiation hygiene. figs., tabs., refs.

  13. Cherenkov counting efficiencies for {beta}{sup -}-emitters in dry state in glass vials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita-Murase, Yuko; Murakami, Isao; Homma, Yoshio [Laboratory for Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, Kyoritsu College of Pharmacy, Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-10-01

    Cherenkov counting efficiencies for standardized {beta}{sup -} -emitters in the dry state at the centre of air-filled glass vials were measured with a liquid scintillation spectrometer. Cherenkov counting efficiencies, which are plotted as a function of the average energy of {beta}{sup -}-particles and the internal conversion electrons, give a straight line on log-log scale. (author)

  14. High-temperature plasmonic thermal emitter for thermophotovotaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Jingjing; Guler, Urcan; Li, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths.......We use titanium nitride (TiN) to demonstrate an ultra-thin plasmonic thermal emitter operating at high temperatures (830 K). The spectrally selective emitter exhibits a large emittance at around 2.5 μm and below, and suppresses emission at longer wavelengths....

  15. Emittance measurement of high-brightness microbeams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishizuka, Hiroshi; Nakahara, Yuriko (Fukuoka Inst. of Tech. (Japan)); Kawasaki, Sunao; Musyoki, S.; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Akihiko; Shiho, Makoto

    1994-09-01

    Arrays of microtriodes have recently become available due to the development of microfabricated field-emission electron sources. Computer simulation has shown that the brightness of beams emitted by them is significantly higher than that of the common microbeams, and possible application of the accelerated beam to free electron lasers has been discussed. Experimentation on beam generation has started, but methods for diagnosing the beam have not yet been established. Difficulty is predicted, because of the high brightness, in applying the conventional methods of emittance measurement. In this paper we propose a new method that determines the emittance without using apertures. The cross section of a converging beam is elongated by a quadrupole lens, and parameters of the emittance ellipse are obtained from the beam size on a screen when changing either the strength or the axial position of the quadrupole lens. (author).

  16. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  17. Effects of radiobiological uncertainty on shield design for a 60-day lunar mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, John W.; Nealy, John E.; Schimmerling, Walter

    1993-01-01

    Some consequences of uncertainties in radiobiological risk due to galactic cosmic ray exposure are analyzed to determine their effect on engineering designs for a first lunar outpost - a 60-day mission. Quantitative estimates of shield mass requirements as a function of a radiobiological uncertainty factor are given for a simplified vehicle structure. The additional shield mass required for compensation is calculated as a function of the uncertainty in galactic cosmic ray exposure, and this mass is found to be as large as a factor of 3 for a lunar transfer vehicle. The additional cost resulting from this mass is also calculated. These cost estimates are then used to exemplify the cost-effectiveness of research.

  18. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  19. Research on Radar Emitter Attribute Recognition Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In order to solve emitter recognition problems in a practical reconnaissance environment, attribute mathematics is introduced. The basic concepts and theory of attribute set and attribute measure are described in detail. A new attribute recognition method based on attribute measure is presented in this paper. Application example is given, which demonstrates this new method is accurate and effective. Moreover, computer simulation for recognizing the emitter purpose is selected, and compared with classical statistical pattern recognition through simulation. The excellent experimental results demonstrate that this is a brand-new attribute recognition method as compared to existing statistical pattern recognition techniques.

  20. Quadrupole Transfer Function for Emittance Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, Peter; Jansson, Andreas; Tan, Cheng-Yang

    2008-01-01

    Historically the use of the quadrupole moment measurement has been impeded by the requirement for large dynamic range, as well as measurement sensitivity to beam position. We investigate the use of the transfer function technique [1-3] in combination with the sensitivity and 160dB revolution line rejection of the direct diode detection analog front end [4] to open the possibility of an emittance diagnostic that may be implemented without operational complication, quasi- parasitic to the operation of existing tune measurement systems. Such a diagnostic would be particularly useful as an emittance monitor during acceleration ramp development in machines like RHIC and the LHC.

  1. Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-09-28

    MOT-OOO1AF I Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters Prepared by DI Jeffrey C. Buchholz E L ri: 8 James P. Stec OCT C "t989 Mary C...Schutte Micro -Optics Technologies, Inc. 8608 University Green #5 Middleton, WI 53562 28 September 1989 D,:?UqflON SA2". N’.’ _ Disuibunon Uanu-ted Contract...Title Report Date Current Injection Pumping of Organic Light Emitters 28 September 1989 Authors Jeffrey C. Buchholz, James P. Stec, Mary C. Schutte

  2. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  3. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Huck, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    In recent years the controlled coupling of single photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic non-linearity on a nano-scaled platform. In this article we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nano-wires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale, and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultra-strong coupling regime.

  4. Ill-posed problem and regularization in reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial tumor imaging data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chvetsov, Alevei V.; Sandison, George A.; Schwartz, Jeffrey L.; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-11-01

    The main objective of this article is to improve the stability of reconstruction algorithms for estimation of radiobiological parameters using serial tumor imaging data acquired during radiation therapy. Serial images of tumor response to radiation therapy represent a complex summation of several exponential processes as treatment induced cell inactivation, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss. Accurate assessment of treatment response would require separation of these processes because they define radiobiological determinants of treatment response and, correspondingly, tumor control probability. However, the estimation of radiobiological parameters using imaging data can be considered an inverse ill-posed problem because a sum of several exponentials would produce the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind which is ill posed. Therefore, the stability of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters presents a problem even for the simplest models of tumor response. To study stability of the parameter reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for head and neck cancer and a simplest case of a two-level cell population model of tumor response. Inverse reconstruction was performed using a simulated annealing algorithm to minimize a least squared objective function. Results show that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and cell doubling time exhibit significant nonphysical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. However, after applying a stabilization algorithm based on variational regularization, the reconstruction produces statistical distributions for survival fractions and doubling time that are comparable to published in vitro data. This algorithm is an advance over our previous work where only cell surviving fractions were reconstructed. We conclude that variational regularization allows for an increase in the number of free parameters in our model which enables development of more

  5. The impact of modeling nuclear fragmentation on delivered dose and radiobiology in ion therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lühr, Armin; Hansen, David C; Teiwes, Ricky; Sobolevsky, Nikolai; Jäkel, Oliver; Bassler, Niels

    2012-08-21

    The importance of nuclear interactions for ion therapy arises from the influence of the particle spectrum on, first, radiobiology and therefore also on treatment planning, second, the accuracy of measuring dose and, third, the delivered dose distribution. This study tries to determine the qualitative as well as the quantitative influence of the modeling of inelastic nuclear interactions on ion therapy. Thereby, three key disciplines are investigated, namely dose delivery, dose assessment and radiobiology. In order to perform a quantitative analysis, a relative comparison between six different descriptions of nuclear interactions is carried out for carbon ions. The particle transport is simulated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT10A while dose planning and radiobiology are covered by the analytic treatment planning program for particles TRiP, which determines the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) with the local effect model. The obtained results show that the physical dose distribution can in principle be significantly influenced by the modeling of fragmentation (about 10% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections for a target volume ranging from 15 to 25 cm). While the impact of nuclear fragmentation on stopping power ratios can be neglected, the fluence correction factor may be influenced by the applied nuclear models. In contrast to the results for the physical dose, the variation of the RBE is only small (about 1% for a 20% change in all inelastic nuclear cross sections) suggesting a relatively weak dependence of radiobiology on the detailed composition of the particle energy spectrum of the mixed radiation field. Also, no significant change (about 0.2 mm) of the lateral penumbra of the RBE-weighted dose is observed.

  6. Prognostic value of radiobiological hypoxia during fractionated irradiation for local tumor control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zips, Daniel; Böke, Simon; Kroeber, Theresa; Meinzer, Andreas; Brüchner, Kerstin; Thames, Howard D; Baumann, Michael; Yaromina, Ala

    2011-05-01

    Previous experiments showed that the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells (rHF) in un-treated tumors did not accurately predict local tumor control after fractionated irradiation. Thus, the prognostic value of rHF determined during fractionated irradiation was investigated. Six human squamous cell carcinoma lines were transplanted into nude mice and then irradiated with 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Thereafter, single dose irradiation under normal and clamped blood flow was given. Local tumor control rates were used to calculate the rHF and the TCD₅₀, i.e., the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors, after single dose irradiation. These values were compared with the in parallel determined TCD₅₀ after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. The rHF after 15 fractions varied between 28% and 100%. No correlation was found with the TCD₅₀ after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Single dose top-up TCD₅₀ under ambient and clamp conditions after 15 fractions significantly correlated with TCD₅₀ after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. rHF after 15 fractions is not a prognostic parameter for the outcome after fractionated irradiation. In contrast, the radiobiological parameters number of tumor stem cells, intrinsic radiosensitivity, and number of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells appear promising to predict outcome after fractionated irradiation.

  7. Prognostic value of radiobiological hypoxia during fractionated irradiation for local tumor control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zips, Daniel; Boeke, Simon; Kroeber, Theresa; Meinzer, Andreas; Bruechner, Kerstin; Yaromina, Ala [OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Thames, Howard D. [Texas Univ., M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States). Div. of Quantitative Sciences; Baumann, Michael [OncoRay National Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Dresden (Germany). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Universitaetsklinikum Dresden (Germany). Experimental Center

    2011-05-15

    Background and Purpose: Previous experiments showed that the fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells (rHF) in untreated tumors did not accurately predict local tumor control after fractionated irradiation. Thus, the prognostic value of rHF determined during fractionated irradiation was investigated. Materials and Methods: Six human squamous cell carcinoma lines were transplanted into nude mice and then irradiated with 15 fractions over 3 weeks. Thereafter, single dose irradiation under normal and clamped blood flow was given. Local tumor control rates were used to calculate the rHF and the TCD{sub 50}, i.e., the radiation dose necessary to control 50% of the tumors, after single dose irradiation. These values were compared with the in parallel determined TCD{sub 50} after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Results: The rHF after 15 fractions varied between 28% and 100%. No correlation was found with the TCD{sub 50} after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Single dose top-up TCD{sub 50} under ambient and clamp conditions after 15 fractions significantly correlated with TCD{sub 50} after 30 fractions in 6 weeks. Conclusion: rHF after 15 fractions is not a prognostic parameter for the outcome after fractionated irradiation. In contrast, the radiobiological parameters number of tumor stem cells, intrinsic radiosensitivity, and number of radiobiologically hypoxic tumor cells appear promising to predict outcome after fractionated irradiation. (orig.)

  8. Fast neutrons set the pace. [Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hough, J.H.; Slabbert, J.P. (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, Pretoria (South Africa). National Accelerator Centre)

    1985-01-01

    Radiobiological investigations with fast neutrons have been initiated at the CSIR cyclotron in Pretoria. It was proposed some years ago to create a neutron therapy facility using the CSIR cyclotron. Neutrons are classified as high linear energy transfer (LET) particles. Biological damage occurring in tissue is a direct function of the LET of the incident radiation. To quantify the biological effects of different types of radiation on mammalian cells, several procedures and concepts have evolved from radiobiological research. Probably the most significant laboratory techniques developed, were the derivation of cell survival curves which are obtained by determining the number of cell colonies that have survived a certain radiation dose. A semi-logarithmic plot of surviving fraction versus the absorbed dose yields the survival curve. Dose modifying factors such as the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of the radiation can be quantified in terms of this relationship. A radiobiological programme has to be undertaken before patients can receive neutron therapy at the CSIR cyclotron. The article is a discussion of this programme.

  9. Comparison of treatment plans: a retrospective study by the method of radiobiological evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puzhakkal, Niyas; Kallikuzhiyil Kochunny, Abdullah; Manthala Padannayil, Noufal; Singh, Navin; Elavan Chalil, Jumanath; Kulangarakath Umer, Jamshad

    2016-09-01

    There are many situations in radiotherapy where multiple treatment plans need to be compared for selection of an optimal plan. In this study we performed the radiobiological method of plan evaluation to verify the treatment plan comparison procedure of our clinical practice. We estimated and correlated various radiobiological dose indices with physical dose metrics for a total of 30 patients representing typical cases of head and neck, prostate and brain tumors. Three sets of plans along with a clinically approved plan (final plan) treated by either Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT) or Rapid Arc (RA) techniques were considered. The study yielded improved target coverage for final plans, however, no appreciable differences in doses and the complication probabilities of organs at risk were noticed. Even though all four plans showed adequate dose distributions, from dosimetric point of view, the final plan had more acceptable dose distribution. The estimated biological outcome and dose volume histogram data showed least differences between plans for IMRT when compared to RA. Our retrospective study based on 120 plans, validated the radiobiological method of plan evaluation. The tumor cure or normal tissue complication probabilities were found to be correlated with the corresponding physical dose indices.

  10. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  11. Longitudinal emittance measurements at REX-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Fraser, M A; Jones, R.M.; Jones, R M; Pasini, M; Posocco, P A; Voulot, D; Wenander, F

    2012-01-01

    We report on measurements of the longitudinal emittance at the Radioactive ion beam EXperiment (REX) at ISOLDE, CERN. The rms longitudinal emittance was measured as 0.34 ± 0.08 π ns keV/u at the output of the RFQ and as 0.36 ± 0.04π ns keV/u in front of the third 7-gap split-ring resonator (7G3) using the three-gradient technique; systematic errors are not included but are estimated at approximately 10%. The 86% emittance was measured a factor of approximately 4.4 times larger than the rms emittance at 1.48 ± 0.2 and 1.55 ± 0.12π ns keV/u at the RFQ and 7G3, respectively. The REX switchyard magnet was used as a spectrometer to analyse the energy spread of the beam as it was manipulated by varying the voltage of the rebuncher (ReB) and 7G3 cavities operating at non-accelerating phases. The transfer matrix for a multi-gap bunching cavity is derived and suitably truncated to allow for the accurate reconstruction of the beam parameters from measurement. The technique for measuring the energy spread was rig...

  12. Beam characterization for the field-emitter-array cathode-based low-emittance gun

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. Leemann

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A 1   Å x-ray free electron laser can be operated at 6 GeV provided a very high brightness electron beam. Therefore, Paul Scherrer Institute has initiated development of the low-emittance gun based on field emission. A field-emitter array (FEA is expected to deliver high peak current while reducing the source emittance to levels close to the thermal limit. A 100 keV gun test stand has been designed in order to gain experience with electron bunches emitted by pulsed FEAs, investigate emittance compensation, and develop diagnostic procedures to characterize the beam. First FEA samples have been installed and pulsed in the gun; the emitted bunches have been accelerated and characterized. We present results acquired with the first FEA samples.

  13. Nanoelectrospray emitter arrays providing interemitter electric field uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan T; Page, Jason S; Marginean, Ioan; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2008-07-15

    Arrays of electrospray ionization (ESI) emitters have been reported previously as a means of enhancing ionization efficiency or signal intensity. A key challenge when working with multiple, closely spaced ESI emitters is overcoming the deleterious effects caused by electrical interference among neighboring emitters. Individual emitters can experience different electric fields depending on their relative position in the array, such that it becomes difficult to operate all of the emitters optimally for a given applied potential. In this work, we have developed multi-nanoESI emitters arranged with a circular pattern, which enable the constituent emitters to experience a uniform electric field. The performance of the circular emitter array was compared to a single emitter and to a previously developed linear emitter array, which verified that improved electric field uniformity was achieved with the circular arrangement. The circular arrays were also interfaced with a mass spectrometer via a matching multicapillary inlet, and the results were compared with those obtained using a single emitter. By minimizing interemitter electric field inhomogeneities, much larger arrays having closer emitter spacing should be feasible.

  14. What is so super about super-emitters? Characterizing methane high emitters from natural gas infrastructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavala Araiza, D.; Lyon, D. R.; Alvarez, R.; Harriss, R. C.; Palacios, V.; Hamburg, S.

    2015-12-01

    Methane emissions across the natural gas supply chain are dominated at any one time by a few high-emitters (super-emitters or fat-tail of the distribution), often underrepresented in published datasets used to construct emission inventories. Characterization of high-emitters is essential for improving emission estimates based on atmospheric data (top-down) and emission inventories (bottom-up). The population of high-emitters (e.g. 10-20% of sites that account for 80-90% of the emissions) is temporally and spatially dynamic. As a consequence, it is challenging to design sampling methods and construct estimates that accurately represent their frequency and magnitude of emissions. We present new methods to derive facility-specific emission distribution functions that explicitly integrate the influence of the relatively rare super-emitters. These methods were applied in the Barnett Shale region to construct a custom emission inventory that is then compared to top-down emission estimates for the region. We offer a methodological framework relevant to the design of future sampling campaigns, in which these high-emitters are seamlessly incorporated to representative emissions distributions. This framework can be applied to heterogeneous oil and gas production regions across geographies to obtain accurate regional emission estimates. Additionally, we characterize emissions relative to the fraction of a facility's total methane throughput; an effective metric to identify sites with excess emissions resulting from avoidable operating conditions, such as malfunctioning equipment (defined here as functional super-emitters). This work suggests that identifying functional super-emitters and correcting their avoidable operating conditions would result in significant emission reductions. However, due to their spatiotemporal dynamic behavior, achieving and maintaining uniformly low emissions across the entire population of sites will require mitigation steps (e.g. leak detection

  15. Research in radiobiology. Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-03-31

    The toxicity, retention, biological effects, distribution, decorporation and measuring techniques of radionuclides are discussed. Calculations of trabecular bone formation rates from tetracycline labeling is included. The characteristics of trabecular bone in the Rhesus monkey are discussed. Studies on the early retention and distribution of radium 224 in beagles are included. Studies on the decorporation of plutonium and americium in dogs by DTPA and salicylic acid are presented.

  16. Research in radiobiology. Annual report of work in progress in the internal irradiation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jee, W.S.S.

    1975-03-31

    Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 papers. In addition, twenty-three injection tables are presented for toxicity animals and test animals. The injection tables include the calculated average dose in rads to the skeleton at death for 13 actinides. (HLW)

  17. Gold-Coated Nanoelectrospray Emitters Fabricated by Gravity-Assisted Etching Self-Termination and Electroless Deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xudong; Liang, Yu; Weng, Yejing; Chen, Yuanbo; Jiang, Hao; Zhang, Lihua; Liang, Zhen; Zhang, Yukui

    2016-12-06

    To improve the stability and sensitivity of nanoelectrospray for liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy (LC-MS) analysis, we present a new method to fabricate gold-coated emitters. Via gravity-assisted etching self-termination, the emitter with a tapered outer surface and a straight inner surface is prepared with good reproducibility, without the need of fluid introduced to protect internal surface during etching. Followed by electroless deposition, the emitter is further coated with gold film homogeneously, by which the relative standard deviation (RSD) value of total ion current in 160 h is <5%, showing good stability. Compared to that obtained by a commercial emitter, the identified protein number from 2 μg HeLa cell digests is increased over 10%, contributed by the stable electrospray and improved signal intensity of peptides. Furthermore, the integrated gold-coated emitter is prepared at the end of the ultranarrow-bore packed column (inner diameter of 25 μm), and 218 proteins are identified from 2 ng HeLa cell digests. All of these results demonstrate the great promise of such emitters for use in ultrasensitive proteome analysis.

  18. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de los Andes, A.A. 4976, Bogotá (Colombia); Johnson, N. F. [Department of Physics, University of Miami, Coral Gables, Miami, FL 33124 (United States)

    2013-12-04

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system’s quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  19. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  20. Ghost signals in Allison emittance scanners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockli, Martin P.; /SNS Project, Oak Ridge /Tennessee U.; Leitner, M.; /LBL, Berkeley; Moehs, D.P.; /Fermilab; Keller, R.; /LBL, Berkeley; Welton, R.F.; /SNS Project, Oak

    2004-12-01

    For over 20 years, Allison scanners have been used to measure emittances of low-energy ion beams. We show that scanning large trajectory angles produces ghost signals caused by the sampled beamlet impacting on an electric deflection plate. The ghost signal strength is proportional to the amount of beam entering the scanner. Depending on the ions, and their velocity, the ghost signals can have the opposite or the same polarity as the main beam signals. The ghost signals cause significant errors in the emittance estimates because they appear at large trajectory angles. These ghost signals often go undetected because they partly overlap with the real signals, are mostly below the 1% level, and often hide in the noise. A simple deflection plate modification is shown to reduce the ghost signal strength by over 99%.

  1. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    CERN Document Server

    Alexahin, Y

    2014-01-01

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  2. An ultracold low emittance electron source

    CERN Document Server

    Xia, G; Murray, A J; Bellan, L; Bertsche, W; Appleby, R B; Mete, O; Chattopadhyay, S

    2014-01-01

    Ultracold atom-based electron sources have recently been proposed as an alternative to the conventional photo-injectors or thermionic electron guns widely used in modern particle accelerators. The advantages of ultracold atom-based electron sources lie in the fact that the electrons extracted from the plasma (created from near threshold photo-ionization of ultracold atoms) have a very low temperature, i.e. down to tens of Kelvin. Extraction of these electrons has the potential for producing very low emittance electron bunches. These features are crucial for the next generation of particle accelerators, including free electron lasers, plasma-based accelerators and future linear colliders. The source also has many potential direct applications, including ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) and electron microscopy, due to its intrinsically high coherence. In this paper, the basic mechanism of ultracold electron beam production is discussed and our new research facility for an ultracold, low emittance electron s...

  3. Computing Eigen-Emittances from Tracking Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexahin, Y. [Fermilab

    2014-09-18

    In a strongly nonlinear system the particle distribution in the phase space may develop long tails which contribution to the covariance (sigma) matrix should be suppressed for a correct estimate of the beam emittance. A method is offered based on Gaussian approximation of the original particle distribution in the phase space (Klimontovich distribution) which leads to an equation for the sigma matrix which provides efficient suppression of the tails and cannot be obtained by introducing weights. This equation is easily solved by iterations in the multi-dimensional case. It is also shown how the eigen-emittances and coupled optics functions can be retrieved from the sigma matrix in a strongly coupled system. Finally, the developed algorithm is applied to 6D ionization cooling of muons in HFOFO channel.

  4. Reverse Emittance Exchange for Muon Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    V. Ivanov, A. Afanasev, C.M. Ankenbrandt, R.P. Johnson, G.M. Wang, S.A. Bogacz, Y.S. Derbenev

    2009-05-01

    Muon collider luminosity depends on the number of muons in the storage ring and on the transverse size of the beams in collision. Ionization cooling as it is currently envisioned will not cool the beam sizes sufficiently well to provide adequate luminosity without large muon intensities. Six-dimensional cooling schemes will reduce the longitudinal emittance of a muon beam so that smaller high frequency RF cavities can be used for later stages of cooling and for acceleration. However, the bunch length at collision energy is then shorter than needed to match the interaction region beta function. New ideas to shrink transverse beam dimensions by lengthening each bunch will help achieve high luminosity in muon colliders. Analytic expressions for the reverse emittance exchange mechanism were derived, including a new resonant method of beam focusing.

  5. FIrpic: archetypal blue phosphorescent emitter for electroluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranoff, Etienne; Curchod, Basile F E

    2015-05-14

    FIrpic is the most investigated bis-cyclometallated iridium complex in particular in the context of organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) because of its attractive sky-blue emission, high emission efficiency, and suitable energy levels. In this Perspective we review the synthesis, structural characterisations, and key properties of this emitter. We also survey the theoretical studies and summarise a series of selected monochromatic electroluminescent devices using FIrpic as the emitting dopant. Finally we highlight important shortcomings of FIrpic as an emitter for OLEDs. Despite the large body of work dedicated to this material, it is manifest that the understanding of photophysical and electrochemical processes are only broadly understood mainly because of the different environment in which these properties are measured, i.e., isolated molecules in solvent vs. device.

  6. Emittance growths in resonance crossing at FFAGs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab; Pang, X.; Wang, F.; Wang, X.; Lee, S.Y.; /Indiana U.

    2007-10-01

    Scaling laws of the emittance growth for a beam crossing the 6th-order systematic space-charge resonances and the random-octupole driven 4th-order resonance are obtained by numerical multi-particle simulations. These laws can be important in setting the minimum acceleration rate and maximum tolerable resonance strength for the design of non-scaling fixed-field alternating gradient accelerators.

  7. Large-area lanthanum hexaboride electron emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, D. M.; Hirooka, Y.; Sketchley, T. A.

    1985-09-01

    The characteristics of lanthanum-boron thermionic electron emitters are discussed, and a large-area, continuously operating cathode assembly and heater are described. Impurity production and structural problems involving the support of the LaB6 have been eliminated in the presented configuration. The performance of the cathode in a plasma discharge, where surface modification occurs by ion sputtering, is presented. Problem areas which affect lifetime and emission current capability are discussed.

  8. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adjei, Daniel, E-mail: nana.adjeidan@gmail.com [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Radiation Protection Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box LG 80, Legon, Accra (Ghana); Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, 2, Kaliskiego Str., 00-908 Warsaw (Poland); Vyšín, Luděk [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, 152, Radzikowskiego Str., 31-342 Cracow (Poland); Pina, Ladislav [Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Engineering Physics, Czech Technical University in Prague, Břehová 7, 115 19 Prague 1 (Czech Republic); Davídková, Marie [Institute of Nuclear Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Řež (Czech Republic); Juha, Libor [Institute of Physics, Czech Academy of Sciences, Na Slovance 2, 182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray “water window” spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280–540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 10{sup 3} photons/μm{sup 2}/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms’ sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the “water window”, where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET – Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  9. Mixed-field GCR Simulations for Radiobiological Research Using Ground Based Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Hee Y.; Rusek, Adam; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    2014-01-01

    Space radiation is comprised of a large number of particle types and energies, which have differential ionization power from high energy protons to high charge and energy (HZE) particles and secondary neutrons produced by galactic cosmic rays (GCR). Ground based accelerators such as the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) are used to simulate space radiation for radiobiology research and dosimetry, electronics parts, and shielding testing using mono-energetic beams for single ion species. As a tool to support research on new risk assessment models, we have developed a stochastic model of heavy ion beams and space radiation effects, the GCR Event-based Risk Model computer code (GERMcode). For radiobiological research on mixed-field space radiation, a new GCR simulator at NSRL is proposed. The NSRL-GCR simulator, which implements the rapid switching mode and the higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, can integrate multiple ions into a single simulation to create GCR Z-spectrum in major energy bins. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, a GCR reference field is proposed after extensive simulation studies using the GERMcode. The GCR reference field is shown to reproduce the Z and LET spectra of GCR behind shielding within 20% accuracy compared to simulated full GCR environments behind shielding. A major challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3-years in relation to simulations with cell and animal models of human risks. We discuss possible approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks and fractionation approaches at a GCR simulator.

  10. Issues for Simulation of Galactic Cosmic Ray Exposures for Radiobiological Research at Ground Based Accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myung-Hee Y Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available For research on the health risks of galactic cosmic rays (GCR ground-based accelerators have been used for radiobiology research with mono-energetic beams of single high charge, Z and energy, E (HZE particles. In this paper we consider the pros and cons of a GCR reference field at a particle accelerator. At the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL we have proposed a GCR simulator, which implements a new rapid switching mode and higher energy beam extraction to 1.5 GeV/u, in order to integrate multiple ions into a single simulation within hours or longer for chronic exposures. After considering the GCR environment and energy limitations of NSRL, we performed extensive simulation studies using the stochastic transport code, GERMcode (GCR Event Risk Model to define a GCR reference field using 9 HZE particle beam-energy combinations each with a unique absorber thickness to provide fragmentation and 10 or more energies of proton and 4He beams. The reference field is shown to well represent the charge dependence of GCR dose in several energy bins behind shielding compared to a simulated GCR environment. However a more significant challenge for space radiobiology research is to consider chronic GCR exposure of up to 3 years in relation to simulations with animal models of human risks. We discuss issues in approaches to map important biological time scales in experimental models using ground-based simulation with extended exposure of up to a few weeks using chronic or fractionation exposures. A kinetics model of HZE particle hit probabilities suggests that experimental simulations of several weeks will be needed to avoid high fluence rate artifacts, which places limitations on the experiments to be performed. Ultimately risk estimates are limited by theoretical understanding, and focus on improving understanding of mechanisms and development of experimental models to improve this understanding should remain the highest priority for space radiobiology

  11. Development of a compact laser-produced plasma soft X-ray source for radiobiology experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adjei, Daniel; Ayele, Mesfin Getachew; Wachulak, Przemyslaw; Bartnik, Andrzej; Wegrzynski, Łukasz; Fiedorowicz, Henryk; Vyšín, Luděk; Wiechec, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Pina, Ladislav; Davídková, Marie; Juha, Libor

    2015-12-01

    A desk-top laser-produced plasma (LPP) source of soft X-rays (SXR) has been developed for radiobiology research. The source is based on a double-stream gas puff target, irradiated with the focused beam of a commercial Nd:YAG laser. The source has been optimized to get a maximum photon emission from LPP in the X-ray "water window" spectral wavelength range from 2.3 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of oxygen) to 4.4 nm (i.e., an absorption edge of carbon) (280-540 eV in photon energy units) by using argon gas-puff target and spectral filtering by free-standing thin foils. The present source delivers nanosecond pulses of soft X-rays at a fluence of about 4.2 × 103 photons/μm2/pulse on a sample placed inside the vacuum chamber. In this paper, the source design, radiation output characterization measurements and initial irradiation experiments are described. The source can be useful in addressing observations related to biomolecular, cellular and organisms' sensitivity to pulsed radiation in the "water window", where carbon atoms absorb X-rays more strongly than the oxygen, mostly present in water. The combination of the SXR source and the radiobiology irradiation layout, reported in this article, make possible a systematic investigation of relationships between direct and indirect action of ionizing radiation, an increase of a local dose in carbon-rich compartments of the cell (e.g., lipid membranes), an experimental estimation of a particular role of the Auger effect (in particular in carbon atoms) in the damage to biological systems, and the study of ionization/excitation-density (LET - Linear Energy Transfer) and dose-rate effects in radiobiology.

  12. Studying Reionization with Ly-alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    McQuinn, Matthew; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Dutta, Suvendra

    2007-01-01

    We show that observations of high-redshift Ly-alpha emitters (LAEs) have the potential to provide definitive evidence for reionization in the near future. Using 200 Mpc radiative transfer simulations, we calculate the effect that patchy reionization has on the line profile, on the luminosity function, and, most interestingly, on the clustering of emitters for several realistic models of reionization. Reionization increases the measured clustering of emitters, and we show that this enhancement would be essentially impossible to attribute to anything other than reionization. Our results motivate looking for the signature of reionization in existing LAE data. We find that for stellar reionization scenarios the angular correlation function of the 58 LAEs in the Subaru Deep Field z = 6.6 photometric sample is more consistent with a fully ionized universe (mean volume ionized fraction x_i = 1) than a universe with x_i 2-sigma confidence level. Measurements in the next year on Subaru will increase their z = 6.6 LAE ...

  13. The new hybrid thermal neutron facility at TAPIRO reactor for BNCT radiobiological experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, J; Rosi, G; Agosteo, S

    2007-01-01

    A new thermal neutron irradiation facility, devoted to carry out both dosimetric and radiobiological studies on boron carriers, which are being developed in the framework of INFN BNCT project, has been installed at the ENEA Casaccia TAPIRO research fast reactor. The thermal column, based on an original, hybrid, neutron spectrum shifter configuration, has been recently become operative. In spite of its low power (5 kW), the new facility is able to provide a high thermal neutron flux level, uniformly distributed inside the irradiation cavity, with a quite low gamma background. The main features and preliminary benchmark measurements of the Beam-shaping assembly are here presented and discussed.

  14. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 25. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Krause, Mechthild [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radiologie; Cordes, Nils [Universitaetsklinikum Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). OncoRay - Nationales Zentrum fuer Strahlenforschung in der Radioonkologie; Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany); Petersen, Cordula [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Strahlentherapie und Radioonkologie; Rodemann, H. Peter [Universitaetsklinikum Tuebingen (Germany). Sektion fuer Strahlenbiologie; Rothkamm, Kai [Universitaetsklinikum Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Lab. fuer Strahlentherapie und Experimentelle Radioonkologie; Zips, Daniel (ed.) [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany). Universitaetsklinik fuer Radioonkologie

    2016-05-01

    The proceedings of the 25th symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology include papers on the following issues: radiotherapy individualization based on imaging; pre-clinic imaging and new experimental methods; methods and models, micromilieu and metabolism, combined therapy; secondary tumors following radiotherapy; radiogenic effects in normal tissue; resistance mechanism of tumors and normal tissue; personalized radio-oncology - which biological data are needed; pre-clinic and personalized radio-oncology; biomarkers - pre-clinic and translational; translational examinations for personalized radio-oncology.

  15. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 18. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 18. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Dahm-Daphi, Jochen; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemann, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2009-07-15

    The proceedings on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology contain two review articles (prediction of normal tissue reactions after radiotherapy, ?H2AX foci as a marker for DNA double-strand breaks) and 34 contributions to the following topics: Hypoxia and molecular mechanisms of radiation resistance; biological imaging of the tumor micromilieu; DNA repair, genomic instability and carcerogenesis; molecular factors of radiation resistance; actual controversial discussion on possible irradiation caused metastasis risk enhancement; EGFR inhibition and irradiation; biology of experimental radiation/ normal tissue toxicity.

  16. Tcp and NTCP radiobiological models: conventional and hypo fractionated treatments in radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astudillo V, A.; Paredes G, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Resendiz G, G.; Posadas V, A. [Hospital Angeles Lomas, Av. Vialidad de la Barranca s/n, Col. Valle de las Palmas, 52763 Huixquilucan de Degallado, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Mitsoura, E. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Medicina, Paseo Tollocan, Esq. Jesus Carranza s/n, Col. Moderna de la Cruz, 50180 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rodriguez L, A.; Flores C, J. M., E-mail: armando.astudillo@inin.gob.mx [Hospital Medica Sur, Puente de Piedra 150, Col. Toriello Guerra, 14050 Tlalpan, Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The hypo and conventional fractionated schedules performance were compared in terms of the tumor control and the normal tissue complications. From the records of ten patients, treated for adenocarcinoma and without mastectomy, the dose-volume histogram was used. Using radiobiological models the probabilities for tumor control and normal tissue complications were calculated. For both schedules the tumor control was approximately the same. However, the damage in the normal tissue was larger in conventional fractionated schedule. This is important because patients assistance time to their fractions (15 fractions/25 fractions) can be optimized. Thus, the hypo fractionated schedule has suitable characteristics to be implemented. (Author)

  17. Experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiobiology. Vol. 22. Proceedings; Experimentelle Strahlentherapie und Klinische Strahlenbiologie. Bd. 22. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, Michael; Cordes, Nils; Dikomey, Ekkehard; Krause, Mechthild; Petersen, Cordula; Rodemannn, H. Peter; Zips, Daniel (eds.)

    2013-03-01

    The proceedings of the 22th Symposium on experimental radiotherapy and clinical radiotherapy contain lectures and poster on the following issues: Radiation induced immuno-targeting of tumors; targeting in the radiotherapy; biomarkers; targeting; radio-oncological therapy of rectal carcinoma - contribution of radiobiology for therapy optimization; biomarkers for radiation sensibility; resistance mechanisms of tumors; resistance mechanisms of normal tissue; micro ambience, P13L inhibition in radiotherapy: improvement of the local tumor control by molecular mechanisms or the influence of the tumor micro-ambience? DNA repair; radiation effects and technical development.

  18. Emissivity Tuned Emitter for RTPV Power Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl M. Stoots; Robert C. O' Brien; Troy M. Howe

    2012-03-01

    Every mission launched by NASA to the outer planets has produced unexpected results. The Voyager I and II, Galileo, and Cassini missions produced images and collected scientific data that totally revolutionized our understanding of the solar system and the formation of the planetary systems. These missions were enabled by the use of nuclear power. Because of the distances from the Sun, electrical power was produced using the radioactive decay of a plutonium isotope. Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) used in the past and currently used Multi-Mission RTGs (MMRTGs) provide power for space missions. Unfortunately, RTGs rely on thermocouples to convert heat to electricity and are inherently inefficient ({approx} 3-7% thermal to electric efficiency). A Radioisotope Thermal Photovoltaic (RTPV) power source has the potential to reduce the specific mass of the onboard power supply by increasing the efficiency of thermal to electric conversion. In an RTPV, a radioisotope heats an emitter, which emits light to a photovoltaic (PV) cell, which converts the light into electricity. Developing an emitter tuned to the desired wavelength of the photovoltaic is a key part in increasing overall performance. Researchers at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) have built a Thermal Photovoltaic (TPV) system, that utilizes a simulated General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) from a MMRTG to heat a tantalum emitter. The GPHS is a block of graphite roughly 10 cm by 10 cm by 5 cm. A fully loaded GPHS produces 250 w of thermal power and weighs 1.6 kgs. The GRC system relies on the GPHS unit radiating at 1200 K to a tantalum emitter that, in turn, radiates light to a GaInAs photo-voltaic cell. The GRC claims system efficiency of conversion of 15%. The specific mass is around 167 kg/kWe. A RTPV power source that utilized a ceramic or ceramic-metal (cermet) matrix would allow for the combination of the heat source, canister, and emitter into one compact unit, and allow variation in size

  19. Wavelength locking of single emitters and multi-emitter modules: simulation and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanson, Dan; Rappaport, Noam; Peleg, Ophir; Berk, Yuri; Dahan, Nir; Klumel, Genady; Baskin, Ilya; Levy, Moshe

    2016-03-01

    Wavelength-stabilized high-brightness single emitters are commonly used in fiber-coupled laser diode modules for pumping Yb-doped lasers at 976 nm, and Nd-doped ones at 808 nm. We investigate the spectral behavior of single emitters under wavelength-selective feedback from a volume Bragg (or hologram) grating (VBG) in a multi-emitter module. By integrating a full VBG model as a multi-layer thin film structure with commercial raytracing software, we simulated wavelength locking conditions as a function of beam divergence and angular alignment tolerances. Good correlation between the simulated VBG feedback strength and experimentally measured locking ranges, in both VBG misalignment angle and laser temperature, is demonstrated. The challenges of assembling multi-emitter modules based on beam-stacked optical architectures are specifically addressed, where the wavelength locking conditions must be achieved simultaneously with high fiber coupling efficiency for each emitter in the module. It is shown that angular misorientation between fast and slow-axis collimating optics can have a dramatic effect on the spectral and power performance of the module. We report the development of our NEON-S wavelength-stabilized fiber laser pump module, which uses a VBG to provide wavelength-selective optical feedback in the collimated portion of the beam. Powered by our purpose-developed high-brightness single emitters, the module delivers 47 W output at 11 A from an 0.15 NA fiber and a 0.3 nm linewidth at 976 nm. Preliminary wavelength-locking results at 808 nm are also presented.

  20. Delay modeling of bipolar ECL/EFL (Emitter-Coupled Logic/Emitter-Follower-Logic) circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Andrew T.

    1986-08-01

    This report deals with the development of a delay-time model for timing simulation of large circuits consisting of Bipolar ECL(Emitter-Coupled Logic) and EFL (Emitter-Follower-Logic) networks. This model can provide adequate information on the performance of the circuits with a minimum expenditure of computation time. This goal is achieved by the use of proper circuit transient models on which analytical delay expressions can be derived with accurate results. The delay-model developed in this report is general enough to handle complex digital circuits with multiple inputs or/and multiple levels. The important effects of input slew rate are also included in the model.

  1. A radiobiological model of radiotherapy response and its correlation with prognostic imaging variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispin-Ortuzar, Mireia; Jeong, Jeho; Fontanella, Andrew N.; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2017-04-01

    Radiobiological models of tumour control probability (TCP) can be personalized using imaging data. We propose an extension to a voxel-level radiobiological TCP model in order to describe patient-specific differences and intra-tumour heterogeneity. In the proposed model, tumour shrinkage is described by means of a novel kinetic Monte Carlo method for inter-voxel cell migration and tumour deformation. The model captures the spatiotemporal evolution of the tumour at the voxel level, and is designed to take imaging data as input. To test the performance of the model, three image-derived variables found to be predictive of outcome in the literature have been identified and calculated using the model’s own parameters. Simulating multiple tumours with different initial conditions makes it possible to perform an in silico study of the correlation of these variables with the dose for 50% tumour control (\\text{TC}{{\\text{D}}50} ) calculated by the model. We find that the three simulated variables correlate with the calculated \\text{TC}{{\\text{D}}50} . In addition, we find that different variables have different levels of sensitivity to the spatial distribution of hypoxia within the tumour, as well as to the dynamics of the migration mechanism. Finally, based on our results, we observe that an adequate combination of the variables may potentially result in higher predictive power.

  2. An Estimation of Radiobiological Parameters for Head-and-Neck Cancer Cells and the Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, X. Sharon; Yang, Qiuhui; Lee, Steve P.; Li, X. Allen; Wang, Dian

    2012-01-01

    In vitro survival measurements using two human head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cell lines were performed. The specially designed split-dose surviving fraction was obtained and fitted to the linear-quadratic formalism. The repair halftime (Tr), the potential doubling time (Td), α/β and radiosensitivity α, were estimated. Other radiobiological models: EUD, BED, TCP, etc., were used to examine the potential treatment effectiveness of different IMRT techniques. Our data indicated the repair halftime of ~17 min based on two HNC cell lines. The combined α/β, α and Td are α/β = 8.1 ± 4.1 Gy, α = 0.22 ± 0.08 Gy−1, Td = 4.0 ± 1.8 day, respectively. The prolonged IMRT dose delivery for entire HNC treatment course could possibly result in the loss of biological effectiveness, i.e., the target EUDs decreased by 11% with fraction dose delivery time varying from 5 to 30 min. We determined the sublethal damage repair halftime and other radiobiological parameters for HNC cells, and to evaluate treatment effectiveness of the prolonged dose delivery times associated with different IMRT techniques. The estimated repair halftime for HNC is relatively short and may be comparable to the step-and-shoot IMRT fraction dose delivery time. The effectiveness of IMRT treatment may be improved by reducing the fraction delivery time for HNC treatment. PMID:24213325

  3. A model to describe potential effects of chemotherapy on critical radiobiological treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, D.; Desco, M. M.; Antoranz, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    Although chemo- and radiotherapy can annihilate tumors on their own. they are also used in coadjuvancy: improving local effects of radiotherapy using chemotherapy as a radiosensit.izer. The effects of radiotherapy are well described by current radiobiological models. The goal of this work is to describe a discrete radiotherapy model, that has been previously used describe high radiation dose response as well as unusual radio-responses of some types of tumors (e.g. prostate cancer), to obtain a model of chemo+radiotherapy that can describe how the outcome of their combination is a more efficient removal of the tumor. Our hypothesis is that, although both treatments haven different mechanisms, both affect similar key points of cell metabolism and regulation, that lead to cellular death. Hence, we will consider a discrete model where chemotherapy may affect a fraction of the same targets destroyed by radiotherapy. Although radiotherapy reaches all cells equally, chemotherapy diffuses through a tumor attaining lower concentration in its center and higher in its surface. With our simulations we study the enhanced effect of combined therapy treatment and how it depends on the tissue critical parameters (the parameters of the lion-extensive radiobiological model), the number of “targets” aimed at by chemotherapy, and the concentration and diffusion rate of the drug inside the tumor. The results show that an equivalent, cliemo-radio-dose can be computed that allows the prediction of the lower radiation dose that causes the same effect than a radio-only treatment.

  4. In vivo radiobiological assessment of the new clinical carbon ion beams at CNAO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facoetti, A; Vischioni, B; Ciocca, M; Ferrarini, M; Furusawa, Y; Mairani, A; Matsumoto, Y; Mirandola, A; Molinelli, S; Uzawa, A; Vilches, Freixas G; Orecchia, R

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the in vivo study performed to evaluate the uniformity of biological doses within an hypothetical target volume and calculate the values of relative biological effectiveness (RBE) at different depths in the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of the new CNAO (National Centre for Oncological Hadrontherapy) carbon beams is presented, in the framework of a typical radiobiological beam calibration procedure. The RBE values (relative to (60)Co γ rays) of the CNAO active scanning carbon ion beams were determined using jejunal crypt regeneration in mice as biological system at the entrance, centre and distal end of a 6-cm SOBP. The RBE values calculated from the iso-effective doses to reduce crypt survival per circumference to 10, ranged from 1.52 at the middle of the SOBP to 1.75 at the distal position and are in agreement with those previously reported from other carbon ion facilities. In conclusion, this first set of in vivo experiments shows that the CNAO carbon beam is radiobiologically comparable with the NIRS (National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Chiba, Japan) and GSI (Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung, Darmstadt, Germany) ones.

  5. Development of a soft X-ray microprobe for single cell radiobiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Liang; YAN Jingwen; JIANG Shiping; YU Yang

    2009-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for radiobiological studies was developed which deliver precise doses of radiation to the selected individual cells. The facility used synchrotron radiation as soft X-ray source. A zone plate combining with a pinhole produced a fine probe from bending magnet for single cell irradiating with defined doses. The diameter of microprobe at the target position was about 2 μm by scanning a knife-edge with an AXUV photo diode. The fluxes of soft X-rays at 516.7 eV (2.4 nm) were about 5.4×104 photons/s.100mA measured with the photo diode. The absorbed dose rate for typical yeast cells was about 11.34 Gy/s with the storage current of 100 mA. A preliminary experiment for yeast cells irradiation has shown that the microprobe had a definite biological effect for radiobiological investigations. The soft X-ray microprobe at "water window" region has provided a useful tool for single cell irradiating damage and a capability of individually irradiating a certain numbers of cells each time.

  6. Bringing the heavy: carbon ion therapy in the radiobiological and clinical context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaff, Cody D; Krauze, Andra; Belard, Arnaud; O'Connell, John J; Camphausen, Kevin A

    2014-03-28

    Radiotherapy for the treatment of cancer is undergoing an evolution, shifting to the use of heavier ion species. For a plethora of malignancies, current radiotherapy using photons or protons yields marginal benefits in local control and survival. One hypothesis is that these malignancies have acquired, or are inherently radioresistant to low LET radiation. In the last decade, carbon ion radiotherapy facilities have slowly been constructed in Europe and Asia, demonstrating favorable results for many of the malignancies that do poorly with conventional radiotherapy. However, from a radiobiological perspective, much of how this modality works in overcoming radioresistance, and extending local control and survival are not yet fully understood. In this review, we will explain from a radiobiological perspective how carbon ion radiotherapy can overcome the classical and recently postulated contributors of radioresistance (α/β ratio, hypoxia, cell proliferation, the tumor microenvironment and metabolism, and cancer stem cells). Furthermore, we will make recommendations on the important factors to consider, such as anatomical location, in the future design and implementation of clinical trials. With the existing data available we believe that the expansion of carbon ion facilities into the United States is warranted.

  7. Radiobiological characterization of post-lumpectomy focal brachytherapy with lipid nanoparticle-carried radionuclides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrycushko, Brian A.; Gutierrez, Alonso N.; Goins, Beth; Yan, Weiqiang; Phillips, William T.; Otto, Pamela M.; Bao, Ande

    2011-02-01

    Post-operative radiotherapy has commonly been used for early stage breast cancer to treat residual disease. The primary objective of this work was to characterize, through dosimetric and radiobiological modeling, a novel focal brachytherapy technique which uses direct intracavitary infusion of β-emitting radionuclides (186Re/188Re) carried by lipid nanoparticles (liposomes). Absorbed dose calculations were performed for a spherical lumpectomy cavity with a uniformly injected activity distribution using a dose point kernel convolution technique. Radiobiological indices were used to relate predicted therapy outcome and normal tissue complication of this technique with equivalent external beam radiotherapy treatment regimens. Modeled stromal damage was used as a measure of the inhibition of the stimulatory effect on tumor growth driven by the wound healing response. A sample treatment plan delivering 50 Gy at a therapeutic range of 2.0 mm for 186Re-liposomes and 5.0 mm for 188Re-liposomes takes advantage of the dose delivery characteristics of the β-emissions, providing significant EUD (58.2 Gy and 72.5 Gy for 186Re and 188Re, respectively) with a minimal NTCP (0.046%) of the healthy ipsilateral breast. Modeling of kidney BED and ipsilateral breast NTCP showed that large injected activity concentrations of both radionuclides could be safely administered without significant complications.

  8. Radar Emitter Signal Recognition Based on Complexity Features

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张葛祥; 金炜东; 胡来招

    2004-01-01

    Intra-pulse characteristics of different radar emitter signals reflect on signal waveform by way of changing frequency, phase and amplitude. A novel approach was proposed to extract complexity features of radar emitter signals in a wide range of signal-to-noise ratio ( SNR), and radial basis probability neural network (RBPNN) was used to recognize different radar emitter signals. Complexity features, including Lempel-Ziv complexity (LZC) and correlation dimension (CD), can measure the complexity and irregularity of signals, which mirrors the intra-pulse modulation laws of radar emitter signals. In an experiment, LZC and CD features of 10 typical radar emitter signals were extracted and RBPNN was applied to identify the 10 radar emitter signals. Simulation results show that the proposed approach is effective and has good application values because average accurate recognition rate is high when SNR varies in a wide range.

  9. Correlated spontaneous emission of fluorescent emitters mediated by single plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Bouchet, Dorian; Ithurria, Sandrine; Gulinatti, Angelo; Rech, Ivan; Carminati, Rémi; De Wilde, Yannick; Krachmalnicoff, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Manipulating the spontaneous emission of a fluorescent emitter can be achieved by placing the emitter in a nanostructured environment. A privileged spot is occupied by plasmonic structures that provide a strong confinement of the electromagnetic field, which results in an enhancement of the emitter-environment interaction. While plasmonic nanostructures have been widely exploited to control the emission properties of single photon emitters, performing the coupling between quantum emitters with plasmons poses a huge challenge. In this Letter we report on a first crucial step towards this goal by the observation of correlated emission between a single CdSe/CdS/ZnS quantum dot exhibiting single photon statistics and a fluorescent nanobead located micrometers apart. This is accomplished by coupling both emitters to a silver nanowire. Single-plasmons are created on the latter from the quantum dot, and transfer energy to excite in turn the fluorescent nanobead.

  10. Semiconductor Quantum Dash Broadband Emitters: Modeling and Experiments

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Mohammed Zahed Mustafa

    2013-10-01

    Broadband light emitters operation, which covers multiple wavelengths of the electromagnetic spectrum, has been established as an indispensable element to the human kind, continuously advancing the living standard by serving as sources in important multi-disciplinary field applications such as biomedical imaging and sensing, general lighting and internet and mobile phone connectivity. In general, most commercial broadband light sources relies on complex systems for broadband light generation which are bulky, and energy hungry. \\tRecent demonstration of ultra-broadband emission from semiconductor light sources in the form of superluminescent light emitting diodes (SLDs) has paved way in realization of broadband emitters on a completely novel platform, which offered compactness, cost effectiveness, and comparatively energy efficient, and are already serving as a key component in medical imaging systems. The low power-bandwidth product is inherent in SLDs operating in the amplified spontaneous emission regime. A quantum leap in the advancement of broadband emitters, in which high power and large bandwidth (in tens of nm) are in demand. Recently, the birth of a new class of broadband semiconductor laser diode (LDs) producing multiple wavelength light in stimulated emission regime was demonstrated. This very recent manifestation of a high power-bandwidth-product semiconductor broadband LDs relies on interband optical transitions via quantum confined dot/dash nanostructures and exploiting the natural inhomogeneity of the self-assembled growth technology. This concept is highly interesting and extending the broad spectrum of stimulated emission by novel device design forms the central focus of this dissertation. \\tIn this work, a simple rate equation numerical technique for modeling InAs/InP quantum dash laser incorporating the properties of inhomogeneous broadening effect on lasing spectra was developed and discussed, followed by a comprehensive experimental analysis

  11. Radiobiologically optimized couch shift: A new localization paradigm using cone-beam CT for prostate radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Yimei, E-mail: yhuang2@hfhs.org; Gardner, Stephen J.; Wen, Ning; Zhao, Bo; Gordon, James; Brown, Stephen; Chetty, Indrin J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, 2799 W Grand Boulevard, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: To present a novel positioning strategy which optimizes radiation delivery by utilizing radiobiological response knowledge and evaluate its use during prostate external beam radiotherapy. Methods: Five patients with low or intermediate risk prostate cancer were evaluated retrospectively in this IRB-approved study. For each patient, a VMAT plan with one 358° arc was generated on the planning CT (PCT) to deliver 78 Gy in 39 fractions. Five representative pretreatment cone beam CTs (CBCT) were selected for each patient. The CBCT images were registered to PCT by a human observer, which consisted of an initial automated registration with three degrees-of-freedom, followed by manual adjustment for agreement at the prostate/rectal wall interface. To determine the optimal treatment position for each CBCT, a search was performed centering on the observer-matched position (OM-position) utilizing a score function based on radiobiological and dosimetric indices (EUD{sub prostate}, D99{sub prostate}, NTCP{sub rectum}, and NTCP{sub bladder}) for the prostate, rectum, and bladder. We termed the optimal treatment position the radiobiologically optimized couch shift position (ROCS-position). Results: The dosimetric indices, averaged over the five patients’ treatment plans, were (mean ± SD) 79.5 ± 0.3 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 78.2 ± 0.4 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 11.1% ± 2.7% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 7.6% (NTCP{sub bladder}). The corresponding values from CBCT at the OM-positions were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.8 ± 0.7 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 12.1% ± 5.6% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 51.6% ± 15.2% (NTCP{sub bladder}), respectively. In comparison, from CBCT at the ROCS-positions, the dosimetric indices were 79.5 ± 0.6 Gy (EUD{sub prostate}), 77.3 ± 0.6 Gy (D99{sub prostate}), 8.0% ± 3.3% (NTCP{sub rectum}), and 46.9% ± 15.7% (NTCP{sub bladder}). Excessive NTCP{sub rectum} was observed on Patient 5 (19.5% ± 6.6%) corresponding to localization at OM

  12. Coated nano-particle jamming of quantum emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2012-01-01

    Spherical active coated nano-particles are examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two or four quantum emitters (electric Hertzian dipoles). The ability of the coated nano-particle to effectively cloak the emitters to a far-field observer is reported. This offers an interest...... an interesting route towards the jamming of quantum emitters/nano-antennas, for instance, in biological fluorescence assays....

  13. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazarov, Ivan; Cultrera, Luca; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-05-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56±0.03 mm mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  14. Thermal emittance measurements of a cesium potassium antimonide photocathode

    CERN Document Server

    Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Maxson, Jared; Roussel, William

    2011-01-01

    Thermal emittance measurements of a CsK2Sb photocathode at several laser wavelengths are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. The thermal emittance is 0.56+/-0.03 mm-mrad/mm(rms) at 532 nm wavelength. The results are compared with a simple photoemission model and found to be in a good agreement.

  15. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ""True"" Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This work further developed a highly promising Variable Emittance technology for spacecraft thermal control based on Conducting Polymer (CP) electrochromics...

  16. Efficient low-temperature thermophotovoltaic emitters from metallic photonic crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Prashant; Han, Sang Eon; Stein, Andreas; Norris, David J

    2008-10-01

    We examine the use of metallic photonic crystals as thermophotovoltaic emitters. We coat silica woodpile structures, created using direct laser writing, with tungsten or molybdenum. Optical reflectivity and thermal emission measurements near 650 degrees C demonstrate that the resulting structures should provide efficient emitters at relatively low temperatures. When matched to InGaAsSb photocells, our structures should generate over ten times more power than solid emitters while having an optical-to-electrical conversion efficiency above 32%. At such low temperatures, these emitters have promise not only in solar energy but also in harnessing geothermal and industrial waste heat.

  17. Minimum emittance in storage rings with uniform or nonuniform dipoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-xi Wang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A simple treatment of minimum emittance theory in storage rings is presented, favoring vector and matrix forms for a more concise picture. Both conventional uniform dipoles and nonuniform dipoles with bending radius variation are treated. Simple formulas are given for computing the minimum emittance, optimal lattice parameters, as well as effects of nonoptimal parameters. For nonuniform dipoles, analytical results are obtained for a three-piece sandwich dipole model. Minimization of the effective emittance for light sources is given in detail. Usefulness of gradient and/or nonuniform dipoles for reducing the effective emittance is addressed.

  18. High efficiency quasi-monochromatic infrared emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brucoli, Giovanni; Bouchon, Patrick; Haïdar, Riad; Besbes, Mondher; Benisty, Henri; Greffet, Jean-Jacques

    2014-02-01

    Incandescent radiation sources are widely used as mid-infrared emitters owing to the lack of alternative for compact and low cost sources. A drawback of miniature hot systems such as membranes is their low efficiency, e.g., for battery powered systems. For targeted narrow-band applications such as gas spectroscopy, the efficiency is even lower. In this paper, we introduce design rules valid for very generic membranes demonstrating that their energy efficiency for use as incandescent infrared sources can be increased by two orders of magnitude.

  19. Radiological and Environmental Research Division, Center for Human Radiobiology. Annual report, July 1980-June 1981. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-03-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 22 papers of this annual report of the Center for Human Radiobiology. Abstracts were not written for 2 appendices which contain data on the exposure and radium-induced malignancies of 2259 persons whose radium content has been determined at least once. (KRM)

  20. Combining surface plasmonic and light extraction enhancement on InGaN quantum-well light-emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fadil, Ahmed; Ou, Yiyu; Iida, Daisuke

    2016-01-01

    Surface plasmon coupling with light-emitters and surface nano-patterning have widely been used separately to improve low efficiency InGaN light-emitting diodes. We demonstrate a method where dielectric nano-patterning and Ag nanoparticles (NPs) are combined to provide both light extraction...... and internal quantum efficiency enhancement for InGaN/GaN quantum-well light-emitters. By fabricating dielectric nano-rod pattern on the GaN surface, an optical coating that improves the light extraction is obtained, and furthermore has a low refractive index which blue-shifts the plasmonic resonance of Ag NPs...

  1. Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days Growth of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2 Hadron Radiobiology : Investigation of the Inhibition of ten days'Grown of Vicia Faba Roots after Exposure in the 600 MeV Neutron Beam from SC2

  2. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, D J; Acosta, J G; Cremaldi, L M; Oliveros, S J; Perera, L P; Neuffer, D V

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 microseconds, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long ...

  3. Muon Emittance Exchange with a Potato Slicer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, D. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Hart, T. L. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, J. G. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, L. M. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Oliveros, S. J. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Perera, L. P. [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, D. V. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-04-15

    We propose a novel scheme for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized transverse, longitudinal, and angular momentum emittances of 0.100, 2.5, and 0.200 mm-rad are exchanged into 0.025, 70, and 0.0 mm-rad. A skew quadrupole triplet transforms a round muon bunch with modest angular momentum into a flat bunch with no angular momentum. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the flat bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 µs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift in the ring until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87 %.

  4. Therapeutic use of alpha-emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lassmann, M. [Klinik und Poliklinik fuer Nuklearmedizin der Univ. Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    In recent years there is a growing interest in the therapeutic use of {alpha}-emitters for patient treatment, {alpha}-particles have much higher energy and their range is only a few cell diameters. Their high LET and the limited ability of cells to repair DNA damage from {alpha}-radiation explain their high relative biological effectiveness and cytotoxicity. Potential {alpha}-emitting isotopes for therapeutic applications are {sup 224}Ra, {sup 223}Ra, {sup 213}Bi and {sup 211}At. The treatment with {alpha}-particles is focused upon targeted cancer therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, on palliation of bone metastases or upon pain relief in patients with ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Examples for targeted cancer therapy are the treatment of melanoma with {sup 213}Bi and non-Hodgkin lymphoma with {sup 211}At. For metastatic bone pain palliation {sup 223}Ra was applied in a phase I clinical trial. For amelioration of pain in AS-patients {sup 224}Ra-chloride is used. This radiopharmaceutical is licensed for this particular application in Germany. Today there are some potential clinical applications for {alpha}-emitters although most of them are in the state of scientific, non-routine investigations. In-vivo dosimetry for risk assessment associated with this treatment is even more difficult to perform than for therapies using beta-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. (orig.)

  5. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  6. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  7. Modification of radiobiological effects of 171 MeV protons by elements of physical protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulinina, Taisia; Shurshakov, Vyacheslav; Ivanov, Alexander; Molokanov, Alexander

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation includes protons of various energies. Physical protection is effective in the case of low energy protons (50-100 MeV) and becomes insufficient for radiation with a high part of high-energy protons. In the experiment performed on outbred mice, the purpose of the study was to evaluate the radiobiological effect of 171 MeV protons and protons modified by elements of physical protection of the spacecraft, on a complex of indicators of the functional condition of the system hematopoiesis and the central nervous system in 24 hours after irradiation at 20 cGy dose. The spacecraft radiation protection elements used in the experiment were a construction of wet hygiene wipes called a «protective curtain», and a glass plate imitating an ISS window. Mass thickness of the " protective curtain" in terms of water equivalent was ̴ 6,2 g/cm2. Physical shielding along the path of 171 MeV protons increases their linear energy transfer leading to the absorbed dose elevation and strengthening of the radiobiological effect. In the experiment, the two types of shielding together raised the absorbed dose from 20 to 23.2 cGy. Chemically different materials (glass and water in the wipes) were found to exert unequal modifying effects on physical and biological parameters of the proton-irradiated mice. There was a distinct dose-dependent reduction of bone marrow cellularity within the dose range from 20 cGy to 23.2 cGy in 24 hours after exposure. No modifying effect of the radiation protection elements on spontaneous motor activity was discovered when compared with entrance protons. The group of animals protected by the glass plate exhibited normal orientative-trying reactions and weakened grip with the forelimbs. The effects observed in the experiment indicate the necessity to carry out comprehensive radiobiological researches (physical, biological and mathematical) in assessing the effects of physical protection, that are actual for ensuring radiation safety of crews in

  8. MO-D-BRD-03: Radiobiology and Commissioning of Electronic Brachytherapy for IORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, J. [Oregon Health & Science Univ (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Electronic brachytherapy (eBT) has seen an insurgence of manufacturers entering the US market for use in radiation therapy. In addition to the established interstitial, intraluminary, and intracavitary applications of eBT, many centers are now using eBT to treat skin lesions. It is important for medical physicists working with electronic brachytherapy sources to understand the basic physics principles of the sources themselves as well as the variety of applications for which they are being used. The calibration of the sources is different from vendor to vendor and the traceability of calibrations has evolved as new sources came to market. In 2014, a new air-kerma based standard was introduced by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to measure the output of an eBT source. Eventually commercial treatment planning systems should accommodate this new standard and provide NIST traceability to the end user. The calibration and commissioning of an eBT system is unique to its application and typically entails a list of procedural recommendations by the manufacturer. Commissioning measurements are performed using a variety of methods, some of which are modifications of existing AAPM Task Group protocols. A medical physicist should be familiar with the different AAPM Task Group recommendations for applicability to eBT and how to properly adapt them to their needs. In addition to the physical characteristics of an eBT source, the photon energy is substantially lower than from HDR Ir-192 sources. Consequently, tissue-specific dosimetry and radiobiological considerations are necessary when comparing these brachytherapy modalities and when making clinical decisions as a radiation therapy team. In this session, the physical characteristics and calibration methodologies of eBt sources will be presented as well as radiobiology considerations and other important clinical considerations. Learning Objectives: To understand the basic principles of electronic

  9. Proton Radiobiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Tommasino

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In addition to the physical advantages (Bragg peak, the use of charged particles in cancer therapy can be associated with distinct biological effects compared to X-rays. While heavy ions (densely ionizing radiation are known to have an energy- and charge-dependent increased Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE, protons should not be very different from sparsely ionizing photons. A slightly increased biological effectiveness is taken into account in proton treatment planning by assuming a fixed RBE of 1.1 for the whole radiation field. However, data emerging from recent studies suggest that, for several end points of clinical relevance, the biological response is differentially modulated by protons compared to photons. In parallel, research in the field of medical physics highlighted how variations in RBE that are currently neglected might actually result in deposition of significant doses in healthy organs. This seems to be relevant in particular for normal tissues in the entrance region and for organs at risk close behind the tumor. All these aspects will be considered and discussed in this review, highlighting how a re-discussion of the role of a variable RBE in proton therapy might be well-timed.

  10. Low damage dry etch for III-nitride light emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedy, Joseph G.; Young, Nathan G.; Kelchner, Kathryn M.; Hu, Yanling; Farrell, Robert M.; Nakamura, Shuji; DenBaars, Steven P.; Weisbuch, Claude; Speck, James S.

    2015-08-01

    We have developed a dry etch process for the fabrication of lithographically defined features close to light emitting layers in the III-nitride material system. The dry etch was tested for its effect on the internal quantum efficiency of c-plane InGaN quantum wells using the photoluminescence of a test structure with two active regions. No change was observed in the internal quantum efficiency of the test active region when the etched surface was greater than 71 nm away. To demonstrate the application of the developed dry etch process, surface-etched air gaps were fabricated 275 nm away from the active region of an m-plane InGaN/GaN laser diode and served as the waveguide upper cladding. Electrically injected lasing was observed without the need for regrowth or recovery anneals. This dry etch opens up a new design tool that can be utilized in the next generation of GaN light emitters.

  11. A new concept for the modeling of the positron emitter production for the particle therapy; Ein neues Konzept zur Modellierung der Positronenemitter-Produktion bei der Partikeltherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Priegnitz, Marlen

    2012-07-01

    One of the three main tumour treatment forms is radiation therapy. Here, the application of ion beams, in particular protons and carbon ions, is of growing importance. This high precision therapy requires a consequent monitoring of the dose delivery since the induced dose deposition is very sensitive to density changes in the irradiated tissue. Up to now, positron emission tomography (PET) is the only in vivo method in clinical use for monitoring the dose deposition in ion beam therapy. It allows for the verification of the particle range as well as the position of the irradiation field. The distribution of activity measured by means of PET cannot be compared directly to the planned dose distribution. Thus, a calculation of the expected activity distribution is required which then can be compared to the measurement. Simulation of the expected activity distribution requires the exact knowledge of various cross sections. Only a few of them have been measured in the required energy range so far. Therefore, in Monte Carlo simulations often intrinsic nuclear models or semi-empirical parametrization are used which often exhibit insufficient accuray. Among experts the question on the optimum ion species for tumour therapy is still open. Especially lithium ions exhibit a great potential due to their favourable physical and radiobiological properties. Also for these ions a PET monitoring is highly desirable. The presented work shows the feasibility of range verification by means of PET for lithium irradiation. Furthermore, a concept for modeling positron emitter distributions without the knowledge of cross sections is developed. This prediction is based on depth-dependent positron emitter yields measured in reference materials (water, graphite and polyethylene). With these data the positron emitter distribution in any material of known stoichiometry can be calculated by means of an appropriate linear combination. The feasibility of the yield concept is shown for lithium and

  12. Comparison of 1/f noise in complementary NPN and PNP polysilicon emitter bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ul Hoque, Md M.; Celik-Butler, Zeynep; Trogolo, Joe; Weiser, Douglas; Green, Keith

    2005-05-01

    1/f noise was investigated in a complementary polysilicon emitter bipolar process. Noise measurements were carried out for variable base bias resistance (RS) to analyze how the contribution of each noise source changes as RS is varied. Two noise measurement setups were used to identify different noise sources in the transistors: noise from the base current (SIB), collector current (SIC), and internal resistances (SVr). The coherence for transistors measured in both measurement setups were close to unity, implying a single dominant noise source. SIB had the dominant contribution at lower bias currents. In this case, RS was relatively larger than the input resistance of the transistor. Higher current measurements with a smaller RS showed a dominant contribution from SVr. SIB was modeled as a combination of the minority carrier diffusion fluctuations in the monosilicon and polysilicon emitter, and tunneling fluctuations through the interfacial oxide. A combination of the number and diffusion fluctuations of the minority carriers in the base was used to model SIC. It was concluded that mainly originates from the fluctuations in the internal emitter resistance, which was ascribed to the tunneling fluctuations of the majority carriers through the interfacial oxide.

  13. Emitter space charge layer transit time in bipolar junction transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustagi, S. C.; Chattopadhyaya, S. K.

    1981-04-01

    The charge defined emitter space charge layer transit times of double diffused transistors have been calculated using a regional approach, and compared with the corresponding base transit times. The results obtained for emitter space-charge layer transit times have been discussed with reference to the capacitance analysis of Morgan and Smit (1960) for graded p-n junctions.

  14. TOMOGRAPHIC MEASUREMENT OF LONGITUDINAL EMITTANCE GROWTH DUE TO STRIPPING FOILS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MONTAG, C.; AHRENS, L.; THIEBERGER, P.

    2005-05-16

    During beam acceleration in the Brookhaven accelerator complex, heavy ions are stripped of their electrons in several steps. Depending on the properties of the stripping foils, this process results in an increased energy spread and longitudinal emittance growth. A tomographic phase space reconstruction technique has been applied to measure the associated emittance growth for different stripping foil materials.

  15. Bunch transverse emittance increase in electron storage rings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Jie

    2009-01-01

    In this paper a theoretical framework to estimate the bunch transverse emittance growing in electron storage rings due to short range transverse wakefield of the machine is established. New equilibrium emittance equations are derived and applied to explain the experimentally obtained results in ATF damping ring. This equation will be useful for linear collider damping ring design.

  16. Electronic Warfare:Issues and Challenges for Emitter Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Gupta

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic warfare (EW is an important capability that provides advantage to defence forces over their adversaries. Defence forces gather tactical intelligence through EW sensors, which provide the means to counter hostile actions of enemy forces. Functions of an EW system is threat detection and the area surveillance so as to determine the identity of surrounding emitters. Emitter classification system identifies possible threats by analysing intercepted signals. Problem of identifying emitters based on its intercepted signal characteristics is a challenging problem in electronic warfare studies. Major issues and challenges for emitter classification such as drifting of emitter parameters due to aging, operational characteristic of an emitter, i.e., same emitter can operate on multiple bands and multiple pulse repetition frequencies (PRFs are highlighted. A novel approach based on some well-known statistical methods, e.g., regression analysis, hypothesis testing, and discriminent analysis is proposed. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been tested over ELINT (Electronic Intelligence data and illustrated using simulation data. The proposed approach can play a solution for wide variety of problems in emitter classification in electronic warfare studies.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.228-234, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.529

  17. Thermionic scanner pinpoints work function of emitter surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasor, N. S.

    1966-01-01

    In the electron tube testing, a thermionic scanner makes accurate spatial resolution measurements of the metallic surface work functions of emitters. The scanner determines the emitter function and its local departures from the mean value on a point-by-point basis for display on an oscilloscope.

  18. Studies of phosphorus Gaussian profile emitter silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Stem

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering recent modifications on n-type highly doped silicon parameters, an emitter optimization was made based on one-dimensional models with analytical solutions. In order to get good accuracy, a fifth order approximation has been considered. Two kinds of emitters, homogeneous and non-homogeneous, with phosphorus Gaussian profile emitter solar cells were optimized. According to our results: homogeneous emitter solar cells show their maximum efficiencies (h @ 21.60-21.74%with doping levelsnus = 1x10(19 - 5x10(18 (cm-3 and (1.2-2.0 mum emitter thickness range. Non-homogeneous emitter solar cells provide a slightly higher efficiency (eta = 21.82-21.92%, with Ns = 1x10(20 (cm-3 with 2.0 mum thickness under metal-contacted surface and Ns = 1x10(19 - 5x10(18 (cm-3 with (1.2-2.0 mum thickness range, (sheet resistance range 90-100 W/ under passivated surface. Although non-homogeneous emitter solar cells have a higher efficiency than homogeneous emitter ones, the required technology is more complex and their overall interest for practical applications is questionable.

  19. Non-blinking single-photon emitters in silica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouw, F.T.; Cogan, N.M.B.; Berends, Anne; van der Stam, Ward; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304829137; Koenderink, A.F.; Kraus, T.D.; de Mello-Donega, Celso|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/125593899

    2016-01-01

    Samples for single-emitter spectroscopy are usually prepared by spin-coating a dilute solution of emitters on a microscope cover slip of silicate based glass (such as quartz). Here, we show that both borosilicate glass and quartz contain intrinsic defect colour centres that fluoresce when excited at

  20. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, July, August and September 1986. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    Contents include: post-radiation regional cerebral blood flow in primates; heart-function studies in dogs after acute gamma irradiation of the precordium; the effect of anesthetic, sedative or narcotic drugs on intrahepatic and extrahepatic biliary kinetics; effect of gamma radiation on sodium channels in different conformations in neuroblastoma cells; effects of ethanol exposure on brain sodium channels; ionizing radiation alters the properties of sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes; thymic hormones in thymus recovery from radiation injury; acute toxicity of petroleum- and shale-derived distillate fuel; light microscopic, hematologic, and serum chemistry studies; radioprotective properties of detoxified lipid A from Salmonella Minnesota R595; brain areas involved in production of morphine-induced locomotor hyperactivity of the C57B1/6J mouse; preliminary evaluation of US Army radiac detector DT-236/PD and radiac computer-indicator CP-696/UD; and calorimetric dose measurements and calorimetric system developed for the armed forces radiobiology research institute.

  1. Heavy charged particle radiobiology: using enhanced biological effectiveness and improved beam focusing to advance cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Christopher; Borak, Thomas B; Tsujii, Hirohiko; Nickoloff, Jac A

    2011-06-03

    Ionizing radiation causes many types of DNA damage, including base damage and single- and double-strand breaks. Photons, including X-rays and γ-rays, are the most widely used type of ionizing radiation in radiobiology experiments, and in radiation cancer therapy. Charged particles, including protons and carbon ions, are seeing increased use as an alternative therapeutic modality. Although the facilities needed to produce high energy charged particle beams are more costly than photon facilities, particle therapy has shown improved cancer survival rates, reflecting more highly focused dose distributions and more severe DNA damage to tumor cells. Despite early successes of charged particle radiotherapy, there is room for further improvement, and much remains to be learned about normal and cancer cell responses to charged particle radiation.

  2. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, G.A.; Schubert, W.W.; Marshall, T.M. (Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represents a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space. (author).

  3. Radiobiological studies with the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Genetic and developmental effects of high LET radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, G. A.; Schubert, W. W.; Marshall, T. M.

    1992-01-01

    The biological effects of heavy charged particle (HZE) radiation are of particular interest to travellers and planners for long-duration space flights where exposure levels represent a potential health hazard. The unique feature of HZE radiation is the structured pattern of its energy deposition in targets. There are many consequences of this feature to biological endpoints when compared with effects of ionizing photons. Dose vs response and dose-rate kinetics may be modified, DNA and cellular repair systems may be altered in their abilities to cope with damage, and the qualitative features of damage may be unique for different ions. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is being used to address these and related questions associated with exposure to radiation. HZE-induced mutation, chromosome aberration, cell inactivation and altered organogenesis are discussed along with plans for radiobiological experiments in space.

  4. Power flow from a dipole emitter near an optical antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kevin C Y; Jun, Young Chul; Seo, Min-Kyo; Brongersma, Mark L

    2011-09-26

    Current methods to calculate the emission enhancement of a quantum emitter coupled to an optical antenna of arbitrary geometry rely on analyzing the total Poynting vector power flow out of the emitter or the dyadic Green functions from full-field numerical simulations. Unfortunately, these methods do not provide information regarding the nature of the dominant energy decay pathways. We present a new approach that allows for a rigorous separation, quantification, and visualization of the emitter output power flow captured by an antenna and the subsequent reradiation power flow to the far field. Such analysis reveals unprecedented details of the emitter/antenna coupling mechanisms and thus opens up new design strategies for strongly interacting emitter/antenna systems used in sensing, active plasmonics and metamaterials, and quantum optics.

  5. Vacuum Rabi spectra of a single quantum emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Ota, Yasutomo; Kumagai, Naoto; Iwamoto, Satoshi; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation of the vacuum Rabi splitting of a single quantum emitter by measuring its direct spontaneous emission into free space. We used a semiconductor quantum dot inside a photonic crystal nanocavity, in conjunction with an appropriate cavity design and filtering with a polarizer and an aperture, enabling the extraction of the inherently-weak emitter's signal. The emitter's vacuum Rabi spectra exhibit clear differences to those measured by detecting the cavity photon leakage. Moreover, we observed an asymmetric vacuum Rabi spectrum induced by interference between the emitter and cavity detection channels. Our observations lay the groundwork for accessing various cavity quantum electrodynamics phenomena that manifest themselves only in the emitter's direct spontaneous emission.

  6. Superradiance of a subwavelength array of independent classical nonlinear emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Nefedkin, N E; Zyablovsky, A A; Pukhov, A A; Vinogradov, A P; Lisyansky, A A

    2015-01-01

    We suggest a mechanism for the emergence of a superradiance burst in a subwavelength array of nonlinear classical emitters. We assume that the emitters interact via their common field of radiative response and that they may have an arbitrary distribution of initially phases. We show that only if this distribution is not uniform, a non-zero field of radiative response arises leading to a superradiance burst. Although this field cannot synchronize the emitters, it forces fast oscillations of a classical nonlinear emitter to have long-period envelopes. Constructive interference in the envelopes creates a large dipole moment of the array which results in a superradiance pulse. The intensity of the superradiance is proportional to the squared number of the emitters, which envelopes participate in the fluctuation.

  7. Properties of nanolasers based on few discrete emitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Mølbjerg; Nielsen, Per Kær; Lorke, Michael

    2012-01-01

    to a high-Q optical cavity. This system has previously been studied for the one and two emitters case, see e.g. [1, 2]. The emitters and cavity are modelled as two-level systems and a harmonic oscillator, respectively. The coupled system is modelled using the Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian and the two......-level systems are pumped incoherently by a rate P. Solutions are found using the corresponding master equation. However, with cavity populations exceeding 100 and several emitters, the dimension of the Hilbert space of the system becomes too large to handle efficiently on a conventional computer. E.g. for four...... emitters and 100 photon states the density matrix has more than 2.5 × 106 elements. We have been able to simplify the problem significantly by adiabatically eliminating the photon-assisted polarizations and the correlations between emitters and cavity [3]. This results in a set of rate equations...

  8. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  9. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi, E-mail: nakahara@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi [Department of Quantum Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2009-11-30

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I-V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6x10{sup 9} A/m{sup 2} sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  10. Chasing Ghosts in Space Radiobiology Research: The Lost Focus on Non-Targeted Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, Francis; Saganti, Premkumar; Cacao, Eliedonna

    2016-07-01

    The doses and dose-rates of astronaut exposures to galactic cosmic rays (GCR) are accurately known, and lead to particle hits per cell nucleus from high charge and energy (HZE) particles of much less than one hit per cell per week. A large number of experiments have shown that additivity of biological effects is a valid assumption for space radiation exposures, while experiments at higher doses and dose-rates than occur in space continue to be a focus of the majority of space radiobiology research. Furthermore HZE particle exposures with mono-energetic particles manifest themselves as a mixed-radiation field due to the contributions of delta-rays and the random impact parameter of a particles track core to DNA and non-DNA targets in cells and tissues. The mixed-field manifestation of mono-energetic HZE particle exposures is well known from theoretical studies of microdosimetry and track structure. Additional mixed-field effects occur for single species experiments due to nuclear fragmentation in particle accelerator beam-lines and biological samples along with energy straggling. In contrast to these well known aspects of space radiobiology there are many open questions on the contribution of non-targeted effects to low dose and dose-rate exposures. Non-targeted effects (NTEs) include bystander effects and genomic instability, and have been shown to be the most important outstanding question for reducing uncertainties in space radiation cancer risk assessment. The dose-rate and radiation quality dependence of NTE's has not been established, while there is an over-arching need to develop 21st century experimental models of human cancer risk. We review possible mechanisms of NTE's and how new experiments to address these issues could be designed.

  11. Heavy ion microprobes: a unique tool for bystander research and other radiobiological applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, K. O.; Fournier, C.; Taucher-Scholz, G.

    2008-07-01

    The risk assessment for low doses of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has been challenged by a growing body of experimental evidence showing that non-irradiated bystander cells can receive signals from irradiated cells to elicit a variety of cellular responses. These may be significant for radiation protection but also for radiation therapy using heavy ions. Charged particle microbeams for radiobiological application provide a unique means to address these issues by allowing the precise irradiation of single cells with a counted numbers of ions. Here, we focus specifically on heavy ion microbeam facilities currently in use for biological purposes, describing their technical features and biological results. Typically, ion species up to argon are used for targeted biological irradiation at the vertically collimated microbeam at JAEA (Takasaki, Japan). At the SNAKE microprobe in Munich, mostly oxygen ions have been used in a horizontal focused beam line for cell targeting. At GSI (Darmstadt), a horizontal microprobe with a focused beam for defined targeting using ion species up to uranium is operational. The visualization of DNA damage response proteins relocalizing to defined sites of ion traversal has been accomplished at the three heavy ion microbeam facilities described above and is used to study mechanistic aspects of heavy ion effects. However, bystander studies have constituted the main focus of biological applications. While for cell inactivation and effects on cell cycle progression a response of non-targeted cells has been described at JAEA and GSI, respectively, in part controversial results have been obtained for the induction of DNA damage measured by double-strand formation or at the cytogenetic level. The results emphasize the influence of the cellular environment, and standardization of experimental conditions for cellular studies at different facilities as well as the investigation of bystander effects in tissue will be the aims of future

  12. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundrat, Pavel [Institute of Physics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Na Slovance 2, CZ-182 21 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2007-12-07

    A semi-analytical model of light ions' Bragg peaks is presented and used in conjunction with a detailed probabilistic radiobiological module to predict the biological effectiveness of light ion irradiation for hadrontherapy applications. The physical Bragg peak model is based on energy-loss calculations with the SRIM code and phenomenological formulae for the energy-loss straggling. Effects of nuclear reactions are accounted for on the level of reducing the number of primary particles only. Reaction products are not followed at all and their contribution to dose deposition is neglected. Beam widening due to multiple scattering and calculations of spread-out Bragg peaks are briefly discussed. With this simple physical model, integral depth-dose distributions are calculated for protons, carbon, oxygen and neon ions. A good agreement with published experimental data is observed for protons and lower energy ions (with ranges in water up to approximately 15 cm), while less satisfactory results are obtained for higher energy ions due to the increased role of nuclear reaction products, neglected in this model. A detailed probabilistic radiobiological module is used to complement the simple physical model and to estimate biological effectiveness along the penetration depth of Bragg peak irradiation. Excellent agreement is found between model predictions and experimental data for carbon beams, indicating potential applications of the present scheme in treatment planning in light ion hadrontherapy. Due to the semi-analytical character of the model, leading to high computational speed, applications are foreseen in particular in the fully biological optimization of multiple irradiation fields and intensity-modulated beams.

  13. A semi-analytical radiobiological model may assist treatment planning in light ion radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundrát, Pavel

    2007-12-07

    A semi-analytical model of light ions' Bragg peaks is presented and used in conjunction with a detailed probabilistic radiobiological module to predict the biological effectiveness of light ion irradiation for hadrontherapy applications. The physical Bragg peak model is based on energy-loss calculations with the SRIM code and phenomenological formulae for the energy-loss straggling. Effects of nuclear reactions are accounted for on the level of reducing the number of primary particles only. Reaction products are not followed at all and their contribution to dose deposition is neglected. Beam widening due to multiple scattering and calculations of spread-out Bragg peaks are briefly discussed. With this simple physical model, integral depth-dose distributions are calculated for protons, carbon, oxygen and neon ions. A good agreement with published experimental data is observed for protons and lower energy ions (with ranges in water up to approximately 15 cm), while less satisfactory results are obtained for higher energy ions due to the increased role of nuclear reaction products, neglected in this model. A detailed probabilistic radiobiological module is used to complement the simple physical model and to estimate biological effectiveness along the penetration depth of Bragg peak irradiation. Excellent agreement is found between model predictions and experimental data for carbon beams, indicating potential applications of the present scheme in treatment planning in light ion hadrontherapy. Due to the semi-analytical character of the model, leading to high computational speed, applications are foreseen in particular in the fully biological optimization of multiple irradiation fields and intensity-modulated beams.

  14. The radiobiological principles of boron neutron capture therapy: A critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopewell, J.W., E-mail: john.hopewell@gtc.ox.ac.uk [Green Templeton College and Particle Therapy Cancer Research Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Morris, G.M. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Schwint, A. [Department of Radiobiology, Constituyentes Atomic Center, National Atomic Energy Commission, San Martin, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Coderre, J.A. [Ora Inc, 300 Brickstone Square, Andover, MA (United States)

    2011-12-15

    The radiobiology of the dose components in a BNCT exposure is examined. The effect of exposure time in determining the biological effectiveness of {gamma}-rays, due to the repair of sublethal damage, has been largely overlooked in the application of BNCT. Recoil protons from fast neutrons vary in their relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as a function of energy and tissue endpoint. Thus the energy spectrum of a beam will influence the RBE of this dose component. Protons from the neutron capture reaction in nitrogen have not been studied but in practice protons from nitrogen capture have been combined with the recoil proton contribution into a total proton dose. The relative biological effectiveness of the products of the neutron capture reaction in boron is derived from two factors, the RBE of the short range particles and the bio-distribution of boron, referred to collectively as the compound biological effectiveness factor. Caution is needed in the application of these factors for different normal tissues and tumors. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiobiological properties of different dose components in BNCT are considered. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effectiveness of {gamma}-ray dose depends strongly on exposure time due to sublethal damage repair. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effectiveness of fast neutron dose depends on neutron energy spectrum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma}-ray and fast neutron characteristics vary between beams and thus weighting factors will differ. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Weighing factors for boron dose depend on the carrier, the tissue and its mode of administration.

  15. Theory and measurements of emittance preservation in plasma wakefield acceleration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederico, Joel

    2016-12-01

    In this dissertation, we examine the preservation and measurement of emittance in the plasma wakefield acceleration blowout regime. Plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA) is a revolutionary approach to accelerating charged particles that has been demonstrated to have the potential for gradients orders of magnitude greater than traditional approaches. The application of PWFA to the design of a linear collider will make new high energy physics research possible, but the design parameters must first be shown to be competitive with traditional methods. Emittance preservation is necessary in the design of a linear collider in order to maximize luminosity. We examine the conditions necessary for circular symmetry in the PWFA blowout regime, and demonstrate that current proposals meet these bounds. We also present an application of beam lamentation which describes the process of beam parameter and emittance matching. We show that the emittance growth saturates as a consequence of energy spread in the beam. The initial beam parameters determine the amount of emittance growth, while the contribution of energy spread is negligible. We also present a model for ion motion in the presence of a beam that is much more dense than the plasma. By combining the model of ion motion and emittance growth, we find the emittance growth due to ion motion is minimal in the case of marginal ion motion. In addition, we present a simulation that validates the ion motion model, which is under further development to examine emittance growth of both marginal and pronounced ion motion. Finally, we present a proof-of-concept of an emittance measurement which may enable the analysis of emittance preservation in future PWFA experiments.

  16. Professor Hassan K. Awwad; The Father of Radiation Oncology and Radiobiology in Egypt and the Arab World, His Good Deeds Last Forever and Inspire us for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaghloul, Mohamed S; El-Badawi, Samy A; Abd Elbaky, Hoda

    2007-03-01

    Our most respected professor Hassan K. Awwad passed away on January 5th, 2007, at the age of 81. He was considered as the father of radiotherapy in Egypt. He was always named "The Professor", as he was the founder of the radiotherapy departments at the National Cancer Institute, Cairo University&Faculty of Medicine, Alexandria University. He also shared in developing NEMROCK (Kasr El Aini Center of Radiation Oncology and Nuclear Medicine), the place where he graduated and worked during his early years of experience. He, together with professor Reda Hamza, dean of NCI, Cairo at that time, had initiated 7 oncology centers all over Egypt, from Aswan in the South to Dammietta and Damanhour in the North. These 7 centers were developed by the Ministry of Health. Prof. Awwad and Prof. Hamza were responsible for facility providing and plans. They chose all the necessary equipment, tools and personnel. These centers were in action since 1988 and are currently taking care of the oncology patients in a wide area of the country. Prof. Awwad graduated from the Faculty of medicine, Cairo University, in 1949. He had his Medical Doctorate (MD) in Radiotherapy from Alexandria University in 1956. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) awarded him fellowships in France (Institute Gustave Rossy) to gain experience in brachytherapy in 1956 and 1971, England 1956, 1959. Another fellowship was awarded to Prof Awwad in Harvard University (Peter Bent Brigham Hospital) in radiobiology and radiotherapy during the years 1964-1965. He personally and with other members of the National Cancer Institute gave much of their efforts and time to teach, train and guide young radiotherapists, biologists, physicists and radiation therapists through direct on-hand teaching and training as well as holding training courses for radiation oncologists, physicists and technologists. He insisted to ensure its regularity 4 times yearly. These courses trained a lot of personnel from all over Egypt, Sudan

  17. Mesoscopic quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic nanostructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Mads Lykke

    This thesis reports research on quantum dots coupled to dielectric and plasmonic nano-structures by way of nano-structure fabrication, optical measurements, and theoretical modeling. To study light-matter interaction, plasmonic gap waveguides with nanometer dimensions as well as samples for studies...... of quantum dots in proximity to semiconductor/air and semiconductor/metal interfaces, were fabricated. We measured the decay dynamics of quantum dots near plasmonic gap waveguides and observed modied decay rates. The obtainable modications with the fabricated structures are calculated to be too small...... for the spontaneous emission of mesoscopic quantum emitters is developed. The light-matter interaction is in this model modied beyond the dipole expectancy and found to both suppress and enhance the coupling to plasmonic modes in excellent agreement with our measurements. We demonstrate that this mesoscopic effect...

  18. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  19. 滴灌条件下水的硬度对滴头堵塞的影响%Effect of water hardness on emitter clogging of drip irrigation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘燕芳; 吴普特; 朱德兰; 张林; 陈俊英

    2015-01-01

    Hard water is used for drip irrigation in some areas of China due to precipitation and groundwater resource limitation. But it is proved that drip irrigation emitters can be clogged when using hard water for irrigation. In order to explore the influence of temporary hard water on emitter clogging and clogging mechanism in drip irrigation system, a laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the variations of the emitter's average relative flow rate and the distribution of clogged emitters along the drip line and the clogging materials in the clogged emitters. The experiment started in April 2014 at the Irrigation Hydraulics Laboratory of Northwest A&F University. Two kinds of emitters (internal cylindrical type and internal inserting type) were used and water hardness was set at 3 levels (0, 250 and 500 mg/L) in this experiment. Corresponding to 3 kinds of irrigation water, 3 independent and identical drip irrigation systems with cyclic water were built. Each system has 4 drip lines (2 drip tubes with internal cylindrical emitter and 2 drip tapes with internal inserting emitter). And there were 18 emitters on each drip line. The total duration of irrigation was 35 d, with a daily application of 4 h (from 8:00 to 12:00) under working pressure of 100 kPa. Flow rates of all the emitters were measured once every 7 days using the weighting method. The clogging in the labyrinth passage was analyzed by the field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) after all irrigation events. The results indicated that the water hardness had a very significant influence on the level of emitter clogging. For the 2 kinds of emitters, the average relative flow rates were maintained at more than 95% of the original flow rate during whole experiment with 0 hardness water, and none of emitters was clogged; the average relative flow rates were 51.1% and 59.4% respectively for internal cylindrical emitter and internal inserting emitter with 250 mg/L hardness water, and the

  20. Courant-Snyder invariant density screening method for emittance analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Ji-Lei; TANG Jing-Yu; JING Han-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Emittance is an important characteristic of describing charged particle beams.In hadron accelerators,we often meet irregular beam distributions that are not appropriately described by a single rms emittance or 95% emittance or total emittance.In this paper,it is pointed out that in many cases a beam halo should be described with very different Courant-Snyder parameters from the ones used for the beam core.A new method - the Courant-Snyder invariant density screening method - is introduced for analyzing emittance data clearly and accurately.The method treats the emittance data from both measurements and numerical simulations.The method uses the statistical distribution of the beam around each particle in phase space to mark its local density parameter,and then uses the density distribution to calculate the beam parameters such as the Courant-Snyder parameters and emittance for different beam boundary definitions.The method has been used in the calculations for.beams from different sources,and shows its advantages over other methods.An application code based on the method including the graphic interface has also been designed.

  1. Radiobiological rationale and clinical implications of hypo-fractionated radiation therapy; Bases radiobiologiques et applications cliniques de la radiotherapie hypofractionnee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, E.C.; Forsythe, K.; Buckstein, M.; Kao, J.; Rosenstein, B.S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, One Gustave L. Levy Place, Box 1236, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Recent clinical trials of hypo-fractionated radiation treatment have provided critical insights into the safety and efficacy of hypo-fractionation. However, there remains much controversy in the field, both at the level of clinical practice and in our understanding of the underlying radiobiological mechanisms. In this article, we review the clinical literature on hypo-fractionated radiation treatment for breast, prostate, and other malignancies. We highlight several ongoing clinical trials that compare outcomes of a hypo-fractionated approach versus those obtained with a conventional approach. Lastly, we outline some of the preclinical and clinical evidence that argue in favor of differential radiobiological mechanisms underlying hypo-fractionated radiation treatment. Emerging data from the ongoing studies will help to better define and guide the rational use of hypo-fractionation in future years. (authors)

  2. Optimization in brachytherapy with the implementation of Radiobiology; Optimizacion en Braquiterapia con la implementacion de la Radiobiologia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duran, M.P.; Bourel, V.J.; Rodriguez, I.; Torre, M. de la; Caneva, S. [Braqui S.R.L. Viamonte 1861, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1998-12-31

    In the brachytherapy planning treatments with High dose rates (HDR), the optimization algorithms used are based in dosimetric considerations and/or geometric ones, ignoring the radiobiological response of the tissue treated. In this work we wish to show the implementation of radiobiological concepts in the optimization. Assuming that the subtiles differences that result in the dose distribution among the different optimization models which are not visible in an isodose plane, it is studied how is classically make it , the quality implant through natural histograms about dose volumes and the resulting parameters. Also is studied the necrosis probability which may be caused by the choice of some optimization model, allowing with this the choice of the best implant. (Author)

  3. Comp Plan: A computer program to generate dose and radiobiological metrics from dose-volume histogram files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Lois Charlotte; Miller, Julie-Anne; Kumar, Shivani; Whelan, Brendan M; Vinod, Shalini K

    2012-01-01

    Treatment planning studies often require the calculation of a large number of dose and radiobiological metrics. To streamline these calculations, a computer program called Comp Plan was developed using MATLAB. Comp Plan calculates common metrics, including equivalent uniform dose, tumor control probability, and normal tissue complication probability from dose-volume histogram data. The dose and radiobiological metrics can be calculated for the original data or for an adjusted fraction size using the linear quadratic model. A homogeneous boost dose can be added to a given structure if desired. The final output is written to an Excel file in a format convenient for further statistical analysis. Comp Plan was verified by independent calculations. A lung treatment planning study comparing 45 plans for 7 structures using up to 6 metrics for each structure was successfully analyzed within approximately 5 minutes with Comp Plan. The code is freely available from the authors on request.

  4. Emittance Adapter for a Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Radiation Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, Alexander Wu; /SLAC; Raimondi, Pantaleo; /Frascati

    2012-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of reaching very small horizontal and vertical emittances inside an undulator in a storage ring, by means of a local exchange of the apparent horizontal and vertical emittances, performed with a combination of skew quadrupoles and one solenoid in a dedicated insertion line in the storage ring. The insertion leaves the ring parameters and its optical properties unaffected. This scheme could greatly relax the emittance requirements for a diffraction limited synchrotron light source. The lattice derivation and design is described.

  5. Design of a minimum emittance nBA lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. Y.

    1998-04-01

    An attempt to design a minimum emittance n-bend achromat (nBA) lattice has been made. One distinct feature is that dipoles with two different lengths were used. As a multiple bend achromat, five bend achromat lattices with six superperiod were designed. The obtained emittace is three times larger than the theoretical minimum. Tunes were chosen to avoid third order resonances. In order to correct first and second order chromaticities, eight family sextupoles were placed. The obtained emittance of five bend achromat lattices is almost equal to the minimum emittance of five bend achromat lattice consisting of dipoles with equal length.

  6. Emittance Compensation in a Flat Beam RF Photoinjector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, J. B.; Anderson, S.; Colby, E.; Serafini, L.

    1997-05-01

    The beam dynamics of a flat beam rf photoinjector, which is intended to produce asymmetric emittances for linear collider applications, are analyzed, by both analytical and computational methods. The analytical model is a generalization of the recently developed theory of emittance compensation in round beams(L.Serafini, and J.B. Rosenzweig, submitted to Physical Review E.), in which a new mode of laminar flow beam dynamics, the invariant envelope, is found to give the ideal conditions for emittance minimization. Three-dimensional rf and beam dynamics simulations are used to iluminate the analytical results. abstract.

  7. New Low Emittance Lattice for the Super-B Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biagini, M.E.; Boscolo, M.; Raimondi, P.; Tomassini, S.; Zobov, M.; /Frascati; Seeman, J.; Sullivan, M.; Wienands, U.; Wittmer, W.; /SLAC; Bettoni, S.; /CERN; Paoloni, E.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa; Bogomyagkov, A.; Koop, I.; Levichev, E.; Nikitin, S.; Piminov, P.; Shatilov, D.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2011-10-21

    New low emittance lattices have been designed for the asymmetric SuperB accelerator, aiming at a luminosity of 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. Main optics features are two alternating arc cells with different horizontal phase advance, decreasing beam emittance and allowing at the same time for easy chromaticity correction in the arcs. Emittance can be further reduced by a factor of two for luminosity upgrade. Spin rotation schemes for the e{sup -} beam have been studied to provide longitudinal polarization at the IP, and implementation into the lattice is in progress.

  8. Observation of picometer vertical emittance with a vertical undulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, K P; Boland, M J; Dowd, R; Tan, Y-R E; Cowie, B C C; Papaphilippou, Y; Taylor, G N; Rassool, R P

    2012-11-09

    Using a vertical undulator, picometer vertical electron beam emittances have been observed at the Australian Synchrotron storage ring. An APPLE-II type undulator was phased to produce a horizontal magnetic field, which creates a synchrotron radiation field that is very sensitive to the vertical electron beam emittance. The measured ratios of undulator spectral peak heights are evaluated by fitting to simulations of the apparatus. With this apparatus immediately available at most existing electron and positron storage rings, we find this to be an appropriate and novel vertical emittance diagnostic.

  9. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    In recent work, the first quantitative measurements of electron beam vertical emittance using a vertical undulator were presented, with particular emphasis given to ultralow vertical emittances [K. P. Wootton, et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams, 17, 112802 (2014)]. Using this apparatus, a geometric vertical emittance of 0.9 ± 0.3 pm rad has been observed. A critical analysis is given of measurement approaches that were attempted, with particular emphasis on systematic and statistical uncertainties. The method used is explained, compared to other techniques and the applicability of these results to other scenarios discussed.

  10. The photon dose calculation algorithm used in breast radiotherapy has significant impact on the parameters of radiobiological models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petillion, Saskia; Swinnen, Ans; Defraene, Gilles; Verhoeven, Karolien; Weltens, Caroline; Van den Heuvel, Frank

    2014-07-08

    The comparison of the pencil beam dose calculation algorithm with modified Batho heterogeneity correction (PBC-MB) and the analytical anisotropic algorithm (AAA) and the mutual comparison of advanced dose calculation algorithms used in breast radiotherapy have focused on the differences between the physical dose distributions. Studies on the radiobiological impact of the algorithm (both on the tumor control and the moderate breast fibrosis prediction) are lacking. We, therefore, investigated the radiobiological impact of the dose calculation algorithm in whole breast radiotherapy. The clinical dose distributions of 30 breast cancer patients, calculated with PBC-MB, were recalculated with fixed monitor units using more advanced algorithms: AAA and Acuros XB. For the latter, both dose reporting modes were used (i.e., dose-to-medium and dose-to-water). Next, the tumor control probability (TCP) and the normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) of each dose distribution were calculated with the Poisson model and with the relative seriality model, respectively. The endpoint for the NTCP calculation was moderate breast fibrosis five years post treatment. The differences were checked for significance with the paired t-test. The more advanced algorithms predicted a significantly lower TCP and NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis then found during the corresponding clinical follow-up study based on PBC calculations. The differences varied between 1% and 2.1% for the TCP and between 2.9% and 5.5% for the NTCP of moderate breast fibrosis. The significant differences were eliminated by determination of algorithm-specific model parameters using least square fitting. Application of the new parameters on a second group of 30 breast cancer patients proved their appropriateness. In this study, we assessed the impact of the dose calculation algorithms used in whole breast radiotherapy on the parameters of the radiobiological models. The radiobiological impact was eliminated by

  11. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  12. An Expanded Multi-scale Monte Carlo Simulation Method for Personalized Radiobiological Effect Estimation in Radiotherapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Wang, Wei; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    A novel and versatile “bottom-up” approach is developed to estimate the radiobiological effect of clinic radiotherapy. The model consists of multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations from organ to cell levels. At cellular level, accumulated damages are computed using a spectrum-based accumulation algorithm and predefined cellular damage database. The damage repair mechanism is modeled by an expanded reaction-rate two-lesion kinetic model, which were calibrated through replicating a radiobiological experiment. Multi-scale modeling is then performed on a lung cancer patient under conventional fractionated irradiation. The cell killing effects of two representative voxels (isocenter and peripheral voxel of the tumor) are computed and compared. At microscopic level, the nucleus dose and damage yields vary among all nucleuses within the voxels. Slightly larger percentage of cDSB yield is observed for the peripheral voxel (55.0%) compared to the isocenter one (52.5%). For isocenter voxel, survival fraction increase monotonically at reduced oxygen environment. Under an extreme anoxic condition (0.001%), survival fraction is calculated to be 80% and the hypoxia reduction factor reaches a maximum value of 2.24. In conclusion, with biological-related variations, the proposed multi-scale approach is more versatile than the existing approaches for evaluating personalized radiobiological effects in radiotherapy. PMID:28322329

  13. An Expanded Multi-scale Monte Carlo Simulation Method for Personalized Radiobiological Effect Estimation in Radiotherapy: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Feng, Yuanming; Wang, Wei; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Ping

    2017-03-01

    A novel and versatile “bottom-up” approach is developed to estimate the radiobiological effect of clinic radiotherapy. The model consists of multi-scale Monte Carlo simulations from organ to cell levels. At cellular level, accumulated damages are computed using a spectrum-based accumulation algorithm and predefined cellular damage database. The damage repair mechanism is modeled by an expanded reaction-rate two-lesion kinetic model, which were calibrated through replicating a radiobiological experiment. Multi-scale modeling is then performed on a lung cancer patient under conventional fractionated irradiation. The cell killing effects of two representative voxels (isocenter and peripheral voxel of the tumor) are computed and compared. At microscopic level, the nucleus dose and damage yields vary among all nucleuses within the voxels. Slightly larger percentage of cDSB yield is observed for the peripheral voxel (55.0%) compared to the isocenter one (52.5%). For isocenter voxel, survival fraction increase monotonically at reduced oxygen environment. Under an extreme anoxic condition (0.001%), survival fraction is calculated to be 80% and the hypoxia reduction factor reaches a maximum value of 2.24. In conclusion, with biological-related variations, the proposed multi-scale approach is more versatile than the existing approaches for evaluating personalized radiobiological effects in radiotherapy.

  14. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Parajon, M.; Martinez-Ballarin, R.; Abad, E.

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 106 protons/cm2 s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  15. Design study of the ESS-Bilbao 50 MeV proton beam line for radiobiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huerta-Parajon, M., E-mail: mhuerta@essbilbao.org; Martinez-Ballarin, R., E-mail: rmartinez@essbilbao.org; Abad, E., E-mail: eabad@essbilbao.org

    2015-02-01

    The ESS-Bilbao proton accelerator facility has been designed fulfilling the European Spallation Source (ESS) specifications to serve as the Spanish contribution to the ESS construction. Furthermore, several applications of the ESS-Bilbao proton beam are being considered in order to contribute to the knowledge in the field of radiobiology, materials and aerospace components. Understanding of the interaction of radiation with biological systems is of vital importance as it affects important applications such as cancer treatment with ion beam therapy among others. ESS-Bilbao plans to house a facility exclusively dedicated to radiobiological experiments with protons up to 50 MeV. Beam line design, optimisation and initial calculations of flux densities and absorbed doses were undertaken using the Monte Carlo simulation package FLUKA. A proton beam with a flux density of about 10{sup 6} protons/cm{sup 2} s reaches the water sample with a flat lateral distribution of the dose. The absorbed dose at the pristine Bragg peak calculated with FLUKA is 2.4 ± 0.1 Gy in 1 min of irradiation time. This value agrees with the clinically meaningful dose rates, i.e. around 2 Gy/min, used in hadrontherapy. Optimisation and validation studies in the ESS-Bilbao line for radiobiological experiments are detailed in this article.

  16. A study of the radiobiological modeling of the conformal radiation therapy in cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyakuryal, Anil Prasad

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of mortalities in the world. The precise diagnosis of the disease helps the patients to select the appropriate modality of the treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The physics of X-radiation and the advanced imaging technologies such as positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) plays an important role in the efficient diagnosis and therapeutic treatments in cancer. However, the accuracy of the measurements of the metabolic target volumes (MTVs) in the PET/CT dual-imaging modality is always limited. Similarly the external beam radiation therapy (XRT) such as 3D conformal radiotherapy (3DCRT) and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is the most common modality in the radiotherapy treatment. These treatments are simulated and evaluated using the XRT plans and the standard methodologies in the commercial planning system. However, the normal organs are always susceptible to the radiation toxicity in these treatments due to lack of knowledge of the appropriate radiobiological models to estimate the clinical outcomes. We explored several methodologies to estimate MTVs by reviewing various techniques of the target volume delineation using the static phantoms in the PET scans. The review suggests that the more precise and practical method of delineating PET MTV should be an intermediate volume between the volume coverage for the standardized uptake value (SUV; 2.5) of glucose and the 50% (40%) threshold of the maximum SUV for the smaller (larger) volume delineations in the radiotherapy applications. Similarly various types of optimal XRT plans were designed using the CT and PET/CT scans for the treatment of various types of cancer patients. The qualities of these plans were assessed using the universal plan-indices. The dose-volume criteria were also examined in the targets and organs by analyzing the conventional dose-volume histograms (DVHs). The biological models such as tumor

  17. Radiobiological evaluation of prostate cancer IMRT and conformal-RT plans using different treatment protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Komisopoulos, Georgios; Buckey, Courtney; Mavroeidi, Margarita; Swanson, Gregory P; Baltas, Dimos; Papanikolaou, Nikos; Stathakis, Sotirios

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the clinical efficacy of both step-and-shoot IMRT and 3D-Conformal Radiation Therapy modalities (CRT) in treating prostate cancer using radiobiological measures. Another aim was to estimate the risks for developing secondary malignancies in bladder and rectum due to radiotherapy from the corresponding modalities. The treatment plans of ten prostate cancer patients were developed using IMRT and CRT. For the IMRT plans, two beam energies and two treatment protocols were used (the RTOG 0415 and a most restrictive one proposed by Fox Chase Cancer Center (FCCC)). For the evaluation of these plans, the complication-free tumor control probability, the total probability of injury, the total probability of control/benefit, and the biologically effective uniform dose were employed. Furthermore, based on the dosimetric data of IMRT and CRT, the risk for secondary malignancies was calculated for bladder and rectum. The average risk for secondary malignancy was lower for the bladder (0.37%) compared to the rectum (0.81%) based on all the treatment plans of the ten prostate cancer patients. The highest average risk for secondary malignancy for bladder and rectum was for the CRT-6X modality (0.46% and 1.12%, respectively) and the lowest was for the IMRT RTOG-18X modality (0.33% and 0.56%, respectively). The ≥ Grade 2 LENT/SOMA response probability was lower for the bladder than for the rectum in all the plans. For the bladder the highest average value was for the IMRT RTOG-18X (0.9%) and the lowest was for the CRT-18X modality (0.1%). For the rectum, the highest average value was for the IMRT RTOG-6X (11.9%) and the lowest was for the IMRT FCCC-18X modality (2.2%). By using radiobiological measures it is shown that the IMRT FCCC plans had the lowest risks for normal tissue complications, whereas the IMRT RTOG had the highest. Regarding the risk for secondary malignancies, the CRT plans showed the highest values for both bladder and

  18. A comparative analysis of radiobiological models for cell surviving fractions at high doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisheh, B; Edgren, M; Belkić, Dž; Mavroidis, P; Brahme, A; Lind, B K

    2013-04-01

    For many years the linear-quadratic (LQ) model has been widely used to describe the effects of total dose and dose per fraction at low-to-intermediate doses in conventional fractionated radiotherapy. Recent advances in stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) have increased the interest in finding a reliable cell survival model, which will be accurate at high doses, as well. Different models have been proposed for improving descriptions of high dose survival responses, such as the Universal Survival Curve (USC), the Kavanagh-Newman (KN) and several generalizations of the LQ model, e.g. the Linear-Quadratic-Linear (LQL) model and the Pade Linear Quadratic (PLQ) model. The purpose of the present study is to compare a number of models in order to find the best option(s) which could successfully be used as a fractionation correction method in SRT. In this work, six independent experimental data sets were used: CHOAA8 (Chinese hamster fibroblast), H460 (non-small cell lung cancer, NSLC), NCI-H841 (small cell lung cancer, SCLC), CP3 and DU145 (human prostate carcinoma cell lines) and U1690 (SCLC). By detailed comparisons with these measurements, the performance of nine different radiobiological models was examined for the entire dose range, including high doses beyond the shoulder of the survival curves. Using the computed and measured cell surviving fractions, comparison of the goodness-of-fit for all the models was performed by means of the reduced χ (2)-test with a 95% confidence interval. The obtained results indicate that models with dose-independent final slopes and extrapolation numbers generally represent better choices for SRT. This is especially important at high doses where the final slope and extrapolation numbers are presently found to play a major role. The PLQ, USC and LQL models have the least number of shortcomings at all doses. The extrapolation numbers and final slopes of these models do not depend on dose. Their asymptotes

  19. Radioembolisation with {sup 90}Y-microspheres: dosimetric and radiobiological investigation for multi-cycle treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cremonesi, Marta; Ferrari, Mahila; Pedroli, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Medical Physics, Milan (Italy); Bartolomei, Mirco; Arico, Demetrio; De Cicco, Concetta [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Orsi, Franco; Bonomo, Guido [European Institute of Oncology, Unit of Interventistic Radiology, Milan (Italy); Mallia, Andrew [Gamma Unit, Radiology Department, St. Luke' s Hospital (Malta); Paganelli, Giovanni [European Institute of Oncology, Division of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy)

    2008-11-15

    Radioembolisation with {sup 90}Y-microspheres is a new locoregional treatment of hepatic lesions, usually applied as single cycle. Multi-cycle treatments might be considered as a strategy to improve the risk-benefit balance. With the aim to derive suitable information for patient tailored therapy, available patients' dosimetric data were reviewed according to the linear-quadratic model and converted into biological effective dose (BED) values. Single vs. multi-cycle approaches were compared through radiobiological perspective. Twenty patients with metastatic lesions underwent radioembolisation. The {sup 90}Y-administered activity (AA) was established in order to respect a precautionary limit dose (40 Gy) for the non-tumoral liver (NTL). BED was calculated setting {alpha}/{beta} = 2.5 Gy (NTL), 10 Gy (tumours); T{sub 1/2,eff} = T{sub 1/2,phys} = 64.2 h; T{sub 1/2,rep} = 2.5 h (NTL), 1.5 h (tumours). The BED to NTL was considered as a constraint for multi-cycle approach. The AA for two cycles and the percent variations of AA, tumour dose, BED were estimated. In one-cycle, for a prescribed BED to NTL of 64 Gy (NTL dose = 40 Gy), AA was 1.7 (0.9-3.2) GBq, tumour dose was 130 (65-235) Gy, and tumour BED was 170 (75-360) Gy. Considering two cycles, {proportional_to}15% increase was found for AA and dose to NTL, with unvaried BED for NTL. Tumour dose increase was 20 (10-35) Gy; tumour BED increase was 10 (3-11) Gy. In different protocols allowing 80 Gy to NTL, the BED sparing estimated was {proportional_to}50 Gy (two cycles) and 65 Gy (three cycles). From a radiobiological perspective, multi-cycle treatments would allow administering higher activities with increased tumour irradiation and preserved radiation effects on NTL. Trials comparing single vs. multiple cycles are suggested. (orig.)

  20. Cell survivor: Modeling radiobiological phenomena with a new kind of simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Melissa A.

    Despite widespread societal fear of radiation, whether justified or unjustified, and whether related to medicine (e.g., CT scans) or other forms of nuclear and atomic radiation (e.g., nuclear power) there is a fundamental lack of basic understanding of radiation effects on the human body. Different types of radiation are psychologically grouped into the same general fear category irrespective of their different potential to do harm, and this fear is not balanced by their potential beneficial effects. By modeling certain types of radiation biology experiments within a game engine, it is possible to enhance the player's intuitive understanding of radiobiology, both the effects of different types of radiation as well as different environmental factors that can enhance or suppress repair. For this dissertation, a game/simulation has been developed that intends to narrow the gap between public perception and the reality of these physical processes. The building blocks of this simulation are cells, which are damaged by incident radiation, accumulating either single or double strand breaks. They grow and reproduce, and are especially vulnerable during certain phases of the cell cycle (e.g. mitosis). Two dominant damage mechanisms are modeled, along with multiple repair mechanisms, for example, double strand breaks can be repaired by either non-homologous end joining or homologous repair. The output of the developed simulation was compared to data collected in experimental studies and the simulation appears to be a valid representation of the dominant mechanisms of radiobiology, as far as can be determined within the scope of this dissertation. Cell survival curves generated from playtest data display shoulders that depend on the LET of incident radiation, and rest time restores repair capability. In addition to public outreach, the presented code can be used to aid investigators by collecting data during play that can be used as a distributed Monte Carlo simulation

  1. Emittance measurement at the NSLS x-ray ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Safranek, J.; Stefan, P.M.

    1996-12-31

    A pinhole camera for imaging x-ray synchrotron radiation from a dipole magnet is now in operation at the NSLS X-Ray Ring. The pinhole camera detector is a 0.5 mm thick YAG phosphor screen viewed by a video camera. Both the theoretical pinhole diffraction pattern and the measured modulation transfer function (MTF) of the phosphor and camera have been deconvolved from the measured profile in order to derive the true transverse profile of the electron beam. This profile was then fit to a 2-dimensional Gaussian. The electron beam emittance as a function of the phase space acceptance of the pinhole camera has been derived, so the horizontal and vertical electron emittances can be deduced from the major and minor sigmas of the fit Gaussian. In the X-Ray Ring, the vertical emittance is kept small to maximize the synchrotron radiation brightness. The ratio of the measured vertical to horizontal emittance is 0.001.

  2. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-01

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  3. Very bright, near-infrared single photon emitters in diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. W. M. Lau

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate activation of bright diamond single photon emitters in the near infrared range by thermal annealing alone, i.e., without ion implantation. The activation is crucially dependent on the annealing ambient. The activation of the single photon emitters is only observed when the sample is annealed in forming gas (4% H2 in Ar above temperatures of 1000 °C. By contrast, no emitters are activated by annealing in vacuum, oxygen, argon or deuterium. The emitters activated by annealing in forming gas exhibit very bright emission in the 730-760 nm wavelength range and have linewidths of ∼1.5-2.5 nm at room temperature.

  4. Design rules for core/shell nanowire resonant emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Da-Som; Kim, Sun-Kyung

    2017-01-01

    We study design principles to boost the extraction of light from core/shell GaN nanowire optical emitters. A full-vectorial electromagnetic simulation reveals that the extraction efficiency of an emitter within a nanowire cavity depends strongly on its position; the efficiency becomes maximized as the emitter's location approaches the center of the structure. The total extraction of light is sinusoidally modulated by the nanowire diameter, which is directly correlated with optical resonances. The introduction of a conformal dielectric coating on a nanowire leads to a dramatic enhancement in the extraction efficiency, which results from an increase in side emission owing to an optical antenna effect. A simple high-refractive-index dielectric coating approximately doubles the total extraction efficiency of a nanowire LED. These numerical findings will be valuable in providing strategies for high-efficiency nanowire-based optical emitters.

  5. CSR-induced emittance growth in achromats: Linear formalism revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venturini, M.

    2015-09-11

    We review the R-matrix formalism used to describe Coherent Synchrotron Radiation (CSR)-induced projected emittance growth in electron beam transport lines and establish the connection with a description in terms of the dispersion-invariant function.

  6. Emittance Scanner Optimization for Low Energy Ion Beams

    CERN Document Server

    Stockli, Martin P

    2005-01-01

    Ion beam emittances are normally measured as two-dimensional distributions of the beam current fraction within a window dx centered at position coordinate x and a window dx' centered at trajectory angle x'. Unthresholded rms emittances evaluated from experimental data are very sensitive to noise, bias, and other undesired signals. Undesired signals occur when particles from outside the measured window dx*dx' contribute to the signal from the particles within the measured window. Increasing the window size increases the desired signal while most undesired contributions remain unchanged. However, the decreasing resolution causes an error in the emittance results, especially in the rms emittance. Using theoretical distributions we will present the tradeoff between resolution and accuracy.

  7. Emittance of TD-NiCr after simulated reentry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, R. K.; Dicus, D. L.; Lisagor, W. B.

    1978-01-01

    The effects of simulated reentry heating on the emittance of TD-NiCr were investigated. Groups of specimens with three different preconditioning treatments were exposed to 6, 24, and 30 half-hour simulated reentry exposure cycles in a supersonic arc tunnel at each of three conditions intended to produce surface temperatures of 1255, 1365, and 1475 K. Emittance was determined at 1300 K on specimens which were preconditioned only and specimens after completion of reentry simulation exposure. Oxide morphology and chemistry were studied by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. A consistent relationship was established between oxide morphology and total normal emittance. Specimens with coarser textured oxides tended to have lower emittances than specimens with finer textured oxides.

  8. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  9. Localization of Narrowband Single Photon Emitters in Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bray, Kerem; Sandstrom, Russell; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-03-23

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bioimaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work, we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  10. Nanostructure-induced distortion in single-emitter microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Kangmook; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-01-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35...

  11. Field emitters made of the contacted ytterbium and carbon nanolayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.G. Sominski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The operation of field emitters of a new type prepared from contacted nanolayers of ytterbium and carbon has been investigated. The performed calculations and experiments allowed to optimize the emission characteristics of the emitters. The calculations took into account the existence of a transition zone between the layers of Yb and C. Emission characteristics of the cathodes including up to 40 pairs of layers of carbon and ytterbium with optimum thicknesses of 5 and 2 nm respectively were measured. The created multilayered emitters provide the average emission current density over the surface of the emitter up to 10–20 A/cm2 and show promise for use in miniature electronic devices.

  12. Localization of narrowband single photon emitters in nanodiamonds

    CERN Document Server

    Bray, Kerem; Elbadawi, Christopher; Fischer, Martin; Schreck, Matthias; Shimoni, Olga; Lobo, Charlene; Toth, Milos; Aharonovich, Igor

    2016-01-01

    Diamond nanocrystals that host room temperature narrowband single photon emitters are highly sought after for applications in nanophotonics and bio-imaging. However, current understanding of the origin of these emitters is extremely limited. In this work we demonstrate that the narrowband emitters are point defects localized at extended morphological defects in individual nanodiamonds. In particular, we show that nanocrystals with defects such as twin boundaries and secondary nucleation sites exhibit narrowband emission that is absent from pristine individual nanocrystals grown under the same conditions. Critically, we prove that the narrowband emission lines vanish when extended defects are removed deterministically using highly localized electron beam induced etching. Our results enhance the current understanding of single photon emitters in diamond, and are directly relevant to fabrication of novel quantum optics devices and sensors.

  13. FXR LIA Optimization - Time-resolved OTR Emittance Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacob, J; Ong, M; Wargo, P; LeSage, G

    2005-07-21

    The Flash X-Ray Radiography (FXR) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory utilizes a high current, long pulse linear induction accelerator to produce high doses of x-ray radiation. Accurate characterization of the transverse beam emittance is required in order to facilitate accelerator modeling and tuning efforts and, ultimately, to optimize the final focus spot size, yielding higher resolution radiographs. In addition to conventional magnet scan, pepper-pot, and multiple screen techniques, optical transition radiation (OTR) has been proven as a useful emittance measurement diagnostic and is particularly well suited to the FXR accelerator. We shall discuss the time-resolved emittance characterization of an induction linac electron beam using OTR, and we will present our experimental apparatus and analysis software. We shall also develop the theoretical background of beam emittance and transition radiation.

  14. Optimization of Metamaterial Selective Emitters for Use in Thermophotovoltaic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfiester, Nicole A.

    The increasing costs of fossil fuels, both financial and environmental, has motivated many to look into sustainable energy sources. Thermophotovoltaics (TPVs), specialized photovoltaic cells focused on the infrared range, offer an opportunity to achieve both primary energy capture, similar to traditional photovoltaics, as well as secondary energy capture in the form of waste heat. However, to become a feasible energy source, TPV systems must become more efficient. One way to do this is through the development of selective emitters tailored to the bandgap of the TPV diode in question. This thesis proposes the use of metamaterial emitters as an engineerable, highly selective emitter that can withstand the temperatures required to collect waste heat. Metamaterial devices made of platinum and a dielectric such as alumina or silicon nitride were initially designed and tested as perfect absorbers. High temperature robustness testing demonstrates the device's ability to withstand the rigors of operating as a selective emitter.

  15. Scanning Anode Field Emission Characterisation of Carbon Nanotube emitter arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berhanu, S.; Gröning, O.; Chen, Z.; Merikhi, J.; Bachmann, P.K.

    2011-01-01

    Scanning anode field emission microscopy (SAFEM) was used to characterise carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays produced within Philips CediX-Technotubes' activities. Four different samples were investigated and compared. The field enhancement distributions were determined and the local field

  16. Beam Emittance Measurement for PLS-II Linac

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Byung-Joon; Park, Chong do; Chunjarean, SomJai; Kim, Changbum

    2016-01-01

    The PLS-II has a 100 MeV pre-injector for the 3 GeV Linac. A thermionic gun produces electron charge of 200 pC with a bunch duration of 500 ps by a 250 ps triggering pulser. At the pre-injector, one of the most important beam parameters to identify the beam quality is a transverse emittance of electron bunches. Therefore we measure the beam emittance and twiss functions at 100 MeV in order to match the beam optics to beam transport line and go through it to the storage ring. To get the transverse emittance measurement, well-known technique, quadrupole scan, is used at the pre-injector. The emittance were 0.591 mm-mrad in horizontal and 0.774 mm-mrad in vertical direction.

  17. Transverse Emittance Measurement and Preservation at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082907

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation will be discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constra...

  18. Intelligent Variable Emittance Panels Using New, ?True? Solid Electrolyte Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This firm has, in ongoing work in collaboration with the Air Force, NASA and JPL, developed a unique Variable Emittance technology based on the electrochromism of...

  19. Attribute measure recognition approach and its applications to emitter recognition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUAN Xin; HE You; YI Xiao

    2005-01-01

    This paper studies the emitter recognition problem. A new recognition method based on attribute measure for emitter recognition is put forward. The steps of the method are presented. The approach to determining the weight coefficient is also discussed. Moreover, considering the temporal redundancy of emitter information detected by multi-sensor system, this new recognition method is generalized to multi-sensor system. A method based on the combination of attribute measure and D-S evidence theory is proposed. The implementation of D-S reasoning is always restricted by basic probability assignment function. Constructing basic probability assignment function based on attribute measure is presented in multi-sensor recognition system. Examples of recognizing the emitter purpose and system are selected to demonstrate the method proposed. Experimental results show that the performance of this new method is accurate and effective.

  20. Transverse emittance measurement at REGAE via a solenoid scan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, Max

    2012-12-15

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required. A quantity to rate the beam quality is the beam emittance. In the course of this thesis transverse emittance measurements by a solenoid scan could be realized and beyond that an improved theoretical description of a solenoid was successful. The foundation of emittance measurements are constituted by theoretical models which describe the envelope of a beam. Two different models were derived. The first is an often used model to determine the transverse beam emittance without considering space charge effects. More interesting and challenging was the development of an envelope model taking space charge effects into account. It is introduced and cross checked with measurements and simulations.

  1. Transverse emittance investigation of the ISOLDE target ion sources

    CERN Document Server

    Lettry, Jacques; Wenander, F

    2003-01-01

    In order to produce target-ion sources allowing for a high isotopic resolution in the separator, CERN/ISOLDE (Isotope Separator On Line) has purchased a commercial emittance metre, capable of measuring transverse phase-space emittances for ion-beam intensities down to approximately 1 nA. It was installed at the ISOLDE off-line separator where targets are tested with respect to material purity and the ion-source efficiencies are determined. Now, also the emittance and brightness are measured for different stable elements. An extensive programme has been launched aiming at a complete survey of the emittance dependence on the various ion-source parameters. Results from the measurements on the different ISOLDE ion-source types, with associated analysis, are presented.

  2. Two-photon interference from two blinking quantum emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jöns, Klaus D.; Stensson, Katarina; Reindl, Marcus; Swillo, Marcin; Huo, Yongheng; Zwiller, Val; Rastelli, Armando; Trotta, Rinaldo; Björk, Gunnar

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the effect of blinking on the two-photon interference measurement from two independent quantum emitters. We find that blinking significantly alters the statistics in the Hong-Ou-Mandel second-order intensity correlation function g(2 )(τ ) and the outcome of two-photon interference measurements performed with independent quantum emitters. We theoretically demonstrate that the presence of blinking can be experimentally recognized by a deviation from the gD(2 )(0 ) =0.5 value when distinguishable photons from two emitters impinge on a beam splitter. Our findings explain the significant differences between linear losses and blinking for correlation measurements between independent sources and are experimentally verified using a parametric down-conversion photon-pair source. We show that blinking imposes a mandatory cross-check measurement to correctly estimate the degree of indistinguishability of photons emitted by independent quantum emitters.

  3. Analysis of measured radar data for specific emitter identification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conning, M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available of emitters. The processes developed are pulse extraction, feature calculation, dimensionality reduction and classification. A pulse is detected whenever the phase changes from being random to being linear. Time domain features are then calculated from...

  4. Rare Earth Doped High Temperature Ceramic Selective Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Pal, AnnaMarie; Patton, Martin O.; Jenkins, Phillip P.

    1999-01-01

    As a result of their electron structure, rare earth ions in crystals at high temperature emit radiation in several narrow bands rather than in a continuous blackbody manner. This study develops a spectral emittance model for films of rare earth containing materials. Although there are several possible rare earth doped high temperature materials, this study was confined to rare earth aluminum garnets. Good agreement between experimental and theoretical spectral emittances was found for erbium, thulium and erbium-holmium aluminum garnets. Spectral emittances of these films are sensitive to temperature differences across the film. Emitter efficiency is also a sensitive function of temperature. For thulium aluminum garnet the efficiency is 0.38 at 1700 K but only 0.19 at 1262 K.

  5. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  6. Innovative energy efficient low-voltage electron beam emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felis, Kenneth P.; Avnery, Tovi; Berejka, Anthony J.

    2002-03-01

    Advanced electron beams (AEB) has developed a modular, low voltage (80-125 keV), high beam current (up to 40 ma), electron emitter with typically 25 cm of beam width, that is housed in an evacuated, returnable chamber that is easy to plug in and connect. The latest in nanofabrication enables AEB to use an ultra-thin beam window. The power supply for AEB's emitter is based on solid-state electronics. This combination of features results in a remarkable electrical efficiency. AEB's electron emitter relies on a touch screen, computer control system. With 80 μm of unit density beam penetration, AEB's electron emitter has gained market acceptance in the curing of opaque, pigmented inks and coatings used on flexible substrates, metals and fiber composites and in the curing of adhesives in foil based laminates.

  7. Progress on the emitter wrap-through silicon solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gee, J. M.; Buck, M. E.; Schubert, W. K.; Basore, P. A.

    The Emitter Wrap-Through (EWT) solar cell is a back-contacted solar cell with a carrier-collection junction (emitter) on the front surface. Elimination of grids from the front surface allows for higher performance by eliminating grid-obscuration losses and reducing series resistance, while keeping an emitter on the front surface maintains high collection efficiency in solar-grade materials with modest diffusion lengths. The EWT cell uses laser-drilled vias to wrap the emitter diffusion on the front surface to interdigitated contacts on the back surface. We report on progress towards demonstration of two concepts for the EWT cell. The first EWT concept uses a fabrication sequence based on heavily diffused grooves and plated metallizations, and the second EWT concept uses a single furnace step and screen-printed metallizations. We also report on demonstration of double-sided carrier collection in the EWT cell.

  8. Beam dynamics in rf guns and emittance correction techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serafini, Luca

    1994-02-01

    In this paper we present a general review of beam dynamics in a laser-driven rf gun. The peculiarity of such an accelerating structure versus other conventional multi-cell linac structures is underlined on the basis of the Panofsky-Wenzel theorem, which is found to give a theoretical background for the well known Kim's model. A basic explanation for some proposed methods to correct rf induced emittance growth is also derived from the theorem. We also present three emittance correction techniques for the recovery of space-charge induced emittance growth, namely the optimum distributed disk-like bunch technique, the use of rf spatial harmonics to correct spherical aberration induced by space charge forces and the technique of emittance filtering by clipping the electron beam. The expected performances regarding the beam quality achievable with different techniques, as predicted by scaling laws and simulations, are analyzed, and, where available, compared to experimental results.

  9. Novalike Cataclysmic Variables are Significant Radio Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Coppejans, Deanne L; Miller-Jones, James C A; Rupen, Michael P; Knigge, Christian; Sivakoff, Gregory R; Groot, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Radio emission from non-magnetic cataclysmic variables (CVs, accreting white dwarfs) could allow detailed studies of outflows and possibly accretion flows in these nearby, numerous and non-relativistic compact accretors. Up to now, however, very few CVs have been detected in the radio. We have conducted a VLA pilot survey of four close and optically-bright novalike CVs at 6 GHz, detecting three, and thereby doubling the number of radio detections of these systems. RW Sex, V603 Aql and the old nova TT Ari were detected in both of the epochs, while V1084 Her was not detected (to a $3\\sigma$ upper-limit of 7.8 $\\mu\\rm{Jy}\\,\\rm{beam}^{-1}$). These observations clearly show that the sensitivity of previous surveys was typically too low to detect these objects and that non-magnetic CVs can indeed be significant radio emitters. The three detected sources show a range of properties, including flaring and variability on both short ($\\sim$200 s) and longer-term (days) time-scales, as well as circular polarization level...

  10. Sources of Emittance in RF Photocathode Injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, David [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2016-12-11

    Advances in electron beam technology have been central to creating the current generation of x-ray free electron lasers and ultra-fast electron microscopes. These once exotic devices have become essential tools for basic research and applied science. One important beam technology for both is the electron source which, for many of these instruments, is the photocathode RF gun. The invention of the photocathode gun and the concepts of emittance compensation and beam matching in the presence of space charge and RF forces have made these high-quality beams possible. Achieving even brighter beams requires a taking a finer resolution view of the electron dynamics near the cathode during photoemission and the initial acceleration of the beam. In addition, the high brightness beam is more sensitive to degradation by the optical aberrations of the gun’s RF and magnetic lenses. This paper discusses these topics including the beam properties due to fundamental photoemission physics, space charge effects close to the cathode, and optical distortions introduced by the RF and solenoid fields. Analytic relations for these phenomena are derived and compared with numerical simulations.

  11. Molecular hydrogen in Lyman Alpha Emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Vallini, Livia; Ferrara, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    We present a physically motivated model to estimate the molecular hydrogen (H2) content of high-redshift (z~5.7,6.6) Lyman Alpha Emitters (LAEs) extracted from a suite of cosmological simulations. We find that the H2 mass fraction, (f_H2), depends on three main LAE physical properties: (a) star formation rate, (b) dust mass, and (c) cold neutral gas mass. At z~5.7, the value of f_H2 peaks and ranges between 0.5-0.9 for intermediate mass LAEs with stellar mass M_* ~ 10^{9-10} solar mass, decreasing for both smaller and larger galaxies. However, the largest value of the H2 mass is found in the most luminous LAEs. These trends also hold at z\\sim6.6, although, due to a lower dust content, f_H2(z=6.6)\\sim0.5 f_H2(z=5.7) when averaged over all LAEs; they arise due to the interplay between the H2 formation/shielding controlled by dust and the intensity of the ultraviolet (UV) Lyman-Werner photo-dissociating radiation produced by stars. We then predict the carbon monoxide (CO) luminosities for such LAEs and check tha...

  12. A Program to Generate a Particle Distribution from Emittance Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Bouma, DS; Lallement, JB

    2010-01-01

    We have written a program to generate a particle distribution based on emittance measurements in x-x’ and y-y’. The accuracy of this program has been tested using real and constructed emittance measurements. Based on these tests, the distribution generated by the program can be used to accurately simulate the beam in multi-particle tracking codes, as an alternative to a Gaussian or uniform distribution.

  13. Minimum emittance of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source

    CERN Document Server

    Shoji, Y

    1999-01-01

    Theoretically achievable minimum emittances of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source are calculated. The rings discussed in this paper consist of isochronus and achromatic bending cells, isochronus TBA (triple bend achromat) cells with negative dispersion, isochronus TBA cells with inverse bends or isochronus QBA (four bend achromat) cells. We show that the minimum emittances of these rings are roughly 2 or 3 times of those of the optimized non-isochronus rings.

  14. Bulk molybdenum field emitters by inductively coupled plasma etching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ningli; Cole, Matthew T; Milne, William I; Chen, Jing

    2016-12-07

    In this work we report on the fabrication of inductively coupled plasma (ICP) etched, diode-type, bulk molybdenum field emitter arrays. Emitter etching conditions as a function of etch mask geometry and process conditions were systematically investigated. For optimized uniformity, aspect ratios of >10 were achieved, with 25.5 nm-radius tips realised for masks consisting of aperture arrays some 4.45 μm in diameter and whose field electron emission performance has been herein assessed.

  15. Study of ultra-low emittance design for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, M. -H.; Huang, X.; Safranek, J.; /SLAC

    2015-09-17

    Since its 2003 construction, the SPEAR3 synchrotron light source at SLAC has continuously improved its performance by raising beam current, top-off injection, and smaller emittance. This makes SPEAR3 one of the most productive light sources in the world. Now, to further enhance the performance of SPEAR3, we are looking into the possibility of converting SPEAR3 to an ultra-low emittance storage ring within its site constraint.

  16. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Ekdahl, Carl; Schulze, Martin E.

    2017-01-01

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accu...

  17. A Novel Depletion-Mode MOS Gated Emitter Shorted Thyristor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张鹤鸣; 戴显英; 张义门; 马晓华; 林大松

    2000-01-01

    A Novel MOS-gated thyristor, depletion-mode MOS gated emitter shorted thyristor (DMST),and its two structures are proposed. In DMST,the channel of depletion-mode MOS makes the thyristor emitter-based junction inherently short. The operation of the device is controlled by the interruption and recovery of the depletion-mode MOS P channel. The perfect properties have been demonstrated by 2-D numerical simulations and the tests on the fabricated chips.

  18. Radiobiological evaluation of the influence of dwell time modulation restriction in HIPO optimized HDR prostate brachytherapy implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimos Baltas

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: One of the issues that a planner is often facing in HDR brachytherapy is the selective existence of high dose volumes around some few dominating dwell positions. If there is no information available about its necessity (e.g. location of a GTV, then it is reasonable to investigate whether this can be avoided. This effect can be eliminated by limiting the free modulation of the dwell times. HIPO, an inverse treatment plan optimization algorithm, offers this option.In treatment plan optimization there are various methods that try to regularize the variation of dose non-uniformity using purely dosimetric measures. However, although these methods can help in finding a good dose distribution they do not provide any information regarding the expected treatment outcome as described by radiobiology based indices.Material and methods: The quality of 12 clinical HDR brachytherapy implants for prostate utilizing HIPO and modulation restriction (MR has been compared to alternative plans with HIPO and free modulation (without MR.All common dose-volume indices for the prostate and the organs at risk have been considered together with radiobiological measures. The clinical effectiveness of the different dose distributions was investigated by calculating the response probabilities of the tumors and organs-at-risk (OARs involved in these prostate cancer cases. The radiobiological models used are the Poisson and the relative seriality models. Furthermore, the complication-free tumor control probability, P+ and the biologically effective uniform dose (D = were used for treatment plan evaluation and comparison.Results: Our results demonstrate that HIPO with a modulation restriction value of 0.1-0.2 delivers high quality plans which are practically equivalent to those achieved with free modulation regarding the clinically used dosimetric indices.In the comparison, many of the dosimetric and radiobiological indices showed significantly different results. The

  19. Emittance minimization at the ELBE superconducting electron gun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moeller, K.; Arnold, A.; Lu, P.; Murcek, P.; Teichert, J.; Vennekate, H.; Xiang, R.

    2014-07-01

    The transverse emittance is one of the most important quantities which characterize the quality of an electron source. For high quality experiments low beam emittance is required. By means of theoretical considerations and simulation calculations we have studied how the emittance of the Rossendorf superconducting radio-frequency photoelectron source (SRF gun) can be minimized. It turned out that neither a solenoid magnet nor the effect of space charge forces is needed to create a pronounced emittance minimum. The minimum appears by just adjusting the starting phase of the electron bunch with respect to the RF phase of the gun in a suitable way. Investigation of various correlations between the properties of the beam particles led to an explanation on how the minimum comes about. It is shown that the basic mechanism of minimization is the fact that the longitudinal properties of the particles (energy) are strongly influenced by the starting phase. Due to the coupling of the longitudinal and transverse degrees of freedom by the relativistic equation of motion the transverse degrees of freedom and thereby the emittance can be strongly influenced by the starting phase as well. The results obtained in this study will be applied to minimize the emittance in the commissioning phase of the SRF gun.

  20. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guag Joshua W

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  1. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantchenko, Oxana S; Seidman, Seth J; Guag, Joshua W; Witters, Donald M; Sponberg, Curt L

    2011-06-09

    The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz. The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters.

  2. Radiotoxicity induced by Auger electron emitters in human osteosarcoma cell line using comet assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yu-Jie; LI Qing-Nuan; ZHU Ran; ZHU Ben-Xing; ZHANG Yong-Ping; ZHANG Xiao-Dong; FAN Wo; HONG Cheng-Jiao; LI Wen-Xin

    2003-01-01

    The comet assay (single cell gel electrophoresis assay) was used to evaluate the radiotoxicity of Augerelectron emitters in the human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS-8603). After internal exposure to 67Ga-EDTMP, the sar-coma cell has been injured severely. The comet length was longer along with the increase of dose, the appearance ofcomet tail was different from that with respect to the 60Co γ-ray irradiation. DNA damage of cell was mainly due tothe radiation effect of Auger electrons. The 67Ga may be a therapeutic radionuclide with good prospect for tumortreatment and palliation of bone pain induced by metastasis.

  3. Beam Emittance Measurement with Laser Wire Scanners in the ILC Beam Delivery System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I.; /CERN; Blair, G.A.; /Royal Holloway, U. of London; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2008-02-01

    Accurate measurement of the beam phase-space is essential for the next generation of electron accelerators. A scheme for beam optics optimization and beam matrix reconstruction algorithms for the diagnostics section of the beam delivery system of the International Linear Collider based on laser-wire beam profile monitors are discussed. Possible modes of operation of the laser-wire system together with their corresponding performance are presented. Based on these results, prospects for reconstructing the ILC beam emittance from representative laser-wire beam size measurements are evaluated.

  4. Radiobiological mechanisms of stereotactic body radiation therapy and stereotactic radiation surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Mi Sook; Kim, Won Woo; Park, In Hwan; Kim, Hee Jong; Lee, Eun Jin; Jung, Jae Hoon [Research Center for Radiotherapy, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Lawrence Chin Soo; Song, Chang W. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota Medical School, Minneapolis (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Despite the increasing use of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiation surgery (SRS) in recent years, the biological base of these high-dose hypo-fractionated radiotherapy modalities has been elusive. Given that most human tumors contain radioresistant hypoxic tumor cells, the radiobiological principles for the conventional multiple-fractionated radiotherapy cannot account for the high efficacy of SBRT and SRS. Recent emerging evidence strongly indicates that SBRT and SRS not only directly kill tumor cells, but also destroy the tumor vascular beds, thereby deteriorating intratumor microenvironment leading to indirect tumor cell death. Furthermore, indications are that the massive release of tumor antigens from the tumor cells directly and indirectly killed by SBRT and SRS stimulate anti-tumor immunity, thereby suppressing recurrence and metastatic tumor growth. The reoxygenation, repair, repopulation, and redistribution, which are important components in the response of tumors to conventional fractionated radiotherapy, play relatively little role in SBRT and SRS. The linear-quadratic model, which accounts for only direct cell death has been suggested to overestimate the cell death by high dose per fraction irradiation. However, the model may in some clinical cases incidentally do not overestimate total cell death because high-dose irradiation causes additional cell death through indirect mechanisms. For the improvement of the efficacy of SBRT and SRS, further investigation is warranted to gain detailed insights into the mechanisms underlying the SBRT and SRS.

  5. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constanzo, J. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Fallavier, M., E-mail: m.fallavier@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Alphonse, G. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Hospices-Civils-de-Lyon, CHLS, F-69495 Pierre-Bénite (France); Bernard, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); CNRS/IN2P3, Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon, F-69622 Villeurbanne (France); Battiston-Montagne, P. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C. [Université de Lyon, F-69622, Lyon (France); Université Lyon 1, Villeurbanne (France); Faculté de Médecine Lyon-Sud, LRCM, F-69921 Oullins (France); Hospices-Civils-de-Lyon, CHLS, F-69495 Pierre-Bénite (France); and others

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  6. Radiobiology of Small Hive Beetle (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae) and Prospects for Management Using Sterile Insect Releases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Danielle; Chun, Stacey; Follett, Peter

    2015-06-01

    Small hive beetle, Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae), is considered a serious threat to beekeeping in the Western Hemisphere, Australia, and Europe mainly due to larval feeding on honey, pollen, and brood of the European honeybee, Apis mellifera L. Control methods are limited for this pest. Studies were conducted to provide information on the radiobiology of small hive beetle and determine the potential for sterile insect releases as a control strategy. Adult males and females were equally sensitive to a radiation dose of 80 Gy and died within 5-7 d after treatment. In reciprocal crossing studies, irradiation of females only lowered reproduction to a greater extent than irradiation of males only. For matings between unirradiated males and irradiated females, mean reproduction was reduced by >99% at 45 and 60 Gy compared with controls, and no larvae were produced at 75 Gy. Irradiation of prereproductive adults of both sexes at 45 Gy under low oxygen (1-4%) caused a high level of sterility (>99%) while maintaining moderate survivorship for several weeks, and should suffice for sterile insect releases. Sterile insect technique holds potential for suppressing small hive beetle populations in newly invaded areas and limiting its spread.

  7. Late radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy. Clinical importance, radiobiological mechanisms and strategies of prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andratschke, Nicolaus; Maurer, Jean; Molls, Michael; Trott, Klaus-Rüdiger

    2011-08-01

    The clinical importance of radiation-induced heart disease, in particular in post-operative radiotherapy of breast cancer patients, has been recognised only recently. There is general agreement, that a co-ordinated research effort would be needed to explore all the potential strategies of how to reduce the late risk of radiation-induced heart disease in radiotherapy. This approach would be based, on one hand, on a comprehensive understanding of the radiobiological mechanisms of radiation-induced heart disease after radiotherapy which would require large-scale long-term animal experiments with high precision local heart irradiation. On the other hand - in close co-operation with mechanistic in vivo research studies - clinical studies in patients need to determine the influence of dose distribution in the heart on the risk of radiation-induced heart disease. The aim of these clinical studies would be to identify the critical structures within the organ which need to be spared and their radiation sensitivity as well as a potential volume and dose effect. The results of the mechanistic studies might also provide concepts of how to modify the gradual progression of radiation damage in the heart by drugs or biological molecules. The results of the studies in patients would need to also incorporate detailed dosimetric and imaging studies in order to develop early indicators of impending radiation-induced heart disease which would be a pre-condition to develop sound criteria for treatment plan optimisation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Radiobiological inactivation of Epstein-Barr virus. [UV and X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, E.; Heston, L.; Grogan, E.; Miller, G.

    1978-01-01

    Lymphocyte transforming properties of B95-8 strain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are very sensitive to inactivation by either uv or x irradiation. No dose of irradiation increases the transforming capacity of EBV. The x-ray dose needed for inactivation of EBV transformation (dose that results in 37% survival, 60,000 rads) is similar to the dose required for inactivation of plaque formation by herpes simplex virus type 1 (Fischer strain). Although herpes simplex virus is more sensitive than EBV to uv irradiation, this difference is most likely due to differences in the kinetics or mechanisms of repair of uv damage to the two viruses. The results lead to the hypothesis that a large part, or perhaps all, of the EBV genome is in some way needed to initiate transformation. The abilities of EBV to stimulate host cell DNA synthesis, to induce nuclear antigen, and to immortalize are inactivated in parallel. All clones of marmoset cells transformed by irradiated virus produce extracellular transforming virus. These findings suggest that the abilities of the virus to transform and to replicate complete progeny are inactivated together. The amounts of uv and x irradiation that inactivate transformation by B95-8 virus are less than the dose needed to inactivate early antigen induction by the nontransforming P/sub 3/HR-1 strain of EBV. Based on radiobiological inactivation, 10 to 50% of the genome is needed for early antigen induction.

  9. Light ion production for a future radiobiological facility at CERN: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford-Haworth, Joshua; Bellodi, Giulia; Küchler, Detlef; Lombardi, Alessandra; Röhrich, Jörg; Scrivens, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Recent medical applications of ions such as carbon and helium have proved extremely effective for the treatment of human patients. However, before now a comprehensive study of the effects of different light ions on organic targets has not been completed. There is a strong desire for a dedicated facility which can produce ions in the range of protons to neon in order to perform this study. This paper will present the proposal and preliminary investigations into the production of light ions, and the development of a radiobiological research facility at CERN. The aims of this project will be presented along with the modifications required to the existing linear accelerator (Linac3), and the foreseen facility, including the requirements for an ion source in terms of some of the specification parameters and the flexibility of operation for different ion types. Preliminary results from beam transport simulations will be presented, in addition to some planned tests required to produce some of the required light ions (lithium, boron) to be conducted in collaboration with the Helmholtz-Zentrum für Materialien und Energie, Berlin.

  10. Radiobiology and Reproduction—What Can We Learn from Mammalian Females?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Garcia-Caldés

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation damages DNA and induces mutations as well as chromosomal reorganizations. Although radiotherapy increases survival among cancer patients, this treatment does not come without secondary effects, among which the most problematic is gonadal dysfunction, especially in women. Even more, if radio-induced DNA damage occurs in germ cells during spermatogenesis and/or oogenesis, they can produce chromosomal reorganizations associated with meiosis malfunction, abortions, as well as hereditary effects. However, most of our current knowledge of ionizing radiation genotoxic effects is derived from in vitro studies performed in somatic cells and there are only some experimental data that shed light on how germ cells work when affected by DNA alterations produced by ionizing radiation. In addition, these few data are often related to mammalian males, making it difficult to extrapolate the results to females. Here, we review the current knowledge of radiobiology and reproduction, paying attention to mammalian females. In order to do that, we will navigate across the female meiotic/reproductive cycle/life taking into account the radiation-induced genotoxic effects analysis and animal models used, published in recent decades.

  11. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, April, May, June 1987. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-07-01

    This document is a collection of reprinted technical reports. Partial contents include: Effect of ionizing radiation on prostaglandins and gastric secretion in rhesus monkeys; Characterization of rat prothymocyte with monoclonal antibodies recognizing rat lymphocyte membrane antigenic determinants; Effects of subdiaphragmatic vagotomy on the acquisition of a radiation-induced condition taste aversion; Ethanol-induced taste aversions; Lack of involvement of acetaldehyde and the area postrema; Dose and time relationships of the radioprotector WR-2721 on locomotor activity in mice; Purification and analysis of rat hematopoietic stem cells by flow cytometry, Plasma histamine and catecholamine levels during hypotension induced by morphine and compound 48/80; Effects of ionizing radiation on hippocampal excitability, Tumor necrosis factor/cachectin is a less-potent inducer of serum amyloid A synthesis than interleukin 1, Protection of mice against fission-neutron irradiation by WR-2721 or WR-151327, Induction of colony-stimulating factor in vivo by recombinant interleukin 1 a and recombinant tumor necrosis factor alpha; 16,16-Dimethyl prostaglandin E2 increases survival in mice following irradiation, Selenium pretreatment enhances the radioprotective effect and reduces the lethal toxicity of WR-2721; Rat phantom depth dose studies in electron, x-ray, gamma-ray, and reactor-radiation fields; Wall attenuation and scatter characteristics of ionization chambers at Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute.

  12. AFRRI (Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute) reports, July, August, September 1989. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-11-01

    This volume contains AFRRI Scientific Reports SR 89-26 through SR89-39 and Technical Report TR89-1 for Jul-Sep 1989. Partial contents include: Induction of marrow hypoxia by radioprotective agents; Cell-cycle radiation response: Role of intracellular factors; Characteristics of radiation-induced performance changes in bar-press avoidance with and without a preshock warning cue; Norepinephrine-induced phosphorylation of a 25 kd phosphoprotein in rat aorta is altered in intraperitoneal sepsis; Quantitative measurement of radiation-induced base products in DNA using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry; Tropism of canine neutrophils to xanthine oxidase; Effects of acute sublethal gamma radiation exposure on aggressive behavior in male mice: A dose-response study; Progressive behavioral changes during the maturation of rats with early radiation-induced hypoplasia of fascia dentata granule cells; Stomach nodules in pigeons; An assessment of the behavioral toxicity of high-energy iron particles compared to other qualities of radiation; L-leucyl-L-leucine methyl ester treatment of canine marrow and peripheral blood cells; Localization of cyclo-oxygenase and prostaglandin E2 in the secretory granule of the mast cell; Radioprotection of mice with interleukin-1: Relationship to the number of spleen colony-forming units; Survival after total-body irradiation. I. Effects of partial small-bowel shielding; Laboratory x-ray irradiator for cellular radiobiology research studies: Dosimetry report.

  13. Silicon Carbide Emitter Turn-Off Thyristor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel MOS-controlled SiC thyristor device, the SiC emitter turn-off thyristor (ETO is a promising technology for future high-voltage switching applications because it integrates the excellent current conduction capability of a SiC thyristor with a simple MOS-control interface. Through unity-gain turn-off, the SiC ETO also achieves excellent Safe Operation Area (SOA and faster switching speeds than silicon ETOs. The world's first 4.5-kV SiC ETO prototype shows a forward voltage drop of 4.26 V at 26.5 A/cm2 current density at room and elevated temperatures. Tested in an inductive circuit with a 2.5 kV DC link voltage and a 9.56-A load current, the SiC ETO shows a fast turn-off time of 1.63 microseconds and a low 9.88 mJ turn-off energy. The low switching loss indicates that the SiC ETO could operate at about 4 kHz if 100 W/cm2 conduction and the 100 W/cm2 turn-off losses can be removed by the thermal management system. This frequency capability is about 4 times higher than 4.5-kV-class silicon power devices. The preliminary demonstration shows that the SiC ETO is a promising candidate for high-frequency, high-voltage power conversion applications, and additional developments to optimize the device for higher voltage (>5 kV and higher frequency (10 kHz are needed.

  14. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter towards its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, sub-diffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the complex near-field coupling between emitters and nanostructures, and open up new opportunities to perform super-resolution microscopy with higher accuracy.

  15. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; /Fermilab; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  16. Transverse emittance measurement and preservation at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Maria

    2016-06-20

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is a high energy storage ring that provides proton and heavy ion collisions to study fundamental particle physics. The luminosity production is closely linked to emittance preservation in the accelerator. The transverse emittance is the phase space density of the beam and should be conserved when the particle beam is transformed through the accelerator. Perturbing effects, however, can lead to emittance increase and hence luminosity degradation. Measuring the emittance growth is a complex task with high intensity beams and changing energies. The machine optics and the transverse beam size have to be measured as accurately as possible. Beta function measurements with k-modulation are discussed. With this method the quadrupole focussing strength is varied and the resulting tune change is traced to determine the beta function at the quadrupole. A new k-modulation measurement tool was developed for the LHC. The fully automatic and online measurement system takes constraints of various systems such as tune measurement precision and powering limitations of the LHC superconducting circuits into account. With sinusoidal k-modulation record low beta function measurement uncertainties in the LHC have been reached. 2015 LHC beta function and β*, which is the beta function at the collision point, measurements with k-modulation will be presented. Wire scanners and synchrotron light monitors are presently used in the LHC to measure the transverse beam size. Accuracy and limitations of the LHC transverse profile monitors are discussed. During the 2012 LHC proton run it was found that wire scanner photomultiplier saturation added significant uncertainty on all measurements. A large discrepancy between emittances from wire scanners and luminosity was discovered but not solved. During Long Shutdown 1 the wire scanner system was upgraded with new photomultipliers. A thorough study of LHC wire scanner measurement precision in 2015 is presented

  17. Transverse emittance dilution due to coupler kicks in linear accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon Buckley

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the main concerns in the design of low emittance linear accelerators (linacs is the preservation of beam emittance. Here we discuss one possible source of emittance dilution, the coupler kick, due to transverse electromagnetic fields in the accelerating cavities of the linac caused by the power coupler geometry. In addition to emittance growth, the coupler kick also produces orbit distortions. It is common wisdom that emittance growth from coupler kicks can be strongly reduced by using two couplers per cavity mounted opposite each other or by having the couplers of successive cavities alternate from above to below the beam pipe so as to cancel each individual kick. While this is correct, including two couplers per cavity or alternating the coupler location requires large technical changes and increased cost for superconducting cryomodules where cryogenic pipes are arranged parallel to a string of several cavities. We therefore analyze consequences of alternate coupler placements. We show here that alternating the coupler location from above to below compensates the emittance growth as well as the orbit distortions. For sufficiently large Q values, alternating the coupler location from before to after the cavity leads to a cancellation of the orbit distortion but not of the emittance growth, whereas alternating the coupler location from before and above to behind and below the cavity cancels the emittance growth but not the orbit distortion. We show that cancellations hold for sufficiently large Q values. These compensations hold even when each cavity is individually detuned, e.g., by microphonics. Another effective method for reducing coupler kicks that is studied is the optimization of the phase of the coupler kick so as to minimize the effects on emittance from each coupler. This technique is independent of the coupler geometry but relies on operating on crest. A final technique studied is symmetrization of the cavity geometry in the

  18. Study of Abnormal Vertical Emittance Growth in ATF Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alabau, M.; Faus-Golfe, A.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Alabau, M.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; Le Meur, G.; Rimbault, C.; Touze, F.; /Orsay, LAL; Angal-Kalinin, D.; Jones, J.K.; /Daresbury; Appleby, R.; Scarfe, A.; /Manchester U.; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; White, G.R.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC; Zimmermann, F.; /CERN

    2011-11-04

    Since several years, the vertical beam emittance measured in the Extraction Line (EXT) of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at KEK, that will transport the electron beam from the ATF Damping Ring (DR) to the future ATF2 Final Focus beam line, is significantly larger than the emittance measured in the DR itself, and there are indications that it grows rapidly with increasing beam intensity. This longstanding problem has motivated studies of possible sources of this anomalous emittance growth. One possible contribution is non-linear magnetic fields in the extraction region experimented by the beam while passing off-axis through magnets of the DR during the extraction process. In this paper, simulations of the emittance growth are presented and compared to observations. These simulations include the effects of predicted non-linear field errors in the shared DR magnets and orbit displacements from the reference orbit in the extraction region. Results of recent measurements using closed orbit bumps to probe the relation between the extraction trajectory and the anomalous emittance growth are also presented.

  19. MONOBLOCK EMITTERS FOR MELTING OF SYNTHETIC FATTY ACIDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Cherepanov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with usage of monoblock emitters for melting of synthetic fatty acids, which are delivered to plants in a solid state and are used in the production of detergents as liquids. In such emitters all lamps are arranged in a common case. Irradiation of the solid phase in the direction of the channel melting axis is done through an output quartz window. This method excludes the possibility of slowing down or stopping the process when one of the tubes is overheated. Halogen lamps are used as light sources, each one is placed in individual transparent body. Combined effect of thermal power supply and the light emission should provide a significant increase in the rate of the channel melting in the solid phase of the synthetic fatty acid. The results of evaluations for achievable rates of the channel melting in the solid phase of the synthetic fatty acids are presented. Melting of the channel with one meter depth can be reached in less than an hour when eight halogen lamps of 100 W power are used. To exclude the possibility of self-ignition of the liquid phase of synthetic fatty acid it is proposed to adjust the luminosity of the emitter and the surface temperature by selecting the number of lamps in the monoblock emitter cavity. The usage of cylindrical quartz tube as a case for monoblock emitter increases the diameter of the melting channel due to side effects of light on the solid and liquid phases.

  20. Electrical control of optical emitter relaxation pathways enabled by graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tielrooij, K. J.; Orona, L.; Ferrier, A.; Badioli, M.; Navickaite, G.; Coop, S.; Nanot, S.; Kalinic, B.; Cesca, T.; Gaudreau, L.; Ma, Q.; Centeno, A.; Pesquera, A.; Zurutuza, A.; de Riedmatten, H.; Goldner, P.; García de Abajo, F. J.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Koppens, F. H. L.

    2015-03-01

    Controlling the energy flow processes and the associated energy relaxation rates of a light emitter is of fundamental interest and has many applications in the fields of quantum optics, photovoltaics, photodetection, biosensing and light emission. Advanced dielectric, semiconductor and metallic systems have been developed to tailor the interaction between an emitter and its environment. However, active control of the energy flow from an emitter into optical, electronic or plasmonic excitations has remained challenging. Here, we demonstrate in situ electrical control of the relaxation pathways of excited erbium ions, which emit light at the technologically relevant telecommunication wavelength of 1.5 μm. By placing the erbium at a few nanometres distance from graphene, we modify the relaxation rate by more than a factor of three, and control whether the emitter decays into electron-hole pairs, emitted photons or graphene near-infrared plasmons, confined to control of the local density of optical states constitute a new paradigm for active (quantum) photonics and can be applied using any combination of light emitters and two-dimensional materials.

  1. Transverse emittance growth in staged laser-wakefield acceleration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Mehrling

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We present a study on the emittance evolution of electron bunches, externally injected into laser-driven plasma waves using the three-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC code OSIRIS. Results show order-of-magnitude transverse emittance growth during the injection process, if the electron bunch is not matched to its intrinsic betatron motion inside the wakefield. This behavior is supported by analytic theory reproducing the simulation data to a percent level. The length over which the full emittance growth develops is found to be less than or comparable to the typical dimension of a single plasma module in current multistage designs. In addition, the analytic theory enables the quantitative prediction of emittance degradation in two consecutive accelerators coupled by free-drift sections, excluding this as a scheme for effective emittance-growth suppression, and thus suggests the necessity of beam-matching sections between acceleration stages with fundamental implications on the overall design of staged laser-wakefield accelerators.

  2. Study of Lower Emittance Lattices for SPEAR3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Xiaobiao; Nosochkov, Yuri; Safranek, James A.; Wang, Lanfa; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    We study paths to significantly reduce the emittance of the SPEAR3 storage ring. Lattice possibilities are explored with the GLASS technique. New lattices are designed and optimized for practical dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. Various techniques are employed to optimize the nonlinear dynamics, including the Elegant-based genetic algorithm. Experimental studies are also carried out on the ring to validate the lattice design. The SPEAR3 storage ring is a third generation light source which has a racetrack layout with a circumference of 234.1 m. The requirement to maintain the photon beamline positions put a significant constraint on the lattice design. Consequently the emittance of SPEAR3 is not on par with some of the recently-built third generation light sources. The present operational lattice has an emittance of 10 nm. For the photon beam brightness of SSRL to remain competitive among the new or upgraded ring-based light sources, it is necessary to significantly reduce the emittance of SPEAR3. In this paper we report our ongoing effort to develop a lower emittance solution for SSRL. We first show the potential of the SPEAR3 lattice with results of the standard cell study using the GLASS technique. This is followed by a discussion of the design strategy for full-ring linear lattices. Several lattice options are compared. We then show the methods and results for dynamic aperture optimization. Experiments were also conducted on the SPEAR3 ring to implement the lattice and to measure the key lattice parameters.

  3. High value of the radiobiological parameter Dq correlates to expression of the transforming growth factor beta type II receptor in a panel of small cell lung cancer cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, S; Krarup, M; Nørgaard, P;

    1998-01-01

    Our panel of SCLC cell lines have previously been examined for their radiobiological characteristics and sensitivity to treatment with TGF beta 1. In this study we examined the possible correlations between radiobiological parameters and the expression of the TGF beta type II receptor (TGF beta-r...... role for the repair of radiation induced DNA damage in SCLC....

  4. Realization of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at conventional X-ray tubes and unconventional radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beyreuther, Elke

    2010-09-10

    More than hundred years after the discovery of X-rays different kinds of ionizing radiation are ubiquitous in medicine, applied to clinical diagnostics and cancer treatment as well. Irrespective of their nature, the widespread application of radiation implies its precise dosimetric characterization and detailed knowledge of the radiobiological effects induced in cancerous and normal tissue. Starting with in vitro cell irradiation experiments, which define basic parameters for the subsequent tissue and animal studies, the whole multi-stage process is completed by clinical trials that translate the results of fundamental research into clinical application. In this context, the present dissertation focuses on the establishment of radiobiological in vitro cell experiments at unconventional, but clinical relevant radiation qualities. In the first part of the present work the energy dependent biological effectiveness of photons was studied examining low-energy X-rays (≤ 50 keV), as used for mammography, and high-energy photons (≥ 20 MeV) as proposed for future radiotherapy. Cell irradiation experiments have been performed at conventional X-ray tubes providing low-energy photons and 200 kV reference radiation as well. In parallel, unconventional quasi-monochromatic channeling X-rays and high-energy bremsstrahlung available at the radiation source ELBE of the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf were considered for radiobiological experimentation. For their precise dosimetric characterization dosimeters based on the thermally stimulated emission of exoelectrons and on radiochromic films were evaluated, whereas just the latter was found to be suitable for the determination of absolute doses and spatial dose distributions at cell position. Standard ionization chambers were deployed for the online control of cell irradiation experiments. Radiobiological effects were analyzed in human mammary epithelial cells on different subcellular levels revealing an increasing amount

  5. Radiobiology of hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy: what are the optimal fractionation schedules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibamoto, Yuta; Miyakawa, Akifumi; Otsuka, Shinya; Iwata, Hiromitsu

    2016-01-01

    In hypofractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high doses per fraction are usually used and the dose delivery pattern is different from that of conventional radiation. The daily dose is usually given intermittently over a longer time compared with conventional radiotherapy. During prolonged radiation delivery, sublethal damage repair takes place, leading to the decreased effect of radiation. In in vivo tumors, however, this decrease in effect may be counterbalanced by rapid reoxygenation. Another issue related to hypofractionated SRT is the mathematical model for dose evaluation and conversion. The linear–quadratic (LQ) model and biologically effective dose (BED) have been suggested to be incorrect when used for hypofractionation. The LQ model overestimates the effect of high fractional doses of radiation. BED is particularly incorrect when used for tumor responses in vivo, since it does not take reoxygenation into account. Correction of the errors, estimated at 5–20%, associated with the use of BED is necessary when it is used for SRT. High fractional doses have been reported to exhibit effects against tumor vasculature and enhance host immunity, leading to increased antitumor effects. This may be an interesting topic that should be further investigated. Radioresistance of hypoxic tumor cells is more problematic in hypofractionated SRT, so trials of hypoxia-targeted agents are encouraged in the future. In this review, the radiobiological characteristics of hypofractionated SRT are summarized, and based on the considerations, we would like to recommend 60 Gy in eight fractions delivered three times a week for lung tumors larger than 2 cm in diameter. PMID:27006380

  6. Characteristic 8 keV X rays possess radiobiological properties of higher-LET radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shridhar, Ravi; Estabrook, William; Yudelev, Mark; Rakowski, Joseph; Burmeister, Jay; Wilson, George D; Joiner, Michael C

    2010-03-01

    Electronic brachytherapy systems are being developed that can deliver X rays of varying energy depending on the material of a secondary target. A copper target produces characteristic 8 keV X rays. Our aim was to determine whether 8 keV X rays might deliver greater biological effectiveness than megavoltage photons. Cells of the U251 human glioma cell line were used to compare the biological effects of 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays in terms of relative biological effectiveness (RBE), oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), and DNA damage. The RBE at 50% and 10% survival was 2.6 and 1.9, respectively. At 50% survival, the OER for cells treated with 8 keV X rays was 1.6 compared with 3.0 for (60)Co gamma rays. The numbers of H2AX foci per Gy after treatment with 8 keV X rays and (60)Co gamma rays were similar; however, the size of the foci generated at 8 keV was significantly larger, possibly indicating more complex DNA damage. The mean area of H2AX foci generated by 8 keV X rays was 0.785 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.756-0.814) compared with 0.491 microm(2) (95% CI: 0.462-0.520) for (60)Co gamma rays (P X rays produce two to three times the biological effectiveness of megavoltage photons, with a radiobiological profile similar to higher-LET radiations.

  7. [Observation of radiobiological characteristics in a HepG2 cell line with mitochondrial DNA deletion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hengwen; Pan, Yi; Zeng, Zijun; Fang, Liangyi; Zhang, Hongdan; Xie, Songxi; Li, Weixiong; Xu, Jiabin

    2015-06-01

    To study the radiobiological characteristics of a HepG2 cell line with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion. HepG2 cells were cultured in a medium containing ethidium bromide, acetylformic acid and uracil. The HepG2 cell line with mtDNA deletion (ρ(0)HepG2 cells) were acquired after 30 subcultures by limited dilution cloning. The cell survival was then observed in the absence of acetylformic acid and uracil, and the total mtDNA deletion in the cells was confirmed by PCR. The radiosensitivity of HepG2 and ρ(0)HepG2 cells was evaluated by exposure to gradient doses of 6 MV X ray irradiation. The cell apoptosis was assessed following a 2 Gy X-ray exposure with Hochest33342 staining, and the invasiveness of ρ(0)HepG2 cells was measured by Transwell assay. HepG2 cells could survive 30 subcultures in the presence of ethidium bromide, and massive cell death occurred after removal of acetylformic acid and uracil from the medium. PCR confirmed total mtDNA deletion from ρ(0)HepG2 cells, whose α/β value was significantly lower than that of HepG2 cells. ρ(0)Hep-G2 cells showed an obviously lowered cell apoptosis rate following X-ray exposure with enhanced cell invasiveness. HepG2 cells can be induced by ethidium bromide into ρ(0)HepG2 cells with an increased radiation resistance, anti-apoptosis ability and cell invasiveness.

  8. Cooperative behavior of quantum dipole emitters coupled to a zero-index nanoscale waveguide

    CERN Document Server

    Sokhoyan, Ruzan

    2015-01-01

    We study cooperative behavior of quantum dipole emitters coupled to a rectangular waveguide with dielectric core and silver cladding. We investigate cooperative emission and inter-emitter entanglement generation phenomena for emitters whose resonant frequencies are near the frequency cutoff of the waveguide, where the waveguide effectively behaves as zero-index metamaterial. We show that coupling emitters to a zero-index waveguide allows one to relax the constraint on precision positioning of emitters for observing inter-emitter entanglement generation and extend the spatial scale at which the superradiance can be observed.

  9. Automation of the particle dosimetry and the dose application for radiobiological experiments at a vertical proton beam

    CERN Document Server

    Moertel, H; Eyrich, W; Fritsch, M; Distel, L

    2002-01-01

    A facility with a vertical beam for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been setup at the Tandem accelerator at Erlangen. This energy region is optimal to investigate the biological effects of the linear energy transfer in the Bragg region under physiological conditions. A new automated data acquisition system for dosimetry and monitoring based on a personal computer was developed and optimized for this setup. A specially designed sample holder offers possibilities of cooling or changing of atmosphere during irradiation. First irradiations of biological samples have shown the functionality of the setup.

  10. Hafnia-plugged microcavities for thermal stability of selective emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Heon-Ju; Smyth, Katherine; Bathurst, Stephen; Chou, Jeffrey; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Joannopoulos, John; Saka, Nannaji; Kim, Sang-Gook

    2013-06-01

    Two-dimensional arrays of micro-cavities effectively control photon motion and selectively emit radiation tailored to the preferred bandgap of photovoltaic (PV) cells, thus enhancing the efficiency of thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. At the high operating temperatures, however, the micro- and nano-patterned structures of the selective emitters quickly lose their integrity--obliterating the tight tolerances required for precise spectral control. Even if oxidation, recrystallization, and grain growth could be avoided with single-crystal tungsten (W) selective emitters with vacuum packaging, surface diffusion, evaporation, and re-condensation are not avoidable in long-term operation at high temperatures. The concept of a planar array of plugged micro-cavities to suppress the curvature-dependent thermal degradation modes is proposed and tested. Based on scale-accelerated failure tests of silicon devices, the lifetime of W selective emitters operating at 1100 K is estimated to be at least 30 yr.

  11. Fully tuneable, Purcell-enhanced solid-state quantum emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petruzzella, M., E-mail: m.petruzzella@tue.nl; Xia, T.; Pagliano, F.; Birindelli, S.; Zobenica, Z.; Fiore, A. [COBRA Research Institute, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, NL-5600MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Midolo, L. [Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Blegdamsvej 17, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Li, L. H.; Linfield, E. H. [School of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2015-10-05

    We report the full energy control over a semiconductor cavity-emitter system, consisting of single Stark-tunable quantum dots embedded in mechanically reconfigurable photonic crystal membranes. A reversible wavelength tuning of the emitter over 7.5 nm as well as an 8.5 nm mode shift are realized on the same device. Harnessing these two electrical tuning mechanisms, a single exciton transition is brought on resonance with the cavity mode at several wavelengths, demonstrating a ten-fold enhancement of its spontaneous emission. These results open the way to bring several cavity-enhanced emitters mutually into resonance and therefore represent a key step towards scalable quantum photonic circuits featuring multiple sources of indistinguishable single photons.

  12. Pro jected Shell Mo del Description for the Proton Emitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卞宝安

    2016-01-01

    Proton radioactivity is an important decay mode for nuclei near the proton drip-line. Studies of this decay mode can reveal valuable information on exotic nuclear structure and provide important information on the stucture of nuclei in extreme conditions. The new experimental data can let us understand the interactions in exotic systems, which motivate further theoretical development. The most recent application of the projected shell model (PSM) for proton emitters is represented. We study the rotational bands of the deformed proton emitter 141Ho by using the PSM. The experimental data are well reproduced. Strongly suppressed γ transition from the low-lying Iπ= 3/2+ state makes this state isomeric. Variations in the dynamical moment of inertia are discussed due to band crossings using the band diagram. The calculated results for proton emitter 151Lu shows it is oblately deformed.

  13. Cooperative Lamb shift in a quantum emitter array

    CERN Document Server

    Meir, Ziv; Shahmoon, Ephraim; Oron, Dan; Ozeri, Roee

    2013-01-01

    Whenever several quantum light emitters are brought in proximity with one another, their interaction with common electromagnetic fields couples them, giving rise to cooperative shifts in their resonance frequency. Such collective line shifts are central to modern atomic physics, being closely related to superradiance on one hand and the Lamb shift on the other. Although collective shifts have been theoretically predicted more than fifty years ago, the effect has not been observed yet in a controllable system of a few isolated emitters. Here, we report a direct spectroscopic observation of the cooperative shift of an optical electric dipole transition in a system of up to eight Sr ions suspended in a Paul trap. We study collective resonance shift in the previously unexplored regime of far-field coupling, and provide the first observation of cooperative effects in an array of quantum emitters. These results pave the way towards experimental exploration of cooperative emission phenomena in mesoscopic systems.

  14. Emittance growth in the DARHT Axis-II Downstream Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdahl, Jr., Carl August [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schulze, Martin E. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-04-14

    Using a particle-in-cell (PIC) code, we investigated the possibilities for emittance growth through the quadrupole magnets of the system used to transport the high-current electron beam from an induction accelerator to the bremsstrahlung converter target used for flash radiography. We found that even highly mismatched beams exhibited little emittance growth (< 6%), which we attribute to softening of their initial hard edge current distributions. We also used this PIC code to evaluate the accuracy of emittance measurements using a solenoid focal scan following the quadrupole magnets. If the beam is round after the solenoids, the simulations indicate that the measurement is highly accurate, but it is substantially inaccurate for elliptical beams

  15. DC-SC Photoinjector with Low Emittance at Peking University

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang Rong; Hao, J; Huang, Senlin; Lu Xiang Yang; Quan, Shengwen; Zhang, Baocheng; Zhao, Kui

    2005-01-01

    High average power Free Electron Lasers require the high quality electron beams with the low emittance and the sub-picosecond bunches. The design of DC-SC photoinjector, directly combining a DC photoinjector with an SRF cavity, can produce high average current beam with moderate bunch charge and high duty factor. Because of the DC gun, the emittance increases quickly at the beginning, so a carefully design is needed to control that. In this paper, the simulation of an upgraded design has been done to lower the normalized emittance below 1.5mm·mrad. The photoinjector consists of a DC gap and a 2+1/2-cell SRF cavity, and it is designed to produce 4.2 MeV electron beams at 100pC bunch charge and 81.25MHz repetition rate (8 mA average current).

  16. Hybrid genetic optimization for design of photonic crystal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammohan, R. R.; Farfan, B. G.; Su, M. F.; El-Kady, I.; Reda Taha, M. M.

    2010-09-01

    A unique hybrid-optimization technique is proposed, based on genetic algorithms (GA) and gradient descent (GD) methods, for the smart design of photonic crystal (PhC) emitters. The photonic simulation is described and the granularity of photonic crystal dimensions is considered. An innovative sliding-window method for performing local heuristic search is demonstrated. Finally, the application of the proposed method on two case studies for the design of a multi-pixel photonic crystal emitter and the design of thermal emitter in thermal photovoltaic is demonstrated. Discussion in the report includes the ability of the optimal PhC structures designed using the proposed method, to produce unprecedented high emission efficiencies of 54.5% in a significantly long wavelength region and 84.9% at significantly short wavelength region.

  17. Field Emission from Lateral Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohai Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available A field emission from a lateral emitter made by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT yarn was investigated. The lateral emitter showed an excellent field emission performance with a low turn-on electric field of 1.13 V/um at an emission current of 1 uA, high emission current of 0.2 mA at an applied voltage of 700 V, and long-time emission stability for over 20 h without any significant current decay under an initial emission current of about 0.10 mA. The lateral emitter also demonstrated a uniform line emission pattern. It is suggested that the field emission occurs from the outmost MWCNTs which are protruding out from the yarn surface.

  18. Field Emission from Lateral Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Yarn Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guohai; Song, Yenan

    2016-10-01

    A field emission from a lateral emitter made by a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) yarn was investigated. The lateral emitter showed an excellent field emission performance with a low turn-on electric field of 1.13 V/um at an emission current of 1 uA, high emission current of 0.2 mA at an applied voltage of 700 V, and long-time emission stability for over 20 h without any significant current decay under an initial emission current of about 0.10 mA. The lateral emitter also demonstrated a uniform line emission pattern. It is suggested that the field emission occurs from the outmost MWCNTs which are protruding out from the yarn surface.

  19. Emittance measurements for the Illinois/CEBAF polarized electron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunham, B.M.; Cardman, L.S. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States); Sinclair, C.K. [Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The transverse thermal properties of the electrons photoemitted from GaAs determine the intrinsic beam emittance, an important quantity in applications such as polarized electron sources and high-brightness sources. In this paper, emittance measurements using the Illinois/CEBAF polarized electron source are described. The emittance was measured as a function of both the laser beam spot size and laser wavelength at low currents. The data was used to infer the transverse thermal energy of the electrons photoemitted from GaAs for wavelengths between 514 and 840 nm. Near the bandgap the transverse energy is {approximately}34 meV, a factor of 3 lower than that of the beam from a typical thermionic electron gun. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  20. On the measurement of positron emitters with Ge detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peyres, Virginia, E-mail: virginia.peyres@ciemat.e [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Torano, Eduardo [Ciemat, Laboratorio de Metrologia de Radiaciones Ionizantes, Avda. Complutense 22, Madrid 28040 (Spain)

    2011-05-01

    This paper discusses the problems related to the measurement of positron emitters with germanium detectors. Five positron emitters with important applications in nuclear medicine ({sup 22}Na, {sup 18}F, {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N and {sup 68}Ga) have been studied. Measurements and Monte Carlo simulations have been used to determine the optimal conditions of measurement in gamma-ray spectrometry systems. The results obtained indicate that adding adequate absorbers, detection efficiencies are close to those of gamma emitters of similar energy measured in the same conditions, which allows a rapid calibration of a Ge-based spectrometry system. More accurate results are also presented using a detailed Monte Carlo simulation. Comparison to experimental data shows a good agreement.

  1. High efficiency and stable white OLED using a single emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). School of Mechanical, Aerospace, Chemical and Materials Engineering

    2016-01-18

    The ultimate objective of this project was to demonstrate an efficient and stable white OLED using a single emitter on a planar glass substrate. The focus of the project is on the development of efficient and stable square planar phosphorescent emitters and evaluation of such class of materials in the device settings. Key challenges included improving the emission efficiency of molecular dopants and excimers, controlling emission color of emitters and their excimers, and improving optical and electrical stability of emissive dopants. At the end of this research program, the PI has made enough progress to demonstrate the potential of excimer-based white OLED as a cost-effective solution for WOLED panel in the solid state lighting applications.

  2. Laser Process for Selective Emitter Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Poulain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Selective emitter solar cells can provide a significant increase in conversion efficiency. However current approaches need many technological steps and alignment procedures. This paper reports on a preliminary attempt to reduce the number of processing steps and therefore the cost of selective emitter cells. In the developed procedure, a phosphorous glass covered with silicon nitride acts as the doping source. A laser is used to open locally the antireflection coating and at the same time achieve local phosphorus diffusion. In this process the standard chemical etching of the phosphorous glass is avoided. Sheet resistance variation from 100 Ω/sq to 40 Ω/sq is demonstrated with a nanosecond UV laser. Numerical simulation of the laser-matter interaction is discussed to understand the dopant diffusion efficiency. Preliminary solar cells results show a 0.5% improvement compared with a homogeneous emitter structure.

  3. High-efficiency photonic crystal narrowband thermal emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farfan, G. B.; Su, M. F.; Reda Taha, M. M.; El-Kady, I.

    2010-02-01

    Photonic crystals (PhC) are artificial structures fabricated with a periodicity in the dielectric function. This periodic electromagnetic potential results in creation of energy bandgaps where photon propagation is prohibited. PhC structures have promising use in thermal applications if optimized to operate at specific thermal emission spectrum. Here, novel utilization of optimized PhC's in thermal applications is presented. We demonstrate through numerical simulation the modification of the thermal emission spectrum by a metallic photonic crystal (PhC) to create high-efficiency multispectral thermal emitters. These emitters funnel radiation from a broad emission spectrum associated with a Plancklike distribution into a prescribed narrow emission band. A detailed quantitative evaluation of the spectral and power efficiencies of a PhC thermal emitter and its portability across infrared (IR) spectral bands are provided. We show an optimized tungsten PhC with a predominant narrow-band emission profile with an emitter efficiency that is more than double that of an ideal blackbody and ~65-75% more power-efficiency across the IR spectrum. We also report on using optimal three-dimensional Lincoln log photonic crystal (LL-PhC) emitters for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generation as opposed to using a passive filtering approach to truncate the broadband thermal source emission to match the bandgap of a photovoltaic (PV) cell. The emitter performance is optimized for the 1-2μm PV band using different PhC materials, specifically copper, silver and gold. The use of the proposed PhC in TPV devices can produce significant energy savings not reported before. The optimal design of the PhC geometry is obtained by implementing a variety of optimization methods integrated with artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms.

  4. Observation of negative differential transconductance in tunneling emitter bipolar transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Veenhuizen, Marc J.; Locatelli, Nicolas; Moodera, Jagadeesh; Chang, Joonyeon

    2009-08-01

    We report on measurement of negative differential transconductance (NDTC) of iron (Fe)/magnesium-oxide (MgO)/silicon tunneling emitter NPN bipolar transistors. Device simulations reveal that the NDTC is a consequence of an inversion layer at the tunneling-oxide/P-silicon interface for low base voltages. Electrons travel laterally through the inversion layer into the base and give rise to an increase in collector current. The NDTC results from the recombination of those electrons at the interface between emitter and base contact which is dependent on the base voltage. For larger base voltages, the inversion layer disappears marking the onset of normal bipolar transistor behavior.

  5. Emittance Measurements at the Langley Chemical Physics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, B. W.

    1960-01-01

    Total hemispherical emittance measurements are made routinely for materials which may be heated by electrical resistance methods over the temperature range of 600 degrees to 2,000 F by using a black-body reference method. This employs a conical black body and a thermopile detector with a calcium fluoride lens. Emittance is obtained by measuring the radiant flux from the specimen strip and comparing it with the flux from an equal area of the black-body cone at the same temperature. The temperature measurements are made by use of thermocouples. It is planned to extend the temperature range of this type of measurement to temperatures above 2,000 F. Another technique has been investigated for measuring emittance of materials not amenable to electrical heating or thermocouple attachment. This method uses a black-body-cavity furnace similar to that used in reference 5 to measure emittance of transparent materials such as glass. The method employs a heated black-body cavity in which the semicircular specimen is allowed to come to the equilibrium temperature of the cavity and then is rotated in front of a water-cooled viewing port where a sensitive thermistor detector alternately views the specimen surface and the black-body cavity. The ratio of the two readings gives the specimen emittance directly, for the temperature of the black body. The detector output is recorded on a fast Brown self-balancing potentiometer. The furnace is provided with a water-cooled blackened shutter which may be inserted behind the specimen to eliminate any transmitted black-body radiation if the specimen is transparent. This apparatus is capable of measuring total normal emittance over the temperature range of 1,000 degrees to 2,000 F. Preliminary data for boron nitride specimens of two thicknesses are shown where total normal emittance is plotted against temperature for two experimental conditions: (1) black-body radiation incident on the back of the specimen and (2) no black-body radiation

  6. Beam emittance reduction during operation of Indus-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fakhri, Ali Akbar, E-mail: fakhri@rrcat.gov.in; Kant, Pradeep; Ghodke, A. D.; Singh, Gurnam [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore 452 013 (India)

    2015-11-15

    Indus-2 storage ring is a 2.5 GeV third generation synchrotron radiation source. This source was commissioned using a moderate optics. Beam injection was accomplished using an off momentum electron beam to avoid difficulties faced in storage of beam at 550 MeV. The injection procedure and relevant beam dynamical studies are discussed. The switch over from the moderate optics to low emittance optics is done at 2.5 GeV after storing the electron beam. The procedure evolved to reduce the beam emittance and its implementation during the operation is discussed.

  7. Spectrum of classes of point emitters of electromagnetic wave fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castañeda, Román

    2016-09-01

    The spectrum of classes of point emitters has been introduced as a numerical tool suitable for the design, analysis, and synthesis of non-paraxial optical fields in arbitrary states of spatial coherence. In this paper, the polarization state of planar electromagnetic wave fields is included in the spectrum of classes, thus increasing its modeling capabilities. In this context, optical processing is realized as a filtering on the spectrum of classes of point emitters, performed by the complex degree of spatial coherence and the two-point correlation of polarization, which could be implemented dynamically by using programmable optical devices.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Su Kang

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube emitter, and the transmitted X-ray image was of high resolution.

  9. Epitaxial Growth of Germanium on Silicon for Light Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chengzhao Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the role of Ge as an enabler for light emitters on a Si platform. In spite of the large lattice mismatch of ~4.2% between Ge and Si, high-quality Ge layers can be epitaxially grown on Si by ultrahigh-vacuum chemical vapor deposition. Applications of the Ge layers to near-infrared light emitters with various structures are reviewed, including the tensile-strained Ge epilayer, the Ge epilayer with a delta-doping SiGe layer, and the Ge/SiGe multiple quantum wells on Si. The fundamentals of photoluminescence physics in the different Ge structures are discussed briefly.

  10. Recent progress of carbon nanotube field emitters and their application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seelaboyina, Raghunandan; Choi, Wonbong

    2007-01-01

    The potential of utilizing carbon nanotube field emission properties is an attractive feature for future vacuum electronic devices including: high power microwave, miniature x-ray, backlight for liquid crystal displays and flat panel displays. Their high emission current, nano scale geometry, chemical inertness and low threshold voltage for emission are attractive features for the field emission applications. In this paper we review the recent developments of carbon nanotube field emitters and their device applications. We also discuss the latest results on field emission current amplification achieved with an electron multiplier microchannel plate, and emission performance of multistage field emitter based on oxide nanowire operated in poor vacuum.

  11. Ultra-low emittance X-band photocathode RF gun

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chuan-Xiang; LIU Xiao-Han

    2009-01-01

    In this paper,we present the simulation results of a 1.6 cell X-band photocathode RF gun for ultra-low emittance electron beams.It will work at 9.3 GHz.The emittance,bunch length,electron energy and energy spread at the gun exit are optimized at bunch charge of 1pC using PARMELA.Electron bunches type coupler is adopted in this gun and an initial simulation by MAFIA is also given in this paper.

  12. Ultra-Sensitivity Glucose Sensor Based on Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Yinglin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new glucose sensor based on field emitter of ZnO nanorod arrays (ZNA was fabricated. This new type of ZNA field emitter-based sensor shows high sensitivity with experimental limit of detection of 1 nM glucose solution and a detection range from 1 nM to 50 μM in air at room temperature, which is lower than that of glucose sensors based on surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy, fluorescence signal transmission, and electrochemical signal transduction. The new glucose sensor provides a key technique for promising consuming application in biological system for detecting low levels of glucose on single cells or bacterial cultures.

  13. Coherent polarization locking of a diode emitter array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, S P; Phua, P B

    2009-07-01

    We present our work on the coherent combining of an array of diode emitters in a conventional diode bar configuration using the coherent polarization locking technique. An external laser cavity is designed so that the diode emissions from four diode emitters are spatially overlapped and passively phase locked via a series of birefringent walk-off crystals and a polarizing beam splitter. This concept was experimentally demonstrated up to 1030 mW of coherently combined power and was shown to increase the laser brightness of the diode bar by approximately 50 times.

  14. Thermal emittance and response time of a cesium antimonide photocathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cultrera, Luca; Bazarov, Ivan; Bartnik, Adam; Dunham, Bruce; Karkare, Siddharth; Merluzzi, Richard; Nichols, Matthew

    2011-10-01

    Measurements of the intrinsic emittance and response time of a Cs3Sb photocathode are presented. The emittance is obtained with a solenoid scan technique using a high voltage dc photoemission gun. Photoemission response time is evaluated using a RF deflecting cavity synchronized to a picosecond laser pulse train. We find that Cs3Sb has both small mean transverse energy, 160 ± 10 meV at 532 nm laser wavelength, and a prompt response time (below the resolution of our measurement) making it a suitable material for high brightness electron photoinjectors.

  15. Emittances Studies at the Fermilab/NICADD Photoinjector Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhoplav, Rodion; Melissinos, A C; Regis-Guy Piot, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    The Fermilab/NICADD photoinjector incorporates an L-band rf-gun capable of generating 1-10 nC bunches. The bunches are then accelerated to 16 MeV with a TESLA superconducting cavity. In the present paper we present parametric studies of transverse emittances and energy spread for a various operating points of the electron source (RF-gun E-field, laser length and spot size, and solenoid settings). We especially study the impact, on transverse emittance, of Gaussian and Plateau temporal distribution of the photocathode drive-laser.

  16. Efficient Terahertz Photoconductive Emitters with Improved Electrode Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-Xin Wang; Yi-Jie Niu; Wei Cheng; Zhi-Qiang Li; Zi-Ran Zhao

    2014-01-01

    We present the design, fabrication, and characterization of two new types of terahertz photoconductive emitters. One has an asymmetric four-contact electrode structure and the other has an arc-shaped electrode structure, which are all modified from a traditional strip line antenna. Numerical simulations and real experiments confirm the good performance of the proposed antennas. An amplitude increase of about 40% is experimentally observed for the terahertz signals generated from the new structures. The special electrode structure and its induced local bias field enhancement are responsible for this radiation efficiency improvement. Our work demonstrates the feasibility of developing highly efficient terahertz photoconductive emitters by optimizing the electrode structure.

  17. The Role of Sustainability Resources of Large Greenhouse Gas Emitters: The Case of Corporations in Alberta, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marwa Hannouf

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the global challenge of climate change, it becomes crucial to understand the factors that can guide carbon intensive companies to comply with environmental regulations through significant reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG emissions. Using the natural-resource-based view, the argument in this paper is that focusing on sustainability-driven resources by companies is a way to meet environmental compliance and reduce GHG emissions while gaining differential competitive benefits. A specific analysis on Alberta case has discussed large GHG emitters’ environmental compliance mechanisms in the context of their sustainability resources. The aim is examining if large GHG emitters in Alberta related to corporations having sustainability resources are complying with the Specified Gas Emitters Regulation (SGER reduction requirement through cleaner-production driven internal mechanisms. The paper examines the existence of the sustainability resources in the reporting companies related to large GHG emitters responsible for 86% of total GHG reported by facilities with emissions above the threshold of 100 kilotonnes of GHG per year under SGER in Alberta. Corporations are found not using their sustainability resource potential to achieve internal reductions in GHG emissions throughout their facilities. Thus, some recommendations are presented for Alberta case as well as for environmental regulations in other jurisdictions that can potentially help policy makers improve their climate change regulations and achieve their global targets and enable companies to gain competitive advantage while meeting GHG reduction compliance.

  18. Boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface in the presence of a particle counter flow: I. Ion emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Astrelin, V. T., E-mail: V.T.Astrelin@inp.nsk.su; Kotelnikov, I. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    Emission of positively charged ions from a plasma emitter irradiated by a counterpropagating electron beam is studied theoretically. A bipolar diode with a plasma emitter in which the ion temperature is lower than the electron temperature and the counter electron flow is extracted from the ion collector is calculated in the one-dimensional model. An analog of Bohm’s criterion for ion emission in the presence of a counterpropagating electron beam is derived. The limiting density of the counterpropagating beam in a bipolar diode operating in the space-charge-limited-emission regime is calculated. The full set of boundary conditions on the plasma emitter surface that are required for operation of the high-current optics module in numerical codes used to simulate charged particle sources is formulated.

  19. The radiobiology of laser-driven particle beams: focus on sub-lethal responses of normal human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manti, L.; Perozziello, F. M.; Borghesi, M.; Candiano, G.; Chaudhary, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Leanza, R.; Prise, K. M.; Romagnani, L.; Romano, F.; Scuderi, V.; Tramontana, A.

    2017-03-01

    Accelerated proton beams have become increasingly common for treating cancer. The need for cost and size reduction of particle accelerating machines has led to the pioneering investigation of optical ion acceleration techniques based on laser-plasma interactions as a possible alternative. Laser-matter interaction can produce extremely pulsed particle bursts of ultra-high dose rates (>= 109 Gy/s), largely exceeding those currently used in conventional proton therapy. Since biological effects of ionizing radiation are strongly affected by the spatio-temporal distribution of DNA-damaging events, the unprecedented physical features of such beams may modify cellular and tissue radiosensitivity to unexplored extents. Hence, clinical applications of laser-generated particles need thorough assessment of their radiobiological effectiveness. To date, the majority of studies have either used rodent cell lines or have focussed on cancer cell killing being local tumour control the main objective of radiotherapy. Conversely, very little data exist on sub-lethal cellular effects, of relevance to normal tissue integrity and secondary cancers, such as premature cellular senescence. Here, we discuss ultra-high dose rate radiobiology and present preliminary data obtained in normal human cells following irradiation by laser-accelerated protons at the LULI PICO2000 facility at Laser Lab Europe, France.

  20. The effects of emitter-tied field plates on lateral PNP ionizing radiation response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnaby, H.J.; Schrimpf, R.D.; Cirba, C.R. [Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States); Pease, R.L. [RLP Research, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleetwood, D.M. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kosier, S.L. [VTC Inc., Bloomington, MN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Radiation response comparisons of lateral PNP bipolar technologies reveal that device hardening may be achieved by extending the emitter contact over the active base. The emitter-tied field plate suppresses recombination of carriers with interface traps.

  1. Radiobiologic comparison of helical tomotherapy, intensity modulated radiotherapy, and conformal radiotherapy in treating lung cancer accounting for secondary malignancy risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komisopoulos, Georgios [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece); Mavroidis, Panayiotis, E-mail: mavroidis@uthscsa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Department of Medical Radiation Physics, Karolinska Institutet and Stockholm University, Stockholm (Sweden); Rodriguez, Salvador; Stathakis, Sotirios; Papanikolaou, Nikos [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Health Sciences Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nikiforidis, Georgios C.; Sakellaropoulos, Georgios C. [Department of Medical Physics, Medical School, University of Patras, Patras (Greece)

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to examine the importance of using measures to predict the risk of inducing secondary malignancies in association with the clinical effectiveness of treatment plans in terms of tumor control and normal tissue complication probabilities. This is achieved by using radiobiologic parameters and measures, which may provide a closer association between clinical outcome and treatment delivery. Overall, 4 patients having been treated for lung cancer were examined. For each of them, 3 treatment plans were developed based on the helical tomotherapy (HT), multileaf collimator-based intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (CRT) modalities. The different plans were evaluated using the complication-free tumor control probability (p{sub +}), the overall probability of injury (p{sub I}), the overall probability of control/benefit (p{sub B}), and the biologically effective uniform dose (D{sup ¯¯}). These radiobiologic measures were used to develop dose-response curves (p-D{sup ¯¯} diagram), which can help to evaluate different treatment plans when used in conjunction with standard dosimetric criteria. The risks for secondary malignancies in the heart and the contralateral lung were calculated for the 3 radiation modalities based on the corresponding dose-volume histograms (DVHs) of each patient. Regarding the overall evaluation of the different radiation modalities based on the p{sub +} index, the average values of the HT, IMRT, and CRT are 67.3%, 61.2%, and 68.2%, respectively. The corresponding average values of p{sub B} are 75.6%, 70.5%, and 71.0%, respectively, whereas the average values of p{sub I} are 8.3%, 9.3%, and 2.8%, respectively. Among the organs at risk (OARs), lungs show the highest probabilities for complications, which are 7.1%, 8.0%, and 1.3% for the HT, IMRT, and CRT modalities, respectively. Similarly, the biologically effective prescription doses (D{sub B}{sup ¯¯}) for the

  2. Modeling detector response in solid-state systems for radiation therapy and radiobiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugtenburg, R.P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH, UK (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-01

    -filled proportional counters (TEPC) where it is anticipated that intercomparisons with experiment will help to validate the use of such codes for the microdosimetry predictions on the sub-cellular scale in radiobiological systems. Monte Carlo based microdosimetry calculations are also expected to assist in explaining LET dependencies found in many solid-state detector systems. (Author)

  3. Three-dimensional radiobiological dosimetry of kidneys for treatment planning in peptide receptor radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baechler, Sebastien; Hobbs, Robert F.; Boubaker, Ariane; Buchegger, Franz; He Bin; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, 1007 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Department of Nuclear Medicine, Lausanne University Hospital, 1011 Lausanne (Switzerland); Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) delivers high absorbed doses to kidneys and may lead to permanent nephropathy. Reliable dosimetry of kidneys is thus critical for safe and effective PRRT. The aim of this work was to assess the feasibility of planning PRRT based on 3D radiobiological dosimetry (3D-RD) in order to optimize both the amount of activity to administer and the fractionation scheme, while limiting the absorbed dose and the biological effective dose (BED) to the renal cortex. Methods: Planar and SPECT data were available for a patient examined with {sup 111}In-DTPA-octreotide at 0.5 (planar only), 4, 24, and 48 h post-injection. Absorbed dose and BED distributions were calculated for common therapeutic radionuclides, i.e., {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu, using the 3D-RD methodology. Dose-volume histograms were computed and mean absorbed doses to kidneys, renal cortices, and medullae were compared with results obtained using the MIRD schema (S-values) with the multiregion kidney dosimetry model. Two different treatment planning approaches based on (1) the fixed absorbed dose to the cortex and (2) the fixed BED to the cortex were then considered to optimize the activity to administer by varying the number of fractions. Results: Mean absorbed doses calculated with 3D-RD were in good agreement with those obtained with S-value-based SPECT dosimetry for {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu. Nevertheless, for {sup 111}In, differences of 14% and 22% were found for the whole kidneys and the cortex, respectively. Moreover, the authors found that planar-based dosimetry systematically underestimates the absorbed dose in comparison with SPECT-based methods, up to 32%. Regarding the 3D-RD-based treatment planning using a fixed BED constraint to the renal cortex, the optimal number of fractions was found to be 3 or 4, depending on the radionuclide administered and the value of the fixed BED. Cumulative activities obtained using the proposed simulated

  4. Nonlocal effects: relevance for the spontaneous emission rates of quantum emitters coupled to plasmonic structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filter, Robert; Bösel, Christoph; Toscano, Giuseppe; Lederer, Falk; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    The spontaneous emission rate of dipole emitters close to plasmonic dimers are theoretically studied within a nonlocal hydrodynamic model. A nonlocal model has to be used since quantum emitters in the immediate environment of a metallic nanoparticle probe its electronic structure. Compared to local calculations, the emission rate is significantly reduced. The influence is mostly pronounced if the emitter is located close to sharp edges. We suggest to use quantum emitters to test nonlocal effects in experimentally feasible configurations.

  5. Achieving ultra-high temperatures with a resistive emitter array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Tom; Franks, Greg; Holmes, Nicholas; LaVeigne, Joe; Matis, Greg; McHugh, Steve; Norton, Dennis; Vengel, Tony; Lannon, John; Goodwin, Scott

    2016-05-01

    The rapid development of very-large format infrared detector arrays has challenged the IR scene projector community to also develop larger-format infrared emitter arrays to support the testing of systems incorporating these detectors. In addition to larger formats, many scene projector users require much higher simulated temperatures than can be generated with current technology in order to fully evaluate the performance of their systems and associated processing algorithms. Under the Ultra High Temperature (UHT) development program, Santa Barbara Infrared Inc. (SBIR) is developing a new infrared scene projector architecture capable of producing both very large format (>1024 x 1024) resistive emitter arrays and improved emitter pixel technology capable of simulating very high apparent temperatures. During earlier phases of the program, SBIR demonstrated materials with MWIR apparent temperatures in excess of 1400 K. New emitter materials have subsequently been selected to produce pixels that achieve even higher apparent temperatures. Test results from pixels fabricated using the new material set will be presented and discussed. A 'scalable' Read In Integrated Circuit (RIIC) is also being developed under the same UHT program to drive the high temperature pixels. This RIIC will utilize through-silicon via (TSV) and Quilt Packaging (QP) technologies to allow seamless tiling of multiple chips to fabricate very large arrays, and thus overcome the yield limitations inherent in large-scale integrated circuits. Results of design verification testing of the completed RIIC will be presented and discussed.

  6. Auger Emitter Based Radiotherapy- A Possible New Treatment for Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredericia, Pil; Groesser, Torsten; Severin, Gregory;

    2014-01-01

    damage produced by Low-LET radiation used in current radiotherapy (2-3) Considerable efforts have been made in the past twenty years to develop Auger emitter-based radiotherapy However, previous studies lack precise measurement of RBE, which is the fundamental factor defining the relationship between...

  7. Jamming of Quantum Emitters by Active Coated Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arslanagic, Samel; Ziolkowski, Richard W.

    2013-01-01

    A spherical active coated nanoparticle consisting of a silica nanocore covered concentrically with a silver nanoshell is examined analytically and numerically in the presence of one, two, or four quantum emitters modeled by electric Hertzian dipoles. The ability of the active coated nanoparticle...

  8. Brightness limitations of cold field emitters caused by Coulomb interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cook, B.J.; Verduin, T.; Hagen, C.W.; Kruit, P.

    2010-01-01

    Emission theory predicts that high brightness cold field emitters can enhance imaging in the electron microscope. This (neglecting chromatic aberration) is because of the large (coherent) probe current available from a high brightness source and is based on theoretically determined values of reduced

  9. Calculation Of Extraction Optics For Ion System With Plazma Emitter

    CERN Document Server

    Frolov, B A

    2004-01-01

    The 2-D code for simulating of ion optics system of positive ion extraction from a plasma source is described. Example calculation of 100 kV optics for the extraction ion IHEP gun is presented. The trajectories of particles and emittance plots are resulted. The aberrations influ-ence strongly on ion optics for considered geometry.

  10. Magnetized Plasma Experiments Using Thermionic- Thermoelectronic Plasma Emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamori, Eiichirou; Cheng, C. Z.; Fujikawa, Nobuko; Lee, Jyun-Yi; Peng, Albert

    2008-11-01

    We are developing a magnetic mirror device, which is the first magnetized plasma device in Taiwan, to explore basic plasma sciences relevant to fusion, space and astrophysical plasmas. Our research subjects include electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT), Alfven wave physics, and plasma turbulence. A large diameter (> 200 mm) plasma emitter1, which utilizes thermionic- thermoelectronic emission from a mixture of LaB6 (Lanthanum-hexaboride) and beta-eucryptite (lithium type aluminosylicate) powders, is employed as a plasma source because of its production ability of fully ionized plasma and controllability of plasma emission rate. The plasma emitter has been installed recently and investigation of its characteristics will be started. The employment of beta-eucryptite in plasma emitter is the first experimental test because such investigation of beta-eucryptite has previously been used only for Li+-ion source2. Our plan for magnetized plasma experiments and results of the plasma emitter investigation will be presented. 1. K. Saeki, S. Iizuka, N. Sato, and Y. Hatta, Appl. Phys. Lett., 37, 1980, pp. 37-38. 2. M. Ueda, R. R. Silva, R. M. Oliveira, H. Iguchi, J. Fujita and K. Kadota, J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 30 1997, pp. 2711--2716.

  11. Development of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Three sets of High Intensity Beam Emittance Measurement Units (HIBEMUs) are being developed at Peking University. They are HIBEMU-2 (slit-wire type, one direction), HIBEMU-3 (Allison scanner type, one direction) and HIBEMU-4 (slit-wire type, two directions). For HIBEMU-2 and HIBEMU-3, more recent work has been done on software redesign in order to measure beam emittance and to draw phase diagram more efficiently and precisely. Software for control and data processing of them were developed in Labveiw environment, trying to improve calculation rationality and to offer user-friendly interface. Mechanical modification was also done for HIBEMU-3, mainly concentrating on the protection of Faraday cups from being overheated by the high intensity beam and also from interference of secondary electrons. This paper will also cover the mechanical structure as well as the software development of HIBEMU-4, which is a two-direction emittance scanner newly designed and manufactured for the high energy beam transport (HEBT) of Peking University Neutron Imaging FaciliTY (PKUNIFTY). At the end of this paper, comparison and analysis of the three HIBEMUs are given to draw forth better design of the future emittance measurement facility.

  12. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.

  13. Measurement of Transverse Emittance in the Fermilab Booster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, William Sproull

    A new beam profile monitor has been built and installed in the Fermilab Booster synchrotron. It nondestructively measures the beam's vertical density distribution on a fast turn-by-turn basis. This enables one to measure the beam's transverse emittance and to observe emittance growth as it occurs. For high intensities (>2 times 10^{12 } protons), the normalized 95% emittance was observed to grow from 6pi mm-mrad at injection to 16pi mm-mrad at extraction. The initial (beam losses are shown to be caused by the space charge tune shift onto integer and 1/2 integer resonance lines. The growth near injection accounts for approximately 40% of the observed emittance increase throughout the acceleration cycle. The remaining 60% is due to two factors: slow linear growth due to betatron-motion driven by noise in the rf system; and faster growth after the transition energy that is caused by coupling of the longitudinal beam motion into the transverse planes.

  14. Scanning Emitter Lifetime Imaging Microscopy for Spontaneous Emission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frimmer, Martin; Chen, Yuntian; Koenderink, A. Femius

    2011-01-01

    We report an experimental technique to map and exploit the local density of optical states of arbitrary planar nanophotonic structures. The method relies on positioning a spontaneous emitter attached to a scanning probe deterministically and reversibly with respect to its photonic environment while...

  15. The brightest Ly α emitter: Pop III or black hole?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pallottini, A.; Ferrara, A.; Pacucci, F.; Gallerani, S.; Salvadori, S.; Schneider, R.; Schaerer, D.; Sobral, D.; Matthee, J.

    2015-01-01

    CR7 is the brightest z = 6.6 Ly α emitter (LAE) known to date, and spectroscopic follow-up by Sobral et al. suggests that CR7 might host Population (Pop) III stars. We examine this interpretation using cosmological hydrodynamical simulations. Several simulated galaxies show the same `Pop III wave' p

  16. Application of positron emitters to studies on plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishioka, N.S.; Matsuoka, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Sekine, T. [and others

    1998-10-01

    A newly developed positron emitting tracer imaging system enables us to study dynamically the physiological function of plants, although this system covers, at present, a limited area in a plant. Production of the positron emitters {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 18}F and {sup 48}V for this application, using an AVF cyclotron, is described. (author)

  17. HYDRAULIC CHARACTERIZATIONS OF TORTUOUS FLOW IN PATH DRIP IRRIGATION EMITTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Yun-kai; YANG Pei-ling; REN Shu-mei; XU Ting-wu

    2006-01-01

    At present, the tortuous emitter has the most advanced performances in drip irrigation. But the theories and methods for designing its flow path have been strictly confidential and the researches on the function of practical guidance have seldom been published. Seven types of most representative tortuous emitting-pipes currently used in agricultural irrigation regions of China were chosen for investigating the geometric parameters of the flow path by means of combining high-precision microscope and AutoCAD technology. By the measurement platform developed by the authors for hydraulic performances of emitters, the free discharge rates from the 7 types of emitters were measured at 9 pressure levels of 1.5 m, 3.0 m, 5.0 m, 7.0 m, 9.0 m, 10.0 m, 11.0 m, 13.0 m and 15.0 m. Then the discharge-pressure relationship, manufacturing variation coefficient, average velocity on the cross-section of flow path and the critical Reynolds number for the flow regime transformation within the paths were analyzed in detail. The results show that both pressure-ascending work pattern and pressure-descending work pattern have some impacts on the discharge rates of tortuous emitters, but the impact level is not significant. The target pressure could be approached by repetitive applications of the two work patterns during pressure regulation. The operation under low pressures has some impacts on the hydraulic performances of emitters, but the impact level is also not significant. The classical model of the discharge-pressure relationship is suitable for the pressure range of 1.5 m -15.0 m. The Reynolds number for fluids within the 7 types of tortuous emitters ranges from =105 to =930. The critical Reynolds number for the flow regime transformation is smaller than that for the routine dimension flow path. The variation coefficient of emitter discharge rates is slightly fluctuating around a certain value within the whole pressure range.

  18. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tao, E-mail: tsong241@gmail.com; Sites, James R. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523 (United States); Kanevce, Ana [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2016-06-21

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to the emitter/absorber interface, especially for high-efficiency cells with high bulk lifetime. Performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant when interface defect states are located near mid-gap energies. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e., defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV ≤ ΔE{sub C} ≤ 0.3 eV) can help maintain good cell efficiency in spite of high interface defect density, much like with Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) cells. The basic principle is that positive ΔE{sub C}, often referred to as a “spike,” creates an absorber inversion and hence a large hole barrier adjacent to the interface. As a result, the electron-hole recombination is suppressed due to an insufficient hole supply at the interface. A large spike (ΔE{sub C} ≥ 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a “cliff” (ΔE{sub C} < 0 eV) allows high hole concentration in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. Another way to mitigate performance losses due to interface defects is to use a thin and highly doped emitter, which can invert the absorber and form a large hole barrier at the interface. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. The ΔE{sub C} of other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ΔE{sub C}. These

  19. Emitter/absorber interface of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tao [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA; Kanevce, Ana [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, Colorado 80401, USA; Sites, James R. [Physics Department, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado 80523, USA

    2016-06-17

    The performance of CdTe solar cells can be very sensitive to their emitter/absorber interfaces, especially for high-efficiency cells with improved bulk properties. When interface defect states are located at efficient recombination energies, performance losses from acceptor-type interface defects can be significant. Numerical simulations show that the emitter/absorber band alignment, the emitter doping and thickness, and the defect properties of the interface (i.e. defect density, defect type, and defect energy) can all play significant roles in the interface recombination. In particular, a type I heterojunction with small conduction-band offset (0.1 eV /= 0.4 eV), however, can impede electron transport and lead to a reduction of photocurrent and fill-factor. In contrast to the spike, a 'cliff' (.delta..EC < 0 eV) is likely to allow many holes in the vicinity of the interface, which will assist interface recombination and result in a reduced open-circuit voltage. In addition, a thin and highly-doped emitter can invert the absorber, form a large hole barrier, and decrease device performance losses due to high interface defect density. CdS is the most common emitter material used in CdTe solar cells, but the CdS/CdTe interface is in the cliff category and is not favorable from the band-offset perspective. Other n-type emitter choices, such as (Mg,Zn)O, Cd(S,O), or (Cd,Mg)Te, can be tuned by varying the elemental ratio for an optimal positive value of ..delta..EC. These materials are predicted

  20. Using antennas separated in flight direction to avoid effect of emitter clock drift in geolocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormesher, Richard C.; Bickel, Douglas L

    2012-10-23

    The location of a land-based radio frequency (RF) emitter is determined from an airborne platform. RF signaling is received from the RF emitter via first and second antennas. In response to the received RF signaling, signal samples for both antennas are produced and processed to determine the location of the RF emitter.

  1. Electro-optical properties of dislocations in silicon and their possible application for light emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguirov, Tzanimir Vladimirov

    2007-10-14

    This thesis addresses the electro-optical properties of silicon, containing dislocations. The work demonstrates that dislocation specific radiation may provide a means for optical diagnostics of solar cell grade silicon. It provides insight into the mechanisms governing the dislocation recombination activity, their radiation, and how are they influenced by other defects present in silicon. We demonstrate that photoluminescence mapping is useful for monitoring the recombination activity in solar cell grade silicon and can be applied for identification of contaminants, based on their photoluminescence signatures. It is shown that the recombination at dislocations is strongly influenced by the presence of metals at the dislocation sites. The dislocation radiation activity correlates with their electrical activity. It is shown that the dislocation and band-to-band luminescence are essentially anti-correlated. {beta}FeSi{sub 2} precipitates, with a luminescence at 0.8 eV, were detected within the grains of block cast materials. They exhibit a characteristic feature of quantum dots, namely blinking. The second aspect of the thesis concerns the topic of silicon based light emitters for on-chip optical interconnects. The goal is an enhancement of sub-band-gap or band-to-band radiation by controlled formation of dislocation-rich areas in microelectronics-grade silicon as well as understanding of the processes governing such enhancement. For light emitters based on band-to-band emission it is shown, that internal quantum efficiency of nearly 2 % can be achieved, but the emission is essentially generated in the bulk of the wafer. On the other hand, light emitters utilizing the emission from dislocation-rich areas of a well localized wafer depth were explored. Three different methods for reproducible formation of a dislocation-rich region beneath the wafer surface were investigated and evaluated in view of their room temperature sub-band-gap radiation: (1) silicon implantation

  2. Ultra High p-doping Material Research for GaN Based Light Emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir Dmitriev

    2007-06-30

    The main goal of the Project is to investigate doping mechanisms in p-type GaN and AlGaN and controllably fabricate ultra high doped p-GaN materials and epitaxial structures. Highly doped p-type GaN-based materials with low electrical resistivity and abrupt doping profiles are of great importance for efficient light emitters for solid state lighting (SSL) applications. Cost-effective hydride vapor phase epitaxial (HVPE) technology was proposed to investigate and develop p-GaN materials for SSL. High p-type doping is required to improve (i) carrier injection efficiency in light emitting p-n junctions that will result in increasing of light emitting efficiency, (ii) current spreading in light emitting structures that will improve external quantum efficiency, and (iii) parameters of Ohmic contacts to reduce operating voltage and tolerate higher forward currents needed for the high output power operation of light emitters. Highly doped p-type GaN layers and AlGaN/GaN heterostructures with low electrical resistivity will lead to novel device and contact metallization designs for high-power high efficiency GaN-based light emitters. Overall, highly doped p-GaN is a key element to develop light emitting devices for the DOE SSL program. The project was focused on material research for highly doped p-type GaN materials and device structures for applications in high performance light emitters for general illumination P-GaN and p-AlGaN layers and multi-layer structures were grown by HVPE and investigated in terms of surface morphology and structure, doping concentrations and profiles, optical, electrical, and structural properties. Tasks of the project were successfully accomplished. Highly doped GaN materials with p-type conductivity were fabricated. As-grown GaN layers had concentration N{sub a}-N{sub d} as high as 3 x 10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}. Mechanisms of doping were investigated and results of material studies were reported at several International conferences providing

  3. Clinical radiobiology of glioblastoma multiforme. Estimation of tumor control probability from various radiotherapy fractionation schemes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Fiorentino, Alba [Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Radiation Oncology Department, Negrar, Verona (Italy); Simeon, Vittorio [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Laboratory of Preclinical and Translational Research, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Tini, Paolo; Pirtoli, Luigi [University of Siena and Tuscany Tumor Institute, Unit of Radiation Oncology, Department of Medicine Surgery and Neurological Sciences, Siena (Italy); Chiumento, Costanza [Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Radiotherapy, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy); Salvatore, Marco [I.R.C.C.S. SDN Foundation, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Napoli (Italy); Storto, Giovanni [I.R.C.C.S.-Regional-Cancer-Hospital-C.R.O.B, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Department of Radiation and Metabolic Therapies, Rionero-in-Vulture (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    The aim of this study was to estimate a radiobiological set of parameters from the available clinical data on glioblastoma (GB). A number of clinical trial outcomes from patients affected by GB and treated with surgery and adjuvant radiochemotherapy were analyzed to estimate a set of radiobiological parameters for a tumor control probability (TCP) model. The analytical/graphical method employed to fit the clinical data allowed us to estimate the intrinsic tumor radiosensitivity (α), repair capability (b), and repopulation doubling time (T{sub d}) in a first phase, and subsequently the number of clonogens (N) and kick-off time for accelerated proliferation (T{sub k}). The results were used to formulate a hypothesis for a scheduleexpected to significantly improve local control. The 95 % confidence intervals (CI{sub 95} {sub %}) of all parameters are also discussed. The pooled analysis employed to estimate the parameters summarizes the data of 559 patients, while the studies selected to verify the results summarize data of 104 patients. The best estimates and the CI{sub 95} {sub %} are α = 0.12 Gy{sup -1} (0.10-0.14), b = 0.015 Gy{sup -2} (0.013-0.020), α/b = 8 Gy (5.0-10.8), T{sub d} = 15.4 days (13.2-19.5), N = 1 . 10{sup 4} (1.2 . 10{sup 3} - 1 . 10{sup 5}), and T{sub k} = 37 days (29-46). The dose required to offset the repopulation occurring after 1 day (D{sub prolif}) and starting after T{sub k} was estimated as 0.30 Gy/day (0.22-0.39). The analysis confirms a high value for the α/b ratio. Moreover, a high intrinsic radiosensitivity together with a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation and moderate repopulation kinetics were found. The results indicate a substantial independence of the duration of the overall treatment and an improvement in the treatment effectiveness by increasing the total dose without increasing the dose fraction. (orig.) [German] Schaetzung eines strahlenbiologischen Parametersatzes auf der Grundlage klinischer Daten bei

  4. Phosphorus emitter and metal - grid optimization for homogeneous (n+p and double-diffused (n++n+p emitter silicon solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Cid Sánchez

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on studying two types of structure: homogeneous and double-diffused emitter silicon solar cells. The emitter collection efficiencies and the recombination current densities were studied for a wide range of surface dopant concentrations and thicknesses. The frontal metal-grid was optimized for each emitter, considering the dependence on the metal-semiconductor contact resistivity and on the emitter sheet resistance. The best efficiency for n+p structures, η≈ 25.5%, is found for emitters with thicknesses between (0.5-3 µm and surface doping concentrations in the range 2 x 10(19 cm-3- 4 x 10(18 cm-3; while the n++n+p structure a maximum efficiency of η≈ 26.0% was identified for an even wider range of emitter profiles.

  5. Experimental study of coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line at the A0-photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Thangaraj, Jayakar C T; Johnson, A; Lumpkin, A H; Edwards, H; Ruan, J; Santucci, J; Sun, Y E -; Church, M; Piot, P

    2012-01-01

    Next generation accelerators will require a high current, low emittance beam with a low energy spread. Such accelerators will employ advanced beam conditioning systems such as emittance exchangers to manipulate high brightness beams. One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation could limit high current operation of the emittance exchanger. In this paper, we report on the preliminary experimental and simulation study of the coherent synchroton radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector.

  6. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, David A

    2003-07-28

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 {angstrom}, the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 {pi} mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the laser and electron beam at the GTF. A convolved measurement of the relative timing between the laser and the rf phase in the gun shows that the jitter is less than 2.5 ps rms. Emittance measurements of the electron beam at 35 MeV are reported as a function of the (Gaussian) pulse length and transverse profile of the laser as well as the charge of the electron beam at constant phase and gradient in both the gun and linac. At 1 nC the emittance was found to be {approx} 13 {pi} mm-mrad for 5 ps and 8 ps long laser pulses. At 0.5 nC the measured emittance decreased approximately 20% in the 5 ps case and 40% in the 8 ps case. These measurements are between 40-80% higher than simulations for similar experimental conditions. In addition, the thermal emittance of the electron beam was measured to be 0.5 {pi} mm-mrad.

  7. Evolution of the spherical cavity radius generated around a subsurface drip emitter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gil

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The emitter discharge in subsurface drip irrigation can be affected by soil properties. A positive pressure develops at the emitter outlet where a spherical cavity is assumed to form. In steady-state conditions, the pressure in the soil relates to soil hydraulic properties, the emitter discharge, and the cavity radius. This pressure in the soil is very sensitive to the cavity radius. In this paper, the development of the cavity around the emitter outlet was measured for various emitter discharges in laboratory tests carried out in containers with uniform loamy soils. A trend between soil pressure and emitter discharge was established that illustrates the performance of buried emitters in the field. Its application to the prediction of water distribution in subsurface drip irrigation units and its effect on the estimation of irrigation performance are also shown.

  8. Radiobiological Effects of Alpha-Particles from Astatine-211: From DNA Damage to Cell Death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claesson, Kristina

    2011-05-15

    In recent years, the use of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation for radiotherapeutic applications has gained increased interest. Astatine-211 (211At) is an alpha-particle emitting radionuclide, promising for targeted radioimmunotherapy of isolated tumor cells and microscopic clusters. To improve development of safe radiotherapy using 211At it is important to increase our knowledge of the radiobiological effects in cells. During radiotherapy, both tumors and adjacent normal tissue will be irradiated and therefore, it is of importance to understand differences in the radio response between proliferating and resting cells. The aim of this thesis was to investigate effects in fibroblasts with different proliferation status after irradiation with alpha-particles from 211At or X-rays, from inflicted DNA damage, to cellular responses and biological consequences. Throughout this work, irradiation was performed with alpha-particles from 211A or X-rays. The induction and repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in human normal fibroblasts were investigated using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and fragment analysis. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 211At for DSB induction varied between 1.4 and 3.1. A small increase of DSBs was observed in cycling cells compared to stationary cells. The repair kinetics was slower after 211At and more residual damage was found after 24 h. Comparison between cells with different proliferation status showed that the repair was inefficient in cycling cells with more residual damage, regardless of radiation quality. Activation of cell cycle arrests was investigated using immunofluorescent labeling of the checkpoint kinase Chk2 and by measuring cell cycle distributions with flow cytometry analysis. After alpha-particle irradiation, the average number of Chk2-foci was larger and the cells had a more affected cell cycle progression for several weeks compared with X-irradiated cells, indicating a more powerful arrest after 211At

  9. Impact of water temperature and structural parameters on the hydraulic labyrinth-channel emitter performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed I. Al-Amoud

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of water temperature and structural parameters of a labyrinth emitter on drip irrigation hydraulic performance were investigated. The inside structural parameters of the trapezoidal labyrinth emitter include path width (W and length (L, trapezoidal unit numbers (N, height (H, and spacing (S. Laboratory experiments were conducted using five different types of labyrinth-channel emitters (three non-pressure compensating and two pressure-compensating emitters commonly used for subsurface drip irrigation systems. The water temperature effect on the hydraulic characteristics at various operating pressures was recorded and a comparison was made to identify the most effective structural parameter on emitter performance. The pressure compensating emitter flow exponent (x average was 0.014, while non-pressure compensating emitter’s values average was 0.456, indicating that the sensitivity of non-pressure compensating emitters to pressure variation is an obvious characteristic (p<0.001 of this type of emitters. The effects of water temperature on emitter flow rate were insignificant (p>0.05 at various operating pressures, where the flow rate index values for emitters were around one. The effects of water temperature on manufacturer’s coefficient of variation (CV values for all emitters were insignificant (p>0.05. The CV values of the non-pressure compensating emitters were lower than those of pressure compensating emitters. This is typical for most compensating models because they are manufactured with more elements than non-compensating emitters are. The results of regression analysis indicate that N and H are the essential factors (p<0.001 to affect the hydraulic performance.

  10. DEGRO practical guidelines for radiotherapy of non-malignant disorders. Part I: physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichl, Berthold [Hospital Weiden, Department of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Weiden (Germany); Block, Andreas [Hospital Dortmund, Institute for Medical Radiation Physics and Radiation Protection, Dortmund (Germany); Schaefer, Ulrich [Lippe Hospital, Dept. of Radiotherapy, Lemgo (Germany); Bert, Christoph; Mueller, Reinhold [University Hospitals Erlangen, Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Erlangen (Germany); Jung, Horst [University Hospital Hamburg-Eppendorf, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Radiation Oncology, Hamburg (Germany); Roedel, Franz [University Hospital Goethe-University, Dept. of Radiotherapy and Oncology, Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Collaboration: the German Cooperative Group on Radiotherapy for Benign Diseases (GCG-BD)

    2015-09-15

    Synopsis of the introductory paragraph of the DEGRO consensus S2e-guideline recommendations for the radiotherapy of benign disorders, including physical principles, radiobiological mechanisms, and radiogenic risk. This work is based on the S2e-guideline recommendations published November 14, 2013. The basic principles of radiation physics and treatment delivery, evaluation of putative underlying radiobiological mechanisms, and the assessment of genetic and cancer risk following low-dose irradiation will be presented. Radiation therapy of benign diseases is performed according to similar physical principles as those governing treatment of malignant diseases in radiation oncology, using the same techniques and workflows. These methods comprise usage of orthovoltage X-ray units, gamma irradiation facilities, linear accelerators (LINACs), and brachytherapy. Experimental in vitro and in vivo models recently confirmed the clinically observed anti-inflammatory effect of low-dose X-irradiation, and implicated a multitude of radiobiological mechanisms. These include modulation of different immunological pathways, as well as the activities of endothelial cells, mono- and polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and macrophages. The use of effective dose for radiogenic risk assessment and the corresponding tumor incidence rate of 5.5 %/Sv are currently controversially discussed. Some authors argue that the risk of radiation-induced cancers should be estimated on the basis of epidemiological data. However, such data are rarely available at present and associated with high variability. Current radiobiological studies clearly demonstrate a therapeutic effectiveness of radiation therapy used to treat benign diseases and implicate various molecular mechanisms. Radiogenic risks should be taken into account when applying radiation treatment for benign diseases. (orig.) [German] Zusammenfassung des einfuehrenden Kapitels der DEGRO-S2e-Leitlinie zur Strahlentherapie gutartiger Erkrankungen

  11. Neutron field produced by 25 MeV deuteron on thick beryllium for radiobiological study; energy spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Masashi; Mihara, Erika; Sasaki, Michiya; Nakamura, Takashi; Honma, Toshihiko; Kono, Koji; Fujitaka, Kazunobu

    2004-01-01

    Biological data is necessary for estimation of protection from neutrons, but there is a lack of data on biological effects of neutrons for radiation protection. Radiological study on fast neutrons has been done at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences. An intense neutron source has been produced by 25 MeV deuterons on a thick beryllium target. The neutron energy spectrum, which is essential for neutron energy deposition calculation, was measured from thermal to maximum energy range by using an organic liquid scintillator and multi-sphere moderated 3He proportional counters. The spectrum of the gamma rays accompanying the neutron beam was measured simultaneously with the neutron spectrum using the organic liquid scintillator. The transmission by the shield of the spurious neutrons originating from the target was measured to be less than 1% by using the organic liquid scintillator placed behind the collimator. The measured neutron energy spectrum is useful in dose calculations for radiobiology studies.

  12. Brachytherapy optimization using radiobiological-based planning for high dose rate and permanent implants for prostate cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeley, Kaelyn; Cunha, J. Adam; Hong, Tae Min

    2017-01-01

    We discuss an improvement in brachytherapy--a prostate cancer treatment method that directly places radioactive seeds inside target cancerous regions--by optimizing the current standard for delivering dose. Currently, the seeds' spatiotemporal placement is determined by optimizing the dose based on a set of physical, user-defined constraints. One particular approach is the ``inverse planning'' algorithms that allow for tightly fit isodose lines around the target volumes in order to reduce dose to the patient's organs at risk. However, these dose distributions are typically computed assuming the same biological response to radiation for different types of tissues. In our work, we consider radiobiological parameters to account for the differences in the individual sensitivities and responses to radiation for tissues surrounding the target. Among the benefits are a more accurate toxicity rate and more coverage to target regions for planning high-dose-rate treatments as well as permanent implants.

  13. A very thin havar film vacuum window for heavy ions to perform radiobiology studies at the BNL Tandem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieberger, P.; Abendroth, H.; Alessi, J.; Cannizzo, L.; Carlson, C.; Gustavsson, A.; Minty, M.; Snydstrup, L.

    2011-03-28

    Heavy ion beams from the BNL Tandem Van de Graaff accelerators will be made available for radiobiology studies on cell cultures. Beam energy losses need to be minimized both in the vacuum window and in the air in order to achieve the ranges required for the cells to be studied. This is particularly challenging for ions heavier than iron. The design is presented of a 0.4-inch diameter Havar film window that will satisfy these requirements. Films as thin as 80 microinches were successfully pressure tested. The final thickness to be used may be slightly larger to help in achieving pin hole free windows. We discuss design considerations and present pressure and vacuum test results as well as tests with heavy ion beams.

  14. Manipulation of radiobiological hypoxia in a human melanoma xenograft to exploit the bioreductive cytotoxicity of RSU-1069

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, S.; Stratford, I.J.; Adams, G.E. (Medical Research Council, Harwell (UK). Radiobiological Research Unit)

    1989-11-01

    RSU-1069 (a 2-nitroimidazole) is known to be an efficient hypoxic cell radiosensitizer and potent cytotoxin for hypoxic cells in murine tumours (Chaplin et al. 1986). The authors demonstrated that the compound is also able to kill human melanoma cells, growing as a xenograft, provided the tumour blood supply is occluded for an hour or more, thereby substantially increasing the proportion of susceptible, hypoxic cells. Pharmacokinetic effects may also contribute to this phenomenon, as the effectiveness of bioreductive cytotoxic agents may increase with prolonged contact times (Stratford et al. 1986b). Hydralazine increased radiobiological hypoxia in the HX118 xenograft but this did not enhance the susceptibility of clonogenic melanoma cells to killing by RSU-1069. (author).

  15. Emittance Measurements of the SSRL Gun Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez, Michael; Clendenin, James; Fisher, Alan; Miller, Roger; Palmer, Dennis; Park, Sam; Schmerge, John; Weaver, Jim; Wiedemann, Helmut; Winick, Herman; Yeremian, Dian; /SLAC; Meyerhofer, David; Reis, David; /Rochester U.

    2011-09-01

    A photocathode RF gun test stand is under construction in the injector vault of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC. The goal of this facility is to produce an electron beam with a normalized emittance of 1-3[mm-mr], a longitudinal bunch duration of the order of 10[ps] FWHM and approximately 1[nC] of charge per bunch. The beam will be generated from a laser driven copper photocathode RF gun developed in collaboration with BNL, LBL and UCLA. The 3-5[MeV] beam from the gun will be accelerated using a SLAC three meter S-band accelerator section. The emittance of the electron beam will be measured through the use of quadrupole scans with phosphor screens and also a wire scanner. The details of the experimental setup will be discussed, and first measurements will be presented and compared with results from PARMELA simulations.

  16. Measurement of ultra low transverse emittance at REGAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hachmann, M., E-mail: max.hachmann@desy.de; Flöttmann, K.

    2016-09-01

    The linear accelerator REGAE at DESY produces short and low charged electron bunches, on the one hand to resolve the excitation transitions of atoms temporally by pump-probe electron diffraction experiments and on the other hand to investigate principal mechanisms of laser plasma acceleration. For both cases a high quality electron beam is required which can be identified with a small beam emittance. A standard magnet scan is used for the emittance measurement which is in case of a low charged bunch most sensitive to the beam size determination (RMS or 2nd central moment of a distribution). Therefore the diagnostic and a routine to calculate proper central moments of an arbitrary distribution will be introduced and discussed.

  17. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, T.; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  18. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys

    2016-03-01

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based in combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth from CSR can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  19. Emittance preservation during bunch compression with a magnetized beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stratakis, Diktys [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-02

    The deleterious effects of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) on the phase-space and energy spread of high-energy beams in accelerator light sources can significantly constrain the machine design and performance. In this paper, we present a simple method to preserve the beam emittance by means of using magnetized beams that exhibit a large aspect ratio on their transverse dimensions. The concept is based on combining a finite solenoid field where the beam is generated together with a special optics adapter. Numerical simulations of this new type of beam source show that the induced phase-space density growth can be notably suppressed to less than 1% for any bunch charge. This work elucidates the key parameters that are needed for emittance preservation, such as the required field and aspect ratio for a given bunch charge.

  20. Intrinsic normalized emittance growth in laser-driven electron accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, M.; Bacci, A.; Benedetti, C.; Chiadroni, E.; Ferrario, M.; Mostacci, A.; Palumbo, L.; Rossi, A. R.; Serafini, L.; Antici, P.

    2013-01-01

    Laser-based electron sources are attracting strong interest from the conventional accelerator community due to their unique characteristics in terms of high initial energy, low emittance, and significant beam current. Extremely strong electric fields (up to hundreds of GV/m) generated in the plasma allow accelerating gradients much higher than in conventional accelerators and set the basis for achieving very high final energies in a compact space. Generating laser-driven high-energy electron beam lines therefore represents an attractive challenge for novel particle accelerators. In this paper we show that laser-driven electrons generated by the nowadays consolidated TW laser systems, when leaving the interaction region, are subject to a very strong, normalized emittance worsening which makes them quickly unusable for any beam transport. Furthermore, due to their intrinsic beam characteristics, controlling and capturing the full beam current can only be achieved improving the source parameters.

  1. Coupling of individual quantum emitters to channel plasmons

    CERN Document Server

    Bermúdez-Ureña, Esteban; Geiselmann, Michael; Marty, Renaud; Radko, Ilya P; Holmgaard, Tobias; Alaverdyan, Yury; Moreno, Esteban; García-Vidal, Francisco J; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I; Quidant, Romain

    2015-01-01

    Efficient light-matter interaction lies at the heart of many emerging technologies that seek on-chip integration of solid-state photonic systems. Plasmonic waveguides, which guide the radiation in the form of strongly confined surface plasmon-polariton modes, represent a promising solution to manipulate single photons in coplanar architectures with unprecedented small footprints. Here we demonstrate coupling of the emission from a single quantum emitter to the channel plasmon polaritons supported by a V-groove plasmonic waveguide. Extensive theoretical simulations enable us to determine the position and orientation of the quantum emitter for optimum coupling. Concomitantly with these predictions, we demonstrate experimentally that 42% of a single nitrogen vacancy centre emission efficiently couples into the supported modes of the V-groove. This work paves the way towards practical realization of efficient and long distance transfer of energy for integrated solid-state quantum systems.

  2. Quantum Emitters near Layered Plasmonic Nanostructures: Decay Rate Contributions

    CERN Document Server

    Pors, Anders

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a numerical framework for calculating decay rate contributions when excited two-level quantum emitters are located near layered plasmonic nanostructures, particularly emphasizing the case of plasmonic nanostructures atop metal substrates where three decay channels exist: free space radiation, Ohmic losses, and excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). The calculation of decay rate contributions is based on Huygen's equivalence principle together with a near-field to far-field transformation of the local electric field, thereby allowing us to discern the part of the electromagnetic field associated with free propagating waves rather than SPPs. The methodology is applied to the case of an emitter inside and near a gap-plasmon resonator, emphasizing strong position and orientation dependencies of the total decay rate, contributions of different decay channels, radiation patterns, and directivity of SPP excitation.

  3. Review of Emittance and Stability Monitoring Using Synchrotron Radiation Monitors

    CERN Document Server

    Holldack, K; Peatman, W B

    2001-01-01

    Different techniques of emittance and stability monitoring using bend magnet and undulator radiation will be reviewed. Besides imaging methods for emittance monitoring , the problem of XBPM's used for the measurement of the centre of mass position of the undulator beams will be treated in detail. The key feature of these monitors is a careful electron optical design to take account of gap dependent changes of the shape and photon energy of the undulator beam as well as spurious signals from dipoles and high heat load. The reason for the fact that these monitors work well on low energy machines like BESSY II but often fail due in high energy machines will be demonstrated by experimental results obtained on different types of BESSY II insertion devices such as undulators, wavelength shifters, multipole wigglers and electromagnetic undulators. Experimental results of global and local orbit monitoring and a proof of principle of a XBPM-based local feedback will be shown.

  4. Waveguide coupled resonance fluorescence from on-chip quantum emitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhonin, Maxim N; Dixon, James E; Coles, Rikki J; Royall, Ben; Luxmoore, Isaac J; Clarke, Edmund; Hugues, Maxime; Skolnick, Maurice S; Fox, A Mark

    2014-12-10

    Resonantly driven quantum emitters offer a very promising route to obtain highly coherent sources of single photons required for applications in quantum information processing (QIP). Realizing this for on-chip scalable devices would be important for scientific advances and practical applications in the field of integrated quantum optics. Here we report on-chip quantum dot (QD) resonance fluorescence (RF) efficiently coupled into a single-mode waveguide, a key component of a photonic integrated circuit, with a negligible resonant laser background and show that the QD coherence is enhanced by more than a factor of 4 compared to off-resonant excitation. Single-photon behavior is confirmed under resonant excitation, and fast fluctuating charge dynamics are revealed in autocorrelation g((2)) measurements. The potential for triggered operation is verified in pulsed RF. These results pave the way to a novel class of integrated quantum-optical devices for on-chip quantum information processing with embedded resonantly driven quantum emitters.

  5. Refractory absorber/emitter using monolayer of ceramic microparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyachenko, P. N.; do Rosário, J. J.; Leib, E. W.; Petrov, A. Y.; Störmer, M.; Weller, H.; Vossmeyer, T.; Schneider, G. A.; Eich, M.

    2016-04-01

    We present a self-assembled refractory absorber/emitter without the necessity to structure the metallic surface itself, still retaining the feature of tailored optical properties for visible light emission and thermophotovoltaic (TPV) applications. We have demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that monolayers of zirconium dioxide (ZrO2) microparticles on a tungsten layer can be used as large area, efficient and thermally stable selective absorbers/emitters. The band edge of the absorption is based on critically coupled microsphere resonances. It can be tuned from visible to near-infrared range by varying the diameter of the microparticles. We demonstrated the optical functionality of the structure after annealing up to temperatures of 1000°C under vacuum conditions. In particular it opens up the route towards high efficiency TPV systems with emission matched to the photovoltaic cell.

  6. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe$_2$

    CERN Document Server

    Schwarz, S; Withers, F; Maguire, J K; Foster, A P; Dufferwiel, S; Hague, L; Makhonin, M N; Wilson, L R; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K S; Tartakovskii, A I

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe$_2$, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe$_2$ under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realization of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron-hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologi...

  7. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, Mark; Billing, Michael; Calvey, Joseph; Conolly, Christopher; Crittenden, James; Dobbins, John; Dugan, Gerald; Eggert, Nicholas; Fontes, Ernest; Forster, Michael; Gallagher, Richard; Gray, Steven; Greenwald, Shlomo; Hartill, Donald; Hopkins, Walter; Kreinick, David; Kreis, Benjamin; Leong, Zhidong; Li, Yulin; Liu, Xianghong; Livezey, Jesse; Lyndaker, Aaron; Makita, Junki; McDonald, Michael; Medjidzade, Valeri; Meller, Robert; O'Connell, Tim; Peck, Stuart; Peterson, Daniel; Ramirez, Gabriel; Rendina, Matthew; Revesz, Peter; Rider, Nate; Rice, David; Rubin, David; Sagan, David; Savino, James; Schwartz, Robert; Seeley, Robert; Sexton, James; Shanks, James; Sikora, John; Smith, Eric; Strohman, Charles; Williams, Heather; Antoniou, Fanouria; Calatroni, Sergio; Gasior, Marek; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Pfingstner, Juergen; Rumolo, Giovanni; Schmickler, Hermann; Taborelli, Mauro; Asner, David; Boon, Laura; Garfinkel, Arthur; Byrd, John; Celata, Christine; Corlett, John; De Santis, Stefano; Furman, Miguel; Jackson, Alan; Kraft, Rick; Munson, Dawn; Penn, Gregory; Plate, David; Venturini, Marco; Carlson, Benjamin; Demma, Theo; Dowd, Rohan; Flanagan, John; Jain, Puneet; Kanazawa, Ken-ichi; Kubo, Kiyoshi; Ohmi, Kazuhito; Sakai, Hiroshi; Shibata, Kyo; Suetsugu, Yusuke; Tobiyama, Makoto; Gonnella, Daniel; Guo, Weiming; Harkay, Katherine; Holtzapple, Robert; Jones, James; Wolski, Andrzej; Kharakh, David; Ng, Johnny; Pivi, Mauro; Wang, Lanfa; Ross, Marc; Tan, Cheng-Yang; Zwaska, Robert; Schachter, Levi; Wilkinson, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud’s effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results

  8. Developments of fast emittance monitors for ion sources at RCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yorita, T., E-mail: yorita@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp; Hatanaka, K.; Fukuda, M.; Shimada, K.; Yasuda, Y.; Saito, T.; Tamura, H.; Kamakura, K. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    Recently, several developments of low energy beam transport line and its beam diagnostic systems have been performed to improve the injection efficiency of ion beam to azimuthally varying field cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics, Osaka University. One of those is the fast emittance monitor which can measure within several seconds for the efficient beam development and a Pepper-Pot Emittance Monitor (PPEM) has been developed. The PPEM consists of pepper-pot mask, multichannel plate, fluorescent screen, mirror, and CCD camera. The CCD image is taken via IEEE1394b to a personal computer and analyzed immediately and frequently, and then real time measurement with about 2 Hz has been achieved.

  9. First observation of the exchange of transverse and longitudinal emittances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Edwards, H.; Fliller, R.P.; Koeth, T.; Sun, Y.-E; /Fermilab

    2011-02-01

    An experimental program to demonstrate a novel phase space manipulation in which the horizontal and longitudinal emittances of a particle beam are exchanged has been completed at the Fermilab A0 Photoinjector. A new beamline, consisting of a TM{sub 110} deflecting mode cavity flanked by two horizontally dispersive doglegs has been installed. We report on the first direct observation of transverse and longitudinal emittance exchange: {l_brace}{var_epsilon}{sub x}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub y}{sup n}, {var_epsilon}{sub z}{sup n}{r_brace} = {l_brace} 2.9 {+-} 0.1, 2.4 {+-} 0.1, 13.1 {+-} 1.3{r_brace} {yields} {l_brace}11.3 {+-} 1.1, 2.9 {+-} 0.5, 3.1 {+-} 0.3{r_brace} mm-mrad.

  10. Crystalline silicon solar cells with high resistivity emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panek, P.; Drabczyk, K.; Zięba, P.

    2009-06-01

    The paper presents a part of research targeted at the modification of crystalline silicon solar cell production using screen-printing technology. The proposed process is based on diffusion from POCl3 resulting in emitter with a sheet resistance on the level of 70 Ω/□ and then, shaped by high temperature passivation treatment. The study was focused on a shallow emitter of high resistivity and on its influence on output electrical parameters of a solar cell. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) has been employed for appropriate distinguishing the total donor doped profile. The solar cell parameters were characterized by current-voltage characteristics and spectral response (SR) methods. Some aspects playing a role in suitable manufacturing process were discussed. The situation in a photovoltaic industry with emphasis on silicon supply and current prices of solar cells, modules and photovoltaic (PV) systems are described. The economic and quantitative estimation of the PV world market is shortly discussed.

  11. A New SIMOX Emitter Switching Thyristor--BO-ECT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Bo; Alex Q.Huang

    2001-01-01

    SIMOX Emitter switching thyristor(SIMEST) is a new MOS-gated thyristor with highvoltage current saturation capability. In this paper,an improved SIMEST, the Buried-Oxide Emitter Controlled Thyristor (BO-ECT) is proposed. Comparing with the SIMEST, the BO-ECT not only has a simple gate and source metalization structure and is therefore easy for layout design, but it also has an improved high-voltage current saturation capability. The operational mechanism and the forward biased safe operating area (FBSOA) are analyzed. Two-dimensional simulation results indicate that the BO-ECT has a much lower forward voltage drop than that of the IGBT while at the same time has a wider or similar FBSOA as the IGBT.

  12. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, Mark; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Alexander, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Billing, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Calvey, Joseph; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Conolly, Christopher; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Crittenden, James; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dobbins, John; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Dugan, Gerald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Eggert, Nicholas; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Fontes, Ernest; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Forster, Michael; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gallagher, Richard; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Gray, Steven; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Greenwald, Shlomo; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hartill, Donald; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Hopkins, Walter; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreinick, David; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Kreis, Benjamin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Leong, Zhidong; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Li, Yulin; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Liu, Xianghong; /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /Cornell U., CLASSE /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN /CERN; /more authors..

    2012-07-06

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  13. Electron Cloud at Low Emittance in CesrTA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, J. P.; Billing, M. G.; Calvey, J.; Crittenden, J. A.; Dugan, G.; Eggert, N.; Forster, M.; Greenwald, S.; Hartill, D. L.; Hopkins, W. H.; Kreinick, D. L.; Li, Y.; Liu, X.; Livezey, J. A.; Meller, R.; Peck, S.; Peterson, D. P.; Rice, D.; Rider, N.; Rubin, D.; Sagan, D.; Schwartz, R.; Shanks, J. P.; Sikora, J.; Harkay, K. C.; Antoniou, F.; Calatroni, S.; Gasior, M.; Papaphilippou, Y.; Pfingstner, J.; Rumolo, G.; Schmickler, H.; Taborelli, M.; Holtzapple, R.; Jones, J.; Wolski, A.; Tan, C.Y.; Zwaska, R. M; Flanagan, J. W.; Kanazawa, K.I.; Sakai, H.; Shibata, K.; Suetsugu, Y.; Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; De Santis, S.; Furman, M.; Kraft, R.; Munson, D. V.; Penn, G.; Plate, D.; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M. T. F.; Wang, L.; Schachter, L.

    2010-05-23

    The Cornell Electron Storage Ring (CESR) has been reconfigured as a test accelerator (CesrTA) for a program of electron cloud (EC) research at ultra low emittance. The instrumentation in the ring has been upgraded with local diagnostics for measurement of cloud density and with improved beam diagnostics for the characterization of both the low emittance performance and the beam dynamics of high intensity bunch trains interacting with the cloud. A range of EC mitigation methods have been deployed and tested and their effectiveness is discussed. Measurements of the electron cloud's effect on the beam under a range of conditions are discussed along with the simulations being used to quantitatively understand these results.

  14. Lattice and emittance optimization techniques and the ALS brightness upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steier, C.; Madur, A.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; Sannibale, F.; Sun, C.; Wan, W.; Yang, L.

    2011-09-01

    An upgrade project is under way to further improve the brightness of the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab by reducing its horizontal emittance from 6.3 to 2.2 nm (effective emittance in the straights from 6.4 to 2.5 nm). This will result in a brightness increase by a factor of three for bend magnet beamlines and at least a factor of two for insertion device beamlines and will keep the ALS competitive with newer sources. This paper presents an overview of the upgrade project with emphasis on the nonlinear beam dynamics simulations. It also discusses in a more general way the techniques used at LBNL for finding optimum lattices (e.g. the ones with maximum brightness) and optimizing the particle dynamics, thereby increasing beam lifetime and stability.

  15. Comparison of the radiobiological effect of carbon ion beam therapy and conventional radiation therapy on cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yoshiyuki; Nakano, Takashi; Ohno, Tatsuya; Oka, Kuniyuki

    2008-09-01

    Little clinical evidence has been provided to show the minimization of radiation resistance of tumors using high linear energy transfer radiation. We therefore investigated the radiobiological and molecular pathological aspects of carbon beam therapy. A total of 27 patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the cervix were treated using a carbon beam and 50 control patients with SCC of the cervix using a photon beam. The expression of Ki-67, p53, and p27 proteins before radiotherapy and 5 and 15 days after therapy initiation were investigated using immunohistochemistry. Similar changes were observed in Ki-67 labeling index (LI) and p53 LI during carbon and photon beam therapies. However, for carbon beam therapy, the mean p27 LI significantly decreased from 25.2% before treatment to 18.6% on the 5th day after treatment initiation, followed by a significant increase to 36.1% on the 15th day. In contrast, for photon beam therapy, the p27 LI consistently decreased from the initial 19.9% to 13.7% on the 15th day. Histological effects were observably stronger under carbon than photon beam therapy, though no statistically significant difference was observed (p = 0.07 on the 5th day and p = 0.10 on the 15th day). The changes in p27 LI under carbon beam therapy were significantly different from those under photon beam therapy, which suggests important molecular differences in the radio-biological response between therapies. Further investigation is required to elucidate the clinical relevance of these putative changes and optimize the relative biological effectiveness of carbon beam to X-ray.

  16. Voltage controlled optics of a monolayer semiconductor quantum emitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Goodfellow, Kenneth; Kinnischtzke, Laura; Vamivakas, Nick; University of Rochester Team

    2015-03-01

    Two-dimensional atomically thin materials are being actively investigated for next generation optoelectronic devices. Particularly exciting are transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDC) since these materials exhibit a band gap, and support valley specific exciton mediated optical transitions. In this work we report the observation of single photon emission in the TMDC tungsten diselenide. We present magneto-optical spectroscopy results and demonstrate voltage controlled photoluminescence of these localized quantum emitters.

  17. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  18. Industrial application of electron sources with plasma emitters

    CERN Document Server

    Belyuk, S I; Rempe, N G

    2001-01-01

    Paper contains a description, operation, design and parameters of electron sources with plasma emitters. One presents examples of application of these sources as part of automated electron-beam welding lines. Paper describes application of such sources for electron-beam deposition of composite powders. Electron-beam deposition is used to rebuild worn out part and to increase strength of new parts of machines and tools. Paper presents some examples of rebuilding part and the advantages gained in this case

  19. Gamma Emitters in Marine Sediments near the Columbia River.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterberg, C; Kulm, L D; Byrne, J V

    1963-03-08

    Samples from sediment cores collected at 26 different locations 5 to 35 miles offshore in and around Astoria Submarine Canyon were analyzed for gamma emitters. Chromium-51 and zinc-65 were the principal radio-nuclides found, although several fission products and natural potassium-40 were also present. Radioactivity fell off sharply with distance from the mouth of the Columbia River, indicating that the river serves as a common source of the artificial radionuclides.

  20. Analysis of kicker noise induced beam emittance growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang W.; Sandberg, J.; Ahrens, L.; Blacker, I.M.; Brennan, M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Fischer, W.; Hahn, H.; Huang, H.; Kling, N.; Lafky, M.; Marr, G.; Mernick, K.; Mi, J.; Minty, M.; Naylor, C.; Roser, T.; Shrey, T.; van Kuik, B.; Zelenski, A.

    2012-05-20

    Over the last few years, physicists have occasionally observed the presence of noise acting on the RHIC beams leading to emittance growth at high beam energies. While the noise was sporadic in the past, it became persistent during the Run-11 setup period. An investigation diagnosed the source as originating from the RHIC dump kicker system. Once identified the issue was quickly resolved. We report in this paper the investigation result, circuit analysis, measured and simulated waveforms, solutions, and future plans.

  1. Emittance coupling driven by space charge in the CSNS linac

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN Xue-Jun; FU Shi-Nian; PENG Jun

    2009-01-01

    In the conventional design of RF linacs, the bunched beams are not in thermal equilibrium. The space charge forces couple the particle motions between the transverse and the longitudinal directions. Fur-thermore it will cause the equipartitioning process which leads to emittance growth and halo formation. In the design of the China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS) linac, three cases are investigated using the Hofmann stability charts. In this paper, we present the equipartitioning beam study of the CSNS Alvarez DTL linac.

  2. Photon pair source via two coupling single quantum emitters

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭勇刚; 郑雨军

    2015-01-01

    We study the two coupling two-level single molecules driven by an external field as a photon pair source. The proba-bility of emitting two photons, P2, is employed to describe the photon pair source quality in a short time, and the correlation coefficient RAB is employed to describe the photon pair source quality in a long time limit. The results demonstrate that the coupling single quantum emitters can be considered as a stable photon pair source.

  3. Superconducting wiggler magnets for beam-emittance damping rings

    CERN Document Server

    Schoerling, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge are necessary for the luminosity performance of linear electron-positron colliders, such as the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). An effective way to create ultra-low emittance beams with a high bunch charge is to use damping rings, or storage rings equipped with strong damping wiggler magnets. The remanent field of the permanent magnet materials and the ohmic losses in normal conductors limit the economically achievable pole field in accelerator magnets operated at around room temperature to below the magnetic saturation induction, which is 2.15 T for iron. In wiggler magnets, the pole field in the center of the gap is reduced further like the hyperbolic cosine of the ratio of the gap size and the period length multiplied by pi. Moreover, damping wiggler magnets require relatively large gaps because they have to accept the un-damped beam and to generate, at a small period length, a large magnetic flux density amplitude to effectively damp the beam emittance....

  4. Low Emittance Gun Project based on Field Emission

    CERN Document Server

    Ganter, Romain; Dehler, M; Gobrecht, Jens; Gough, Chris; Ingold, Gerhard; Leemann, Simon C; Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Paraliev, Martin; Pedrozzi, Marco; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Schlott, Volker; Sehr, Harald; Streun, Andreas; Wrulich, Albin F; Zelenika, Sasa

    2004-01-01

    The design of an electron gun capable of producing beam emittance one order of magnitude lower than current technology would reduce considerably the cost and size of a free electron laser emitting at 0.1nm. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) including a gate and a focusing layer are an attractive technology for such high brightness sources. Electrons are extracted from micrometric tips thanks to voltage pulses between gate and tips. The focusing layer should then reduce the initial divergence of each emitted beamlets. This FEA will be inserted in a high gradient diode configuration coupled with a radiofrequency structure. In the diode part very high electric field pulses (several hundreds of MV/m) will limit the degradation of emittance due to space charge effect. This first acceleration will be obtained with high voltage pulses (typically a megavolt in a few hundred of nanoseconds) synchronized with the low voltage pulses applied to the FEA (typically one hundred of volts in one nanosecond at frequency below kilohe...

  5. Data compression for complex ambiguity function for emitter location

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pourhomayoun, Mohammed; Fowler, Mark L.

    2010-08-01

    The Complex Ambiguity Function (CAF) used in emitter location measurement is a 2-dimensional complex-valued function of time-difference-of-arrival (TDOA) and frequency-difference-of-arrival (FDOA). In classical TDOA/FDOA systems, pairs of sensors share data (using compression) to compute the CAF, which is then used to estimate the TDOA/FDOA for each pair; the sets of TDOA/FDOA measurements are then transmitted to a common site where they are fused into an emitter location. However, in some recently published methods for improved emitter location methods, it has been proposed that after each pair of sensors computes the CAF it is the entire CAFs that should be shared rather than the extracted TDOA/FDOA estimates. This leads to a need for methods to compress the CAFs. Because a CAF is a 2-D functions it can be thought of as a form of image - albeit, a complex-valued image. We apply and appropriately modify the Embedded Zerotree Wavelet (EZW) to compress the Ambiguity Function. Several techniques are analyzed to exploit the correlation between the imaginary part and real part of Ambiguity Function and comparisons are made between the approaches. The impact of such compression on the overall location accuracy is assessed via simulations.

  6. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-01-01

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  7. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander V. Eletskii

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  8. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Grigory S; Eletskii, Alexander V

    2013-07-17

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  9. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Samina [Centre for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India); Husain, Mushahid, E-mail: mush_reslab@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  10. Optical Signatures of Quantum Emitters in Suspended Hexagonal Boron Nitride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exarhos, Annemarie L; Hopper, David A; Grote, Richard R; Alkauskas, Audrius; Bassett, Lee C

    2017-03-28

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is rapidly emerging as an attractive material for solid-state quantum engineering. Analogously to three-dimensional wide-band-gap semiconductors such as diamond, h-BN hosts isolated defects exhibiting visible fluorescence at room temperature, and the ability to position such quantum emitters within a two-dimensional material promises breakthrough advances in quantum sensing, photonics, and other quantum technologies. Critical to such applications is an understanding of the physics underlying h-BN's quantum emission. We report the creation and characterization of visible single-photon sources in suspended, single-crystal, h-BN films. With substrate interactions eliminated, we study the spectral, temporal, and spatial characteristics of the defects' optical emission. Theoretical analysis of the defects' spectra reveals similarities in vibronic coupling to h-BN phonon modes despite widely varying fluorescence wavelengths, and a statistical analysis of the polarized emission from many emitters throughout the same single-crystal flake uncovers a weak correlation between the optical dipole orientations of some defects and h-BN's primitive crystallographic axes, despite a clear misalignment for other dipoles. These measurements constrain possible defect models and, moreover, suggest that several classes of emitters can exist simultaneously throughout free-standing h-BN, whether they be different defects, different charge states of the same defect, or the result of strong local perturbations.

  11. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules. PMID:28348342

  12. The Next Generation Photoinjector (thermal Emittance, Quantum Efficiency)

    CERN Document Server

    Palmer, D T

    1998-01-01

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 A range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1 nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 $\\pi$ mm-mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 $\\pi$ mm-mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes...

  13. X-ray pinhole camera resolution and emittance measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyrille Thomas

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Third generation synchrotron light sources are characterized by a low emittance and a low emittance coupling. Some light sources are already operating with extremely low coupling close to 0.1%. Measurement of the transverse beam size is generally used to measure the emittance and the coupling. To this end, several systems are currently used and an x-ray pinhole camera is one of them. In this paper we derive the point spread function of the x-ray pinhole camera both analytically and numerically using the Fresnel diffraction integral and taking into account the broadband spectrum of the bending magnet source, and we show that an optimized design allows the measurement of extremely small vertical beam sizes below 5  μm. The point spread function of several scintillator screens is also measured, and it shows that the contribution of the diffraction and the screen point spread functions have to be taken into account for an accurate measurement of a low coupling. Finally, we show measurements of the vertical beam sizes as small as 6  μm for our nonoptimized setup.

  14. Emittance Measurement for Beamline Extension at the PET Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle-induced X-ray emission is used for determining the elemental composition of materials. This method uses low-energy protons (of several MeV, which can be obtained from high-energy (of tens MeV accelerators. Instead of manufacturing an accelerator for generating the MeV protons, the use of a PET cyclotron has been suggested for designing the beamline for multipurpose applications, especially for the PIXE experiment, which has a dedicated high-energy (of tens MeV accelerator. The beam properties of the cyclotron were determined at this experimental facility by using an external beamline before transferring the ion beam to the experimental chamber. We measured the beam profile and calculated the emittance using the pepper-pot method. The beam profile was measured as the beam current using a wire scanner, and the emittance was measured as the beam distribution at the beam dump using a radiochromic film. We analyzed the measurement results and are planning to use the results obtained in the simulations of external beamline and aligned beamline components. We will consider energy degradation after computing the beamline simulation. The experimental study focused on measuring the emittance from the cyclotron, and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  15. Tail's Entropy and dose of critical annihilation: a new view of the problem radiobiological; Entropia de Tsallis y dosis de aniquilacion critica: una nueva vision del problema radiobiologico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sotolongo Grau, O.; Rodriguez Perez, D.; Antoranz, J. C.

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a model based on a minimum radiobiological physical hypotheses containing known models as special cases, allowing to define operations of addition and multiplication dose survival probabilities to fit the experimental data.

  16. Cool and warm hybrid white organic light-emitting diode with blue delayed fluorescent emitter both as blue emitter and triplet host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Yong Joo; Yook, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Jun Yeob

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with an external quantum efficiency above 20% was developed using a new blue thermally activated delayed fluorescent material, 4,6-di(9H-carbazol-9-yl)isophthalonitrile (DCzIPN), both as a blue emitter and a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. DCzIPN showed high quantum efficiency of 16.4% as a blue emitter and 24.9% as a host for a yellow phosphorescent emitter. The hybrid WOLEDs with the DCzIPN host based yellow emitting layer sandwiched between DCzIPN emitter based blue emitting layers exhibited high external quantum efficiency of 22.9% with a warm white color coordinate of (0.39, 0.43) and quantum efficiency of 21.0% with a cool white color coordinate of (0.31, 0.33) by managing the thickness of the yellow emitting layer. PMID:25598436

  17. Radiobiological and genetic effects of Bromus inermis seed progeny from populations of the East-Ural Radioactive Trace (Russia, Kyshtym accident) - Radiobiological and genetic effects for Bromus inermis Leyss. Populations at the East-Ural radioactive trace (Russia, Kyshtym accident in 1957)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antonova, Elena V.; Pozolotna, Vera N. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology UB RAS, 8 Marta str. 202, 620144, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Karimullina, Elina M. [Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology UB RAS, 8 Marta str. 202, 620144, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, 2011 Biological Sciences III, Irvine, CA 92697-2300 (United States); Roeder, Marion S. [Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research, Corrensstrasse 3, D-06466, Gatersleben (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    This investigation dedicates the problem of remote consequences of radiation impact on plant populations. This is a part of a complex research, which includes the classic triad of radioecology (Timofeev-Ressovsky 1963): 'accumulation and migration of radionuclides in different components of ecosystems - assessment of radiation dose - investigation of radiobiological effects'. We used the populations of smooth brome (Bromus inermis Leyss.) as a model system for the investigation of radiobiological and genetic effects. It is radiosensitive plant (Preobrazhenskaya 1971). These species may be used as objects for bio-indication at the radioactive contaminated areas, and as well as large-scale radioecological studies, because the adaptation processes are faster for radiosensitive species (Shevchenko et al., 1992; Pozolotina et al. 2005). We calculated external and internal whole-body dose rates by ERICA Tool (Karimullina et al., 2013). The total dose rate for brome was under 100 mGy h{sup -1} at the most polluted site but 43-110 times (Tier 3) exceeded the background along the pollution gradient. Therefore it can be concluded that herbaceous plant populations currently exist under low level chronic exposure at the EURT area. During seven years we have studied variability of viability, mutability and radioresistance of brome seed progeny. The combined effects of radiation exposure and weather conductions at the EURT area were absent. It may be connect with wide variability of inter-population test parameters. At the same time the weather conductions had an influence on the quality of seed progeny at the background area. We analyzed also correlation between original viability and radioresistance of seed progeny from the all plots. This dependence was positive. It was shown negative dependence between original viability of seed progeny and low weight molecular antioxidants content too. Ionizing radiation is a mutagenic factor and, accordingly, elevated mutation

  18. 4D Emittance Measurements Using Multiple Wire and Waist Scan Methods in the ATF Extraction Line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rimbault, C.; Bambade, P.; Brossard, J.; /Orsay, LAL; Alabau, M.; /Valencia U., IFIC; Kuroda, S.; /KEK, Tsukuba; Scarfe, A.; /Manchester U.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-11-02

    Emittance measurements performed in the diagnostic section of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) extraction line since 1998 led to vertical emittances three times larger than the expected ones, with a strong dependence on intensity. An experimental program is pursued to investigate potential sources of emittance growth and find possible remedies. This requires efficient and reliable emittance measurement techniques. In the past, several phase-space reconstruction methods developed at SLAC and KEK have been used to estimate the vertical emittance, based on multiple location beam size measurements and dedicated quadrupole scans. These methods have been shown to be very sensitive to measurement errors and other fluctuations in the beam conditions. In this context new emittance measurements have been performed revisiting these methods and newly developed ones with a systematic approach to compare and characterise their performance in the ATF extraction line.

  19. Reduction of bend-plane emittance growth in a chicane pulse compressor

    CERN Document Server

    Dowell, D H

    1999-01-01

    Emittance preservation in beam bending systems is vitally important in the production of bright, high-current electron microbunches. Generally, the emittance increase occurs in the bend plane and results from changes in the microbunch energy distribution as the beam transits the bend. This redistribution of electron energies increases the beam's divergence, and hence the emittance, by spoiling the achromatic transport of the bending system. In this paper we investigate the correlated emittance growth in a three dipole chicane compressor due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). Breaking the symmetry of the chicane partially cancels the CSR-induced correlation thereby reducing the bend plane emittance growth. The consequences of this emittance compensation scheme are discussed.

  20. Surface Analysis of LaB6 Single Crystal Thermionic Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, Masatoshi; Futamoto, Masaaki; Hosoki, Shigeyuki; Usami, Katuhisa

    1980-07-01

    Surface analysis of heated LaB6 thermionic emitter is made by means of Auger electron spectroscopy. Changes in surface state with changing emitter temperature and ambient oxygen pressure are investigated. The emitter temperature is varied from room temperature to 1700°C, and the oxygen pressure from 1× 10-5 Pa to 7× 10-3 Pa. With the increase of temperature the emitter surface passes through four states depending on oxygen pressure, before it reaches a clean state. Among them a state is particularly noteworthy that the emitter surface is covered with a layer of lanthanum oxide just before assuming the clean surface state. A surface state diagram is shown. The optimum conditions of emitter temperature and oxygen gas pressure to exhibit high emission properties are described.

  1. Heavily doped transparent-emitter regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibib, M. A.; Lindholm, F. A.; Therez, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical treatment of transparent-emitter devices, particularly solar cells, that is more complete than previously available treatments. The proposed approach includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, built-in field due to impurity profile, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. It is demonstrated that the transparent-emitter model can predict experimental values of Voc observed on n(plus)-p thin diffused junction silicon solar cells made on low-resistivity (0.1 ohm-cm) substrates. A test is included for the self-consistent validity of the transparent-emitter model. This test compares the calculated transit time of minority carriers across the emitter with the Auger-impact minority-carrier lifetime within the emitter region.

  2. Heavily doped transparent-emitter regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibib, M. A.; Lindholm, F. A.; Therez, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical treatment of transparent-emitter devices, particularly solar cells, that is more complete than previously available treatments. The proposed approach includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, built-in field due to impurity profile, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. It is demonstrated that the transparent-emitter model can predict experimental values of Voc observed on n(plus)-p thin diffused junction silicon solar cells made on low-resistivity (0.1 ohm-cm) substrates. A test is included for the self-consistent validity of the transparent-emitter model. This test compares the calculated transit time of minority carriers across the emitter with the Auger-impact minority-carrier lifetime within the emitter region.

  3. Direct evaluation of radiobiological parameters from clinical data in the case of ion beam therapy: an alternative approach to the relative biological effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cometto, A; Russo, G; Bourhaleb, F; Milian, F M; Giordanengo, S; Marchetto, F; Cirio, R; Attili, A

    2014-12-07

    The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) concept is commonly used in treatment planning for ion beam therapy. Whether models based on in vitro/in vivo RBE data can be used to predict human response to treatments is an open issue. In this work an alternative method, based on an effective radiobiological parameterization directly derived from clinical data, is presented. The method has been applied to the analysis of prostate cancer trials with protons and carbon ions.Prostate cancer trials with proton and carbon ion beams reporting 5 year-local control (LC5) and grade 2 (G2) or higher genitourinary toxicity rates (TOX) were selected from literature to test the method. Treatment simulations were performed on a representative subset of patients to produce dose and linear energy transfer distribution, which were used as explicative physical variables for the radiobiological modelling. Two models were taken into consideration: the microdosimetric kinetic model (MKM) and a linear model (LM). The radiobiological parameters of the LM and MKM were obtained by coupling them with the tumor control probability and normal tissue complication probability models to fit the LC5 and TOX data through likelihood maximization. The model ranking was based on the Akaike information criterion.Results showed large confidence intervals due to the limited variety of available treatment schedules. RBE values, such as RBE = 1.1 for protons in the treated volume, were derived as a by-product of the method, showing a consistency with current approaches. Carbon ion RBE values were also derived, showing lower values than those assumed for the original treatment planning in the target region, whereas higher values were found in the bladder. Most importantly, this work shows the possibility to infer the radiobiological parametrization for proton and carbon ion treatment directly from clinical data.

  4. SU-E-T-398: Evaluation of Radiobiological Parameters Using Serial Tumor Imaging During Radiotherapy as An Inverse Ill-Posed Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chvetsov, A; Sandison, G; Schwartz, J; Rengan, R [University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Combination of serial tumor imaging with radiobiological modeling can provide more accurate information on the nature of treatment response and what underlies resistance. The purpose of this article is to improve the algorithms related to imaging-based radiobilogical modeling of tumor response. Methods: Serial imaging of tumor response to radiation therapy represents a sum of tumor cell sensitivity, tumor growth rates, and the rate of cell loss which are not separated explicitly. Accurate treatment response assessment would require separation of these radiobiological determinants of treatment response because they define tumor control probability. We show that the problem of reconstruction of radiobiological parameters from serial imaging data can be considered as inverse ill-posed problem described by the Fredholm integral equation of the first kind because it is governed by a sum of several exponential processes. Therefore, the parameter reconstruction can be solved using regularization methods. Results: To study the reconstruction problem, we used a set of serial CT imaging data for the head and neck cancer and a two-level cell population model of tumor response which separates the entire tumor cell population in two subpopulations of viable and lethally damage cells. The reconstruction was done using a least squared objective function and a simulated annealing algorithm. Using in vitro data for radiobiological parameters as reference data, we shown that the reconstructed values of cell surviving fractions and potential doubling time exhibit non-physical fluctuations if no stabilization algorithms are applied. The variational regularization allowed us to obtain statistical distribution for cell surviving fractions and cell number doubling times comparable to in vitro data. Conclusion: Our results indicate that using variational regularization can increase the number of free parameters in the model and open the way to development of more advanced

  5. Reconstruction of the environmental correlation function from single emitter photon statistics: a non-Markovian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Shikerman, Faina; Pe'er, Avi

    2012-01-01

    We consider the two-level system approximation of a single emitter driven by a continuous laser pump and simultaneously coupled to the electromagnetic vacuum and to a thermal reservoir beyond the Markovian approximation. We discuss the connection between a rigorous microscopic theory and the phenomenological spectral diffusion approach, used to model the interaction of the emitter with the thermal bath, and obtained analytic expressions relating the thermal correlation function to the single emitter photon statistics.

  6. The Nasa space radiation school, an excellent training in radiobiology and space radiation protection; La NASA space radiation summer school, une formation d'excellence en radiobiologie et radioprotection spatiale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogin, G. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Nancy (France)

    2009-10-15

    The astronauts have to spend more time in space and the colonization of the moon and Mars are in the cross hairs of international agencies. The cosmic radiation from which we are protected on ground by atmosphere and by the terrestrial magnetosphere (.4 mSv/year according to Who) become really threatening since 20 km altitude, delivering an average radiation dose of a therapeutic kind to astronauts with peaks related to solar events. It is composed in majority of hadrons: protons (85%) and heavy ions (13%), but also photons (2%) of high energy (GeV/n)). the incurred risks are multiple: early ones(cataract, central nervous system damages, whole body irradiation) but especially delayed ones (carcinogenesis). The astronauts radiation protection turns poor and the rate of death risk by cancer returning from a mission on Mars has been estimated at 5%. The Nasa created in 2004 a summer school aiming to awareness young researchers to the space radiobiology specificities. Areas concerned as follow: radioinduced DNA damage and repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, bystander effect, genome instability, neuro degeneration, delayed effects and carcinogenesis in relation with radiation exposure. (N.C.)

  7. 6th International Microbeam Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Kevin M. Prise

    2004-01-01

    The extended abstracts which are submitted here present a summary of the proceedings of the 6th International Workshop/12th LH Gray Workshop: Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response, held at St. Catherine's College, University of Oxford, UK on March, 29th-31st, 2003. In 1993 the 4th LH Gray Workshop entitled ''Microbeam Probes of Cellular Radiation Response'' was held at the Gray Cancer Institute in Northwood. This was organized by Prof BD Michael, Dr M. Folkard and Dr KM Prise and brought together 40 participants interested in developing and applying new microbeam technology to problems in radiation biology (1). The workshop was an undoubted success and has spawned a series of subsequent workshops every two years. In the past, these workshops have been highly successful in bringing together groups interested in developing and applying micro-irradiation techniques to the study of cell and tissue damage by ionizing radiations. Following the first microbeam workshop, there has been a rapid growth in the number of centres developing radiobiology microbeams, or planning to do so and there are currently 15-20 worldwide. Much of the recent research using microbeams has used them to study low-dose effects and ''non-targeted'' responses such bystander effects, genomic instability and adaptive responses. The goal of the 6th workshop was to build on our knowledge of the development of microbeam approaches and the application to radiation biology in the future with the meeting stretching over a 3 day period. Over 80 participants reviewed the current state of radiobiology microbeam research worldwide and reported on new technological developments both in the fields of physics and biology.

  8. Experimental studies on coherent synchrotron radiation at an emittance exchange beam line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. T. Thangaraj

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to investigate experimentally the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy-chirped beam.

  9. Improvements in emittance wake field optimization for the SLAC Linear Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Decker, Franz Josef

    2003-01-01

    The transverse emittances in the SLAC Linear Collider can be severely diluted by collective wakefield effects and dispersion. For the 1997/98 SLC/SLD run important changes were implemented in the way the emittance is optimized. Early in the linac, where the energy spread is large due to BNS damping, the emittance growth is dominated by dispersion. In this regime emittance tuning bumps may introduce additional wakefield tails and their use is now avoided. At the end of the linac the energy spread is minimal and the emittance measurement is most sensitive to wakefield emittance dilution. In previous years, the emittances were tuned on wire scanners located near but not at the end of the linac (after about 90% of its length). Simulations show that emittance growth of up to 100% can occur in the remaining 10%. In this run wire scanners at the entrance of the Final Focus, the last place where the emittances can be measured, were used for the optimization. Screens at the end of the linac allow additional real time ...

  10. Method of manufacturing a hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2017-02-07

    A method of manufacturing an all back contact solar cell which has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. A second emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The method further includes forming contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  11. Copper conducting electrode with nickel as a seed layer for selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Atteq ur; Shin, Eun Gu; Lee, Soo Hong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In this research, we investigated selective emitter formation with a single-step photolithography process having a metallization scheme composed of nickel/copper metal stacks. The nickel seed layers were deposited by applying the electroless deposition process while copper was formed by light induced electro-plating arrangements as the main conducting electrode. The electroless deposition of nickel, along with a sintering process, was employed to create a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon. The nickel metal stack below the copper-conducting electrode also helped in lowering the sheet resistance and improving the contact adhesion. The nickel used as a seed layer was successfully demonstrated in the fabrication of a homogeneous 60 Ω/ emitter and selective emitter cells. Lower series resistances of 0.165 Ω and 0.253 Ω were achieved for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. The best cell efficiency of 18.37% for the selective emitter solar cell was achieved, with average cell efficiencies of 18.17% and 17.3% for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. An approximate efficiency increase of about 0.8% was recorded for the selective emitter solar cells.

  12. DIAGNOSIS OF THE LOW EMITTANCE BEAM IN ATF DR EXTRACTION LINE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCormick, Douglas

    2003-05-06

    The ATF (Accelerator Test Facility in KEK) damping ring has been designed to produce the low emittance beam required by future linear colliders. In the design, the normalized vertical emittance of the ATF damping ring is 3.0E-8 radm which corresponds to the vertical beam size of about 10 micron in the extraction line. The emittance of the beam extracted from the ATF damping ring is measured with four wire scanners located in a dispersion free region of the extraction line. The optics of the extraction line is also studied. We will report the method and the result of the emittance measurement at the extraction line.

  13. Tunable graphene micro-emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gongtao; Wei, Xianlong; Gao, Song; Chen, Qing; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-05-10

    Microfabricated electron emitters have been studied for half a century for their promising applications in vacuum electronics. However, tunable microfabricated electron emitters with fast temporal response and controllable electron emission still proves challenging. Here, we report the scaling down of thermionic emitters to the microscale using microfabrication technologies and a Joule-heated microscale graphene film as the filament. The emission current of the graphene micro-emitters exhibits a tunability of up to six orders by a modest gate voltage. A turn-on/off time of less than 1 μs is demonstrated for the graphene micro-emitters, indicating a switching speed about five orders of magnitude faster than their bulky counterparts. Importantly, emission performances of graphene micro-emitters are controllable and reproducible through engineering graphene dimensions by microfabrication technologies, which enables us to fabricate graphene micro-emitter arrays with uniform emission performances. Graphene micro-emitters offer an opportunity of realizing large-scale addressable micro-emitter arrays for vacuum electronics applications.

  14. Experimental Studies on Coherent Synchrotron Radiation at an Emittance Exchange Beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangaraj, J.C.T.; Thurman-Keup, R.; Ruan, J.; Johnson, A.S.; Lumpkin, A.H.; Santucci, J.; /Fermilab

    2012-04-01

    One of the goals of the Fermilab A0 photoinjector is to experimentally investigate the transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange (EEX) principle. Coherent synchrotron radiation in the emittance exchange line could limit the performance of the emittance exchanger at short bunch lengths. In this paper, we present experimental and simulation studies of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the emittance exchange line at the A0 photoinjector. We report on time-resolved CSR studies using a skew-quadrupole technique. We also demonstrate the advantages of running the EEX with an energy chirped beam.

  15. Beam emittance investigation in high brightness injector using different driver laser profiles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Beam emittance plays an important role in any accelerator, and it is a main parameter to judge the performance of an accelerator. Emittance optimization is an indispensable part in conditioning and operation of the facility. For a laser-driven high brightness injector, different time structure of the laser pulse has different effects on transverse emittance. In order to compare Gaussian and flat-top laser pulse, systematic simulations of 500 pC have been done. From the simulation results, one can see that flat-top pulse laser will yield smaller minimal transverse beam size and transverse beam emittance than Gaussian pulse laser.

  16. High Turndown Ratio, High Delta-Emittance, Variable Emissivity Electrochromics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Among thermal control methods, variable-emittance materials remain the most promising for addressing deficiencies of current systems (mechanical louvers, loop heat...

  17. Silanization of inner surfaces of nanoelectrospray ionization emitters for reduced analyte adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yong Seok; Wood, Troy D

    2008-04-01

    During the course of nanoelectrospray ionization (nanoESI) of substance P, an unusual type of signal reduction was observed with flow rates silanized. Emitters treated with hexamethyldisilazane or 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane showed higher analyte signals for substance P than untreated emitters, suggesting a reduction of analyte adsorption onto the inner walls of silanized emitters. The efficacy of reduced peptide adsorption was demonstrated for emitters silanized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane using a simple peptide mixture as well as a more complex peptide mixture (a tryptic digest of horse hemoglobin).

  18. Analysis of emittance compensation and simulation results to photo-cathode RF gun

    CERN Document Server

    LiuShengGuang

    2002-01-01

    The emittance compensation technology will be used on the photo-cathode RF gun for Shanghai SDUV-FEL. The space charge force and its effect on electron beam transverse emittance in RF gun is studied, the principle of emittance compensation in phase-space is discussed. The authors have designed a compensation solenoid and calculated its magnetic field distribution. Its performance has been studied by the code PARMELA. A simulation result indicates that the normalized transverse RMS emittance for electron beam of 1.5 nC is 1.612 pi mm centre dot mrad, electron energy E = 5.71 MeV

  19. Low-energy, high-current, ion source with cold electron emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vizir, A. V.; Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Shandrikov, M. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [High Current Electronics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2012-02-15

    An ion source based on a two-stage discharge with electron injection from a cold emitter is presented. The first stage is the emitter itself, and the second stage provides acceleration of injected electrons for gas ionization and formation of ion flow (<20 eV, 5 A dc). The ion accelerating system is gridless; acceleration is accomplished by an electric field in the discharge plasma within an axially symmetric, diverging, magnetic field. The hollow cathode electron emitter utilizes an arc discharge with cathode spots hidden inside the cathode cavity. Selection of the appropriate emitter material provides a very low erosion rate and long lifetime.

  20. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patterson, A. A., E-mail: apatters@mit.edu; Akinwande, A. I. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA and Microsystems Technology Laboratories, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  1. Measurements of Intra-Beam Scattering at Low Emittance in the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byrd, J.; Corlett, J.; Nishimura, H.; Robin, D.; De Santis, S.; Steier, C.; Wolski, A.; Wu, Y.; /LBL, Berkeley; Bane, K.; Raubenheimer, T.; Ross, M.; Sheppard, J.; Smith,; /SLAC

    2006-03-13

    The beam emittance at the interaction point of linear colliders is expected to be strongly influenced by the emittance of the beams extracted from the damping rings. Intra-beam scattering (IBS) potentially limits the minimum emittance of low-energy storage rings, and this effect strongly influences the choice of energy of damping rings [1]. Theoretical analysis suggests that the NLC damping rings will experience modest emittance growth at 1.98 GeV, however there is little experimental data of IBS effects for very low-emittance machines in the energy regime of interest. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a third-generation synchrotron light source operating with high-intensity, low-emittance beams at energies of approximately 1-2 GeV, and with emittance coupling capability of 1% or less. We present measurements of the beam growth in three dimensions as a function of current, for normalized natural horizontal emittance of approximately 1-10 mm-mrad at energies of 0.7-1.5 GeV, values comparable to the parameters in an NLC damping ring. Using a dedicated diagnostic beamline with an x-ray scintillator imaging system, measurements of the transverse beamsize are made, and bunch length measurements are made using an optical streak camera. Emittance growth as a function of bunch current is determined, and compared with preliminary calculation estimates.

  2. A method to measure the nonlinear force caused emittance growth in a RF photoinjector

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Zheng-Hong; Yang Zhen-Ping

    2006-01-01

    Based on the multi-slit method, a new method is introduced to measure the non linear force caused emittance growth in a RF photoinjector. It is possible to reconstruct the phase space of a beam under some conditions by the multi-slit method. Based on the reconstructed phase space, besides the emittance, the emittance growth from the distortion of the phase space can also be measured. The emittance growth results from the effects of nonlinear force acting on electron, which is very important for the high quality beam in a RF photoinjector.

  3. Carbon Nanotube Electron Emitter for X-ray Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Jung Su Kang; Je Hwang Ryu; Kyu Chang Park

    2012-01-01

    The carbon nanotube field emitter array was grown on silicon substrate through a resist-assisted patterning (RAP) process. The shape of the carbon nanotube array is elliptical with 2.0 × 0.5 mm2 for an isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The field emission properties with triode electrodes show a gate turn-on field of 3 V/µm at an anode emission current of 0.1 mA. The author demonstrated the X-ray source with triode electrode structure utilizing the carbon nanotube em...

  4. Applications using high-Tc superconducting terahertz emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakade, Kurama; Kashiwagi, Takanari; Saiwai, Yoshihiko; Minami, Hidetoshi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Klemm, Richard A.; Kadowaki, Kazuo

    2016-03-01

    Using recently-developed THz emitters constructed from single crystals of the high-Tc superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8+δ, we performed three prototype tests of the devices to demonstrate their unique characteristic properties for various practical applications. The first is a compact and simple transmission type of THz imaging system using a Stirling cryocooler. The second is a high-resolution Michelson interferometer used as a phase-sensitive reflection-type imaging system. The third is a system with precise temperature control to measure the liquid absorption coefficient. The detailed characteristics of these systems are discussed.

  5. Feasibility of a ring FEL at low emittance storage rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agapov, I., E-mail: ilya.agapov@xfel.eu

    2015-09-01

    A scheme for generating coherent radiation at latest generation low emittance storage rings such as PETRA III at DESY (Balewski et al., 2004 [1]) is proposed. The scheme is based on focusing and subsequent defocusing of the electron beam in the longitudinal phase space at the undulator location. The expected performance characteristics are estimated for radiation in the wavelength range of 500–1500 eV. It is shown that the average brightness is increased by several orders of magnitude compared to spontaneous undulator radiation, which can open new perspectives for photon-hungry soft X-ray spectroscopy techniques.

  6. Sparsity-based AOA Estimation for Emitter Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingwen Zhang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Angle of arrival (AOA is able to achieve high accuracy when the antenna arrays are deployed much closer to the emitter. However, spatial resolution problem still exists. This paper presents a novel AOA estimation method called sparsity angle sensing (SAS to improve the resolution. It integrates compressive sensing theorem into the parameter estimation formula. Traditional approaches for AOA estimation such as beamforming (BF, minimum variance distortionless response (MVDR, multiple signal classification (MUSIC are compared with SAS, and simulation results are discussed. It is shown that SAS method outperforms the other three methods in spatial resolution and robustness.  

  7. a New Strongly Deformed Proton-Emitter 117La

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soramel, F.; Guglielmetti, A.; Bonetti, R.; Poli, G. L.; Malerba, F.; Bianchi, E.; Stroe, L.; Müller, L.; Andrighetto, A.; Guo, J. Y.; Li, Z. C.; Maglione, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Signorini, C.; Liu, Z. H.; Ruan, M.; Ivascu, M.; Broude, C.; Ferreira, L. S.

    2001-11-01

    The decay by proton emission of the 117La nucleus has been studied via the 310 MeV 58Ni + 64Zn reaction. The nucleus has two levels that decay to the ground state of 116Ba with Ep = 783(6) keV (T1/2 = 20(5) ms) and Ep = 933(10) keV (T1/2 = 10(5) ms). Calculations done for a deformed proton emitter reproduce the experimental results confirming that 117La is well deformed (β2 ~ 0.3).

  8. Estimation of a Self-Consistent Set of Radiobiological Parameters From Hypofractionated Versus Standard Radiation Therapy of Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedicini, Piernicola, E-mail: ppiern@libero.it [Service of Medical Physics, Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata, Rionero in Vulture (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Laboratory of Medical Physics and Expert Systems, Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Rome (Italy); Benassi, Marcello [Service of Medical Physics, Istituto Scientifico Romagnolo per lo Studio e la Cura dei Tumori, Meldola (Italy)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To determine a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters in prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A method to estimate intrinsic radiosensitivity (α), fractionation sensitivity (α/β), repopulation doubling time, number of clonogens, and kick-off time for accelerated repopulation of prostate cancer has been developed. Based on the generalized linear-quadratic model and without assuming the isoeffective hypothesis, the potential applications of the method were investigated using the clinical outcome of biochemical relapse-free survival recently reviewed in the literature. The strengths and limitations of the method, regarding the fitted parameters and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), are also discussed. Results: Our best estimate of α/β is 2.96 Gy (95% CI 2.41-3.53 Gy). The corresponding α value is 0.16 Gy{sup −1} (95% CI 0.14-0.18 Gy{sup −1}), which is compatible with a realistic number of clonogens: 6.5 × 10{sup 6} (95% CI 1.5 × 10{sup 6}-2.1 × 10{sup 7}). The estimated cell doubling time is 5.1 days (95% CI 4.2-7.2 days), very low if compared with that reported in the literature. This corresponds to the dose required to offset the repopulation occurring in 1 day of 0.52 Gy/d (95% CI 0.32-0.68 Gy/d). However, a long kick-off time of 31 days (95% CI 22-41 days) from the start of radiation therapy was found. Conclusion: The proposed analytic/graphic method has allowed the fitting of clinical data, providing a self-consistent set of radiobiological parameters for prostate cancer. With our analysis we confirm a low value for α/β with a correspondingly high value of intrinsic radiosensitivity, a realistic average number of clonogens, a long kick-off time for accelerated repopulation, and a surprisingly fast repopulation that suggests the involvement of subpopulations of specifically tumorigenic stem cells during continuing radiation therapy.

  9. Electrically pumped single-defect light emitters in WSe2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarz, S.; Kozikov, A.; Withers, F.; Maguire, J. K.; Foster, A. P.; Dufferwiel, S.; Hague, L.; Makhonin, M. N.; Wilson, L. R.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Tartakovskii, A. I.

    2016-06-01

    Recent developments in fabrication of van der Waals heterostructures enable new type of devices assembled by stacking atomically thin layers of two-dimensional materials. Using this approach, we fabricate light-emitting devices based on a monolayer WSe2, and also comprising boron nitride tunnelling barriers and graphene electrodes, and observe sharp luminescence spectra from individual defects in WSe2 under both optical and electrical excitation. This paves the way towards the realisation of electrically-pumped quantum emitters in atomically thin semiconductors. In addition we demonstrate tuning by more than 1 meV of the emission energy of the defect luminescence by applying a vertical electric field. This provides an estimate of the permanent electric dipole created by the corresponding electron-hole pair. The light-emitting devices investigated in our work can be assembled on a variety of substrates enabling a route to integration of electrically pumped single quantum emitters with existing technologies in nano-photonics and optoelectronics.

  10. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Summers, Don; Cremaldi, Lucien; Hart, Terry; Oliveros, Sandra; Perera, Lalith; Wu, Wanwei; Neuffer, David

    2015-01-01

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low beta region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 microseconds, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a sho...

  11. A Complete Census of Hα Emitters in NGC 6397

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallanca, Cristina; Beccari, Giacomo; Ferraro, Francesco R.; Pasquini, Luca; Lanzoni, Barbara; Mucciarelli, Alessio

    2017-08-01

    We used a data set of archival Hubble Space Telescope images obtained through the F555W, F814W, and F656N filters to perform a complete search for objects showing {{H}}α emission in the globular cluster NGC 6397. As a photometric diagnostic, we used the {(V-{{H}}α )}0 color excess in the {(V-{{H}}α )}0-{(V-I)}0 color-color diagram. In the analyzed field of view, we identified 53 {{H}}α emitters. In particular, we confirmed the optical counterpart to 20 X-ray sources (7 cataclysmic variables, 2 millisecond pulsars and 11 active binaries) and identified 33 previously unknown sources, thus significantly enlarging the population of known active binaries in this cluster. We report the main characteristics for each class of objects. Photometric estimates of the equivalent width of the {{H}}α emission line were derived from the {(V-{{H}}α )}0-excess and, for the first time, compared to the spectroscopic measurements obtained from the analysis of MUSE spectra. The very good agreement between the spectroscopic and photometric measures fully confirmed the reliability of the proposed approach to measure the {{H}}α emission. The search demonstrated the efficiency of this novel approach to pinpoint and measure {{H}}α -emitters, thus offering a powerful tool to conduct a complete census of objects with formations and evolutions that can be strongly affected by dynamical interactions in star clusters.

  12. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyritsakis, A., E-mail: akyritsos1@gmail.com; Xanthakis, J. P. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Zografou Campus, Athens 15700 (Greece)

    2016-01-28

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  13. Field Emitter Arrays for a Free Electron Laser Application

    CERN Document Server

    Shing-Bruce-Li, Kevin; Ganter, Romain; Gobrecht, Jens; Raguin, Jean Yves; Rivkin, Leonid; Wrulich, Albin F

    2004-01-01

    The development of a new electron gun with the lowest possible emittance would help reducing the total length and cost of a free electron laser. Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are an attractive technology for electron sources of ultra high brightness. Indeed, several thousands of microscopic tips can be deposited on a 1 mm diameter area. Electrons are then extracted by applying voltage to a first grid layer close to the tip apexes, the so called gate layer, and focused by a second grid layer one micrometer above the tips. The typical aperture diameter of the gate and the focusing layer is in the range of one micrometer. One challenge for such cathodes is to produce peak currents in the ampere range since the usual applications of FEAs require less than milliampere. Encouraging peak current performances have been obtained by applying voltage pulses at low frequency between gate and tips. In this paper we report on different tip materials available on the market: diamond FEAs from Extreme Devices Inc., ZrC single ...

  14. Specific Emitter Identification Based on the Natural Measure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Jia

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Specific emitter identification (SEI techniques are often used in civilian and military spectrum-management operations, and they are also applied to support the security and authentication of wireless communication. In this letter, a new SEI method based on the natural measure of the one-dimensional component of the chaotic system is proposed. We find that the natural measures of the one-dimensional components of higher dimensional systems exist and that they are quite diverse for different systems. Based on this principle, the natural measure is used as an RF fingerprint in this letter. The natural measure can solve the problems caused by a small amount of data and a low sample rate. The Kullback–Leibler divergence is used to quantify the difference between the natural measures obtained from diverse emitters and classify them. The data obtained from real application are exploited to test the validity of the proposed method. Experimental results show that the proposed method is not only easy to operate, but also quite effective, even though the amount of data is small and the sample rate is low.

  15. Theory and measurement of emittance properties for radiation thermometry applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitt, D. P.; Hernicz, R. S.

    1972-01-01

    Some basic concepts of radiation physics are briefly reviewed to provide an introduction to the radiative properties - including emittance, reflectance, absorptance, and transmittance - their definitions, interrelations, theory and methods of measurement. Analyzed data showing typical characteristics of temperature and wavelength dependence, surface effects and environmental influences on the radiation properties of selected classes of materials are presented. Emphasis is placed on those emittance properties of particular interest to conventional radiation thermometry applications, but sufficient generality on all properties is presented to be useful for new or unusual techniques where a more detailed understanding of the behavior of materials is desirable. Data sources are identified to assist the reader in locating property information. It is the intention of the paper to give the reader a background to become more fully aware of the pitfalls, limitations, but of course, advantages in the use of data from the literature. The paper is written in the form of an abbreviated review fully documenting the more important topics and concepts which can only be treated briefly.

  16. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T., E-mail: tobias.heindel@tu-berlin.de; Reitzenstein, S. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technische Universität Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    2015-01-15

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g{sup (2)}(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g{sup (2)}(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  17. Longitudinal emittance blowup in the large hadron collider

    CERN Document Server

    Baudrenghien, P

    2013-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) relies on Landau damping for longitudinal stability. To avoid decreasing the stability margin at high energy, the longitudinal emittance must be continuously increased during the acceleration ramp. Longitudinal blowup provides the required emittance growth. The method was implemented through the summer of 2010. Band-limited RF phase-noise is injected in the main accelerating cavities during the whole ramp of about 11min. Synchrotron frequencies change along the energy ramp, but the digitally created noise tracks the frequency change. The position of the noise-band, relative to the nominal synchrotron frequency, and the bandwidth of the spectrum are set by pre-defined constants, making the diffusion stop at the edges of the demanded distribution. The noise amplitude is controlled by feedback using the measurement of the average bunch length. This algorithm reproducibly achieves the programmed bunch length of about 1.2ns, at flat top with low bunch-to-bunch scatter and provides a...

  18. Emitter Choice for Epitaxial CdTe Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Tao; Kanevce, Ana; Sites, James R.

    2016-11-21

    High-quality epitaxial CdTe layers with low defect density and high carrier concentration have been demonstrated by several research groups. Nevertheless, one primary challenge for high-performance epitaxial CdTe solar cells is how to choose a suitable emitter partner for the junction formation. The numerical simulations show that a type I heterojunction with small conduction band offset (0.1 eV = ..delta..Ec = 0.3 eV) is necessary to maintain a good cell efficiency even with large interface recombination. Otherwise, a small 'cliff' can assist interface recombination causing smaller Voc, and a large 'spike' (..delta..Ec = 0.4 eV) can impede the photo current and lead to a reduction of JSC and FF. Among the three possible emitters, CdS, CdMgTe, and MgZnO, CdMgTe (with ~30% Mg) and MgZnO (with ~ 20% Mg) are likely to be a better choice since their type-I junction can tolerate a larger density of interface defects.

  19. Predicted emittance and brightness of the pseudospark electron-beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pitchford, L.C. [Univ. Paul Sabatier, Toulouse (France). Centre de Physique Atomique

    1995-06-01

    The emittance /and brightness of the electron beam generated during the hollow cathode phase of pseudospark operation are calculated using the two-dimensional hybrid fluid-particle model previously developed to study the time and space development of the plasma in a pseudospark discharge. Two distinct energy components exist in the electron beam; a high-energy component with an energy equivalent to the full discharge voltage and another, broad, low-energy component. In the 100 ns following breakdown and for the conditions of the calculations, the emittance of the high energy component decreases by an order of magnitude and the brightness of the high energy component reaches almost 10{sup 10} A/m{sup 2} rad{sub 2}. This work demonstrates the feasibility of using the model to guide the optimization of the pseudospark electron beam properties and shows that the optimum beam properties are achieved after the plasma has filled the hollow cathode and begun to expand radially in the main gap.

  20. Development of chemical sensors by using beta emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, H. J; Yu, S. K.; Yoon, M. O.; Park, K. S.; Rhim, G. J. [Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    The objective of this project is development of core techniques for fabrication of biosensor. This includes a method for immobilization of biologically active molecules, a method for labelling target molecules with beta emitter, and a detection method based on beta counting. A radioimmuno-sensor for detection of DNA antibody, self-assembled monolayers of {omega}-carboxylated thiol molecules such as thioctic acid and 12-mercaptododecanoic acid were used in combination with chemical coupling methods. EDC (1 - ethyl - 3 [3 - (dimethylamino)propyl] carbodiimide) and NHS (N - hydroxy - succinimide) were used as coupling reagents to induce amide bond formation between the COOH group on the sensor surface and the -NH{sub 2} group on the antibody. Various experimental conditions such as COOH concentration, immobilization pH, reaction times etc, have been examined to establish optimum conditions for efficient immobilization of the antibody. Efficient labeling of the target antigen, DNA, with a beta emitter, {sup 35}S, was achieved by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Detection of sensing signal from antigens that are selectively bound to the surface of the DNA radioimmuno-sensor has been accomplished by use of the beta counting method. According to the present results, efficient immobilization of the antibody is possible at very low antibody concentration below or equal to 0.1 mg/mL with detection limit reaching as low as 10{sup -11} M bp DNA concentration. 25 refs., 14 figs. (Author)

  1. Longitudinal emittance reduction in LEIR of ion beams for LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Angoletta, M E; Findlay, A; Hancock, S; Manglunki, D

    2014-01-01

    For the 2013 LHC ion run the anticipated request for batches from the PS Complex comprising four ion bunches spaced by 100 ns was changed to batches of two bunches spaced by 200 ns. This modified demand was met by suppressing a splitting step in the PS machine, but with the consequence of halving the longitudinal emittance required from LEIR. Thus NOMINAL Pb54+ beams from LEIR had to be delivered inside ~9 eVs to provide sufficient blow-up margin in the PS. Machine Development (MD) sessions were carried out in LEIR to investigate methods to satisfy these stricter requirements. Two main ingredients were found to reduce longitudinal emittance. The first and most important was to adjust carefully the frequency offset at capture in order to align the RF with the position where the beam is deposited by the electron cooling system prior to acceleration. The second ingredient was to reduce the final bucket area in order to reduce any residual filamentation during capture. This note documents the results obtaine...

  2. Discrete space charge affected field emission: Flat and hemisphere emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Kevin L., E-mail: kevin.jensen@nrl.navy.mil [Code 6854, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Shiffler, Donald A.; Tang, Wilkin [Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico 87117 (United States); Rittersdorf, Ian M. [Code 6770, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Lebowitz, Joel L. [Department of Mathematics and Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Harris, John R. [U.S. Navy Reserve, New Orleans, Louisiana 70143 (United States); Lau, Y. Y. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Petillo, John J. [Leidos, Billerica, Massachusetts 01821 (United States); Luginsland, John W. [Physics and Electronics Directorate, AFOSR, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2015-05-21

    Models of space-charge affected thermal-field emission from protrusions, able to incorporate the effects of both surface roughness and elongated field emitter structures in beam optics codes, are desirable but difficult. The models proposed here treat the meso-scale diode region separate from the micro-scale regions characteristic of the emission sites. The consequences of discrete emission events are given for both one-dimensional (sheets of charge) and three dimensional (rings of charge) models: in the former, results converge to steady state conditions found by theory (e.g., Rokhlenko et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 107, 014904 (2010)]) but show oscillatory structure as they do. Surface roughness or geometric features are handled using a ring of charge model, from which the image charges are found and used to modify the apex field and emitted current. The roughness model is shown to have additional constraints related to the discrete nature of electron charge. The ability of a unit cell model to treat field emitter structures and incorporate surface roughness effects inside a beam optics code is assessed.

  3. Emittance Measurements from a Laser Driven Electron Injector

    CERN Document Server

    Reis, D

    2003-01-01

    The Gun Test Facility (GTF) at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was constructed to develop an appropriate electron beam suitable for driving a short wavelength free electron laser (FEL) such as the proposed Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). For operation at a wavelength of 1.5 (angstrom), the LCLS requires an electron injector that can produce an electron beam with approximately 1 pi mm-mrad normalized rms emittance with at least 1 nC of charge in a 10 ps or shorter bunch. The GTF consists of a photocathode rf gun, emittance-compensation solenoid, 3 m linear accelerator (linac), drive laser, and diagnostics to measure the beam. The rf gun is a symmetrized 1.6 cell, s-band high gradient, room temperature, photocathode structure. Simulations show that this gun when driven by a temporally and spatially shaped drive laser, appropriately focused with the solenoid, and further accelerated in linac can produce a beam that meets the LCLS requirements. This thesis describes the initial characterization of the ...

  4. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehahn, A; Krüger, L; Gschrey, M; Schulze, J-H; Rodt, S; Strittmatter, A; Heindel, T; Reitzenstein, S

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g((2))(0) Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g((2))(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  5. Operating single quantum emitters with a compact Stirling cryocooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlehahn, A.; Krüger, L.; Gschrey, M.; Schulze, J.-H.; Rodt, S.; Strittmatter, A.; Heindel, T.; Reitzenstein, S.

    2015-01-01

    The development of an easy-to-operate light source emitting single photons has become a major driving force in the emerging field of quantum information technology. Here, we report on the application of a compact and user-friendly Stirling cryocooler in the field of nanophotonics. The Stirling cryocooler is used to operate a single quantum emitter constituted of a semiconductor quantum dot (QD) at a base temperature below 30 K. Proper vibration decoupling of the cryocooler and its surrounding enables free-space micro-photoluminescence spectroscopy to identify and analyze different charge-carrier states within a single quantum dot. As an exemplary application in quantum optics, we perform a Hanbury-Brown and Twiss experiment demonstrating a strong suppression of multi-photon emission events with g(2)(0) < 0.04 from this Stirling-cooled single quantum emitter under continuous wave excitation. Comparative experiments performed on the same quantum dot in a liquid helium (LHe)-flow cryostat show almost identical values of g(2)(0) for both configurations at a given temperature. The results of this proof of principle experiment demonstrate that low-vibration Stirling cryocoolers that have so far been considered exotic to the field of nanophotonics are an attractive alternative to expensive closed-cycle cryostats or LHe-flow cryostats, which could pave the way for the development of high-quality table-top non-classical light sources.

  6. Final Muon Emittance Exchange in Vacuum for a Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, Don [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Acosta, John [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Cremaldi, Lucien [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Hart, Terry [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Oliveros, Sandra [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Perera, Lalith [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Wu, Wanwei [Univ. of Mississippi, Oxford, MS (United States); Neuffer, David [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2015-05-07

    We outline a plan for final muon ionization cooling with quadrupole doublets focusing onto short absorbers followed by emittance exchange in vacuum to achieve the small transverse beam sizes needed by a muon collider. A flat muon beam with a series of quadrupole doublet half cells appears to provide the strong focusing required for final cooling. Each quadrupole doublet has a low β region occupied by a dense, low Z absorber. After final cooling, normalized xyz emittances of (0.071, 0.141, 2.4) mm-rad are exchanged into (0.025, 0.025, 70) mm-rad. Thin electrostatic septa efficiently slice the bunch into 17 parts. The 17 bunches are interleaved into a 3.7 meter long train with RF deflector cavities. Snap bunch coalescence combines the muon bunch train longitudinally in a 21 GeV ring in 55 μs, one quarter of a synchrotron oscillation period. A linear long wavelength RF bucket gives each bunch a different energy causing the bunches to drift until they merge into one bunch and can be captured in a short wavelength RF bucket with a 13% muon decay loss and a packing fraction as high as 87%.

  7. Sectoral thermal emitter for testing of modern IR systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulski, R.; Piątkowski, T.; Polakowski, H.

    2014-11-01

    The paper presents multi-sector stable IR grey body radiation source, that can be used for testing of MRT. Its main element is monolithic metal plate with a test pattern, made of material with high thermal conductivity. On the surface of the test plate the sectors of different emissivity are created during manufacturing process. As a result when viewed by a thermal camera those sectors exhibit thermal contrast depending mainly on the radiative properties of each sector. The value of thermal contrast between particular sectors can be adjusted by changing the temperature of a test plate with respect to ambient. The emissivity values of particular sectors have been calculated and the procedure of adjusting the thermal contrast has been described, as well as the technology used to create the test plate. The model of described emitter has been tested and the results of temperature values obtained from thermal camera were compared with theoretical, calculated figures. The proposed emitter is dedicated for testing and calibrating of modern observations IR systems.

  8. A radiobiology-based inverse treatment planning method for optimisation of permanent l-125 prostate implants in focal brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haworth, Annette; Mears, Christopher; Betts, John M.; Reynolds, Hayley M.; Tack, Guido; Leo, Kevin; Williams, Scott; Ebert, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment plans for ten patients, initially treated with a conventional approach to low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR, 145 Gy to entire prostate), were compared with plans for the same patients created with an inverse-optimisation planning process utilising a biologically-based objective. The ‘biological optimisation’ considered a non-uniform distribution of tumour cell density through the prostate based on known and expected locations of the tumour. Using dose planning-objectives derived from our previous biological-model validation study, the volume of the urethra receiving 125% of the conventional prescription (145 Gy) was reduced from a median value of 64% to less than 8% whilst maintaining high values of TCP. On average, the number of planned seeds was reduced from 85 to less than 75. The robustness of plans to random seed displacements needs to be carefully considered when using contemporary seed placement techniques. We conclude that an inverse planning approach to LDR treatments, based on a biological objective, has the potential to maintain high rates of tumour control whilst minimising dose to healthy tissue. In future, the radiobiological model will be informed using multi-parametric MRI to provide a personalised medicine approach.

  9. Radiation-induced cataract-genesis: pathophysiologic, radiobiological and clinical aspects; Catarate radio-induite: aspects physiopathologiques, radiobiologiques et cliniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belkacemi, Y.; Touboul, E.; Meric, J.B. [Hopital Tenon, Service d' Oncologie-Radiotherapie, 75 - Paris (France); Rat, P.; Warnet, J.M. [Paris-5 Univ., Lab. de Toxicologie, UFR Pharmacie, Unite de Pharmacotoxicologie Cellulaire, Service Pharmacie, 75 (France)

    2001-08-01

    Cataract-genesis is a widely reported late effect of irradiated crystalline lens. In this review the authors discussed the different aspects of radiation cataract pathogenesis, and the different mechanisms involved in the lens opacification, particularly the epithelium modifications such as epithelial cell death. The authors also reported the influence of radiation exposure on cataract formation following total body irradiation (TBI) and autologous or allogeneic bone marrow transplantation for hematologic malignancies. Moreover, the radiobiological parameters are not studied for the crystalline lens of human. We applied for the first time the linear quadratic (LQ) and biological effective dose (BED) concept to TBI data. The calculated value of {alpha}/{beta} of 1 Gy is in the range of the values reported for the other late responding tissues. The other risk factors for cataract development after TBI such as age, gender, central nervous system boost, long-term steroid therapy and heparin administration are discussed. In terms of cataract or sicca syndrome prevention, numerous compounds have been successfully tested in experimental models or used for the prevention of radiation-induced xerostomia in patients treated for head and neck cancer. However, none of them has been clinically evaluated for ocular radiation late effects prevention. In this report the authors discussed some of the radioprotectors potentially interesting for radiation-induced cataract or sicca syndrome prevention. (author)

  10. Assessment of Annual Effective Dose for Natural Radioactivity of Gamma Emitters in Biscuit Samples in Iraq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abojassim, Ali Abid; Al-Alasadi, Lubna A; Shitake, Ahmed R; Al-Tememie, Faeq A; Husain, Afnan A

    2015-09-01

    Biscuits are an important type of food, widely consumed by babies in Iraq and other countries. This work uses gamma spectroscopy to measure the natural radioactivity due to long-lived gamma emitters in children's biscuits; it also estimates radiation hazard indices, that is, the radium equivalent activity, the representative of gamma level index, the internal hazard index, and the annual effective dose in children. Ten samples were collected from the Iraqi market from different countries of origin. The average specific activities for (226)Ra, (232)Th, and (40)K were 9.390, 3.1213, and 214.969 Bq/kg, respectively, but the average of the radium equivalent activity and the internal hazard index were 33.101 Bq/kg and 0.107, respectively. The total average annual effective dose from consumption by adults, children, and infants is estimated to be 0.655, 1.009, and 0.875 mSv, respectively. The values found for specific activity, radiation hazard indices, and annual effective dose in all samples in this study were lower than worldwide median values for all groups; therefore, these values are found to be safe.

  11. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  12. Direct Observation of Ultralow Vertical Emittance using a Vertical Undulator - presentation slides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Kent

    2015-09-17

    Direct emittance measurement based on vertical undulator is discussed. Emittance was evaluated from peak ratios, the smallest measured being =0.9 ±0.3 pm rad. The angular distribution of undulator radiation departs from Gaussian approximations, a fact of which diffraction-limited light sources should be aware.

  13. Effects of base resistor on electron emission from a field emitter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luginsland, J.W.; Valfells, A.; Lau, Y.Y. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Field emitters have remained an important, high brightness electron source for display and for generation of coherent radiation. The rapid rise in the emitter current with voltage in these emitters leads to serious implications on the emitter stability (thermal, mechanical, and electrical), and an obvious way to improve the emitter stability is to add a series resistor to the emitters. However, the addition of a series resistor would result in a higher operating voltage, loss in efficiency, and much higher cost. In this paper, the authors use a simple model to provide a quantitative analysis of the effects of a base resistor on the voltage-current (V-I) characteristics of a single field emitter. Two features of the present work are noteworthy. First, they present a set of universal curves, from which the effects of a series resistor can immediately be determined once the Fowler-Nordheim coefficients A, B, and the gap spacing D are specified. Thus, these curves are applicable to a large class of field emitters. Second, the calculations take into account the effects of space charge that is present in the gap. The relative importance of the space charge and of the series resistor will become apparent from these curves. Examples will be given.

  14. A transverse emittance and acceptance measurement system in a low-energy beam transport line

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kashiwagi, H., E-mail: kashiwagi.hirotsugu@jaea.go.jp; Miyawaki, N.; Kurashima, S.; Okumura, S. [Department of Advanced Radiation Technology, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A transverse beam emittance and acceptance measurement system has been developed to visualize the relationship between the injected beam emittance and the acceptance of a cyclotron. The system is composed of a steering magnet, two pairs of slits to limit the horizontal and vertical phase-space, a beam intensity detector just behind the slits for the emittance measurement, and a beam intensity detector in the cyclotron for the acceptance measurement. The emittance is obtained by scanning the slits and measuring the beam intensity distribution. The acceptance is obtained by measuring the distribution of relative beam transmission by injecting small emittance beams at various positions in a transverse phase-space using the slits. In the acceptance measurement, the beam from an ion source is deflected to the defined region by the slits using the steering magnet so that measurable acceptance area covers a region outside the injection beam emittance. Measurement tests were carried out under the condition of accelerating a beam of {sup 16}O{sup 6+} from 50.2 keV to 160 MeV. The emittance of the injected beam and the acceptance for accelerating and transporting the beam to the entrance of the extraction deflector were successfully measured. The relationship between the emittance and acceptance is visualized by displaying the results in the same phase-plane.

  15. Electron Emitter for small-size Electrodynamic Space Tether using MEMS Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, René A. W.; Blanke, Mogens

    2004-01-01

    system with focus on electron emitter design and manufacture using micro-electro-mechanical- system (MEMS) technology. The paper addresses the system concepts of a small size electrodynamic tether mission and shows a novel electron emitter for the 1-2 mA range where altitude can be effectively affected...

  16. Dependence of simulated positron emitter yields in ion beam cancer therapy on modeling nuclear fragmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lühr, Armin; Priegnitz, Marlen; Fiedler, Fine;

    2014-01-01

    In ion beam cancer therapy, range verification in patients using positron emission tomography (PET) requires the comparison of measured with simulated positron emitter yields. We found that (1) changes in modeling nuclear interactions strongly affected the positron emitter yields and that (2) Monte...

  17. High efficiency thermophotovoltaic emitter by metamaterial-based nano-pyramid array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Wei; Tang, Guihua; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-11-30

    A 2D pyramidal metamaterial-based nano-structure is proposed as a wavelength-selective Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) emitter. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis complemented with normal field method is used to predict the emittance as well as the electromagnetic field and Poynting vector distributions. The proposed emitter is shown to be wavelength-selective, polarization-insensitive, and direction-insensitive in emittance. The mechanisms supporting the emittance close to 1.0 in the wavelength range of 0.3-2.0 μm are elucidated by the distribution of electromagnetic field and Poynting vectors in the proposed structure. Finally, thermal stability and radiant heat-to-electricity TPV efficiency for a realistic InGaAsSb TPV system are discussed.

  18. Membrane-based emitter for coupling microfluidics with ultrasensitive nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2011-07-15

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high-performance nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been fabricated and evaluated. The ∼100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter enables highly stable electrosprays at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction and provides excellent stability, reproducibility, and sensitivity as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  19. Start to end simulations of transverse to longitudinal emittance exchange at the A0 photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fliller, R.P.; Edwards, H.; Ruan, J.; /Fermilab; Koeth, T.; /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2008-06-01

    Various schemes to exchange the transverse and longitudinal emittance have been proposed. [1][2] One scheme involves a deflecting mode RF cavity between two doglegs to exchange the horizontal and longitudinal emittances. This will produce a complete and uncoupled emittance exchange in the thin cavity limit using first order matrix optics. Various other effects, such as a finite length cavity, can leave the emittances coupled after the exchange and dilute the final emittances. Other effects such as space charge and synchrotron radiation can be investigated through simulations. A transverse to longitudinal exchange experiment using the double dogleg approach is underway at the A0 Photoinjector at Fermilab. In this paper we present start to end simulations of the experiment using various codes to account for space charge and Coherent Synchrotron Radiation effects. The results of these simulations are compared with analytical approximations and preliminary data. The effect on the exchange is also discussed.

  20. Energy distribution for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube field emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, SeGi; Yi, Whikun; Lee, Jeonghee; Jeong, Taewon; Jin, Sunghwan; Heo, Jungna; Kang, J. H.; Choi, Y. S.; Lee, Chang Soo; Yoo, Ji-Beom; Kim, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Field emission energy distribution (FEED) has been measured for undergate-type triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters where the gate electrodes are located underneath the cathode electrodes. The diode-type emission for these CNT emitters was found to follow the Fowler-Nordheim relation, whereas the triode-type emission exhibited the deviation from this relation. The FEED peaks for the undergate CNT emitters under the triode-type emission shifted to lower energy as the gate voltage increased, indicating nonmetallic behavior for the CNT emitters. There exist two different characteristic FEED peaks, where their peak energy shifts as a function of the gate voltage belong to two different slopes. From the difference in the position and intensity of the peaks, it was found that one was field emission directly from CNTs and the other might be emitted from CNTs through glass powders which were added during the CNT field emitter fabrication process.